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Sample records for cancer care providers

  1. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  2. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  3. Are primary care providers implementing evidence-based care for breast cancer survivors?

    PubMed Central

    Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Aiken, Alice; McColl, Mary Ann; Tranmer, Joan; Langley, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the implementation of key best practice guideline recommendations for posttreatment breast cancer survivorship care by primary care providers (PCPs). Design Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Setting Southeastern Ontario. Participants Eighty-two PCPs: 62 family physicians (FPs) and 20 primary health care nurse practitioners (PHCNPs). Main outcome measures Twenty-one “need-to-know” breast cancer survivorship care guideline recommendations rated by participants as “implemented routinely,” “aware of guideline recommendation but not implemented routinely,” or “not aware of guideline recommendation.” Results Overall, FPs and PHCNPs in our sample reported similar practice patterns in terms of implementation of breast cancer survivorship guideline recommendations. The PCPs reported routinely implementing approximately half (46.4%, 9.7 of 21) of the key guideline recommendations with breast cancer survivors in their practices. Implementation rates were higher for recommendations related to prevention and surveillance aspects of survivorship care, such as mammography and weight management. Knowledge and practice gaps were highest for recommendations related to screening for and management of long-term effects such as fatigue and distress. There were only a few minor differences reported between FPs and PHCNPs. Conclusion There are knowledge and practice gaps related to implementation of the key guideline recommendations for breast cancer survivorship care in the primary care setting that could be targeted for improvement through educational or other interventions.

  4. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  5. Who provides follow-up care for patients with early breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Worster, A.; Wood, M. L.; McWhinney, I. R.; Bass, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess how often family physicians are involved in posttreatment care of their stage I breast cancer patients and to identify factors associated with family physicians providing follow-up care. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study with a 5-year follow up by chart review. PARTICIPANTS: All cases of breast cancer seen at the London Regional Cancer Centre between 1982 and 1987 were reviewed to identify 183 stage I cancer patients alive at 5 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Whether a physician (other than an oncologist) was involved in the follow-up care of patients, and whether the physician was a family physician or a surgeon. RESULTS: Follow-up care during the 5-year postoperative period was provided in most cases by oncologists alone (66.7%); family physicians and surgeons were involved in 17.5% and 15.8% of cases, respectively. Surgeons became involved in follow-up care much earlier (12 months) than family physicians did (23 months) (P = 0.01) and were more likely to provide care for patients who received radiation treatment (P = 0.04) and for patients who lived in London (P = 0.004). Most malignant breast lesions (77.5%) were discovered by patients themselves (P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Currently, family physicians are infrequently involved in follow-up care of their patients with early breast cancer. PMID:7580380

  6. The Gynecologist Has a Unique Role in Providing Oncofertility Care to Young Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Francesca E; Jozefik, Jennifer K; Kim, Alison M; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2011-01-01

    Facing a cancer diagnosis at any age is devastating. However, young cancer patients have the added burden that life-preserving cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, may compromise their future fertility. The possibility of reproductive dysfunction as a consequence of cancer treatment has a negative impact on the quality of life of cancer survivors. The field of oncofertility, which merges the clinical specialties of oncology and reproductive endocrinology, was developed to explore and expand fertility preservation options and to better manage the reproductive status of cancer patients. Fertility preservation for females has proved to be a particular challenge because mature female gametes are rare and difficult to acquire. The purpose of this article is to provide the gynecologist with a comprehensive overview of how cancer treatments affect the female reproductive axis, delineate the diverse fertility preservation options that are currently available or being developed for young women, and describe current measures of ovarian reserve that can be used pre- and post-cancer treatment. As a primary care provider, the gynecologist will likely interact with patients throughout the cancer care continuum. Thus, the gynecologist is in a unique position to join the oncofertility team in providing young cancer patients with up-to-date fertility preservation information and referrals to specialists. PMID:21927621

  7. [Case report: coordination of the care provided to patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Peinado-Barraso, M del Carmen; Cabrerizo-Cordero, M del Rosario; Granados-Matute, Ana Eva; Contreras-Fariñas, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    In Spain, cancer is the leading cause of death in absolute terms. Statistically, the most frequent type of cancer in women in developed countries is breast cancer, which is becoming the leading cause of death from cancer among women. The breast cancer is statistically the most frequent in women and it is getting the first reason of death by cancer between the feminine population, in most of developed countries. This health problem is usually associated with psychological dependency, which can be aggravated in elderly patients without adequate family support. TThe nursing process is the most commonly used tool to establish interaction among the nurse, the patient and the family. Through this interaction, the nurse can identify the patient's health objectives and energy limitations, as well as the resources available to obtain optimal health status. The nursing process is a systematic method for providing efficient humanistic care aimed at achieving expected outcomes. In the case presented herein, we employed Marjory Gordon's Functional Patterns and the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). The nursing diagnoses detected were fear, anxiety, self-care deficit, impaired mobility, risk of low self-esteem, ineffective coping, and potential complications (pain and infection). The care session is one of the main interventions to improve the effectiveness of the care provided. During this session, methodological adjustments of the nursing process are analyzed, with special attention paid to the appropriateness of the interventions, the possible alternatives and encouragement of reflective practice Essential elements to improve quality of life in these elderly oncology patients are the role of nursing through the care provided and coordination among professionals in different disciplines and healthcare levels. PMID:18840337

  8. Examining Forms of Spiritual Care Provided in the Advanced Cancer Setting.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Peterson, Zachary D; Sullivan, Adam J; Enzinger, Andrea C; Trevino, Kelly M; Zollfrank, Angelika A; Balboni, Michael J; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Balboni, Tracy A

    2015-11-01

    Spiritual care (SC) is important to the care of seriously ill patients. Few studies have examined types of SC provided and their perceived impact. This study surveyed patients with advanced cancer (N = 75, response rate [RR] = 73%) and oncology nurses and physicians (N = 339, RR = 63%). Frequency and perceived impact of 8 SC types were assessed. Spiritual care is infrequently provided, with encouraging or affirming beliefs the most common type (20%). Spiritual history taking and chaplaincy referrals comprised 10% and 16%, respectively. Most patients viewed each SC type positively, and SC training predicted provision of many SC types. In conclusion, SC is infrequent, and core elements of SC-spiritual history taking and chaplaincy referrals-represent a minority of SC. Spiritual care training predicts provision of SC, indicting its importance to advancing SC in the clinical setting. PMID:25005589

  9. Clinical Care Providers’ Perspectives on Body Size and Weight Management Among Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Allison M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Coa, Kisha I; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Peairs, Kimberly S.; Shockney, Lillie D.; Klassen, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine clinical care providers’ perspectives on cancer survivors’ body size and weight management Study Design In-depth, semi-structured, qualitative interviews Methods Interviews were conducted with 33 providers (e.g., oncologists, surgeons, primary care providers, nurses, dietitians) across academic and community clinical settings. They were transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically using constant comparative analysis. Results Providers conceptualized weight in relation to acute treatment, cancer outcomes, or overall health/comorbidities. These patterns were reflected in their reported framing of weight discussions, although providers indicated that they counsel patients on weight to varying extents. Perspectives differed based on professional roles and patient populations. Providers reported that survivors are motivated to lose weight, particularly due to comorbidity concerns, but face numerous barriers to doing so. Conclusion Providers described survivor-level and capacity-level factors influencing survivors’ weight management. Differences by provider type highlighted the role of provider knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs in clinical encounters. Opportunities for research and intervention include developing and disseminating evidence-based clinical resources for weight management among cancer survivors, addressing capacity barriers, and exploring communication strategies at interpersonal and population levels. PMID:25716349

  10. An Assessment to Inform Pediatric Cancer Provider Development and Delivery of Survivor Care Plans.

    PubMed

    Warner, Echo L; Wu, Yelena P; Hacking, Claire C; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly L; Gardner, Emmie; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2015-12-01

    Current guidelines recommend all pediatric cancer survivors receive a survivor care plan (SCP) for optimal health management, yet clinical delivery of SCPs varies. We evaluated oncology providers' familiarity with and preferences for delivering SCPs to inform the implementation of a future SCP program at our institution. From November 2013 to April 2014, oncology providers from the Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City, UT, completed a survey (n?=?41) and a 45-min focus group (n?=?18). Participants reported their familiarity with and training in SCP guidelines, opinions on SCPs, and barriers to delivering SCPs. As a secondary analysis, we examined differences in survey responses between physicians and nurses with Fisher's exact tests. Focus group transcripts and open-ended survey responses were content analyzed. Participants reported high familiarity with late effects of cancer treatment (87.8 %) and follow-up care that cancer survivors should receive (82.5 %). Few providers had delivered an SCP (oncologists 35.3 % and nurses 5.0 %; p?=?0.03). Barriers to providing SCPs included lack of knowledge (66.7 %), SCP delivery is not expected in their clinic (53.9 %), and no champion (48.7 %). In qualitative comments, providers expressed that patient age variation complicated SCP delivery. Participants supported testing an SCP intervention program (95.1 %) and felt this should be a team-based approach. Strategies for optimal delivery of SCPs are needed. Participants supported testing an SCP program to improve the quality of patient care. Team-based approaches, including nurses and physicians, that incorporate provider training on and support for SCP delivery are needed to improve pediatric cancer care. PMID:25893925

  11. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  12. Novel Telemedicine Technologies in Geriatric Chronic Non-Cancer Pain: Primary Care Providers’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Mimi; Richardson, Joshua E.; Granieri, Evelyn; Reid, M. Cary

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify primary care providers’ interest in, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to, using novel telemedicine technologies (e.g., smartphones) for managing chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in older adults. Design Six focus groups were conducted with 25 primary care providers. Setting Two academically affiliated primary care practices serving older adults with CNCP in New York City. Methods The investigators used content analysis to analyze transcribed focus group data and identify specific themes. Results While most providers reported limited use of telemedicine, they expressed substantial interest in trying devices such as smartphones in the management of older patients with CNCP. Perceived barriers to implementation of telemedicine tools included information overload, lack of mobile device usability among patients and clinicians, liability issues, and cost. To overcome these barriers, participants suggested implementing electronic or human-based pre-analysis of data (e.g., a computer or a person that triages patient data), creating a low-cost and user-friendly mobile device design, and targeting appropriate user populations. Conclusions Primary care providers are interested in applying telemedicine when caring for older adults with CNCP. Although they perceived multiple barriers to device implementation, they offered innovative solutions to address these barriers. Providers felt that novel telemedicine technologies may improve the management of CNCP but wanted evidence that the devices were both cost- and time-efficient, and led to improved patient outcomes before adopting their use in practice. PMID:24341423

  13. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  14. Knowledge, experiences, and barriers to colorectal cancer screening: a survey of health care providers working in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Omran, Suha; Barakat, Husam; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Aljadaa, Nabeela

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and early detection can effectively decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Health care providers (HCPs) working in primary care settings as the first contact with the health care system can play a pivotal role in cancer prevention and screening for early detection. The purpose of this study was to explore the knowledge, experiences, and perceived barriers to CRC screening among HCPs working in primary care settings. A cross-sectional design and a self-administered questionnaire (SAQ) was used to collect data from 236 HCPs working in health centers in Jordan. The 236 HCPs were nurses (45.8%), physicians (45.3%), and others (7.2%). A third of the HCPs (30%) knew the recommended age to begin CRC screening for patients with average risk. Overall physicians scored higher than nurses on questions assessing CRC screening knowledge. The majority of HCPs were not knowledgeable about CRC screening recommendations but believed that CRC is preventable (75.8%). The main perceived barriers to CRC screening were patient's fear of finding out that they have cancer and lack of awareness about CRC screening tests, shortage of trained HCPs to conduct invasive screening procedures, and lack of policy/protocol on CRC screening. HCPs working in primary care settings in Jordan do not have adequate knowledge about CRC screening. There is a need for tailored continuing educational programs and other interventions to improve HCPs' knowledge, as this can increase CRC screening in primary care settings and compliance with current screening guidelines. PMID:24882440

  15. Differences in Parent-Provider Concordance Regarding Prognosis and Goals of Care Among Children With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Abby R.; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I.; Geyer, J. Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concordance between parents of children with advanced cancer and health care providers has not been described. We aimed to describe parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals of care, including differences by cancer type. Patients and Methods A total of 104 pediatric patients with recurrent or refractory cancer were enrolled at three large children's hospitals. On enrollment, their parents and providers were invited to complete a survey assessing perceived prognosis and goals of care. Patients' survival status was retrospectively abstracted from medical records. Concordance was assessed via discrepancies in perceived prognosis, ? statistics, and McNemar's test. Distribution of categorical variables and survival rates across cancer type were compared with Fisher's exact and log-rank tests, respectively. Results Data were available from 77 dyads (74% of enrolled). Parent-provider agreement regarding prognosis and goals of care was poor (?, 0.12 to 0.30). Parents were more likely to report cure was likely (P < .001). The frequency of perceived likelihood of cure and the goal of cure varied by cancer type for both parents and providers (P < .001 to .004). Relatively optimistic responses were more common among parents and providers of patients with hematologic malignancies, although there were no differences in survival. Conclusion Parent-provider concordance regarding prognosis and goals in advanced pediatric cancer is generally poor. Perceptions of prognosis and goals of care vary by cancer type. Understanding these differences may inform parent-provider communication and decision making. PMID:25024073

  16. CHAMBER: A Regional Performance Improvement CME Initiative for Breast Cancer Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Linda M; Geradts, Joseph; Hamilton, Erika P; Havlin, Kathleen A; Kimmick, Gretchen G; Marcom, P Kelly; Spector, Neil L; Watson, Melanie; Rabin, Daniel U; Bruno, Theodore O; Noe, Amanda; Miller, Stacy; Subramaniam, Chitra; Layton, Sherry; Grichnik, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    CHAMBER was a regional educational initiative for providers of care to patients with HER2+ breast cancer. The study goals were to (1) enhance testing for HER2/neu overexpression in patients with invasive breast cancer; (2) increase the appropriate use of targeted therapy for patients with HER2+ breast cancer; and (3) enhance patients' coping ability. This Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI-CME) initiative included clinical practice assessment, educational activities, and reassessment. Chart review revealed a high rate of HER2 testing (98%) before and after education. Targeted therapy for patients with HER2+ breast cancer declined after the program (from 96% to 61%), perhaps attributable to an increase in awareness of medical reasons to avoid use of targeted therapy. Assessment for patients' emotional coping ability increased after education (from 55% to 76%; P=.01). Rates of testing for HER2 amplification and assessment of emotional well-being after education were consistent with ASCO Quality Oncology Practice Initiative benchmark values. Documentation of actions to address emotional problems remained an area for improvement. PMID:26285246

  17. Guideline for referral of patients with suspected lung cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, M. Elisabeth; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicions about the presence of lung cancer in their patients. Composition of the committee Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network and from among the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Lung Cancer Disease Site Group. Methods This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. Report Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of lung cancer within the Canadian context. Conclusion Earlier identification and referral of patients with lung cancer might ultimately help improve lung cancer morbidity and mortality. These guidelines might also be of value for informing the development of lung cancer diagnostic programs and for helping policy makers to ensure appropriate resources are in place. PMID:25122814

  18. Guideline for referral of patients with suspected colorectal cancer by family physicians and other primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, M. Elisabeth; Vella, Emily T.; Hey, Amanda; Simunovic, Marko; Harris, William; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this guideline is to assist FPs and other primary care providers with recognizing features that should raise their suspicions about the presence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in their patients. Composition of the committee Committee members were selected from among the regional primary care leads from the Cancer Care Ontario Provincial Primary Care and Cancer Network, the members of the Ontario Colorectal Cancer Screening Advisory Committee, and the members of the Cancer Care Ontario Gastrointestinal Cancer Disease Site Group. Methods This guideline was developed through systematic review of the evidence base, synthesis of the evidence, and formal external review involving Canadian stakeholders to validate the relevance of recommendations. Report Evidence-based guidelines were developed to improve the management of patients presenting with clinical features of CRC within the Canadian context. Conclusion The judicious balancing of suspicion of CRC and level of risk of CRC should encourage timely referral by FPs and primary care providers. This guideline might also inform indications for referral to CRC diagnostic assessment programs. PMID:25122815

  19. Increasing Patient / Provider Communications about Colorectal Cancer Screening In Rural Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Berta M.; Skelly, Joan M.; Dorwaldt, Anne L.; Howe, Kathleen D.; Dana, Greg S.; Flynn, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rural populations as well as less educated people in the U.S. are less likely to receive colorectal cancer (CRC) screening than people living in urban areas and more educated people. Methods We tested a computer tablet, Patient/Provider Communication Assistant (PPCA), which collected data, educated patients, and printed personalized notes to patients and providers encouraging conversation about CRC screening. Mixed model analyses using a pre-post quasi-experimental design compared patient results during the comparison and intervention periods in 5 rural primary care practices on provider discussion about CRC screening, provider recommendation, and patient intention to be screened. Models including age, education and literacy measures as covariates were examined. Results Providers talked with patients about CRC screening in general, and colonoscopy specifically more frequently after the PPCA than with the comparison group (p values =.04 and .01, respectively). Providers recommended CRC screening more often to patients in the intervention group than to the comparison group (p=.02). Patients planned to be screened and specifically with colonoscopy more frequently following the intervention than in the comparison group (p=.003). There were no interactions between group and any of the covariates. Ninety-five percent of the patients regardless of age or education found the PPCA easy to use. Conclusion Results indicated increased provider discussion and recommendation, and patients' intentions to obtain CRC screening, and in particular colonoscopy, for patients exposed to the intervention, regardless of the patients' age or literacy levels. The PPCA is a promising intervention method that is acceptable to rural patients. PMID:18725831

  20. Is Distance to Provider a Barrier to Care for Medicaid Patients with Breast, Colorectal, or Lung Cancer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoggins, John F.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Donahue, Sara M. A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Blough, David K.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distance to provider might be an important barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients who qualify for Medicaid coverage. Whether driving time or driving distance is a better indicator of travel burden is also of interest. Methods: Driving distances and times from patient residence to primary care provider were…

  1. 'Palliative care': a contradiction in terms? A qualitative study of cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their relatives and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative cancer care aims to improve quality of life and ultimately quality of dying, while prolonging life is not an objective anymore when death nears. The question is, however, whether these perspectives on palliative care are congruent with the perspectives of immigrant families with a Turkish or Moroccan background. Methods A qualitative design was used as we were looking for the personal views of 'very ill' cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their family members and their Dutch care providers. We interviewed 83 people, involved in 33 cases to obtain information about their views, values and norms on 'good care'. Results The main concerns about 'good care' expressed by Turkish and Moroccan families were: maximum treatment and curative care until the end of their lives, never having hope taken away, devoted care by their families, avoiding shameful situations, dying with a clear mind and being buried in their own country. Their views conflict, to some extent, with the dominant principles in palliative care, for example, the emphasis on quality of life and advanced care planning, which includes discussing diagnosis and prognosis with the patient. Conclusions Patients and their families with a Turkish or Moroccan background often have different ideas about 'good care' than their Dutch care providers. As many of them are aiming at cure until the end of life, they find 'good palliative care' a contradiction in terms. PMID:20831777

  2. Social Support, Self-Rated Health, and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Identity Disclosure to Cancer Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles S.; Smith-Stoner, Marilyn; Heckler, Charles E.; Flannery, Marie; Margolies, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe factors related to diagnosis, identity disclosure, and social support among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients with cancer, and to explore associations between these factors and self-rated health. Design Cross-sectional self-report survey design using descriptive and exploratory multivariate statistical approaches. Setting Online, Internet-based. Sample 291 LGBT patients (89% Caucasian; 50% gay, 36% lesbian, 7% bisexual, 3% transgender) with mixed cancers. Methods Participants completed a researcher-designed online survey assessing experiences of cancer diagnosis among LGBT patients at a single time point. Main Research Variables Demographics, which provider(s) delivered the patients’ cancer diagnoses, to whom patients had disclosed their LGBT identity, how they disclosed, who was on their social support team at the time of diagnosis, and current self-rated health. Findings 79% of participants reported disclosing their identities to more than one cancer care provider. Participants most commonly introduced the topic of LGBT identity themselves, sometimes as a way to correct heterosexual assumptions (34%). Friends were the most common members of LGBT patients’ support teams (79%). Four disclosure and support factors were consistently associated with better self-rated health. Conclusions Disclosure of LGBT identity is a common experience in the context of cancer care, and disclosure and support factors are associated with better self-reported health among LGBT patients. Implications for Nursing Creating safe environments for LGBT patients to disclose could improve cancer care delivery to this underserved population. Nurses and other providers should acknowledge and include diverse support team members in LGBT patients’ care. PMID:25542320

  3. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  4. Attitudes and Beliefs of Primary Care Providers in New Mexico About Lung Cancer Screening Using Low-Dose Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Richard M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Getrich, Christina M.; Rhyne, Robert L.; Crowell, Richard E.; Taylor, Kathryn L.; Reifler, Ellen J.; Wescott, Pamela H.; Murrietta, Ambroshia M.; Saeed, Ali I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction On the basis of results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), national guidelines now recommend using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) to screen high-risk smokers for lung cancer. Our study objective was to characterize the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of primary care providers about implementing LDCT screening. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with primary care providers practicing in New Mexico clinics for underserved minority populations. The interviews, conducted from February through September 2014, focused on providers’ tobacco cessation efforts, lung cancer screening practices, perceptions of NLST and screening guidelines, and attitudes about informed decision making for cancer screening. Investigators iteratively reviewed transcripts to create a coding structure. Results We reached thematic saturation after interviewing 10 providers practicing in 6 urban and 4 rural settings; 8 practiced at federally qualified health centers. All 10 providers promoted smoking cessation, some screened with chest x-rays, and none screened with LDCT. Not all were aware of NLST results or current guideline recommendations. Providers viewed study results skeptically, particularly the 95% false-positive rate, the need to screen 320 patients to prevent 1 lung cancer death, and the small proportion of minority participants. Providers were uncertain whether New Mexico had the necessary infrastructure to support high-quality screening, and worried about access barriers and financial burdens for rural, underinsured populations. Providers noted the complexity of discussing benefits and harms of screening and surveillance with their patient population. Conclusion Providers have several concerns about the feasibility and appropriateness of implementing LDCT screening. Effective lung cancer screening programs will need to educate providers and patients to support informed decision making and to ensure that high-quality screening can be efficiently delivered in community practice. PMID:26160294

  5. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Choosing your prenatal care provider Choosing your prenatal care provider Now playing: E-mail to a friend ... provider. Who can you go to for prenatal care? You can choose who your prenatal care provider ...

  6. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... describes health care providers involved in primary care, nursing care, and specialty care. This is just one way ... MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). NURSING CARE Registered nurses (RNs) have graduated from a nursing ...

  7. Quality of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice. This requires addressing how data collection about cancer care can be standardized and made most useful to a variety of audiences including providers, patients and their families, purchasers, payers, researchers, and policymakers. The Applied Research Program has spearheaded several key activities to carry out this initiative.

  8. Primary care provider practices and beliefs related to cervical cancer screening with the HPV test in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Roland, K.B.; Benard, V.B.; Greek, A.; Hawkins, N.A.; Manninen, D.; Saraiya, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer screening using the human papillomavirus (HPV) test and Pap test together (co-testing) is an option for average-risk women ?30 years of age. With normal co-test results, screening intervals can be extended. The study objective is to assess primary care provider practices, beliefs, facilitators and barriers to using the co-test and extending screening intervals among low-income women. Method Data were collected from 98 providers in 15 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinics in Illinois between August 2009 and March 2010 using a cross-sectional survey. Results 39% of providers reported using the co-test, and 25% would recommend a three-year screening interval for women with normal co-test results. Providers perceived greater encouragement for co-testing than for extending screening intervals with a normal co-test result. Barriers to extending screening intervals included concerns about patients not returning annually for other screening tests (77%), patient concerns about missing cancer (62%), and liability (52%). Conclusion Among FQHC providers in Illinois, few administered the co-test for screening and recommended appropriate intervals, possibly due to concerns over loss to follow-up and liability. Education regarding harms of too-frequent screening and false positives may be necessary to balance barriers to extending screening intervals. PMID:23628517

  9. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care

  10. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as lymphedema , pain management, sexual functioning, or psychosocial issues. A patient may also receive palliative care ... 2007/Cancer-Care-for-the-Whole-Patient-Meeting-Psychosocial-Health-Needs.aspx . Does NCI support palliative care ...

  11. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  12. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using ?2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  13. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past ... dermatitis worse? What are the most common irritants? Skin cancer What type of skin cancer do I ...

  14. Impact of computer-assisted data collection, evaluation and management on the cancer genetic counselor's time providing patient care.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stephanie A; McIlvried, Dawn E

    2011-06-01

    Cancer genetic counseling sessions traditionally encompass collecting medical and family history information, evaluating that information for the likelihood of a genetic predisposition for a hereditary cancer syndrome, conveying that information to the patient, offering genetic testing when appropriate, obtaining consent and subsequently documenting the encounter with a clinic note and pedigree. Software programs exist to collect family and medical history information electronically, intending to improve efficiency and simplicity of collecting, managing and storing this data. This study compares the genetic counselor's time spent in cancer genetic counseling tasks in a traditional model and one using computer-assisted data collection, which is then used to generate a pedigree, risk assessment and consult note. Genetic counselor time spent collecting family and medical history and providing face-to-face counseling for a new patient session decreased from an average of 85-69 min when using the computer-assisted data collection. However, there was no statistically significant change in overall genetic counselor time on all aspects of the genetic counseling process, due to an increased amount of time spent generating an electronic pedigree and consult note. Improvements in the computer program's technical design would potentially minimize data manipulation. Certain aspects of this program, such as electronic collection of family history and risk assessment, appear effective in improving cancer genetic counseling efficiency while others, such as generating an electronic pedigree and consult note, do not. PMID:21240560

  15. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Ask About Cancer Research Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ®) General Information About Spirituality Key Points Religious ... To help patients with spiritual needs during cancer care, medical staff will listen to the wishes of ...

