Sample records for cancer care providers

  1. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  2. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  3. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerry J. Barker; Joel B. Epstein; Karen B. Williams; Meir Gorsky; Judith E. Raber-Durlacher

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundThe Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral\\/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was to evaluate the knowledge and current practice for preventing and managing oral side effects associated with

  4. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics. PMID:24761922

  5. Breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: Provider attitudes, practices, and barriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan A. Sabatino; Ellen P. McCarthy; Russell S. Phillips; Risa B. Burns

    2007-01-01

    Background: We surveyed primary care providers to evaluate breast cancer risk assessment and management practices. Methods: Primary care providers included staff (attendings, fellows, nurse practitioners) and residents practicing ?1 session\\/week in an outpatient general medicine practice or community practices. Of 201 eligible providers, 107 (53%) completed a self-administered questionnaire ascertaining attitudes, perceived barriers, and clinical practices related to assessing and

  6. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Richards, Thomas B; White, Mary C; Caraballo, Ralph S

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and its implications for primary care providers. One of the unique features of lung cancer screening is the potential complexity in patient management if an LDCT scan reveals a small pulmonary nodule. Additional tests, consultation with multiple specialists, and follow-up evaluations may be needed to evaluate whether lung cancer is present. Primary care providers should know the resources available in their communities for lung cancer screening with LDCT and smoking cessation, and the key points to be addressed in informed and shared decision-making discussions with patients. PMID:24830610

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer Patient Care

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer number of NCI-designated cancer centers have a specialized pancreatic cancer program. The creation of the IUPUI Signature Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research has been the foundation for putting IUPUI, the IU

  8. Advancing survivorship care through the National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center: developing American Cancer Society guidelines for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca; Sharpe, Katherine; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi; Willis, Anne; Gansler, Ted; Ganz, Patricia A; Edge, Stephen B; McCabe, Mary S; Stein, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    The National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center (The Survivorship Center) began in 2010 as a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the George Washington University Cancer Institute and was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Survivorship Center aims to improve the overall health and quality of life of posttreatment cancer survivors. One key to addressing the needs of this ever-growing population is to develop clinical follow-up care guidelines that emphasize not only the importance of surveillance for cancer recurrence, but also address the assessment and management of the physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects that may result from having cancer and undergoing cancer treatment as well as highlight the importance of healthy behaviors that can reduce the risk of cancer recurrence, second primary cancers, and other chronic diseases. Currently, The Survivorship Center is coordinating the work of experts in oncology, primary care, and other health care professions to develop follow-up care guidelines for 10 priority cancer sites. PMID:23512728

  9. The Nursing Dimension of Providing Palliative Care to Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Sharron L.; Thaxton, Cheryl; Allison, Courtney; Barfield, Raymond C.; Tamburro, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Palliative care for children and adolescents with cancer includes interventions that focus on the relief of suffering, optimization of function, and improvement of quality of life at any and all stages of disease. This care is most effectively provided by a multidisciplinary team. Nurses perform an integral role on that team by identifying symptoms, providing care coordination, and assuring clear communication. Several basic tenets appear essential to the provision of optimal palliative care. First, palliative care should be administered concurrently with curative therapy beginning at diagnosis and assuming a more significant role at end of life. This treatment approach, recommended by many medical societies, has been associated with numerous benefits including longer survival. Second, realistic, objective goals of care must be developed. A clear understanding of the prognosis by the patient, family, and all members of the medical team is essential to the development of these goals. The pediatric oncology nurse is pivotal in developing these goals and assuring that they are adhered to across all specialties. Third, effective therapies to prevent and relieve the symptoms of suffering must be provided. This can only be accomplished with accurate and repeated assessments. The pediatric oncology nurse is vital in providing these assessments and must possess a working knowledge of the most common symptoms associated with suffering. With a basic understanding of these palliative care principles and competency in the core skills required for this care, the pediatric oncology nurse will optimize quality of life for children and adolescents with cancer. PMID:23641169

  10. Provider Continuity Prior to the Diagnosis of Advanced Lung Cancer and End-of-Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gulshan; Wang, Yue; Graham, James E.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effect of provider continuity prior to the diagnosis of advanced lung cancer and end-of-life care. Methods Retrospective analysis of 69,247 Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older diagnosed with Stage IIIB or IV lung cancer between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2005 who died within two years of diagnosis. We examined visit patterns to a primary care physician (PCP) and/or any provider one year prior to the diagnosis of advanced lung cancer as measures of continuity of care. Outcome measures were hospitalization, ICU use and chemotherapy use during the last month of life, and hospice use during the last week of life. Results Seeing a PCP or any provider in the year prior to the diagnosis of advanced lung cancer increased the likelihood of hospitalization, ICU care, chemotherapy and hospice use during the end of life. Patients with 1–3, 4–7 or >7 visits to their PCP in the year prior to the diagnosis of lung cancer had 1.0 (reference), 1.08 (95% CI; 1.04–1.13), and 1.14 (95% CI; 1.08–1.19) odds of hospitalization during the last month of life, respectively. Odds of hospice use during the last week of life were higher in patients with visits to multiple PCPs (OR 1.10: 95% CI; 1.06–1.15) compared to those whose visits were all to the same PCP. Conclusion Provider continuity in the year prior to the diagnosis of advanced lung cancer was not associated with lower use of aggressive care during end of life. Our study did not have information on patient preferences and result should be interpreted accordingly. PMID:24019974

  11. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers.

  12. Knowledge, experiences, and barriers to colorectal cancer screening: a survey of health care providers working in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Omran, Suha; Barakat, Husam; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Aljadaa, Nabeela

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and early detection can effectively decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Health care providers (HCPs) working in primary care settings as the first contact with the health care system can play a pivotal role in cancer prevention and screening for early detection. The purpose of this study was to explore the knowledge, experiences, and perceived barriers to CRC screening among HCPs working in primary care settings. A cross-sectional design and a self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) was used to collect data from 236 HCPs working in health centers in Jordan. The 236 HCPs were nurses (45.8%), physicians (45.3%), and others (7.2%). A third of the HCPs (30%) knew the recommended age to begin CRC screening for patients with average risk. Overall physicians scored higher than nurses on questions assessing CRC screening knowledge. The majority of HCPs were not knowledgeable about CRC screening recommendations but believed that CRC is preventable (75.8%). The main perceived barriers to CRC screening were patient's fear of finding out that they have cancer and lack of awareness about CRC screening tests, shortage of trained HCPs to conduct invasive screening procedures, and lack of policy/protocol on CRC screening. HCPs working in primary care settings in Jordan do not have adequate knowledge about CRC screening. There is a need for tailored continuing educational programs and other interventions to improve HCPs' knowledge, as this can increase CRC screening in primary care settings and compliance with current screening guidelines. PMID:24882440

  13. Implementation of Cancer Clinical Care Pathways: A Successful Model of Collaboration Between Payers and Providers

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Bruce A.; Lang, James; Grzegorczyk, James; Stark, Donna; Rybarczyk, Thomas; Leyden, Thomas; Cooper, Joseph; Ruane, Thomas; Milligan, Scott; Stella, Philip; Scott, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite rising medical costs within the US health care system, quality and outcomes are not improving. Without significant policy reform, the cost-quality imbalance will reach unsustainable proportions in the foreseeable future. The rising cost of health care in part results from an expanding aging population with an increasing number of life-threatening diseases. This is further compounded by a growing arsenal of high-cost therapies. In no medical specialty is this more apparent than in the area of oncology. Numerous attempts to reduce costs have been attempted, often with limited benefit and brief duration. Because physicians directly or indirectly control or influence the majority of medical care costs, physician behavioral changes must occur to bend the health care cost curve in a sustainable fashion. Experts within academia, health policy, and business agree that a significant paradigm change in stakeholder collaboration will be necessary to accomplish behavioral change. Such a collaboration has been pioneered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Physician Resource Management, a highly specialized oncology health care consulting firm with developmental and ongoing technical, analytic, and consultative support from Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, a division of Cardinal Health. We describe a successful statewide collaboration between payers and providers to create a cancer clinical care pathways program. We show that aligned stakeholder incentives can drive high levels of provider participation and compliance in the pathways that lead to physician behavioral changes. In addition, claims-based data can be collected, analyzed, and used to create and maintain such a program. PMID:22942833

  14. Guideline for referral of patients with suspected lung cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, M. Elisabeth; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicions about the presence of lung cancer in their patients. Composition of the committee Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network and from among the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Lung Cancer Disease Site Group. Methods This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. Report Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of lung cancer within the Canadian context. Conclusion Earlier identification and referral of patients with lung cancer might ultimately help improve lung cancer morbidity and mortality. These guidelines might also be of value for informing the development of lung cancer diagnostic programs and for helping policy makers to ensure appropriate resources are in place. PMID:25122814

  15. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prenatal care > Choosing your prenatal care provider Prenatal care Prenatal care is the care you get while ... been added to your dashboard . Choosing your prenatal care provider Prenatal care is medical care you get ...

  16. 'Palliative care': a contradiction in terms? A qualitative study of cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their relatives and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative cancer care aims to improve quality of life and ultimately quality of dying, while prolonging life is not an objective anymore when death nears. The question is, however, whether these perspectives on palliative care are congruent with the perspectives of immigrant families with a Turkish or Moroccan background. Methods A qualitative design was used as we were looking for the personal views of 'very ill' cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their family members and their Dutch care providers. We interviewed 83 people, involved in 33 cases to obtain information about their views, values and norms on 'good care'. Results The main concerns about 'good care' expressed by Turkish and Moroccan families were: maximum treatment and curative care until the end of their lives, never having hope taken away, devoted care by their families, avoiding shameful situations, dying with a clear mind and being buried in their own country. Their views conflict, to some extent, with the dominant principles in palliative care, for example, the emphasis on quality of life and advanced care planning, which includes discussing diagnosis and prognosis with the patient. Conclusions Patients and their families with a Turkish or Moroccan background often have different ideas about 'good care' than their Dutch care providers. As many of them are aiming at cure until the end of life, they find 'good palliative care' a contradiction in terms. PMID:20831777

  17. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  18. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePLUS

    This article describes health care providers involved in primary care, nursing care, and specialty care. This is just ... PRIMARY CARE A primary care provider (PCP) is a person you may see first for checkups and health ...

  19. Improving Palliative Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute–funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families.

  20. Attitudes and Beliefs of Primary Care Providers in New Mexico About Lung Cancer Screening Using Low-Dose Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Richard M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Getrich, Christina M.; Rhyne, Robert L.; Crowell, Richard E.; Taylor, Kathryn L.; Reifler, Ellen J.; Wescott, Pamela H.; Murrietta, Ambroshia M.; Saeed, Ali I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction On the basis of results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), national guidelines now recommend using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) to screen high-risk smokers for lung cancer. Our study objective was to characterize the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of primary care providers about implementing LDCT screening. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with primary care providers practicing in New Mexico clinics for underserved minority populations. The interviews, conducted from February through September 2014, focused on providers’ tobacco cessation efforts, lung cancer screening practices, perceptions of NLST and screening guidelines, and attitudes about informed decision making for cancer screening. Investigators iteratively reviewed transcripts to create a coding structure. Results We reached thematic saturation after interviewing 10 providers practicing in 6 urban and 4 rural settings; 8 practiced at federally qualified health centers. All 10 providers promoted smoking cessation, some screened with chest x-rays, and none screened with LDCT. Not all were aware of NLST results or current guideline recommendations. Providers viewed study results skeptically, particularly the 95% false-positive rate, the need to screen 320 patients to prevent 1 lung cancer death, and the small proportion of minority participants. Providers were uncertain whether New Mexico had the necessary infrastructure to support high-quality screening, and worried about access barriers and financial burdens for rural, underinsured populations. Providers noted the complexity of discussing benefits and harms of screening and surveillance with their patient population. Conclusion Providers have several concerns about the feasibility and appropriateness of implementing LDCT screening. Effective lung cancer screening programs will need to educate providers and patients to support informed decision making and to ensure that high-quality screening can be efficiently delivered in community practice. PMID:26160294

  1. Rural health professionals' perspectives on providing grief and loss support in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Breen, L J; O'Connor, M

    2013-11-01

    Research demonstrates considerable inequalities in service delivery and health outcomes for people with cancer living outside large metropolitan cities. Semi-structured interviews with 11 professionals providing grief and loss support for people with cancer and their families in rural, regional, and remote areas Western Australia revealed the challenges they faced in delivering such support. The data are presented in four themes - Inequity of regional versus metropolitan services, Strain of the 'Jack of all trades' role, Constraints to accessing professional development, and Challenges in delivering post-bereavement services. These challenges are likely to be of growing concern given that populations are declining in rural areas as Australia becomes increasingly urban. The findings have implications in enhancing the loss and grief support services available in rural, regional, and remote Western Australia, including those grieving the death of a loved one through cancer. PMID:23834431

  2. Making It Work: Health Care Provider Perspectives on Strategies to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Gwede, Clement K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Koskan, Alexis M.; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates are low among men and women who seek health care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This study explores health care providers' perspectives about their patient's motivators and impediments to CRCS and receptivity to preparatory education. Methods A mixed methods design consisting of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and a short survey. Setting: FQHCs in the Tampa Bay area. Participants: Seventeen health care providers practicing in FQHCs. Results Test-specific patient impediments and motivations were identified including fear of abnormal findings; importance of offering less invasive fecal occult blood tests; and need for patient-centered test-specific educational materials in clinics. Opportunities to improve provider practices were identified including providers' reliance on patients' report of symptoms as a cue to recommend CRCS and overemphasis of clinic-based guaiac stool tests. Conclusions This study adds to the literature on CRCS test-specific motivators and impediments. Providers offered unique approaches for motivating patients to follow through with recommended CRCS and were receptive to in-clinic patient education and. Findings are readily inform the design of educational materials and interventions to increase CRCS in FQHCs. PMID:23943277

  3. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care

  4. Cancer care in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Attiga, Fadwa; Mansour, Asem

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Jordan after cardiovascular diseases. Due to increase in life expectancy and prolonged exposure to risk factors, cancer mortality and morbidity are expected to increase as the young population ages. This increase will constitute a challenging burden on healthcare systems in Jordan and many other neighboring countries. Planning is key to managing the expected rise in the demand for cancer care, and this will require public health initiatives to guarantee access to quality cancer care. Over the past decade, cancer care in Jordan has witnessed remarkable improvement through access to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we address the history of cancer care in Jordan, including cancer statistics, infrastructure, workforce as well as cancer care outcomes. We also discuss many of the challenges that we face and offer suggestions for the improvement of cancer management in Jordan and the region. PMID:25732671

  5. Choosing an HIV Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment plan. “Care provider” means a doctor, a physician’s assistant, or a nurse practitioner. There are several issues you may want to consider in choosing an HIV care provider. You might decide to ... from physicians who are specialists in infectious diseases. However, especially ...

  6. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  7. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using ?2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  8. Providing general practice needs-based care for carers of people with advanced cancer: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Girgis, Afaf; Jiwa, Moyez; Sibbritt, David; Burridge, Letitia H; Senior, Hugh E

    2013-01-01

    Background Carers of patients with advanced cancer often have health and psychosocial needs, which are frequently overlooked. Aim To meet the needs of carers through a GP consultation directed by a self-completed carer needs checklist. Design and setting Randomised controlled trial in general practice with recruitment through specialist oncology clinics, in Brisbane, Australia. Method Intervention was (a) carer–GP consultations directed by a self-completed checklist of needs at baseline and 3 months; and (b) a GP-Toolkit to assist GPs to address carer-identified needs. Control group received usual care. Outcome measures were intensity of needs, anxiety and depression, and quality of life. Results Total recruitment 392. Overall, no significant differences were detected in the number or intensity of need between groups. Compared to controls, intervention participants with baseline clinical anxiety showed improvements in mental wellbeing (P = 0.027), and those with baseline clinical depression had slower development of anxiety (P = 0.044) at 6 months. For those not anxious, physical wellbeing improved at 1 month (P = 0.040). Carers looking after patients with poor functional status had more physical needs (P = 0.037) at 1 month and more psychological and emotional needs at 3 months (P = 0.034). Those caring for less unwell patients showed improved mental wellbeing at 3 months (P = 0.022). Conclusion The intervention did not influence the number or intensity of needs reported by carers of people with advanced cancer. There was limited impact in people with pre-existing clinical anxiety and depression. For the carer of those most severely affected by advanced cancer, it drew attention to the needs arising from the caregiving role. PMID:24152483

  9. Perceptions of Patient-Provider Communication in Breast and Cervical Cancer-Related Care: A Qualitative Study of Low-Income English- and Spanish-Speaking Women

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Dong, XinQi

    2013-01-01

    To explore patient perceptions of patient-provider communication in breast and cervical cancer-related care among low-income English- and Spanish- speaking women, we examined communication barriers and facilitators reported by patients receiving care at safety net clinics. Participants were interviewed in English or Spanish after receiving an abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening test or cancer diagnosis. Following an inductive approach, interviews were coded and analyzed by the language spoken with providers and patient-provider language concordance status. Of 78 participants, 53% (n = 41) were English-speakers and 47% (n = 37) were Spanish-speakers. All English-speakers were language-concordant with providers. Of Spanish-speakers, 27% (n = 10) were Spanish-concordant; 38% (n = 14) were Spanish-discordant, requiring an interpreter; and 35% (n = 13) were Spanish mixed-concordant, experiencing both types of communication throughout the care continuum. English-speakers focused on communication barriers, and difficulty understanding jargon arose as a theme. Spanish-speakers emphasized communication facilitators related to Spanish language use. Themes among all Spanish-speaking sub-groups included appreciation for language support resources and preference for Spanish-speaking providers. Mixed-concordant participants accounted for the majority of Spanish-speakers who reported communication barriers. Our data suggest that, although perception of patient-provider communication may depend on the language spoken throughout the care continuum, jargon is lost when health information is communicated in Spanish. Further, the respective consistency of language concordance or interpretation may play a role in patient perception of patient-provider communication. PMID:23553683

  10. Smoking in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Childhood Cancers Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment Pediatric Supportive Care Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Research ... and Suicide section in the PDQ summary on Pediatric Supportive Care .) All patients taking these medicines, especially ...

  11. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Ask About Cancer Research Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ®) General Information About Spirituality Key Points Religious ... To help patients with spiritual needs during cancer care, medical staff will listen to the wishes of ...

  12. Providing end of life care.

    PubMed

    2015-07-10

    It could be argued that the role of emergency department (ED) staff is to provide treatment to those with traumatic or acute injury or illness. However, because more and more older people with advanced chronic illnesses are presenting at EDs, staff must provide more palliative or end of life (EOL) care. In chaotic environments where staff's main concern is saving lives, this can be challenging. PMID:26159341

  13. Homeopathy in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Homeopathy is a controversial system of care that is practiced extensively in Europe, Asia, and South America primarily for functional and minor ailments. In this review, published studies on homeopathic remedies and cancer were examined. Data were obtained from multiple research disciplines, ranging from basic science to scientifically valid animal and clinical studies. The data from a few laboratory experiments in cancer models show some beneficial effect of homeopathic remedies on selected cancer cell lines. However, in the clinical arena, this effect is not clear. Several published outcome studies and some randomized controlled trials have shown that there may be a role for homeopathy in symptom relief and improving quality of life in patients touched by cancer. Such effects have not been demonstrated unequivocally, and specific antitumor effects have not been shown in any controlled clinical research to date, which raises the need for further clinical trials to investigate the use of homeopathy in cancer care. PMID:20486620

  14. Cancer Care, Inc.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site, by Cancer Care, Inc., contains easy-to-understand medical information about cancer for patients, survivors, and their families. In addition, it offers advice and resources for coping with the diagnosis and the side-effects of treatment. A Special Programs Section includes information on the causes, treatment, and prevention of cancer; suggestions for coping with and relieving cancer pain; and tips on how to advocate for health policy reform and better medical care. Visitors can listen to RealAudio educational programs through teleconference and participate in online or telephone support groups. The site has information on insurance, directories of support organizations, and links to other Websites and news media resources. Professionals visiting the site can find information on how to better assist and support cancer patients and their families.

  15. Healthcare Equity: Providing Quality Care for

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    , especially for minority and low-income groups Overall quality is improving, access is getting worse of diabetes care, maternal and child health care, and adverse events Disparities in cancer care Quality of care among states in the South Evidence Institute on Multicultural Health #12;Figure 2.45. Hospital

  16. Primary Care Provider Turnover and Quality in Managed Care Organizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary E. Plomondon; David J. Magid; John F. Steiner; Samantha MaWhinney; Blair D. Gifford; Sarah C. Shih; Gary K. Grunwald; John S. Rumsfeld

    Although associations with continuity of care have been studied, little is known about associations with a specific aspect of continuity of care, namely, primary care provider turnover. From literature, primary care provider turnover is the rate at which primary care providers leave a health plan organization. Known to be costly, healthcare turnover, including physicians, nurses, allied health personnel, and staff,

  17. Who Will Provide Your Care? (Long-Term Care)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may need. Share page: Who Will Provide Your Care? Long-term care services and support typically come ... you live at home. About 80 percent of care at home is provided by unpaid caregivers and ...

  18. Group Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Group family day care providers need to create high-quality programs where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the group family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care providers:…

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vulvodynia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vulvodynia? Skip sharing on social media ... been ruled out. To diagnose vulvodynia, 1 a health care provider may recommend that a woman have blood ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  3. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share A Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep Article Body Did ... By: Immunizations Vomiting or choking What can child care providers do? Follow these guidelines to help protect ...

  4. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fewer procedures and better quality of life. Good communication between patients, family caregivers, and the health care ... feelings and concerns. Patients with cancer have special communication needs. Patients, their families, and their health care ...

  5. For Health Care Professional - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides numerous cancer-related resources for health care professionals. For information regarding cancer types, treatment, clinical trials and links to other National Cancer Institute resources, please go to the NCI home page.

  6. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  7. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  8. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  9. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  10. Resources for the Family Day Care Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jeanne, Ed.; And Others

    The 34 brief articles in this sourcebook for family day care providers are presented mainly in two large sections: (1) management of family day care business, and (2) interaction with children. Many of these articles pose and provide answers to questions that are likely to occur to child caregivers, such as "Does the IRS really expect me to keep…

  11. Trust Between Family and Health Care Provider

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra J. Lynn-sMcHale; Janet A. Deatrick

    2000-01-01

    This concept analysis includes the definition, characteristics, boundaries, preconditions, and outcomes of the concept of trust between the family and health care provider. Based on the results of this concept analysis, trust between the family and health care provider is defined as a process, consisting of varying levels, that evolves over time and is based on mutual intention, reciprocity, and

  12. HealthCare Provider BLS (CPR) Certification

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    HealthCare Provider BLS (CPR) Certification UIC COM, CON, COP, COD Faculty, Residents, and Students The Graham Clinical Performance Center (GCPC) is offering BLS Certification (healthcare provider CPR) on site

  13. Optimizing cancer care through mobile health.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada

    2015-07-01

    The survival rates for patients living with cancer are increasing, due to recent advances in detection, prevention and treatment. It has been estimated that there were 28 million cancer survivors around the world in 2012. In the UK, for patients diagnosed in 2007, it is predicted that more than half of them will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. A large majority of cancer survivors report unmet supportive care needs and distressing symptoms and adverse long-term consequences related to their cancer. Cancer management could be optimized to better meet patients demand through technology, including mobile health (m-Health). m-Health is defined as the use of mobile communications and network technologies for health care. m-Health can help both patients and health-care professionals and play an important part in managing and delivering cancer care including managing side effects, supporting drug adherence, providing cancer information, planning and follow up and detecting and diagnosing cancer. Health authorities have already published guidelines regulating m-Health to insure patient safety and improve the accountability of its applications. PMID:25649121

  14. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  15. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is receiving palliative care. Hospice care is a form of palliative care that is given to a ... technical language and specific details of laws and forms are hard to understand. To ease the burden, ...

  16. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Your Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips Office of Cancer ... your needs and interests. If you are a health care provider… this workbook contains several documents which can ...

  17. Medicaid managed care and provider consolidation.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, G S; Talbert, J C

    2000-01-01

    In the thrust toward constructing economic value, health care provider firms have been consolidating at a marked rate. Medicaid managed care programs have been rapidly emerging with the objectives of containing health care costs and improving services for beneficiaries. However, there are concerns that the trend toward achieving market efficiency through merger is largely incongruent with the economic and health value objectives of Medicaid managed care programs in the states. Discordance among value objectives arises primarily because of inefficient and market concentrating horizontal merger strategies employed by firms and disruptions in quality of care that occur during the transition to integrated health care systems. By promoting vertical integration strategies and filling in the quality gaps created by an active merger environment, Medicaid offices advance state objectives of cost containment and quality while recognizing that providers operate in a complex and competitive environment that necessitates consolidation for organizational survival. PMID:11924313

  18. Educational needs of inpatient oncology nurses in providing psychosocial care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng Hsuan; Raingruber, Bonnie

    2014-02-01

    Patients with cancer have multiple psychosocial needs during inpatient admissions. However, nurses often are not sure how to best approach those psychosocial needs. Therefore, the purpose of this survey was to determine the educational needs of inpatient oncology nurses in terms of providing psychosocial care to patients and to determine the barriers that inpatient nurses experience when providing psychosocial care. Twenty-six inpatient oncology RNs participated in an online survey that assessed barriers to psychosocial care as well as educational needs. Nurses identified that time, lack of patient privacy, nurses' emotional energy, confusion about clinical guidelines, lack of experience with screening tools, not knowing how to approach sensitive topics, and poor communication between team members undermine psychosocial care. Inpatient nurses need additional training to provide excellent psychosocial care. PMID:24476738

  19. Cancer Patient Navigator Tasks across the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Holden, Alan E. C.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tran, Jacqueline H.; Seals, Brenda F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Harjo, Lisa; Foo, Mary Anne; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patient navigation (PN) programs have been shown to increase access to and utilization of cancer care for poor and underserved individuals. Despite mounting evidence of its value, cancer patient navigation is not universally understood or provided. We describe five PN programs and the range of tasks their navigators provide across the cancer care continuum (education and outreach, screening, diagnosis and staging, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life). Tasks are organized by their potential to make cancer services understandable, available, accessible, affordable, appropriate, and accountable. Although navigators perform similar tasks across the five programs, their specific approaches reflect differences in community culture, context, program setting, and funding. Task lists can inform the development of programs, job descriptions, training, and evaluation. They also may be useful in the move to certify navigators and establish mechanisms for reimbursement for navigation services. PMID:22423178

  20. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. PMID:25084716

  1. Importance of accessible cancer care.

    PubMed

    Skrabek, Pamela

    2013-10-01

    Accessibility is a fundamental principle of government run health systems. Despite this, many factors impair access to care including geography, language, socioeconomic status and gender. Waiting for health care is a barrier to access that can result in significant anxiety and stress, deterioration in functional status and loss of income. Prompt access to diagnosis and treatment are key requirements to improving survival and quality of life for patients with cancer. This review will focus on studies, programs and policies aimed at improving access to care, applicability to patients with lymphoma, and potential impact. There is a growing burden on health care systems due to increasing cancer incidence and escalating health expenditures. Accordingly, initiatives and programs must be evaluated for effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23958140

  2. Better Baby Care: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Margaret; Tate, Costella

    A resource for child caregivers providing family day care for infants and toddlers, this book is designed to provide information and suggestions in a format that is easy to follow, and in language that is easy to read. Chapter 1 gives tips on "baby-proofing" the home, as well as ideas for toys, equipment, and how to integrate a baby into the…

  3. Caring: Information for Family Day-Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This series of leaflets provides information for family day care providers on nine topics. Age differences and developmental stages are emphasized. The first topic concerns ways to help young children get along with others. Self-esteem is emphasized, and methods for helping children develop self-esteem are listed. The second leaflet discusses…

  4. Review of Pesticide Education Materials for Health Care Providers Providing Care to Agricultural Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Quandt, Sara A.; Early, Julie; Jackson, David S.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Pesticide exposure is an important environmental and occupational health risk for agricultural workers and their families, but health care providers receive little training in it. Objective: To evaluate the medical resources available to providers caring for patients, particularly farmworkers, exposed to pesticides and to recommend a…

  5. Monitoring care of colorectal cancer patients in

    E-print Network

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    Monitoring care of colorectal cancer patients in Northern Ireland diagnosed 2006 (with comparisons 1996 & 2001) Colorectal1996-2006 #12;Monitoring care of colorectal cancer patients in Northern Ireland should be cited as; Fitzpatrick D and Gavin A, 2009. Monitoring care of colorectal cancer patients

  6. Diffusion of standards of care for cancer pain.

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, N; Young, J; MacDonald, N

    1995-01-01

    The authors report the results of a symposium on improving the standards of care for patients with cancer pain. The symposium was sponsored by the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control of the National Cancer Institute of Canada and was held Apr. 8 to 10, 1994, in Toronto. Participants included experts on control of cancer pain and on diffusion techniques, patients with cancer and representatives of regulatory agencies. They suggested the following strategies to improve outcomes in patients with cancer pain. Processes for accreditation of health care institutions should require documentation of cancer pain, its treatment and its outcome. Tertiary care facilities that provide cancer treatment should have expert, subspecialty, multidisciplinary programs for pain control and should provide adequate psychosocial support to patients suffering cancer pain. The Canadian Cancer Society should conduct a public-education campaign to encourage patients to report pain to health care providers. The National Cancer Institute of Canada should foster research on cancer pain by restructuring its process for review of pain-research protocols. Examinations for professionals who care for patients with cancer should include a defined number of questions concerning pain and symptom control. Provincial programs to monitor prescribing through the use of triplicate prescription pads should have an educational as well as regulatory purpose. PMID:7736371

  7. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer. PMID:24857069

  8. Child Care Provider Training Helping Early Childhood Educators

    E-print Network

    Child Care Provider Training Helping Early Childhood Educators Provide Quality Care for Today of child care on a regular basis from persons other than their parents (Child Care Aware, 2012). The Texas Workforce Commission estimates that there are over 100,000 child care providers caring for more than 760

  9. Weight loss counseling by health care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, H; Adams, M L; Katz, D L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study explores the pattern of weight loss counseling by health care providers in Connecticut and the associated weight loss efforts by patients. METHODS: Data from the 1994 Connecticut Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey were analyzed to determine (1) the frequency of weight management counseling by health care providers of overweight adults with and without additional cardiovascular risk factors and (2) the current weight loss practices of overweight subjects. RESULTS: Only 29% of all overweight respondents and fewer than half with additional cardiovascular risk factors, reported that they had been counseled to lose weight. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest a need for more counseling of overweight persons, especially those with cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:10224993

  10. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. PMID:25777363

  11. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The financial costs of cancer care are a burden to people diagnosed with cancer, their families, and society as a whole. National expenditures associated with cancer have been steadily increasing in the United States. Care for cancer survivors accounted for an estimated 137.4 billion in medical care expenditures in the United States in 2010. In the near future, cancer costs may increase at a faster rate than overall medical expenditures.

  12. The "specter" of cancer: exploring secondary trauma for health professionals providing cancer support and counseling.

    PubMed

    Breen, Lauren J; O'Connor, Moira; Hewitt, Lauren Y; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-02-01

    Health professionals are vulnerable to occupational stress and tend to report high levels of secondary trauma and burnout; this is especially so for those working in "high-death" contexts such as cancer support and palliative care. In this study, 38 health professionals (psychologists, social workers, pastoral carers/chaplains, nurses, group facilitators, and a medical practitioner) who provide grief support and counseling in cancer and palliative care each participated in a semistructured interview. Qualitatively, a grounded theory analysis revealed four themes: (a) the role of health professionals in supporting people who are experiencing grief and loss issues in the context of cancer, (b) ways of working with patients with cancer and their families, (c) the unique qualities of cancer-related loss and grief experiences, and (d) the emotional demands of the work and associated self-care. The provision of psychological services in the context of cancer is colored by the specter of cancer, an unseen yet real phenomenon that contributes to secondary trauma and burnout. The participants' reported secondary trauma has serious repercussions for their well-being and may compromise the care they provide. The findings have implications for the retention and well-being of personnel who provide psychosocial care in cancer and the quality and delivery of services for people with cancer and their families. PMID:24079353

  13. Integrating palliative care with intensive care for critically ill patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    With newer information indicating more favorable outcomes of intensive care therapy for lung cancer patients, intensivists increasingly are willing to initiate an aggressive trial of this therapy. Concerns remain, however, that the experience of the intensive care unit for patients with lung cancer and their families often may be distressing. Regardless of prognosis, all patients with critical illness should receive high-quality palliative care, including symptom control, communication about appropriate care goals, and support for both patient and family throughout the illness trajectory. In this article, we suggest strategies for integrating palliative care with intensive care for critically ill lung cancer patients. We address assessment and management of symptoms, knowledge and skill needed for effective communication, and interdisciplinary collaboration for patient and family support. We review the role of expert consultants in providing palliative care in the intensive care unit, while highlighting the responsibility of all critical care clinicians to address basic palliative care needs of patients and their families. PMID:22339793

  14. Integrating palliative care with intensive care for critically ill patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gay, Elizabeth B; Weiss, Stefanie P; Nelson, Judith E

    2012-01-01

    With newer information indicating more favorable outcomes of intensive care therapy for lung cancer patients, intensivists increasingly are willing to initiate an aggressive trial of this therapy. Concerns remain, however, that the experience of the intensive care unit for patients with lung cancer and their families often may be distressing. Regardless of prognosis, all patients with critical illness should receive high-quality palliative care, including symptom control, communication about appropriate care goals, and support for both patient and family throughout the illness trajectory. In this article, we suggest strategies for integrating palliative care with intensive care for critically ill lung cancer patients. We address assessment and management of symptoms, knowledge and skill needed for effective communication, and interdisciplinary collaboration for patient and family support. We review the role of expert consultants in providing palliative care in the intensive care unit, while highlighting the responsibility of all critical care clinicians to address basic palliative care needs of patients and their families. PMID:22339793

  15. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  16. Integration of care with cure in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Priyadarshini; Ghooi, Ravindra; Vijayakumar, K

    2013-09-01

    Quality of life is as important as quantity of life, if not more. In some life-threatening diseases, the possibility of cure is sometimes poor, and symptoms of the disease reduce the quality of life too. Improvement of symptoms helps the patients to live more comfortably while allowing them to retain their autonomy and dignity despite the life-threatening disease. The total care of such patients, helping them to live as well as possible in spite of their symptoms forms the basis of palliative care. Palliative care is an upcoming discipline, which aims to provide comfort to patients suffering from severe disease-related discomfort. It is not end-of-life support, as previously thought but is recommended to be integrated with therapy right from diagnosis. Studies conducted overseas show that when introduced early, palliative care leads to better outcomes of curative therapies, while making the patient comfortable and pain-free. There are different models and methods of delivery of palliative care and the involvement of family in the care of the patient produces the best outcome. Palliative care can be delivered both at a dedicated centre as well as at the patient's home, depending on the preferences of the patient. This paper discusses the efforts towards providing care for patients in different stages of cancer therapy. PMID:24968527

  17. Home Care for Cancer Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... often involves a team approach that includes doctors, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, family members, and others. ... or organizations devoted to home care. A doctor, nurse, or social worker can provide information about a ...

  18. Risk-Based Health Care, the Cancer Survivor, the Oncologist and the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mary S.; Partridge, Ann; Grunfeld, Eva; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face substantial risks for morbidity, reduced quality of life, and premature mortality related to the cancer itself and/or the interventions undertaken to control cancer. Risk-based care that involves a personalized systematic plan of periodic screening, surveillance, and prevention relevant to the cancer experience is recommended to address the comprehensive health needs of the growing population of cancer survivors. Risk-based care and coordination between oncology and primary care providers have been identified as important metrics of quality cancer survivorship care. Various models of survivorship care, treatment summaries and survivorship care plans have been promoted as methods to facilitate communication among providers across care transitions and improve survivor access to quality survivorship care. However, research supporting the feasibility of implementing these practices and their effectiveness in enhancing health outcomes is limited. This article reviews key concepts underpinning clinical and research initiatives endeavoring to improve access to quality care among long-term survivors and summarizes results of intervention studies implementing these elements in transitioning survivors from oncology to primary care providers for long-term follow-up care. PMID:24331199

  19. Disparity in cancer care: a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S.; Shahid, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Canada is facing cancer crisis. Cancer has become the leading cause of death in Canada. Despite recent advances in cancer management and research, growing disparities in cancer care have been noticed, especially in socio-economically disadvantaged groups and under-served communities. With the rising incidence of cancer and the increasing numbers of minorities and of social disparities in general, and without appropriate interventions, cancer care disparities will become only more pronounced. This paper highlights the concepts and definitions of equity in health and health care and examines several health determinants that increase the risk of cancer. It also reviews cancer care inequity in the high-risk groups. A conceptual framework is proposed and recommendations are made for the eradication of disparities within the health care system and beyond. PMID:23300361

  20. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have to decide about is what kind of health care provider you would like to care for you ... or a certified nurse-midwife. Each of these health care providers is described below. Each one has different ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  2. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. ...Financial Participation § 438.804 Primary care provider payment increases. ...MCO, PIHP or PAHP for specified primary care services furnished as of...

  3. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. ...Financial Participation § 438.804 Primary care provider payment increases. ...MCO, PIHP or PAHP for specified primary care services furnished as of...

  4. Breathtaking advances begin with outstanding people from researchers determined to find cures to healthcare providers who deliver extraordinary care to

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to healthcare providers who deliver extraordinary care to dedicated volunteers and partners who passionately in cancer research and care. To build on that track record and to find better therapies, we must recruit recruit and retain leading experts in cancer research and care? Gifts provide current resources

  5. Resolving tensions: optimising the role of primary care in lung cancer follow-up care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Highet; S A Murray; C Campbell; M Kendall; P Rainey; R Neal; P Rose; C Anandan; E Amoakwa; D Weller

    2011-01-01

    AbstractIntroductionThere is a little consensus on how to manage the supportive and palliative care needs of people with lung cancer once they have completed initial treatment. We aimed to gain insights into the perspectives of clinicians and service users as to how primary care could provide better care in collaboration with lung cancer specialists.MethodsWe conducted a qualitative study encompassing (a)

  6. Who provides GP after-hours care?

    PubMed

    Pham, Mai; McRae, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the demographic and financial factors likely to influence the supply side of after-hours GP care is crucial in meeting the increasing demand for these services. This study answers two questions: which GPs are more likely to provide after-hours GP care, and of those who do, which are more likely to take a heavier load. Data from the first wave of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey is used, with logistic regression applied to address the decision to undertake after-hours work and linear regression to address the question of the quantum of work. The results show that female, older, and urban GPs are less likely to work outside of normal hours. GPs who are employees are less likely to participate in after-hours work than GPs who are principals or partners of a practice. On the other hand, principals and partners, are likely work more hours in the after-hours period than employee GPs if they do participate in this work. Similarly, those GPs in solo practice who work after-hours also tend to take a heavier after-hours workload than the GPs who are not in solo practice. The role of GP wages and family income does not seem to be compelling. These conclusions are likely to relate to the ways doctors behave independent of the health system. PMID:25616724

  7. Multidisciplinary care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulvat, Melissa C; Hansen, Nora M; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients with breast cancer has become increasingly complex with advancements in diagnostic modalities, surgical approaches, and adjuvant treatments. A multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care is essential to the successful integration of available therapies. This article addresses the key components of multidisciplinary breast cancer care, with a special emphasis on new and emerging approaches over the past 10 years in the fields of diagnostics, surgery, radiation, medical oncology, and plastic surgery. PMID:19186235

  8. Integrating yoga into cancer care.

    PubMed

    DiStasio, Susan A

    2008-02-01

    Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body. The postures are combined with pranayama, or rhythmic control of the breath. As a complementary therapy, yoga integrates awareness of breath, relaxation, exercise, and social support--elements that are key to enhancing quality of life in patients with cancer. Yoga practice may assist cancer survivors in managing symptoms such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, pain, and fatigue. As with all exercise programs, participants need to be aware of potential risks and their own limitations. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with yoga as a complementary therapy, including current research findings, types of yoga, potential benefits, safety concerns, teacher training, and ways to integrate yoga into cancer care. PMID:18258582

  9. Managed Behavioral Health Care Provider Practice Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Keefe; Michael L. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Managed care is a dominating issue on the public policy agenda. Difficulties in defining and operationalizing it continue to have ramifications for the nation. It is often assumed that the care being reimbursed by managed care organizations is for clients whose psychiatric conditions have been appropriately diagnosed and treated. Based on the responses of a randomly-selected group from the major

  10. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care On This Page Key findings Who visits CHCs? ... or Latino patients (data not shown). Who provides care at CHC visits, and who visits these providers? ...

  11. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...funds may be offered to provide assistance to Coast Guard Family Child Care Providers or to family home day care providers so that family child care services can be provided to military members and civilian employees of the Coast Guard, at...

  12. South Africa project provides cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L

    1997-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the five leading causes of death among women aged 45-59 years in the developing world, and the most common type of cancer among South African women, accounting for about 25% of all cancer-related mortality. The Philani Cervical Cancer Prevention Project, located in Site C of Khayelitsha, a settlement outside of Cape Town, is now screening women to prevent development of the disease. The Philani Project is a demonstration study for a larger cervical cancer prevention project. AVSC International is providing technical and management assistance as one of the project's five collaborators. Working out of a mobile clinic parked next to an outpatient treatment center, the project is comparing the use of Pap smears and four other screening approaches in a low-resource situation in order to develop protocols for similar programs. Now in its second year, the Philani project has enrolled 1600 previously unscreened women over age 35 years. Follow-up and treatment are provided. 80% of women identified with a problem through screening and in need of colposcopy return for follow-up and treatment. However, the number of women who return voluntarily for follow-up is continuously increasing due to the staff's attention to providing community education about cervical screening. About 9% of clients were found to have abnormalities of the cervix with the potential to progress to a malignancy, and 8 cases of outright cervical cancer have been detected. Community outreach, innovative programs, and coordinated efforts are discussed. PMID:12293924

  13. Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Advancing cancer care through groundbreaking research

    E-print Network

    de Bakker, Paul

    Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Advancing cancer care through groundbreaking research Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center combines a commitment to further the most innovative scientific advancements to impact cancer care. An emphasis on delivering compassionate care to each individual patient

  14. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M.; Benson, Al B.; Klein, Ira M.; Silver, Samuel M.; Beveridge, Roy A.; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F. Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28–31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Skip sharing on social ... disabilities. 2 How are newborns tested for PKU? Health care providers conduct a PKU screening test using a ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on ... and urine tests. 1 Cushing’s Syndrome If a health care provider suspects Cushing’s syndrome, he or she may ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)? Skip sharing ... a "floppy" body and weak muscle tone, a health care provider may conduct genetic testing for Prader-Willi ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menkes Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Menkes disease? Skip sharing on social ... 3 months old. To diagnose Menkes disease, a health care provider will order blood tests to measure the ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers often use a blood sample to diagnose ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers can check for Down syndrome during pregnancy ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose IDDs? Skip sharing on social media ... 1 This type of test will help the health care provider examine the ability of a person to ...

  11. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose birth defects? Skip sharing on social ... to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening Health care providers recommend that certain pregnant women, including those ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  14. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  15. Developing a service model that integrates palliative care throughout cancer care: the time is now.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Seah, Davinia S E; King, Tari; Leighl, Natasha B; Hauke, Ralph; Wollins, Dana S; Von Roenn, Jamie Hayden

    2014-10-10

    Palliative care is a fundamental component of cancer care. As part of the 2011 to 2012 Leadership Development Program (LDP) of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), a group of participants was charged with advising ASCO on how to develop a service model integrating palliative care throughout the continuum of cancer care. This article presents the findings of the LDP group. The group focused on the process of palliative care delivery in the oncology setting. We identified key elements for models of palliative care in various settings to be potentially equitable, sustainable, feasible, and acceptable, and here we describe a dynamic model for the integrated, simultaneous implementation of palliative care into oncology practice. We also discuss critical considerations to better integrate palliative care into oncology, including raising consciousness and educating both providers and the public about the importance of palliative care; coordinating palliative care efforts through strengthening affiliations and/or developing new partnerships; prospectively evaluating the impact of palliative care on patient and provider satisfaction, quality improvement, and cost savings; and ensuring sustainability through adequate reimbursement and incentives, including linkage of performance data to quality indicators, and coordination with training efforts and maintenance of certification requirements for providers. In light of these findings, we believe the confluence of increasing importance of incorporation of palliative care education in oncology education, emphasis on value-based care, growing use of technology, and potential cost savings makes developing and incorporating palliative care into current service models a meaningful goal. PMID:25199756

  16. The cancer recognition (CARE) antibody test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry T. Thornthwaite; Emily C. McDuffee; Robert B. Harris; Julie R. Secor McVoy

    2004-01-01

    The cancer recognition (CARE) antibody (Ab) test is a serologic assay for a specific IgM that is elevated in cancer patients. All tests are measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of human serum. The target polypeptide in the CARE Ab test is the IgM binding epitope (LT-11) of the CARE antigen (Ag) consisting of a 16 mer structure

  17. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  18. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alan; Ezzat, Adnan

    1997-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy in Saudi Arabia will be accompanied by an alteration of the patterns of disease similar to that in Western countries. One of these will be cancer, the second leading cause of death in the west at present, where 1:3 people develop cancer during their lifetime and 1:4 die of it. Cancer deaths are rarely easy. The distress particularly the pain it can cause is legendary. Palliative care is the care and study of patients with active progressive far advanced disease, where cure is impossible, the prognosis predictably short, and the focus of care is the patient's quality of life. A Palliative Care Program has been developed at KFSH&RC, since 1991. This has broadened the spectrum of health services available to cancer patients. Palliative care needs to be more widely available in the kingdom to relieve an important cause of human suffering. PMID:23008572

  19. Performance measurement in cancer care: uses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lazar, G S; Desch, C E

    1998-05-15

    Unnecessary, inappropriate, and futile care are given in all areas of health care including cancer care. Not only does such care increase costs and waste precious resources, but patients may have adverse outcomes when the wrong care is given. One of the ways to address this issue is to measure performance with the use of administrative data sets. Through performance measurement, the best providers can be chosen, providers can be rewarded on the basis of the quality of their performance, opportunities for improvement can be identified, and variation in practice can be minimized. Purchasers should take leadership role in creating data sets that will enhance, clinical performance. Specifically, purchasers should require the following from payers: 1) staging information; 2) requirements and/or incentives for proper International Classification of Diseases coding, including other important (comorbid) conditions; 3) incentives or requirements for proper data collection if the payer is using a reimbursement strategy that places the risk on the provider; and 4) a willingness to collect and report information to providers of care, with a view toward increasing quality and decreasing the costs of cancer care. Demanding better clinical performance can lead to better outcomes. Once good data is presented to patients and providers, better clinical behavior and improved cancer care systems will quickly follow. PMID:9587100

  20. Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers Roles of Child Health-Care

    E-print Network

    Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers in Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 1. Use and disseminate information from 7 #12;Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers In addition to routine screening and follow

  1. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  2. Food Safety Training Needs of Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Anne S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A sample of child-care centers and family day-care homes in Michigan was used to identify what care providers need to know about safe food handling. Their primary concern was to become informed about what causes food to become unsafe and how to prevent foodborne illnesses. Providers preferred printed materials to tapes or workshops. (AA)

  3. Questions to Ask a Veteran's Health Care Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caregiver.va.gov Questions to Ask a Veteran’s Health Care Providers . The list of questions below can help ... you accept? . Planning for Discharge from the Hospital/Health Care Facility . As part of the process of planning ...

  4. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16, 2009, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Perspectives of Foster-Care Providers, Service Provicers, and Judges Regarding Privtized Foster-Care Services

    E-print Network

    Humphrey, Kristen R.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford

    2006-01-01

    Perspectives of Foster-Care Providers, Service Providers, and Judges Regarding Privatized Foster-Care Services Kristen R. Humphrey, Ann P. Turnbull, and H. Rutherford Turnbull III, University of Kansas This qualitative study examined perceptions... offoster-care providers, service providers, and juvenile- court judges regarding privatized foster-care services in Kansas. Kansas was the first state to privatize all foster care, adoption, and family-preservation services. Most states report either...

  6. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Organizational Barriers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer clinical trials offer the opportunity for cancer patients to access state-of-the-art treatments and, in the process, contribute to the scientific knowledge base about effectiveness of curative interventions. However, accrual to clinical trials is far from optimal. Only about 5 percent of cancer patients receive care through a treatment trial. Understanding the factors that promote or impede trial participation is an essential step toward increasing accrual.

  7. Cultural Aspects of Communication in Cancer Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Surbone

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as\\u000a a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase,\\u000a and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care\\u000a leads to improved therapeutic outcome and

  8. Health Care Provider Value Chain Lukasz Kawczynski, Marco Taisch

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Health Care Provider Value Chain Lukasz Kawczynski, Marco Taisch Department of Management health care system. This paper aims to propose a value definition and a value chain model within the health care. In order to define value patients and experts were surveyed. The proposed definition offers

  9. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  10. Developing Successful Models of Cancer Palliative Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Bishop, Margaret Firer; Caron, Paula; Stephens, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This article describes successful institutionally-based programs for providing high quality palliative care to people with cancer and their family members. Challenges and opportunities for program development are also described. Data Sources Published literature from 2000 to present describing concurrent oncology palliative care clinical trials, standards and guidelines were reviewed. Conclusion Clinical trials have demonstrated feasibility and positive outcomes and formed the basis for consensus guidelines that support concurrent oncology palliative care models. Implications for nursing practice Oncology nurses should advocate for all patients with advanced cancer and their families to have access to concurrent oncology palliative oncology care from the time of diagnosis with a life-limiting cancer. PMID:20971407

  11. Clinical Cancer Care Full screening services and diagnostics

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Clinical Cancer Care · Full screening services and diagnostics · Advanced treatments for all forms of cancer · Most frequent cancers at the Cancer Center: Breast 15% Gastrointestinal 13% Skin 17% Lung 13 treatment protocols that link the latest Cancer Center research to clinical care · Familial Cancer Program

  12. Exploring care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Kevin T; Abbott, Amy A; Norris, Joan F

    2013-08-01

    Care transitions involve coordination of patient care across multiple care settings. Many problems occur during care transitions resulting in negative patient outcomes and unnecessary readmissions. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives in a single metropolitan Midwest city. A qualitative descriptive design was used to solicit patients', caregivers', and health-care providers' perceptions of care transitions, their role within the process, barriers to effective care transitions, and strategies to overcome these barriers. Five themes emerged: preplanned admissions are ideal; lack of needed patient information upon admission; multiple services are needed in preparing patients for discharge; rushed or delayed discharges lead to patient misunderstanding; and difficulties in following aftercare instructions. Findings illustrated provider difficulty in meeting multiple care needs, and the need for patient-centered care to achieve positive outcomes associated with quality measures, reduced readmissions, and care transitions. PMID:23113935

  13. The challenges of providing palliative care for older people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Anita-Luise; Hughes, Julian C

    2011-08-01

    Palliative care seems the right approach to dementia, except that it suggests a dichotomy between cure and care. As in cancer care, supportive care provides a broader framework, viewing dementia from the time of diagnosis until death and bereavement. The challenge is to find the right approach to the individual. This challenge arises in the person's own home, in long-term care homes, and in hospitals. The challenging features of palliative care for older people with dementia are found in connection with the use of antibiotics, antipsychotics, and other medications, as well as in decisions about whether the person is in pain or in distress, or whether artificial feeding should be contemplated or not, as well as about the use of advance care plans. In short, the challenges are essentially ethical as well as clinical. The right approach will be the one that recognizes this facet of clinical care. PMID:21503596

  14. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring For Sick Children: Implications For Public Policy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Jody Heymann; Phuong Hong Vo; Cara A. Bergstrom

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted of child care providers at every city-sponsored preschool and afterschool program in an urban area in the United States. In addition, random sampling was used to identify home-based child care providers from a list obtained through a child care

  15. Lactose Intolerance: Information for Health Care Providers

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Providers Most tweens* and teens are not getting the recommended 1,300 mg of calcium a day they need to build strong bones--in fact, fewer than one in 10 girls and just more than one in four boys ages 9 to 13 in osteoporosis prevention. The tween and teen years are critical for bone development because most bone mass

  16. Child Abuse Issues for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marlys; Koskie, Beth

    Written for child caregivers, this booklet provides very basic information about child abuse and neglect, discusses early warnings that signal when a family is in trouble or when a child is at risk, and indicates how caregivers can helpfully intervene. Also suggested are ways caregivers might protect themselves against the charge of child abuse.…

  17. Finding Medical Care for Colorectal Cancer Symptoms: Experiences among Those Facing Financial Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Financial barriers can substantially delay medical care seeking. Using patient narratives provided by 252 colorectal cancer patients, we explored the experience of financial barriers to care seeking. Of the 252 patients interviewed, 84 identified financial barriers as a significant hurdle to obtaining health care for their colorectal cancer

  18. Inequalities in breast cancer care and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M.; Sainsbury, R.; Kerr, D.

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons across Europe suggest that survival from breast cancer is less good in the United Kingdom than in many countries. The care given in some UK breast cancer units is exemplary. However, it is difficult to escape the conclusion that a substantial number of women who present with breast cancer receive suboptimal care. Cancer registry-based studies have clearly demonstrated variations between surgeons and between hospitals in the management of early breast cancer. Although variations in surgical practice per se may have little impact on survival, there is evidence that differences in the use of systemic adjuvant therapy influence outcome. Five-year survival seems to be greater in women treated by surgeons seeing more than 30-50 new cases of breast cancer each year. This may be because such patients are more likely to be treated by a multidisciplinary team and to receive adjuvant therapy. Proposals that would increase the overall quality of breast cancer care and remove current inequalities must be carefully considered and should then be implemented. PMID:9303363

  19. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life. PMID:24376975

  20. Prostate cancer screening and health care system distrust in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Matthews, Stephen A.; Anderson, Roger T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aim to examine whether distrust of health care system (hereafter distrust) is associated with prostate cancer screening and whether different dimensions of distrust demonstrate similar relationships with prostate cancer screening. Method With data on 1,784 men aged 45–75 from the Philadelphia metropolitan area, we first applied factor analysis to generate factor scores capturing two distrust sub-scales: competence and values. We then implemented logistic regressions to estimate the relationships between distrust and prostate cancer screening, controlling for covariates related to demographics (e.g., race and age), socioeconomic status (e.g., poverty status and education), health care resources (e.g., insurance status), and health status (i.e., self-rated health). Results Without considering any other covariates, both competence and values distrust were negatively associated to the receipt of prostate cancer screening. After accounting for other covariates shown above, values distrust remained negatively associated with the odds of receiving prostate cancer screening (OR=0.89, 95% CI=[0.81, 0.98]) but competence distrust was not a significant predictor. Conclusions Values distrust was independently associated with prostate cancer screening. Macro-level change in the health care system may influence men’s health behaviors. Our findings suggested that efforts to make the health care system more transparent and enhanced communications between men and health providers may facilitate prostate cancer screening. PMID:23775208

  1. Understanding & Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Care Continuum

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences is pleased to announce the May 2012 Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) Special Issue, Understanding and Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Care Continuum.

  2. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bronwynne C. Evans; Michael J. Belyea; Ebere Ume

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a female relative. The

  3. Successful Strategies for Recruiting Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tom; Roach, Megan

    The purpose of this handbook is to show how communities can initiate a successful recruitment campaign for family day care providers. In 11 chapters, discussion focuses on (1) the need for recruitment; (2) the recruitment process; (3) determining day care need; (4) conducting provider surveys; (5) incentive programs; (6) training classes; (7)…

  4. Mexican American Males Providing Personal Care for Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a…

  5. The cancer recognition (CARE) antibody test.

    PubMed

    Thornthwaite, Jerry T; McDuffee, Emily C; Harris, Robert B; Secor McVoy, Julie R; Lane, I W

    2004-12-28

    The cancer recognition (CARE) antibody (Ab) test is a serologic assay for a specific IgM that is elevated in cancer patients. All tests are measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of human serum. The target polypeptide in the CARE Ab test is the IgM binding epitope (LT-11) of the CARE antigen (Ag) consisting of a 16 mer structure that has been produced synthetically. The mean relative concentration (MRC) is determined relative to standard, normalized human plasma. Non-parametric analysis showed median MRC values of healthy volunteers (HVs) with no history of cancer (n =47), family history of cancer (n = 126) and a previous cancer history (n = 24) to be 26, 34 and 46, respectively. It was determined that there was no significance found among the medians of the three HV groups (P = 0.53). The specificity of the HV types was between 87 and 98%. Benign/non-cancer surgical patients (n = 27) had a median value of 20 with a specificity of 96%. The cancer patients (n = 61) had a median value of 246 with a sensitivity of 89%. There was a significant difference between the HV and cancer patients (P < 0.0001) as well as between the benign/surgical non-cancerous group and cancer patients (P < 0.0001). The IgM antibody is heat stable at room temperature for two days versus being frozen at -80 degrees C (r2 = 0.97). Either serum or plasma samples may be used in the CARE Ab test (r2 = 0.92). The CARE Ab was almost exclusively IgM with no serum conversion to IgG in sequential measurements of patients with cancer over a six-month period. Preliminary data from patients undergoing post-operative cancer treatment showed that decreasing Ab levels revealed patients negative for residual cancer or undergoing remission, while relapsing patients show an increase in Ab levels. A return to a positive Ab level shortly after treatment is a poor prognostic sign while in advanced cancers the Ab levels may be depressed significantly. PMID:15533599

  6. Survivorship care plans: Is there buy-in from community oncology providers?

    PubMed Central

    Salz, Talya; McCabe, Mary S.; Onstad, Erin E.; Baxi, Shrujal S.; Deming, Richard L.; Franco, Regina A.; Glenn, Lyn A.; Harper, Gregory R.; Jumonville, Alcee J.; Payne, Roxanne M.; Peters, Elissa A.; Salner, Andrew L.; Schallenkamp, John M.; Williams, Sheron R.; Yiee, Kevin; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine recommended that cancer survivors and their primary care providers receive survivorship care plans (SCPs) to summarize cancer treatment and plan ongoing care. However, the use of SCPs remains limited. Methods Oncology providers at 14 National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) hospitals completed a survey regarding their perceptions of SCPs, including barriers to implementation, strategies for implementation, the role of oncology providers, and the importance of topics in SCPs (diagnosis, treatment, recommended ongoing care, and the aspects of ongoing care that the oncology practice will provide). Results Among 245 providers (70% response rate), 52% reported ever providing any component of an SCP to patients. The most widely reported barriers were lack of personnel and time to create SCPs (69% and 64% of respondents, respectively). The most widely endorsed strategy among those using SCPs was the use of a template with pre-specified fields; 94% of those who used templates found them helpful. For each topic of an SCP, while 87%-89% of oncology providers felt it was very important for primary care providers to receive the information, only 58%-65% of respondents felt it was very important for patients to receive the information. Further, 33%-38% of respondents had mixed feelings about whether it was oncology providers’ responsibility to provide SCPs. Conclusions Practices need additional resources to overcome barriers to implementing SCPs. We found resistance toward SCPs, particularly the perceived value for the survivor and the idea that oncology providers are responsible for SCP dissemination. PMID:24327371

  7. How Cancer Survivors Provide Support on Cancer-Related Internet Mailing Lists

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Frydman, Gilles; Forlenza, Michael; Rimer, Barbara K

    2007-01-01

    Background Internet mailing lists are an important and increasingly common way for cancer survivors to find information and support. Most studies of these mailing lists have investigated lists dedicated to one type of cancer, most often breast cancer. Little is known about whether the lessons learned from experiences with breast cancer lists apply to other cancers. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the structural characteristics of 10 Internet cancer-related mailing lists and identify the processes by which cancer survivors provide support. Methods We studied a systematic 9% sample of email messages sent over five months to 10 cancer mailing lists hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR). Content analyses were used to compare the structural characteristics of the lists, including participation rates and members’ identities as survivors or caregivers. We used thematic analyses to examine the types of support that list members provided through their message texts. Results Content analyses showed that characteristics of list members and subscriber participation rates varied across the lists. Thematic analyses revealed very little “off topic” discussion. Feedback from listowners indicated that they actively modeled appropriate communication on their lists and worked to keep discussions civil and focused. In all lists, members offered support much more frequently than they requested it; survivors were somewhat more likely than caregivers to offer rather than to ask for support. The most common topics in survivors’ messages were about treatment information and how to communicate with health care providers. Although expressions of emotional support were less common than informational support, they appeared in all lists. Many messages that contained narratives of illness or treatment did not specifically ask for help but provided emotional support by reassuring listmates that they were not alone in their struggles with cancer. Survivors’ explicit expressions of emotional support tended to be messages that encouraged active coping. Such messages also provided senders with opportunities to assume personally empowering “helper” roles that supported self-esteem. Conclusions Many cancer survivors use the Internet to seek informational and emotional support. Across 10 lists for different cancers, informational support was the main communication style. Our finding of an emphasis on informational support is in contrast to most prior literature, which has focused on emotional support. We found the most common expressions of support were offers of technical information and explicit advice about how to communicate with health care providers. Topics and proportions of informational and emotional support differed across the lists. Our previous surveys of ACOR subscribers showed that they join the lists primarily to seek information; this qualitative study shows that they can and do find what they seek. They also find opportunities to play rewarding roles as support givers. PMID:17513283

  8. Palliative care in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Sheila; Cuvelier, Geoff; Harlos, Mike; Barr, Ronald

    2011-05-15

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with advanced or terminal cancer have distinctive medical and psychosocial needs that may not have been adequately provided by either pediatric or adult palliative care services. A discussion group, as part of a larger workshop on AYA with cancer, was held in Toronto on March 11-13, 2010;117:-. Recommendations were as follows: Develop a specific AYA screening tool designed to detect increased anxiety or new symptoms and to initiate discussion about palliative or symptom care; Set Canadian standards for palliative care in AYA patients. These standards should be included in hospital accreditation; Involve the palliative/symptom care team early in the disease trajectory to help manage clinically important symptoms that may not be associated with imminent death; Establish specific AYA multidisciplinary palliative care teams throughout Canada that are flexible and can work in both pediatric and adult facilities, and are able to work in a "virtual" environment to support patients being cared for at home; Improve physical facilities in hospices and hospitals to meet the distinctive needs of terminally ill AYA patients; Enhance support for palliative care at home by: changing legislation to improve Compassionate Care Benefits and developing "virtual palliative care support teams". Adequate provision of AYA palliative care and symptom management services will likely confer notable benefits to AYA patients and their families, and is likely to be cost saving to the tax payer by avoiding prolonged hospitalization and promoting easier return to work for the families and caregivers. PMID:21523753

  9. [Palliative care in patients without cancer: Impact of the end-of-life care team].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Kubokawa, Naomi; Hukuda, Koji; Hattori, Hideyuki; Hong, Young-Jae; Miura, Hisayuki; Shibasaki, Masataka; Endo, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Jun; Odate, Mitsuru; Senda, Kazuyoshi; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing problems associated with life-threatening illnesses by promoting the prevention and relief of suffering. Palliative care in Japan has been developed mainly for cancer patients. At the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, an end-of-life care team (EOLCT) has been developed to promote palliative care for patients without cancer. In the first 6 months of its operation, 109 requests were received by the team, 40% of which were for patients without cancer or related disease, including dementia, frailty due to advanced age, chronic respiratory failure, chronic heart failure, and intractable neurologic diseases. The main purpose of the EOLCT is to alleviate suffering. The relevant activities of the team include the use of opioids, providing family care, and giving support in decision-making (advance care planning) regarding withholding; enforcement; and withdrawal of mechanical ventilators, gastric feeding tubes, and artificial alimentation. The EOLCT is also involved in ongoing discussions of ethical problems. The team is actively engaged in the activities of the Japanese Geriatric Society and contributes to the development of decision-making guidelines for end-of-life by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The EOLCT can be helpful in promoting palliative care for patients with diseases other than cancer. The team offers support during times of difficulty and decision-making. PMID:24047661

  10. Promoting Gynecologic Cancer Awareness at a Critical Juncture—Where Women and Providers Meet

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Rodriguez, Juan; Hawkins, Nikki A

    2015-01-01

    Given the absence of effective population-based screening tests for ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar cancers, early detection can depend on women and health care providers recognizing the potential significance of symptoms. In 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge campaign began distributing consumer education materials promoting awareness of gynecologic cancer symptoms. We investigated providers’ in-office use of CDC gynecologic cancer materials and their recognition of the symptoms highlighted in the materials. We analyzed data from a national 2012 survey of US primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and gynecologists (N = 1,380). Less than a quarter of providers (19.4 %) reported using CDC gynecologic cancer education materials in their offices. The provider characteristics associated with the use of CDC materials were not consistent across specialties. However, recognition of symptoms associated with gynecologic cancers was consistently higher among providers who reported using CDC materials. The possibility that providers were educated about gynecologic cancer symptoms through the dissemination of materials intended for their patients is intriguing and warrants further investigation. Distributing consumer education materials in health care provider offices remains a priority for the Inside Knowledge campaign, as the setting where women and health care providers interact is one of the most crucial venues to promote awareness of gynecologic cancer symptoms. PMID:24214840

  11. Integrating dietary supplements into cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Abrams, Donald I; Ladas, Elena J; Deng, Gary; Hardy, Mary; Capodice, Jillian L; Winegardner, Mary F; Gubili, J K; Yeung, K Simon; Kussmann, Heidi; Block, Keith I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies confirm that a majority of patients undergoing cancer therapy use self-selected forms of complementary therapies, mainly dietary supplements. Unfortunately, patients often do not report their use of supplements to their providers. The failure of physicians to communicate effectively with patients on this use may result in a loss of trust within the therapeutic relationship and in the selection by patients of harmful, useless, or ineffective and costly nonconventional therapies when effective integrative interventions may exist. Poor communication may also lead to diminishment of patient autonomy and self-efficacy and thereby interfere with the healing response. To be open to the patient's perspective, and sensitive to his or her need for autonomy and empowerment, physicians may need a shift in their own perspectives. Perhaps the optimal approach is to discuss both the facts and the uncertainty with the patient, in order to reach a mutually informed decision. Today's informed patients truly value physicians who appreciate them as equal participants in making their own health care choices. To reach a mutually informed decision about the use of these supplements, the Clinical Practice Committee of The Society of Integrative Oncology undertook the challenge of providing basic information to physicians who wish to discuss these issues with their patients. A list of leading supplements that have the best suggestions of benefit was constructed by leading researchers and clinicians who have experience in using these supplements. This list includes curcumin, glutamine, vitamin D, Maitake mushrooms, fish oil, green tea, milk thistle, Astragalus, melatonin, and probiotics. The list includes basic information on each supplement, such as evidence on effectiveness and clinical trials, adverse effects, and interactions with medications. The information was constructed to provide an up-to-date base of knowledge, so that physicians and other health care providers would be aware of the supplements and be able to discuss realistic expectations and potential benefits and risks. PMID:23439656

  12. A Review and Characterization of the Various Perceptions of Quality Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Colosia, Ann D; Peltz, Gerson; Pohl, Gerhardt; Liu, Esther; Copley-Merriman, Kati; Khan, Shahnaz; Kaye, James A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is important to maintain high-quality cancer care while reducing spending. This requires an understanding of how stakeholders define “quality.” The objective of this literature review was to understand the perceptions patients, physicians, and managed care professionals have about quality cancer care, especially chemotherapy. METHODS A computerized literature search was conducted for articles concerning quality cancer care in patients who received chemotherapy. Among >1100 identified sources, 25 presented interviews/survey results from stakeholders. RESULTS Patients defined quality cancer care as being treated well by providers, having multiple treatment options, and being part of the decision-making process. Waiting to see providers, having problems with referrals, going to different locations for treatment, experiencing billing inaccuracies, and navigating managed care reimbursement negatively affected patients' quality-of-care perceptions. Providers perceived quality cancer care as making decisions based on the risks-benefits of specific chemotherapy regimens and patients' health status rather than costs. Providers objected to spending substantial time interacting with payers instead of delivering care to patients. Payers must control the costs of cancer care but do not want an adversarial relationship with providers and patients. Payers' methods of managing cancer more efficiently involved working with providers to develop assessment and decision-assist tools. CONCLUSIONS Delivering quality cancer care is increasingly difficult because of the shortage of oncologists and rising costs of chemotherapy agents, radiation therapy, and imaging tests. The definition of quality cancer care differed among stakeholders, and healthcare reform must reflect these various needs to maintain and improve quality while controlling costs. Cancer 2011. © 2010 American Cancer Society PMID:20939015

  13. Supportive Care of the Older Cancer Patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lodovico Balducci

    Cancer mainly affects individuals aged 65 and over, so that supportive care for cancer treatment concerns mostly elderly patients.\\u000a Age is a risk factor for increased incidence and severity of chemotherapy-related toxicity and also for the emergence of different\\u000a forms of toxicity including delirium and malnutrition; in addition age may modulate the perception of pain and the response\\u000a to analgesics,

  14. The oncology palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre: an early intervention model for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Breffni; Swami, Nadia; Pope, Ashley; Rodin, Gary; Dougherty, Elizabeth; Mak, Ernie; Banerjee, Subrata; Bryson, John; Ridley, Julia; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-04-01

    Several recently published randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the benefits of early palliative care involvement for patients with advanced cancer. In the oncology outpatient setting, palliative care clinics are an ideal site for the provision of early, collaborative support, which can be maintained throughout the cancer trajectory. Despite this, access to ambulatory palliative care clinics is limited, even at tertiary cancer centres. Existing programs for outpatient palliative care are variable in scope and are not well described in the literature. We describe the development and expansion of an outpatient palliative care clinic at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, demonstrating how the clinic functions at a local and regional level. This clinic served as the intervention for a recent large cluster-randomized trial of early palliative care. The model for this service can be adapted by other palliative care programs that aim to provide early, integrated oncology care. PMID:25281230

  15. Spirituality in nursing: nurses' perceptions about providing spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    Providing spiritual care is an important foundation of nursing and is a requirement mandated by accreditation organizations. Spiritual care is essential in all clinical areas but particularly in home care and hospice. Clinicians may be unable to respond to spiritual needs because of inadequate education or the assumption that spiritual needs should be addressed by clergy, chaplains, or other "spiritual" care providers. In reality, clinicians in the home may be in the best position to offer spiritual support when caring for patients at home at end of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine relationships between spirituality and nurses' providing spiritual care. Professional nurses (n = 69) working in 2 large healthcare organizations completed the Perceptions of Spiritual Care Questionnaire. Approximately, 33% of the nurses worked in home care. Significant correlations were found among those nurses whose reported nursing education programs adequately prepared them to meet spiritual needs and taught ways to incorporate spiritual care into practice and those who did not. PMID:23817473

  16. Barriers and Facilitators of Adolescent Behavioral Health in Primary Care: Perceptions of Primary Care Providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George W. Bitar; Paul Springer; Robert Gee; Chad Graff; Manuel Schydlower

    2009-01-01

    Several major policy reports describe the central role of primary care in improving the delivery of behavioral health care services to children and adolescents. Although primary care providers are uniquely positioned to provide these services, numerous obstacles hinder the integration of these services, including time, clinic management and organization issues, training, and resources. Although many of these obstacles have been

  17. The Health of Female Child Care Providers: Implications for Quality of Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dee Baldwin; Sherry Gaines; Judith Lupo Wold; Armenia Williams; Janie Leary

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the health behaviors and perceived health status of child care providers. Health behaviors and health status were also examined in relation to caring for children and the providers’ perceptions of quality child care. A researcher-developed questionnaire, adapted from Williams, Mason, and Wold (2001), was mailed to a random sample of 1,000 child

  18. Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

  19. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  20. Facts and Fancies: A Handbook for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Mary

    This handbook is intended to serve as a reference guide for the family day care mother offering information and suggestions that may be useful in her daily work. Section one deals with the family day care provider on a personal level; how she communicates with parents and how she manages her business, including record keeping, taxes, and Social…

  1. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Acne How should I care for my skin if I have acne? What will make my ...