  16. Integrating acupuncture into cancer care.

    PubMed

    Chien, Tsai-Ju; Liu, Chia-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Hua

    2013-10-01

    Oncology acupuncture has become a new and promising field of research because more and more cancer patients have sought non-pharmacological alternatives for symptom management. While different mechanisms have been proposed to explain its efficacy, including theories of the neural system, endocrine cytokine or immunological regulation, its eventual role has become that of alleviating the side effects induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the related articles focusing on acupuncture mechanisms and applications in cancer care to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture in cancer care. A detailed search was performed to identify the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews on acupuncture in oncology, using PUBMED and Cochrane. The search terms included: Acupuncture, acupressure, and cancer. Additional terms were used to target specific symptoms (i.e., breast cancer, hot flash, xerostomia, nausea, vomiting, cancer pain, insomnia, fatigue). Two authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Ultimately, 25 articles underwent full-text review. Recent trials made efforts in studying (a) hot flashes in breast cancer, (b) xerostomia induced by radiotherapy in head and neck cancer, (c) nausea and vomiting post-chemotherapy, (d) cancer pain, and (e) fatigue and insomnia in cancer patients. Controversial results for acupuncture application in cancer care appeared in different categories, but a trend emerged that acupuncture can palliate cancer-related symptoms. The research to date certainly offers us a valid complementary therapy in treating cancer-related symptoms. Meanwhile, practical strategies with safe measures for enhancing the efficacy are needed in further interventions, as well as continuing research with a validated methodology. PMID:24716183

  17. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  18. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Family Issues Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®) Overview Key Points Good ... fewer procedures and better quality of life. Good communication between patients, family caregivers, and the health care ...

  19. Group Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Group family day care providers need to create high-quality programs where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the group family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care providers:…

  20. Find a Hospice or Palliative Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 20 50 100 miles Provider Name: Organization Type: Hospice Multi-Location Hospice Provider Palliative Care Provider or Sitemap Contact Us Privacy Informacion en Español Copyright National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization 1731 King Street, Suite ...

  1. Providing Child Care At East Carolina University

    E-print Network

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    Providing Child Care At East Carolina University Preliminary Report October 9, 2006 #12;Providing Child Care At East Carolina University Preliminary Report October 9, 2006 1 Overview In April 2006 to child care for university employees and exploring child care options for the campus community

  2. Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share A Child Care Provider's Guide to Safe Sleep Article Body Did ... Caused By: Immunizations Vomiting or choking What can child care providers do? Follow these guidelines to help protect ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vulvodynia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vulvodynia? Skip sharing on social media ... been ruled out. To diagnose vulvodynia, 1 a health care provider may recommend that a woman have blood ...

  7. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  8. For Health Care Professional - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides numerous cancer-related resources for health care professionals. For information regarding cancer types, treatment, clinical trials and links to other National Cancer Institute resources, please go to the NCI home page.

  9. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  10. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research...in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (Nd), is soliciting voluntary...respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking...

  11. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Association of Cancer Online Resources, a cancer information system that offers access to electronic mailing lists and websites, provides a list of long-term follow-up care clinics on its Ped-Onc ... medical information should patients keep? It is important for people ...

  12. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  13. Concept of optimisation of the radiation protection system in the nuclear sector: management of individual cancer risks and providing targeted health care.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F; Agapov, A M; Panfilov, A P; Kaidalov, O V; Gorski, A I; Maksioutov, M A; Suspitsin, Y V; Vaizer, V I

    2006-12-01

    The paper discusses the provision of targeted health care to nuclear workers in Russia based on radiation-epidemiological estimates of cancer risks. Cancer incidence rates are analysed for the workers of the Institute of Physical Power Engineering (the first nuclear installation in the world) who were subjected to individual dosimetric monitoring from 1950 to 2002. The value of excess relative risk for solid cancers was found to be ERR Gy(-1) = 0.24 (95% CI: -4.22; 7.96). It has been shown that 81.8% of the persons covered by individual dosimetric monitoring have potential attributive risk up to 5%, and the risk is more than 10% for 3.7% of the workers. Among the detected cancer cases, 73.5% of the individuals show an attributive risk up to 5% and the risk is in excess of 10% for 3.9% of the workers. Principles for the provision of targeted health care, given voluntary health insurance, are outlined. PMID:17146121

  14. Cannabis in cancer care

    E-print Network

    Abrams, DI; Guzman, M

    2015-01-01

    from a trial of cannabis oil against their cancer risk thecannabis extracts or oils that these preparations can “cure cancer. ”cancer therapies in favor of self-medicating with high-potency cannabis oils.

  15. CARE: a hypermedia cancer information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Chander, Prem M.; Ragan, Don P.; Porter, Arthur

    1996-02-01

    This paper discusses the CARE (Cancer Attitude Risk Education) system, an interactive user friendly hypermedia information system that will allow users to learn more about various aspects of cancer such as risk factors, diagnosis and available treatment options. The CARE system provides information to the user through various means like text, video, graphics, photographs, animation and sound. A defining feature of the CARE system is that it collects information from the user as well as disseminating information. The CARE system collects items such as name, age, gender and answers to risk assessment questions as the user browses through the system. The data collected through the CARE system is valuable to cancer researchers and support groups.

  16. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  17. Follow-Up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    American Cancer Society's Long-Term Guidelines for Prostate Cancer Survivors Newly developed guidelines that provide detailed recommendations about nutrition and physical activity, cancer testing, management of side effects, and coordination of care.

  18. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. PMID:26199294

  19. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  20. Realizing IOM Care Recommendations in Practice - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer survivorship, which begins at diagnosis and includes families and caregivers, is a neglected phase of the cancer care trajectory. Few guidelines exist, and most health care providers lack education and training in caring for this population. Survivors themselves often are unaware of the health risks and issues they face and usually are not provided with a plan for follow-up care after treatment is complete.

  1. CancerCare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oncology experts Publications Read about cancer-related topics online or in print Financial Assistance Find financial help and resources Co-Payment Assistance Get help with co-payments for chemotherapy ...

  2. Caring: Information for Family Day-Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This series of leaflets provides information for family day care providers on nine topics. Age differences and developmental stages are emphasized. The first topic concerns ways to help young children get along with others. Self-esteem is emphasized, and methods for helping children develop self-esteem are listed. The second leaflet discusses…

  3. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals. PMID:25280546

  4. Review of Pesticide Education Materials for Health Care Providers Providing Care to Agricultural Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiott, Ann E.; Quandt, Sara A.; Early, Julie; Jackson, David S.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Pesticide exposure is an important environmental and occupational health risk for agricultural workers and their families, but health care providers receive little training in it. Objective: To evaluate the medical resources available to providers caring for patients, particularly farmworkers, exposed to pesticides and to recommend a…

  5. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  6. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  7. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  8. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  9. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer. PMID:24857069

  10. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  11. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. PMID:25777363

  12. The "specter" of cancer: exploring secondary trauma for health professionals providing cancer support and counseling.

    PubMed

    Breen, Lauren J; O'Connor, Moira; Hewitt, Lauren Y; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-02-01

    Health professionals are vulnerable to occupational stress and tend to report high levels of secondary trauma and burnout; this is especially so for those working in "high-death" contexts such as cancer support and palliative care. In this study, 38 health professionals (psychologists, social workers, pastoral carers/chaplains, nurses, group facilitators, and a medical practitioner) who provide grief support and counseling in cancer and palliative care each participated in a semistructured interview. Qualitatively, a grounded theory analysis revealed four themes: (a) the role of health professionals in supporting people who are experiencing grief and loss issues in the context of cancer, (b) ways of working with patients with cancer and their families, (c) the unique qualities of cancer-related loss and grief experiences, and (d) the emotional demands of the work and associated self-care. The provision of psychological services in the context of cancer is colored by the specter of cancer, an unseen yet real phenomenon that contributes to secondary trauma and burnout. The participants' reported secondary trauma has serious repercussions for their well-being and may compromise the care they provide. The findings have implications for the retention and well-being of personnel who provide psychosocial care in cancer and the quality and delivery of services for people with cancer and their families. PMID:24079353

  13. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  14. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... care services. (b) Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1)...

  15. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... care services. (b) Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1)...

  16. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Healthcare Connect Fund. Health care providers in the Healthcare...for funding for the site. Health care providers must also notify the Administrator within 30 days of a change in the health care provider's name, site...

  17. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Healthcare Connect Fund. Health care providers in the Healthcare...for funding for the site. Health care providers must also notify the Administrator within 30 days of a change in the health care provider's name, site...

  18. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity...

  19. Financial Burden of Cancer Care | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The financial costs of cancer care are a burden to people diagnosed with cancer, their families, and society as a whole. National expenditures associated with cancer have been steadily increasing in the United States. Care for cancer survivors accounted for an estimated 137.4 billion in medical care expenditures in the United States in 2010. In the near future, cancer costs may increase at a faster rate than overall medical expenditures.

  20. Cancer care decision making in multidisciplinary meetings.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin; Stubbe, Maria; Signal, Louise; Stairmand, Jeannine; Dennett, Elizabeth; Koea, Jonathan; Simpson, Andrew; Sarfati, Diana; Cunningham, Chris; Batten, Lesley; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Barton, Josh; Holdaway, Maureen

    2015-03-01

    Little research has been undertaken on the actual decision-making processes in cancer care multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs). This article was based on a qualitative observational study of two regional cancer treatment centers in New Zealand. We audiorecorded 10 meetings in which 106 patient cases were discussed. Members of the meetings categorized cases in varying ways, drew on a range of sources of authority, expressed different value positions, and utilized a variety of strategies to justify their actions. An important dimension of authority was encountered authority-the authority a clinician has because of meeting the patient. The MDM chairperson can play an important role in making explicit the sources of authority being drawn on and the value positions of members to provide more clarity to the decision-making process. Attending to issues of process, authority, and values in MDMs has the potential to improve cancer care decision making and ultimately, health outcomes. PMID:25281239

  1. Teleradiotherapy Network: Applications and Feasibility for Providing Cost-Effective Comprehensive Radiotherapy Care in Low- and Middle-Income Group Countries for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, Michael; Samiei, Massoud; Shah, Ragesh; Lutters, Gerd; Bodis, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Globally, new cancer cases will rise by 57% within the next two decades, with the majority in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Consequently, a steep increase of about 40% in cancer deaths is expected there, mainly because of lack of treatment facilities, especially radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is required for more than 50% of patients, but the capital cost for equipment often deters establishment of such facilities in LMICs. Presently, of the 139 LMICs, 55 do not even have a radiotherapy facility, whereas the remaining 84 have a deficit of 61.4% of their required radiotherapy units. Networking between centers could enhance the effectiveness and reach of existing radiotherapy in LMICs. A teleradiotherapy network could enable centers to share and optimally utilize their resources, both infrastructure and staffing. This could be in the form of a three-tier radiotherapy service consisting of primary, secondary, and tertiary radiotherapy centers interlinked through a network. The concept has been adopted in some LMICs and could also be used as a “service provider model,” thereby reducing the investments to set up such a network. Teleradiotherapy networks could be a part of the multipronged approach to address the enormous gap in radiotherapy services in a cost-effective manner and to support better accessibility to radiotherapy facilities, especially for LMICs. PMID:25763906

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  3. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will have to decide is what kind of health care provider you would like to care for you ... practice doctor Certified nurse-midwife Each of these health care providers is described below. Each one has different ...

  4. Disparity in cancer care: a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S.; Shahid, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Canada is facing cancer crisis. Cancer has become the leading cause of death in Canada. Despite recent advances in cancer management and research, growing disparities in cancer care have been noticed, especially in socio-economically disadvantaged groups and under-served communities. With the rising incidence of cancer and the increasing numbers of minorities and of social disparities in general, and without appropriate interventions, cancer care disparities will become only more pronounced. This paper highlights the concepts and definitions of equity in health and health care and examines several health determinants that increase the risk of cancer. It also reviews cancer care inequity in the high-risk groups. A conceptual framework is proposed and recommendations are made for the eradication of disparities within the health care system and beyond. PMID:23300361

  5. Mapping the risk perception and communication gap between different professions of healthcare providers in cancer care: a cross-sectional protocol

    PubMed Central

    Stub, Trine; Musial, Frauke; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Salamonsen, Anita; Kristoffersen, Agnete; Berntsen, Gro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies show that patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have a poorer survival prognosis than those who do not. It remains unclear whether this is due to a priori poorer prognosis that makes patients turn to CAM, or whether there is a factor associated with CAM use itself that influences the prognosis negatively. Healthcare providers should assist patients in safeguarding their treatment decision. However, the current non-communication between CAM and conventional providers leaves it up to the patients themselves to choose how to best integrate the two worlds of therapy. In this study, an interactive shared decision-making (SDM) tool will be developed to enable patients and health professionals to make safe health choices. Methods and analysis We will delineate, compare and evaluate perception and clinical experience of communication of risk situations among oncology experts, general practitioners and CAM practitioners. To accomplish this, we will develop a pilot and implement a large-scale survey among the aforementioned health professionals in Norway. Guided by the survey results, we will develop a ?-version of a shared decision-making tool for healthcare providers to use in guiding patients to make safe CAM decisions. Ethics and dissemination Participants must give their informed and written consent before inclusion. They will be informed about the opportunity to drop out from the study followed by deletion of all data registered. The study needs no approval from The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics because all participants are healthcare professionals. Results from this study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed medical journals. PMID:26338839

  6. Palliative Care and Symptom Management in Older Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with cancer are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with palliative care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of patients with cancer with an emphasis on quality of life. This article discusses the evaluation and management of pain and other common nonpain symptoms that occur in elderly patients with cancer, as well as end-of-life care. PMID:26614860

  7. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  8. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  9. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  10. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  11. Who provides GP after-hours care?

    PubMed

    Pham, Mai; McRae, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the demographic and financial factors likely to influence the supply side of after-hours GP care is crucial in meeting the increasing demand for these services. This study answers two questions: which GPs are more likely to provide after-hours GP care, and of those who do, which are more likely to take a heavier load. Data from the first wave of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey is used, with logistic regression applied to address the decision to undertake after-hours work and linear regression to address the question of the quantum of work. The results show that female, older, and urban GPs are less likely to work outside of normal hours. GPs who are employees are less likely to participate in after-hours work than GPs who are principals or partners of a practice. On the other hand, principals and partners, are likely work more hours in the after-hours period than employee GPs if they do participate in this work. Similarly, those GPs in solo practice who work after-hours also tend to take a heavier after-hours workload than the GPs who are not in solo practice. The role of GP wages and family income does not seem to be compelling. These conclusions are likely to relate to the ways doctors behave independent of the health system. PMID:25616724

  12. Caring for survivors of breast cancer: perspective of the primary care physician

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S.L.; Wai, E.S.; Alexander, C.; Singh–Carlson, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, and survivorship care is becoming more complex. Primary care physicians provide care for most survivors of breast cancer in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The present study offers insight into the confidence of primary care physicians in their abilities to provide such care. It also explores potential ways to assist those providers in enhancing this aspect of their practice. Methods A questionnaire was mailed to 1000 primary care physicians caring for survivors of breast cancer. The questionnaire explored the perspectives of the responding physicians on their ability to manage various aspects of survivorship care for breast cancer patients, identified preferences for the content and format of communication from oncologists at the time of transition from active oncology treatment to survivorship, and determined the means most commonly used to obtain knowledge about breast cancer. This 1-page, 31-item checkbox and open-answer questionnaire assessed the perceptions of primary care physicians about the care of breast cancer survivors after completion of active treatment and their personal preferences for resources providing information about breast cancer. Results The questionnaire response rate was 59%. Primary care physicians reported being most confident in screening for recurrence and managing patient anxiety; they were least confident in managing lymphedema and providing psychosocial counselling. Compared with physicians following fewer survivors of breast cancer, those who followed more breast cancer survivors had higher confidence in managing the biomedical aspects of follow-up and in providing counselling about nutrition and exercise. Most physicians found discharge letters from oncologists to be useful. Point-form discharge information was preferred by 43%; detailed description, by 19%; and both formats, by 38%. The most useful information items identified for inclusion in a discharge letter were a diagnosis and treatment summary and the recommended surveillance and endocrine therapy. Continuing medical education events and online resources were the means most commonly used to obtain knowledge about breast cancer. Conclusions Primary care physicians who provide follow-up for survivors of breast cancer report that they are confident in managing care and satisfied with discharge letters containing a diagnosis and treatment summary, and recommendations for surveillance and endocrine treatment. At the time of patient discharge, additional information about common medical and psychosocial issues in this patient population would be useful to primary care physicians. Preferred means to access current breast cancer information include continuing medical education events and online resources. PMID:21980253

  13. Cancer Prevalence Estimates | Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections

    Cancer.gov

    This site is based on a study that estimates and projects the national cost of cancer care through the year 2020 separately for multiple cancer sites using the most recent available U.S. population projections, cancer incidence, survival, and cost of care data.

  14. Certification of Health Care Provider for a Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    this time, will the patient need care? No Yes hour(s) per day; days per week from _________________ throughCertification of Health Care Provider for a Serious Health Condition Family and Medical Leave Act care: If family member is your child, please provide date of birth: If providing care for your Spouse

  15. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  16. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  17. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  18. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  19. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  20. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  1. Providers and Types of Spiritual Care during Serious Illness

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Debra; Usher, Barbara M.; Williams, Sharon; Rawlings, Jim; Daaleman, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Patients and palliative care experts endorse the importance of spiritual care for seriously ill patients and their families. However, little is known about spiritual care during serious illness, and whether it satisfies patients' and families' needs. The objective of this study was to describe spiritual care received by patients and families during serious illness, and test whether the provider and the type of care is associated with satisfaction with care. Methods Cross-sectional interview with 38 seriously ill patients and 65 family caregivers about spiritual care experiences. Results The 103 spiritual care recipients identified 237 spiritual care providers; 95 (41%) were family or friends, 38 (17%) were clergy, and 66 (29%) were health care providers. Two-thirds of spiritual care providers shared the recipient's faith tradition. Recipients identified 21 different types of spiritual care activities. The most common activity was help coping with illness (87%) and the least common intercessory prayer (4%). Half of recipients were very or somewhat satisfied with spiritual care, and half found it very helpful for facilitating inner peace and meaning making. Satisfaction with spiritual care did not differ by provider age, race, gender, role, or frequency of visits. Types of care that helped with understanding or illness coping were associated with greater satisfaction with care. Conclusion Seriously ill patients and family caregivers experience spiritual care from multiple sources, including health care providers. Satisfaction with this care domain is modest, but approaches that help with understanding and with coping are associated with greater satisfaction. PMID:18715183

  2. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY: The... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  3. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care On This Page Key findings Who visits CHCs? ... or Latino patients (data not shown). Who provides care at CHC visits, and who visits these providers? ...

  4. Baseline Management Practices at Providers in Better Jobs Better Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Amy L.; Brannon, S. Diane; Vasey, Joseph; Dansky, Kathryn H.; Kemper, Peter

    2007-01-01

    High turnover and difficult recruitment of direct care workers are challenges for long-term care providers. This study reports the extent and variation of the use of management practices for direct care workers and their supervisors across four long-term care settings in the Better Jobs Better Care demonstration. Overall, there is limited use of…

  5. Delivering High-Quality and Affordable Care Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Ganz, Patricia A.; Aberle, Denise; Abernethy, Amy; Bekelman, Justin; Brawley, Otis; Goodwin, James S.; Hu, Jim C.; Schrag, Deborah; Temel, Jennifer S.; Schnipper, Lowell

    2013-01-01

    The national cost of cancer care is projected to reach $173 billion by 2020, increasing from $125 billion in 2010. This steep upward cost trajectory has placed enormous an financial burden on patients, their families, and society as a whole and raised major concern about the ability of the health care system to provide and sustain high-quality cancer care. To better understand the cost drivers of cancer care and explore approaches that will mitigate the problem, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine held a workshop entitled “Delivering Affordable Cancer Care in the 21st Century” in October 2012. Workshop participants included bioethicists, health economists, primary care physicians, and medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists, from both academic and community settings. All speakers expressed a sense of urgency about the affordability of cancer care resulting from the future demographic trend as well as the high cost of emerging cancer therapies and rapid diffusion of new technologies in the absence to evidence indicating improved outcomes for patients. This article is our summary of presentations at the workshop that highlighted the overuse and underuse of screening, treatments, and technologies throughout the cancer care continuum in oncology practice in the United States. PMID:24127450

  6. Providing and financing aged care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ergas, Henry; Paolucci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the provision and financing of aged care in Australia. Demand for aged care will increase substantially as a result of population aging, with the number of Australians aged 85 and over projected to increase from 400,000 in 2010 to over 1.8 million in 2051. Meeting this demand will greatly strain the current system, and makes it important to exploit opportunities for increased efficiency. A move to greater beneficiary co-payments is also likely, though its extent may depend on whether aged care insurance and other forms of pre-payment can develop. PMID:22312229

  7. The expanding role of primary care in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Greg; Berendsen, Annette; Crawford, S Michael; Dommett, Rachel; Earle, Craig; Emery, Jon; Fahey, Tom; Grassi, Luigi; Grunfeld, Eva; Gupta, Sumit; Hamilton, Willie; Hiom, Sara; Hunter, David; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Macleod, Una; Mason, Robert; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Neal, Richard D; Peake, Michael; Roland, Martin; Seifert, Bohumil; Sisler, Jeff; Sussman, Jonathan; Taplin, Stephen; Vedsted, Peter; Voruganti, Teja; Walter, Fiona; Wardle, Jane; Watson, Eila; Weller, David; Wender, Richard; Whelan, Jeremy; Whitlock, James; Wilkinson, Clare; de Wit, Niek; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-09-01

    The nature of cancer control is changing, with an increasing emphasis, fuelled by public and political demand, on prevention, early diagnosis, and patient experience during and after treatment. At the same time, primary care is increasingly promoted, by governments and health funders worldwide, as the preferred setting for most health care for reasons of increasing need, to stabilise health-care costs, and to accommodate patient preference for care close to home. It is timely, then, to consider how this expanding role for primary care can work for cancer control, which has long been dominated by highly technical interventions centred on treatment, and in which the contribution of primary care has been largely perceived as marginal. In this Commission, expert opinion from primary care and public health professionals with academic and clinical cancer expertise-from epidemiologists, psychologists, policy makers, and cancer specialists-has contributed to a detailed consideration of the evidence for cancer control provided in primary care and community care settings. Ranging from primary prevention to end-of-life care, the scope for new models of care is explored, and the actions needed to effect change are outlined. The strengths of primary care-its continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive care for individuals and families-are particularly evident in prevention and diagnosis, in shared follow-up and survivorship care, and in end-of-life care. A strong theme of integration of care runs throughout, and its elements (clinical, vertical, and functional) and the tools needed for integrated working are described in detail. All of this change, as it evolves, will need to be underpinned by new research and by continuing and shared multiprofessional development. PMID:26431866

  8. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, and diabetes. Health care providers can also offer tips on quitting smoking, ... lesbians experience violence in their intimate relationships. However, health care providers do not ask lesbians about intimate partner ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  11. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on ... and urine tests. 1 Cushing’s Syndrome If a health care provider suspects Cushing’s syndrome, he or she may ...

  14. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menkes Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Menkes disease? Skip sharing on social ... 3 months old. To diagnose Menkes disease, a health care provider will order blood tests to measure the ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers can check for Down syndrome during pregnancy ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose IDDs? Skip sharing on social media ... 1 This type of test will help the health care provider examine the ability of a person to ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Skip sharing on social ... disabilities. 2 How are newborns tested for PKU? Health care providers conduct a PKU screening test using a ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose birth defects? Skip sharing on social ... to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening Health care providers recommend that certain pregnant women, including those ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)? Skip sharing ... a "floppy" body and weak muscle tone, a health care provider may conduct genetic testing for Prader-Willi ...

  7. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  8. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M.; Benson, Al B.; Klein, Ira M.; Silver, Samuel M.; Beveridge, Roy A.; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F. Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28–31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  9. Successful Reentry: The Perspective of Private Correctional Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Greifinger, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  10. Successful reentry: the perspective of private correctional health care providers.

    PubMed

    Mellow, Jeff; Greifinger, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  11. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  12. Research Group: Public Economics March, 2010 Health Care Providers

    E-print Network

    10-164 Research Group: Public Economics March, 2010 Health Care Providers Payments Regulation when;Health care providers payments regulation when horizontal and vertical differentiation matter1 David for health care providers competing in both quality and product differentiation of their services

  13. Quality of Cancer Care - Applied Research

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of these efforts, substantially supported by the Applied Research Program, is to enhance the state of the science on the quality of cancer care and inform federal and private-sector decision making on care delivery, coverage, regulation, and standard setting. Work is underway to make cancer a working model for quality of care research and the translation of this research into practice.