  2. Providers' Perceptions of Challenges in Obstetrical Care for Somali Women

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jalana N.; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Davis, Olga I.; Shipp, Michele P.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. This pilot study explored health care providers' perceptions of barriers to providing health care services to Somali refugee women. The specific aim was to obtain information about providers' experiences, training, practices and attitudes surrounding the prenatal care, delivery, and management of women with Female Genital Cutting (FGC). Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 obstetricians/gynecologists and nurse midwives in Columbus, Ohio. Results. While providers did not perceive FGC as a significant barrier in itself, they noted considerable challenges in communicating with their Somali patients and the lack of formal training or protocols guiding the management of circumcised women. Providers expressed frustration with what they perceived as Somali patients' resistance to obstetrical interventions and disappointment with a perception of mistrust from patients and their families. Conclusion. Improving the clinical encounter for both patients and providers entails establishing effective dialogue, enhancing clinical and cultural training of providers, improving health literacy, and developing trust through community engagement. PMID:24223041

  3. Formal Care Providers' Perceptions of Home and Community-Based Services: Informing Dementia Care Quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Jansen; Dorothy A. Forbes; Maureen Markle-Reid; Pamela Hawranik; Dawn Kingston; Shellie Peacock; Sandra Henderson; Beverly Leipert

    2009-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the perceptions of formal care providers on the nature and quality of home- and community-based dementia care. The purpose of this descriptive interpretive research was to explore formal care providers' perceptions of their experiences with Canadian home- and community-based dementia care. Participants within three personal interviews and six focus groups (n?=?41) included nurses, social

  4. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for benefits; and (5) A health care provider listed above who...to diagnose and treat physical or mental health...

  5. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for benefits; and (5) A health care provider listed above who...to diagnose and treat physical or mental health...

  6. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for benefits; and (5) A health care provider listed above who...to diagnose and treat physical or mental health...

  7. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for benefits; and (5) A health care provider listed above who...to diagnose and treat physical or mental health...

  8. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...certification of the existence of a serious health condition to substantiate a claim for benefits; and (5) A health care provider listed above who...to diagnose and treat physical or mental health...

  9. New analysis reexamines the value of cancer care in the United States compared to Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Soneji, Samir; Yang, JaeWon

    2015-03-01

    Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment since 1970 in the United States compared to Western Europe, US cancer mortality rates have decreased only modestly. This has raised questions about the additional value of US cancer care derived from this additional spending. We calculated the number of US cancer deaths averted, compared to the situation in Western Europe, between 1982 and 2010 for twelve cancer types. We also assessed the value of US cancer care, compared to that in Western Europe, by estimating the ratio of additional spending on cancer to the number of quality-adjusted life-years saved. Compared to Western Europe, for three of the four costliest US cancers-breast, colorectal, and prostate-there were approximately 67,000, 265,000, and 60,000 averted US deaths, respectively, and for lung cancer there were roughly 1,120,000 excess deaths in the study period. The ratio of incremental cost to quality-adjusted life-years saved equaled $402,000 for breast cancer, $110,000 for colorectal cancer, and $1,979,000 for prostate cancer-amounts that exceed most accepted thresholds for cost-effective medical care. The United States lost quality-adjusted life-years despite additional spending for lung cancer: -$19,000 per quality-adjusted life-year saved. Our results suggest that cancer care in the United States may provide less value than corresponding cancer care in Western Europe for many leading cancers. PMID:25732488

  10. Providing long term care for sex offenders: liabilities and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Corson, Tyler Rogers; Nadash, Pamela

    2013-11-01

    The high risk for recidivism among sex offenders who need long term care (LTC) raises serious issues when they are cared for alongside frail, vulnerable adults. LTC providers must balance offenders' right to access care with other residents' right to be free from abuse and must assess and manage the risks associated with admitting offenders. This article identifies sources of legal liability that derive from sex offender management and discusses the need for the LTC community to develop reasonable, balanced guidance on how best to mitigate the risks associated with sex offenders, protect the rights of all residents, and reduce provider liabilities. PMID:24094899

  11. Working Together in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Provider Perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric J Thomas; Gwen D Sherwood; Jennipher L Mulhollem; J Bryan Sexton; Robert L Helmreich

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elicit healthcare provider perceptions of working together in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).STUDY DESIGN: We conducted focus groups to elicit descriptions of how providers work together. The groups included one each of transport nurses, staff nurses, residents, fellows, attending physicians and two multiple provider groups. To identify themes and their descriptive elements we performed qualitative data analysis.RESULTS:

  12. Improving palliative care outcomes for Aboriginal Australians: service providers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians have a lower rate of utilisation of palliative care services than the general population. This study aimed to explore care providers’ experiences and concerns in providing palliative care for Aboriginal people, and to identify opportunities for overcoming gaps in understanding between them and their Aboriginal patients and families. Methods In-depth, qualitative interviews with urban, rural and remote palliative care providers were undertaken in inpatient and community settings in Western Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers with QSR NVivo 10 software used to help manage data. Data analysis was informed by multiple theoretical standpoints, including the social ecological model, critical cultural theories and the ‘cultural security’ framework. Thematic analysis was carried out that identified patterns within data. Results Fifteen palliative care providers were interviewed. Overall they reported lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture and being uncertain of the needs and priorities of Aboriginal people during end-of-life care. According to several participants, very few Aboriginal people had an understanding of palliative care. Managing issues such as anger, denial, the need for non-medical support due to socioeconomic disadvantage, and dealing with crises and conflicts over funeral arrangements were reported as some of the tensions between Aboriginal patients and families and the service providers. Conclusion Early referral to palliative care is important in demonstrating and maintaining a caring therapeutic relationship. Paramount to meeting the needs for Aboriginal patients was access to appropriate information and logistical, psychological and emotional support. These were often seen as essential but additional to standard palliative care services. The broader context of Aboriginal history and historical distrust of mainstream services was seen to impinge on Aboriginal people’s willingness and ability to accept care and support from these services. This context needs to be understood and acknowledged at the system level. More cultural safety training was requested by care providers but it was not seen as replacing the need for an Aboriginal worker in the palliative care team. PMID:23875957

  13. An action plan for translating cancer survivorship research into care.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S; Glasgow, Russell E; Khoury, Muin J; Hawkins, Nikki A; Stein, Kevin D; Rechis, Ruth; Parry, Carla; Leach, Corinne R; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H

    2014-11-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG: Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: "Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care." Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research-improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. PMID:25249551

  14. Issues and innovations in nursing practice: Palliative care for patients with cancer: district nurses' experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Dunne; K A Sullivan; G Kernohan

    2005-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports a study exploring district nurses' experiences of providing palliative care for patients with cancer and their families. Background. There is an increasing demand for palliative care in the community, as many patients wish to die at home. District nurses are central to providing palliative care in the community, but there is a dearth of literature on

  15. Mexican-American Males Providing Personal Care for their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bronwynne C.; Belyea, Michael J.; Ume, Ebere

    2011-01-01

    We know little about Mexican-American (MA) family adaptation to critical events in the informal caregiving experience but, in these days of economic and social turmoil, sons must sometimes step up to provide personal care for their aging mothers. This article compares two empirically real cases of MA males who provided such care, in lieu of a female relative. The cases are selected from a federally-funded, descriptive, longitudinal, mixed methods study of 110 MA caregivers and their care recipients. In case-oriented research, investigators can generate propositions (connected sets of statements) that reflect their findings and conclusions, and can be tested against subsequent cases: Caregiving strain and burden in MA males may have more to do with physical and emotional costs than financial ones; MA males providing personal care for their mothers adopt a matter-of-fact approach as they act “against taboo”; and this approach is a new way to fulfill family obligations. PMID:21643486

  16. Human Trafficking: The Role of the Health Care Provider

    PubMed Central

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. PMID:20732668

  17. Supportive care for children with cancer.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Marianne D; Schouten-van Meeteren, Netteke Y N

    2011-06-01

    In developed countries the survival rate of children with cancer exceeds 75%. Optimal supportive care is necessary to deliver the burdensome treatment protocols. As the intensity of primary treatment has escalated, so have the side effects like myelosuppression and infection. Children who receive aggressive chemotherapy have an approximately 40% chance of experiencing a febrile episode during neutropenia. Patients should be treated with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics even if they have been assessed as low risk. There is no proof of the usefulness of special measures concerning food products during neutropenia. In contrast to adults, most children who receive chemotherapy will have a central venous catheter inserted (? 80-90%). The two most important complications are infections and thrombosis. The Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) guideline in adult oncology is available to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting. In highly emetogenic chemotherapy, the combination of a serotonin receptor antagonist plus a corticosteroid should be used. Pain in children with cancer is mainly therapy- or procedure-related. As in adults, the stepladder of the World Health Organization (WHO) is used as a guideline for adequate treatment of pain. It is of utmost importance that children receive optimal pain management during the initial procedures. Sedation is performed in many different ways. Palliative care starts with information about the incurability of the disease for parents, the patient, and the professionals involved. Children in palliative care for progressive cancer should be at home as much as possible, even in the terminal phase. The organization of health care and the facilities differ at a national level, so the requirements and choices for optimal care vary by country. Palliative care has to be incorporated into the structural base in the training of pediatricians and pediatric nurses. The first goal of palliative care is to reduce distressing symptoms. During the whole period of palliative care stepwise withdrawal and withholding of treatment options are important issues. The multidisciplinary approach should also span the broad field of psychosocial issues covering both the child's and the caregiver's specific psychosocial needs. Continuity of care is also depicted by contacts afterwards during family bereavement. PMID:21600366

  18. The Journey from Babysitter to Child Care Professional: Military Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Dianne Miller

    2002-01-01

    Describes the transformation of women from babysitters to child care professionals as a result of becoming a family child care provider in the U.S. military Family Child Care (FCC) program. Discusses application process, orientation training, the use of peer mentors, initial setup, inspections, enrollment, caregiver training, and accreditation.…

  19. The competencies required by professional hospice palliative care spiritual care providers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dan; Aherne, Michael; Pereira, José

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association (2002) identifies spiritual care of the dying and their families as a core service for Hospice Palliative Care programs. Yet, until the Spiritual Care Development Initiative of the Canadian Pallium Project, there was no published literature indicating systematic profiling of occupationally relevant core competencies or competency-based training programs specific to this specialized field of practice. This article describes a Canadian Community of Practice process to develop an occupational analysis-based competency profile for the Professional Hospice Palliative Care Spiritual Care Provider utilizing a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) methodology. Competency profiles are important contributions to the development of curricula to train care providers who are recognized by other professions and by institutions as possessing the requisite theoretical and clinical expertise, particularly in academic tertiary care settings. PMID:20636158

  20. Factors that influence critical care nurses' intentions to provide culturally congruent care to Arab Muslims.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among critical care nurses' attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions to provide culturally congruent care to Arab Muslims. The provision of culturally congruent care is contingent on understanding nurses' motivational influences for providing culture care. Significant relationships among critical care nurses' behavioral beliefs, normative beliefs, control beliefs, intentions, and demographic variables supported the need for culture-specific debriefing sessions, underscored the importance of collaborative practice and interdisciplinary learning models, and established an evidence-based foundation for the design of culturally informed approaches to nursing education and service. PMID:18217234

  1. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  2. Providing Obstetric Care to a Remote Native Population

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinson, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family-practice residency program has been involved in providing direct patient care to a number of Native communities in a remote area of Manitoba. The residents and preceptors have provided care on site in the communities, as well as being the primary referral services in the tertiary-care setting. During the 12 years of the program's evolution much experience was gained in dealing with a generally high-risk obstetric population whose care was complicated by such factors as language barriers, distance, and economic and social circumstances. The author of this article reviews the nature of the program and the issues, medical and other, that it deals with, making some reference to experience of similar populations elsewhere. PMID:21253222

  3. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    PubMed Central

    Kuschner, Ware G; Reddy, Sunayana; Mehrotra, Nidhi; Paintal, Harman S

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1) the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e-) cigarette; and 2) new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room. Counseling patients about the hazards of thirdhand smoke may provide additional motivation to quit smoking. PMID:21475626

  4. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Kuschner, Ware G; Reddy, Sunayana; Mehrotra, Nidhi; Paintal, Harman S

    2011-01-01

    PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF TWO NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN NICOTINE ADDICTION AND SMOKING CESSATION: 1) the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e-) cigarette; and 2) new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as "thirdhand smoke". The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room. Counseling patients about the hazards of thirdhand smoke may provide additional motivation to quit smoking. PMID:21475626

  5. Achieving provider engagement: providers' perceptions of implementing and delivering integrated care.

    PubMed

    Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  6. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  7. Robotic surgery in cancer care: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Malignancy-associated mortality, decreased productivity, and spiritual, social and physical burden in cancer patients and their families impose heavy costs on communities. Therefore cancer prevention, early detection, rapid diagnosis and timely treatment are very important. Use of modern methods based on information technology in cancer can improve patient survival and increase patient and health care provider satisfaction. Robot technology is used in different areas of health care and applications in surgery have emerged affecting the cancer treatment domain. Computerized and robotic devices can offer enhanced dexterity by tremor abolition, motion scaling, high quality 3D vision for surgeons and decreased blood loss, significant reduction in narcotic use, and reduced hospital stay for patients. However, there are many challenges like lack of surgical community support, large size, high costs and absence of tactile and haptic feedback. A comprehensive view to identify all factors in different aspects such as technical, legal and ethical items that prevent robotic surgery adoption is thus very necessary. Also evidence must be presented to surgeons to achieve appropriate support from physicians. The aim of this review article is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers to this advanced technology in patients and surgeons as an approach to improve cancer care. PMID:24606422

  8. Leveraging state cancer registries to measure and improve the quality of cancer care: a potential strategy for California and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, Robert A; Tai, Caroline G; Blayney, Douglas W; Deapen, Dennis; Hogarth, Michael; Kizer, Kenneth W; Lipscomb, Joseph; Malin, Jennifer; Phillips, Stephen K; Santa, John; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent increased attention to healthcare performance and the burden of disease from cancer, measures of quality of cancer care are not readily available. In 2013, the California HealthCare Foundation convened an expert workgroup to explore the potential for leveraging data in the California Cancer Registry (CCR), one of the world's largest population-based cancer registries, for measuring and improving the quality of cancer care. The workgroup assessed current registry operations, the value to be gained by linking CCR data with health insurance claims or encounter data and clinical data contained in health system electronic health records, and potential barriers to these linkages. The workgroup concluded that: 1) The CCR mandate should be expanded to include use of its data for quality of cancer care measurement and public reporting; and 2) a system should be developed to support linkage of registry data with both claims data and provider electronic health record data. PMID:25766400

  9. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  10. Making Home-Based Child Care Work for You: A Parent and Child Care Provider Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough-Abunassar, Holly

    At some point in many children's lives, parents are faced with the difficult question, "What about child care?" Intended for both parents and providers, this guide is designed to help parents decide whether family child care is suited to their needs, guiding them through the process of choosing a provider and allowing them a look behind the scenes…

  11. Educating nurses to provide culturally competent care during disasters.

    PubMed

    Danna, Denise M; Pierce, Stephanie S; Schaubhut, Rose M; Billingsley, Luanne; Bennett, Marsha J

    2015-03-01

    Health disparities are exacerbated during times of disasters. To decrease health disparities, it is essential that health care providers understand the specific needs, culture, and norms of individuals, groups, and populations in a disaster. Survivors respond and recover from disaster events within the context of their culture and beliefs; therefore, implementing cultural competent interventions for disaster victims is central to providing services and care. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a continuing education program and academic courses for nurses and nursing students. PMID:25723334

  12. Antibiotic use in ontario facilities that provide chronic care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Loeb; Andrew E. Simor; Lisa Landry; Stephen Walter; Margaret McArthur; JoAnn Duffy; Debora Kwan; Allison McGeer

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and variability of antibiotic use in facilities which provide chronic care and to determine how\\u000a often clinical criteria for infection are met when antibiotics are prescribed in these facilities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: A prospective, 12-month, observational cohort study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Twenty-two facilities which provide chronic care in southwestern Ontario.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PARTICIPANTS: Patients who were treated with systemic antibiotics over

  13. Transforming health care service delivery and provider selection.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2011-06-01

    Commoditization pressures in medicine have risked transforming service provider selection from "survival of the fittest" to "survival of the cheapest." Quality- and safety-oriented mandates by the Institute of Medicine have led to the creation of a number of data-driven quality-centric initiatives including Pay for Performance and Evidence-Based Medicine. A synergistic approach to creating quantitative accountability in medical service delivery is through the creation of consumer-oriented performance metrics which provide patients with objective data related to individual service provider quality, safety, cost-efficacy, efficiency, and customer service. These performance metrics could in turn be customized to the individual preferences and health care needs of each individual patient, thereby providing an objective methodology for service provider selection while empowering health care consumers. PMID:21468775

  14. Weight stigma in maternity care: women’s experiences and care providers’ attitudes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weight stigma is pervasive in Western society and in healthcare settings, and has a negative impact on victims’ psychological and physical health. In the context of an increasing focus on the management of overweight and obese women during and after pregnancy in research and clinical practice, the current studies aimed to examine the presence of weight stigma in maternity care. Addressing previous limitations in the weight stigma literature, this paper quantitatively explores the presence of weight stigma from both patient and care provider perspectives. Methods Study One investigated associations between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and experiences of maternity care from a state-wide, self-reported survey of 627 Australian women who gave birth in 2009. Study Two involved administration of an online survey to 248 Australian pre-service medical and maternity care providers, to investigate their perceptions of, and attitudes towards, providing care for pregnant patients of differing body sizes. Both studies used linear regression analyses. Results Women with a higher BMI were more likely to report negative experiences of care during pregnancy and after birth, compared to lower weight women. Pre-service maternity care providers perceived overweight and obese women as having poorer self-management behaviours, and reported less positive attitudes towards caring for overweight or obese pregnant women, than normal-weight pregnant women. Even care providers who reported few weight stigmatising attitudes responded less positively to overweight and obese pregnant women. Conclusions Overall, these results provide preliminary evidence that weight stigma is present in maternity care settings in Australia. They suggest a need for further research into the nature and consequences of weight stigma in maternity care, and for the inclusion of strategies to recognise and combat weight stigma in maternity care professionals’ training. PMID:23339533

  15. Palliative care for cancer patients in Sudan: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Gafer, Nahla; Elhaj, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Sudan is facing an increasing number of cancer patients every year, and cancer is now among the top ten killer diseases in the country. The majority of cancer patients are diagnosed with an advanced type of cancer where curative treatment has little, if any, effect. The need for palliative care (PC) is urgent. In spite of this, there is no established programme for comprehensive cancer control in the country. In this article we review the state of PC services available for cancer patients. A PC service started in 2010 as an outpatient service at the main oncology centre in Sudan. With the help of international bodies, several training activities in PC were held. Currently the service includes an outpatient clinic, a nine-bed ward, and a limited home-care service. PC has started to reach two other hospitals in the country. Unfortunately, the need is still great; the services provided are not fully supported by the hospital administration. And even now, thousands of patients outside the cities of Khartoum and Medani have no access to oral morphine. PMID:25624872

  16. Electronic health records (EHRs): supporting ASCO's vision of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter; Artz, David; Warner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    ASCO's vision for cancer care in 2030 is built on the expanding importance of panomics and big data, and envisions enabling better health for patients with cancer by the rapid transformation of systems biology knowledge into cancer care advances. This vision will be heavily dependent on the use of health information technology for computational biology and clinical decision support systems (CDSS). Computational biology will allow us to construct models of cancer biology that encompass the complexity of cancer panomics data and provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms governing cancer behavior. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality promotes CDSS based on clinical practice guidelines, which are knowledge bases that grow too slowly to match the rate of panomic-derived knowledge. CDSS that are based on systems biology models will be more easily adaptable to rapid advancements and translational medicine. We describe the characteristics of health data representation, a model for representing molecular data that supports data extraction and use for panomic-based clinical research, and argue for CDSS that are based on systems biology and are algorithm-based. PMID:24857080

  17. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients. PMID:26033108

  18. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (II/V)].

    PubMed

    Brusint, B; Vich, P; Ávarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Díaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family doctors need to thoroughly understand this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The second one deals with population screening and its controversies, screening in high-risk women, and the current recommendations. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors, and helping them to be able to care for their patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:24953002

  19. Interventions to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care: Results of a Randomized Trial

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Interventions to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care: Results of a Randomized Trial and forward movement in stage of adoption at 6 months post-intervention. African American primary care to their scheduled visit with their primary care provider. Hypotheses were that differences between groups would

  20. The national database of hospital-based cancer registries: a nationwide infrastructure to support evidence-based cancer care and cancer control policy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Shibata, Akiko; Emori, Yoshiko; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the current status of cancer care is essential for effective cancer control and high-quality cancer care. To address the information needs of patients and physicians in Japan, hospital-based cancer registries are operated in 397 hospitals designated as cancer care hospitals by the national government. These hospitals collect information on all cancer cases encountered in each hospital according to precisely defined coding rules. The Center for Cancer Control and Information Services at the National Cancer Center supports the management of the hospital-based cancer registry by providing training for tumor registrars and by developing and maintaining the standard software and continuing communication, which includes mailing lists, a customizable web site and site visits. Data from the cancer care hospitals are submitted annually to the Center, compiled, and distributed as the National Cancer Statistics Report. The report reveals the national profiles of patient characteristics, route to discovery, stage distribution, and first-course treatments of the five major cancers in Japan. A system designed to follow up on patient survival will soon be established. Findings from the analyses will reveal characteristics of designated cancer care hospitals nationwide and will show how characteristics of patients with cancer in Japan differ from those of patients with cancer in other countries. The database will provide an infrastructure for future clinical and health services research and will support quality measurement and improvement of cancer care. Researchers and policy-makers in Japan are encouraged to take advantage of this powerful tool to enhance cancer control and their clinical practice. PMID:23448800

  1. A decision model for community nurses providing bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Brownhill, Suzanne; Chang, Esther; Bidewell, John; Johnson, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    Community (district) nurses play a significant role in assisting and supporting bereaved informal carers (family members and friends) of recently decease clients of palliative care. Bereavement care demands a wide range of competencies including clinical decision-making. To date, little has been known about the decision-making role of community nurses in Australia. The aim of this study was to conduct in-depth examination of an existing data set generated from semi-structured interviews of 10 community nurses providing follow-up bereavement care home visits within an area health service of a metropolitan region of Sydney, Australia. A grounded theory approach to data analysis generated a model, which highlights an interaction between 'the relationship','the circumstances' (surrounding the bereavement),'the psychosocial variant', 'the mix of nurses', 'the workload', and 'the support' available for the bereaved and for community nurses, and elements of 'the visit' (central to bereavement care). The role of community nurses in bereavement care is complex, particularly where decision-making is discretionary and contingent on multiple variables that effect the course of the family's grief. The decision model has the potential to inform community nurses in their support of informal carers, to promote reflective practice and professional accountability, ensuring continuing competence in bereavement care. PMID:23653962

  2. Agents for Change: Nonphysician Medical Providers and Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Nathan A; McMillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization’s quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts. PMID:25663213

  3. Integrated transitional care: patient, informal caregiver and health care provider perspectives on care transitions for older persons with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Toscan, Justine; Mairs, Katie; Hinton, Stephanie; Stolee, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Complex older adults, such as those with hip fracture, frequently require care from multiple professionals across a variety of settings. Integrated care both between providers and across settings is important to ensure care quality and patient safety. The purpose of this study was to determine the core factors related to poorly integrated care when hip fracture patients transition between care settings. Methods A qualitative, focused ethnographic approach was used to guide data collection and analysis. Patients, their informal caregivers and health care providers were interviewed and observed at each care transition. A total of 45 individual interviews were conducted. Interview transcripts and field notes were coded and analysed to uncover emerging themes in the data. Results Four factors related to poorly integrated transitional care were identified: confusion with communication about care, unclear roles and responsibilities, diluted personal ownership over care, and role strain due to system constraints. Conclusions Our research supports a broader notion of collaborative practice that extends beyond specific care settings and includes an appropriate, informed role for patients and informal caregivers. This research can help guide system-level and setting-specific interventions designed to promote high-quality, patient-centred care during care transitions. PMID:22977426

  4. Information From Your Health Care ProviderGASTROENTERITIS (Stomach Flu)

    E-print Network

    Rusu, Adrian

    Information From Your Health Care ProviderGASTROENTERITIS (Stomach Flu) ABASIC INFORMATION DESCRIPTION Irritation and inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Gastroenteritis is a general term may range from 2 or 3 loose stools to many watery stools. · Nausea and vomiting. · Stomach cramps

  5. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY

    E-print Network

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, you are eligible to take a pregnancy disability leave condition related to her pregnancy or childbirth. Please answer, fully and completely, all applicable parts

  6. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY California Pregnancy to a disability resulting from her pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical condition which may qualify to submit a timely, complete, and sufficient medical certification to support your request for pregnancy

  7. Primary Care Providers' Views regarding Assessing and Treating Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ryan D.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) usually do not explore patient suicidality during routine visits. Factors that predict PCP attitudes toward the assessment and treatment of suicidality were examined via an online survey of 195 practicing PCPs affiliated with medical schools in the United States. PCPs who perceived themselves as competent to work with…

  8. Contact Information | Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections

    Cancer.gov

    This site is based on a study that estimates and projects the national cost of cancer care through the year 2020 separately for multiple cancer sites using the most recent available U.S. population projections, cancer incidence, survival, and cost of care data.

  9. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (I/V)].

    PubMed

    Vich, P; Brusint, B; Alvarez-Hernández, C; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Diaz-García, N; Redondo-Margüello, E

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of the patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians should have a thorough knowledge of this disease in order to optimize the health care services for these patients, and making the best use of available resources. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. The first article reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, and protective factors in this disease This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review on breast cancer, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:25002351

  10. Palliative cancer care in Middle Eastern countries: accomplishments and challenges †

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Arnaout, M.; Daher, M.; Nestoros, S.; Pitsillides, B.; Charalambous, H.; Gultekin, M.; Fahmi, R.; Mostafa, K.A.H.; Khleif, A.D.; Manasrah, N.; Oberman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background In larger parts of the Middle East palliative care is still misunderstood among health professionals, cancer patients and the public at large. One reason to that is because the term does not obviously communicate the intent of this clinical discipline, which is lending better quality of life while combating cancer. Further, culture, tradition and religion have contributed to this misgiving and confusion especially at the terminal stage of the disease. Methods The Middle East Cancer Consortium jointly with the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Oncology Nursing Society, the San Diego Hospice Center for Palliative Medicine and the Children's Hospital & Clinics of Minnesota initiated a series of training courses and workshops in the Middle East to provide updated training to physicians, nurses, social workers and psychologists from throughout the region with basic concepts of palliative care and pain managements in adults and children cancers. Results During the past 6 years hundreds of professionals took part in these educational and training activities, thereby creating the core of trained caregivers who start to make the change in their individual countries. Conclusions The outcome of consecutive training activities can overcome geopolitical instabilities, and yield a genuine change in approach of both regulators, medical administrators, medical staff and the public; as to the important contribution of palliative care services to the welfare of the patient and his/her family. PMID:22628412

  11. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities. PMID:25265763

  12. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  13. A value framework in head and neck cancer care.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2014-01-01

    The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer. PMID:24857117

  14. Private Companies Providing Health Care Price Data: Who Are They and What Information do They Provide?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Labno, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is interest in making health care price information more transparent given the increase in enrollment in high-deductible and consumer-directed health plans, and as policy efforts intensify to engage consumers to obtain high value care. We examine the role of private companies that market price transparency tools, primarily to self-insured employers – an important yet understudied topic. What companies exist? How did they emerge? What information do they provide? Where do they get that information? How does the price and quality information provided compare across companies? PMID:25678764

  15. Pharmacy Students' Perceptions of Their Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Daniel L.; Miller, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess students' perceptions of their preparedness to perform advanced pharmacy practice competencies. Design The Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care (PREP) survey was modified and administered to each class at a Midwestern university from 2005-2008. Factor analysis and 1-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons were applied to assess the effectiveness of changes made in the pharmacy curriculum. Assessment Factor analysis yielded patterns similar to those reported in the literature. Students rated themselves highest on the psychological aspects and lowest on the administrative aspects of care. Perceived pharmaceutical care skills grew as students progressed through the curriculum, and changes in coursework were reflected in the competencies. Conclusion Students’ perceived competencies (ie, communication, psychological, technical, administrative) were similar to those at other institutions and perceptions of competencies increased in a manner consistent with actual program outcomes. PMID:20221359

  16. Providing care to children in times of war.

    PubMed

    Cole, Will; Edwards, Mary J; Burnett, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    The Geneva Conventions stipulate that an occupying power must ensure adequate health care delivery to noncombatants. Special emphasis is given to children, who are among the most vulnerable in a conflict zone. Whether short-term pediatric care should be provided by Military Treatment Facilities to local nationals for conditions other than combat-related injury is controversial. A review of 1,197 children without traumatic injury cared for during 10 years in Iraq and Afghanistan was conducted. Mortality rates were less than 1% among patients with surgical conditions and resource utilization was not excessive. In view of international humanitarian law and these outcomes, children with nontraumatic conditions can and should be considered for treatment at Military Treatment Facilities. The ability to correct the condition and availability of resources necessary to do so should be taken into account. PMID:26032375

  17. Integrating genetic and genomic information into effective cancer care in diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Fashoyin-Aje, L.; Sanghavi, K.; Bjornard, K.; Bodurtha, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of issues in the integration of genetic (related to hereditary DNA) and genomic (related to genes and their functions) information in cancer care for individuals and families who are part of health care systems worldwide, from low to high resourced. National and regional cancer plans have the potential to integrate genetic and genomic information with a goal of identifying and helping individuals and families with and at risk of cancer. Healthcare professionals and the public have the opportunity to increase their genetic literacy and communication about cancer family history to enhance cancer control, prevention, and tailored therapies. PMID:24001763

  18. Views of breast and colorectal cancer survivors on their routine follow-up care

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, R.; Folkes, A.; Babineau, J.; Grunfeld, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our understanding of optimum health care delivery for cancer survivors is limited by the lack of a patient-centred perspective. The objectives of the present study were to explore the views of breast and colorectal cancer survivors on their routine follow-up care, with respect to needs, preferences, and quality of follow-up, and their views on cancer specialist– compared with family physician (fp)–led follow-up care. Methods In Nova Scotia, Canada, 23 cancer survivors (13 breast, 10 colorectal) participated in either a focus group or a one-on-one interview. Participants were asked to reflect upon their lives as cancer survivors and on the type and quality of care and support they received during the follow-up period. Each focus group or interview was transcribed verbatim, and the transcripts were audited and subjected to a thematic analysis. Results Six themes were identified: My care is my responsibilityHow I receive information on follow-up careI have many care needsI want to be prepared and informedThe role of my fp in my cancer experience and follow-up careThe role of media Survivors often characterized the post–primary treatment experience as lacking in information and preparation for follow-up and providing inadequate support to address many of the care needs prevalent in survivor populations. Despite valuing fp participation in follow-up care, many survivors continued to receive comfort and reassurance from specialist care. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to implement strategies that better prepare breast cancer and colorectal cancer survivors for post-treatment care and that reassure survivors of the ability of their fp to provide quality care during this period. PMID:23300354

  19. Family culture, family resources, dependent care, caregiver burden and self-care agency of spouses of cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darlene Schott-Baer

    1989-01-01

    A descriptive correlational design was used to examine the relationship between the self-care agency of caregivers providing dependent-care to a spouse with cancer and a set of variables assessing the family system. The following basic conditioning factors associated with the family system were selected for this study: family culture, family resources, level of dependent-care, and caregiver burden. Spouses (N =

  20. Partnering Urban Academic Medical Centers And Rural Primary Care Clinicians To Provide Complex Chronic Disease Care

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Som, Dara; Thornton, Karla; Bankhurst, Arthur; Boyle, Jeanne; Harkins, Michelle; Moseley, Kathleen; Murata, Glen; Komaramy, Miriam; Katzman, Joanna; Colleran, Kathleen; Deming, Paulina; Yutzy, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Many of the estimated thirty-two million Americans expected to gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act are likely to have high levels of unmet need for various chronic illnesses and to live in areas that are already underserved. In New Mexico an innovative new model of health care education and delivery known as Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) provides high-quality primary and specialty care to a comparable population. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology and case-based learning, Project ECHO enables specialists at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center to partner with primary care clinicians in underserved areas to deliver complex specialty care to patients with hepatitis C, asthma, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, pediatric obesity and mental illness. As of March 2011, 298 Project ECHO teams across New Mexico have delivered more than 10,000 specialty care consultations for hepatitis C and other chronic diseases. PMID:21596757

  1. Timeliness in breast cancer care as an indicator of quality.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Deirdre

    2014-02-01

    The current study sought to define best practice for timeliness for a breast cancer program at each diagnostic step. The study was a retrospective review of patients newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer who were enrolled in the breast cancer database from 2009-2011. A convenience sampling methodology was used for patient selection, and descriptive statistics for various time intervals were calculated for identified data points from abnormal imaging to surgery. No evidence-based practice standards exist for access to breast cancer care. Practice guidelines that include benchmarks for quality measures and an established process to measure patient outcomes would promote high-quality care. An understanding of how practice sites function also would help healthcare providers identify and develop resources to improve patient outcomes. In the current study, the advanced practice nurse (APN) in the practice setting was identified as a key point person in facilitating patients' timely access to healthcare services. The physician and APN practice model was instrumental in influencing the process. The results of the current study provided clinical data to identify benchmarks that a breast oncology practice can use to monitor timeliness as a quality indicator. PMID:24476729

  2. Research Initiatives | CanCORS: Research Gaps Identified in Cancer Care Quality and Outcomes

    Cancer.gov

    CanCORS has prospectively studied the quality of care and health outcomes of approximately 5,000 lung cancer patients and approximately 5,000 colorectal cancer patients. The study design, which blends patient, provider, and caregiver surveys with detailed clinical data from medical records, provides a rich and comprehensive data resource, allowing the investigators to examine care processes and outcomes during initial treatment as well as long-term survivorship in greater detail than previously possible.

  3. Enhancing quality improvements in cancer care through CME activities at a nationally recognized cancer center.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-06-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal. PMID:23608956

  4. [Update of breast cancer in Primary Care (III/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez Hernández, C; Vich Pérez, P; Brusint, B; Cuadrado Rouco, C; Díaz García, N; Robles Díaz, L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease with implications in all aspects of patients? life, therefore, family doctors must know this pathology in depth, in order to optimize the health care provided to these patients with the best available resources. This series of five articles on breast cancer is based on a review of the scientific literature of the last ten years. This third article will review the clinical context and the staging and prognostic factors of the disease. This summary report aims to provide a global, current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:24953699

  5. American society of clinical oncology statement: toward individualized care for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Smith, Thomas J; Helft, Paul R; Debono, David J; Berry, Scott R; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel M; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2011-02-20

    Patients with advanced incurable cancer face complex physical, psychological, social, and spiritual consequences of disease and its treatment. Care for these patients should include an individualized assessment of the patient's needs, goals, and preferences throughout the course of illness. Consideration of disease-directed therapy, symptom management, and attention to quality of life are important aspects of quality cancer care. However, emerging evidence suggests that, too often, realistic conversations about prognosis, the potential benefits and limitations of disease-directed therapy, and the potential role of palliative care, either in conjunction with or as an alternative to disease-directed therapy, occur late in the course of illness or not at all. This article addresses the American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) vision for improved communication with and decision making for patients with advanced cancer. This statement advocates an individualized approach to discussing and providing disease-directed and supportive care options for patients with advanced cancer throughout the continuum of care. Building on ASCO's prior statements on end-of-life care (1998) and palliative care (2009), this article reviews the evidence for improved patient care in advanced cancer when patients' individual goals and preferences for care are discussed. It outlines the goals for individualized care, barriers that currently limit realization of this vision, and possible strategies to overcome these barriers that can improve care consistent with the goals of our patients and evidence-based medical practice. PMID:21263086

  6. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. 54.613 Section... Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon...telecommunications carrier, each eligible rural health care provider is...