  14. Health care providers' perspectives of an intervention designed to improve colorectal cancer screening rates in family medicine residency clinics : a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sara; Goldsmith, Geoffrey; Price, Robert; Brooks, Audrey; Harvey, Amanda

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain feedback from family medicine residents and clinic nurses regarding a colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) intervention. Focus groups were used to ask participants three questions about their perceptions of the intervention and subsequent patient screening behaviors. Content analysis and constant comparison were used to yield two meaningful themes from the participant responses: patient-specific issues and study design issues. Patient-specific issues included: lack of education and fear, finances and insurance coverage, and compliance. Study design issues included: lack of time, a need for reminders to discuss CRCS with patients, quality of the nurse's role, and a need for better clinical staff education and awareness. Results show ways to significantly improve future implementation of the CRCS intervention. Ultimately, future use of clinic-based CRCS interventions could be vastly improved by utilizing strategies to promote teamwork and increase the sense of mutual ownership among clinic staff. PMID:22826203

  15. Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers Roles of Child Health-Care

    E-print Network

    Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers in Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 1. Use and disseminate information from 7 #12;Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers In addition to routine screening and follow

  16. Annual Costs of Cancer Care | Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections

    Cancer.gov

    This site is based on a study that estimates and projects the national cost of cancer care through the year 2020 separately for multiple cancer sites using the most recent available U.S. population projections, cancer incidence, survival, and cost of care data.

  17. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  18. Food Safety Training Needs of Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Anne S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A sample of child-care centers and family day-care homes in Michigan was used to identify what care providers need to know about safe food handling. Their primary concern was to become informed about what causes food to become unsafe and how to prevent foodborne illnesses. Providers preferred printed materials to tapes or workshops. (AA)

  19. The Role of Child Care Providers in Child Abuse Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibel, Nancy L.; Gillespie, Linda G.; Temple, Tabitha

    2008-01-01

    Child care providers are likely to be the professionals who most frequently interact with families with young children. Thus, infant and toddler child care providers are uniquely positioned to recognize and respond to families' needs for information and support. This article describes knowledge, skills, and strategies that support child care

  20. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in over 100,000 Americans in 2001. To combat this disease, new avenues to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer, such as chemoprevention, are being explored by CRN researchers at two sites. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have been shown to decrease incident colon cancer.

  1. Logic Regression for Provider Effects on Kidney Cancer Treatment Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Filson, Christopher; Xia, Rong; Miller, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In the delivery of medical and surgical care, often times complex interactions between patient, physician, and hospital factors influence practice patterns. This paper presents a novel application of logic regression in the context of kidney cancer treatment delivery. Using linked data from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and Medicare we identified patients diagnosed with kidney cancer from 1995 to 2005. The primary endpoints in the study were use of innovative treatment modalities, namely, partial nephrectomy and laparoscopy. Logic regression allowed us to uncover the interplay between patient, provider, and practice environment variables, which would not be possible using standard regression approaches. We found that surgeons who graduated in or prior to 1980 despite having some academic affiliation, low volume surgeons in a non-NCI hospital, or surgeons in rural environment were significantly less likely to use laparoscopy. Surgeons with major academic affiliation and practising in HMO, hospital, or medical school based setting were significantly more likely to use partial nephrectomy. Results from our study can show efforts towards dismantling the barriers to adoption of innovative treatment modalities, ultimately improving the quality of care provided to patients with kidney cancer. PMID:24795774

  2. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  4. Difficult Children and Difficult Parents: Constructions by Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Erica; Ring, Gail

    2007-01-01

    As more mothers of young children work, concerns about child care have gained prominence. Analyses of this topic typically address availability, safety, and costs of care, or the impact of care on children's "outcomes." When providers' input is included, it is generally used as an assessment tool to reinforce the researcher's conceptual framework.…

  5. Ethnic disparities in cervical cancer illness burden and subsequent care: a prospective view in managed care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer S

    2008-06-01

    Costs associated with cervical neoplasia and cancer impose a significant burden on managed care. More than 50,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the United States, accumulating approximately $4.6 billion in costs per year. The apparent disparity of care related to screening and treatment among specific ethnic groups and economically disadvantaged subpopulations results in elevated cervical cancer mortality rates and adds to managed care's burden. This is likely the result of several factors, including differences in the stage of cervical cancer at diagnosis, cultural barriers to undergoing regular cervical screening, and impaired access to follow-up care after receiving abnormal Papanicolaou smear test results. To overcome socioeconomic and cultural barriers to providing adequate care for patients with cervical cancer, the implementation and effectiveness of secondary prevention methods should be revisited and options for primary prevention, such as human papillomavirus vaccination, should be explored. Vaccines have the potential to reduce disparities in care, particularly if they are provided to economically disadvantaged women or those whose culture serves as an obstacle to obtaining appropriate care. If action is not taken to broaden access to vaccines, it is likely that managed care will continue to bear the burden of increased costs due to poor outcomes. PMID:18611087

  6. Providing medical care within underserved communities has

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    not discriminate in educational or employment opportunities or decisions for qualified persons on the basis of race Program, students will gain the knowledge base and clinical skills necessary to provide quality healthcare with local leaders in healthcare, business, education, and government to learn first-hand how to be

  7. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Organizational Barriers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer clinical trials offer the opportunity for cancer patients to access state-of-the-art treatments and, in the process, contribute to the scientific knowledge base about effectiveness of curative interventions. However, accrual to clinical trials is far from optimal. Only about 5 percent of cancer patients receive care through a treatment trial. Understanding the factors that promote or impede trial participation is an essential step toward increasing accrual.

  8. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe. PMID:25841689

  9. Research Initiatives | Multidisciplinary Cancer Care in the United States

    Cancer.gov

    Multidisciplinary cancer care is a developing area of care delivery research within the NCI's Outcomes Research Branch (ORB). This care delivery paradigm is widely implemented in oncology care settings to assure quality cancer care, and involves leveraging the expertise of clinicians from various disciplines to enable complex treatment decision-making and appropriate and timely care for the patient.

  10. American Cancer Society Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines.

    PubMed

    El-Shami, Khaled; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Erb, Nicole L; Willis, Anne; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cannady, Rachel S; Wong, Sandra L; Rose, Johnie; Barbour, April L; Stein, Kevin D; Sharpe, Katherine B; Brooks, Durado D; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2015-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women and second leading cause of cancer death when men and women are combined in the United States (US). Almost two-thirds of CRC survivors are living 5 years after diagnosis. Considering the recent decline in both incidence and mortality, the prevalence of CRC survivors is likely to increase dramatically over the coming decades with the increase in rates of CRC screening, further advances in early detection and treatment and the aging and growth of the US population. Survivors are at risk for a CRC recurrence, a new primary CRC, other cancers, as well as both short-term and long-term adverse effects of the CRC and the modalities used to treat it. CRC survivors may also have psychological, reproductive, genetic, social, and employment concerns after treatment. Communication and coordination of care between the treating oncologist and the primary care clinician is critical to effectively and efficiently manage the long-term care of CRC survivors. The guidelines in this article are intended to assist primary care clinicians in delivering risk-based health care for CRC survivors who have completed active therapy. CA Cancer J Clin 2015;65:427-455. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26348643

  11. Finding Medical Care for Colorectal Cancer Symptoms: Experiences among Those Facing Financial Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Financial barriers can substantially delay medical care seeking. Using patient narratives provided by 252 colorectal cancer patients, we explored the experience of financial barriers to care seeking. Of the 252 patients interviewed, 84 identified financial barriers as a significant hurdle to obtaining health care for their colorectal cancer

  12. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-11 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Family child care providers. 55... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...

  13. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-12 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Family child care providers. 55... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...

  14. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-13 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Family child care providers. 55... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...

  15. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Family child care providers. 55... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...

  16. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-14 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Family child care providers. 55... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...

  17. Caregivers' Level of Trust in Their Children's Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huey Jen; Boothroyd, Roger A.

    2006-01-01

    Trust in healthcare providers is associated with clinical outcomes among adult patients. Children with disabilities have complex health needs that place stress on caregivers. Consequently, they are increasingly likely to rely on their children's health care providers to ensure children's health care needs are met. However, no studies have explored…

  18. An Investigation of Turnover among Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Gail G.

    In an effort to explain the high turnover rate among family day care (FDC) providers, a study of the effects of perceived social support, job satisfaction, and the establishment of boundaries between a family day care provider's nuclear family and her FDC system was conducted. Analysis of data gathered from a mail survey of over 300 currently and…

  19. Understanding & Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Care Continuum

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences is pleased to announce the May 2012 Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) Special Issue, Understanding and Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Care Continuum.

  20. How Cancer Survivors Provide Support on Cancer-Related Internet Mailing Lists

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Frydman, Gilles; Forlenza, Michael; Rimer, Barbara K

    2007-01-01

    Background Internet mailing lists are an important and increasingly common way for cancer survivors to find information and support. Most studies of these mailing lists have investigated lists dedicated to one type of cancer, most often breast cancer. Little is known about whether the lessons learned from experiences with breast cancer lists apply to other cancers. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the structural characteristics of 10 Internet cancer-related mailing lists and identify the processes by which cancer survivors provide support. Methods We studied a systematic 9% sample of email messages sent over five months to 10 cancer mailing lists hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR). Content analyses were used to compare the structural characteristics of the lists, including participation rates and members’ identities as survivors or caregivers. We used thematic analyses to examine the types of support that list members provided through their message texts. Results Content analyses showed that characteristics of list members and subscriber participation rates varied across the lists. Thematic analyses revealed very little “off topic” discussion. Feedback from listowners indicated that they actively modeled appropriate communication on their lists and worked to keep discussions civil and focused. In all lists, members offered support much more frequently than they requested it; survivors were somewhat more likely than caregivers to offer rather than to ask for support. The most common topics in survivors’ messages were about treatment information and how to communicate with health care providers. Although expressions of emotional support were less common than informational support, they appeared in all lists. Many messages that contained narratives of illness or treatment did not specifically ask for help but provided emotional support by reassuring listmates that they were not alone in their struggles with cancer. Survivors’ explicit expressions of emotional support tended to be messages that encouraged active coping. Such messages also provided senders with opportunities to assume personally empowering “helper” roles that supported self-esteem. Conclusions Many cancer survivors use the Internet to seek informational and emotional support. Across 10 lists for different cancers, informational support was the main communication style. Our finding of an emphasis on informational support is in contrast to most prior literature, which has focused on emotional support. We found the most common expressions of support were offers of technical information and explicit advice about how to communicate with health care providers. Topics and proportions of informational and emotional support differed across the lists. Our previous surveys of ACOR subscribers showed that they join the lists primarily to seek information; this qualitative study shows that they can and do find what they seek. They also find opportunities to play rewarding roles as support givers. PMID:17513283

  1. Palliative care in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Sheila; Cuvelier, Geoff; Harlos, Mike; Barr, Ronald

    2011-05-15

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with advanced or terminal cancer have distinctive medical and psychosocial needs that may not have been adequately provided by either pediatric or adult palliative care services. A discussion group, as part of a larger workshop on AYA with cancer, was held in Toronto on March 11-13, 2010;117:-. Recommendations were as follows: Develop a specific AYA screening tool designed to detect increased anxiety or new symptoms and to initiate discussion about palliative or symptom care; Set Canadian standards for palliative care in AYA patients. These standards should be included in hospital accreditation; Involve the palliative/symptom care team early in the disease trajectory to help manage clinically important symptoms that may not be associated with imminent death; Establish specific AYA multidisciplinary palliative care teams throughout Canada that are flexible and can work in both pediatric and adult facilities, and are able to work in a "virtual" environment to support patients being cared for at home; Improve physical facilities in hospices and hospitals to meet the distinctive needs of terminally ill AYA patients; Enhance support for palliative care at home by: changing legislation to improve Compassionate Care Benefits and developing "virtual palliative care support teams". Adequate provision of AYA palliative care and symptom management services will likely confer notable benefits to AYA patients and their families, and is likely to be cost saving to the tax payer by avoiding prolonged hospitalization and promoting easier return to work for the families and caregivers. PMID:21523753

  2. Outcomes Research Branch | Assessing Patients' Experiences of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Two ORB studies have addressed the need for comprehensive, psychometrically sound, cancer-specific measures of patients' experience of and satisfaction with the care they receive during the post-treatment, survivorship phase of the cancer care continuum. The Assessment of Patients' Experience of Cancer Care (APECC) Study, funded as a SEER Rapid Response Surveillance Study (RRSS), developed and pilot tested a survey instrument to assess patients' experiences and satisfaction with care for colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, and leukemia.

  3. Predictions of Children's Experiences with Latina Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Stephen A.; Howes, Carollee

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: Relatively little is known about the pre-academic experiences of Latino/a children in family child care. In this work we tested the extent to which previously established relations among provider characteristics, scaffolding and responsive behaviors, total quality (Family Day Care Rating Scale), and children's engagement in…

  4. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  5. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. 438.804 Section 438.804 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Conditions for Federal...

  6. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...from use of the excess capacity facilities by the third party must be used for the health care provider contribution or for sustainability of the health care network supported by the Healthcare Connect Fund. Network costs that may be funded with any...

  7. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...from use of the excess capacity facilities by the third party must be used for the health care provider contribution or for sustainability of the health care network supported by the Healthcare Connect Fund. Network costs that may be funded with any...

  8. Providing Children and Adolescents Opportunities for Social Interaction as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Heather L; Bingen, Kristin; Hoag, Jennifer A; Karst, Jeffrey S; Velázquez-Martin, Blanca; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-12-01

    Experiences with peers constitute an important aspect of socialization, and children and adolescents with cancer may experience reduced social interaction due to treatment. A literature review was conducted to investigate the evidence to support a standard of care evaluating these experiences. Sixty-four articles were reviewed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Moderate quality of evidence suggest that social interaction can be beneficial to increase knowledge, decrease isolation, and improve adjustment and constitute an important, unmet need. The evidence supports a strong recommendation for youth with cancer to be provided opportunities for social interaction following a careful assessment of their unique characteristics and preferences. PMID:26700923

  9. Health care provider choice: the North West Province of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tembon, A C

    1996-01-01

    Health care is provided in many developing countries free of any charge at the point of delivery. This is attributed to the fact that health care is one of the basic human rights. While modern health care in public health units is free, patients in rural areas continue to use either self-care, traditional healers or both. In Cameroon, the idea of integrating traditional and modern medical practices is discussed by both traditional and medical practitioners. However, it is not very clear what influences the household's choice of one or the other. Within a health district, where there are many providers, the question as to whether or not there is a possibility of choice open to all is posed. This article reports on a study undertaken in a rural health district that shows that there are many factors that influence the choice of health care. Among these factors is quality of care which is the most important factor influencing the choice of health care provider. As quality of care increases in governmental health centres, their choice probability also increases. Other factors include: the time spent seeking treatment; household income and size; distance; and, cost of health care. Those with higher incomes tend to choose private health units and those with larger families tend to choose government health units. Other socio-cultural factors, difficult to model, appear to also influence the choice of providers. It is concluded that since household income influences the choice of private health units, policies targeting poverty alleviation should be instituted in the rural areas to provide households with income. This will enable them widened access to private health care and enable government to redeploy its scarce resources to maintain and extend services to needy areas. PMID:10157065

  10. Providers' Perceptions of Challenges in Obstetrical Care for Somali Women

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jalana N.; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Davis, Olga I.; Shipp, Michele P.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. This pilot study explored health care providers' perceptions of barriers to providing health care services to Somali refugee women. The specific aim was to obtain information about providers' experiences, training, practices and attitudes surrounding the prenatal care, delivery, and management of women with Female Genital Cutting (FGC). Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 obstetricians/gynecologists and nurse midwives in Columbus, Ohio. Results. While providers did not perceive FGC as a significant barrier in itself, they noted considerable challenges in communicating with their Somali patients and the lack of formal training or protocols guiding the management of circumcised women. Providers expressed frustration with what they perceived as Somali patients' resistance to obstetrical interventions and disappointment with a perception of mistrust from patients and their families. Conclusion. Improving the clinical encounter for both patients and providers entails establishing effective dialogue, enhancing clinical and cultural training of providers, improving health literacy, and developing trust through community engagement. PMID:24223041

  11. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...to the cost of services at Coast Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I...

  12. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...to the cost of services at Coast Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I...

  13. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...to the cost of services at Coast Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I...

  14. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...to the cost of services at Coast Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I...

  15. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated...to the cost of services at Coast Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I...

  16. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...capable of providing health care services” include only: (1) Podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, optometrists, and chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation...

  17. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1) Podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, optometrists, and chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation...

  18. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1) Podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, optometrists, and chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation...

  19. Improving palliative care outcomes for Aboriginal Australians: service providers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians have a lower rate of utilisation of palliative care services than the general population. This study aimed to explore care providers’ experiences and concerns in providing palliative care for Aboriginal people, and to identify opportunities for overcoming gaps in understanding between them and their Aboriginal patients and families. Methods In-depth, qualitative interviews with urban, rural and remote palliative care providers were undertaken in inpatient and community settings in Western Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers with QSR NVivo 10 software used to help manage data. Data analysis was informed by multiple theoretical standpoints, including the social ecological model, critical cultural theories and the ‘cultural security’ framework. Thematic analysis was carried out that identified patterns within data. Results Fifteen palliative care providers were interviewed. Overall they reported lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture and being uncertain of the needs and priorities of Aboriginal people during end-of-life care. According to several participants, very few Aboriginal people had an understanding of palliative care. Managing issues such as anger, denial, the need for non-medical support due to socioeconomic disadvantage, and dealing with crises and conflicts over funeral arrangements were reported as some of the tensions between Aboriginal patients and families and the service providers. Conclusion Early referral to palliative care is important in demonstrating and maintaining a caring therapeutic relationship. Paramount to meeting the needs for Aboriginal patients was access to appropriate information and logistical, psychological and emotional support. These were often seen as essential but additional to standard palliative care services. The broader context of Aboriginal history and historical distrust of mainstream services was seen to impinge on Aboriginal people’s willingness and ability to accept care and support from these services. This context needs to be understood and acknowledged at the system level. More cultural safety training was requested by care providers but it was not seen as replacing the need for an Aboriginal worker in the palliative care team. PMID:23875957

  20. Effective Factors in Providing Holistic Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Jasemi, Madineh; Valizadeh, Leila; Keogh, Brian; Taleghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holistic care is a comprehensive model of caring. Previous studies have shown that most nurses do not apply this method. Examining the effective factors in nurses’ provision of holistic care can help with enhancing it. Studying these factors from the point of view of nurses will generate real and meaningful concepts and can help to extend this method of caring. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was used to identify effective factors in holistic care provision. Data gathered by interviewing 14 nurses from university hospitals in Iran were analyzed with a conventional qualitative content analysis method and by using MAXQDA (professional software for qualitative and mixed methods data analysis) software. Results: Analysis of data revealed three main themes as effective factors in providing holistic care: The structure of educational system, professional environment, and personality traits. Conclusion: Establishing appropriate educational, management systems, and promoting religiousness and encouragement will induce nurses to provide holistic care and ultimately improve the quality of their caring. PMID:26009677

  1. The role of primary care in early detection and follow-up of cancer.

    PubMed

    Emery, Jon D; Shaw, Katie; Williams, Briony; Mazza, Danielle; Fallon-Ferguson, Julia; Varlow, Megan; Trevena, Lyndal J

    2014-01-01

    Primary care providers have important roles across the cancer continuum, from encouraging screening and accurate diagnosis to providing care during and after treatment for both the cancer and any comorbid conditions. Evidence shows that higher cancer screening participation rates are associated with greater involvement of primary care. Primary care providers are pivotal in reducing diagnostic delay, particularly in health systems that have long waiting times for outpatient diagnostic services. However, so-called fast-track systems designed to speed up hospital referrals are weakened by significant variation in their use by general practitioners (GPs), and affect the associated conversion and detection rates. Several randomized controlled trials have shown primary care-led follow-up care to be equivalent to hospital-led care in terms of patient wellbeing, recurrence rates and survival, and might be less costly. For primary care-led follow-up to be successful, appropriate guidelines must be incorporated, clear communication must be provided and specialist care must be accessible if required. Finally, models of long-term cancer follow-up are needed that provide holistic care and incorporate management of co-morbid conditions. We discuss all these aspects of primary care, focusing on the most common cancers managed at the GP office-breast, colorectal, prostate, lung and cervical cancers. PMID:24247164

  2. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider.

    PubMed

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. PMID:20732668

  3. Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures.

    PubMed

    Erwin, W Mark; Korpela, A Pauliina; Jones, Robert C

    2013-12-01

    Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a 'primary spine care provider' may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society's needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

  4. Chiropractors as Primary Spine Care Providers: precedents and essential measures

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, W. Mark; Korpela, A. Pauliina; Jones, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chiropractors have the potential to address a substantial portion of spinal disorders; however the utilization rate of chiropractic services has remained low and largely unchanged for decades. Other health care professions such as podiatry/chiropody, physiotherapy and naturopathy have successfully gained public and professional trust, increases in scope of practice and distinct niche positions within mainstream health care. Due to the overwhelming burden of spine care upon the health care system, the establishment of a ‘primary spine care provider’ may be a worthwhile niche position to create for society’s needs. Chiropractors could fulfill this role, but not without first reviewing and improving its approach to the management of spinal disorders. Such changes have already been achieved by the chiropractic profession in Switzerland, Denmark, and New Mexico, whose examples may serve as important templates for renewal here in Canada. PMID:24302774

  5. The Journey from Babysitter to Child Care Professional: Military Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Dianne Miller

    2002-01-01

    Describes the transformation of women from babysitters to child care professionals as a result of becoming a family child care provider in the U.S. military Family Child Care (FCC) program. Discusses application process, orientation training, the use of peer mentors, initial setup, inspections, enrollment, caregiver training, and accreditation.…

  6. Western voodoo: providing mental health care to Haitian refugees.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, M B

    1989-12-01

    This article described certain aspects of Haitian life, voodoo and its role in Haitian society, the quality and quantity of psychiatric and mental health care for Haitians in Haiti, and suggestions for providing appropriate mental health care to Haitian refugees in the United States. Conway and Buchanan (1985) described what has helped Haitian refugees adapt in the transition to life in the United States: the strengths from their cultural heritage, such as fortitude; perseverance in the most arduous circumstances; deep religious faith; high self-respect; reliance on the extended family; and the tradition of sharing. Building on these assets may assist Western mental health-care providers in offering culturally sensitive mental health care to Haitians. PMID:2607490

  7. Provider Influence | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  8. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  9. Achieving provider engagement: providers' perceptions of implementing and delivering integrated care.

    PubMed

    Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  10. Continuing care of the cancer patient as a social engineering problem.

    PubMed

    Walter, N T

    1979-07-01

    Care of the cancer patient has become fractionated toward maintaining the physiological integrity of the patient's life support systems, e.g., the hematopoietic or neurological systems. The concept of total continuing care for the cancer patient is illustrated in this description of a pilot hospice project in a community medical center. The project also illustrates the concept of team support by the health care staff and volunteers. The total continuing care unit described provides support and care which makes living not just possible, but worthwhile, for cancer patients. PMID:445493

  11. Tips and Tidbits: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    This book provides practical information and advice designed to help family day care providers solve problems they confront in their daily work with children. The book is organized into 7 sections. Part I, "Effective Ways to Change Unacceptable Behavior," offers recommendations about discipline, alternatives to punishment, modeling, and praise.…

  12. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    PubMed Central

    Kuschner, Ware G; Reddy, Sunayana; Mehrotra, Nidhi; Paintal, Harman S

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1) the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e-) cigarette; and 2) new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room. Counseling patients about the hazards of thirdhand smoke may provide additional motivation to quit smoking. PMID:21475626

  13. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Quality of Care

    Cancer.gov

    The issue of quality of care involves many different components, including what cancer care quality looks like, which patients are more likely to receive poor quality care, and ways to measure healthcare quality.