  7. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. 54.613 Section... Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon...telecommunications carrier, each eligible rural health care provider is entitled...

  8. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418...MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. A hospice that provides...

  9. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418...MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. A hospice that provides...

  10. 42 CFR 418.110 - Condition of participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. 418.110 Section 418...MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of participation: Organizational...participation: Hospices that provide inpatient care directly. A hospice that provides...

  11. Caring for a child with cancer: impact on mother's health.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Forugh; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Shoghi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    The life of a mother undergoes a dramatic change after a child is diagnosed with cancer. The present study aimed to determine effects on the everyday life process and health status of mothers with children suffering from leukemia. This qualitative study was based on a grounded theory approach with sixteen mothers. The results indicate that after onset of disease in their children, they marginalized their own health and tied their identities to taking care of the child and keeping the child healthy by ignoring themselves, becoming imprisoned in a taking-care-of-the-child position, and trying very hard for seek balance and stability Enduring physical pressures on the one hand, and constantly attempting to achieve balance and stability in family processes on the other hand, gradually cause exhaustion. It seems that health care providers and nurses should pay much more attention to the health status of this group of mothers. PMID:24641400

  12. Provider-client interactions and quantity of health care use.

    PubMed

    Lien, Hsien-Ming; Albert Ma, Ching-To; McGuire, Thomas G

    2004-11-01

    This paper considers three types of provider-client interactions that influence quantity of health care use: rationing, effort, and persuasion. By rationing, we refer to a quantity limit set by a provider; effort, the productive inputs supplied by a provider to increase a client's demand; persuasion, the unproductive inputs used by a provider to induce a client's demand. We construct a theoretical model incorporating all three mechanisms as special cases. When the general model is specialized into one of three mechanisms, a set of empirical implications emerges. We test for the presence of each mechanism using data of patients receiving outpatient treatment for alcohol abuse in the Maine Addiction Treatment System. We find evidence for rationing and persuasion, but not effort. PMID:15556245

  13. Determinants of job satisfaction among selected care providers in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Shah, M A; Chowdhury, R I; al-Enezi, N; Shah, N M

    2001-01-01

    The study reports job satisfaction among a sample of 370 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and medical laboratory technologists in the Ministry of Health hospitals in Kuwait. Job satisfaction was measured using Dunnette's scale. The respondents in all four categories were satisfied with all aspects of their jobs except salary. The medical laboratory technologists were, however, dissatisfied with professional advancement as well. The physicians were found to be most satisfied, closely followed by nurses and pharmacists, while medical laboratory technologists were least satisfied. Multivariate analysis was used to assess the net effects of background and work environment characteristics on overall job satisfaction. Introduction to job, in-service training, and monthly income had significant positive effects on overall job satisfaction. These findings may have serious implications for health care delivery systems that recruit expatriate care providers. PMID:11398232

  14. A need for otolaryngology education among primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Amanda; Sardesai, Maya G.; Meyer, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Otolaryngic disorders are very common in primary care, comprising 20–50% of presenting complaints to a primary care provider. There is limited otolaryngology training in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education for primary care. Continuing medical education may be the next opportunity to train our primary care providers (PCPs). The objective of this study was to assess the otolaryngology knowledge of a group of PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. Methods PCPs enrolled in an otolaryngology update course completed a web-based anonymous survey on demographics and a pre-course knowledge test. This test was composed of 12 multiple choice questions with five options each. At the end of the course, they were asked to evaluate the usefulness of the course for their clinical practice. Results Thirty seven (74%) PCPs completed the survey. Mean knowledge test score out of a maximum score of 12 was 4.0±1.7 (33.3±14.0%). Sorted by area of specialty, the mean scores out of a maximum score of 12 were: family medicine 4.6±2.1 (38.3±17.3%), pediatric medicine 4.2±0.8 (35.0±7.0%), other (e.g., dentistry, emergency medicine) 4.2±2.0 (34.6±17.0%), and adult medicine 3.9±2.1 (32.3±17.5%). Ninety one percent of respondents would attend the course again. Conclusion There is a low level of otolaryngology knowledge among PCPs attending an otolaryngology update course. There is a need for otolaryngology education among PCPs. PMID:22754276

  15. Training mid-level providers on palliative care: bringing advanced directives and symptom assessment and management to community oncology practices.

    PubMed

    Lesperance, Mary; Shannon, Robert; Pumphrey, Phyllis K; Dunbar, Erin; Genther, Renee; Coleman, C Lynn; Tabano, Margaret; Maurer, Jennifer; Vazquez, Adrienne; Capp, Elizabeth; McMillan, Jessica; Wilkerson, Katie; Robbins, Gerald; Phillips, Dorothy Green; Howick, Priscilla; Solaun, Catherine; Sloan, Jeff; Colón-Otero, Gerardo

    2014-05-01

    Palliative care services are not available in most outpatient oncology practices. A program training 11 mid-level providers from oncology practices on advanced directive discussions and supportive symptom assessment and management performed by palliative care specialists was completed. A follow-up session 9 months later identified barriers to implementation. Of the 11 mid-level providers, 8 participated in the follow-up session, and 9 of the 11 providers implemented advanced directive's discussions and symptom assessment and management for patients with metastatic cancer. Main barriers included uncertainties about reimbursement, patients' lack of knowledge about palliative care, and lack of access to supportive services. This program successfully promoted advanced directive discussions and supportive/palliative care symptom assessment and management to community oncology practices, which will hopefully translate into improved quality of life for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:23616274

  16. Public Perception of Cancer Care in Poland and Austria

    PubMed Central

    J?drzejewski, Mariusz; Thallinger, Christiane; Mrozik, Magda; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background. We compared the public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria. Both countries are members of the European Union (EU) but reflect two extremes in health-related per capita spending. Recently, the EUROCARE-5 study reported on very discrepant cancer outcomes between the two countries. Methods. A one-time survey was conducted to compare the public perception of cancer treatment in Poland and Austria. In total, 3,649 subjects, representing the general population, cancer patients, and cancer patients’ family members, were surveyed. Results. In both countries, cancer was considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care was indicated as the most important issue influencing political election decisions. Polish compared with Austrian cancer patients gave a significantly lower positive assessment of overall cancer treatment efficacy and detection methods. Cancer cure rates estimated by Polish and Austrian citizens were 29% and 44%, respectively. The majority of all citizens interviewed thought that cancer patients should have access to all available registered cancer drugs. However, only 18% of Poles versus 62% of Austrians agreed with the notion that the available cancer treatment in their countries is of a standard comparable to that of other EU countries. Consequently, 24% of Poles and 7% of Austrians identified financial status, age, gender, and residence as factors influencing the availability of cancer treatments. Conclusion. In both countries, cancer is considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care issues may strongly influence decisions for political elections. Vast differences in the two populations’ perceptions of cancer care reflect actual cancer outcomes and the national per capita spending on health-related issues. PMID:25520325

  17. Variations in breast cancer treatment by patient and provider characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Z. Ayanian; Edward Guadagnoli

    1996-01-01

    Summary Guidelines for the optimal treatment of breast cancer have been publicized over the past 15 years, yet clinical practices continue to vary substantially in the United States. This article reviews the literature on variations in local and systemic treatment of breast cancer by patient and provider characteristics.

  18. Health reforms as examples of multilevel interventions in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann B; Fennell, Mary L; Devers, Kelly J

    2012-05-01

    To increase access and improve system quality and efficiency, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with sweeping changes to the nation's health-care system. Although not intended to be specific to cancer, the act's implementation will profoundly impact cancer care. Its components will influence multiple levels of the health-care environment including states, communities, health-care organizations, and individuals seeking care. To illustrate these influences, two reforms are considered: 1) accountable care organizations and 2) insurance-based reforms to gather evidence about effectiveness. We discuss these reforms using three facets of multilevel interventions: 1) their intended and unintended consequences, 2) the importance of timing, and 3) their implications for cancer. The success of complex health reforms requires understanding the scientific basis and evidence for carrying out such multilevel interventions. Conversely and equally important, successful implementation of multilevel interventions depends on understanding the political setting and goals of health-care reform. PMID:22623600

  19. Cancer control in low- and middle-income countries: the role of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Grey, Nathan; Garces, Ana

    2009-09-01

    Cancer is among the most preventable and the most curable of the major chronic life-threatening diseases. As the cancer burden grows, it is evident that new approaches must be developed to more effectively manage the disease. Given their unique role, primary care physicians and health workers are critically important to these interventions and to the successful implementation of comprehensive cancer control strategies. In this article, an overview of the epidemiologic trends related to cancer is provided, several special circumstances affecting cancer control efforts in low- and middle-income countries are identified, and broad and specific approaches for primary care physicians and other primary care health workers to prevent and control cancer are recommended. PMID:19616150

  20. Ontology-based Modeling of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings Samina R. Abidi, Syed SR. Abidi, Sajjad, Canada Abstract Breast cancer follow-up care can be provided by family phy- sicians after specialists complete the primary treatment. Can- cer Care Nova Scotia has developed a breast cancer follow- up Clinical

  1. Health Care Provider Perspectives on Informal Supporters’ Involvement in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosack, Katie E.; Wendorf, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    Positive social support has been associated with medication adherence and slowed disease progression among people living with HIV. The nature of support within the medical context itself has not been adequately investigated, however. The purpose of our study was to describe HIV health care providers’ perspectives on informal supporter-oriented health care and whether and how the involvement of patients’ adult informal supporters in health care and health care decision making is helpful or beneficial. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 11 HIV specialists between March and September, 2005. Using directed qualitative content analysis, we first describe the frequency and course of others’ involvement and the type of support provided. We then situate these findings within the context of role theory and consider the meaning they have in terms of the negotiated relationships among and between patients, providers, and informal supporters. Finally, we provide research and clinical recommendations based on these findings that are designed to improve patient care. PMID:21709129

  2. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507 Section...SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child...

  3. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false What requirements must foster care providers meet? 20.507 Section...SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child...

  4. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions AGENCY...providing medical assistance for health care-acquired conditions. It would...Hospital-acquired condition HCAC Health care-acquired condition ICR...

  5. Transitions: A Guide to Teens Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    Transitions: A Guide to Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers (HCP’s) Posted under Health Guides . Updated 8 ... can help me plan my transition to adult health care? Your pediatrician or other health care provider Your ...

  6. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement. PMID:24083746

  7. Primary Care Physicians’ Cancer Screening Recommendation Practices and Perceptions of Cancer Risk of Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Harry T; Ma, Grace X; Gold, Robert S; Atkinson, Nancy L; Wang, Min Qi

    2013-01-01

    Asian Americans experience disproportionate incidence and mortality rates of certain cancers, compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Primary care physicians are a critical source for cancer screening recommendations and play a significant role in increasing cancer screening of their patients. This study assessed primary care physicians’ perceptions of cancer risk in Asians and screening recommendation practices. Primary care physicians practicing in New Jersey and New York City (n=100) completed a 30-question survey on medical practice characteristics, Asian patient communication, cancer screening guidelines, and Asian cancer risk. Liver cancer and stomach cancer were perceived as higher cancer risks among Asian Americans than among the general population, and breast and prostate cancer were perceived as lower risks. Physicians are integral public health liaisons who can be both influential and resourceful toward educating Asian Americans about specific cancer awareness and screening information. PMID:23679307

  8. Cancer Care in the United States: What's Right, What's Wrong? - September 16, 1999

    Cancer.gov

    CANCER CARE IN THE UNITED STATES: WHAT'S RIGHT, WHAT'S WRONG? ENSURING THE QUALITY OF CANCER CARE Robert Hiatt, M.D., Ph.D., Deputy Director of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute National Institutes

  9. Geriatric medical oncology in the care of elderly cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilbert B. Zulian

    2002-01-01

    Most cancers are diagnosed after 70 years of age but standard management and treatment for elderly cancer patients remain to be established. To determine whether the availability and recognition of medical oncology may influence cancer care in this population, five successive periods were studied. The number of formal written consultations given at the geriatric hospital and at the center for

  10. Impact of Combined Hospice Care on Terminal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kung-Ming; Huang, Chih-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many patients with advanced cancer will develop physical and psychological symptoms related to their disease. These symptoms are infrequently treated by conventional care. Palliative care programs have been developed to fill this gap in care. However, there are limited beds in hospice units. To allow more terminal cancer patients to receive care from a hospice team, a combined hospice care system was recently developed in Taiwan. This study is a report of our experiences with this system. Patients and Methods From January to December 2009, terminal cancer patients who accepted consultation from a hospice team for combined hospice care were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, clinical symptoms, referring department, type of cancer, and outcome were analyzed. Results A total of 354 terminal cancer patients in acute wards were referred to a hospice consulting team. The mean patient age was 61 years, and the proportion of males was 63.28%. After combined hospice care, there was a significant improvement in the sign rate of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders from 41.53% to 71.47% (p?care also enabled 64.21% of terminal cancer patients who were not transferred to hospice ward to receive combined care by a hospice consulting team while in acute wards, thus increasing the hospice utilization of terminal cancer patients. The major symptoms presented by the patients were pain (58%), dyspnea (52%), constipation (45%), and fatigue (23%). Conclusions Through the hospice consulting system, hospice combined care has a positive effect on the utilization of hospice care, rate of DNR signing and quality of end-of-life care for terminal cancer patients. PMID:21504306

  11. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  12. Advancing Cancer Care Delivery Research in the Next Decade

    Cancer.gov

    A more substantial and coordinated effort is needed to advance the science of cancer care delivery to help address the complex problems facing our health care systems. In response, NCI has created a new Healthcare Delivery Research Program (HDRP) to strengthen its support and coordination of research in ways that both improve survival and enhance patient care experiences.

  13. Partnering urban academic medical centers and rural primary care clinicians to provide complex chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Som, Dara; Thornton, Karla; Bankhurst, Arthur; Boyle, Jeanne; Harkins, Michelle; Moseley, Kathleen; Murata, Glen; Komaramy, Miriam; Katzman, Joanna; Colleran, Kathleen; Deming, Paulina; Yutzy, Sean

    2011-06-01

    Many of the estimated thirty-two million Americans expected to gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act are likely to have high levels of unmet need because of various chronic illnesses and to live in areas that are already underserved. In New Mexico an innovative new model of health care education and delivery known as Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) provides high-quality primary and specialty care to a comparable population. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology and case-based learning, Project ECHO enables specialists at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center to partner with primary care clinicians in underserved areas to deliver complex specialty care to patients with hepatitis C, asthma, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, pediatric obesity, chronic pain, substance use disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular conditions, and mental illness. As of March 2011, 298 Project ECHO teams across New Mexico have collaborated on more than 10,000 specialty care consultations for hepatitis C and other chronic diseases. PMID:21596757

  14. Practice Patterns and Perceptions of Thoracic Oncology Providers on Tobacco Use and Cessation in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Graham W.; Marshall, James R.; Cummings, K. Michael; Toll, Benjamin; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hutson, Alan; Dibaj, Seyedeh; Herbst, Roy; Dresler, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco use is associated with poor outcomes in cancer patients, but there is little information on the practice patterns or perceptions of tobacco use and smoking cessation by oncology providers. Methods An online survey of practices, perceptions, and barriers to tobacco assessment and cessation in cancer patients was conducted in members of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Responses of physician level respondents were analyzed and reported. Results Responses from 1,507 IASLC members who completed the survey are reported representing 40.5% of IASLC members. Over 90% of physician respondents believe current smoking affects outcome and that cessation should be a standard part of clinical care. At the initial patient visit, 90% ask patients about tobacco use, 79% ask patients if they will quit, 81% advise patients to stop tobacco use, but only 40% discuss medication options, 39% actively provide cessation assistance, and fewer yet address tobacco at follow-up. Dominant barriers to physician cessation effort are pessimism regarding their ability to help patients stop using tobacco (58%) and concerns about patient resistance to treatment (67%). Only 33% report themselves adequately trained to provide cessation interventions. Discussion Physicians who care for lung cancer patients recognize the importance of tobacco cessation as a necessary part of clinical care, but many still do not routinely provide assistance to their patients. Increasing tobacco cessation will require increased assessment and cessation at diagnosis and during follow-up, increased clinician education, and improved tobacco cessation methods. PMID:23529191

  15. Assessing and Enhancing Health Care Providers' Response to Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Leppäkoski, Tuija; Paavilainen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV). A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n = 68, follow-up; n = 100) was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants' quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers' response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used. PMID:24864205

  16. Pediatric health care providers' knowledge of pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Debbie M; Richiuso, Nancy; Danek, Gale

    2004-01-01

    Pulse oximetry monitors have become so commonplace in acute health care settings over the last decade that blood oxygen is now considered a "fifth" vital sign. This study assessed the knowledge base related to pulse oximetry technology and clinical interpretation of the data given. A total of 68 participants--nurses, respiratory therapists, and resident physicians at a large general pediatric unit of a children's hospital--completed a survey of open-ended questions. Preliminary analysis revealed that 84% of the clinicians felt they received adequate training; 84% correctly identified what a pulse oximeter measured; 40% correctly identified how a pulse oximeter worked, but only 15% had a correct understanding of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. Clinicians identified a wide range of normal arterial oxygen saturation values and made numerous errors in evaluating saturation readings in hypothetical clinical situations. Although the majority of pediatric staff felt well trained and knowledgeable about pulse oximetry, there was a lack of knowledge of basic principles. The results of this study have implications for basic professional education programs and the orientation and ongoing education of pediatric health care providers. PMID:15022847

  17. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PATIENT’S GUIDE TO THE HIPAA PRIVACY RULE: When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, ... 1. If I do not object, can my health care provider share or discuss my health information with ...

  18. From triple to quadruple aim: care of the patient requires care of the provider.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Sinsky, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Triple Aim-enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs-is widely accepted as a compass to optimize health system performance. Yet physicians and other members of the health care workforce report widespread burnout and dissatisfaction. Burnout is associated with lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes, and it may increase costs. Burnout thus imperils the Triple Aim. This article recommends that the Triple Aim be expanded to a Quadruple Aim, adding the goal of improving the work life of health care providers, including clinicians and staff. PMID:25384822

  19. Providing sensitive health care to gay and lesbian youth.

    PubMed

    Sanford, N D

    1989-05-01

    While the years of adolescence are usually very difficult, for gay and lesbian youth they are tremendously traumatic. Gay and lesbian youth face many problems because of the homophobia in our culture; such a young person often hides his or her gay or lesbian identity, and health care professionals often deny its existence. Increased anxiety and fear cause gay and lesbian youth to be particularly vulnerable to the major problems of adolescence, such as drug and alcohol abuse, sexual acting-out, pregnancy, AIDS, homelessness and suicide. The etiology of homosexuality is still not understood, and a number of theories are discussed in this article. Troiden's model of gay and lesbian identity development is presented, covering sensitization, identity confusion, assumption and commitment. A lack of appropriate role models has been a significant problem, although some change is occurring. Specific ways of helping these troubled adolescents are given, with a particular emphasis on education and providing methods of support. PMID:2726016

  20. Primary care utilization patterns before and after lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, L E; Carney Doebbeling, C

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate change in primary care utilization rates after lung cancer diagnosis in the Veterans Health Administration. We used electronic medical record data (1997-2005) to identify male veterans (n = 323) with incident lung cancers. Primary care utilization rates were assessed in the 12-month period before and after cancer diagnosis. Statistical analysis included paired t-tests. Rates of primary care utilization decreased by 0.02 visits per person-month (VPPM) in the 12-month period after cancer diagnosis (P > 0.05). Utilization for acute conditions decreased by 20% (P < 0.01) in the 12-month period after diagnosis, from 0.32 VPPM before diagnosis to 0.12 VPPM after diagnosis. Utilization for chronic conditions remained stable after diagnosis (0.29 VPPM vs. 0.29 VPPM, P > 0.05). Indications for primary care utilization after diagnosis were similar to indications for utilization prior to diagnosis. Common indications for utilization included hypertension and lower respiratory infections. We speculate that primary care utilization for acute conditions was lower after cancer diagnosis because several of the acute conditions (e.g. upper respiratory infection) treated prior to the cancer may have been harbingers of the cancer diagnosis. Additional research is required to illuminate how primary care can best be delivered during the initial phase of cancer treatment. PMID:19267732

  1. HIV status, trust in health care providers, and distrust in the health care system among Bronx women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. O. Cunningham; N. L. Sohler; L. Korin; W. Gao; K. Anastos

    2007-01-01

    Trust in health care providers and the health care system are essential. This study examined factors associated with trust in providers and distrust in the health care system among minority HIV-positive and -negative women.Interviews were conducted and laboratory tests performed with 102 women from the Women's Interagency HIV Study Bronx site. Interviews collected information about trust in providers, distrust in

  2. Challenges of Providing Confidential Care to Adolescents in Urban Primary Care: Clinician Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M. Diane; Rubin, Susan E.; Campos, Giselle; O’Sullivan, Lucia F.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinician time alone with an adolescent has a major impact on disclosure of risk behavior. This study sought to describe primary care clinicians’ patterns of delivering time alone, decision making about introducing time alone to adolescents and their parents, and experiences delivering confidential services. METHODS We undertook qualitative interviews with 18 primary care clinicians in urban health centers staffed by specialists in pediatrics, family medicine, and adolescent medicine. RESULTS The annual preventive care visit is the primary context for provision of time alone with adolescents; clinicians consider the parent-child dynamic and the nature of the chief complaint for including time alone during visits for other than preventive care. Time constraints are a major barrier to offering time alone more frequently. Clinicians perceive that parental discomfort with time alone is rare. Many clinicians wrestle with internal conflict about providing confidential services to adolescents with serious health threats and regard their role as facilitating adolescent-parent communication. Health systems factors can interfere with delivery of confidential services, such as inconsistent procedures for determining whether unaccompanied youth would be seen. CONCLUSION Despite competing time demands, clinicians report commitment to offering time alone during preventive care visits and infrequently offer it at other times. Experienced clinicians can gain skills in the art of managing complex relationships between adolescents and their parents. Office systems should be developed that enhance the consistency of delivery of confidential services. PMID:21242559

  3. A National Initiative for Women and Healthcare Providers: CDC’s Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Sun Hee; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L.; Gelb, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. This report provides an overview of the development of this national campaign. PMID:21933006

  4. Pharmaceutical care management: a modern approach to providing seamless and integrated health care.

    PubMed

    al-Shaqha, W M; Zairi, M

    2001-01-01

    Institutional pharmaceutical services have widely evolved over the past 20-30 years. Hospital pharmacy practice has changed from a profession concerned chiefly with the bulk preparation and distribution of drug products to one centred on ensuring optimal drug therapy. Whereas hospital pharmacists were charged with maintaining large drug stock on nursing units, many of them now provide individualized patient therapies. The practice of hospital pharmacy has therefore become one encompassing all aspects of drug therapy, from the procurement of drugs and drug delivery devices, their preparation and distribution, to their most appropriate selection and use for each patient. Hospital pharmacy services have traditionally had little involvement at the key stages in patients' hospital care. This leads to the conclusion that the model of clinical pharmacy practice adopted by many pharmacy department hospitals is no longer appropriate for the demands of today's health-care services. Reviews many new models proposed for clinical pharmacy practice including an integrated model for providing a pharmaceutical care management approach in the health-care system. This model is a response to the failures of traditional drug therapy. It is primarily an idea about how health professionals and patient should integrate their work to obtain outcomes important to patients and clinicians. PMID:11729625

  5. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  6. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  7. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  8. Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Data Brief Number 145, March 2014 Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, ... ambulatory obstetric care The percentage of routine prenatal care visits at which women saw non-ob/gyn ...

  9. Cancer spending and accountable care organizations: Evidence from the Physician Group Practice Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Colla, Carrie H.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Fisher, Elliott S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although accountable care organizations (ACOs) are rapidly being deployed in Medicare, little is known about how the model might affect high-risk, high cost groups such as cancer patients. The Physician Group Practice Demonstration, which ran from 2005 to 2010 in 10 physician groups, provides the best current evidence on the likely effectiveness of accountable care organizations for Medicare beneficiaries. Changes in cancer treatment and spending under this program may be indicative of cancer treatment under ACO payment reform. Methods Using Medicare fee-for-service claims data, regression analysis was used to estimate changes in payments for cancer patients using a difference-in-difference design comparing pre- (2001–2004) and post-intervention (2005–2009) trends in spending on cancer patients in PGPD participants to local control groups. Results Regression models indicate the Physician Group Practice Demonstration was associated with average Medicare spending reductions per cancer patient of $721 annually across participating sites, an annual 3.9% reduction in payments per patient. Savings derived entirely from reductions in acute care payments for inpatient stays. The Demonstration was also associated with a reduction in mortality among cancer patients. There was no significant change in the proportion of deaths occurring in the hospital. There were significant reductions in hospice use, hospital discharges and ICU days, but no reductions in cancer-specific procedures or chemotherapy. Estimates of all measures varied considerably across participating sites. Conclusions The Physician Group Practice Demonstration was associated with reductions in admissions for inpatient care among beneficiaries with prevalent cancer, with no adverse effect on mortality. Participants in the Physician Group Practice Demonstration did not change the trajectory of spending for cancer-specific treatments. Implications Inpatient care for beneficiaries with cancer may represent a significant source of potential savings for ACOs, but evidence from the Physician Group Practice Demonstration indicates that no changes were made to cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or surgical procedures. PMID:25072017

  10. Regulation, Subsidy Receipt and Provider Characteristics: What Predicts Quality in Child Care Homes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raikes, H.A.; Raikes, H.H.; Wilcox, B.

    2005-01-01

    Far less is known about predictors of quality for family child care homes than for child care centers. The current study of 120 randomly-selected family child care providers in four Midwestern states examined distal, state policy-level variables (family child care regulations and the concentration of children cared for who received public child…

  11. Family physicians' roles in cancer care. Survey of patients on a provincial cancer registry.

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Judith Belle; Stewart, Moira

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe cancer patients' experience of the role of family physicians (FPs) in their care. DESIGN: Mail survey of a random sample of patients from the Manitoba Cancer Registry. SETTING: Manitoba. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred two adults, 6 to 12 months after diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion needing different kinds of help from FPs and their rating of FPs' response; FACT-G quality-of-life score. RESULTS: Response rate was 56.6%; two thirds of the sample were in the follow-up phase. Most (91%) had an FP involved in their care, but FP involvement decreased after diagnosis. The most frequently needed kinds of help (with general medical problems, quick referrals, taking extra time, and quick office appointments) were well provided by FPs, but family support was not. Higher quality-of-life scores were associated with more help with general medical problems, more provision of cancer-related information, and more emotional support of patients and their families. CONCLUSION: Family physicians respond well to the most common needs of cancer patients and should be proactive in offering their support to both patients and families. PMID:15233372

  12. Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook for Family Day Care Home Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    The guide offers information to family day care providers who desire to expand their knowledge of early childhood development in order to work with infants and young children with special needs in their day care settings. The first of four chapters answers common questions and concerns of day care providers, describes children with special needs…

  13. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded into broader information systems. If the purpose of introducing mHealth is to promote the adoption of integrated care models, using mHealth should not be limited to some activities or to some phases of the health care process. Instead, there should be a higher degree of pervasiveness at all stages and in all health care delivery activities. PMID:25679446

  14. Quality indicators of clinical cancer care (QC3) in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valentina; Spitale, Alessandra; Ortelli, Laura; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Bordoni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Assessing the quality of cancer care (QoCC) has become increasingly important to providers, regulators and purchasers of care worldwide. The aim of this study was to develop evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) for colorectal cancer (CRC) to be applied in a population-based setting. Design A comprehensive evidence-based literature search was performed to identify the initial list of QIs, which were then selected and developed using a two-step-modified Delphi process involving two multidisciplinary expert panels with expertise in CRC care, quality of care and epidemiology. Setting The QIs of the clinical cancer care (QC3) population-based project, which involves all the public and private hospitals and clinics present on the territory of Canton Ticino (South Switzerland). Participants Ticino Cancer Registry, The Colorectal Cancer Working Group (CRC-WG) and the external academic Advisory Board (AB). Main outcome measures Set of QIs which encompass the whole diagnostic-treatment process of CRC. Results Of the 149 QIs that emerged from 181 sources of literature, 104 were selected during the in-person meeting of CRC-WG. During the Delphi process, CRC-WG shortened the list to 89 QI. AB finally validated 27 QIs according to the phase of care: diagnosis (N=6), pathology (N=3), treatment (N=16) and outcome (N=2). Conclusions Using the validated Delphi methodology, including a literature review of the evidence and integration of expert opinions from local clinicians and international experts, we were able to develop a list of QIs to assess QoCC for CRC. This will hopefully guarantee feasibility of data retrieval, as well as acceptance and translation of QIs into the daily clinical practice to improve QoCC. Moreover, evidence-based selected QIs allow one to assess immediate changes and improvements in the diagnostic-therapeutic process that could be translated into a short-term benefit for patients with a possible gain both in overall and disease-free survival. PMID:23869102

  15. Training Programs for Family Child Care Providers: An Analysis of Ten Curricula. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy

    This report analyzes the following 10 curricula for training programs for family child care providers: (1) Child Care, a family day home care provider program developed by Texas A&M's Agricultural Extension Service; (2) the Family Day Care Education Series, a coordinated resource manual and independent study course, the Active Learning Series, and…

  16. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  17. Institute of medicine recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care: what do they mean for the general internist?

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Wenger, Neil

    2014-10-01

    In order to evaluate and address the deficiencies in the U.S. cancer care system, particularly affecting the growing elderly population, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a panel representing oncology providers, surgeons, primary care providers, researchers, policy makers and patients. The Committee concluded that cancer care is on the brink of crisis and issued recommendations targeting all stakeholders involved in cancer care. General internists play a critical role in the care of cancer patients, from the time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship and end of life care. We review the IOM recommendations, highlight those that are particularly relevant to the general internist, and outline clinical, research and educational opportunities where general internists should take an expanded role. PMID:24950884

  18. Systematic review of guidelines for the management of suspected lung cancer in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, M. Elisabeth Del; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review the literature and provide an update and integration of existing peer-reviewed guidelines with recent systematic reviews and with primary studies related to the early recognition and management of lung cancer in primary care. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles. The quality of the evidence to support existing guideline recommendations, and the consistency of recommendations with updated evidence, were assessed. Applicability in a Canadian primary care setting was also evaluated. Study selection All studies that explored signs or symptoms of or risk factors for lung cancer in the primary care setting were included. All diagnostic studies in which symptomatic primary care patients underwent 1 or more investigations were also searched. Synthesis Recommendations were consistent among guidelines despite a paucity of supporting evidence. Updated evidence provided further support for the recommendations. Recommendations for identifying signs and symptoms of lung cancer presenting in primary care and for initial management can be adopted and applied within a Canadian primary care setting. Conclusion This updated review of recommendations might help promote evidence-based practice and, ultimately, more timely management and improved prognosis for lung cancer patients. It might also assist in the development of lung cancer diagnostic assessment programs. PMID:25122830

  19. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment; examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life; and examine psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life.

  20. Derivative financial instruments and nonprofit health care providers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Louis J; Owhoso, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the extent of derivative financial instrument use among US nonprofit health systems and the impact of these financial instruments on their cash flows, reported operating results, and financial risks. Our examination is conducted through a case study of New Jersey hospitals and health systems. We review the existing literature on interest rate derivative instruments and US hospitals and health systems. This literature describes the design of these derivative financial instruments and the theoretical benefits of their use by large health care provider organizations. Our contribution to the literature is to provide an empirical evaluation of derivative financial instruments usage among a geographically limited sample of US nonprofit health systems. We reviewed the audited financial statements of the 49 community hospitals and multi-hospital health systems operating in the state of New Jersey. We found that 8 percent of New Jersey's nonprofit health providers utilized interest rate derivatives with an aggregate principle value of $229 million. These derivative users combine interest rate swaps and caps to lower the effective interest costs of their long-term debt while limiting their exposure to future interest rate increases. In addition, while derivative assets and liabilities have an immaterial balance sheet impact, derivative related gains and losses are a material component of their reported operating results. We also found that derivative usage among these four health systems was responsible for generating positive cash flows in the range of 1 percent to 2 percent of their total 2001 cash flows from operations. As a result of our admittedly limited samples we conclude that interest rate swaps and caps are effective risk management tools. However, we also found that while these derivative financial instruments are useful hedges against the risks of issuing long-term financing instruments, they also expose derivative users to credit, contract termination and interest rate volatility risks. In conclusion, we find that these financial instruments can also generate negative as well as positive cash flows and have both a positive and negative impact on reported operating results. PMID:15839528

  1. Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening in Rural Kenya: Perspectives from a Provider Survey.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Joelle I; Hamisi, Sabina; Njoroge, Betty; Huchko, Megan J

    2015-08-01

    Although cervical cancer is highly preventable through screening, it remains the number one cause of cancer-related death in Kenyan women due to lack of funding and infrastructure for prevention programs. In 2012, Family AIDS Care and Education Services in partnership with the Kenya Ministry of Health began offering free screening at eleven rural health facilities. We sought to explore why screening coverage remains low at some sites. We examined the barriers to screening through a survey of 106 healthcare staff. The most frequently cited barriers to service delivery included staffing shortages, lack of trained staff, insufficient space, and supply issues. The patient barriers commonly perceived by the staff included inadequate knowledge, wait time, discomfort with male providers, and fear of pain with the speculum exam. Despite multilateral efforts to implement cervical cancer screening, staff face significant challenges to service provision and increased education is needed for both providers and patients. PMID:25677728

  2. The international cancer expert corps: a unique approach for sustainable cancer care in low and lower-middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Formenti, Silvia C; Williams, Tim R; Petereit, Daniel G; Soo, Khee C; Wong, John; Chao, Nelson; Shulman, Lawrence N; Grover, Surbhi; Magrath, Ian; Hahn, Stephen; Liu, Fei-Fei; DeWeese, Theodore; Khleif, Samir N; Steinberg, Michael; Roth, Lawrence; Pistenmaa, David A; Love, Richard R; Mohiuddin, Majid; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases including cancer in low- and lower-middle income countries (LMICs) and in geographic-access limited settings within resource-rich countries requires effective and sustainable solutions. The International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) is pioneering a novel global mentorship-partnership model to address workforce capability and capacity within cancer disparities regions built on the requirement for local investment in personnel and infrastructure. Radiation oncology will be a key component given its efficacy for cure even for the advanced stages of disease often encountered and for palliation. The goal for an ICEC Center within these health disparities settings is to develop and retain a high-quality sustainable workforce who can provide the best possible cancer care, conduct research, and become a regional center of excellence. The ICEC Center can also serve as a focal point for economic, social, and healthcare system improvement. ICEC is establishing teams of Experts with expertise to mentor in the broad range of subjects required to establish and sustain cancer care programs. The Hubs are cancer centers or other groups and professional societies in resource-rich settings that will comprise the global infrastructure coordinated by ICEC Central. A transformational tenet of ICEC is that altruistic, human-service activity should be an integral part of a healthcare career. To achieve a critical mass of mentors ICEC is working with three groups: academia, private practice, and senior mentors/retirees. While in-kind support will be important, ICEC seeks support for the career time dedicated to this activity through grants, government support, industry, and philanthropy. Providing care for people with cancer in LMICs has been a recalcitrant problem. The alarming increase in the global burden of cancer in LMICs underscores the urgency and makes this an opportune time fornovel and sustainable solutions to transform cancer care globally. PMID:25478326

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Breast cancer care compared with clinical

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Breast cancer care compared with clinical Guidelines: an observational these factors is not well known. In two French regions, we measured compliance with Clinical Practice Guidelines for non-metastatic BC care management and identified factors associated with non-compliance at clinical

  4. The Trouble With Teen and Young Adult Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2015-07-01

    For the past two years, I have been immersed in the writing of two books-This Should Not Be Happening: Young Adults With Cancer and Meeting the Need for Psychosocial Care in Young Adults With Cancer (Katz, 2014, 2015). In the preparation of these two manuscripts, I read everything ever written about cancer in these populations. The experience proved to be a somewhat frustrating endeavor, with more information and evidence missing than available.?. PMID:26148312

  5. Attitudes of primary care physicians toward cancer-prevention trials: a focus group analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Frayne, S. M.; Mancuso, M.; Prout, M. N.; Freund, K. M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recruitment of low-income and minority women to cancer-prevention trials requires a joint effort from specialists and primary care providers. We sought to assess primary care providers' attitudes toward participating in cancer-prevention trial recruitment. PROCEDURES: We conducted a focus group with seven Boston-based primary care providers serving low-income and minority women. Providers discussed knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding their role in recruitment to prevention trials. FINDINGS: A qualitative analysis of the focus group transcript revealed nine categories. Three categories related specifically to the primary care physician: 1) the dual role physicians play as advocates for both patient and research; 2) threats to maintaining the primary care relationship; and 3) general philosophy toward prevention. An additional six categories could be subdivided as they apply to the primary care physician, the patient, and the community: 4) trust/commitment; 5) benefits of the research; 6) access to the research; 7) knowledge and recall of the research; 8) influences of media coverage about the research; and 9) cultural sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Investigators conducting cancer-prevention trials must address the concerns of primary care physicians to optimize recruitment of subjects- especially low-income and minority women-into trials. PMID:11730121

  6. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with your doctor or nurse. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Partnership ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  7. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with your doctor or nurse. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ... strokes. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes for ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip ... social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider should check a pregnant woman's blood pressure ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose precocious puberty & delayed puberty? Skip sharing ... and analyzing his or her medical history, a health care provider may perform tests to diagnose precocious puberty, ...