  14. A typology for provider payment systems in health care.

    PubMed

    Jegers, Marc; Kesteloot, Katrien; De Graeve, Diana; Gilles, Willem

    2002-06-01

    A typology to classify provider payment systems from an incentive point of view is developed. We analyse the way, how these systems can influence provider behaviour and, a fortiori, contribute to attain the general objectives of health care, i.e. quality of care, efficiency and accessibility. The first dimension of the typology indicates whether there is a link between the provider's income and his activity. In variable systems, the provider has an ability to influence his earnings, contrary to fixed systems. The second dimension indicates whether the provider's payments are related to his actual costs or not. In retrospective systems, the provider's own costs are the basis for reimbursement ex post whereas in prospective systems payments are determined ex ante without any link to the real costs of the individual provider. These different characteristics are likely to influence provider behaviour in different ways. Furthermore the most frequently used criteria to determine the provider's income are discussed: per service, per diem, per case, per patient and per period. Also a distinction is made between incentives at the level of the individual provider (micro-level) and the sponsor (macro-level). Finally, the potential interactions when several payment systems are used simultaneously are discussed. This typology is useful to classify and compare different types of payment systems as prevailing in different countries, and provides a useful framework for future research of health care payment systems. PMID:11965334

  15. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  16. Providing effective and preferred care closer to home: a realist review of intermediate care.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Mark; Hunt, Harriet; Cooper, Chris; Shepperd, Sasha; Pawson, Ray; Anderson, Rob

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate care is one of the number of service delivery models intended to integrate care and provide enhanced health and social care services closer to home, especially to reduce reliance on acute care hospital beds. In order for health and social care practitioners, service managers and commissioners to make informed decisions, it is vital to understand how to implement the admission avoidance and early supported discharge components of intermediate care within the context of local care systems. This paper reports the findings of a theory-driven (realist) review conducted in 2011-2012. A broad range of evidence contained in 193 sources was used to construct a conceptual framework for intermediate care. This framework forms the basis for exploring factors at service user, professional and organisational levels that should be considered when designing and delivering intermediate care services within a particular local context. Our synthesis found that involving service users and their carers in collaborative decision-making about the objectives of care and the place of care is central to achieving the aims of intermediate care. This pivotal involvement of the service user relies on practitioners, service managers and commissioners being aware of the impact that organisational structures at the local level can have on enabling or inhibiting collaborative decision-making and care co-ordination. Through all interactions with service users and their care networks, health and social care professionals should establish the meaning which alternative care environments have for different service users. Doing so means decisions about the best place of care will be better informed and gives service users choice. This in turn is likely to support psychological and social stability, and the attainment of functional goals. At an organisational level, integrated working can facilitate the delivery of intermediate care, but there is not a straightforward relationship between integrated organisational processes and integrated professional practice. PMID:25684035

  17. Strangulation forensic examination: best practice for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Faugno, Diana; Waszak, Daria; Strack, Gael B; Brooks, Melodie Ann; Gwinn, Casey G

    2013-01-01

    Strangulation is one of the most dangerous forms of interpersonal violence (IVP), yet it is often not reported and missed by the health care provider because of lack of visible injury. The victim of strangulation can have critical injuries and a late onset symptoms. Victims of IVP should be directly asked whether they were choked or whether during the assault they felt like they could not breathe because of pressure on their neck. The objective of this article is to summarize "best practice" for health care providers so that they are better prepared to care for victims who report a history of strangulation. A summary of how to perform a forensic examination of the strangled patient is provided along with important documentation takeaways and useful forms to ensure that the severity of the strangulation is assessed, that critical injuries are identified, and that all injuries and findings are accurately documented for legal proceedings. PMID:24176831

  18. The ABCs of Safe and Healthy Child Care: A Handbook for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Cynthia M.; Polder, Jacquelyn A.

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining a safe and healthy child care setting, this manual for home or center child care providers contains information and guidelines to help providers maintain child health and reduce sickness and injuries. Part 1, "Introduction," describes how diseases are spread and how to prevent and prepare for unintentional…

  19. Payment reform, accountable care, and risk: early lessons for providers.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Michael E

    2010-10-01

    Several organizations have begun to design and even implement accountable care organization (ACO), payment reform, and risk sharing pilots. Here are some early lessons: Providers should not design and implement ACOs, payment pilots, and risk models in a vacuum. Providers should tackle five core decision areas that underlie all ACOs, payment pilots, and risk arrangements. Providers should invest in analytics to inform tactical and strategic decisions simultaneously. Successful organizations implement pilot programs before going into full production mode. PMID:20922897

  20. Transforming health care service delivery and provider selection.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2011-06-01

    Commoditization pressures in medicine have risked transforming service provider selection from "survival of the fittest" to "survival of the cheapest." Quality- and safety-oriented mandates by the Institute of Medicine have led to the creation of a number of data-driven quality-centric initiatives including Pay for Performance and Evidence-Based Medicine. A synergistic approach to creating quantitative accountability in medical service delivery is through the creation of consumer-oriented performance metrics which provide patients with objective data related to individual service provider quality, safety, cost-efficacy, efficiency, and customer service. These performance metrics could in turn be customized to the individual preferences and health care needs of each individual patient, thereby providing an objective methodology for service provider selection while empowering health care consumers. PMID:21468775

  1. Weight stigma in maternity care: women’s experiences and care providers’ attitudes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weight stigma is pervasive in Western society and in healthcare settings, and has a negative impact on victims’ psychological and physical health. In the context of an increasing focus on the management of overweight and obese women during and after pregnancy in research and clinical practice, the current studies aimed to examine the presence of weight stigma in maternity care. Addressing previous limitations in the weight stigma literature, this paper quantitatively explores the presence of weight stigma from both patient and care provider perspectives. Methods Study One investigated associations between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and experiences of maternity care from a state-wide, self-reported survey of 627 Australian women who gave birth in 2009. Study Two involved administration of an online survey to 248 Australian pre-service medical and maternity care providers, to investigate their perceptions of, and attitudes towards, providing care for pregnant patients of differing body sizes. Both studies used linear regression analyses. Results Women with a higher BMI were more likely to report negative experiences of care during pregnancy and after birth, compared to lower weight women. Pre-service maternity care providers perceived overweight and obese women as having poorer self-management behaviours, and reported less positive attitudes towards caring for overweight or obese pregnant women, than normal-weight pregnant women. Even care providers who reported few weight stigmatising attitudes responded less positively to overweight and obese pregnant women. Conclusions Overall, these results provide preliminary evidence that weight stigma is present in maternity care settings in Australia. They suggest a need for further research into the nature and consequences of weight stigma in maternity care, and for the inclusion of strategies to recognise and combat weight stigma in maternity care professionals’ training. PMID:23339533

  2. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  3. Survivorship care after early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, Stella

    2015-11-01

    This article discusses the changing realities for patients after a diagnosis of early breast cancer due to the various survivorship issues that create a new normality for each patient. The importance of individualised treatment plans, the issues of fertility , of returning to work, of support following end of treatment are only a few of the many questions discussed. The age of personalised treatment needs to address the personalised care in survivorship as well. PMID:26466769

  4. Agents for change: nonphysician medical providers and health care quality.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Nathan A; Mcmillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization's quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts. PMID:25663213

  5. Agents for Change: Nonphysician Medical Providers and Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Nathan A; McMillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization’s quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts. PMID:25663213

  6. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  7. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Circulation Talk With Your Health Care Provider About High Blood Pressure Why is high blood pressure dangerous? Blood pressure is the force of blood ... pur-TEN-shun”). If it is not controlled, high blood pressure can cause: yy Stroke yy Kidney yy Heart ...

  8. Growing Healthy Bodies: Nutrition Education for Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viebrock, Margaret A.; Berry, Holly

    This booklet discusses the important role that day care providers can play in ensuring that children eat healthy snacks and meals and learn good eating habits. Section one of the booklet examines snack foods, discusses the difference between nutritious and less-nutritious snacks, and recommends snack foods appropriate for different age groups.…

  9. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDER FOR EMPLOYEE'S PREGNANCY DISABILITY HUMAN RESOURCES Employee by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, you are eligible to take a pregnancy disability leave condition related to her pregnancy or childbirth. Please answer, fully and completely, all applicable parts

  10. Intimate partner violence: a guide for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Shavers, Clarissa Agee

    2013-12-10

    Women, men, children, and adolescents who self-disclose exposures to or at risk for exposures to intimate partner violence or domestic violence may exhibit moderate-to-severe psycho-social-emotional, mental, and physical healthcare problems. Healthcare providers have a unique opportunity to assist this population in the primary care office. PMID:24253530

  11. Infant Childrearing: Beliefs of Parents and Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Gwendolyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined differences in childrearing beliefs and changes in mothers' and fathers' beliefs over a six-month period. Results of Luster Parental Beliefs Survey and Personal Style Inventory indicated significant differences between mothers and fathers in beliefs about spoiling, and between mothers and care providers in beliefs about discipline.…

  12. Primary Care Providers' Views regarding Assessing and Treating Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ryan D.; Rudd, M. David; Bryan, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) usually do not explore patient suicidality during routine visits. Factors that predict PCP attitudes toward the assessment and treatment of suicidality were examined via an online survey of 195 practicing PCPs affiliated with medical schools in the United States. PCPs who perceived themselves as competent to work with…

  13. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  14. Family caregiving: who provides the care, and at what cost?

    PubMed

    Robinson, K M

    1997-01-01

    Today, there are an estimated 1.6 million people over 65 years of age who require assistance with two or more daily activities. This number is projected to rise to 2.1 million by 2001, with fewer family caregivers expected to be available to provide this informal care. Seventy-two percent of unpaid family caregivers are women, the majority of whom are mid-life daughters or daughters in law. Uncompensated care to the frail elderly requires an average of 28 to 39.9 hours per week of custodial care. The financial impact on informal caregivers includes: 9% of family caregivers who leave the labor force to provide care, 29.4% who adjust their work schedules, and 18.1% who take time off without pay. The estimated annual value of uncompensated kin care in 1990 was $18 billion. Thirty-two percent of all family caregivers are categorized as poor or near-poor at incomes that are less than 125% of the federal poverty level. PMID:9362866

  15. Electronic health records (EHRs): supporting ASCO's vision of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter; Artz, David; Warner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    ASCO's vision for cancer care in 2030 is built on the expanding importance of panomics and big data, and envisions enabling better health for patients with cancer by the rapid transformation of systems biology knowledge into cancer care advances. This vision will be heavily dependent on the use of health information technology for computational biology and clinical decision support systems (CDSS). Computational biology will allow us to construct models of cancer biology that encompass the complexity of cancer panomics data and provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms governing cancer behavior. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality promotes CDSS based on clinical practice guidelines, which are knowledge bases that grow too slowly to match the rate of panomic-derived knowledge. CDSS that are based on systems biology models will be more easily adaptable to rapid advancements and translational medicine. We describe the characteristics of health data representation, a model for representing molecular data that supports data extraction and use for panomic-based clinical research, and argue for CDSS that are based on systems biology and are algorithm-based. PMID:24857080

  16. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians’ perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers’ (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs’ views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). Methods A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006 - September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. Results CSPs’ lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients’ limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient–provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people’s distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff, providing appropriate cultural training for CSPs, cancer education for Aboriginal stakeholders, continuity of care, avoiding use of medical jargon, accommodating patients’ psychosocial and logistical needs, and in-service coordination. Conclusion Individual CSPs identified challenges in cross-cultural communication and their willingness to accommodate culture-specific needs within the wider health care system including better communication with Aboriginal patients. However, participants’ comments indicated a lack of concerted effort at the system level to address Aboriginal disadvantage in cancer outcomes. PMID:24188503

  17. Models of care for early-stage breast cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Madarnas, Y.; Joy, A.A.; Verma, S.; Sehdev, S.; Lam, W.; Sideris, L.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that follow-up for patients with early breast cancer (ebc) can be effectively carried out by the primary health care provider if a plan is in place. Here, we present data from a recent survey conducted in Ontario indicating that a shared-care model could work if communication between all health professionals involved in the care of ebc patients were to be improved. Patients and primary care providers benefit when the specialist provides written information about what their roles are and what to expect. Primary care providers need to have easy access to the specialist to discuss areas of concern. Patients also need to share responsibility for their care, ensuring that they attend follow-up visits on a regular basis and that they discuss areas of concern with their primary health care provider. A shared-care model has the potential to provide the best care for the least cost to the health system. PMID:21698058

  18. Inequities in access to cancer care in Canada: An ethical perspective.

    PubMed

    Purificacion, Sunshine J; French, John G; d'Agincourt-Canning, Lori

    2015-11-01

    The ability to provide quality cancer care largely depends on how accessible the services are to those in need. In the current state, disparities exist in access to Canadian cancer services, and this poses an ethical challenge. This article highlights ethical and strategic considerations related to equity in access to Canadian cancer care. Based on the principles of bioethics-beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice-various action strategies have been recommended in order to improve access to cancer care nationally. PMID:26347478

  19. Private Companies Providing Health Care Price Data: Who Are They and What Information do They Provide?

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kathryn A.; Labno, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is interest in making health care price information more transparent given the increase in enrollment in high-deductible and consumer-directed health plans, and as policy efforts intensify to engage consumers to obtain high value care. We examine the role of private companies that market price transparency tools, primarily to self-insured employers – an important yet understudied topic. What companies exist? How did they emerge? What information do they provide? Where do they get that information? How does the price and quality information provided compare across companies? PMID:25678764

  20. Grantee Research Highlight: Taking Account of the Patient's Perspective when Examining the Quality of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Optimizing patient experiences with care is especially important in cancer because cancer care is often complex and involves communication with and coordination across providers of multiple specialties and across multiple institutional settings. Unsatisfactory interactions with the health care system pose an additional burden on patients when they are already ill and vulnerable. More importantly, less-than-optimal patient experiences can have a significant negative impact on patients’ health-related quality of life.

  1. Pharmacy Students' Perceptions of Their Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Daniel L.; Miller, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess students' perceptions of their preparedness to perform advanced pharmacy practice competencies. Design The Preparedness to Provide Pharmaceutical Care (PREP) survey was modified and administered to each class at a Midwestern university from 2005-2008. Factor analysis and 1-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons were applied to assess the effectiveness of changes made in the pharmacy curriculum. Assessment Factor analysis yielded patterns similar to those reported in the literature. Students rated themselves highest on the psychological aspects and lowest on the administrative aspects of care. Perceived pharmaceutical care skills grew as students progressed through the curriculum, and changes in coursework were reflected in the competencies. Conclusion Students’ perceived competencies (ie, communication, psychological, technical, administrative) were similar to those at other institutions and perceptions of competencies increased in a manner consistent with actual program outcomes. PMID:20221359

  2. Family Child Care Health and Safety Checklist: A Packet for Family Child Care Providers [with Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro; Gravell, Joanne

    This checklist and accompanying video are designed to help family child care providers assess the health and safety of the child care home. The checklist includes suggestions for conducting the self-evaluation and for creating a safer, healthier home environment. The areas of the checklist are: your home, out of bounds areas, gates and guards,…

  3. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  4. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ...Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY: Office of...SUMMARY: The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity...enhance their ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an [[Page...

  5. Contact Information | Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections

    Cancer.gov

    This site is based on a study that estimates and projects the national cost of cancer care through the year 2020 separately for multiple cancer sites using the most recent available U.S. population projections, cancer incidence, survival, and cost of care data.

  6. Palliative cancer care in Middle Eastern countries: accomplishments and challenges †

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Arnaout, M.; Daher, M.; Nestoros, S.; Pitsillides, B.; Charalambous, H.; Gultekin, M.; Fahmi, R.; Mostafa, K.A.H.; Khleif, A.D.; Manasrah, N.; Oberman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background In larger parts of the Middle East palliative care is still misunderstood among health professionals, cancer patients and the public at large. One reason to that is because the term does not obviously communicate the intent of this clinical discipline, which is lending better quality of life while combating cancer. Further, culture, tradition and religion have contributed to this misgiving and confusion especially at the terminal stage of the disease. Methods The Middle East Cancer Consortium jointly with the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Oncology Nursing Society, the San Diego Hospice Center for Palliative Medicine and the Children's Hospital & Clinics of Minnesota initiated a series of training courses and workshops in the Middle East to provide updated training to physicians, nurses, social workers and psychologists from throughout the region with basic concepts of palliative care and pain managements in adults and children cancers. Results During the past 6 years hundreds of professionals took part in these educational and training activities, thereby creating the core of trained caregivers who start to make the change in their individual countries. Conclusions The outcome of consecutive training activities can overcome geopolitical instabilities, and yield a genuine change in approach of both regulators, medical administrators, medical staff and the public; as to the important contribution of palliative care services to the welfare of the patient and his/her family. PMID:22628412

  7. Are Latinos Less Satisfied with Communication by Health Care Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Leo S; Cunningham, William E; Brown, Julie A; Liu, Honghu; Hays, Ron D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine associations of patient ratings of communication by health care providers with patient language (English vs Spanish) and ethnicity (Latino vs white). METHODS A random sample of patients receiving medical care from a physician group association concentrated on the West Coast was studied. A total of 7,093 English and Spanish language questionnaires were returned for an overall response rate of 59%. Five questions asking patients to rate communication by their health care providers were examined in this study. All five questions were administered with a 7-point response scale. MAIN RESULTS We estimated the associations of satisfaction ratings with language (English vs Spanish) and ethnicity (white vs Latino) using ordinal logistic models, controlling for age and gender. Latinos responding in Spanish (Latino/Spanish) were significantly more dissatisfied compared with Latinos responding in English (Latino/English) and non-Latino whites responding in English (white) when asked about: (1) the medical staff listened to what they say (29% vs 17% vs 13% rated this “very poor,”“poor,” or “fair”; p < .01); (2) answers to their questions (27% vs 16% vs 12%; p < .01); (3) explanations about prescribed medications (22% vs 19% vs 14%; p < .01); (4) explanations about medical procedures and test results (36% vs 21% vs 17%; p < .01); and (5) reassurance and support from their doctors and the office staff (37% vs 23% vs 18%; p < .01). CONCLUSION This study documents that Latino/Spanish respondents are significantly more dissatisfied with provider communication than Latino/English and white respondents. These results suggest Spanish-speaking Latinos may be at increased risk of lower quality of care and poor health outcomes. Efforts to improve the quality of communication with Spanish-speaking Latino patients in outpatient health care settings are needed. PMID:10417598

  8. Integrating genetic and genomic information into effective cancer care in diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Fashoyin-Aje, L.; Sanghavi, K.; Bjornard, K.; Bodurtha, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of issues in the integration of genetic (related to hereditary DNA) and genomic (related to genes and their functions) information in cancer care for individuals and families who are part of health care systems worldwide, from low to high resourced. National and regional cancer plans have the potential to integrate genetic and genomic information with a goal of identifying and helping individuals and families with and at risk of cancer. Healthcare professionals and the public have the opportunity to increase their genetic literacy and communication about cancer family history to enhance cancer control, prevention, and tailored therapies. PMID:24001763

  9. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part IV: Quality and Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-11-01

    The 1999 Institute of Medicine report Ensuring Quality Cancer Care discussed the difference between the actual cancer care received in the United States and the care that the patients should get, as well as some points to consider in delivering optimum care. In 2012, a follow-up review article in the journal Cancer entitled "Ensuring quality cancer care" indicated that there had been some interval progress, but more are needed to be done. The 2013 Institute of Medicine report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis indicated that there are continuing major problems with cancer care and that they advocated a national system of quality reporting and a major information technology system to capture and help assess the data. PMID:26444648

  10. Why do health and social care providers co-operate?

    PubMed

    van Raak, Arno; Paulus, Aggie; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid

    2005-09-28

    Within Europe, although there are numerous examples of poor co-ordination in the delivery of integrated care, many providers do co-operate. We wanted to know why providers are moved to co-operate. In terms of systematic research, this is a new field; researchers have only begun to theorise about the rationales for co-operation. Practically, the issue of achieving co-operation attracts much attention from policymakers. Understanding the reasons for co-operation is a prerequisite for developing effective policy in support of integrated care. Our aim is to explore the comparative validity of different theoretical perspectives on the reasons for co-operation, to indicate directions for further study and for policy making. We used data from three successive studies to perform pattern matching with six established theoretical perspectives: transaction costs economics, strategic choice theory, resource dependence theory, learning theory, stakeholder theory and institutional theory. Insights from the studies were compared for validating purposes (triangulation). The first study concerned the evaluation of the Dutch 'National Home Health Care Programme' according to the case study methodology. The second and third studies were surveys among project directors: questionnaires were based on the concepts derived from the first study. Researchers should combine normative institutional theory, resource dependence theory and stakeholder theory into one perspective, in order to study relationship formation in health and social care. The concept of institutions (rules) is the linchpin between the theories. Policy makers must map the institutions of stakeholders and enable integrated care policy to correspond with these institutions as much as possible. PMID:16098408

  11. Improving access to cancer guidelines: feedback from health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, I.S.; Kostaras, X.; Hagen, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined access to locally developed and other available clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) for the management of cancer and evaluated how to improve uptake. Methods A 12-question online survey was administered to 772 members of 12 multidisciplinary tumour teams in a Canadian provincial oncology program. The teams are composed of physicians, surgeons, nurses, allied health professionals, and researchers involved in the provision of cancer care across the province. Many of these individuals construct or provide input into the provincial cpgs. The questionnaires were administered online and were completed voluntarily. Results Responses were received from 232 individuals, a response rate of 30.1%. Most respondents (75.1%) indicated they actively referenced cpgs for cancer treatment. Of the 177 respondents who identified barriers to cpg access, 24.9% said that the cause was being too busy; 24.3% and 22.6% cited the user-unfriendliness of the Web site and a lack of awareness about the cpgs. When asked about innovative changes that could be made to improve access, the creation of cpg summary documents was identified as the most effective change (46.3%). The creation of summary documents was ranked highest by physicians, surgeons, and nurses. Conclusions Clinical practice guidelines are important tools for standardizing treatment protocols and improving outcomes in health care systems, but support for their use is variable among health care professionals. We have identified barriers to—and potential mitigating strategies for—more widespread access to cpgs by the various health professions involved in cancer care. Local creation of succinct and easily accessible cpgs was identified as the single most effective way to enhance access by health care professionals. PMID:26715871

  12. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  13. Black Men May Get Worse Prostate Cancer Care, Study Contends

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_155292.html Black Men May Get Worse Prostate Cancer Care, Study Contends Problems include longer waits, greater ... 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older black men with prostate cancer seem more likely to receive poorer quality of ...

  14. Mind-Body Practices in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K.; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a life threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item Distress Thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  15. Mind-body practices in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item distress thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  16. 76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers AGENCY: Office...supplement grants to seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers...supplement grants to seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total...

  17. The Cost of Cancer Care in Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has supported a number of studies that investigate the cost of patient care for patients enrolled in NCI-sponsored clinical trials compared to care received for comparable patients in standard community care. These data are essential to inform ongoing policy debates about the financial coverage by public and private health insurance plans of care received in cancer clinical trials.

  18. Research Initiatives | CanCORS: Research Gaps Identified in Cancer Care Quality and Outcomes

    Cancer.gov

    CanCORS has prospectively studied the quality of care and health outcomes of approximately 5,000 lung cancer patients and approximately 5,000 colorectal cancer patients. The study design, which blends patient, provider, and caregiver surveys with detailed clinical data from medical records, provides a rich and comprehensive data resource, allowing the investigators to examine care processes and outcomes during initial treatment as well as long-term survivorship in greater detail than previously possible.