  10. The STI and HIV testing practices of primary care providers.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Mitchell; Solorio, M. Rosa

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV testing practices of primary care providers (PCPs) practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. PCPs were identified by matching ZIP codes of physician directories with ZIP codes of Los Angeles County areas that have a population that is > 50% Hispanic (N = 191). PCPs were mailed a survey that assessed their frequencies for asking patients about sexual history, offering STI and safe sex advice, total number of HIV tests ordered in the past six months and their perceived barriers to STI counseling. The survey response rate was 45% (N = 85). RESULTS: Although 73% of PCPs took sexual histories from patients regularly (daily-to-weekly), only 41% offered STI or safe sex advice regularly. PCPs who were white were less likely than those who were Hispanic/Asian/African American/other to take sexual histories from their patients regularly (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The total number of HIV tests ordered for patients by PCPs at their practice locations in the past six months were: none (6%), 1-10 tests (27%), 11-20 tests (24%) and > 20 tests (36%). Thirty-six percent of PCPs reported > or = 1 positive HIV test in the past six months. PCPs' perceived barriers to STI counseling included patient's young age (< 16 years), language and presence of patient's relative/partner in consultation room at time of visit. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest a need for interventions with PCPs practicing in predominantly Hispanic communities to improve their STI and HIV practice patterns. PMID:17393950

  11. Could Fish Oil Interfere with Cancer Care?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called 16:4(n-3) in cancer patients. Experiments in mice have suggested this fatty acid makes cancer cells resistant to chemotherapy, the researchers said. But, it's not certain that what was found to happen in mice would happen with human cancer patients. Experts noted that research on whether ...

  12. Can differences in breast cancer utilities explain disparities in breast cancer care?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Schleinitz; Dina DePalo; Jeffrey Blume; Michael Stein

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black, older, and less affluent women are less likely to receive adjuvant breast cancer therapy than their counterparts.\\u000a Whereas preference contributes to disparities in other healt care scenarios, it is unclear if preference explains differential\\u000a rates of breast cancer care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE: To ascertain utilities from women of diverse backgrounds for the different stages of, and treatments for, breast cancer

  13. Managed Care and Clinical Decision-Making in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health: Provider Perceptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip T. Yanos; Christine I. Garcia; Stephen Hansell; Mark G. Rosato; Shula Minsky

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated how managed care affects clinical decision-making in a behavioral health care system. Providers serving children and adolescents under both managed and unmanaged care (n=28) were interviewed about their awareness of differences between the benefit arrangements, how benefits affect clinical decision-making, outcomes and quality of care; and satisfaction with care. Quantitative and qualitative findings indicated that providers saw

  14. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  15. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of and Experiences with an Integrated Healthcare Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westheimer, Joshua M.; Steinley-Bumgarner, Michelle; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined the experiences of primary care providers participating in an integrated healthcare service between mental health and primary care in a university health center. In this program, behavioral health providers work collaboratively with primary care providers in the treatment of students. Participants…

  16. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  17. How can we deliver high-quality cancer care in a healthcare system in crisis?

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2014-08-01

    This provocative question was addressed in a report from the Institute of Medicine ([IOM], 2013), Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. An interdisciplinary committee synthesized many of the changes that are occurring in our society and health care that will challenge our existing cancer care system. These changes are familiar to many of us: an aging population along with the resulting increase in the number of cancer survivors, an inadequate number of and increased demand for trained healthcare providers, and rising healthcare costs. The IOM report recommended a framework of six interconnected components for improving the quality of cancer care (see Figures 1 and 2). Each of these components is worthy of an editorial and more. I would like to focus, however, on one of them: an adequately staffed, trained, and coordinated workforce. And, for good reason, as I want to retire someday and know that others will be taking my place in caring for cancer survivors across the care continuum. So let's explore this one component in more detail. PMID:25095288

  18. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Strohschein, Fay J.; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care. PMID:25452741

  19. The challenges of individualized care for older patients with localized breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mrózek, Ewa; Povoski, Stephen P; Shapiro, Charles L

    2013-08-01

    Individualized care is achieved when the appropriate screening and/or evaluative tests are used, the treatment plan is driven by evidence-based data and the patient's functional ability, physical and mental health, preference and social situation are incorporated into treatment decisions. Breast cancer is a disease of aging; yet, the management of breast cancer in older women in most cases lacks evidence from prospective randomized clinical trials (i.e., level 1 evidence) to support treatment recommendations. Older women are underrepresented in therapeutic clinical studies, even though studies show that selected fit older women enrolled on clinical trials derive similar benefits as younger women. Very few studies have focused on the distribution and biological behavior of different molecular subtypes of breast cancer in older women making it difficult to conclude whether old age adds extra biological complexity. A comprehensive geriatric assessment that includes a multidimensional process designed to assess functional ability, physical health, cognitive and mental health, social issues and environmental situation of elderly person should be an integral part of individualized care for older patients with breast cancer. However, incorporation of this tool into standard oncology practice is very slow despite the expected steep increase in older individuals with cancer projected over the next 25 years. All of the factors mentioned above hinder progress in delivering individualized care to older patients with breast cancer. This article provides an overview on progress and challenges of individualized and personalized health care in older women with breast cancer. PMID:23984898

  20. Helping Providers to Improve Quality of Day?Care Provision: Theories of Education and Learning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony G. Munton; Ann Mooney; Linda Rowland

    1996-01-01

    This paper argues that continuous training for child care staff is an important element in improving quality of day care provision. Evidence from the day care field, the school effectiveness literature and adult education is cited. Theories of education and learning are used to examine the design of effective approaches to training for day care providers. More specifically, Kolb's model

  1. Substitute Care Providers: Helping Abused and Neglected Children. The User Manual Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kenneth

    This manual for child welfare staff and foster/adoptive parents is intended to provide guidelines for serving abused and neglected children who are in family foster care and adoption. The first section is on substitute care and permanency planning and offers an historical perspective on substitute care and definitions of family foster care and…

  2. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  3. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  4. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  5. Leveraging Primary Care in the Fight Against Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jason L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the decline in youth smoking rates has stopped as the tobacco industry strives to successfully reclaim market areas where it has lost favor. The plateau in lung cancer incidence and stagnation in progress toward smoking abstinence illustrates the necessity for renewed efforts to fight tobacco use. Barriers to fighting tobacco use exist in both the clinical arena and within the general population, but can be overcome. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are uniquely poised to successfully treat nicotine dependence with strategic targeting of these barriers, improved training in smoking cessation techniques, and focused political efforts in tobacco control. Herein, this article describes the landscape of tobacco use in America and provides background, methodology, and resources for PCPs to help achieve the goals of Healthy People 2010 in reducing the illness, disability, and death that occur as a result of tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke. PMID:18172737

  6. Ethical dilemmas in the care of patients with incurable cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuuppelomäki, M; Lauri, S

    1998-07-01

    This article aims to identify and describe the ethical dilemmas that are involved in the care of patients with incurable cancer. The data were collected in semistructured focused interviews with 32 patients, 13 nurses and 13 doctors from two central hospitals and four community health centres. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interpretation was based on the method of content analysis. Ethical dilemmas occurred at the time of diagnosis, in connection with telling the truth, in providing information, in the treatment of pain, and in decision-making situations concerning active treatment. Dilemmas of active treatment concerned chemotherapy, intravenous infusions, blood transfusions and antibiotics. There were also problems in relationships between nursing staff and next of kin, as well as a lack of co-operation between nurses and doctors. PMID:9782916

  7. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Disclaimer FOIA Privacy and Security U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute USA. ...

  8. Preparation for cancer care: perceptions of newly qualified health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Copp, Gina; Caldwell, Kay; Atwal, Anita; Brett-Richards, Madeline; Coleman, Kate

    2007-04-01

    The present paper is derived from a larger survey which examined the perceptions of recently qualified health care professionals' experience on evidence-based practice, team working and cancer care. This study reports solely on the findings relating to cancer care. The perceptions of recently qualified professionals in relation to their initial educational input on issues such as confidence, anxiety, communication skills and practice in cancer care as well as adequacy of support, professional supervision and use of reflection were gathered using a cross-sectional postal survey design. A total of 50 graduates from each professional category in nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and social work were sampled yielding a total sample of 200. Eighty-five questionnaires were returned yielding a response rate of 43%. Twenty-eight (33%) respondents stated that they were currently involved in working with people with cancer. These were as follows: 5 nurses, 8 physiotherapists, 9 occupational therapists and 6 social workers. Despite the low response rate, the findings suggest that health care professionals' educational input and experiences of working with people with cancer were overall positive; for example, in the respondents' confidence, communication skills, decrease in anxiety and application of knowledge gained in classroom to professional practice. Moreover, most respondents learnt about caring for cancer patients through practice rather than classroom teaching. A high percentage (i.e. 64%;18) across all groups felt supported when caring for people with cancer and reported receiving professional supervision as well as being able to actively reflect on their practice. The implications for education and practice were discussed particularly as there have been few studies conducted in relation to the specific needs and collaborative learning of these health care professional groups. PMID:17126078

  9. Palliative care of cancer patients: audit of current hospital procedures.

    PubMed

    Sessa, C; Pampallona, S; Carobbio, M; Neuenschwander, H; Cavalli, F

    1998-05-01

    The palliative care of cancer patients admitted for tumour-related symptoms to three different departments (medical oncology, radiotherapy, internal medicine) of a general hospital was prospectively audited. The physicians directly responsible for the patients provided prospective data by reporting both the diagnostic and therapeutic interventions performed and the degree of control achieved for each symptom. A patient form for evaluation of the control achieved in the case of each symptom by means of linear analogue scales was also provided. The appropriateness of all procedures was evaluated by two external auditors. Over 6 months, 125 such admissions were recorded: 24 patients entered the study and the management of 56 symptoms, the most common of which were pain and dyspnoea, was reviewed. A total of 72 diagnostic procedures were performed, deemed necessary for only 50% of symptoms, optional for 15%, and performed as part of a logical sequence for 38%. A total of 130 therapeutic interventions were undertaken, deemed necessary for 55% of symptoms, optional for 15% and carried out as part of a logical sequence for 44%. Re-evaluations of symptoms and physician and patient evaluations of the degree of control achieved could not be assessed because of lack of information. The audit could not be repeated owing to the low accrual of patients and incompleteness of the data collection. Reasons for failure of the study and proposals for feasible methods of auditing the management of symptoms in cancer patients are discussed. PMID:9629881

  10. Turning the Tables on Assistance: Elderly as Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prohaska, Thomas R.; McAuley, William J.

    Past attention has focused on the role of the elderly as recipients rather than receivers of help. To examine the proportion and characteristics of older community residents involved in care-giving, data used were from the 1979 "Statewide Survey of Older Virginians," aged 60 and older (N=2,146). Of the 10 types of helping activities studied, 5…

  11. Client communication behaviors with health care providers in Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young Mi Kim; Adrienne Kols; Christine Bonnin; Paul Richardson; Debra Roter

    2001-01-01

    Patient participation in health care consultations can improve the quality of decision making and increase patients’ commitment to the treatment plan. This study examines client participation, operationally defined as client active communication, during family planning consultations in Indonesia. Data were collected on 1203 consultations in the provinces of East Java and Lampung. Sessions were audiotaped and the conversation coded using

  12. Rural Health Care Providers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, L. Gary; Salsberg, Edward; Phillips, Debra M.; Lishner, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the rural physician shortage and related policy and research needs. Discusses geographic distribution of physicians, quality of rural care, rural recruitment and retention, rural residency training, factors in medical education affecting entry into rural practice, physician productivity and income, reimbursement, federal and state programs…

  13. Efficiency and Quality When Providing Public Child Care in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjurek, Hans; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of public day care centers in Sweden was studied by collecting data on inputs and services for about 200 centers and analyzing the information by data envelopment analysis. Results show large differences in efficiencies among centers, but these differences have few systematic relations to quality. (SLD)

  14. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T; Lawless, Grant D; Marsland, Thomas A; Deligdish, Craig K; Burgoyne, Douglas S; Knopf, Kevin B; Long, Douglas M; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M; Hennessy, John E; Lang, James R; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D; Vogenberg, F Randy

    2013-07-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2-5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group. PMID:24991360

  15. Child Care Providers' Strategies for Supporting Healthy Eating: A Qualitative Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meghan Lynch; Malek Batal

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed child care settings and providers to be important influences on children's developing behaviors. Yet most research on children's nutritional development has focused on home settings and parents. Thus, through semistructured interviews with child care providers, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of the strategies they perceive to encourage healthy eating in child care settings.

  16. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  17. Are Incentives Everything? Payment Mechanisms for Health Care Providers in Developing Countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varun Gauri

    2001-01-01

    Can provider payment mechanisms solve some of the key problems in developing countries? health care systems by ?getting the incentives right?? Perhaps.Reforms in developing countries? health care systems often focus on ?getting the incentives right.? They aim to use provider payments to optimize the use of scarce resources, transform clinical practice, and improve the quality of care. Gauri examines the

  18. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  19. Uncompensated care provided by private practice physicians in Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, K E; Miller, M K; Dwyer, J W; Nissen, D

    1991-01-01

    While a great deal of attention has been paid in recent years to establishing the magnitude and characteristics of uncompensated care in hospitals, comparatively little research has been undertaken to study physician uncompensated care. This article reports the results of a prospective patient-specific study of uncompensated care in Florida. Of 4,042 cases examined, 26.2 percent had charges voluntarily reduced below the usual and customary charge at the time of service. However, only 13.5 percent of those reductions were attributed to charity. Overall, 10.4 percent of the total billed amount was left unresolved. When payment source was considered, it was found that self-pay patients accounted for 30.6 percent of the cases but accounted for 52.0 percent of the unresolved amounts. Further analysis indicated that the self-pay patients were 35.5 times more likely to leave an outstanding balance than individuals with some type of insurance coverage. Odds of unresolved balances were also calculated as a function of income, specialty type, practice size, and type of visit. PMID:1669686

  20. Accelerating the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Foti, Margaret; Kean, Marcia A

    2015-05-15

    Significant progress has been made in the past 50 years across the field of oncology, and, as a result, the number of cancer survivors in the United States is more than 14.5 million. In fact, the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis, which is due in part to improved treatments that help people with cancer live longer, and improvements in early detection that allow doctors to find cancer earlier when the disease is easier to treat. However, in spite of this progress, innovation in cancer research and care is at risk as the rise in health care spending is leading to significant pressure to contain costs. As the oncology community seeks to ensure that innovation in cancer research and care continues, it is imperative that stakeholders focus their attention on the value that the research and care continuum provides. Over the past several years, the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative has worked with the cancer community to accelerate the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer research and care, while addressing value and cost. This article highlights policy recommendations that resulted from the convening of an expert working group comprising leaders from across the oncology field. Of the recommendations, the co-conveners have identified several issue areas that merit particular focus in 2015: Support FDA's efforts to modernize its framework for bringing new medicines to patients, through facilitating and implementing innovative approaches to drug development and regulatory review. Ensure that cancer clinical pathways or similar decision-support tools are transparent; developed through a physician-driven process that includes patient input; and meet minimum standards for clinical appropriateness, timeliness, and patient centeredness. Support oncology decision-support tools that are timely, clinically appropriate, and patient centered. Build on existing efforts to convene a multistakeholder committee and develop a report on ways to define and measure value in oncology care, taking into account many of the complex dynamics associated with measuring value, including the interests and needs of patients, as well as the importance of committed and ongoing support for innovative research.These policy options are intended to further the national dialogue and represent meaningful and actionable steps toward supporting cancer research and care that is innovative, efficient, and focused on the patient. Clin Cancer Res; 21(10); 2263-7. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25901079

  1. Hill-Burton Facilities Obligated to Provide Free or Reduced-Cost Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Facilities Obligated to Provide Free or Reduced-Cost Health Care Total Obligated Facilities: 152 (03/31/2015) No ... 463-7313 Outpatient Facility 120270 PFCA FL RURAL HEALTH CARE, INC 1213 STATE ROAD 20 INTERLACHEN 32148 386- ...

  2. State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012

    MedlinePLUS

    ... State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012 On This Page Key ... During the last decade, the supply of primary care physicians was lower than the supply of specialty ...

  3. Improving cancer care in India: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanjoy Kumar; Mittal, Balraj

    2004-01-01

    The World Cancer Report, a 351 - page global report issued by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) tells us that cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate globally (Stewart and Kleiues 2003). Cancer rates could increase by 50 % to 15 million new cases in the year 2020. This will be mainly due to steadily aging populations in both developed and developing countries and also to current trends in smoking prevalence and the growing adoption of unhealthy lifestyles. The report also reveals that cancer has emerged as a major public health problem in developing countries, matching its effect in industrialized nations. Healthy lifestyles and public health action by governments and health practitioners could stem this trend, and prevent as many as one third of cancers worldwide. In a developing country such as India there has been a steady increase in the Crude Incidence Rate (CIR) of all cancers affecting both men and women over the last 15 years. The increase reported by the cancer registries is nearly 12 per cent from 1985 to 2001, representing a 57 per cent rise in India's cancer burden. The total number of new cases, which stood at 5.3 lakhs Care lakh is 100,000 in 1985 has risen to over 8.3 lakhs today. The pattern of cancers has changed over the years, with a disturbing increase in cases that are linked to the use of tobacco. In 2003, there were 3.85 lakhs of cases coming under this category in comparison with 1.94 lakhs cases two decades ago. Lung cancer is now the second most common cancer among men. Earlier, it was in fifth place. Among women in urban areas, cancer of the uterine cervix had the highest incidence 15 years ago, but it has now been overtaken by breast cancer. In rural areas, cervical cancer remains the most common form of the disease (The Hindu 2004). PMID:15244530

  4. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  5. The Performance of mHealth in Cancer Supportive Care: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the advent of smartphones, mHealth has risen to the attention of the health care system as something that could radically change the way health care has been viewed, managed, and delivered to date. This is particularly relevant for cancer, as one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and for cancer supportive care, since patients and caregivers have key roles in managing side effects. Given adequate knowledge, they are able to expect appropriate assessments and interventions. In this scenario, mHealth has great potential for linking patients, caregivers, and health care professionals; for enabling early detection and intervention; for lowering costs; and achieving better quality of life. Given its great potential, it is important to evaluate the performance of mHealth. This can be considered from several perspectives, of which organizational performance is particularly relevant, since mHealth may increase the productivity of health care providers and as a result even the productivity of health care systems. Objective This paper aims to review studies on the evaluation of the performance of mHealth, with particular focus on cancer care and cancer supportive care processes, concentrating on its contribution to organizational performance, as well as identifying some indications for a further research agenda. Methods We carried out a review of literature, aimed at identifying studies related to the performance of mHealth in general or focusing on cancer care and cancer supportive care. Results Our analysis revealed that studies are almost always based on a single dimension of performance. Any evaluations of the performance of mHealth are based on very different methods and measures, with a prevailing focus on issues linked to efficiency. This fails to consider the real contribution that mHealth can offer for improving the performance of health care providers, health care systems, and the quality of life in general. Conclusions Further research should start by stating and explaining what is meant by the evaluation of mHealth’s performance and then conduct more in-depth analysis in order to create shared frameworks to specifically identify the different dimensions of mHealth’s performance. PMID:25720295

  6. Perspectives of College Students and Their Primary Health Care Providers on Substance Abuse Screening and Intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. Baldwin; Rhonda M. Johnson; Nina K. Gotz; Heidi A. Wayment; Kristan Elwell

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a needs assessment among students and health-care providers of a southwestern university health center with the goal of developing health-care -provider training addressing substance-abuse screening and intervention. They collected data from focus groups of undergraduate students and structured interviews and questionnaires with health-care providers. They identified gaps in provider and student perspectives on the extent of substance

  7. Affordable Care Act and Clinical Trials: Resources for Patients | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's patient education website, Cancer.Net, provides a detailed article for patients that explains health insurance coverage of clincial trials and a fact sheet that gives an overview of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions.

  8. A Conceptual and Empirical Basis for Including Medical Family Therapy Services in Cancer Care Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Hodgson; Susan L. McCammon; Ryan J. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions in oncology settings have largely been individually and group-based despite evidence that a family-based approach fills a treatment gap in the cancer care experience. Medical Family Therapists are trained to address the family as the unit of treatment and provide services that consider family dynamics, reorganization of couple and family roles, and broader systemic issues. This article describes

  9. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care

    PubMed Central

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties. PMID:14645743

  10. Outside the Box: Will Information Technology Be a Viable Intervention to Improve the Quality of Cancer Care?

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Christopher; Massett, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of health information technology (IT) to resolve the crisis in communication inherent within the fragmented service environment of medical care in the United States is a strategic priority for the Department of Health and Human Services. Yet the deployment of health IT alone is not sufficient to improve quality in health service delivery; what is needed is a human factors approach designed to optimize the balance between health-care users, health-care providers, policies, procedures, and technologies. An evaluation of interface issues between primary and specialist care related to cancer reveals opportunities for human factors improvement along the cancer care continuum. Applications that emphasize cognitive support for prevention recommendations and that encourage patient engagement can help create a coordinated health-care environment conducive to cancer prevention and early detection. An emphasis on reliability, transparency, and accountability can help improve the coordination of activities among multiple service providers during diagnosis and treatment. A switch in emphasis from a transaction-based approach to one emphasizing long-term support for healing relationships should help improve patient outcomes during cancer survivorship and end-of-life care. Across the entire continuum of care, an emphasis on “meaningful use” of health IT—rather than on IT as an endpoint—should help put cancer on a path toward substantive continuous quality improvement. The accompanying research questions will focus on reducing the variance between the social and technical subsystems as IT is used to improve patient outcomes across the interfaces of care. PMID:20386056

  11. Measuring patients' trust in their primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A; Zheng, Beiyao; Dugan, Elizabeth; Camacho, Fabian; Kidd, Kristin E; Mishra, Aneil; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2002-09-01

    Existing scales to measure trust in physicians have differing content and limited testing. To improve on these measures, a detailed conceptual model was constructed and a large item pool (n = 78) was generated following a detailed conceptual model and expert review. After pilot testing, the best-performing items were validated with a random national sample (n = 959) and a regional sample of HMO members (n =1,199). Various psychometric tests produced a 10-item unidimensional scale consistent with most aspects of the conceptual model. Compared with previous scales, the Wake Forest physician trust scale has a somewhat improved combination of internal consistency, variability, and discriminability. The scale is more strongly correlated with satisfaction, desire to remain with a physician, willingness to recommend to friends, and not seeking second opinions; it is less correlated with insurer trust, membership in managed care, and choice of physician. Correlations are equivalent with lack of disputes, length of relationship, and number of visits [corrected]. PMID:12205830

  12. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  13. Pharmacopuncture for cancer care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12-2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  14. Thyroid cancer incidence and socioeconomic indicators of health care access

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian L. Sprague; Shaneda Warren Andersen; Amy Trentham-Dietz

    2008-01-01

    Objective  It has been hypothesized that changes in diagnostic practices have driven the dramatic rise in thyroid cancer incidence over\\u000a the past two decades. This study investigated the relation between the incidence of thyroid cancer and socioeconomic indicators\\u000a of health care access.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We examined thyroid cancer incidence trends in Wisconsin, USA, between 1980 and 2004, according to patient and tumor characteristics.

  15. [Intervention and psychological care for the family caregivers of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that family members of a cancer patient show as much or even higher psychological distress as the cancer patients themselves. There are several reasons for psychological distress among family members. The family of the cancer patient is expected to provide patient care. There are shared responsibilities for decision-making, providing concrete care-giving, meeting the financial and social costs, maintaining stability and adapting to change. In addition, some family caregivers are involved in direct patient care. These responsibilities place both physical and emotional burdens on the family members. It has been shown that spouses demonstrate levels of emotional and functional disruption as great or greater than that of the patient and that these problems often worsen with time, independent of the patient's mood or health. Health problems of caregivers have a very important influence on their ability to meet these demands and it is reported that care-giving affects the physical health of spouse caregivers. Some caregivers may be physically weak or sick, and some may also demonstrate symptoms of cancer. Based on these findings, family members of the cancer patient are called "second-order patients". Therefore, various kinds of care programs are needed to provide support for family members and such interventions are aimed at psychiatric, physical, socio-economic problems. Bereavement is one of the most striking events in human experience. Although bereavement is not a disease, it is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. Bereaved individuals show various physical and psychological symptoms and some of the bereaved individuals develop psychiatric disorders such as bereavement reaction, major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, psychiatric interventions are needed for these bereaved individuals. In the bereavement care clinic, interventions are aimed at psychiatric, physical, socio-economical problems. Among the psychiatric problems, clinicians should consider major depressive disorder because of its higher prevalence, and the need for pharmacotherapy. PMID:19301592

  16. Distinguishing research from clinical care in cancer genetics: theoretical justifications and practical strategies.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, Nina; Cooke, Sarah; Crawford, Gill; Lucassen, Anneke; Parker, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The relationship between clinical research and clinical care is often perceived as unclear, particularly in highly technological subspecialties. This ambiguity is illustrated in cancer genetics where research protocols are frequently used to provide access to procedures that may be offered as a clinical service in other specialties. The project on which this paper is based investigated lay and expert perceptions of the activities which take place within the cancer genetics clinic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 individuals who are involved in cancer genetics research in the UK, the majority (18 clinical geneticists, 10 genetic counsellors/nurse specialists) of whom also provide a clinical service. Interviewees emphasised the need to differentiate research from clinical care for service users, and provided regulatory, ethical, economic and translational justifications for distinguishing these activities. A number of strategies for differentiating research from clinical care were described by those who work as healthcare professionals, which involved deliberately displacing these activities in time and space. It is argued that by distinguishing research from clinical care clinical researchers are engaging in a form of boundary work which enables them to manage what they experience as a conflict of interest generated by the different roles they occupy within the cancer genetics clinic. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the process of informed consent. PMID:19346047

  17. Health Care Providers: A Missing Link in Understanding Acceptability of the Female Condom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, Joanne E.; West, Brooke S.; Sue, Kimberly; Hoffman, Susie; Exner, Theresa M.; Kelvin, Elizabeth; Stein, Zena A.

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers can play a key role in influencing clients to initiate and maintain use of the female condom, an underused method for HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention. In 2001-2002, based on semistructured interviews with 78 health care providers from four types of settings in New York City, we found that most providers had seen the female…

  18. More than Motherhood: Reasons for Becoming a Family Day Care Provider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines motivations for entering family day care work as they relate to responsibilities of motherhood and the prominence of these motivations for the women providing day care within and across groups of workers. Using data from a large-scale representative survey of family day care workers in Illinois, the author examines the range…

  19. Mapping a Research Agenda for Home Care Safety: Perspectives from Researchers, Providers, and Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be…

  20. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers concerning their Latino patients, in particular issues affecting their patients' access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with…

  1. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs...agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking...in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans and...

  2. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    2015-02-01

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  3. Expensive cancer drugs and just health care.

    PubMed

    Ehni, Hans-Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Extremely expensive drugs which cost more than 100.000 $ per year for the treatment of one patient are increasingly common. The benefit of these drugs may either be not accessible to many patients or the overall costs could lead to a heavy burden on the health care system and public resources. This article describes the overall background of this trend and addresses the problem of expensive drugs from a perspective of just health care and just health outcomes. Therefore, basic aspects of just health care are outlined such as goods and principles relevant from a perspective of justice. This framework is applied to the allocation of expensive drugs on three levels. These reflections will demonstrate that there is no simple solution to this problem, and that the decisions cannot be taken by experts, but should be the result of an open, transparent, and fair public dialogue on health priorities. PMID:24810193

  4. Applying justice and commitment constructs to patient–health care provider relationships

    PubMed Central

    Holmvall, Camilla; Twohig, Peter; Francis, Lori; Kelloway, E. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine patients’ experiences of fairness and commitment in the health care context with an emphasis on primary care providers. Design Qualitative, semistructured, individual interviews were used to gather evidence for the justice and commitment frameworks across a variety of settings with an emphasis on primary care relationships. Setting Rural, urban, and semiurban communities in Nova Scotia. Participants Patients (ages ranged from 19 to 80 years) with varying health care needs and views on their health care providers. Methods Participants were recruited through a variety of means, including posters in practice settings and communication with administrative staff in clinics. Individual interviews were conducted and were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A modified grounded theory approach was used to interpret the data. Main findings Current conceptualizations of justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, informational) and commitment (affective, normative, continuance) capture important elements of patient–health care provider interactions and relationships. Conclusion Justice and commitment frameworks developed in other contexts encompass important dimensions of the patient–health care provider relationship with some exceptions. For example, commonly understood subcomponents of justice (eg, procedural consistency) might require modification to apply fully to patient–health care provider relationships. Moreover, the results suggest that factors outside the patient–health care provider dyad (eg, familial connections) might also influence the patient’s commitment to his or her health care provider. PMID:22423030

  5. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section...beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The...the Administrator. (b) An eligible rural health care provider may purchase...

  6. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section...beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The...the Administrator. (b) An eligible rural health care provider may purchase...

  7. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ...Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication...and FDA staff entitled ``Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication...Important Safety Information.'' Dear Health Care Provider (DHCP) Letters are...

  8. Contracts and provider agreements for State home nursing home care. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This interim final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to allow VA to enter into contracts or provider agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans and authorizes VA to use provider agreements to pay for such care. The change made by this law applies to all care provided to these veterans in State homes on and after February 2, 2013. PMID:23227571

  9. Training Providers and Patients to Talk about End-of-Life Care

    Cancer.gov

    Failing to discuss the transition from active cancer treatment to end-of-life care can leave doctors unsure of what a patient truly wants. Failing to receive end-of-life care in line with their values and wishes can cause patients and their families great distress. Researchers have developed innovative, evidence-based programs to help doctors and patients improve their communication skills and grow comfortable with these discussions.