  19. Enhancing Quality Improvements in Cancer Care Through CME Activities at a Nationally Recognized Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal. PMID:23608956

  20. Providing support to caregivers and self-care.

    PubMed

    Kalibala, S

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of HIV/AIDS care has resulted in a wide range of caregivers who work out of public and private hospital facilities, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based facilities. Others are volunteers and community health and social workers based at facilities or community sites. Many caregivers are family members or part of a client's close social network. Additionally, people living with HIV/AIDS (PHA) themselves engage in self-care and provide support to other PHA through support groups. In the best-case scenario the services of these caregivers are sometimes provided free of charge at one site by a specialized NGO. In many cases, however, a person wishing to gain access to care and social services may need an understanding how the systems and procedures of various institutions operate. Many PHA are unprepared for the administrative, financial, and legal barriers that they may encounter. To cope with this need, a new type of support service called the "buddy" system has emerged. Buddies are individuals who are less directly involved with, but who know about HIV/AIDS, the services available and the rights of PHA. A buddy is close enough for the PHA to approach, has sufficient time to devote to him/her and can be asked almost everything. The article on the Rio de Janeiro Buddy Project provides an example of a project for gay men in Brazil. In other parts of the world where the buddy system is non-existent, the PHA must often rely on support provided by family and friends. PMID:12349766

  1. Bring about benefit, forestall harm: what communication studies say about spirituality and cancer care.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Jillian A

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances in medicine allow health care providers to diagnose diseases earlier, diminish suffering, and prolong life. These advances, although widely revered for changing the face of cancer care, come at a cost for patients, families, and even health care providers. One widely cited consequence of better diagnostics and improved treatment regiments is the sense that there is always one more test or therapy available to extend life. Such an approach to cancer care can prove detrimental to patients? healing. In addition, these new tests and treatments further focus attention on the body as the site of healing and cure while downplaying other aspects of health. The absence of psychological, social, and spiritual care from a patient's cancer care plan compromises healing and makes palliative and end of life care more complicated. In this essay, I discuss the tensions that exist between contemporary cancer care and spirituality and use Communication Studies scholarship to navigate the challenges of integrating a patient's religious or spiritual beliefs into their cancer treatment and care. In addition to discussing the challenges of communicating about sensitive topics such as illness, spirituality, and dying, this article uses narrative examples from a comprehensive cancer center and a hospice (both in the United States) to understand how people with cancer and other terminal illnesses communicate their spirituality and how these conversations influence health care choices and provide comfort. By understanding how patients communicate about topics such as the meaning of life, quality of life, dying and death, providers are better equipped to offer care that is consistent with a patient's beliefs and life goals. This approach maintains that communication is more than a means of transferring information, but is constitutive. By understanding that communication creates our lives and shapes our worlds, lay and professional caregivers can meet patients where they are spiritually, emotionally, and socially and offer effective care that is culturally situated. For many in Muslim societies, a cancer diagnosis is Divine fate. Understanding a cancer diagnosis as destiny offers comfort to some, yet cancer patients and their family members may experience isolation because of the stigmas associated with the disease. This double-bind can lead to spiritual or existential crises, which draws further attention to the need for effective spiritual care that ultimately fosters patient and family healing whether or not a cure is possible. Bringing together various approaches to communicating about diverse spiritual and religious ideas may allow for enhanced comprehensive cancer care. PMID:20590353

  2. Parent Involvement in Day Care: A Resource Manual for Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Marley Clevenger; And Others

    Developed as a resource for providers concerned with issues of parent involvement and family support, this manual offers ways to successfully involve parents in day care. It provides detailed descriptions of tested approaches to parent involvement, including practical tips and implementation strategies, in order to help programs adapt a given…

  3. Diet and Pregnancy: Health-Care Providers and Patient Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    May, Linda; Suminski, Richard; Berry, Andrew; Linklater, Emily; Jahnke, Sara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, associations between health-care providers (HCPs) discussing diet with their pregnant patients and patient dietary behavior were assessed in addition to factors related to HCPs discussing diet with their patients. Questionnaires were completed by 237 pregnant women and 31 HCPs at 12 obstetrics–gynecology clinics across the United States. Patients provided versus those not provided dietary counseling by their HCP were more likely (OR = 2.17, 95%; CI = 0.75–6.25) to engage in healthy dietary practices. HCPs that discussed multiple health behaviors were nearly four times more likely to discuss diet with their pregnant patients compared with HCP who did not discuss other health behaviors (OR = 3.67, 95%; CI = 1.10–12.28). This study indicates that HCP education can positively impact dietary behaviors of their pregnant patients. PMID:24453468

  4. Receipt of Psychosocial Care Among Cancer Survivors in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Laura P.; Kent, Erin E.; Weaver, Kathryn E.; Buchanan, Natasha; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Ryerson, A. Blythe; Rowland, Julia H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Given the importance of psychosocial care for cancer survivors, this study used population-based data to characterize survivors who reported a discussion with health care provider(s) about the psychosocial effects of cancer and who reported using professional counseling or support groups (PCSG) and tested associations between receipt of psychosocial care and satisfaction with care. Patients and Methods We examined survivors of adult cancers from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (N = 1,777). Multivariable logistic regression models examined factors associated with receipt of and satisfaction with psychosocial care. Results Most survivors (55.1%) reported neither provider discussions nor use of PCSG; 31.4% reported provider discussion only, 4.4% reported use of PCSG only, and 8.9% reported both. Non-Hispanic blacks (v non-Hispanic whites), married survivors, survivors of breast cancer (v prostate or less prevalent cancers), those treated with chemotherapy, and survivors reporting past research study/clinical trial participation were more likely to report provider discussion(s) (P < .01). Hispanics (v non-Hispanic whites), survivors age 40 to 49 years (v ? 39 years), survivors of breast cancer (v melanoma or less prevalent cancers), those diagnosed ? 1 year ago (v > 5 years ago), survivors treated with radiation, and past research participants were more likely to report use of PCSG (P < .05). Survivors reporting any psychosocial care were more likely to be “very satisfied” with how their needs were met (P < .001). Conclusion Many survivors do not report a discussion with providers about the psychosocial effects of cancer, which reflects a missed opportunity to connect survivors to psychosocial services. These data can benchmark the success of efforts to improve access to cancer-related psychosocial care. PMID:23610114

  5. Primary Medical Care Provider Accreditation (PMCPA): pilot evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stephen M; Chauhan, Umesh; Lester, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Background While practice-level or team accreditation is not new to primary care in the UK and there are organisational indicators in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) organisational domain, there is no universal system of accreditation of the quality of organisational aspects of care in the UK. Aim To describe the development, content and piloting of version 1 of the Primary Medical Care Provider Accreditation (PMCPA) scheme, which includes 112 separate criteria across six domains: health inequalities and health promotion; provider management; premises, records, equipment, and medicines management; provider teams; learning organisation; and patient experience/involvement, and to present the results from the pilot service evaluation focusing on the achievement of the 30 core criteria and feedback from practice staff. Design of study Observational service evaluation using evidence uploaded onto an extranet system in support of 30 core summative pilot PMCPA accreditation criteria. Setting Thirty-six nationally representative practices across England, between June and December 2008. Method Study population: interviews with GPs, practice managers, nurses and other relevant staff from the participating practices were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic approach. For each practice, the number of core criteria that had received either a‘good’or‘satisfactory’rating from a RCGP-trained assessment team, was counted and expressed as a percentage. Results Thirty-two practices completed the scheme, with nine practices passing 100% of core criteria (range: 27–100%). There were no statistical differences in achievement between practices of different sizes and in different localities. Practice feedback highlighted seven key issues: (1) overall view of PMCPA; (2) the role of accreditation; (3) different motivations for taking part; (4) practice managers dominated the workload associated with implementing the scheme; (5) facilitators for implementation; (6) patient benefit — relevance of PMCPA to quality improvement; (7) recommendations for improving the scheme. Conclusion Version 1 of PMCPA has been piloted as a primary care accreditation scheme and shown to be relevant to different types of practice. The scheme is undergoing revision in accordance with the findings from the pilot and ongoing consultation.

  6. Provider and Clinic Cultural Competence in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA. completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  7. Clinician Roles in Early Integrated Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Elyse R.; Greer, Joseph A.; Jackson, Vicki A.; Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Gallagher, Emily R.; Temel, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Early palliative care provides better quality of life, increased prognostic awareness, and even improved survival for patients with advanced cancer but how the integrated care model achieves these outcomes has not been completely explained. Methods: To better understand the clinical approach to early outpatient care from the clinicians' perspective, we conducted focus groups with the palliative care clinicians who had participated in a randomized trial of early palliative care for metastatic lung cancer. Results: Clinicians described their role in providing early palliative care as having three distinct roles in the outpatient setting: (1) managing symptoms to improve functional status and as a bridge to other issues; (2) engaging patients in emotional work to facilitate coping, accepting, and planning; and (3) interpreting the oncologist for the patient and the patient for the oncologist. Conclusions: These data lay the foundation for developing training programs for clinicians in early integrated palliative care. PMID:25390467

  8. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ...Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions AGENCY...providing medical assistance for health care-acquired conditions. It would...Hospital-acquired condition HCAC Health care-acquired condition ICR...

  9. Transitions: A Guide to Teens Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    Transitions: A Guide to Getting Older and Changing Health Care Providers (HCP’s) Posted under Health Guides . Updated 8 ... can help me plan my transition to adult health care? Your pediatrician or other health care provider Your ...

  10. 21 CFR 203.11 - Applications for reimportation to provide emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...reimportation to provide emergency medical care. (a) Applications for reimportation for emergency medical care shall be submitted to the director of the FDA District Office...reimportation to provide emergency medical care shall be reviewed...

  11. The association of spiritual care providers’ activities with family members’ satisfaction with care after a death in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Nielsen, Elizabeth L.; Kross, Erin K.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Hanada, Julie C.; O’Mahoney, Sean K Doll; Curtis, J. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Objective Spiritual distress is common in the ICU, and spiritual care providers are often called upon to provide care for patients and their families. Our goal was to evaluate the activities spiritual care providers’ conduct to support patients and families, and whether those activities are associated with family satisfaction with ICU care. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 350-bed, 65-ICU bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Subjects Spiritual care providers and family members of patients who died in the ICU or within 30 hours of transfer from the ICU. Measurements Spiritual care providers completed surveys reporting their activities. Family members completed validated measures of satisfaction with care and satisfaction with spiritual care. Clustered regression was used to assess the association between activities completed by spiritual care providers and family ratings of care. Results Of 494 eligible patients, 275 family members completed surveys (response rate, 56%). Fifty-seven spiritual care providers received surveys relating to 268 patients, completing 285 surveys for 244 patients (response rate, 91%). Spiritual care providers commonly reported activities related to supporting religious and spiritual needs (>=90%) and providing support for family feelings (90%). Discussions about the patient’s wishes for end-of-life care and a greater number of spiritual care activities performed were both associated with increased overall family satisfaction with ICU care (p<0.05). Discussions about a patient’s end-of-life wishes, preparation for a family conference, and total number of activities performed were associated with improved family satisfaction with decision-making in the ICU (p<0.05). Conclusions Spiritual care providers engage in a variety of activities with families of ICU patients; several are associated with increased family satisfaction with ICU care in general and decision-making in the ICU specifically. These findings provide insight into spiritual care provider activities and provide guidance for interventions to improve spiritual care delivered to families of critically ill patients. PMID:24797373

  12. Ontology-based Modeling of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings Samina R. Abidi, Syed SR. Abidi, Sajjad, Canada Abstract Breast cancer follow-up care can be provided by family phy- sicians after specialists complete the primary treatment. Can- cer Care Nova Scotia has developed a breast cancer follow- up Clinical

  13. Nurse Navigators in Early Cancer Care: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Edward H.; Ludman, Evette J.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Penfold, Robert; Reid, Robert J.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Chubak, Jessica; McCorkle, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a nurse navigator intervention improves quality of life and patient experience with care for people recently given a diagnosis of breast, colorectal, or lung cancer. Patients and Methods Adults with recently diagnosed primary breast, colorectal, or lung cancer (n = 251) received either enhanced usual care (n = 118) or nurse navigator support for 4 months (n = 133) in a two-group cluster randomized, controlled trial with primary care physicians as the units of randomization. Patient-reported measures included the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General (FACT-G) Quality of Life scale, three subscales of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC), and selected subscales from a cancer adaptation of the Picker Institute's patient experience survey. Self-report measures were collected at baseline, 4 months, and 12 months. Automated administrative data were used to assess time to treatment and total health care costs. Results There were no significant differences between groups in FACT-G scores. Nurse navigator patients reported significantly higher scores on the PACIC and reported significantly fewer problems with care, especially psychosocial care, care coordination, and information, as measured by the Picker instrument. Cumulative costs after diagnosis did not differ significantly between groups, but lung cancer costs were $6,852 less among nurse navigator patients. Conclusion Compared with enhanced usual care, nurse navigator support for patients with cancer early in their course improves patient experience and reduces problems in care, but did not differentially affect quality of life. PMID:24276777

  14. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  15. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  16. Implementation of a CKD Checklist for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Louise I.; Aizer, Ayal A.; Singh, Karandeep; Leaf, David E.; Lee, Thomas H.; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives CKD is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial burden. Practice guidelines outlining CKD management exist, but there is limited application of these guidelines. Interventions to improve CKD guideline adherence have been limited. This study evaluated a new CKD checklist (a tool outlining management guidelines for CKD) to determine whether implementation in an academic primary care clinic improved adherence to guidelines. Design, setting, participants, & measurements During a 1-year period (August 2012–August 2013), a prospective study was conducted among 13 primary care providers (PCPs), four of whom were assigned to use a CKD checklist incorporated into the electronic medical record during visits with patients with CKD stages 1–4. All providers received education regarding CKD guidelines. The intervention and control groups consisted of 105 and 263 patients, respectively. Adherence to CKD management guidelines was measured. Results A random-effects logistic regression analysis was performed to account for intra-group correlation by PCP assignment and adjusted for age and CKD stage. CKD care improved among patients whose PCPs were assigned to the checklist intervention compared with controls. Patients in the CKD checklist group were more likely than controls to have appropriate annual laboratory testing for albuminuria (odds ratio [OR], 7.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.6 to 17.2), phosphate (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5 to 8.3), and parathyroid hormone (OR, 8.1; 95% CI, 4.8 to 13.7) (P<0.001 in all cases). Patients in the CKD checklist group had higher rates of achieving a hemoglobin A1c target<7% (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4 to 5.1), use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin-receptor blocker (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.2), documentation of avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (OR, 41.7; 95% CI, 17.8 to 100.0), and vaccination for annual influenza (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.0) and pneumococcus (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.6 to 8.6) (P<0.001 in all cases). Conclusions Implementation of a CKD checklist significantly improved adherence to CKD management guidelines and delivery of CKD care. PMID:25135764

  17. NIH scientists provide new insight into rare kidney cancer

    Cancer.gov

    NIH scientists have discovered a unique feature of a rare, hereditary form of kidney cancer that may provide a better understanding of its progression and metastasis, possibly laying the foundation for the development of new targeted therapies.

  18. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bazzan, Anthony J.; Newberg, Andrew B.; Cho, William C.; Monti, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting. PMID:24288570

  19. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement. PMID:24083746

  20. Cancer Care in the United States: What's Right, What's Wrong? - September 16, 1999

    Cancer.gov

    CANCER CARE IN THE UNITED STATES: WHAT'S RIGHT, WHAT'S WRONG? ENSURING THE QUALITY OF CANCER CARE Robert Hiatt, M.D., Ph.D., Deputy Director of the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute National Institutes

  1. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  2. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noah

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice. PMID:26629435

  3. Cancer Genetic Risk Assessment and Referral Patterns in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Vig, Hetal S.; Armstrong, Joanne; Egleston, Brian L.; Mazar, Carla; Toscano, Michele; Bradbury, Angela R.; Daly, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to describe cancer risk assessment practices among primary care providers (PCPs). Methods: An electronic survey was sent to PCPs affiliated with a single insurance carrier. Demographic and practice characteristics associated with cancer genetic risk assessment and testing activities were described. Latent class analysis supported by likelihood ratio tests was used to define PCP profiles with respect to the level of engagement in genetic risk assessment and referral activity based on demographic and practice characteristics. Results: 860 physicians responded to the survey (39% family practice, 29% internal medicine, 22% obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN), 10% other). Most respondents (83%) reported that they routinely assess hereditary cancer risk; however, only 33% reported that they take a full, three-generation pedigree for risk assessment. OB/GYN specialty, female gender, and physician access to a genetic counselor were independent predictors of referral to cancer genetics specialists. Three profiles of PCPs, based upon referral practice and extent of involvement in genetics evaluation, were defined. Conclusion: Profiles of physician characteristics associated with varying levels of engagement with cancer genetic risk assessment and testing can be identified. These profiles may ultimately be useful in targeting decision support tools and services. PMID:20001580

  4. Support Groups and Pallative Care - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) Provides access to online cancer information and electronic support groups to patients, caregivers or anyone looking for answers and support about cancer and related disorders.

  5. Perspectives of Foster-Care Providers, Service Provicers, and Judges Regarding Privtized Foster-Care Services

    E-print Network

    Humphrey, Kristen R.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford

    2006-01-01

    - mentation of privatization was a lack of reliable data on which to develop a baseline for contractor funding (Snell, 2000). There was no clear idea about the cost or quality of care the state agency provided before privatization (Blackstone, Buck, & Hakim... providers were interviewed on two or three occasions. In the first interview, participants answered questions that al- lowed them to "tell their story" of their experience with out- of-home placement (Morse, 1994). Beginning an interview with "free...

  6. Advancing Cancer Care Delivery Research in the Next Decade

    Cancer.gov

    A more substantial and coordinated effort is needed to advance the science of cancer care delivery to help address the complex problems facing our health care systems. In response, NCI has created a new Healthcare Delivery Research Program (HDRP) to strengthen its support and coordination of research in ways that both improve survival and enhance patient care experiences.

  7. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TO THE HIPAA P RIVACY R ULE : When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, ... doctors, nurses, pharmacies, hospitals, nursing homes, and other health care providers to protect the privacy of your health ...

  8. From triple to quadruple aim: care of the patient requires care of the provider.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Sinsky, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Triple Aim-enhancing patient experience, improving population health, and reducing costs-is widely accepted as a compass to optimize health system performance. Yet physicians and other members of the health care workforce report widespread burnout and dissatisfaction. Burnout is associated with lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes, and it may increase costs. Burnout thus imperils the Triple Aim. This article recommends that the Triple Aim be expanded to a Quadruple Aim, adding the goal of improving the work life of health care providers, including clinicians and staff. PMID:25384822

  9. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice. PMID:26614859

  10. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient. PMID:25385131

  11. Alliance Against Cancer, the network of Italian cancer centers bridging research and care.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Paolo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Ferrarini, Manlio; Pelicci, PierGiuseppe; Dellabona, Paolo; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto; Musto, Pellegrino; Opocher, Giuseppe; Picci, Piero; Ricciardi, Walter; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    Alliance Against Cancer (ACC) was established in Rome in 2002 as a consortium of six Italian comprehensive cancer centers (Founders). The aims of ACC were to promote a network among Italian oncologic institutions in order to develop specific, advanced projects in clinical and translational research. During the following years, many additional full and associate members joined ACC, that presently includes the National Institute of Health, 17 research-oriented hospitals, scientific and patient organizations. Furthermore, in the last three years ACC underwent a reorganization process that redesigned the structure, governance and major activities. The present goal of ACC is to achieve high standards of care across Italy, to implement and harmonize principles of modern personalized and precision medicine, by developing cost effective processes and to provide tailored information to cancer patients. We herein summarize some of the major initiatives that ACC is currently developing to reach its goal, including tumor genetic screening programs, establishment of clinical trial programs for cancer patients treated in Italian cancer centers, facilitate their access to innovative drugs under development, improve quality through an European accreditation process (European Organization of Cancer Institutes), and develop international partnerships. In conclusion, ACC is a growing organization, trying to respond to the need of networking in Italy and may contribute significantly to improve the way we face cancer in Europe. PMID:26578263

  12. Antenatal and obstetric care in Afghanistan – a qualitative study among health care receivers and health care providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite attempts from the government to improve ante- and perinatal care, Afghanistan has once again been labeled “the worst country in which to be a mom” in Save the Children’s World’s Mothers’ Report. This study investigated how pregnant women and health care providers experience the existing antenatal and obstetric health care situation in Afghanistan. Methods Data were obtained through one-to-one semi-structured interviews of 27 individuals, including 12 women who were pregnant or had recently given birth, seven doctors, five midwives, and three traditional birth attendants. The interviews were carried out in Kabul and the village of Ramak in Ghazni Province. Interviews were taped, transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Giorgi’s phenomenological analysis. Results Antenatal care was reported to be underused, even when available. Several obstacles were identified, including a lack of knowledge regarding the importance of antenatal care among the women and their families, financial difficulties, and transportation problems. The women also reported significant dissatisfaction with the attitudes and behavior of health personnel, which included instances of verbal and physical abuse. According to the health professionals, poor working conditions, low salaries, and high stress levels contributed to this matter. Personal contacts inside the hospital were considered necessary for receiving high quality care, and bribery was customary. Despite these serious concerns, the women expressed gratitude for having even limited access to health care, especially treatment provided by a female doctor. Health professionals were proud of their work and enjoyed the opportunity to help their community. Conclusion This study identified several obstacles which must be addressed to improve reproductive health in Afghanistan. There was limited understanding of the importance of antenatal care and a lack of family support. Financial and transportation problems led to underuse of available care, especially by poorly educated rural women. Patients frequently complained of being treated disrespectfully, and health care providers correspondingly complained about poor working conditions leading to exhaustion and a lack of compassion. Widespread corruption, including the necessity of personal contacts inside hospitals, was also emphasized as an obstacle to equitable antenatal and obstetric health care. PMID:23642217

  13. Challenges of Providing Confidential Care to Adolescents in Urban Primary Care: Clinician Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M. Diane; Rubin, Susan E.; Campos, Giselle; O’Sullivan, Lucia F.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinician time alone with an adolescent has a major impact on disclosure of risk behavior. This study sought to describe primary care clinicians’ patterns of delivering time alone, decision making about introducing time alone to adolescents and their parents, and experiences delivering confidential services. METHODS We undertook qualitative interviews with 18 primary care clinicians in urban health centers staffed by specialists in pediatrics, family medicine, and adolescent medicine. RESULTS The annual preventive care visit is the primary context for provision of time alone with adolescents; clinicians consider the parent-child dynamic and the nature of the chief complaint for including time alone during visits for other than preventive care. Time constraints are a major barrier to offering time alone more frequently. Clinicians perceive that parental discomfort with time alone is rare. Many clinicians wrestle with internal conflict about providing confidential services to adolescents with serious health threats and regard their role as facilitating adolescent-parent communication. Health systems factors can interfere with delivery of confidential services, such as inconsistent procedures for determining whether unaccompanied youth would be seen. CONCLUSION Despite competing time demands, clinicians report commitment to offering time alone during preventive care visits and infrequently offer it at other times. Experienced clinicians can gain skills in the art of managing complex relationships between adolescents and their parents. Office systems should be developed that enhance the consistency of delivery of confidential services. PMID:21242559

  14. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health care needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of names of health care providers. You can do this ... asking your parents, friends, and relatives for the names of health care providers that they go to ...

  15. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  16. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  17. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  18. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  19. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  20. Pharmaceutical care management: a modern approach to providing seamless and integrated health care.

    PubMed

    al-Shaqha, W M; Zairi, M

    2001-01-01

    Institutional pharmaceutical services have widely evolved over the past 20-30 years. Hospital pharmacy practice has changed from a profession concerned chiefly with the bulk preparation and distribution of drug products to one centred on ensuring optimal drug therapy. Whereas hospital pharmacists were charged with maintaining large drug stock on nursing units, many of them now provide individualized patient therapies. The practice of hospital pharmacy has therefore become one encompassing all aspects of drug therapy, from the procurement of drugs and drug delivery devices, their preparation and distribution, to their most appropriate selection and use for each patient. Hospital pharmacy services have traditionally had little involvement at the key stages in patients' hospital care. This leads to the conclusion that the model of clinical pharmacy practice adopted by many pharmacy department hospitals is no longer appropriate for the demands of today's health-care services. Reviews many new models proposed for clinical pharmacy practice including an integrated model for providing a pharmaceutical care management approach in the health-care system. This model is a response to the failures of traditional drug therapy. It is primarily an idea about how health professionals and patient should integrate their work to obtain outcomes important to patients and clinicians. PMID:11729625

  1. 76 FR 9968 - Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...private citizens, health care workers, health care providers...public health and safety effects, distributive...each year to the health care industry...environmental, public health and safety, and other advantages...adversely affecting jobs. This final...

  2. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care...

  3. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  4. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  5. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ...Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided...Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care Continuation Coverage, as Required...of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation Coverage Notices...

  6. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care...

  7. APPLICATION providing exceptional health care services resulting in healing in the broadest sense

    E-print Network

    Malcolm Baldrige 2007 NATIONAL QUALITY PROGRAM APPLICATION providing exceptional health care........................................ Page 12 3.1 Patient, Other Customer, and Health Care Market Knowledge............................ Page ................................................................................................................... Page 32 7.1 Health Care Outcomes

  8. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) and Other Health Care... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the availability of the Model Health Care...

  9. Cancer Trends: Influencing Care and Research Priorities

    Cancer.gov

    Many of the trends being seen in cancer are changing how we view cancer and how we address it, from prompting research to identify the underlying causes of cancers increasing in incidence to informing research on treatment and prevention.

  10. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care that meets the physical, behavioral, and emotional needs of the child. Foster care is intended to be...

  11. 25 CFR 20.507 - What requirements must foster care providers meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.507 What requirements must foster care providers meet? If a child needs foster care, the social services worker must select care that meets the physical, behavioral, and emotional needs of the child. Foster care is intended to be...

  12. NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Gralow, Julie R.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N.; Gagel, Robert F.; Kumar, Rashmi N.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Shields, Andrew; Smith, Matthew R.; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H.

    2011-01-01

    Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care in both early and late stages of disease. Risk factors for osteoporosis are increased in patients with cancer, including women with chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure, those treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, and patients undergoing glucocorticoid therapy. The skeleton is a common site of metastatic cancer recurrence, and skeletal-related events are the cause of significant morbidity. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) convened a multidisciplinary task force on Bone Health in Cancer Care to discuss the progress made in identifying effective screening and therapeutic options for management of treatment-related bone loss; understanding the factors that result in bone metastases; managing skeletal metastases; and evolving strategies to reduce bone recurrences. This report summarizes presentations made at the meeting. PMID:19555589

  13. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  14. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  15. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngutu, Mariah; Nyamongo, Isaac K

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. PMID:26346001

  16. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... THE HIPAA P RIVACY R ULE : When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved In Your Care U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • Office ...

  17. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded into broader information systems. If the purpose of introducing mHealth is to promote the adoption of integrated care models, using mHealth should not be limited to some activities or to some phases of the health care process. Instead, there should be a higher degree of pervasiveness at all stages and in all health care delivery activities. PMID:25679446

  18. Developing NaviCanPlan: A Mobile Web Resource Locator for Cancer Providers and Survivors.

    PubMed

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Kellstedt, Debra; Weinberg, Armin D

    2015-12-01

    As of January, 2012, an estimated 13.7 million persons are living as cancer survivors. This population is expected to grow to nearly 18 million by 2022. While their treatment may be considered successful, many cancer survivors experience long-term physical, emotional, and psychosocial late effects of treatment. Our focus was on community-based cancer care-both rural and urban-as almost 90 % of cancer care occurs in community settings, where a full complement of supportive healthcare professionals may not be available. This study describes the results of stakeholder engagement and the feedback processes used to create NaviCanPlan, a mobile web resource locator designed to educate and inform both providers and survivors in finding health-related services, often in noncancer center settings. Individual interviews with survivors and providers regarding resource needs to address a variety of physical and psychosocial late effects were supplemented with site visits, web-based polling, and webinars discussions. Overall, the results indicated a need for a programmatic approach to providing education about community, medical, and nonmedical resources for providers and survivors. Design and content criteria for a web-based mobile resource locator were defined, articulated, and implemented. PMID:25519250

  19. Watch for Cancer Care and Economics Research Blog!

    Cancer.gov

    ARP's Health Services and Economics Branch (HSEB) will soon launch its Cancer Care and Economics Research blog. HSEB studies demographic, social, economic, and health system factors as they relate to screening, diagnostic, treatment, and survivorship care, and it develops and improves the methods and techniques of economic and health services research across the cancer control continuum. The blog is intended to facilitate dialogue about HSEB's research resources and research initiatives.

  20. An innovative path to improving cancer care in Indian country.

    PubMed Central

    Burhansstipanov, L.; Gilbert, A.; LaMarca, K.; Krebs, L. U.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Cancer Survivors' Support Network is an innovative public health program designed to improve survival from cancer and the quality of life after a cancer diagnosis for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian Aboriginal patients and their loved ones. The Network, initiated in 1999, now has more than 300 survivors enrolled as members. This article briefly describes the process that led to its formation and preliminary findings, primarily for breast cancer survivors, of ongoing qualitative and quantitative research. Network data show patterns of cancer care that are partially responsible for poor survivorship outcomes. PMID:12042607

  1. Palliative care in the community for cancer and end-stage cardiorespiratory disease: the views of patients, lay-carers and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Exley, Catherine; Field, David; Jones, Linda; Stokes, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Primary care plays an important role in delivering care to people who are dying. However, providing palliative care to people dying with conditions other than cancer may be more problematic, because it may be more difficult to establish an exact prognosis or to identify their needs. This article draws on qualitative research, which explored the views of health professionals, patients and their carers about care provided at the end of life. Differences between the care of people with cancer and those with end-stage cardiorespiratory disease were found in four main areas: management and progression of disease, communication and information, health care in the community and awareness of dying. The research shows that even in PHCTs (primary health care teams) committed to the delivery of palliative care, people dying with end-stage cardiorespiratory disease are less likely than those with cancer to receive full, and easily understood, information, to be aware that they are dying or to receive district nursing care. There is an increasing call for palliative care to be extended to all, but further work is needed to develop appropriate packages of care for those dying with conditions other than cancer. PMID:15690872

  2. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06–1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).??Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  3. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06-1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).??Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  4. Fragile X-Associated Disorders (FXD): A Handbook for Families, Health Care Providers, Counselors, and Educators

    MedlinePLUS

    ... X-associated Disorders (FXD) A Handbook for Families, Health Care Providers, Counselors, and Educators For Personal Use Only ... many family members. This handbook is for families, health care providers, counselors, educators, and all those wishing to ...

  5. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Heart and Circulation For Women Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Strokes Did ... attacks. Please see the brochure Talk with Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose precocious puberty & delayed puberty? Skip sharing ... and analyzing his or her medical history, a health care provider may perform tests to diagnose precocious puberty, ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip ... social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider should check a pregnant woman's blood pressure ...

  8. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health...

  9. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health...

  10. Liver cancer: Approaching a personalized care

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Gores, Gregory; Llovet, Josep Maria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The knowledge and understanding of all aspects of liver cancer [this including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA)] have experienced a major improvement in the last decades. New laboratory technologies have identified several molecular abnormalities that, at the very end, should provide an accurate stratification and optimal treatment of patients diagnosed with liver cancer. The seminal discovery of the TP53 hotspot mutation [1,2] was an initial landmark step for the future classification and treatment decision using conventional clinical criteria blended with molecular data. At the same time, the development of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) has been instrumental for earlier diagnosis, accurate staging and treatment advances. Several treatment options with proven survival benefit if properly applied are now available. Major highlights include: i) acceptance of liver transplantation for HCC if within the Milan criteria [3], ii) recognition of ablation as a potentially curative option [4,5], iii) proof of benefit of chemoembolization (TACE), [6] and iv) incorporation of sorafenib as an effective systemic therapy [7]. These options are part of the widely endorsed BCLC staging and treatment model (Fig. 1) [8,9]. This is clinically useful and it will certainly keep evolving to accommodate new scientific evidence. This review summarises the data which are the basis for the current recommendations for clinical practice, while simultaneously exposes the areas where more research is needed to fulfil the still unmet needs (Table 1). PMID:25920083

  11. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction. 

  12. Predictors of Health Care Use of Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N N; Sitnikova, Kate; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; de Haes, Hanneke C J M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of health care use among women with breast cancer by conducting a systematic review. Potentially relevant studies were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases. Also, backward and forward citation searches were performed. Studies were selected if they addressed associations between (a) sociodemographic, enabling (e.g., income), clinical and health related, or psychosocial predictors, and (b) medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use of adult women with breast cancer. The health care types of interest were hospital utilization and provider visits. An evaluation of aggregated findings was performed to determine consistency of findings between studies. Sixteen studies were included in the review. Higher age, a more advanced cancer stage, more comorbid disorders, having a mastectomy, a lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction were consistently associated with higher hospital utilization. None of the patient characteristics were consistently associated with medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use-but psychosocial or paramedical associations were also less examined. In conclusion, sociodemographic, medical, and treatment-related factors were consistently associated with (higher) health care use of breast cancer patients. Practitioners may use this information to anticipate future use of subgroups of patients. Results may also be used in the development of interventions that target relevant predictors, to reduce patients' health care use and accompanying health care costs. Furthermore, more research is needed to identify predictors of psychosocial and paramedical health care use. PMID:26132228

  13. Patient and provider characteristics associated with colorectal, breast, and cervical cancer screening among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Caroline A.; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Chan, Albert; Chan, John K.; McClellan, Sean R.; Chung, Sukyung; Olson, Cliff; Nimbal, Vani; Palaniappan, Latha P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Routinely recommended screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers can significantly reduce mortality from these types of cancer, yet screening is underutilized among Asians. Surveys rely on self-report and often are underpowered for analysis by Asian ethnicities. Electronic health records include validated (as opposed to recall-based) rates of cancer screening. In this paper we seek to better understand cancer screening patterns in a population of insured Asian Americans. METHODS We calculated rates of compliance with cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening among Asians from an EHR population, and compared them to non-Hispanic whites. We performed multivariable modeling to evaluate potential predictors (at the provider- and patient- level) of screening completion among Asian patients. RESULTS Aggregation of Asian subgroups masked heterogeneity in screening rates. Asian Indians and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders had the lowest rates of screening in our sample, well below that of non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable analyses, screening completion was negatively associated with patient-physician language discordance for mammography (OR:0.81 95% CI:0.71–0.92) and colorectal cancer screening (OR:0.79 CI:0.72–0.87) and positively associated with patient-provider gender concordance for mammography (OR:1.16 CI:1.00–1.34) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.66 CI:1.51–1.82). Additionally, patient enrollment in online health services increased mammography (OR:1.32 CI:1.20–1.46) and cervical cancer screening (OR:1.31 CI:1.24–1.37). CONCLUSIONS Language- and gender- concordant primary care providers, and culturally tailored online health resources may help improve preventive cancer screening in Asian patient populations. IMPACT This study demonstrates how use of EHR data can inform investigations of primary prevention practices within the healthcare delivery setting. PMID:25368396

  14. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  15. Sun-care product advertising in parenting magazines: what information does it provide about sun protection?

    PubMed

    Kang, Hannah; Walsh-Childers, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the content of sun-care product advertisements in five major U.S. parenting magazines with high circulation: Family Circle, Parents, Family Fun, Parenting (Early Years), and Parenting (School Years). The study examined what information sun-care product advertisements tell parents about skin cancer prevention and about sunscreen use for themselves or for their children based on the Health Belief Model concepts of perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Results showed that the most commonly mentioned benefit of the product was that it blocks ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. One-third of the ads promoted the product's effectiveness in overcoming four of the barriers that prevent people from using sunscreens: eye irritation, skin irritation, an unpleasant smell, and the need to reapply sunscreen too often or after physical activity. However, only a few of the ads provided information about the consequences of unprotected sun exposure or mentioned methods of sun protection or skin cancer prevention other than sunscreen use. We discuss the implications of these messages for parents' ability to understand correctly how to protect their children from damaging sun exposure. PMID:23066971

  16. A Formative Study of Colon Cancer Surveillance Care: Implications for Survivor-Centered Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Katherine Regan; Zapka, Jane; LaPelle, Nancy; Armeson, Kent; Ford, Marvella E

    2015-12-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States, and an increasing number of survivors has underscored the need for improved colon cancer surveillance care quality. Post-treatment surveillance includes follow-up care visits and tests as well as psychosocial support and lifestyle counseling. This formative study explored the individual, interpersonal, and organizational-level factors related to adherence to surveillance care guidelines to identify modifiable factors for potential educational intervention strategies. A convenience sample of 22 survivors (12 women and 10 men) from two cancer centers were recruited to participate in focus groups or key informant telephone interviews to explore their experiences with care after completing treatment and complete a brief survey. Content analysis was used to identify themes. Results confirmed that survivors navigated a complex surveillance care schedule and described a strong trust in their health care providers that guided their follow-up care experiences. Participants defined the terms "survivorship" and "follow-up" in a variety of different ways. Individual-level themes critical to survivors' experiences included having a positive attitude, relying on one's faith, and coping with fears. Interpersonal-level themes centered around interactions and communication with family and health care providers in follow-up care. While organizational-level factors were highlighted infrequently, participants rated office reminder systems and communication among their multiple providers as valuable. Educational interventions capitalizing on survivors' connections with their physicians and focusing on preparing survivors for what to expect in the next phase of their cancer experience, could be beneficial at the end of treatment to activate survivors for the transition to the post-treatment period. PMID:25411092

  17. The International Cancer Expert Corps: A Unique Approach for Sustainable Cancer Care in Low and Lower-Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, C. Norman; Formenti, Silvia C.; Williams, Tim R.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Soo, Khee C.; Wong, John; Chao, Nelson; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Grover, Surbhi; Magrath, Ian; Hahn, Stephen; Liu, Fei-Fei; DeWeese, Theodore; Khleif, Samir N.; Steinberg, Michael; Roth, Lawrence; Pistenmaa, David A.; Love, Richard R.; Mohiuddin, Majid; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2014-01-01

    The growing burden of non-communicable diseases including cancer in low- and lower-middle income countries (LMICs) and in geographic-access limited settings within resource-rich countries requires effective and sustainable solutions. The International Cancer Expert Corps (ICEC) is pioneering a novel global mentorship–partnership model to address workforce capability and capacity within cancer disparities regions built on the requirement for local investment in personnel and infrastructure. Radiation oncology will be a key component given its efficacy for cure even for the advanced stages of disease often encountered and for palliation. The goal for an ICEC Center within these health disparities settings is to develop and retain a high-quality sustainable workforce who can provide the best possible cancer care, conduct research, and become a regional center of excellence. The ICEC Center can also serve as a focal point for economic, social, and healthcare system improvement. ICEC is establishing teams of Experts with expertise to mentor in the broad range of subjects required to establish and sustain cancer care programs. The Hubs are cancer centers or other groups and professional societies in resource-rich settings that will comprise the global infrastructure coordinated by ICEC Central. A transformational tenet of ICEC is that altruistic, human-service activity should be an integral part of a healthcare career. To achieve a critical mass of mentors ICEC is working with three groups: academia, private practice, and senior mentors/retirees. While in-kind support will be important, ICEC seeks support for the career time dedicated to this activity through grants, government support, industry, and philanthropy. Providing care for people with cancer in LMICs has been a recalcitrant problem. The alarming increase in the global burden of cancer in LMICs underscores the urgency and makes this an opportune time fornovel and sustainable solutions to transform cancer care globally. PMID:25478326

  18. Attitudes of primary care physicians toward cancer-prevention trials: a focus group analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Frayne, S. M.; Mancuso, M.; Prout, M. N.; Freund, K. M.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recruitment of low-income and minority women to cancer-prevention trials requires a joint effort from specialists and primary care providers. We sought to assess primary care providers' attitudes toward participating in cancer-prevention trial recruitment. PROCEDURES: We conducted a focus group with seven Boston-based primary care providers serving low-income and minority women. Providers discussed knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding their role in recruitment to prevention trials. FINDINGS: A qualitative analysis of the focus group transcript revealed nine categories. Three categories related specifically to the primary care physician: 1) the dual role physicians play as advocates for both patient and research; 2) threats to maintaining the primary care relationship; and 3) general philosophy toward prevention. An additional six categories could be subdivided as they apply to the primary care physician, the patient, and the community: 4) trust/commitment; 5) benefits of the research; 6) access to the research; 7) knowledge and recall of the research; 8) influences of media coverage about the research; and 9) cultural sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Investigators conducting cancer-prevention trials must address the concerns of primary care physicians to optimize recruitment of subjects- especially low-income and minority women-into trials. PMID:11730121

  19. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  20. July 1, 2006 -Changes in Oregon's Genetic Privacy Law & its Impact on Health Care Providers

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    July 1, 2006 - Changes in Oregon's Genetic Privacy Law & its Impact on Health Care Providers What's Changed? 1. Beginning July 1, 2006, health care providers must notify their patients that any specimens it to their health care provider. 3. The revision changes the types of research that can be done without informed

  1. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  2. Certification of Health Care Provider for U.S. Department of Labor Employee's Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    of Health Care Provider for U.S. Department of Labor Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the employee's health care provider. Please: __________________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last SECTION III: For Completion by the HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTRUCTIONS to the HEALTH

  3. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  4. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting...

  5. The Passport for Care Program - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    The Passport for Care (PFC) Program is in development as an online resource for childhood cancer survivors. These patients face late and long-term physiological effects; psychosocial, employment, and insurance issues; and often lack consistent long-term follow-up care. Patients who successfully complete treatment usually transition back to primary care physicians who may lack understanding of the survivor's medical history and may not be familiar with medical issues faced by this population.

  6. Bayesian Networks for Clinical Decision Support in Lung Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Nicholson, Ann E.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Kadir, Timor; Brady, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Survival prediction and treatment selection in lung cancer care are characterised by high levels of uncertainty. Bayesian Networks (BNs), which naturally reason with uncertain domain knowledge, can be applied to aid lung cancer experts by providing personalised survival estimates and treatment selection recommendations. Based on the English Lung Cancer Database (LUCADA), we evaluate the feasibility of BNs for these two tasks, while comparing the performances of various causal discovery approaches to uncover the most feasible network structure from expert knowledge and data. We show first that the BN structure elicited from clinicians achieves a disappointing area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (± 0.03), whereas a structure learned by the CAMML hybrid causal discovery algorithm, which adheres with the temporal restrictions, achieves 0.81 (± 0.03). Second, our causal intervention results reveal that BN treatment recommendations, based on prescribing the treatment plan that maximises survival, can only predict the recorded treatment plan 29% of the time. However, this percentage rises to 76% when partial matches are included. PMID:24324773

  7. Cancer and Communication in the Health Care Setting: Experiences of Older Vietnamese Immigrants, A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Barg, Frances K.; Armstrong, Katrina; Holmes, John H.; Hornik, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Background As patients grow older, accurate communication with health care providers about cancer becomes increasingly important. However, little is known about the cancer communication experiences of older Asian immigrants. Objective To learn about the cancer-related communication experiences of older Vietnamese immigrants from the insider perspective. Design Qualitative study (grounded theory, constant comparative method) using individual interviews with older Vietnamese immigrants with the purpose of discussing how they learn about cancer. Interviews were conducted in Vietnamese. Participants Vietnamese immigrants aged 50–70 years, recruited through community-based organizations. Most had low education and limited English proficiency. The sample size of 20 was sufficient to achieve theoretical saturation. Results We identified 3 categories of themes concerning informants’ experiences with cancer communication in the health care setting: (1) attitudes about addressing screening with providers, (2) issues/problems communicating with physicians about cancer, and (3) language/translation difficulties. There was substantial overlap between informants who mentioned each theme category, and 40% of the participants mentioned all 3 categories. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of and act upon specific cancer communication needs/challenges of their older immigrant patients. Moreover, health care systems need to be prepared to address the needs of an increasingly multiethnic and linguistically diverse patient population. Finally, community-level interventions should address baseline knowledge deficits while encouraging immigrant patients to engage their doctors in discussions about cancer screening. PMID:18030538

  8. Creating a safer workplace to provide quality care.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J C

    2001-04-01

    In recent years, increasing interest has been placed on how health care workers can be trained and equipped to better protect them from possible workplace accidents and injuries while improving the care they deliver. Better workplace safety also means better customer and employee satisfaction, improved workforce retention and recruitment, and cost savings. Workplace safety is constantly evolving and addresses a whole host of issues ranging from needles and sharps injuries to moving patients to human factor analyses. This issue takes a cross-sectional look at how hospitals and health systems are addressing problem areas--and sharing information and best practices--to strengthen their quality of care at the workplace level. PMID:11330227

  9. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  10. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  11. Circle of Love: Relationships between Parents, Providers, and Children in Family Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Amy C.; Manfredi-Petitt, Lynn A.

    Children need loving bonds with caring adults to develop trusting relationships, solid self-esteem, and a readiness to learn. This book draws on caregivers' personal experience, as well as interviews and conversations, and questionnaires completed by child care providers to explore the issue of love in child care settings and how family child care

  12. Caring for Children in Your Home: A Business Guide for Unregulated Providers. Redleaf Business Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tom

    Addressed to individuals providing unregulated child care in their homes, this booklet presents basic recordkeeping and tax rules. The booklet discusses the following topics: (1) child care regulations, focusing on the benefits of being regulated; (2) the business of child care, listing possible tax deductions; (3) the tax consequences of caring

  13. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  14. Medicaid Personal Care Services for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: What Assistance Is Provided? When Is Assistance Provided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Timothy R.; Patnaik, Ashweeta; Naiser, Emily; Fournier, Constance J.; McMaughan, Darcy K.; Dyer, James A.; Phillips, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nature and timing of services provided to children with an intellectual disability (ID) identified by a new comprehensive assessment and care planning tool used to evaluate children's needs for Medicaid Personal Care Services (PCS) in Texas. The new assessment procedure resulted from a legal settlement with the advocacy…

  15. Indonesia: status of cancer pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Soebadi, R D; Tejawinata, S

    1996-08-01

    Indonesia is a large archipelago with an estimated 203,000-365,400 new cancer cases a year. Most cases present in the advanced stage. Pain is the chief complaint in 89% of the patients of the palliative care unit at Dr. Soetomo hospital. The program is a community-based, family-oriented, and culturally adapted home care, widely applicable throughout the country. The service and medication should be affordable, simple, and available. The WHO three-step ladder has been adopted as the method of choice in cancer pain relief. Facilities supportive for the program are the existing health-care delivery system and non-formal support system (Indonesian Cancer Foundation and Organization for Family Welfare Promotion, PKK). The chief constraints for program implementation are the geographical and population problems, lack of resources and funding for the training of health-care workers, and limited availability of oral morphine. PMID:8754994

  16. Rural Health Care Providers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, L. Gary; Salsberg, Edward; Phillips, Debra M.; Lishner, Denise M.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the rural physician shortage and related policy and research needs. Discusses geographic distribution of physicians, quality of rural care, rural recruitment and retention, rural residency training, factors in medical education affecting entry into rural practice, physician productivity and income, reimbursement, federal and state programs…

  17. Measuring improvement in populations: implementing and evaluating successful change in lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Klesges, Lisa M.; Smeltzer, Mathew P.; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care in lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and in the United States, is a major public health challenge. Such improvement requires accurate and meaningful measurement of quality of care. Preliminary indicators have been derived from clinical practice guidelines and expert opinions, but there are few standard sets of quality of care measures for lung cancer in the United States or elsewhere. Research to develop validated evidence-based quality of care measures is critical in promoting population improvement initiatives in lung cancer. Furthermore, novel research designs beyond the traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are needed for wide-scale applications of quality improvement and should extend into alternative designs such as quasi-experimental designs, rigorous observational studies, population modeling, and other pragmatic study designs. We discuss several study design options to aid the development of practical, actionable, and measurable quality standards for lung cancer care. We also provide examples of ongoing pragmatic studies for the dissemination and implementation of lung cancer quality improvement interventions in community settings. PMID:26380178

  18. Caveats for doctors providing care for themselves, family, friends, and colleagues.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Paul; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are almost always asked by a family member, friend, other healthcare provider, or an employee to provide him or her with medical care. Often this request for medical care is made over the phone, at a social gathering, or in the hallway of hospital. This article will discuss the ethics involved with providing medical care to family, friends, and colleagues and suggest guidelines for caring for these special people/patients. PMID:24873131

  19. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Strohschein, Fay J.; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care. PMID:25452741

  20. Cancer Survivorship and Models of Survivorship Care: A Review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth D; Pandey, Manjari; Jain, Rohit; Mehta, Rutika

    2015-12-01

    There are over 13 million cancer survivors in the United States. This is heterogenous group in age, cultural background, and cancer history and also in regards to the natural history of their cancer survivorship. There are "seasons of survivorship" including acute, transitional, extended, permanent, and chronic in which the medical and psychosocial problems and needs of cancer survivors change. For example, the medical and psychosocial needs of a testicular cancer survivor who is 1 year beyond diagnosis are very different from the same person 20 years later when the risk of recurrence is very low but the risk of second cancers has risen. This is a review of the "seasons of survivorship." Some of the specific needs of cancer survivors in each phase of survivorship are presented. Models of survivorship care are also reviewed. PMID:25635609

  1. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Endocrine Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Recent trends in prostate cancer survival illustrate that mortality from prostate cancer is declining. While some of this decline can be attributed to PSA screening, the survival patterns do not fully support PSA as the only reason for the trend. Initial management of localized or regional prostate cancer usually involves surgical excision, radiation therapy or watchful waiting. Although hormonal therapy is also available, this treatment is mostly used only after a recurrence is detected.

  2. Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections - SEER Cancer Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data from population-based cancer registries covering approximately 28 percent of the U.S. population.

  3. Cancer Survivorship: Moving the Science and Art of Research and Care Beyond Cure - March 31, 2003

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Survivorship: Moving the Science and Art of Research and Care Beyond Cure Statement of Julia H. Rowland, Ph.D. Director, Office of Cancer Survivorship Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences National Cancer Institute National

  4. Uncompensated care provided by private practice physicians in Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, K E; Miller, M K; Dwyer, J W; Nissen, D

    1991-01-01

    While a great deal of attention has been paid in recent years to establishing the magnitude and characteristics of uncompensated care in hospitals, comparatively little research has been undertaken to study physician uncompensated care. This article reports the results of a prospective patient-specific study of uncompensated care in Florida. Of 4,042 cases examined, 26.2 percent had charges voluntarily reduced below the usual and customary charge at the time of service. However, only 13.5 percent of those reductions were attributed to charity. Overall, 10.4 percent of the total billed amount was left unresolved. When payment source was considered, it was found that self-pay patients accounted for 30.6 percent of the cases but accounted for 52.0 percent of the unresolved amounts. Further analysis indicated that the self-pay patients were 35.5 times more likely to leave an outstanding balance than individuals with some type of insurance coverage. Odds of unresolved balances were also calculated as a function of income, specialty type, practice size, and type of visit. PMID:1669686

  5. Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition Carnegie Mellon University HR for FMLA leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition. If requested by your: __________________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last Name of family member for whom you will provide care

  6. Delaware FIRST: Implementing Handicapped Infant/Toddler Curriculum through Families and Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiner, Penny L.; Whitehead, Linda C.

    The Delaware FIRST Program is designed to meet the needs of handicapped infants and toddlers through trained family day care providers. The program is based on a developmental family systems approach. It strives to provide families with ongoing support by offering mainstreamed family day care or respite care, by developing and/or facilitating an…

  7. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers... Administrative Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.56 Classes of health care services and providers... health care items or services: (1) Inpatient hospital services; (2) Outpatient hospital services;...

  8. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers... Administrative Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.56 Classes of health care services and providers... health care items or services: (1) Inpatient hospital services; (2) Outpatient hospital services;...

  9. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers... Administrative Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.56 Classes of health care services and providers... health care items or services: (1) Inpatient hospital services; (2) Outpatient hospital services;...

  10. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  11. Cancers Covered by Patterns of Care/Quality of Care

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  12. Health care expenditures associated with depression in adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Background The rates of depression in adults with cancer have been reported as high as 38%–58%. How depression affects overall health care expenditures in individuals with cancer is an under-researched area. Objective To estimate excess average total health care expenditures associated with depression in adults with cancer by comparing those with and without depression after controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, access to care, and other health status variables. Methods Cross-sectional data on 4,766 adult survivors of cancer from 2006–2009 of the nationally representative household survey, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), were used. The patients were older than 21 years. Cancer and depression were identified from the patients’ medical conditions files. Dependent variables consisted of total, inpatient, outpatient, emergency department, prescription drugs, and other expenditures. Ordinary least square (OLS) on logged dollars and generalized linear models with log-link function were performed. All analyses (SAS 9.3 and STATA12) accounted for the complex survey design of the MEPS. Results Overall, 14% of individuals with cancer reported having depression. In those with cancer and depression, the average annual health care expenditures were $18,401 compared with $12,091 in those without depression. After adjusting for demographic, socio-economic, access to care, and other health status variables, those with depression had about 31.7% greater total expenditures compared with those without depression. Total, outpatient, and prescription expenditures were higher in individuals with depression than in those without depression. Individuals with cancer and depression were significantly more likely to use emergency departments (adjusted odds ratio, 1.46) compared with their counterparts without depression. Limitations Cancer patients who died during the reporting year were excluded. The financial burden of depression may have been underestimated because the costs of end-of-life care are high. The burden for each cancer type was not analyzed because of the small sample size. Conclusion In adults with cancer, those with depression had higher health care utilization and expenditures compared with those without depression. PMID:26270540

  13. Physical, Psychosocial, Relationship, and Economic Burden of Caring for People With Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Afaf; Lambert, Sylvie; Johnson, Claire; Waller, Amy; Currow, David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the issues faced by caregivers of people diagnosed with cancer, with a particular emphasis on the physical, psychosocial, and economic impact of caring. A review of the literature identified cancer as one of the most common health conditions in receipt of informal caregiving, with the majority of caregivers reporting taking on the role of caring because of family responsibility and there being little choice or no one else to provide the care. For some, caregiving can extend for several years and become equivalent to a full-time job, with significant consequent health, psychosocial, and financial burdens. Having a better understanding of the critical and broad roles that caregivers play in the oncology setting and the impact of these on their health and well-being may assist health care professionals in supporting caregivers with these tasks and targeting services and interventions toward those most in need. PMID:23942921

  14. Improving Breast Cancer Care for Older Women

    Cancer.gov

    Earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and the overall increase in average lifespan continue to expand the number of breast cancer survivors who are aged 65 and older. This population is already estimated to be one million of the total 2.3 million breast cancer survivors.