  10. Shared Decision Making in Cancer Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Tattersall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Cancer treatment outcomes have improved over the past 20 years, but treatment decision making in this context remains complex. There are often a number of reasonable treatment alternatives, including no treatment in some circumstances. Patients and doctors often have to weigh up uncertain benefits against uncertain costs. Shared decision making…

  11. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this care. Qualitative data were gathered by phone using a structured interview guide and analyzed using the framework approach. Challenges to providing care were identified at the systems, practice and provider, and education and training levels. Solutions and interventions targeting needed changes at each level were also proposed. The findings have implications for health care reform, medical school and residency training programs, and the development of best practices. PMID:25724445

  12. Improving transitions of care at hospital discharge--implications for pediatric hospitalists and primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Gregory A; Nkoy, Flory L; Srivastava, Rajendu; Lattin, Gena; Wolfe, Doug; Mundorff, Michael B; Colling, Dayvalena; Valdez, Angelika; Lange, Shay; Atkinson, Sterling D; Cook, Lawrence J; Maloney, Christopher G

    2010-01-01

    Delays, omissions, and inaccuracy of discharge information are common at hospital discharge and put patients at risk for adverse outcomes. We assembled an interdisciplinary team of stakeholders to evaluate our current discharge process between hospitalists and primary care providers (PCPs). We used a fishbone diagram to identify potential causes of suboptimal discharge communication to PCPs. Opportunities for improvement (leverage points) to achieve optimal transfer of discharge information were identified using tally sheets and Pareto charts. Quality improvement strategies consisted of training and implementation of a new discharge process including: (1) enhanced PCP identification at discharge, (2) use of an electronic discharge order and instruction system, and (3) autofaxing discharge information to PCPs. The new discharge process's impact was evaluated on 2,530 hospitalist patient discharges over a 34-week period by measuring: (1) successful transfer of discharge information (proportion of discharge information sheets successfully faxed to PCPs), (2) timeliness (proportion of sheets faxed within 2 days of discharge), and (3) content (presence of key clinical elements in discharge sheets). Postintervention, success, and timeliness of discharge information transfer between pediatric hospitalists and PCPs significantly improved while content remained high. PMID:20854359

  13. Palliative Care in Children With Cancer: Which Child and When?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael B. Harris

    2004-01-01

    At a time of increasing interest in palliative care in pediat- rics, pediatric oncology programs may be failing to deliver adequate palliation to children with cancer. In a recent study, parents of children who died on a pediatric oncology service reported that despite treatment at the end of life, their children's suffering was not adequately relieved and that parents were

  14. Assessing HIV Related Training Needs of Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Charles W.; And Others

    Needs assessments enable program developers to address the unique characteristics of their target audiences and their environment. They have a number of useful purposes for AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) education and training. They inform program planning and implementation, provide baseline data, increase the potential for…

  15. Unifying Concepts in Parents' Experiences with Health Care Providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donna M. Dixon

    1996-01-01

    A historical overview of the research related to parent and nurse interaction in the context of an acutely ill hospitalized child provides the pediatric nurse with information about parent needs, stressors, and activities that can guide both practice and future research. Most of the research is descriptive, with little integration across studies. Because it focuses on the inpatient setting, this

  16. HIV Provider Endorsement of Primary Care Buprenorphine Treatment: A Vignette Study

    PubMed Central

    Kunins, Hillary V.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Roose, Robert J.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives Opioid dependence is common among HIV-infected persons in the United States. Factors associated with HIV care providers recommending buprenorphine for opioid dependence are poorly defined. Using vignettes, we sought to identify HIV provider characteristics associated with endorsing buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Methods We used a cross-sectional survey of HIV providers, including 497 physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants attending HIV educational conferences in 2006. Anonymous questionnaires distributed to conference attendees contained one of two vignettes depicting opioid-dependent patients. Respondents recommended type of substance abuse treatment for the vignette patient. Using logistic regression, we tested patient and provider factors associated with HIV provider endorsement of buprenorphine in primary care. Results Sixteen percent of providers endorsed buprenorphine treatment in primary care for vignette patients. Family physicians and general internists (AOR=2.8, CI=1.1–7.1), African American providers (AOR=3.0, CI=1.3–6.8), and those with previous buprenorphine prescribing experience (AOR=4.6, CI=1.2–17.9) were more likely to endorse buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Conclusions HIV providers infrequently endorsed buprenorphine treatment in primary care for vignette patients. Generalist and African American providers and those with previous buprenorphine prescribing experience are more likely to endorse buprenorphine treatment in primary care. Targeting generalist and minority providers may be one strategy to promote effective integration of HIV care and opioid addiction treatment. PMID:19882396

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical expert statement on cancer survivorship care planning.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Snyder, Claire F; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2014-11-01

    The seminal report from the Institute of Medicine, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition," identified four essential components of survivorship care and recommended that a survivorship care plan (SCP), consisting of a treatment summary and follow-up care plan, be developed and used as a tool to deliver patient-centered care by enhancing communication between the oncology team and the patient as well as communication and coordination of care between the oncology team and the primary care provider (PCP). Nearly a decade ago, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) initiated a series of activities to promote chemotherapy treatment plans and summaries and SCPs. Unfortunately, there has been limited success in implementing SCPs in oncology practice because of barriers including, but not limited to, the time-consuming process of completing an SCP, lack of role clarity, and lack of reimbursement for preparation time. ASCO developed this statement and revised template to provide a framework for completing and sharing SCPs and to set clear expectations for survivorship care planning in the oncology setting. This statement is intended to help clinicians recognize the importance of developing patient-centered SCPs and delivering the information to both the patient and PCP and to identify barriers that may exist in completing and delivering these documents effectively. PMID:25316025

  18. Communication and Cultural Issues in Providing Reproductive Health Care to Immigrant Women: Health Care Providers’ Experiences in Meeting Somali Women Living in Finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filio Degni; Sakari Suominen; Birgitta Essén; Walid El Ansari; Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen

    Communication problems due to language and cultural differences between health care professionals and patients are widely\\u000a recognized. Finns are described as more silent whereas one concurrent large immigrant group, the Somalis, are described as\\u000a more open in their communication. The aim of the study was to explore physicians-nurses\\/midwives’ communication when providing\\u000a reproductive and maternity health care to Somali women in

  19. Tumor Boards and the Quality of Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, Mary Beth; Lamont, Elizabeth B.; Bozeman, Samuel R.; Shulman, Lawrence N.; McNeil, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of tumor boards, few data on their effects on cancer care exist. We assessed whether the presence of a tumor board, either general or cancer specific, was associated with recommended cancer care, outcomes, or use in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. Methods We surveyed 138 VA medical centers about the presence of tumor boards and linked cancer registry and administrative data to assess receipt of stage-specific recommended care, survival, or use for patients with colorectal, lung, prostate, hematologic, and breast cancers diagnosed in the period from 2001 to 2004 and followed through 2005. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess associations of tumor boards with the measures, adjusting for patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Most facilities (75%) had at least one tumor board, and many had several cancer-specific tumor boards. Presence of a tumor board was associated with only seven of 27 measures assessed (all P < .05), and several associations were not in expected directions. Rates of some recommended care (eg, white blood cell growth factors with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) were lower in centers with hematologic-specialized tumor boards (39.4%) than in centers with general tumor boards (61.3%) or no tumor boards (56.4%; P = .002). Only one of 27 measures was statistically significantly associated with tumor boards after applying a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions We observed little association of multidisciplinary tumor boards with measures of use, quality, or survival. This may reflect no effect or an effect that varies by structural and functional components and participants’ expertise. PMID:23274388

  20. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists. PMID:2801600

  1. The challenge of providing palliative care to terminally ill prison inmates in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felicity Juliette

    2007-03-01

    Terminally ill prison inmates have a right to all aspects of health care including palliative care provision. However, there are numerous difficulties in providing palliative care to high-security prisoners in the UK. Local community hospices may be reluctant to admit terminally ill prisoners and therefore initiatives must be established to provide appropriate palliative care within the prison itself. Dying prisoners need companionship and to be shown respect and compassion to avoid feelings of loneliness and hopelessness. Inmate volunteers can provide an invaluable source of support and friendship for the terminally ill prisoner, helping to improve quality of life. PMID:17505406

  2. Early Childhood Feeding: Assessing Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of MultiEthnic ChildCare Providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marjorie R. Freedman; Karina P. Alvarez

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical period for shaping and influencing feeding and lifestyle behaviors that have implications for future weight and health. With more women in the workforce, families have become reliant on child care. Thus, the child-feeding relationship has become a shared responsibility between the parent and child-care provider. Little is known about the impact of child-care providers on

  3. African-American Cancer Survivors' Use of Religious Beliefs to Positively Influence the Utilization of Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jill B; Galbraith, Kayoll V; Best, Nakia C; Worthy, Valarie C; Moore, L T C Angelo D

    2014-10-01

    Among African-Americans, religion impacts health-seeking behaviors. This qualitative study used criterion purposeful sampling and thematic analysis in analysis of data from 31 African-American cancer patients to understand the influence of religion on the utilization of cancer care services. Our findings suggest that religious beliefs and practices positively influenced attitudes toward their illness and ability to endure treatment. God's ability to heal and cure, God's control over survival, God's will over their lives, and God's promise for health and prosperity were examples of survivor's religious beliefs. Religious practices such as prayer promoted a trusting relationship with healthcare providers and were a source of strength and encouragement. PMID:25269756

  4. The language of sedation in end-of-life care: The ethical reasoning of care providers in three countries.

    PubMed

    Seale, Clive; Raus, Kasper; Bruinsma, Sophie; van der Heide, Agnes; Sterckx, Sigrid; Mortier, Freddy; Payne, Sheila; Mathers, Nigel; Rietjens, Judith

    2015-07-01

    The application of ethically controversial medical procedures may differ from one place to another. Drawing on a keyword and text-mining analysis of 156 interviews with doctors and nurses involved in end-of-life care ('care providers'), differences between countries in care providers' ethical rationales for the use of sedation are reported. In the United Kingdom, an emphasis on titrating doses proportionately against symptoms is more likely, maintaining consciousness where possible. The potential harms of sedation are perceived to be the potential hastening of social as well as biological death. In Belgium and the Netherlands, although there is concern to distinguish the practice from euthanasia, rapid inducement of deep unconsciousness is more acceptable to care providers. This is often perceived to be a proportionate response to unbearable suffering in a context where there is also greater pressure to hasten dying from relatives and others. This means that sedation is more likely to be organised like euthanasia, as the end 'moment' is reached, and family farewells are organised before the patient is made unconscious for ever. Medical and nursing practices are partly responses to factors outside the place of care, such as legislation and public sentiment. Dutch guidelines for sedation largely tally with the practices prevalent in the Netherlands and Belgium, in contrast with those produced by the more international European Association for Palliative Care whose authors describe an ethical framework closer to that reportedly used by UK care providers. PMID:25389235

  5. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Wallerstedt, Dawn B

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use. PMID:17034678

  6. Patient-centered medical homes: will health care reform provide new options for rural communities and providers?

    PubMed

    Bolin, Jane N; Gamm, Larry; Vest, Joshua R; Edwardson, Nick; Miller, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Many are calling for the expansion of the patient-centered medical home model into rural and underserved populations as a transformative strategy to address issues of access, efficiency, quality, and sustainability in the delivery of health care. Patient-centered medical homes have been touted as a promising cost-saving model for comprehensive management of persons with chronic diseases and disabilities, but it is unclear how rural practitioners in medically underserved areas will implement the patient-centered medical home. This article examines how the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act of 2010 will enhance rural providers' ability to provide patient-centered care and services contemplated under the Act in a comprehensive, coordinated, cost-effective way despite leaner budgets and health workforce shortages. PMID:21378505

  7. Computer Mediated Communication: Providing Pastoral Care to Youth in “A High Tech” World

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanya L. Ramer

    2008-01-01

    This study used a hermeneutical methodology to explore how Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) can be used to provide pastoral care to youth in a high tech world. The research was motivated by the writers desire to find ways to be in communication with youth and provide pastoral care to them during their adolescent years. The thesis will explore computer mediated

  8. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 June 2015. +Related Content Key Facts Having a PCP ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of ...

  9. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePLUS

    Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 June 2015. +Related Content Going to a primary health ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  10. Child Care Providers' Strategies for Supporting Healthy Eating: A Qualitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Meghan; Batal, Malek

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed child care settings and providers to be important influences on children's developing behaviors. Yet most research on children's nutritional development has focused on home settings and parents. Thus, through semistructured interviews with child care providers, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of the…

  11. Assessments of the Importance of Provider Characteristics for Abortion Care: Data From Women in Rajasthan, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Batya Elul

    2010-01-01

    While client satisfaction is a widely recognized component of effective reproductive health care services, little is known about women's perspectives toward abortion care and providers. We use data from a large, community-based abortion knowledge, attitudes, and practices survey in Rajasthan, India, to describe women's assessments of the importance of eight attributes of potential abortion providers and to investigate the sociodemographic

  12. Development of a quality ranking model for home health care providers.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Justin W

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to increase transparency and simplify consumer decision-making regarding the selection of a home health care provider. Currently, quality information on home health care providers is fragmented and difficult to interpret. In this study, a quality-ranking model is developed by selecting multidimensional quality indicators across multiple sources and respective weights using expert judgment. Given the weights and providers' performance on each quality indicator, a composite score is calculated that summarizes a home health care provider's overall quality level. This quality information empowers consumers to narrow their search and select the best-performing, most efficient providers. PMID:23924223

  13. Time To Talk with Your Health Care Providers: 4 Tips to Start the Conversation

    MedlinePLUS

    4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches When patients tell their providers about their use of complementary health practices, they can better stay in ...

  14. Primary care radiography in the early diagnosis of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Finding an abnormality on a plain chest radiograph is usually the first definite evidence of a lung cancer, so this investigation is currently pivotal in the diagnosis of the disease. Although the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) has produced guidance on when a chest radiograph should be done for putative lung cancer presentations, cancer will usually be only one of a number of possible diagnoses, so this is somewhat artificial. Neither is there any evidence that obtaining a chest radiograph for these features leads to an improved outcome. Another major concern is the poor public awareness of the symptoms for which a chest radiograph is recommended. This article discusses the role of the chest radiograph in the early diagnosis of lung cancer with particular emphasis on the limited value of a single negative result and on the potential implications of interventions to increase the number of chest radiographs done in primary care. PMID:20233681

  15. The experiences of stress of palliative care providers in Malaysia: a thematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Beng, Tan Seng; Chin, Loh Ee; Guan, Ng Chong; Yee, Anne; Wu, Cathie; Pathmawathi, Subramaniam; Yi, Kweh Ting; Kuan, Wong Sook; Jane, Lim Ee; Meng, Christopher Boey Chiong

    2015-02-01

    A qualitative study was conducted with semistructured interviews to explore the experiences of stress in 20 palliative care providers of University Malaya Medical Centre in Malaysia. The results were thematically analyzed. Nine basic themes were generated: (1) organizational challenges, (2) care overload, (3) communication challenges, (4) differences in opinion, (5) misperceptions and misconceptions, (6) personal expectations, (7) emotional involvement, (8) death and dying thoughts, and (9) appraisal and coping. A total care model of occupational stress in palliative care was conceptualized from the analysis. This model may inform the development of interventions in the prevention and management of stress in palliative care. PMID:24023263

  16. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity. PMID:25557409

  17. Challenges in multidisciplinary cancer care among general surgeons in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Wright, Frances C; Davis, Dave; McLeod, Robin S; Urbach, David R

    2008-01-01

    Background While many factors can influence the way that cancer care is delivered, including the way that evidence is packaged and disseminated, little research has evaluated how health care professionals who manage cancer patients seek and use this information to identify whether and how this could be supported. Through interviews we identified that general surgeons experience challenges in coordinating care for complex cancer patients whose management is not easily addressed by guidelines, and conducted a population-based survey of general surgeon information needs and information seeking practices to extend these findings. Methods General surgeons with privileges at acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada were mailed a questionnaire to solicit information needs (task, importance), information seeking (source, frequency of and reasons for use), key challenges and suggested solutions. Non-responders received up to three reminder packages. Significant differences among sub-groups (age, setting) were examined statistically (Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney, Chi Square). Standard qualitative methods were used to thematically analyze open-ended responses. Results The response rate was 44.2% (170/385) representing all 14 health regions. System resource constraints (60.4%), comorbidities (56.4%) and physiologic factors (51.8%) were top-ranked issues creating information needs. Local surgical colleagues (84.6%), other local colleagues (82.2%) and the Internet (81.1%) were top-ranked sources of information, primarily due to familiarity and speed of access. No resources were considered to be highly applicable to patient care. Challenges were related to limitations in diagnostics and staging, operative resources, and systems to support multidisciplinary care, together accounting for 76.0% of all reported issues. Findings did not differ significantly by surgeon age or setting of care. Conclusion General surgeons appear to use a wide range of information resources but they may not address the complex needs of many cancer patients. Decision-making is challenged by informational and logistical issues related to the coordination of multidisciplinary care. This suggests that limitations in system capacity may, in part, contribute to variable guideline compliance. Further research is required to evaluate the appropriateness of information seeking, and both concurrent and consecutive mechanisms by which to achieve multidisciplinary care. PMID:19102761

  18. Continuous Improvements of a Clinical Pathway Increased Its Feasibility and Improved Care Providers' Perception in TKA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon Jong; Kim, Seok Jin; Song, Young Dong; Kim, Sei Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to determine 1) whether dropout rate decreased and 2) whether health care providers' perceptions were changed with continued improvements of contents of clinical pathway (CP) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods This retrospective study included two separate analyses of patients and health care providers. In the analysis of patients, dropout rates and reasons were evaluated in two cohorts of patients who underwent TKA with CP applied at two different time periods (384 patients from 2009 to 2010 and 242 patients from 2012 to 2013). Contents of CP were continuously improved during the 3-year interval. Self-administered questionnaire surveys targeted to health care providers were carried out twice (2010 and 2013) and compared. Results Dropout rate decreased from 19.1% in the first time period to 10.4% in the second time period. Although overall satisfaction of care providers was high at both time-points, doctors had more favorable perceptions than nurses; most positive changes of perception were noted in nurses. The health care providers' perceptions for potential concerns of CP were improved while the perceptions for potential benefits and satisfaction were maintained. Conclusions Continuously improved CP has increased feasibility for TKA patients and reduced health care providers' concern about its value. We propose that CP can be implemented and actively used to improve the outcomes and efficacy of patient care for TKA, regardless of the rotation of care providers. PMID:25505701

  19. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo; Lucatorto, Michelle A; Hawthorne, Kara; Hersh, Janis; Myers, Raquel; Elwy, A Rani; Graham, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP) and the primary care provider (PCP) is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1) what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2) how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively) to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts. PMID:25653538

  20. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is organized around two case studies designed to appeal to primary care providers (thrombophilia) and public health professionals (development of a screening grogram for colorectal cancer). NCHPEG has distributed more than 0000 copies of the CD-ROM to NCHPEG member organizations and to other organizations and individuals in response to requests. The program also is available at www.nchpeg.org.

  1. Providing General and Preconception Health Care to Low Income Women in Family Planning Settings: Perception of Providers and Clients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet M. BronsteinHolly; Holly C. Felix; Zoran Bursac; M. Kathryn Stewart; H. Russell Foushee; Joshua Klapow

    This study examines both provider and client perceptions of the extent to which general health concerns are addressed in the\\u000a context of publicly supported family planning care. A mail survey of family planning providers (n = 459) accepting Medicaid-covered clients in Arkansas and Alabama gathered data on reported actions and resource referral\\u000a availability for ten categories of non-contraceptive health concerns. A telephone

  2. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork facilitated the work of professionals. Such findings are important given the growing prevalence of cancer and the importance of attracting and retaining health professionals to work with cancer patients. PMID:21639897

  3. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  4. The impact of supportive nursing care on the needs of men with prostate cancer: a study across seven European countries

    PubMed Central

    Cockle-Hearne, J; Charnay-Sonnek, F; Denis, L; Fairbanks, H E; Kelly, D; Kav, S; Leonard, K; van Muilekom, E; Fernandez-Ortega, P; Jensen, B T; Faithfull, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is for many men a chronic disease with a long life expectancy after treatment. The impact of prostate cancer therapy on men has been well defined, however, explanation of the consequences of cancer treatment has not been modelled against the wider variables of long-term health-care provision. The aim of this study was to explore the parameters of unmet supportive care needs in men with prostate cancer in relation to the experience of nursing care. Methods: A survey was conducted among a volunteer sample of 1001 men with prostate cancer living in seven European countries. Results: At the time of the survey, 81% of the men had some unmet supportive care needs including psychological, sexual and health system and information needs. Logistic regression indicated that lack of post-treatment nursing care significantly predicted unmet need. Critically, men's contact with nurses and/or receipt of advice and support from nurses, for several different aspects of nursing care significantly had an impact on men's outcomes. Conclusion: Unmet need is related not only to disease and treatment factors but is also associated with the supportive care men received. Imperative to improving men's treatment outcomes is to also consider the access to nursing and the components of supportive care provided, especially after therapy. PMID:24064968

  5. Impact of prenatal care provider on the use of ancillary health services during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent declines in the provision of prenatal care by family physicians and the integration of midwives into the Canadian health care system have led to a shift in the pattern of prenatal care provision; however it is unknown if this also impacts use of other health services during pregnancy. This study aimed to assess the impact of the type of prenatal care provider on the self-reported use of ancillary services during pregnancy. Methods Data for this study was obtained from the All Our Babies study, a community-based prospective cohort study of women’s experiences during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to assess the association between type of prenatal care provider and use of ancillary health services in pregnancy. Results During pregnancy, 85.8% of women reported accessing ancillary health services. Compared to women who received prenatal care from a family physician, women who saw a midwife were less likely to call a nurse telephone advice line (OR?=?0.30, 95% CI: 0.18-0.50) and visit the emergency department (OR?=?0.47, 95% CI: 0.24-0.89), but were more likely receive chiropractic care (OR?=?4.07, 95% CI: 2.49-6.67). Women who received their prenatal care from an obstetrician were more likely to visit a walk-in clinic (OR?=?1.51, 95% CI: 1.11-2.05) than those who were cared for by a family physician. Conclusions Prenatal care is a complex entity and referral pathways between care providers and services are not always clear. This can lead to the provision of fragmented care and create opportunities for errors and loss of information. All types of care providers have a role in addressing the full range of health needs that pregnant women experience. PMID:23497179

  6. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Mikaela L; Young, Jane M; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of secondary prevention strategies, such as physical activity, to improve patient outcomes. There is also emerging evidence for the role of primary care providers and nurse coordinated care to support the transition and increase the cost-effectiveness of follow-up. The shift in focus from recurrence alone to the assessment and management of a range of survivorship issues will be important for ensuring that this growing group of patients achieves optimal outcomes.

  7. Recent advances in the surgical care of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A tremendous improvement in every aspect of breast cancer management has occurred in the last two decades. Surgeons, once solely interested in the extipartion of the primary tumor, are now faced with the need to incorporate a great deal of information, and to manage increasingly complex tasks. As a comprehensive assessment of all aspects of breast cancer care is beyond the scope of the present paper, the current review will point out some of these innovations, evidence some controversies, and stress the need for the surgeon to specialize in the various aspects of treatment and to be integrated into the multisciplinary breast unit team. PMID:20089167

  8. Using routinely collected data to stratify prostate cancer patients into phases of care in the United Kingdom: implications for resource allocation and the cancer survivorship programme

    PubMed Central

    Yip, K; McConnell, H; Alonzi, R; Maher, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in British men. The increasing use of PSA screening test has resulted in many more patients being diagnosed with this condition. Advances in its treatment have improved the survival rate among these patients. By 2040, the prevalence of prostate cancer survivors is expected to reach 830?000. Many of them will require medical support for the management of their progressive disease or long-term toxicities from previous treatments. Successful implementation of the cancer survivorship programme among these patients depends on a good understanding of their demand on the health care system. The aim of this study is to segment the population of prostate cancer survivors into different needs groups and to quantify them with respect to their phase of care. Methods: Incidence, survival, prevalence and mortality data collected and reported by cancer registries across the United Kingdom have been used for the current study to provide indicative estimates as to the number of prostate cancer patients in each phase of the care pathway in a year. Results: The majority of prostate cancer patients are in the post-treatment monitoring phase. Around a fifth of the patients are either receiving treatment or in the recovery and readjustment phase having completed their treatment in the preceding year. Thirteen percent have not received any anticancer treatment, a further 12% (32?000) have developed metastatic disease and 4% are in the final stage of their lives. Conclusion: On the basis of our estimates, patients undergoing post-treatment monitoring phase will constitute the biggest group among prostate cancer survivors. The pressure to provide adequate follow-up care to these patients will be a challenge. There is limited data available to definitively quantify the number of prostate cancer patients who follow different pathways of care, and we hope this study has highlighted the importance of collecting and reporting of such data to help future health care planning for these patients. PMID:25791873

  9. Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies: Training Child Care Providers To Support Families. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Holly M.; Hurd, Tracey L.

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  10. Relationships and ResilienceCare Provider Responses to Pressures From Managed Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jody Hoffer Gittell

    2008-01-01

    Organizations in the health care industry and beyond face pressures to lower their costs while maintaining quality, resulting in high levels of stress for their workers. In a nine-hospital study, this article explores the role that relationships play in enabling resilient responses to external pressures and the organizational practices that enable workers to respond in a resilient way when organizational

  11. Supportive care in lung cancer: milestones over the past 40 years.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, Alex; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Hollen, Patricia J; Sarna, Linda; Palmer, Patricia; Krishnasamy, Meinir

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of supportive care in lung cancer (LC) is the focus of this article, which aims to present an overall picture of the developments in the field, highlight milestones over the past four decades, and provide directions for future research and practice. Although in the 1970s this study was minimal, from the 1980s onwards, there was an expansion of the range of topics covered in the literature, reflecting the importance of supportive care to clinical practice. These areas include the identification of supportive care needs in LC, symptoms and symptom management, psychosocial aspects and coping with LC (including support of caregivers), quality of life issues and the development and testing of patient-reported outcomes, the option of best supportive care versus treatment, smoking cessation before and after diagnosis of LC, and service delivery models. This article celebrates the evolution of supportive LC care over the past 40 years alongside recognizing that more work needs to be done in the future and new research foci need to be developed to meet the current needs of patients with LC. The role and the continuous efforts of the International Association of the Study of Lung Cancer, including the sixteenth World Conference on Lung Cancer in 2015 to meet this goal, will be crucial and strategic in the future. PMID:25325780

  12. Transitional care challenges of rehospitalized veterans: listening to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Caroline; Sackett, Nathan; Pierce, Read; Schopfer, David; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Moy, Nicholas; Bachhuber, Melissa; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Lee, Sei J

    2013-10-01

    Readmissions to the hospital are common and costly, often resulting from poor care coordination. Despite increased attention given to improving the quality and safety of care transitions, little is known about patient and provider perspectives of the transitional care needs of rehospitalized Veterans. As part of a larger quality improvement initiative to reduce hospital readmissions, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients and 14 of their interdisciplinary health care providers to better understand their perspectives of the transitional care needs and challenges faced by rehospitalized Veterans. Patients identified 3 common themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) knowledge gaps and deferred power; (2) difficulties navigating the health care system; and (3) complex psychiatric and social needs. Providers identified different themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) substance abuse and mental illness; (2) lack of social or financial support and homelessness; (3) premature discharge and poor communication; and (4) nonadherence with follow-up. Results underscore that rehospitalized Veterans have a complex overlapping profile of real and perceived physical, mental, and social needs. A paradigm of disempowerment and deferred responsibility appears to exist between patients and providers that contributes to ineffective care transitions, resulting in readmissions. These results highlight the cultural constraints on systems of care and suggest that process improvements should focus on increasing the sense of partnership between patients and providers, while simultaneously creating a culture of empowerment, ownership, and engagement, to achieve success in reducing hospital readmissions. PMID:23560514

  13. Transitional Care Challenges of Rehospitalized Veterans: Listening to Patients and Providers

    PubMed Central

    Sackett, Nathan; Pierce, Read; Schopfer, David; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Moy, Nicholas; Bachhuber, Melissa; Wallhagen, Margaret I.; Lee, Sei J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Readmissions to the hospital are common and costly, often resulting from poor care coordination. Despite increased attention given to improving the quality and safety of care transitions, little is known about patient and provider perspectives of the transitional care needs of rehospitalized Veterans. As part of a larger quality improvement initiative to reduce hospital readmissions, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients and 14 of their interdisciplinary health care providers to better understand their perspectives of the transitional care needs and challenges faced by rehospitalized Veterans. Patients identified 3 common themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) knowledge gaps and deferred power; (2) difficulties navigating the health care system; and (3) complex psychiatric and social needs. Providers identified different themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) substance abuse and mental illness; (2) lack of social or financial support and homelessness; (3) premature discharge and poor communication; and (4) nonadherence with follow-up. Results underscore that rehospitalized Veterans have a complex overlapping profile of real and perceived physical, mental, and social needs. A paradigm of disempowerment and deferred responsibility appears to exist between patients and providers that contributes to ineffective care transitions, resulting in readmissions. These results highlight the cultural constraints on systems of care and suggest that process improvements should focus on increasing the sense of partnership between patients and providers, while simultaneously creating a culture of empowerment, ownership, and engagement, to achieve success in reducing hospital readmissions. (Population Health Management 2013;16:326–331) PMID:23560514

  14. Work, income, the economy, and married fathers as child-care providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne M. Casper; Martin O’Connell

    1998-01-01

    Previous research on fathers as child-care providers indicates a need to study the father’s role in child care in the context\\u000a of different economic cycles. Using data from the 1988, 1991, and 1993 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation,\\u000a we examine whether father’ availability and the couple’s economic resources are differentially related to child care by fathers

  15. Changing the Face of Cancer through investments in research, education, outreach and care

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Changing the Face of Cancer through investments in research, education, outreach and care Giving Guide #12;OHSU Knight Cancer Institute We Will End Cancer As We Know It The OHSU Knight Cancer Institute is trans- forming how the world understands and fights cancer. The institute's revolutionary discover- ies

  16. Patient Perceptions and Expectations From Primary Health-care Providers in India

    PubMed Central

    Ardey, Rashmi; Ardey, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study of patient satisfaction at the primary care level has been mostly neglected in India. Aim: This objective of this study was to assess indices of Patient Satisfaction at the level of the family physician which is usually the first point of contact between the patient and the health-care system. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out at a Private Primary Health-Care Center in a semirural area in New Delhi, by exit interviews in the form of a questionnaire from patients randomly selected from people visiting the center during the study period. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results: The findings revealed that 83.58% of the patients were satisfied with the general experience and the behavior of the health-care provider and 85.9% were satisfied with the treatment and care provided, only 65.5% were satisfied with the physical environment of the clinic. However, the percentage of patients who would recommend the facility to their friends was overwhelming (94.6%). Conclusion: These results show that private health-care providers are still the first choice for any form of medical care. However, there was definitely a gap between the increasing expectations of the patients for more information, better Patient–Provider interaction, more control over the treatment process and better amenities even at the Primary Care level. It is this gap, which needs to be fulfilled to facilitate better utilization of Primary Health-Care Services in the community and reduce pressure on tertiary care services in order to ensure Universal Health Coverage. This study would also help us understand the challenges for Primary Care service providers, private and public, in a low socioeconomic urban setting. PMID:25810990

  17. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Ishveen; Chopra, Avijeet

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs) and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient’s and physician’s perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician’s perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13) evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS’s perceptions (n=9) and preferences (n=9). Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist). Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in different aspects of follow-up care. Further, this review also provides useful insight into the unique concerns and needs of BCSs for follow-up care. Thus, clinicians and decision-makers need to understand BCS’s preferences in providing appropriate follow-up care tailored specifically for each patient. PMID:25210481

  18. Gender Differences in Rural and Urban Practice Location among Mid-Level Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Context: Mid-level providers comprise an increasing proportion of the health care workforce and play a key role in providing health services in rural and underserved areas. Although women comprise the majority of mid-level providers, they are less likely to work in a rural area than men. Maldistribution of health providers between urban and rural…

  19. Effectiveness of CancerGuides®: A Study of an Integrative Cancer Care Training Program for Health Professionals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie K. Staples; Amy T. Wilson; Beverly Pierce; James S. Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how CancerGuidesâ®, an integrative cancer care training program, would affect participants' perception of their professional skills, their mood, use of self care and mind-body modalities, and the acceptance of integrative cancer care at their institutions. Study Design: Qualitative and quantitative measures were used during the training program and at 6-month follow-up. A focus group met before and

  20. Matching the unmet needs of cancer survivors to resources using a shared care model.

    PubMed

    Bazzell, Judy L; Spurlock, Amy; McBride, Marilyn

    2015-06-01

    A substantial number of cancer survivors have unmet needs affecting quality of life. The purpose of this project was to match the unmet needs of cancer survivors in three rural counties to available evidence-based interventions and resources that improve survivor quality of life using a shared care model. The modified Survivors Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) was used to explore the unmet needs of 52 survivors in three domains: emotional health, access and continuity of care, and information. A comprehensive search for evidence-based interventions or other services available to these survivors was conducted. Finally, efforts were made to determine whether the use of a shared care delivery model of survivorship care might improve opportunities for survivors to connect with resources. Twenty-five percent of the rural survivors reported high or very high emotional health or access and continuity of care unmet needs. ANOVA results provide evidence that there is a difference between survivor years since diagnosis and access and continuity of care unmet needs. ANOVA results also found that there is a difference between survivor age and emotional unmet needs. Access to interventions and survivorship resources were found to be limited in these rural areas. Interventions or resources found to exist require technology access or substantial travel. In many cases, they were found to be simply out of reach for most rural survivors without assistance from care providers. The unmet needs of survivors can be determined and matched with resources that improve quality of life if providers collaborate through use of a shared care model. PMID:25103849

  1. Candidate quality of care indicators for localized bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Porter, Michael P; Konety, Badrinath R

    2009-01-01

    The surgical management of clinically localized bladder cancer is challenging, and the quality of care delivered to patients with bladder cancer is a subject of increasing interest. Multiple large studies have examined the association between surgical volume and outcomes after radical cystectomy. These studies generally find lower mortality and complication rates at high-volume centers, though interpretation of the data must be tempered by limitations of the datasets driving the studies. Benefits of regionalization of care also must be weighed against other measures proven to predict outcomes; a delay in time to cystectomy beyond 3 months, for example, is strongly associated with increased mortality. Other candidate process measures supported by existing literature include adequacy of lymphadenectomy as measured by nodal yield and availability or offering of orthotopic diversion when appropriate. Assessment and reporting of bladder cancer outcomes should be risk adjusted based on oncologic risk factors and patient comorbid illness. Perioperative morbidity and mortality, cause-specific survival, and overall survival are all key measures. Assessment of health-related quality of life after bladder cancer treatment should also be standardized for reporting. Multiple survey instruments have been developed in recent years, but none has yet been well validated or widely adopted. In particular, capturing variation in quality of life outcomes between patients undergoing bladder-sparing protocols vs. continent diversion vs. incontinent diversion is an important but difficult goal that has not yet been met. The urologic oncology community should take a strong lead in achieving consensus regarding the definition, assessment, and reporting of quality of care data for bladder cancer. PMID:19573775

  2. Legal and Quality of Care Issues for Providers in Managed Behavioral Health Care Arrangements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirley Ann Higuchi; Cherie Jones

    \\u000a Over the last two decades, Americans have witnessed a dramatic increase in enrollment in privately insured managed care plans.\\u000a For example, in 1970, there were 33 health maintenance organizations (HMOs) covering 3 million persons, whereas by 1980, there\\u000a were 236 HMOs serving 9.1 million persons (DeLeon, VandenBos, & Bulatao, 1991). Between 1980 and 1992, the number of privately insured managed

  3. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  4. Providing life-saving health care to undocumented children: controversies and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Young, Janine; Flores, Glenn; Berman, Stephen

    2004-11-01

    Pediatricians and hospitals with special pediatric expertise are facing the dilemma of rationing care to uninsured, undocumented children, especially for expensive life-saving care such as transplants, chemotherapy, and dialysis. This article reviews a relevant case history and provides a review and discussion of the ethical and policy issues associated with this problem. PMID:15520114

  5. Keys to Building Successful Training Programs for Hispanic Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrix, Marisa B.; Bocanegra, Margarita

    1998-01-01

    Critical factors for success in targeted training programs for Hispanic family day care providers include understanding the importance of Hispanic culture, values, and attitudes; becoming familiar with personalism and familism; using day care as an employment strategy for Hispanic women; and developing culturally relevant nutrition lessons. (SK)

  6. The Relationship between Practices and Child Care Providers' Beliefs Related to Child Feeding and Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between child care practices and child care provider knowledge and beliefs about their role in supporting children's healthful eating. Design: Longitudinal design using survey and observation data from baseline and year 1 of the Encouraging Healthy Activity and Eating in Childcare Environments (ENHANCE) pilot…

  7. Grandparents Providing Care to Grandchildren: A Population-Based Study of Continuity and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ye; LaPierre, Tracey A.; Hughes, Mary Elizabeth; Waite, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines transitions in grandchild care and the characteristics of grandparents making these transitions, using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 13,626 grandparents in the 1998-2008 Health and Retirement Study. More than 60% of grandparents provided grandchild care over the 10-year period; more than 70% of…

  8. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  9. [Access to cancer care: mapping hospital admissions and high-complexity outpatient care flows. The case of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Evangelina Xavier Gouveia de; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Noronha, Cláudio Pompeiano; Carvalho, Marilia Sá

    2011-02-01

    This study analyzes the flow of patients with breast cancer treated in Brazil's Unified National Health System (SUS) by type of treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy). Hospital and outpatient services networks were identified based on data from the National Information System for Inpatient Care (SIH), and the National Information System for Outpatient Cancer Care, for 2005-2006, using TabWin and TerraView. Health services networks reach most of the country, and few municipalities are not connected to a network. However, treatment is highly concentrated in the largest cities, and even the latter show evidence of service shortages. Furthermore, a large proportion of patients live more than 150 km from the respective service. Network identification is important for planning and improving services distribution, since geographic access is a relevant issue for treatment outcome. Reduction of morbidity and mortality requires early identification, and appropriate and prompt treatment can reduce the impacts of the disease. PMID:21359468

  10. Providing quality skin and wound care for the bariatric patient: an overview of clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, (defined as body mass index [BMI] ?30), and especially morbid obesity (defined as BMI ?40), has a profound impact on the health and integrity of the patient's integumentary system and on the caregivers who strive to provide care for larger, heavy patients. The purpose of this overview is to address some common skin and wound care issues faced by bariatric patients in order to inform clinicians, patients, and caregivers and enable them to optimize care. For bariatric patients, extra attention must be paid to skin care, cleanliness, skin fold management, perigenital care, odor management, and effective pressure redistribution. Despite these interventions, the multifactorial challenges presented by morbid obesity increase patient risk for serious skin diseases and wound conditions. Implications for practice include how best to educate patients and caregivers for optimal problem prevention. Future research should target improving bariatric care equipment and decreasing risk indices. PMID:24434162

  11. Patient-centered, evidence-based, and cost-conscious cancer care across the continuum: Translating the Institute of Medicine report into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Levit, Laura; Hurria, Arti; Ganz, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) concluded that cancer care in the United States is in crisis. Patients and their families are not receiving the information that they need to make informed decisions about their cancer care. Many patients do not have access to palliative care and too few are referred to hospice at the appropriate point in their disease trajectory. Simultaneously, there is a growing demand for cancer care with increases in new cancer diagnoses and the number of patients surviving cancer. Furthermore, there is a workforce shortage to care for this growing and elderly population. The IOM's report, Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, outlined recommendations to improve the quality of cancer care. This article provides an overview of the IOM report and highlights the recommendations that are most relevant to practicing clinicians who care for patients with cancer across the continuum. The implementation of the recommendations in clinical practice will require better patient-clinician communication, improved care coordination, targeted clinician training, effective dissemination of evidence-based guidelines and strategies for eliminating waste, and continuous quality assessment and improvement efforts. PMID:25203697

  12. The association of race with timeliness of care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Carpenter, William R; Provenzale, Dawn T; Weinberger, Morris; Reeve, Bryce B; Williams, Christina D; Jackson, George L

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Patients with late-stage disease (stage 3/4) have five-year survival rates of 2%–15%. Care quality may be measured as time to receiving recommended care and, ultimately, survival. This study examined the association between race and receipt of timely non-small cell lung cancer care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients. Methods Data were from the External Peer Review Program, a nationwide Veterans Affairs quality-monitoring program. We included Caucasian or African American patients with pathologically confirmed late-stage non-small cell lung cancer in 2006 and 2007. We examined three quality measures: time from diagnosis to (1) treatment initiation, (2) palliative care or hospice referral, and (3) death. Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models. Results After controlling for patient and disease characteristics using Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of treatment (72 days for African American versus 65 days for Caucasian patients, hazard ratio 1.04, P = 0.80) or palliative care or hospice referral (129 days versus 116 days, hazard ratio 1.10, P = 0.34). However, the adjusted model found longer survival for African American patients than for Caucasian patients (133 days versus 117 days, hazard ratio 0.31, P < 0.01). Conclusion For process measures of care quality (eg, time to initiation of treatment and referral to supportive care) the Veterans Affairs health care system provides racially equitable care. The small racial difference in survival time of approximately 2 weeks is not clinically meaningful. Future work should validate this possible trend prospectively, with longer periods of follow-up, in other veteran groups. PMID:23900515

  13. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks Partnership for HEALTH For Men How much aspirin ... take aspirin to reduce the chances of a heart attack. Does aspirin also help women prevent heart attacks? ...