  15. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons?.org/practice-resources/pep)?. PMID:26302272

  16. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY... Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity for members of the public to create short, erin.poetter@hhs... ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an ] opportunity for members of the public...

  17. State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012

    MedlinePLUS

    ... State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012 On This Page Key ... During the last decade, the supply of primary care physicians was lower than the supply of specialty ...

  18. Time to Talk: Tell Your Health Care Provider about Your Use of Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Menu Be an Informed Consumer Decisions about your health care are important—including decisions about whether or not ... that interests you. Discuss the information with your health care provider before making a decision. These fact sheets ...

  19. Time To Talk with Your Health Care Providers: 4 Tips to Start the Conversation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Y Z 4 Tips: Start Talking With Your Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches Share: When patients ... fully informed and can help patients make wise health care decisions. Here are 4 tips to help you ...

  20. Talk with Your Health Care Provider about High Cholesterol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you do? Always ask your provider what your cholesterol numbers are and write them down. Discuss these ... provider may prescribe medicine to help lower your cholesterol. y y Take your medicine every day, or ...

  1. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  2. Teleoncology: Current and future applications for improving cancer care globally

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Access to quality cancer care is often unavailable not only in low- and middle-income countries but also in rural or remote areas of high-income countries. Teleoncology (oncology applications of medical telecommunications, including pathology, radiology, and other related disciplines) has the potential to enhance both access to and the quality of clinical cancer care as well as education and training. Its implementation in the developing world requires an approach tailored to priorities, resources, and needs. We believe that teleoncology can best achieve its proposed goals through programmatic, consistent, and long-term application. Here we review teleoncology initiatives that have the potential to decrease cancer care inequality between resource-poor and resource-rich institutions and offer guidelines for the development of teleoncology programs in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:20152772

  3. Care provider perspectives on end-of-life care in long-term-care homes: implications for whole-person and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Wiersma, Elaine; Arseneau, Lise; Kelley, Mary Lou; Kozak, Jean; Habjan, Sonja; MacLean, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study holistically explores the experience of dying and end-of-life care for older persons with dementia in long-term care (LTC) from the perspective of care providers. Using a focused ethnography methodology, seven researchers interviewed LTC staff, residents' families, volunteers, management staff, and spiritual advisers/clergy over a five-day period. Research was guided by two key questions: What is the dying experience of people living in LTC from the perspective of different care providers? and, What are the salient issues in providing palliative care for elderly people dying in LTC? Based on a thematic analysis of verbatim data, three common themes were identified: tension between completing job tasks on time and "being there" for residents; the importance of family-like bonds between front-line staff and residents; and the importance of communication among staff and between staff and residents and their families at the end of life. Findings are discussed in relation to their implications for policies and practices that can support whole-person care and ultimately a good death for residents of LTC facilities. PMID:20718397

  4. An electronic resource to support staff providing end of life care.

    PubMed

    Pordes, Philippa; Ashcroft, Angela; Williams, Pauline

    The Department of Health's End of Life Care Strategy provided the opportunity to develop effective care, regardless of the setting. However, providing end of life care is challenging for all healthcare practitioners, with each care setting experiencing unique challenges. Within one acute NHS trust, the challenges of identifying and diagnosing dying were identified. An electronic resource tool was developed to aid prognostication and provide a single point of reference to assist healthcare practitioners in improving end of life care for patients in an acute hospital setting. PMID:22216666

  5. [Out-Patient Psychosocial Cancer Counseling Centers and their Clients - Services Provided and Service Utilization by Patients and Patients' Relatives].

    PubMed

    Giesler, JürgenM; Weis, Joachim; Schreib, Melanie; Eichhorn, Svenja; Kuhnt, Susanne; Faust, Tanja; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    Psychosocial cancer counseling centers represent an increasingly important part of comprehensive psychosocial cancer care. Research on the services provided by those centers is sparse, however, as is research on person-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics of their clients. Therefore, the present study analyzes the services provided by 26 psychosocial cancer counseling centers temporarily being funded by the German Cancer Aid as well as selected characteristics of their clients. Analyses are based on data collected during 2011 by means of a documentation system specifically designed for the purposes of psychosocial cancer counseling. Testing focuses on whether cancer patients and cancer patients' relatives differ with respect to various characteristics and the services used. The results show that psychosocial and benefit counseling represent a major part of counseling services, followed by giving information and employing relaxation techniques. Clients seek counseling primarily in early phases of disease and treatment. Women with breast cancer are over-represented among clients. Analyses also reveal significant differences between cancer patients and patients' relatives. Psychotherapeutic interventions and grief-counseling are more frequent in counseling relatives, whereas benefit counseling is more frequent in working with patients. The results emphasize the relevance of outpatient psychosocial cancer counseling. They may also help support initiatives aiming at establishing psychosocial cancer counseling targeted to the needs of each individual client. PMID:26200246

  6. Representation of expatriates among cancer patients in Kuwait and the need for culturally-competent care.

    PubMed

    Alshemmari, Salem H; Refaat, Samar M; Elbasmi, Amani A; Alsirafy, Samy A

    2012-01-01

    From 2000 to 2007, 11,793 cancer patients received treatment in Kuwait. Non-Kuwaitis accounted for 6,016 (51%) patients. They came from 68 countries, mainly from the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean (59%) and South-East Asian (20%) regions. The majority (69%) was from low- and low-middle income countries. Thirty-seven percent were from non-Arabic speaking countries. To provide culturally-competent care for expatriate patients, there is a need to explore the impact of their ethnic, sociocultural, economic, language diversity, and expatriation-related stressors on different aspects of cancer care. PMID:22571250

  7. The Performance of mHealth in Cancer Supportive Care: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the advent of smartphones, mHealth has risen to the attention of the health care system as something that could radically change the way health care has been viewed, managed, and delivered to date. This is particularly relevant for cancer, as one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and for cancer supportive care, since patients and caregivers have key roles in managing side effects. Given adequate knowledge, they are able to expect appropriate assessments and interventions. In this scenario, mHealth has great potential for linking patients, caregivers, and health care professionals; for enabling early detection and intervention; for lowering costs; and achieving better quality of life. Given its great potential, it is important to evaluate the performance of mHealth. This can be considered from several perspectives, of which organizational performance is particularly relevant, since mHealth may increase the productivity of health care providers and as a result even the productivity of health care systems. Objective This paper aims to review studies on the evaluation of the performance of mHealth, with particular focus on cancer care and cancer supportive care processes, concentrating on its contribution to organizational performance, as well as identifying some indications for a further research agenda. Methods We carried out a review of literature, aimed at identifying studies related to the performance of mHealth in general or focusing on cancer care and cancer supportive care. Results Our analysis revealed that studies are almost always based on a single dimension of performance. Any evaluations of the performance of mHealth are based on very different methods and measures, with a prevailing focus on issues linked to efficiency. This fails to consider the real contribution that mHealth can offer for improving the performance of health care providers, health care systems, and the quality of life in general. Conclusions Further research should start by stating and explaining what is meant by the evaluation of mHealth’s performance and then conduct more in-depth analysis in order to create shared frameworks to specifically identify the different dimensions of mHealth’s performance. PMID:25720295

  8. Affordable Care Act and Clinical Trials: Resources for Patients | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's patient education website, Cancer.Net, provides a detailed article for patients that explains health insurance coverage of clincial trials and a fact sheet that gives an overview of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) provisions.

  9. Financial Toxicity of Cancer Care: It's Time to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Yousuf Zafar, S

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a considerably large proportion of cancer patients are affected by treatment-related financial harm. As medical debt grows for some with cancer, the downstream effects can be catastrophic, with a recent study suggesting a link between extreme financial distress and worse mortality. At least three factors might explain the relationship between extreme financial distress and greater risk of mortality: 1) overall poorer well-being, 2) impaired health-related quality of life, and 3) sub-par quality of care. While research has described the financial harm associated with cancer treatment, little has been done to effectively intervene on the problem. Long-term solutions must focus on policy changes to reduce unsustainable drug prices and promote innovative insurance models. In the mean time, patients continue to struggle with high out-of-pocket costs. For more immediate solutions, we should look to the oncologist and patient. Oncologists should focus on the value of care delivered, encourage patient engagement on the topic of costs, and be better educated on financial resources available to patients. For their part, patients need improved cost-related health literacy so they are aware of potential costs and resources, and research should focus on how patients define high-value care. With a growing list of financial side effects induced by cancer treatment, the time has come to intervene on the "financial toxicity" of cancer care. PMID:26657334

  10. A systematic review of patient acceptance of screening for oral cancer outside of dental care settings.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, Priyamvada; Flohr, Francesca D; Llewellyn, Carrie D

    2014-10-01

    This systematic review summarised the literature on patient acceptability of screening for oral cancer outside dental care settings. A comprehensive search of relevant literature was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHAL, psycINFO, CANCERLIT and BNI to identify relevant articles published between 1975 and Dec 2013. Studies reporting acceptability of oral cancer screening to undiagnosed individuals attending non-dental settings were eligible for inclusion. A total of 2935 references were initially identified from the computerised search but 2217 were excluded after screening the titles. From the abstracts of the remaining 178 articles, 47 full text articles were retrieved for further scrutiny, and 12 studies were found to be eligible for inclusion. In these studies, knowledge about oral cancer, anxiety related to the screening process, preference for care provision, and financial cost were influencing factors for the acceptance of screening. Written information provided to patients in primary care was reported to boost immediate knowledge levels of oral cancer, lessen anxiety, and increase intentions for screening. The majority of screening methods were entirely acceptable to patients; lack of acceptability from the patients' viewpoint was not a significant barrier to carrying out opportunistic screening of high-risk populations. In conclusion, the available evidence suggests that acceptance of, and satisfaction with oral cancer screening is high, particularly where patients have previously been educated about oral cancer. Further research focusing on patient's preferences would enable streamlining of the approach to oral cancer screening taken by any national programme. PMID:25127201

  11. Gynecologic care for breast cancer survivors: assisting in the transition to wellness

    PubMed Central

    Salani, Ritu; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there are >2 million survivors of breast cancer in the United States. Two years after cancer treatment, patients may transition to primary care providers and/or gynecologists. Many of these survivors may have difficulties with menopausal symptoms. If they do not know already, some of these women may want or need risk assessment for hereditary-or treatment-induced second cancers. At least 20% will also have significant psychologic, sexual, and/or relationship difficulties that require attention. All of the women will need assistance to learn and follow recommendations for surveillance, detecting recurrence, and promoting wellness. Thus, gynecologists play a critical role in helping these patients in their health care transitions. To assist the gynecologists, we have reviewed the evaluation and management of common sequelae of breast cancer diagnoses and treatments. PMID:22177185

  12. [An information system to integrate outpatient cancer care data in the Unified National Health System].

    PubMed

    Souza, Rômulo Cristovão de; Freire, Sergio Miranda; Almeida, Rosimary Terezinha de

    2010-06-01

    This study focuses on the development of a system to integrate monthly outpatient cancer care data in the Unified National Health System (SUS). The system was modeled to retrace the treatment evolution in each cancer case and services output, with the following advantage: the system focuses on the cancer case, does not require knowledge by the user in order to handle the database, and allows updating the base as new data emerge. The results of direct queries in the system were identical to those obtained from direct inspection of the original database and those from another integration approach. The use of a tool with these characteristics by public administrators can help improve the quality of outpatient cancer care provided by the National Health System. PMID:20657978

  13. Examining Health Care Costs: Opportunities to Provide Value in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Lorenzo, Javier; Macario, Alex

    2015-12-01

    As health care costs threaten the economic stability of American society, increasing pressures to focus on value-based health care have led to the development of protocols for fast-track cardiac surgery and for delirium management. Critical care services can be led by anesthesiologists with the goal of improving ICU outcomes and at the same time decreasing the rising cost of ICU medicine. PMID:26610628

  14. Identifying Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Practices Among Primary Care Providers of Minority, Low-Income and Immigrant Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Denise M.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Gany, Francesca; Aragones, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Objective Minority populations in the United States are disproportionally affected by Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-related cancer. We sought to understand physician practices, knowledge and beliefs that affect utilization of the HPV vaccine in primary care settings serving large minority populations in areas with increased rates of HPV-related cancer. Study Design Cross-sectional survey of randomly selected primary care providers, including pediatricians, family practice physicians and internists, serving large minority populations in Brooklyn, N.Y. and in areas with higher than average cervical cancer rates. Results Of 156 physicians randomly selected, 121 eligible providers responded to the survey; 64% were pediatricians, 19% were internists and 17% were family practitioners. Thirty-four percent of respondents reported that they routinely offered HPV vaccine to their eligible patients. Seventy percent of physicians reported that the lack of preventive care visits for patients in the eligible age group limited their ability to recommend the HPV vaccine and 70% of those who reported this barrier do not routinely recommend HPV vaccine. The lack of time to educate parents about the HPV vaccine and cost of the vaccine to their patients were two commonly reported barriers that affected whether providers offered the vaccine. Conclusions Our study found that the majority of providers serving the highest risk populations for HPV infection and HPV-related cancers are not routinely recommending the HPV vaccine to their patients. Reasons for providers' failure to recommend the HPV vaccine routinely are identified and possible areas for targeted interventions to increase HPV vaccination rates are discussed. PMID:24886959

  15. Accelerating the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Foti, Margaret; Kean, Marcia A

    2015-05-15

    Significant progress has been made in the past 50 years across the field of oncology, and, as a result, the number of cancer survivors in the United States is more than 14.5 million. In fact, the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis, which is due in part to improved treatments that help people with cancer live longer, and improvements in early detection that allow doctors to find cancer earlier when the disease is easier to treat. However, in spite of this progress, innovation in cancer research and care is at risk as the rise in health care spending is leading to significant pressure to contain costs. As the oncology community seeks to ensure that innovation in cancer research and care continues, it is imperative that stakeholders focus their attention on the value that the research and care continuum provides. Over the past several years, the Turning the Tide Against Cancer initiative has worked with the cancer community to accelerate the delivery of patient-centered, high-quality cancer research and care, while addressing value and cost. This article highlights policy recommendations that resulted from the convening of an expert working group comprising leaders from across the oncology field. Of the recommendations, the co-conveners have identified several issue areas that merit particular focus in 2015: Support FDA's efforts to modernize its framework for bringing new medicines to patients, through facilitating and implementing innovative approaches to drug development and regulatory review. Ensure that cancer clinical pathways or similar decision-support tools are transparent; developed through a physician-driven process that includes patient input; and meet minimum standards for clinical appropriateness, timeliness, and patient centeredness. Support oncology decision-support tools that are timely, clinically appropriate, and patient centered. Build on existing efforts to convene a multistakeholder committee and develop a report on ways to define and measure value in oncology care, taking into account many of the complex dynamics associated with measuring value, including the interests and needs of patients, as well as the importance of committed and ongoing support for innovative research.These policy options are intended to further the national dialogue and represent meaningful and actionable steps toward supporting cancer research and care that is innovative, efficient, and focused on the patient. PMID:25901079

  16. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  17. More than Motherhood: Reasons for Becoming a Family Day Care Provider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines motivations for entering family day care work as they relate to responsibilities of motherhood and the prominence of these motivations for the women providing day care within and across groups of workers. Using data from a large-scale representative survey of family day care workers in Illinois, the author examines the range…

  18. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology...-day episode of care. On average, each provider cares for six veterans at VA expense. The potential..., Alcohol abuse, Alcoholism, Claims, Day care, Dental health, Drug abuse, Foreign relations,...

  19. 76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care... announces the award of single-source expansion supplement grants to seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care... seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total of $5,016,218. The additional...

  20. Family Day Care Home Provider Training: Quality Factors and Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poresky, Robert H.

    The primary objective of this report of the second phase of the Day Care Training System project was to train and support family day care home providers. The training was based on the second edition of "Caring for Children Today" (Poresky et al., 1979), with additional training for personnel of the Kansas State Department of Social and…

  1. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 108 / Monday... Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions AGENCY: Centers for... section 2702 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which directs the Secretary of Health...

  2. Provider Perspectives about Latino Patients: Determinants of Care and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Dvorscek, Michael J.; Budge, Stephanie L.; Esmond, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Primary care settings are the gateway through which the majority of Latinos access care for their physical and mental health concerns. This study explored the perspectives of primary care providers concerning their Latino patients, in particular issues affecting their patients' access to and utilization of services. Interviews were conducted with…

  3. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  4. Breast cancer genetics and managed care. The Kaiser Permanente experience.

    PubMed

    Kutner, S E

    1999-12-01

    In 1996, with evolution of the science of cancer genetics and the advent of commercially available BRCA1 and later BRCA2 testing, Kaiser Permanente began to apply these advances in clinical practice. Recommendations for referral to genetic counseling were developed in 1997 as the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Referral for Genetic Counseling for Inherited Susceptibility for Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Implementation of these guidelines with associated protocols in Kaiser Permanente's Northern California Region has occupied the ensuing years and includes dissemination of the high-risk guidelines for breast and ovarian cancer, dissemination of patient and physician educational materials on the breast cancer guidelines, monthly classes and taped healthphone messages for patients, interactive videoconferencing for physicians, a training seminar for medical geneticists who will counsel patients at risk, publication of articles on breast cancer and genetic risk in health plan member- and physician-directed magazines, identification and training of clinical specialists and supporting clinicians to care for patients before and after counseling, individual counseling and testing of patients and families, and development of a data registry. Implementing the guidelines helped us communicate the uncertainty surrounding breast cancer testing, and we were obliged to learn more about ethical, legal, societal, and insurance controversies surrounding genetic testing. Given the lack of effective prevention for breast or ovarian cancer and the difficulty of treatment, the appropriate use of genetics in patient care is essential. In the near future, we will see the need for cancer genetics to become an integral part of practice throughout the spectrum of health care. We at Kaiser Permanente feel that the breast cancer guideline project is the first step in this process. PMID:10630183

  5. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  6. Health Care Providers: A Missing Link in Understanding Acceptability of the Female Condom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantell, Joanne E.; West, Brooke S.; Sue, Kimberly; Hoffman, Susie; Exner, Theresa M.; Kelvin, Elizabeth; Stein, Zena A.

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers can play a key role in influencing clients to initiate and maintain use of the female condom, an underused method for HIV/STI and pregnancy prevention. In 2001-2002, based on semistructured interviews with 78 health care providers from four types of settings in New York City, we found that most providers had seen the female…

  7. Promoting Wellness: A Nutrition, Health and Safety Manual for Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Pam S.

    This manual provides a reference source for use by sponsor organizations of the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) in training family child care providers. The manual begins with separate introductory sections for trainers and for providers. The trainer's section includes materials on: how adults learn, strengths and limitations of various…

  8. Training Providers and Patients to Talk about End-of-Life Care

    Cancer.gov

    Failing to discuss the transition from active cancer treatment to end-of-life care can leave doctors unsure of what a patient truly wants. Failing to receive end-of-life care in line with their values and wishes can cause patients and their families great distress. Researchers have developed innovative, evidence-based programs to help doctors and patients improve their communication skills and grow comfortable with these discussions.

  9. The care of my child with cancer: a new instrument to measure caregiving demand in parents of children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Wells, Diane Keegan; James, Kelly; Stewart, Janet L; Moore, Ida M; Kelly, Katherine Patterson; Moore, Barbara; Bond, Dana; Diamond, Joy; Hall, Brenda; Mahan, Rosemary; Roll, Lona; Speckhart, Beth

    2002-06-01

    The growing societal trend toward delivering more and more illness-related care in the home, driven both by family preferences and by mandates from third-party reimbursers, places additional responsibilities for increasingly complex caregiving on parents of children with serious illness. This article reports on the development and initial field test of The Care of My Child with Cancer, a caregiving demand instrument specific to the childhood cancer population. The instrument demonstrated strong internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and exploratory factor analysis provided initial evidence for the instrument's construct validity. The instrument will now be applied in a collaborative program of nursing research to further investigate caregiving demand and ultimately to develop nursing interventions to maximize medical and quality of life outcomes for children with cancer and their families. PMID:12094361

  10. Patient and Provider Preferences for Colorectal Cancer Screening: How Does CT Colonography Compare to Other Modalities?

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Wasan, Sharmeel K.; Heeren, Timothy C.; Schroy, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patient and provider preferences toward CT colonography (CTC) remain unclear. The primary goals of this study were 1) to investigate patient preferences for one of the currently recommended CRC screening modalities and 2) to evaluate provider preferences before and after review of updated guidelines. Methods Cross-sectional survey of ambulatory-care patients and providers in the primary care setting. Providers were surveyed before and after reviewing the 2008 guidelines by the American Cancer Society, US Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American College of Radiology. Results Of 100 patients surveyed, 59% preferred colonoscopy, 17% fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), 14% stool DNA (sDNA) testing, and 10% CTC (P <0.001). The majority of those whose first choice was a stool-based test chose the alternate stool-based test as their second choice over CTC or colonoscopy (P<0.0001). Patients who preferred colonoscopy chose accuracy (76%) and frequency of testing (10%) as the most important test features, whereas patients who preferred a stool-based test chose discomfort (52%) and complications (23%). Of 170 providers surveyed, 96% chose colonoscopy, 2% FOBT, and 1% FOBT with flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) (p < 0.0001). No providers chose CTC or sDNA as their preferred option before reviewing guidelines, and 89% kept their preference after review of guidelines. As a default option for patients who declined colonoscopy, 44% of providers chose FOBT, 12% FOBT+FS, 4% CTC, and 37% deferred to patient preference before review of guidelines. Of the 33% of providers who changed their preference after review of guidelines, 46% recommended CTC. Accuracy was the most influential reason for provider test choice. Conclusions Patients and providers prefer colonoscopy for CRC screening. Revised guidelines endorsing the use of CTC are unlikely to change provider preferences but may influence choice of default strategies for patients who decline colonoscopy. PMID:25237287

  11. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ...Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication...and FDA staff entitled ``Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication...Important Safety Information.'' Dear Health Care Provider (DHCP) Letters are...

  12. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information... ``Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information.'' Dear Health Care Provider (DHCP) Letters are correspondence--usually in the form of a mass mailing from...

  13. INTRODUCTION Parental care is a widespread reproductive strategy that provides

    E-print Network

    Denardo, Dale

    (Blokpoel, 1981; Cooke et al., 2000). Maternal egg-brooding in pythons provides an ideal opportunity relative to parental behaviors of other species, python egg- brooding is a dynamic process in which varying (Vinegar et al., 1970; Honegger, 1970). Even in python species where facultative thermogenesis does

  14. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...an NPI from the National Provider System (NPS) for itself or for any subpart of the... (2) Use the NPI it obtained from the NPS to identify itself on all standard transactions...transaction. (4) Communicate to the NPS any changes in its required data...

  15. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...an NPI from the National Provider System (NPS) for itself or for any subpart of the... (2) Use the NPI it obtained from the NPS to identify itself on all standard transactions...transaction. (4) Communicate to the NPS any changes in its required data...

  16. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...an NPI from the National Provider System (NPS) for itself or for any subpart of the... (2) Use the NPI it obtained from the NPS to identify itself on all standard transactions...transaction. (4) Communicate to the NPS any changes in its required data...

  17. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...an NPI from the National Provider System (NPS) for itself or for any subpart of the... (2) Use the NPI it obtained from the NPS to identify itself on all standard transactions...transaction. (4) Communicate to the NPS any changes in its required data...