  14. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ...108 June 6, 2011 Part III Department of Health and Human Services...Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions; Final Rule...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for...

  15. 76 FR 9968 - Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 88 RIN...Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws...SUMMARY: The Department of Health and Human Services issues this final...

  16. Predictors of Intensive End-of-Life and Hospice Care in Latino and White Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Jimenez, Rachel; Nilsson, Matthew; Paulk, Elizabeth; Stieglitz, Heather; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of end-of-life (EOL) care preferences and conversations in receipt of care near death for Latinos is unclear. Objective This study examines rates and predictors of intensive EOL and hospice care among Latino and white advanced cancer patients. Design Two-hundred-and-ninety-two self-reported Latino (n=58) and white (n=234) Stage IV cancer patients participated in a U.S. multisite, prospective, cohort study from September 2002 to August 2008. The Latino and white, non-Hispanic participants were interviewed and followed until death, a median of 118.5 days from baseline. Measurements Patient-reported, baseline predictors of EOL care included EOL care preference; terminal illness acknowledgement; EOL discussion; completion of a DNR order; and religious coping. Caregiver postmortem interviews provided information regarding EOL care received. Intensive EOL care was defined as resuscitation and/or ventilation followed by death in an intensive care unit. Hospice was either in- or outpatient. Results Latino and white patients received intensive EOL and hospice care at similar rates (5.2% and 3.4% for intensive care, p=0.88; 70.7% versus 73.4% for hospice, p=0.33). No white or Latino patient who reported a DNR order or EOL discussion at baseline received intensive EOL care. Religious coping and a preference for life-extending care predicted intensive EOL care for white patients (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 6.69 [p=0.02] and aOR 6.63 [p=0.01], respectively), but not for Latinos. No predictors were associated with Latino hospice care. Conclusions EOL discussions and DNR orders may prevent intensive EOL care among Latino cancer patients. Efforts should continue to engage Latino patients and caregivers in these activities. PMID:24053593

  17. Navigating care after a baby dies: a systematic review of parent experiences with health providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K J Gold

    2007-01-01

    Introduction:Health care providers are on the front lines of care when a baby dies, but there is no consensus about which behaviors are most helpful or harmful for families.Materials and Methods:This systematic review of more than 1100 English-language articles from 1966 to 2006 addressed fetal and early infant loss and extracted information about interactions with health providers.Results:Sixty-one studies, covering over

  18. Pay for performance for salaried health care providers: methodology, challenges, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Britton, John R

    2014-01-01

    Pay for performance has been recommended by the Institute of Medicine as an incentive to improve the quality of health care. Traditional quality-improvement methods may be adapted to evaluate performance of salaried providers, but it is important to separate provider contributions from other influencing factors within the health care system. Accurate recording, extraction, and analysis of data together with careful selection and measurement of indicators of performance are crucial for meaningful assessment. If appropriate methodology is not used, much time, effort, and money may be expended gathering data that may be potentially misleading or even useless, with the possibility that good performance may go unrecognized and mediocre performance rewarded. PMID:24626075

  19. The pharmacist as a primary care provider for the medically underserved.

    PubMed

    Goyette, Diane; Disco, Marilyn E; Leal, Sandra; Schwed, David H

    2003-01-01

    Opportunities abound for pharmacists to expand their practices by providing clinical services or assuring access to affordable pharmaceuticals to the medically underserved. The PSSC is a recently established resource at APhA that provides the pharmacy community and HRSA grantees with information and technical assistance on HRSA programs and projects. By participating in HRSA demonstration projections, pharmacists can implement much greatly needed patient care services to reduce disparities in health care. Becoming a 340B-contracted pharmacy can help pharmacists build prescription volume, expand their clinical services, and better serve the health care needs of their communities. PMID:14626534

  20. Edinburgh Research Explorer Coexpression analysis of large cancer datasets provides insight

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Andrew

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Coexpression analysis of large cancer datasets provides insight, Theocharidis, T, Goodlad, JR, Gregory, CD & Freeman, TC 2013, 'Coexpression analysis of large cancer datasets Coexpression analysis of large cancer datasets provides insight into the cellular phenotypes of the tumour

  1. The Prescription or Proscription of Exercise in Colorectal Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical guidelines recommend oncologists prescribe exercise to their patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, 84% of oncologists do not prescribe exercise citing concerns of safety and feasibility. Data are inadequate regarding the proportion of CRC survivors that could be safely prescribed the dose of exercise recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), American Cancer Society (ACS), or National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), in an unsupervised setting. Methods We reviewed published guidelines for exercise prescription among cancer survivors and extracted health-factors that may necessitate referral to trained personnel (physical therapist, exercise professional) for an individualized exercise program, or supervision of exercise as recommended by ACSM/ACS/NCCN. We applied these health-factors to a cohort of non-metastatic CRC survivors, six-months after completing curative care. The primary outcome was the proportion of CRC survivors for whom oncologists could prescribe unsupervised exercise at the dose recommended by ACSM/ACS/NCCN. Results Among 351 CRC survivors, six-months after curative care, 21% to 42% of patients could be prescribed the dose of exercise recommended by ACSM/ACS/NCCN. Estimates varied as a function of the inclusion or exclusion of several prevalent comorbid health conditions including hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Conclusion Our data are consistent with the clinical observation that a large proportion of CRC survivors may be unable to participate in unsupervised exercise six-months after curative care. These data underscore the need for continued research to clarify the safety and feasibility of prescribing exercise to CRC survivors. PMID:24781887

  2. A survey of current practice with regard to oral care for children being treated for cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M Glenny; F Gibson; E Auld; S Coulson; J. E Clarkson; J. V Craig; O. B Eden; H. V Worthington; B Pizer

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish current UK oral care practice for children with cancer. A telephone survey of all 22 United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group (UKCCSG) centres was undertaken. Nineteen (86%) of the centres reported using guidelines\\/protocols for mouth care. The use of routine preventive oral care therapies showed the greatest variation between centres. Four centres

  3. Outcomes Research Branch | Transagency Collaboration Spearheaded Diverse Initiatives to Improve Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    In response to the HHS Secretary's call for a coordinated federal government effort to improve the quality of health care in the US, the Quality of Cancer Care Committee (QCCC) was established in 2000 to improve the quality of cancer care in community settings.

  4. Health care providers' attitudes towards termination of pregnancy: A qualitative study in South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Harries; Kathryn Stinson; Phyllis Orner

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite changes to the abortion legislation in South Africa in 1996, barriers to women accessing abortion services still exist including provider opposition to abortions and a shortage of trained and willing abortion care providers. The dearth of abortion providers undermines the availability of safe, legal abortion, and has serious implications for women's access to abortion services and health service

  5. Enhancing Attitudes, Knowledge, and Skills of Paraprofessional Service Providers in Elder Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Roseman, Ellen S.; Leung, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The preparation of paraprofessional providers of services to older adults is often a "back-burner" issue, even though most direct care of older clients and patients is provided by paraprofessionals. This community-academic project delivered gerontological training to 74 paraprofessional service providers and evaluated the impact of training on…

  6. Quality of Life in Cancer Patients Receiving Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Divya Pal

    2010-01-01

    Background: The main focus of palliative care services is to improve the patient’s quality of life (QOL), which is defined as the subjective evaluation of life as a whole or the patient’s appraisal and satisfaction with their current level of functioning compared with what they perceive to be possible or ideal. Aims: In this prospective study we attempt to validate the Hindi version of a questionnaire designed by the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy (FACIT) measurement system; to measure the subjective QOL of cancer patients receiving home-based palliative care, determine ease of use of the questionnaire and correlate the QOL of these patients with the objective assessment of their Karnofsky’s performance status and their numerical pain score. Settings and Design: One hundred cancer patients receiving free home-based palliative care in New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: A multidisciplinary palliative home care team using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G©) questionnaire in Hindi. Statistical Analysis Used: Microsoft Excel Correlation. Results: The FACT-G© questionnaire in Hindi is a useful tool in measuring QOL and can be used to monitor the patient’s progress and symptom control during the course of the disease. It is simple to use and does not take too much time to complete. The results are tabulated in English and can be used for comparison purposes globally; the scoring process is very simple. Conclusions: Increasing QOL and KPS showed a positive correlation whereas increasing pain and better QOL show negative correlation, as do better performance status and increasing pain score. PMID:20859470

  7. Milwaukee County Child Care Providers Appear Ready for YoungStar: Local Providers Compare Favorably to State as a Whole. Research Brief. Volume 99, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the Wisconsin Early Childhood Association (WECA), the Public Policy Forum surveyed 1,425 child care center directors, center employees, and family child care providers statewide. The survey was designed to provide a picture of the status of Wisconsin's child care workforce in terms of educational attainment, experience,…

  8. An examination of advanced cancer caregivers’ support provided by staff interventions at hospices in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Luxardo, Natalia; Brage, Eugenia; Alvarado, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the type of intervention provided by hospice staff in order to address the pragmatic, psycho-social, and spiritual needs of home-caregivers for patients in the last stage of cancer. The qualitative inquiry was carried out in real life contexts. The explicit demands that caregivers (n = 40) identified in the first interviews were: (1) helping to organize the care of the patient at home; (2) unspecific demands, with unclear or unrealistic purposes (e.g., curative treatment or a miracle expected to occur); (3) specific resources (such as formal caregivers to replace them), and (4) a place to leave the patient either for a temporary period (a respite for the family) or in a permanent way. The main issues discussed were the delays in the patients’ referral to the hospice and the lack of time for long-term interventions; explicit focus is placed on the care by addressing the spiritual and emotional needs of caregivers, unlike in hospital settings where professionals avoid discussions of spiritual needs due to a lack of time, inadequate training and poor understanding of spirituality; hospices’ interventions are based upon an ethos similar to the movement’s original Christian spirit with emphasis placed on qualities of care such as love, charity, and compassion besides expertise and end-of-life competence, all while tolerating a sense of abandonment by health and social security systems following the patient’s referral. PMID:23226163

  9. Performance of the measures of processes of care for adults and service providers in rehabilitation settings

    PubMed Central

    Bamm, Elena L; Rosenbaum, Peter; Wilkins, Seanne; Stratford, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, client-centered care has been embraced as a new philosophy of care by many organizations around the world. Clinicians and researchers have identified the need for valid and reliable outcome measures that are easy to use to evaluate success of implementation of new concepts. Objective The current study was developed to complete adaptation and field testing of the companion patient-reported measures of processes of care for adults (MPOC-A) and the service provider self-reflection measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Design A validation study Settings In-patient rehabilitation facilities. Main outcome measures MPOC-A and measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Results Three hundred and eighty-four health care providers, 61 patients, and 16 family members completed the questionnaires. Good to excellent internal consistency (0.71–0.88 for health care professionals, 0.82–0.90 for patients, and 0.87–0.94 for family members), as well as moderate to good correlations between domains (0.40–0.78 for health care professionals and 0.52–0.84 for clients) supported internal reliability of the tools. Exploratory factor analysis of the MPOC-SP(A) responses supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaire. Conclusion MPOC-A and MPOC-SP(A) are valid and reliable tools to assess patient and service-provider accounts, respectively, of the extent to which they experience, or are able to provide, client-centered service. Research should now be undertaken to explore in more detail the relationships between client experience and provider reports of their own behavior.

  10. Quality of care provided by mid-level health workers: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Zohra S; Cometto, Giorgio; Huicho, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers. Methods Experimental and observational studies comparing mid-level health workers and higher level health workers were identified by a systematic review of the scientific literature. The quality of the evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria and data were analysed using Review Manager. Findings Fifty-three studies, mostly from high-income countries and conducted at tertiary care facilities, were identified. In general, there was no difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers in the areas of maternal and child health and communicable and noncommunicable diseases and that provided by higher level health workers. However, the rates of episiotomy and analgesia use were significantly lower in women giving birth who received care from midwives alone than in those who received care from doctors working in teams with midwives, and women were significantly more satisfied with care from midwives. Overall, the quality of the evidence was low or very low. The search also identified six observational studies, all from Africa, that compared care from clinical officers, surgical technicians or non-physician clinicians with care from doctors. Outcomes were generally similar. Conclusion No difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers and that provided by higher level health workers was found. However, the quality of the evidence was low. There is a need for studies with a high methodological quality, particularly in Africa – the region with the greatest shortage of health workers. PMID:24347706

  11. Lung and colorectal cancer treatment and outcomes in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Williams, Christina D; Fortune-Britt, Alice G

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the second- and third-most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. While many studies have evaluated the treatment quality and outcomes of various aspects of VA LC and CRC care, there are no known reviews synthesizing this information across studies. The purpose of this literature review was to describe LC and CRC treatment (ie, surgical and nonsurgical) and outcomes (eg, mortality, psychosocial, and other) in the VA health care system as reported in the existing peer-reviewed scientific literature. We identified potential articles through a search of published literature using the PubMed electronic database. Our search strategy identified articles containing Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords addressing veterans or veterans’ health and LC and/or CRC. We limited articles to those published in the previous 11 years (January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2013). A total of 230 articles were retrieved through the search. After applying the selection criteria, we included 74 studies (34 LC, 47 CRC, and seven both LC and CRC). VA provides a full array of treatments, often with better outcomes than other health care systems. More work is needed to assess patient-reported outcomes. PMID:25609998

  12. Justice in Health Care Decision-Making: Patients’ Appraisals of Health Care Providers and Health Plan Representatives

    PubMed Central

    Fondacaro, Mark; Frogner, Bianca; Moos, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the development of two versions of a Health Care Justice Inventory (HCJI). One version focuses on patients’ interactions with their providers (HCJI-P) and the other focuses on patients’ interactions with the representatives of their health plans (HCJI-HP). Each version of the HCJI assesses patients’ appraisals of their interactions (with either their Provider or representatives of their Health Plan) along three common dimensions of procedural justice: Trust, Impartiality, and Participation. Both the Provider and Health Plan scales assess indices that are relatively independent of patients’ demographic characteristics. In addition, patients’ appraisals of their interactions with their provider were only moderately related to their appraisals of their interactions with representatives of their health plan, indicating that the Provider and Health Plan scales tap distinct aspects of patients’ overall experience with the health care system. Overall, procedural justice dimensions were significantly related to patient satisfaction in both the Provider and the Health Plan contexts. As predicted, procedural justice factors were more strongly tied to patient satisfaction in the Provider than in the Health Plan context, and health care decisions based on distributive justice principles of Need (rather than Equity or Equality) were most closely tied to patient satisfaction in both contexts. PMID:16021741

  13. A prospective study on ambulatory care provided by primary care pediatricians during influenza season

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to obtain a picture of the nature of the primary care pediatricians’ visits during a winter season. We investigated reasons for visits, diagnosis, and pattern of prescription in 284 children. The reason for visit was a planned visit in 54% of cases, a well-being examination in 26%, and an urgent visit for an acute problem in 20% of cases. Cough was the most common symptom reported (61%). The most common pediatricians’ diagnosis was flu-like syndrome (47%). No disease was found by pediatrician in 27% of children with a symptom reported by caregivers. Antibiotics were prescribed in 25% of children, the vast majority of which affected by viral respiratory infections. The unjustified access to physician’s visit may lead to a inappropriate prescription of drugs. PMID:24755009

  14. How Biomedical Research Provides Fertility Hope to Cancer Survivors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-08-04

    A FASEB Horizons in Bioscience Publication. This publication discusses how biomedical research of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and cryopreservation (freezing) of embryos is helping female cancer survivors have children.

  15. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lonia Mwape; Alice Sikwese; Augustus Kapungwe; Jason Mwanza; Alan Flisher; Crick Lund; Sara Cooper

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative

  16. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore's primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the 'PAIR UP' approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore. PMID:24664374

  17. Living with and treating rare diseases: experiences of patients and professional health care providers.

    PubMed

    Garrino, Lorenza; Picco, Elisa; Finiguerra, Ivana; Rossi, Daniela; Simone, Paola; Roccatello, Dario

    2015-05-01

    We explored the experiences of illness of patients suffering from rare diseases and of the health professionals who care for them at the Center for the Interregional Coordination of Rare Diseases of Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta in Italy. The research was carried out between 2010 and 2011. We collected qualitative data from 22 patients and 12 health professional health care providers. The interviews were analyzed using the Colaizzi phenomenological approach. We identified five themes from the narratives of the patient participants--dealing with disease development, living with the disease, everyday living, relating to others, and relations with health care providers--and four themes from the professional health care participants--dealing with the disease, dealing with expectations, building relationships, and being operators in the context. The study has raised awareness about the issue of rare diseases and it provides some useful considerations for improving services. PMID:25667160

  18. Providing care to military personnel and their families: how we can all contribute.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Todd D; Hemmer, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Providing medical care to members of the military and their families remains a societal duty carried out not only by military physicians but also, and in large part, by civilian providers. As many military families are geographically dispersed, it is probable that all physicians at some point in their training or careers will care for this unique patient population. Understanding the military culture can help physicians provide the best care possible to our military families, and inclusion of military cultural competency curricula in all medical schools is a first step in advancing this understanding. The authors review the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that all health professionals should acquire to be able to care for those who serve and offer recommendations for developing these among all students and trainees. PMID:24979291

  19. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    PubMed

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data. PMID:20659837

  20. Performance of new alternative providers of primary care services in England: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Anthony A; Pape, Utz; Ratneswaren, Anenta; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Health system reforms in England are opening broad areas of clinical practice to new providers of care. As part of these reforms, new entrants – including private companies – have been allowed into the primary care market under ‘alternative provider of medical services’ contracting mechanisms since 2004. The characteristics and performance of general practices working under new alternative provider contracts are not well described. We sought to compare the quality of care provided by new entrant providers to that provided by the traditional model of general practice. Design Open cohort study of English general practices. We used linear regression in cross-sectional and time series analyses, adjusting for practice and population characteristics, to compare quality in practices using alternative provider contracts to traditional practices. We created regression models using practice fixed effects to estimate the impact of practices changing to the new contract type. Setting The English National Health Service. Participants All general practices open from 2008/2009 to 2012/2013. Main outcome measures Seventeen established quality indicators – covering clinical effectiveness, efficiency, access and patient experience. Results In total, 4.1% (347 of 8300) of general practices in England were run by alternative contract providers. These practices tended to be smaller, and serve younger, more diverse and more deprived populations than traditional providers. Practices run by alternative providers performed worse than traditional providers on 15 of 17 indicators after adjusting for practice and population characteristics (p?provider contract did not result in improved performance. Conclusions The introduction of new alternative providers to deliver primary care services in England has not led to improvements in quality and may have resulted in worse care. Regulators should ensure that new entrants to clinical provider markets are performing to adequate standards and at least as well as traditional providers. PMID:25908312

  1. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

  2. Ovarian cancer standard of care: are there real alternatives?

    PubMed Central

    Pepa, Chiara Della; Tonini, Giuseppe; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Tambaro, Rosa; Facchini, Gaetano; Pignata, Sando

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a major issue for gynecological oncologists, and most patients are diagnosed when the disease is already advanced with a poor chance of survival. Debulking surgery followed by platinum-taxane chemotherapy is the current standard of care, but based on several different strategies currently under evaluation, some encouraging data have been published in the last 4 to 5 years. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of the available alternatives to conventional treatment and the most promising new combinations. For example, neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not seem to be inferior to primary debulking. Despite its outcome improvements, intraperitoneal chemotherapy struggles for acceptance due to the heavy toxicity. Dose-dense chemotherapy, after showing an impressive efficacy in Asian populations, has not produced equal results in a European cohort, and the results of alternative platinum doublets are not superior to those of carboplatin and paclitaxel. In this setting, adherence to a maintenance therapy after first-line treatment and multiple (primarily antiangiogenic) agents appears to be effective. Although many questions, including the duration of maintenance treatment and the use of bevacizumab beyond progression, remain unanswered, new biologic agents, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, nintedanib, and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, have emerged as potential therapeutic options in the very near future. Based on the multiplicity of available strategies, the histological and molecular features of the tumor, in addition to patient's clinical condition and disease state, continue to gain importance in guiding treatment choices. PMID:25556615

  3. Team-Based Education in a Palliative Approach for Rural Nurses and Unlicensed Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gail; Pesut, Barbara; Hooper, Brenda Pherne; Erbacker, Lynnelle

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the preparation and delivery of an educational intervention designed to improve rural nurses and unlicensed care providers' confidence in a palliative approach to care. A palliative approach takes the principles of supportive palliative care and adapts them for application earlier in nonspecialized palliative contexts for individuals living with life-limiting chronic illness. Curriculum in a palliative approach was constructed for nurses and unlicensed care providers (care aides and home health workers) and was delivered through a workshop and monthly follow-up sessions offered through distance technology. Participants valued the joint interactive education and came away with greater appreciation for one another's contributions to care. Insights were gained into common challenges when attempting to apply a palliative approach in rural areas. Important lessons were learned about educating nurses and unlicensed care providers together, about the use of technology for this group, and about teaching the concept of a palliative approach. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2014;46(6):279-288. PMID:26057165

  4. caREMOTE: the design of a cancer reporting and monitoring telemedicine system for domestic care.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chihwen; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

    2011-01-01

    After receiving cancer treatment, patients often experience a decline of HRQoL (health-related quality of life). Physicians typically evaluate HRQoL during periodic clinical visits. However, out-patient reporting of vital signals between two visits could be used to interpret the decline of HRQoL. Considering that the vast majority of patients recovering from cancer are not in hospitals, it is often impractical for the care providers to collect these data. In this paper, we design and prototype caREMOTE, a cancer reporting and monitoring telemedicine system, which can be used in domestic cancer care. By extending a standard clinical trial informatics model, we build a prototype on cloud computing services that can be accessed by a mobile application. We aim to maximize the potential of caREMOTE to help medical practitioners efficiently monitor discharged patients' HRQoL and vital signals, and facilitate data reusability and system interoperability in future collaborative cancer research. PMID:22255012

  5. Meaning-making and managing difficult feelings: providing front-line end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Funk, L M; Waskiewich, S; Stajduhar, K I

    Managing grief and difficult emotions related to end-of-life (EOL) care is an often under-recognized part of the work of resident care aides (RCAs). In this interpretive analysis we explore the shared and socially constructed ideas that 11 RCAs in 1 Canadian city employ to make sense of death and the provision of EOL care. RCAs spoke of personal challenges involved in witnessing death and experiencing loss, as well as helplessness and frustration when they could not provide quality EOL care. RCAs invoked "consoling refrains" to manage grief, including "such is life," "they are better off," and "they had a full life." To manage guilt and moral distress, RCAs reminded themselves "I did my best" and "I experience rewards." Though these ideas help RCAs, some may need to be reframed through coaching and mentorship, to prevent unintended negative effects on care or the reproduction of ageist beliefs more broadly. PMID:24547663

  6. Health care providers' readiness to screen for intimate partner violence in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    John, I A; Lawoko, Stephen; Svanström, L; Mohammed, A Z

    2010-01-01

    Research on screening for intimate partner violence (IPV) within health care in a sub-Saharan African context is rare. This paper assessed factors associated with the readiness to screen for IPV among care providers (HCP, n = 274) at Kano hospital, Nigeria. Readiness was measured using the Domestic Violence Health Care Providers' survey instrument, which measures grade of perceived self-efficacy in screening for IPV, fear for victim/provider safety, access to system support to refer IPV victims, professional roles resistant/ fear of offending clients, and blaming the victim for being abused victim. Social workers perceived a higher self-efficacy and better access to system support networks to refer victims than peers in other occupation categories. Female care providers and doctors were less likely to blame the victim than males and social workers, respectively. Younger care providers of Yoruba ethnicity and social workers were less likely to perceive conflicting professional roles related to screening than older providers of Hausa ethnicity and doctors, respectively. Implications of our findings for interventions and further research are discussed. PMID:21061873

  7. Cautious, but optimistic: An ethnographic study on location and content of primary care providers using electronic medical records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher L. Schaefbauer; Katie A. Siek

    2011-01-01

    The integration of technology into primary care facilities has the potential to improve patient care, but also may disrupt provider workflows. Technologies that are designed to fit the use patterns and ideal interactions of providers will be better accepted and utilized. Our ethnographic study of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) usage by 10 primary care providers identified where providers utilize the

  8. Supportive and Palliative Care Research Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Trial of Individual Psychosocial Interventions for Cancer Patients enhanced usual care (EUC), standard Individual Supportive Psychotherapy (ISP), Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy (IMCP) NCT01323309 Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  9. Documentation and Discussion of Preferences for Care Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Sangeeta C.; Chuang, Fukai L.; Antonio, Anna Liza M.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Lorenz, Karl A.; Walling, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to describe the documentation, frequency, and timing of discussions about patient preferences for care and to examine patterns of palliative care and hospice use among patients with advanced cancer. Methods: We prospectively abstracted the medical records of 118 patients receiving care at a Veterans Administration (VA) facility from diagnosis of stage IV disease to 12 months postdiagnosis or death. We used univariate statistics to describe the type and frequency of documentation of patient preferences and palliative care/hospice referral. We calculated the time from diagnosis to the first documentation of preferences and the time from first documentation to death. We compared documentation of patient preferences between decedents and nondecedents using ?2 tests. Results: The majority of patients (81%) had some documentation of their care preferences recorded, although decedents were significantly more likely to have had their preferences documented than nondecedents (96% v 60%; P < .000). Most (53%) patients did not have a formal advance directive documented in the medical record. The mean time from diagnosis to the first documentation of preferences was approximately 2 months. More than half of all patients (53%) and almost three-quarters of decedents (73%) had a palliative care consultation. Conclusion: Despite high rates of preference documentation, there remains room for improvement. Providers may need to be helped to identify patients earlier in their trajectory for appropriate palliative care services, and future work should focus on developing useful alternatives to advance directives for adequately documenting patient preferences. PMID:22379417

  10. Cancer Pain: A Critical Review of Mechanism-based Classification and Physical Therapy Management in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient's symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms – central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective – operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient's findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain. PMID:21976851

  11. Active therapy and models of care for adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramphal, Raveena; Meyer, Ralph; Schacter, Brent; Rogers, Paul; Pinkerton, Ross

    2011-05-15

    The reduction in the cancer mortality rate in adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer has lagged behind the reduction noted in children and older adults. Studies investigating reasons for this are limited but causes appear to be multifactorial. Host factors such as developmental stage, compliance, and tolerance to therapy; provider factors such as lack of awareness of cancer in AYA and referral patterns; differences in disease biology and treatment strategies; low accrual onto clinical trials; and lack of psychosocial support and education programs for AYA all likely play a role. Recommendations for change from a recent international workshop include education of physicians and patients concerning AYA cancer, improved cooperation between pediatric and adult centers, age-appropriate psychosocial support services, programs to help AYA with issues relevant to them, dedicated AYA hospital space, improved accrual to clinical trials, the use of technology to educate patients and enhance communication between patients and the health care team, and ensuring that resident and fellowship training programs provide adequate education in AYA oncology. The longer term goal is to develop AYA oncology into a distinct subspecialist discipline within oncology. The ideal model of care would incorporate medical care, psychosocial support services, and a physical environment that are age-appropriate. When this is not feasible, the development of "virtual units" connecting patients to the health care team or a combination of physical and virtual models are alternative options. The assessment of outcome measures is necessary to determine whether the interventions implemented result in improved survival and better quality of life, and are cost-effective. PMID:21523752

  12. Research and standard of care: lung cancer in romania.

    PubMed

    Ciuleanu, Tudor E

    2012-01-01

    In Romania, lung cancer is the most frequent cancer in men and fourth most frequent in women, and its incidence and mortality continue to rise. Recently, firm antitobacco policies were implemented, in agreement with the MPOWER strategies recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). As of January 2012, the recognized "official" standard of care in lung cancer is still represented by the 2009 edition of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) guidelines. Cancer treatment is free, as the National Program of Oncology covers the budget for all cytotoxic agents and targeted therapy. However, reimbursement for several expensive drugs such as pemetrexed, erlotinib, and bevacizumab is individually approved by a centralized commission. All new drugs registered in Europe by the European Medicines Agency are concomitantly registered in Romania. However, no new drugs (such as gefitinib) or new indications (such as first-line tyrosine-kinase inhibitors or maintenance treatment) have been accepted for reimbursement since 2008. Clinical research is rapidly growing, and Romanian centers demonstrate a high recruitment rate in pivotal trials, despite initial delays because of a slow approval of the studies by authorities. PMID:24451777

  13. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism. PMID:25683782

  14. Monograph: Comparing Cancer Care & Economic Outcomes Across Health Systems (Aug 2013)

    Cancer.gov

    Measuring and projecting the economic burden associated with cancer and identifying effective policies for minimizing its impact are increasingly important issues for health care policy makers and health care systems at multiple levels.

  15. Determinants of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Post, Douglas M.; Katz, Mira L.; Tatum, Cathy; Dickinson, Stephanie L.; Lemeshow, Stanley; Paskett, Electra D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is serious, yet a minority of US adults receive within-guideline screening exams. Methods A random selection of patients attending clinics in 3 different settings completed a survey on CRC-related barriers, knowledge, and beliefs. Results Participants with fewer barriers, better knowledge, and more positive beliefs toward screening were significantly more likely to be within screening guidelines. A physician’s screening recommendation was significantly related to screening in patients < 65 years, but was not significant for older patients. Conclusions Large-scale studies are needed. Results can be used to develop multifaceted, tailored education programs to improve CRC screening in primary care. PMID:19058074

  16. Entrust: connecting low-income HIV+ individuals with health care providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clifford Gentry; Marisol Martinez Martinez Escobar; Philip Vander Broek; Douglas Choi; Stefan Ganchev

    2011-01-01

    Individuals infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) face numerous stigmatizations and challenges, specifically with the maintenance and adherence to their medical regimen. This situation is further complicated when individuals lack monetary resources to maintain their overall wellbeing. This paper presents Entrust, a service that provides low-income HIV positive individuals (clients) with cellphones to communicate with their health care providers. The

  17. STAT-MD Training Workshop Early identification of ASD for pediatric health care providers

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    STAT-MD Training Workshop Early identification of ASD for pediatric health care providers Tues consultation and screening procedures to pediatric medical providers serving young children. This 1-day · Zachary Warren, Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Special

  18. Keeping Kids Safe: A Guide for Safe Food Handling & Sanitation for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Because children under age 5 are susceptible to food-borne illnesses and children in diapers present special sanitation and health problems, food safety and sanitation are emerging as important issues for child care providers. This booklet is designed to give providers and parents a quick and easy reference for food safety and sanitation. The…

  19. Recommended Components of Health Care Provider Training Programs on Intimate Partner Violence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn M Short; Denise Johnson; Alison Osattin

    1998-01-01

    Programs that are effective in training health care providers to recognize and meet the needs of victims of intimate partner violence must be identified and replicated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed criteria for use in developing, enhancing, and evaluating such programs. CDC developed these criteria as a result of continuing efforts to provide useful products

  20. What Role Can School Health Providers Play in Health Care Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Robin

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama is wasting no time in unfolding his plan to provide health coverage for all Americans. He started in February by signing legislation to reinstate the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which expands eligibility criteria to provide 4 million more children access to health care. This first step is one of many needed to…

  1. Routine care provided by specialists to children and adolescents in the United States (2002-2006)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose M Valderas; Barbara Starfield; Christopher B Forrest; Luis Rajmil; Martin Roland; Bonnie Sibbald

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Specialist physicians provide a large share of outpatient health care for children and adolescents in the United States, but little is known about the nature and content of these services in the ambulatory setting. Our objective was to quantify and characterize routine and co-managed pediatric healthcare as provided by specialists in community settings. METHODS: Nationally representative data were obtained

  2. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  3. Addressing Needs of Rural Health Care Providers via Distance Learning. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemi, Gloria; And Others

    This document describes a distance learning program designed to meet the needs of rural health care providers. The program allows students to complete an Associate of Applied Science (AS) in the Meramec Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program through St. Louis Community College (SLCC). The first section of the document provides a draft of the…

  4. Perceptions of Primary Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors: The Effects of Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Allison; Hudson, Shawna V.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Bator, Alicja; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Somer, Robert A.; Ferrante, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Obese breast cancer survivors (BCSs) are impacted by diminished quality of life (QOL), multiple comorbid conditions, and poor disease outcomes. Despite national guidelines recommending a healthy weight to improve QOL and outcomes posttreatment, support and education are not routinely provided to BCSs in primary care. To fill this gap, we assessed perceptions of primary care received among BCSs by weight status. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage BCSs (N = 188) from 2 New Jersey cancer centers between May 2012 and July 2013. Sociodemographics, medical history, functional health status, perceived satisfaction with one's primary care provider (PCP), and PCP involvement in follow-up care were assessed. Results In total, 82% of overweight BCSs and 30% of obese BCSs reported not being told by their doctor that they were overweight or obese, despite these conditions being highly prevalent (35% and 35%, respectively). Obese BCSs were more likely than healthy weight BCSs to be African American, have a higher comorbidity score, poorer functional health, and greater satisfaction with their PCPs. Conclusion The PCP–patient encounter may represent an opportunity for PCPs to correct misperceptions and promote weight reduction efforts among BCSs, thus improving QOL and disease outcomes.

  5. Combat health care providers and resiliency: adaptive coping mechanisms during and after deployment.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Shafer, Michaela; Aramanda, Larry; Hickling, Edward J; Benedek, David M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand the varied health care provider responses to traumas by identifying perceptions of control and self-efficacy, appraisal styles, and postevent coping strategies in active duty military nurses and physicians deployed to combat/terrorist regions. Twenty purposively sampled military health care providers completed a descriptive questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a recorded semistructured interview that was later transcribed and content analyzed. Cognitive-behavioral determinants of healthy response to trauma were used to frame this descriptive interpretive study and to assist with developing a model for healthy adaptation in trauma-exposed health care providers. Participants felt they had the greatest control over their health care provider role in theater, and most expressed a belief that a sense of control and a sense of purpose were important to their coping. All used some form of social support to cope and many found calming activities that allowed for self-reflection to be helpful. Results from this analysis can be used to inform interventions and promote postevent coping behaviors that increase social support, strengthen important bonds, and enhance involvement in activities that elicit positive emotions. Health care providers experienced positive outcomes despite considerable traumatic exposure by using coping strategies that map closely to several principles of psychological first aid. This suggests a need to train all medical personnel in these concepts as they appear helpful in mitigating responses to the stress of combat-related exposures. PMID:23855421

  6. Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening in Primary Care Practice: Innovative Strategies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, David; Breslau, Erica S.; Zapka, Jane G.; Fletcher, Robert H.; Ransohoff, David F.; Winawer, Sidney J.

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been supported by strong research evidence and recommended in clinical practice guidelines for more than a decade. Yet screening rates in the United States remain low, especially relative to other preventable diseases such as breast and cervical cancer. To understand the reasons, the National Cancer Institute and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality sponsored a review of CRC screening implementation in primary care and a program of research funded by these organizations. The evidence base for improving CRC screening supports the value of a New Model of Primary Care Delivery: 1. a team approach, in which responsibility for screening tasks is shared among other members of the practice, would help address physicians’ lack of time for preventive care; 2. information systems can identify eligible patients and remind them when screening is due; 3. involving patients in decisions about their own care may enhance screening participation; 4. monitoring practice performance, supported by information systems, can help target patients at increased risk because of family history or social disadvantage; 5. reimbursement for services outside the traditional provider—patient encounter, such as telephone and e-mail contacts, may foster enhanced screening delivery; 6. training opportunities in communication, cultural competence, and use of information technologies would improve provider competence in core elements of screening programs. Improvement in CRC screening rates largely depends on the efforts of primary care practices to implement effective systems and procedures for screening delivery. Active engagement and support of practices are essential for the enormous potential of CRC screening to be realized. PMID:17534688

  7. Patient and health care provider views of depressive symptoms and diabetes in American Samoa.

    PubMed

    Held, Rachel Forster; DePue, Judith; Rosen, Rochelle; Bereolos, Nicole; Nu'usolia, Ofeira; Tuitele, John; Goldstein, Michael; House, Meaghan; McGarvey, Stephen

    2010-10-01

    High Type 2 diabetes prevalence, associated with recent cultural changes in diet and physical activity, characterizes the U.S. territory of American Samoa. Comorbid diabetes and depression rates are high worldwide and contribute to negative diabetes outcomes; these rates have not been assessed in American Samoa. In this study, 6 focus groups were conducted with 39 American Samoan adults with diabetes; questions on perceptions of diabetes and depressive symptoms were included. Thirteen health care staff interviews were conducted to gain insight into diabetes care in American Samoa. Focus groups and health care staff interviews were translated, transcribed, and entered into NVivo 8 to facilitate analysis. Thematic analysis showed that diabetes patients saw depressive symptoms as directly contributing to high blood sugar. However, these symptoms were rarely mentioned spontaneously, and providers reported they seldom assess them in patients. Many patients and health care staff believed the best ways to respond to feelings of depression involved relaxing, leaving difficult situations, or eating. Staff also discussed cultural stigma associated with depression and the importance of establishing rapport before discussing it. Health care providers in American Samoa need training to increase their awareness of depressive symptoms' negative impact on diabetes management in patients who screen positive for depression. All providers must approach the subject in a supportive context after establishing rapport. This information will be used for cultural translation of a community health worker and primary care-coordinated intervention for adults with diabetes in American Samoa, with the goal of creating an effective and sustainable intervention. PMID:21058808

  8. Grantee Research Highlight: Using Health Systems to Study and Improve the Quality of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Roadmap and National Cancer Institute strategic plans repeatedly emphasize the importance of involving health care systems in research. Integrated care delivery systems can address key research questions that cannot be answered in other types of settings. Research in this setting can lead to essential insights about the quality of care, including the quality of cancer care and how best to improve patient outcomes.

  9. Positive predictive values of ?5% in primary care for cancer: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shapley, Mark; Mansell, Gemma; Jordan, Joanne L; Jordan, Kelvin P

    2010-01-01

    Background The positive predictive value (PPV) for cancer of symptoms, signs, and non-diagnostic test results of patients routinely consulting a GP (unselected primary care populations) can help to determine when malignancy should be excluded. Comparisons with other illness indicate that a value of 5% or more may be regarded as highly predictive. Aim To identify symptoms, signs, and non-diagnostic test results in unselected primary care populations that are highly predictive of cancer. Design of study Systematic review. Setting Primary care. Method Fourteen bibliographic databases were searched, using terms for primary care, cancer, and predictive values. Reference lists of relevant papers were hand-searched. Data were extracted and the quality of each paper was assessed using predefined criteria, and checked by a second reviewer. Results Twenty-five studies were identified. PPVs of 5% or more in specific age and sex groups were reported for: rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, and iron deficiency anaemia and colorectal cancer; haematuria and urological cancer; malignant rectal examination and prostate cancer; haemoptysis and lung cancer; dysphagia and oesophageal cancer; breast lump and breast cancer; and postmenopausal bleeding and gynaecological cancer. Conclusion Robust evidence was found for eight symptoms, signs, and non-diagnostic test results as strongly indicative of cancer for specific age and sex groups in unselected primary care populations. These have the potential to improve the early diagnosis of some cancers in primary care by the use of computer warning flags, improved guidelines, audit, and appraisal. PMID:20849687

  10. Educational objectives: 1. Provide an update on current clinical trials in pancreatic cancer.

    E-print Network

    Educational objectives: 1. Provide an update on current clinical trials in pancreatic cancer. 2. To describe the treatment sequencing for resectable vs. borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. 3. Identify criteria for referral of patients for pancreatic cancer screening. · The Medical College of Wisconsin

  11. Comparing the quality of preconception care provided in healthcare centers in Mashhad in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sardasht, Fatemeh Ghaffari; Shourab, Nahid Jahani; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving the quality of healthcare services is considered as the main strategy to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Providing appropriate healthcare for mothers and their newborn children is facilitated significantly by considering the mothers’ health and welfare before pregnancy occurs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the quality of preconception care provided to women of reproductive age provided by five health centers in Mashhad in 2012 and 2013. Methods: Multi-stage sampling was used to select the participants in this descriptive study. As a result, 360 women of reproductive age and 39 healthcare providers from 24 healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected to participate. The data gathering tool was a checklist based on the Donabedian model that includes the three dimensions of structure, process, and outcome. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5), Kruskal-Wallis tests, ANOVA, and Spearman rank correlation. Results: The results showed that preconception care at the 24 healthcare centers had essentially the same conditions. But in the process and outcome components, the quality of the preconception care at five of the health centers was significantly different (p=0.008). The highest quality of care processes was identified at health center number 3. The difference in the component of outcomes being followed up by the healthcare providers at five of the health centers was statistically significant (p=0.000); however, there were no significant differences found among the satisfaction and awareness of the women who participated at the five health centers. Conclusion: The results showed that the performance of health personnel in providing preconception care and providing follow-up care was not satisfactory. PMID:26120412

  12. Patient-provider perceptions on engagement in HIV care in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bofill, Lina Margarita; Lopez, Maria; Dorigo, Analia; Bordato, Alejandra; Lucas, Mar; Cabanillas, Graciela Fernandez; Sued, Omar; Cahn, Pedro; Cassetti, Isabel; Weiss, Stephen; Jones, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients participating in the national antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in Argentina fail to achieve an undetectable viral load, and approximately 25% are not retained in care. This qualitative study was designed to explore and identify factors associated with engagement and retention in public and private health care in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Qualitative data from key informants (n = 12) and focus groups (n = 4 groups) of patients and providers from private and public HIV treatment facilities were recorded and transcribed. Predetermined and arising themes related to adherence, engagement, and retention in care were coded and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Reasons identified for patients' lack of adherence or engagement in care differed between patients and providers, and patients attributed limitations to low self-efficacy, fear and concerns about HIV, and lack of provider involvement in treatment. In contrast, providers viewed themselves as decision-makers in patient care and patients as responsible for their own nonadherence due to lack of commitment to their own health or due to medication side effects. Patients reported health care system limitations and HIV concerns contributed to a lack of engagement, and providers identified limited HIV literacy and stigma as additional problems. Both agreed that chronic illness and substance addiction impacted adherence and retention, and agreed on the importance of trust, honesty, and communication in the patient-provider relationship. Results support the incorporation of system-, provider-, and patient-focused components into interventions to facilitate patient engagement, adherence, and retention in public and private settings in Argentina. PMID:24138788

  13. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements in Breast Cancer Quality Indicators During a 3-Year Interval

    PubMed Central

    Laronga, Christine; Gray, Jhanelle E; Siegel, Erin M; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William J; Fletcher, Michelle; Schreiber, Fred; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Phillip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David; Malafa, Mokenge; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care (FIQCC), composed of 11 practice sites across Florida, conducted its initial evaluation of adherence to breast cancer quality of care indicators (QCI) in 2006, with feedback provided to encourage quality improvement efforts at participating sites. In this study, our objective was to reassess changes over time resulting from these efforts. STUDY DESIGN Quality care indicators were derived from the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American College of Surgeons, and expert panel consensus. Medical records were reviewed for breast cancer patients first seen by medical oncologists in 2009 at the FIQCC sites, using the same performance indicators as in 2006. Statistical comparisons of 2006 vs 2009 data across sites were made by Pearson chi-square exact test using Monte Carlo estimation. RESULTS Charts of 602 patients in 2006 and 636 patients in 2009 were compared. Performance on medical oncology QCI improved over time for documentation of clinical trial participation discussion (p = 0.001), documentation of consent for chemotherapy (p = 0.047), definitive surgery done after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.017), and planned dose of chemotherapy consistent with published regimens (p = 0.02). Improvements in surgical QCI were seen for documentation of specimen orientation (p < 0.001), inking of margins (p < 0.0001), and performance of sentinel lymph node biopsy (p = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS The 2006 FIQCC study identified several medical and surgical oncology QCI improvement needs. Quality improvement efforts resulted in better performance for numerous metrics, therefore speaking to the benefits of reassessment of adherence to performance indicators to guide QCI efforts. PMID:25086813

  14. Appropriate use of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases: up-to-date indications for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vien X; Le Nguyen, Vi Thuy; Nguyen, Cuong C

    2010-01-01

    The field of endoscopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in recent years. Besides the ‘traditional’ endoscopic procedures (esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography), advances in imaging technology (endoscopic ultrasonography, wireless capsule endoscopy, and double balloon enteroscopy) have allowed GI specialists to detect and manage disorders throughout the digestive system. This article reviews various endoscopic procedures and provides up-to-date endoscopic indications based on the recommendations of American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American Cancer Society for primary care providers in order to achieve high-quality and cost-effective care. PMID:21116340

  15. Home-based palliative care for adult cancer patients in Ibadan—a three year review

    PubMed Central

    Omoyeni, NE; Soyannwo, OA; Aikomo, OO; Iken, OF

    2014-01-01

    Home-based palliative care is a recognised model of health service provision globally, but is just emerging in Nigeria. The aim of this study isto review the spectrum of adult cancer patients involved in home-based palliative care, the services provided, outcome and benefits. Methods Records of all adult cancer patients seen on home-based palliative care between March 2009 and January 2013 by the hospice and palliative care unit, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan were reviewed. Their biographical data, days on programme, diagnosis, stage of disease, major complaint, pain score, other symptoms, services offered, number of home visits, follow-up, and outcomes were extracted, reviewed, and analysed. The data were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Results Sixty patients were enrolled during the study period: there were 20 (33.3%) males and 40 (66.7%) females out of a total of 787 patients. All of them reside within catchment area of the hospice. Breast and prostate cancer constitute 21.7% each, gastrointestinal 16.7%, liver 11.7%, and cervical cancer 10.0%. Homes were visited 1–23 times per person. Days on programme ranged from 9–1207 days (average: 286 days). Pain was reported by 52 (86.7%) with scores of 7 to10 in 26 (50.0%). Only eight (13.3%) were pain-free. Services offered included pain and other symptom control, counselling and training for carers at home, provision of funds and comfort packs, bereavement services. The cost of services was heavily subsidised by the Centre for Palliative Care, Nigeria (CPCN), a non-governmental organisation and UCH. Although all patients are now deceased, the compassionate care received at a subsidised cost was highly valued, as shown from the appreciative comments of relations and carers. Conclusion Home-based palliative care provided at low cost was beneficial to patients and their families. More can be achieved through the training of more health professionals, increased funding, and increased public awareness of the services. PMID:25624871

  16. Ethical and practical considerations in providing critical care to patients with ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Torabi-Parizi, Parizad; Davey, Richard T; Suffredini, Anthony F; Chertow, Daniel S

    2015-06-01

    Infectious disease epidemics in the past have given rise to psychologic and emotional responses among health-care workers (HCWs), stemming from fear of infection during patient care. Early experiences in the AIDS epidemic provide an example where fear of contagion resulted in differential treatment of patients infected with HIV. However, with a deeper understanding of AIDS pathogenesis and treatment, fear and discrimination diminished. Parallels exist between early experiences with AIDS and the present outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, particularly regarding discussions of medical futility in seriously ill patients. We provide a historical perspective on HCWs' risk of infection during the provision of CPR, discuss physicians' duty to treat in the face of perceived or actual HCW risk, and, finally, present the protocols implemented at the National Institutes of Health to reduce HCW risk while providing lifesaving and life-sustaining care. PMID:25764372

  17. Irish midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care to non-Irish women seeking asylum

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Carolyn L; Murphy-Lawless, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Background Immigration and asylum seeking has been an important social and political phenomenon in Ireland since the mid 1990s. Inward migration to Ireland was seen in unprecedented numbers from 1995 onward, peaking in 2002 with 11,634 applications for refugee status. Asylum and immigration is an issue of national and international relevance as the numbers of displaced people worldwide continues to grow, reaching the highest level in 20 years at 45.2 million in 2012. Midwives provide the majority of care to childbearing women around the world, whether working as autonomous practitioners or under the direction of an obstetrician. Limited data currently exist on the perspectives of midwives who provide care to childbearing women while they are in the process of seeking asylum. Such data are important to midwifery leaders, educators, and policy-makers. The aims of this study were to explore midwives’ perceptions and experiences of providing care to women in the asylum process and to gain insight into how midwives can be equipped and supported to provide more effective care to this group in the future. Methods Data were collected via indepth unstructured interviews with a purposive sample of ten midwives from two sites, one a large urban inner city hospital, and the second, a smaller more rural maternity hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Five themes emerged from the data, barriers to communication, understanding cultural difference, challenges of caring for women who were unbooked, the emotional cost of caring, and structural barriers to effective care. Conclusion Findings highlight a need to focus on support and education for midwives, improved maternity services for immigrant women, and urgent policy revision. PMID:24516340

  18. Job Satisfaction of Primary Health-Care Providers (Public Sector) in Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Age and education level of health care providers don’t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi. PMID:24479088

  19. Health Care Provider-Delivered Adherence Promotion Interventions: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ahna L.H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Improving medical regimen adherence is essential for maximizing the therapeutic potential of treatments for pediatric chronic illness. Health care providers are uniquely positioned to deliver adherence promotion interventions. However, no studies have summarized the effectiveness of health care provider-delivered adherence interventions. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of health care provider-delivered adherence promotion interventions in improving adherence among children who have chronic illness. Data sources include PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Scopus. Studies were included if they were randomized-controlled trials of pediatric interventions aiming to increase adherence to the primary regimen for a chronic illness and at least 1 health care provider delivered the intervention. RESULTS: A total of 35 randomized-controlled studies including 4616 children were included. Greater improvements in adherence were observed immediately after health care provider-delivered interventions (d = 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.66) than at longer-term follow-up (d = 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.54). Treatment effect sizes differed across the adherence behaviors measured. There was significant heterogeneity in treatment effects; however, no moderators of treatment effectiveness were identified. This meta-analysis focused on the published literature. In addition, the majority of studies involved children who had asthma and younger children. CONCLUSIONS: Health care provider-delivered interventions for children who have chronic illness can be effective in improving adherence. Gains in adherence are highest immediately after intervention. Future interventions and studies should include multiple methods of assessing adherence, include active comparators, and address long-term maintenance of adherence gains. PMID:24799545

  20. 76 FR 16354 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...RIN 2900-AN63 Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated...State for providing a specified level of care to eligible veterans in a facility that...RIN 2900-AN63 Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans...

  1. Providing more than health care: the dynamics of humanitarian surgery efforts on the local microeconomy.

    PubMed

    Nagengast, Eric S; Caterson, E J; Magee, William P; Hatcher, Kristin; Ramos, Margarita S; Campbell, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Humanitarian cleft surgery has long been provided by teams from resource-rich countries traveling for short-term missions to resource-poor countries. After identifying an area of durable unmet need through surgical missions, Operation Smile constructed a permanent center for cleft care in Northeast India. The Operation Smile Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) uses a high-volume subspecialized institution to provide safe, quality, comprehensive, and cost-effective cleft care to a highly vulnerable patient population in Assam, India. The purpose of this study was to profile the expenses of several cleft missions carried out in Assam and to compare these to the expenditures of the permanent comprehensive cleft care center. We reviewed financial data from 4 Operation Smile missions in Assam between December 2009 and February 2011 and from the GCCCC for the 2012-2013 fiscal year. Expenses from the 2 models were categorized and compared. In the studied period, 33% of the mission expenses were spent locally compared to 94% of those of the center. The largest expenses in the mission model were air travel (48.8%) and hotel expenses (21.6%) for the team, whereas salaries (46.3%) and infrastructure costs (19.8%) made up the largest fractions of expenses in the center model. The evolution from mission-based care to a specialty hospital model in Guwahati incorporated a transition from vertical inputs to investments in infrastructure and human capital to create a sustainable local care delivery system. PMID:25162554

  2. The lung cancer patient, the pneumologist and palliative care: a developing alliance.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten; Schönfeld, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence is now available on the value of palliative care for lung cancer patients in all stages and at all times during the course of the disease. However, pneumologists and their institutions seem to be widely in arrears with the implementation of palliative care concepts and the development of integrated structures. This review focuses on the available evidence and experience of various frequently unmet needs of lung cancer patients, especially psychological, social, spiritual and cultural ones. A PubMed search for evidence on these aspects of palliative care as well as on barriers to the implementation, on outcome parameters and effectiveness, and on structure and process quality was performed with a special focus on lung cancer patients. As a consequence, this review particularly draws pneumologists' attention to improving their skills in communication with the patients, their relatives and among themselves, and to establish team structures with more far-reaching competences and continuity than existing multilateral cooperations and conferences can provide. Ideally, any process of structural and procedural improvement should be accompanied by scientific evaluation and measures for quality optimisation. PMID:25359341

  3. Knowledge and confidence of South African health care providers regarding post-rape care: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In South Africa, providers are trained on post-rape care by a multitude of organisations, resulting in varied knowledge and skills. In 2007, a national training curriculum was developed and piloted in the country. The objectives of this paper are to identify the factors associated with higher knowledge and confidence in providers at the commencement of the training and to reflect on the implications of this for training and other efforts being made to improve services. Methods A cross-sectional study using questionnaires was conducted. Providers who attended the training provided information on socio-demographic background, service provision, training, attitudes, and confidence. Knowledge was measured through multiple choice questions. Bi-variable analysis was carried out in order to test for factors associated with high knowledge and confidence. Variables with a p value of <0.20 were then included in backward selection to develop the final multivariable models. Results Of the 124 providers, 70% were female and 68% were nurses. The mean age of the providers was 41.7 (24 – 64) years. About 60% of providers were trained in providing post-rape care. The median percentage knowledge score was 37.3% (0% - 65.3%) and the median percentage confidence score was 75.4% (10% - 100%). Having a more appropriate attitude towards rape was associated with higher knowledge, while older providers and nurses had lower odds of having high knowledge levels. Working in a crisis centre in the facility, having examined a survivor in the last 3 months, and seeing more than 60% of survivors who came to the facility were associated with higher confidence. Higher confidence was not associated with greater knowledge. Conclusion The study indicated that although confidence was high, there was poor knowledge in providers, even in those who were previously trained. Knowledge seems to be critically dependant on attitude, which highlights the need for educating providers on rape and the seriousness of the problem. There is a need to train more providers in post-rape care in country, and to ensure that training is comprehensive, and that providers who are trained remain knowledgeable and skilled in current best practices. PMID:23822171

  4. The role of health care providers in recognizing and reporting elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sheena

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of abuse cases in older adults is on the rise. Health care providers play an important role in recognizing and reporting abuse, the first step of which is to prepare themselves with knowledge regarding abuse. This consists of knowing the risk factors and signs and symptoms of abuse and how to report it. Of equal importance is knowledge of ethical implications, legalities, and ways to prevent elder abuse. Health care providers must take advantage of their unique roles to assess for mistreatment as well as to spread knowledge on recognizing, reporting, and preventing elder abuse. PMID:21919424

  5. Illness perceptions in relation to experiences of contemporary cancer care settings among colorectal cancer survivors and their partners

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Illness is constituted by subjective experiences of symptoms and their psychosocial consequences. Illness perceptions concern people's lay beliefs about understandings and interpretation of a disease and expectations as to disease outcome. Our knowledge about illness perceptions and coping in relation to the cancer care context among persons with colorectal cancer (CRC) and their partners is incomplete. The aim of the present study was to explore illness perceptions in relation to contemporary cancer care settings among CRC survivors and partners. The present research focused on illness rather than disease, implying that personal experiences are central to the methodology. The grounded theory method used is that presented by Kathy Charmaz. The present results explore illness perceptions in the early recovery phase after being diagnosed and treated for cancer in a contemporary cancer care setting. The core category outlook on the cancer diagnosis when quickly informed, treated, and discharged illustrates the illness perceptions of survivors and partners as well as the environment in which they were found. The cancer care environment is presented in the conceptual category experiencing contemporary cancer care settings. Receiving treatment quickly and without waiting was a positive experience for both partners and survivors; however partners experienced the information as massive and as causing concern. The period after discharge was being marked by uncertainty and loneliness, and partners tended to experience non-continuity in care as more problematic than the survivor did. The results showed different illness perceptions and a mismatch between illness perceptions among survivors and partners, presented in the conceptual category outlook on the cancer diagnosis. One illness perception, here presented among partners, focused on seeing the cancer diagnosis as a permanent life-changing event. The other illness perception, here presented among survivors, concentrated on leaving the cancer diagnosis behind and moving forward. The importance of illness perceptions among survivors, and the differences in illness perceptions between survivors and partners, should be recognized by healthcare professionals to achieve the goals of person-centered contemporary cancer care. PMID:25056939

  6. Quality of Life among Immigrant Latina Breast Cancer Survivors: Realities of Culture and Enhancing Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. Design We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n=19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n=9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Results Participants were largely mono-lingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for 10 or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women’s survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner’s difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in participants’ health care interactions. Conclusion Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors’ quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally-sensitive navigation programs and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters. PMID:21706194

  7. Public and private providers’ quality of care for tuberculosis patients in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nshuti, L.; Neuhauser, D.; Johnson, J. L.; Adatu, F.; Whalen, C. C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING The role of the private sector in tuberculosis treatment in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. In recent years, many fee-for-service clinics have opened up in Kampala, Uganda. Little is known about the tuberculosis caseload seen in private clinics or the standard of care provided to the patients. OBJECTIVE To compare the appropriateness of tuberculosis care in private and public clinics, and the extent of the tuberculosis burden handled in the private sector. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey in private and public clinics treating tuberculosis patients in Kampala, Uganda, during June to August 1999. MEASUREMENTS Clinics were evaluated for appropriateness of care. This was defined as provision of proper diagnosis (sputum smear microscopy as the primary means of diagnosis), treatment (short-course chemotherapy, with or without directly observed therapy), outcome evaluation (smear microscopy at 6 or 7 months) and case notification in accordance with the Uganda National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Programme. RESULTS A total of 114 clinics (104 private, 10 public) were surveyed. Forty-one per cent of the private clinics saw three or more new tuberculosis patients each month. None of the public or private clinics met all standards for appropriate tuberculosis care. Only 24% of all clinics adhered to WHO-recommended treatment guidelines. Public clinics, younger practitioners and practitioners with advanced degrees were most likely to provide appropriate care for tuberculosis. CONCLUSION The private sector cares for many tuberculosis cases in Kampala; however, a new programme that offers continuing medical education is needed to improve tuberculosis care and to increase awareness of national guidelines for tuberculosis care. PMID:11716336

  8. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A; Sledge, George W; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A; Eberlein, Timothy J; Feeley, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report's recommendations-including two recommendations related to quality measurement-remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation's inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America. PMID:24839592

  9. The Quality of Care Provided to Hospitalized Patients at the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Walling, Anne M.; Asch, Steven M.; Lorenz, Karl A.; Roth, Carol P.; Barry, Tod; Kahn, Katherine L.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients in American hospitals receive intensive medical treatments. However, when lifesaving treatments are unsuccessful, patients often die in the hospital with distressing symptoms while receiving burdensome care. Systematic measurement of the quality of care planning and symptom palliation is needed. Methods Medical records were abstracted using sixteen Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators within the domains of end of life care and pain management designed to measure the quality of the dying experience for adult decedents hospitalized for at least 3 days between April 2005 and April 2006 (n=496) at a university medical center recognized for providing intensive care for the seriously ill. Results Over half of the patients (mean age 62, 47% female), were admitted to the hospital with end stage disease and 28% were age 75 or older. One third of the patients required extubation from mechanical ventilation prior to death and 15% died while receiving CPR. Overall, patients received recommended care for 70% of applicable indicators (range 25%–100%). Goals of care were addressed in a timely fashion for patients admitted to the ICU approximately half of the time, while pain assessments (94%) and treatments for pain (95%) and dyspnea (87%) were performed with fidelity. Follow-up for distressing symptoms was performed less well than initial assessment and 29% of patients extubated in anticipation of death had documented dyspnea assessments. Conclusions A practical, chart-based assessment identified discrete deficiencies in care planning and symptom palliation that can be targeted to improve care for patients dying in the hospital. PMID:20585072

  10. Disclosure of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use to Health Care Providers among HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Gange, Stephen J.; Weber, Kathleen; Sharp, Gerald B.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Levine, Alexandra; Robison, Esther; Goparaju, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Monica; Merenstein, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To determine prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use disclosure to health care providers and whether CAM use disclosure is associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence among HIV-infected women, we analyzed longitudinal data collected between October 1994 and March 2002 from HIV-infected CAM-using women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Repeated measures Poisson regression models were constructed to evaluate associations of selected predictors with CAM use disclosure and association between CAM use disclosure and HAART adherence. A total of 1377 HIV-infected women reported CAM use during study follow-up and contributed a total of 4689 CAM-using person visits. The overall prevalence of CAM use disclosure to health care providers was 36% across study visits. Women over 45 years old, with a college education, or with health insurance coverage were more likely to disclose their CAM use to health care providers, whereas women identified as non-Hispanic Black or other ethnicities were less likely to communicate their CAM usage. More health care provider visits, more CAM domains used, and higher health care satisfaction scores had significant relationships with increased levels of CAM use disclosure. Restricting analysis to use of herbal or nonherbal medications only, similar results were obtained. Compared to other CAM domains, mind–body practice had the lowest prevalence of CAM use disclosure. Additionally, CAM use disclosure was significantly associated with higher HAART adherence. From this study, we showed that a high percentage of HIV-infected women did not discuss their CAM use with health care providers. Interventions targeted towards both physicians and patients may enhance communication of CAM use, avoid potential adverse events and drug interactions, and enhance HAART adherence. PMID:19821723

  11. Conceptualizations of postpartum depression by public-sector health care providers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Mann, Joshua R; deCastro, Filipa

    2015-04-01

    In this article we describe the knowledge frameworks that 61 physicians, nurses, social workers, and psychologists from five public-sector health care facilities in Mexico used to conceptualize postpartum depression. We also demonstrate how providers applied social and behavioral antecedents in their conceptualizations of postpartum depression. Using grounded theory, we identify two frameworks that providers used to conceptualize postpartum depression: biochemical and adjustment. We highlight an emerging model of the function of social and behavioral antecedents within the frameworks, as well as the representation of postpartum depression by symptoms of distress and the perception among providers that these symptoms affected responsibilities associated with motherhood. The results provide a foundation for future study of how providers' conceptualizations of postpartum depression might affect detection and treatment practices and might be useful in the development of training materials to enhance the quality of care for women who experience any form of distress in the postpartum period. PMID:25281238

  12. Early integration of palliative and supportive care in the cancer continuum: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Bruera, Eduardo; Morganstern, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care has become synonymously associated with hospice care in the minds of patients and physicians. Supportive care is a more acceptable term and leads to earlier referral. Miscommunication and a "collusion of hope" centered on cancer treatment is detrimental to care at the end of life and results in complicated bereavement. Patients, despite being told prognosis, may not comprehend the news even if delivered in an empathetic manner. There are resource and policy barriers to palliative care. However, integration of palliative care early in the management of advanced cancer has demonstrated multiple benefits without reducing survival. PMID:23714482

  13. Disparities in Ovarian Cancer Care Quality and Survival According to Race and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between racial and socioeconomic status (SES) disparities and the quality of epithelial ovarian cancer care and survival outcome are unclear. Methods A population-based analysis of National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) records for invasive primary epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed in the period from 1998 to 2002 was done using data from patients classified as white or black. Adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline care was defined by stage-appropriate surgical procedures and recommended chemotherapy. The main outcome measures were differences in adherence to NCCN guidelines and overall survival according to race and SES and were analyzed using binomial logistic regression and multilevel survival analysis. Results A total of 47 160 patients (white = 43 995; black = 3165) were identified. Non-NCCN-guideline-adherent care was an independent predictor of inferior overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38 to 1.47). Demographic characteristics independently associated with a higher likelihood of not receiving NCCN guideline-adherent care were black race (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.25 to 1.48), Medicare payer status (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.28), and not insured payer status (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.49). After controlling for disease and treatment-related variables, independent racial and SES predictors of survival were black race (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.22 to 1.36), Medicaid payer status (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.38), not insured payer status (HR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.44), and median household income less than $35 000 (HR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.11). Conclusions These data highlight statistically and clinically significant disparities in the quality of ovarian cancer care and overall survival, independent of NCCN guidelines, along racial and SES parameters. Increased efforts are needed to more precisely define the patient, provider, health-care system, and societal factors leading to these observed disparities and guide targeted interventions. PMID:23539755

  14. Gynaecologic cancer symptom awareness, concern and care seeking among US women: a multi-site qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L; Gelb, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Background With limited screening options, early detection of gynaecologic cancers can depend on women recognizing the potential significance of symptoms and seeking care. Objective We investigated women’s concern about symptoms that might be related to gynaecologic cancers, the underlying conditions they associated with symptoms and their actual and hypothetical response to symptoms. Methods Fifteen focus groups with women aged 40–60 years were conducted in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami and New York City. Participants were given an untitled list of symptoms that could indicate various gynaecologic cancers and asked if any would concern them, what could cause each and what they would do if they experienced any of them. Results Overall, participants expressed greater concern about symptoms clearly gynaecologic in nature than other symptoms. Participants generally did not associate symptoms with any form of cancer. Some women who had experienced symptoms reported waiting an extended period before seeking care or not seeking care at all. The belief that a symptom indicated a benign condition was the most common reason given for delaying or foregoing care seeking. Strategies participants reported using to supplement or replace consultations with health care providers included Internet research and self-care. Conclusion Raising awareness of symptoms that can indicate gynaecologic cancers may lead to earlier detection and improved survival. In particular, women should be informed that gynaecologic cancers can cause symptoms that may not seem related to the reproductive organs (e.g. back pain) and that unusual vaginal bleeding should prompt them to seek care immediately. PMID:22948336

  15. Factors associated with self-reported, pesticide-related visits to health care providers in the agricultural health study.

    PubMed

    Alavanja, M C; Sandler, D P; McDonnell, C J; Lynch, C F; Pennybacker, M; Zahm, S H; Lubin, J; Mage, D; Steen, W C; Wintersteen, W; Blair, A

    1998-07-01

    To investigate factors associated with pesticide-related visits to health care providers (i.e., doctor or hospital visits), responses to self-administered questionnaires received from 35,879 licensed restricted-use pesticide applicators participating in the Agricultural Health Study were analyzed. (In Iowa, applicators are actually certified, whereas in North Carolina they are licensed; for ease of reference, the term license will be used for both states in this paper.) The cohort reported a total of more than 10.9 million pesticide-application days. These applications were associated with one or more pesticide-related health care visits by 2,214 applicators (7.0% of the applicator cohort for whom health care visit data were available). The odds of a pesticide-related health care visit were increased for commercial applicators compared to private applicators [odds ratio (OR = 1.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.52-2.06) and for applicators who used insecticides 70 times or more in their lifetime compared to those who used insecticides less frequently (OR = 1.43; CI, 1.26-1.63). After adjusting for the number of applications in a logistic regression model, significantly higher odds of health care visits were observed among North Carolina applicators compared to Iowa applicators (OR = 1.35; CI, 1.17-1.52), among applicators who mixed their own pesticides (OR = 1.65; CI, 1. 22-2.23), and among applicators who personally repaired their pesticide application equipment at least once per year (OR = 1.12; CI, 1.06-1.25). Significantly lower odds were found among female versus male applicators (OR = 0.68; CI, 0.46-0.99) and among applicators who graduated from high school versus those who did not (OR = 0.82; CI, 0.71-0.94 for high school graduates and OR = 0.79; CI, 0.68-0.91 for those with at least some college). Several methods of pesticide application to crops, seed, or stored grain were also associated with significantly elevated odds ratios of health care visits. These observations suggest that several steps can be taken to reduce the number of health care visits resulting from occupational exposure to pesticides. The implications of this pattern of pesticide-related health care visits may have etiologic implications for cancer and other chronic diseases. PMID:9637799

  16. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees. PMID:25490133

  17. Health Behaviors, Disparities and Deterring Factors for Breast Cancer Screening of Immigrant Women - A Challenge to Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Bejerano, Ivy Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Background This literature review was made to provide comprehensive to provide comprehensive understanding of health disparities as well as factors and barriers to cancer screening of immigrant women in multicultural societies. Methods: Published articles from 1990–2013 were searched using databases such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and Science Direct showing evidence of contributing factors and barriers to breast cancer screening practices of immigrant women in developed and developing countries. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 45 qualified articles were included in the review process. Results: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women. The identified influential factors and barriers that prevent immigrant women from cancer screening were categorized as individual, socio-cultural and behavioral factors. Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors. Presence of social support and recommendation from health care professionals were strongly associated with compliance with cancer screening. Cultural beliefs and practices as well as behavioral factors were among the barriers that deter women from participating in cancer screening. Conclusion: To alleviate the negative factors and barriers that affect the participation of high-risk immigrant women, a client-centered assessment and intervention approach with specific regard to cultural beliefs and practices should be considered by health care professionals. Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide.

  18. Clinical social networking--a new revolution in provider communication and delivery of clinical information across providers of care?

    PubMed

    Kolowitz, Brian J; Lauro, Gonzalo Romero; Venturella, James; Georgiev, Veliyan; Barone, Michael; Deible, Christopher; Shrestha, Rasu

    2014-04-01

    The adoption of social media technologies appears to enhance clinical outcomes through improved communications as reported by Bacigalupe (Fam Syst Heal 29(1):1-14, 2011). The ability of providers to more effectively, directly, and rapidly communicate among themselves as well as with patients should strengthen collaboration and treatment as reported by Bacigalupe (Fam Syst Heal 29(1):1-14, 2011). This paper is a case study in one organization's development of an internally designed and developed social technology solution termed "Unite." The Unite system combines social technologies' features including push notifications, messaging, community groups, and user lists with clinical workflow and applications to construct dynamic provider networks, simplify communications, and facilitate clinical workflow optimization. Modeling Unite as a social technology may ease adoption barriers. Developing a social network that is integrated with healthcare information systems in the clinical space opens the doors to capturing and studying the way in which providers communicate. The Unite system appears to have the potential to breaking down existing communication paradigms. With Unite, a rich set of usage data tied to clinical events may unravel alternative networks that can be leveraged to advance patient care. PMID:24149968

  19. Randomised comparison of combination chemotherapy plus supportive care with supportive care alone in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Scheithauer; H Rosen; G V Kornek; C Sebesta; D Depisch

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To compare the length of survival and quality of life in patients given combination chemotherapy in addition to supportive care and in patients given only supportive care. DESIGN--Randomised study. SETTING--Gastrointestinal oncology departments. PATIENTS--40 previously untreated patients with histologically confirmed, measurable colorectal cancer that was locally recurrent or metastatic. INTERVENTIONS--Patients were allocated randomly to receive chemotherapy or only supportive care in

  20. Increasing Physicians' and Nurses' Compliance with Treatment Guidelines in Cancer Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slenker, Suzanne E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the use of guidelines on the care of patients with breast, colon, and non-small-cell lung cancers is reported. Audits of patient records revealed an increase over time in the percentage of recommended cancer care procedures that were complied with. (Author/MLW)