  18. Employer Child Care Providers Stalled, but Optimistic: Fourteenth Annual Status Report on Employer Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The ten largest employer child care management organizations, as a group, reported a zero growth rate in 2004. This year of no growth follows two years in which the sector grew by only 4% per year. This contrasts dramatically with the fast expansion period for employer child care, 1996 through 2000, when the sector grew at an annual rate of 10%.…

  19. Racial Disparities in Cancer Care in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System and the Role of Site of Care

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Cleo A.; Landrum, Mary Beth; McNeil, Barbara J.; Bozeman, Samuel R.; Williams, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed cancer care disparities within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and whether between-hospital differences explained disparities. Methods. We linked VA cancer registry data with VA and Medicare administrative data and examined 20 cancer-related quality measures among Black and White veterans diagnosed with colorectal (n?=?12?897), lung (n?=?25?608), or prostate (n?=?38?202) cancer from 2001 to 2004. We used logistic regression to assess racial disparities for each measure and hospital fixed-effects models to determine whether disparities were attributable to between- or within-hospital differences. Results. Compared with Whites, Blacks had lower rates of early-stage colon cancer diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]?=?0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.72, 0.90), curative surgery for stage I, II, or III rectal cancer (AOR?=?0.57; 95% CI?=?0.41, 0.78), 3-year survival for colon cancer (AOR?=?0.75; 95% CI?=?0.62, 0.89) and rectal cancer (AOR?=?0.61; 95% CI?=?0.42, 0.87), curative surgery for early-stage lung cancer (AOR?=?0.50; 95% CI?=?0.41, 0.60), 3-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation (3-D CRT/IMRT; AOR?=?0.53; 95% CI?=?0.47, 0.59), and potent antiemetics for highly emetogenic chemotherapy (AOR?=?0.87; 95% CI?=?0.78, 0.98). Adjustment for hospital fixed-effects minimally influenced racial gaps except for 3-D CRT/IMRT (AOR?=?0.75; 95% CI?=?0.65, 0.87) and potent antiemetics (AOR?=?0.95; 95% CI?=?0.82, 1.10). Conclusions. Disparities in VA cancer care were observed for 7 of 20 measures and were primarily attributable to within-hospital differences. PMID:25100422

  20. Supportive care considerations for older adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Naeim, Arash; Aapro, Matti; Subbarao, Rashmi; Balducci, Lodovico

    2014-08-20

    The treatment of cancer presents specific concerns that are unique to the growing demographic of elderly patients. Because the incidence of cancer is strongly correlated with aging, the expansion of supportive care and other age-appropriate therapies will be of great importance as the population of elderly patients with cancer increases in the coming years. Elderly patients are especially likely to experience febrile neutropenia, complications from chemotherapy-induced nausea, anemia, osteoporosis (especially in patients diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer), depression, insomnia, and fatigue. These issues are often complicated by other chronic conditions related to age, such as diabetes and cardiac disease. For many patients, symptoms may be addressed both through lifestyle management and pharmaceutical approaches. Therefore, the key to improving quality of life for the elderly patient with cancer is an awareness of their specific needs and a familiarity with emergent treatment options. PMID:25071112

  1. Non-physician clinician provided HIV treatment results in equivalent outcomes as physician-provided care: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Emdin, Connor A; Chong, Nicholas J; Millson, Peggy E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A severe healthcare worker shortage in sub-Saharan Africa is inhibiting the expansion of HIV treatment. Task shifting, the transfer of antiretroviral therapy (ART) management and initiation from doctors to nurses and other non-physician clinicians, has been proposed to address this problem. However, many health officials remain wary about implementing task shifting policies due to concerns that non-physicians will provide care inferior to physicians. To determine if non-physician-provided HIV care does result in equivalent outcomes to physician-provided care, a meta-analysis was performed. Methods Online databases were searched using a predefined strategy. The results for four primary outcomes were combined using a random effects model with sub-groups of non-physician-managed ART and -initiated ART. TB diagnosis rates, adherence, weight gain and patient satisfaction were summarized qualitatively. Results Mortality (N=59,666) had similar outcomes for non-physicians and physicians, with a hazard ratio of 1.05 (CI: 0.88–1.26). The increase in CD4 levels at one year, as a difference in means of 2.3 (N=17,142, CI: ?12.7–17.3), and viral failure at one year, as a risk ratio of 0.89 (N=10,344, CI: 0.65–1.23), were similar for physicians and non-physicians. Interestingly, loss to follow-up (LTFU) (N=53,435) was reduced for non-physicians with a hazard ratio of 0.72 (CI: 0.56–0.94). TB diagnosis rates, adherence and weight gain were similar for non-physicians and physicians. Patient satisfaction appeared higher for non-physicians in qualitative components of studies and was attributed to non-physicians spending more time with patients as well as providing more holistic care. Conclusions Non-physician-provided HIV care results in equivalent outcomes to care provided by physicians and may result in decreased LTFU rates. PMID:23827470

  2. PLENARY SESSION: Posttreatment Follow-up Care for Cancer Survivors - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    The growing population of cancer survivors at risk for serious adverse effects after treatment, both psychological and physical, is in need of practitioners who understand the complicated health issues they face. Follow-up care needs vary with the survivor; pediatric, young adult, and older adult cancer survivors all face distinct challenges.

  3. Promoting physical exercise in breast cancer care.

    PubMed

    Kirshbaum, Marilyn

    This article is intended to promote awareness of physical exercise as a safe, advantageous and feasible intervention for a patient with breast cancer or recovering from it. The numerous and varied benefits of exercise and the implications for nursing practice in light of current research evidence are discussed. PMID:15997896

  4. Trust in Health Care Providers: Factors Predicting Trust among Homeless Veterans over Time

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether a combination of predisposing, enabling, need, and primary care experience variables would predict trust in medical health care providers for homeless veterans over 18 months. Linear mixed model analysis indicated that, among these variables, race, social support, service-connected disability status, and satisfaction and continuity with providers predicted trust in provider over time. Trust in providers improved during the initial stages of the relationship between patient and provider and then declined to slightly below baseline levels over time. Further research is needed to determine generalizability and effects of provider trust on patient health care status over longer periods of time. PMID:25130239

  5. Breast Cancer Diagnosed During Pregnancy: Adapting Recent Advances in Breast Cancer Care for Pregnant Patients.

    PubMed

    Loibl, Sibylle; Schmidt, André; Gentilini, Oreste; Kaufman, Bella; Kuhl, Christine; Denkert, Carsten; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Parokonnaya, Anastasia; Stensheim, Hanne; Thomssen, Christoph; van Calsteren, Kristel; Poortmans, Philip; Berveiller, Paul; Markert, Udo R; Amant, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer during pregnancy (BCP), although rare, is becoming more common and treatment should be as similar as possible to that for nonpregnant young patients with breast cancer. A group of specialists convened to review current guidelines and provide guidance on how recent advances in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment can be adapted for pregnant patients. The majority of patients with BCP will be considered for treatment during the pregnancy. Premature delivery should be avoided whenever possible. Most treatments, including sentinel lymph node biopsy, systemic therapy with taxanes, platinum agents, or dose-dense treatment can be safely given during pregnancy, after careful risk/benefit assessment for mother and child. Chemotherapy is contraindicated during the first trimester because of a higher risk of fetal malformations but is feasible in the second and third trimesters. Other treatments such as radiation therapy or anti-human epidermal growth receptor 2 treatment are in general not indicated during pregnancy but might be considered in some instances. Patient data should be collected in a systematic way whenever possible. PMID:26247818

  6. Hospice Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caregiver Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Hospice Care On This Page What is hospice, and ... organizations can provide more information about hospice. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization 1–800–658–8898 ( ...

  7. Information at the Point of Care: An Informational Application for Cancer Resources.

    PubMed

    Walker, Deborah Kirk; Hardeman, Amber; Owen, Larry; Frank, Jennifer Sandson

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to design, develop, and modify a cancer resource application (app) that providers, patients, and caregivers could use to locate local and national cancer resources. The project design used a modified version of the Questionnaire for User Interaction Survey 7.0 to gather information from a convenience sample of nurses and community participants regarding their perception of the app. These data helped to identify gaps in resources and modifications needed to make the app more user-friendly. The current cancer care system is complex, and patients often complain of uncoordinated care, lack of information, and insufficient psychosocial support. Cancer centers are working to meet the American College of Surgeons 2015 recommendation of psychosocial assessment and referrals; the Cancer Resource APP described here provides the resources to meet this need. Prototypes of the app were tested in practice and community settings, then solicited feedback guided needed technology modifications. The resulting Cancer Resource APP provides the healthcare community with information to make timely and consistent referrals for patients and caregivers. PMID:26176641

  8. Child-Care Provider Survey Reveals Cost Constrains Quality. Research Brief. Volume 96, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 414 child care providers in southeastern Wisconsin reveals that cost as well as low wages and lack of benefits for workers can constrain providers from pursuing improvements to child-care quality. Of survey respondents, approximately half of whom are home-based and half center-based, 13% have at least three of five structural factors…

  9. Child Care Providers' Strategies for Supporting Healthy Eating: A Qualitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Meghan; Batal, Malek

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed child care settings and providers to be important influences on children's developing behaviors. Yet most research on children's nutritional development has focused on home settings and parents. Thus, through semistructured interviews with child care providers, this study aimed to develop a better understanding of the…

  10. 76 FR 9283 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions... amounts expended for providing medical assistance for health care-acquired conditions. It would also... Federal financial participation FY Fiscal year HAC Hospital-acquired condition HCAC Health...

  11. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePLUS

    Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 June 2015. +Related Content Going to a primary health ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  12. The Cavendish Centre for integrated cancer care: assessment of patients' needs and responses.

    PubMed

    Peace, G; Manasse, A

    2002-03-01

    The use of complementary therapies in combination with conventional medicine is increasing. In cancer care, as at the Cavendish Centre for Cancer Care in Sheffield, the range of therapies offered can include aromatherapy, massage, reflexology, shiatsu, acupuncture, homeopathy, counselling, visualization, hypnotherapy, relaxation, healing and art therapy. Before offering any therapy careful assessment of patients' needs is important as patients seeking complementary therapies may present with unrealistic hopes and expectations of benefit. There are wide variations in provision of services offering complementary cancer care throughout the United Kingdom but few offer a comprehensive assessment which is used as a baseline for both planning treatment and evaluating its outcome and which is conducted by a trained and objective practitioner who has no investment in any specific therapy. We describe the model of care developed at the Cavendish Centre with particular emphasis on the assessment process. Our model of assessment provides an opportunity for patients to tell their story, make sense of the illness experience, construct meaning from it and set realistic expectations for the chosen intervention. It also offers patients involvement and choice in decisions about their care. In addition we present evaluative data from a case series of 157 patients, 138 of whom (88%) reported improvement in their main concern on MYMOP (Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile). PMID:12442821

  13. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-11-01

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity. PMID:25557409

  14. General Internists’ Preferences and Knowledge About the Care of Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Eugene; Daugherty, Christopher K.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Lee, Hannah; Kigin, Mackenzie L.; Rasinski, Kenneth A.; Ford, Jennifer S.; Tonorezos, Emily S.; Nathan, Paul C.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Henderson, Tara O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adult childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are at high risk for illness and premature death. Little is known about the physicians who provide their routine medical care. Objective To determine general internists’ self-reported attitudes and knowledge about the care of CCSs. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Mailed survey delivered between September 2011 and August 2012. Participants Random sample of 2000 U.S. general internists. Measurements Care preferences, comfort levels with caring for CCSs (7-point Likert scale: 1 = very uncomfortable, 7 = very comfortable), familiarity with available surveillance guidelines (7-point Likert scale: 1 = very unfamiliar, 7 = very familiar), and concordance with Children’s Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines in response to a clinical vignette. Results The response rate was 61.6% (1110 of 1801). More than half the internists (51.1%) reported caring for at least 1 CCS; 72.0% of these internists never received a treatment summary. On average, internists were “somewhat uncomfortable” caring for survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and osteosarcoma. Internists reported being “somewhat unfamiliar” with available surveillance guidelines. In response to a clinical vignette about a young adult survivor of Hodgkin lymphoma, 90.6% of respondents did not appropriately recommend yearly breast cancer surveillance, 85.1% did not appropriately recommended cardiac surveillance, and 23.6% did not appropriately recommend yearly thyroid surveillance. Access to surveillance guidelines and treatment summaries were identified as the most useful resources for caring for CCSs. Limitation Findings, based on self-report, may not reflect actual clinical practice. Conclusion Although most general internists report involvement in the care of CCSs, many seem unfamiliar with available surveillance guidelines and would prefer to follow patients in collaboration with a cancer center. Primary Funding Source National Cancer Institute. PMID:24573662

  15. Integrative Oncology: Cancer Care for the Next Millenium - June 7, 2000

    Cancer.gov

    INTEGRATIVE ONCOLOGY: CANCER CARE FOR THE NEXT MILLENIUM Robert Wittes, M.D. Deputy Director of Extramural Science Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis The National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Department of Health

  16. 78 FR 25448 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Crowds Care for Cancer: Supporting Survivors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...and Registration for ``Crowds Care for Cancer: Supporting Survivors Challenge'' AGENCY...SUMMARY: The number of cancer survivors in the United States is currently...aging of the United States population. Cancer survivors may experience a host of...

  17. What matters most for end-of-life care? Perspectives from community-based palliative care providers and administrators

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Bina; Bainbridge, Daryl; Bryant, Deanna; Tan Toyofuku, Sue; Seow, Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There has been little research conducted to understand the essential meaning of quality, community-based, end-of-life (EOL) care, despite the expansion of these services. The purpose of this study was to define what matters most for EOL care from the perspective of a diverse range of palliative care providers in the community who have daily encounters with death and dying. Methods We used interviews to explore the perceptions of providers and administrators from 14 specialised palliative care teams in Ontario, Canada. Participants were prompted with the question ‘What matters most for EOL care?’ Responses were analysed using a phenomenological approach to derive themes depicting the universal essence of EOL care. Results Data from 107 respondents were obtained and analysed, from which 40 formulated concepts emerged; these were further grouped into 9 themes. Of the respondents, 39% were nurses, 19% physicians, 27% were supervisors or executives and 15% other. The most predominate concept was that Patient's Wishes are Fulfilled, cited by almost half the respondents. The most prominent themes were Addressing the Non-physical Needs, Healthcare Teams’ Nature of Palliative Care Delivery, Patient Wishes are Honoured, Addressing the Physical Needs, Preparing for and Accepting Death, Communication and Relationship Development, and Involving and Supporting the Family. Conclusions 9 critical domains of EOL care evolved from the interviews, indicating that quality EOL care extends beyond managing physical pain, but includes a holistic perspective of care, a healthcare team dedicated to the EOL journey and a patient-centred pathway. Tailoring the provision of care to consider these important elements plays a critical role in supporting a positive EOL experience for patients and families. PMID:26124510

  18. Asking questions of a palliative care nurse practitioner on a pancreatic cancer website

    PubMed Central

    GRANT, MARIAN S.; WIEGAND, DEBRA L.; DY, SYDNEY M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence demonstrates the benefits of online cancer interventions but very little about the needs of those with pancreatic cancer or interaction with online providers. Our study was done to (1) see how many people would visit a webpage where they could interact with a palliative care nurse practitioner (PCNP), (2) see how many would ask the PCNP questions, (3) determine the type of questions, and (4) obtain feedback regarding the usefulness of the webpage. Method Mixed-methods descriptive design. Results There were 2174 visits to the webpage, and a total of 84 participants sent 110 questions/comments. Some 28 (33%) were people worried that they might have pancreatic cancer. Most questions (59, 53%) had to do with palliative care issues, with the largest subgroup (26, 23%) involving psychological concerns. A total of 39 completed an online survey and were relatives (20, 52%), or patients (17, 44%). They rated the webpage at 3.3/4 as being helpful at learning about the physical symptoms/treatments of pancreatic cancer, at 3.1/4 for learning about emotional issues, at 3/4 for learning about palliative care, at 2.8/4 for learning about hospice, and at 3.3/4 for reading other people’s questions. Significance of results The PCNP webpage was a helpful resource. Most asking questions were worried about having or getting pancreatic cancer. More research is needed into online providers, interventions, and conducting research online. PMID:24909893

  19. Complementary medicine in palliative care and cancer symptom management.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Wallerstedt, Dawn B

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients varies according to geographical area, gender, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence of CAM use among cancer patients in the United States has been estimated to be between 7% and 54%. Most cancer patients use CAM with the hope of boosting the immune system, relieving pain, and controlling side effects related to disease or treatment. Only a minority of patients include CAM in the treatment plan with curative intent. This review article focuses on practices belonging to the CAM domains of mind-body medicine, CAM botanicals, manipulative practices, and energy medicine, because they are widely used as complementary approaches to palliative cancer care and cancer symptom management. In the area of cancer symptom management, auricular acupuncture, therapeutic touch, and hypnosis may help to manage cancer pain. Music therapy, massage, and hypnosis may have an effect on anxiety, and both acupuncture and massage may have a therapeutic role in cancer fatigue. Acupuncture and selected botanicals may reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and hypnosis and guided imagery may be beneficial in anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Transcendental meditation and the mindfulness-based stress reduction can play a role in the management of depressed mood and anxiety. Black cohosh and phytoestrogen-rich foods may reduce vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Most CAM approaches to the treatment of cancer are safe when used by a CAM practitioner experienced in the treatment of cancer patients. The potential for many commonly used botanical to interact with prescription drugs continues to be a concern. Botanicals should be used with caution by cancer patients and only under the guidance of an oncologist knowledgeable in their use. PMID:17034678

  20. Projecting Primary Care Use in the Medicaid Expansion Population: Evidence for Providers and Policy Makers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eric T; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2015-10-01

    Millions of low-income adults are beginning to gain Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act. To forecast the resulting need for primary care providers, we estimate the effect of Medicaid take-up on visits to office-based primary care providers, including clinics. We estimate that adults with Medicaid coverage at any point in the year have an average of 1.32 visits per year to primary care providers, 0.48 more visits than low-income adults without Medicaid. Consequently, we project a need for 2,113 additional primary care providers (range: 1,130-3,138) if all states expand Medicaid. Our estimates are somewhat lower than several recent forecasts, which may not have controlled adequately for selection bias, and which used non-representative samples for forecasting. Our findings shed light on disparities in access to care, particularly in counties with relatively few primary care providers per capita. Efforts to expand access to primary care should focus on where providers practice, rather than simply training more providers. PMID:26062613

  1. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is organized around two case studies designed to appeal to primary care providers (thrombophilia) and public health professionals (development of a screening grogram for colorectal cancer). NCHPEG has distributed more than 0000 copies of the CD-ROM to NCHPEG member organizations and to other organizations and individuals in response to requests. The program also is available at www.nchpeg.org.

  2. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo; Lucatorto, Michelle A; Hawthorne, Kara; Hersh, Janis; Myers, Raquel; Elwy, A Rani; Graham, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP) and the primary care provider (PCP) is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1) what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2) how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively) to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts. PMID:25653538

  3. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment to follow-up care. PMID:24007941

  4. The care of patients dying from cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woodbine, G.

    1982-01-01

    A census of seriously ill cancer patients at home and in hospital was undertaken in 1977 in Southampton Health District. One hundred and thirty-seven patients were identified in whom no further curative treatment was appropriate. Ninety-seven (71 per cent) were interviewed, 63 at home and 34 in hospital. Thirty-four per cent of patients reported moderate or severe pain in the 24 hours prior to interview. Similar proportions were found in the home and in hospital. Only 5 per cent were receiving oral diamorphine. Night nursing and home help services did not meet the needs of the patients. PMID:6185673

  5. Lung cancer care: the impact of facilities and area measures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the US, and while treatment disparities by race and class have been well described in the literature, the impact of social determinates of health, and specific characteristics of the treatment centers have been less well characterized. As the treatment of lung cancer relies more upon a precision and personalized medicine approach, where patients obtain treatment has an impact on outcomes and could be a major factor in treatment disparities. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the manner in which lung cancer care can be impacted by poor access to high quality treatment centers, and how the built environment can be a mitigating factor in the pursuit of treatment equity. PMID:26380179

  6. Attitudes about providing HIV care: voices from publicly funded clinics in California

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Revery; Koester, Kimberly A; Waldura, Jessica F

    2014-01-01

    Background. As the enactment of health care reform becomes a reality in the USA, it has been widely predicted that HIV+ patients will increasingly be cared for by primary care physicians (PCPs), many of whom lack the experience to deliver full-spectrum HIV care. Objective. To describe PCPs’ preparedness for an influx of HIV+ patients. Methods. This qualitative study included interviews with 20 PCPs from community health centres in California. We inquired about clinicians’ experiences with HIV, their strategies for dealing with unfamiliar aspects of medicine and their management of complicated patients. We also identified the clinicians’ preferred types of information and consultation resources. Results. PCPs are not yet comfortable as providers of comprehensive HIV care; however, they are dedicated to delivering excellent care to all of their patients, regardless of disease process. Although they prefer to refer HIV+ patients to centres of excellence, they are willing to adopt full responsibility when necessary and believe they can deliver high-quality HIV care if provided with adequate consultation and informational resources. Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act will insure an estimated 20000 more HIV+ patients in California. With a dwindling supply of HIV specialists, many of these patients will be principally cared for by PCPs. PCPs will go to great lengths to ensure that HIV+ patients receive superior care, but they need the support of HIV specialists to expand their skills. Priority should be given to ensuring that expert consultation is widely available to PCPs who find themselves caring for HIV+ patients. PMID:25121978

  7. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  8. Competence of health care providers on care of newborns at birth in a level-1 health facility in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Monebenimp, Francisca; Tenefopa, Makudjou; Mve Koh, Valere; Kago, Innocent

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This is an observational study which was carried out at a level one health facility in Yaoundé from June to July 2009. The aim was to evaluate the competence of health care providers towards newborns’ care at birth Methods Ten health care providers took care of three hundred and thirty-five pregnant women who were enrolled for the study after informed verbal consent in the delivery room. Results Out of 340 offspring delivered and taken care of, 179 (52.6%) were male and 161 (47.4%) were female. Only two out of ten health workers had a WHO Essential Newborn Care (ENC) training. None of them had received any refresher course for the past two years. The mean gestational age of women was 39.5±3.5 weeks. Resuscitation was carried out on 21 (6.2%) of the newborns including 7 (33.3%) who had birth asphyxia. Health care providers scored 100% in performing the following tasks: warming up the baby, applying eye drops, injecting vitamin K, identifying the neonate, searching for any apparent life threatening congenital malformations, preventing for infection after procedures and initiating breastfeeding. The score was 24% at neonatal resuscitation tasks. Low level of education was associated with poor competence on applying ENC tasks (p<0.001). Lack of WHO ENC training was associated with poor competence on ENC tasks (p<0.001) and poor skills on resuscitation (p=0.03). Conclusion There is a need to reinforce the capacity of health care providers by training in WHO ENC course with emphasis on providing skills on resuscitation in order to reduce the burden of neonatal intrapartum-related deaths. PMID:22593781

  9. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: clinicians’ views, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Yoxall, Charles W; Ayers, Susan; Sawyer, Alexandra; Bertullies, Sophia; Thomas, Margaret; D Weeks, Andrew; Duley, Lelia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to assess clinicians’ views and experiences of providing immediate neonatal care at birth beside the mother, and of using a mobile trolley designed to facilitate this bedside care. Design Qualitative interview study with semistructured interviews. Results The results were analysed using thematic analysis. Setting A large UK maternity unit. Participants Clinicians (n=20) from a range of disciplines who were present when the trolley was used to provide neonatal care at birth at the bedside. Five clinicians provided/observed advanced resuscitation by the bedside. Results Five themes were identified: (1) Parents’ involvement, which included ‘Contact and involvement’, ‘Positive emotions for parents’ and ‘Staff communication’; (2) Reservations about neonatal care at birth beside the mother, which included ‘Impact on clinicians’ and ‘Impact on parents’; (3) Practical challenges in providing neonatal care at the bedside, which included ‘Cord length’ and ‘Caesarean section’; (4) Comparison of the trolley with usual resuscitation equipment and (5) Training and integration of bedside care into clinical routine, which included ‘Teething problems’ and ‘Training’. Conclusions Overall, most clinicians were positive about providing immediate neonatal care at the maternal bedside, particularly in terms of the clinicians’ perceptions of the parents’ experience. Clinicians also perceived that their close proximity to parents improved communication. However, there was some concern about performing more intensive interventions in front of parents. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at the bedside requires staff training and support. PMID:26423852

  10. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork facilitated the work of professionals. Such findings are important given the growing prevalence of cancer and the importance of attracting and retaining health professionals to work with cancer patients. PMID:21639897

  11. Factors Associated with Providers' Perceptions of Mental Health Care in Santa Luzia's Family Health Strategy, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela R; Pinto, Rogerio M; Rahman, Rahbel; Spector, Anya Y

    2015-01-01

    Brazil has a unique mental health care system, characterized by universal coverage delivered by interdisciplinary teams both in the community and in specialized centros de atenção psicossocial (CAPS-psychosocial care centers). Provision of patient-centered mental health care is an important principle of Brazilian mental health care, but this topic has not been well-studied. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of 151 community health workers (CHWs), nurses, and physicians in Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Chi-squares, t-tests and multivariate regression analyses examined differences in socio-demographics, caseload, engagement in evidence-based practices (EBPs), and transdisciplinary collaboration between providers who reported providing high levels of patient-centered mental health care and those who did not. In multivariate regression models, components of transdisciplinary collaboration were significantly associated with providers' perceptions of patient-centered mental health care (p < 0.05). CHWs were also significantly more likely to report providing patient-centered care than physicians and nurses. EBP engagement and sociodemographics were not associated with perceptions. Results suggest that training efforts to improve patient-centered mental health care in Brazil could build upon CHWs' skills and focus on transdisciplinary collaboration. Findings may inform practice in other countries with similar health care systems. PMID:26703644

  12. Clinical trials to improve childhood cancer care and survival in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Israëls, Trijn; Kambugu, Joyce; Kouya, Francine; El-Mallawany, Nader Kim; Hesseling, Peter B; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Eden, Tim; Renner, Lorna; Molyneux, Elizabeth M

    2013-10-01

    Over 80% of children with cancer live in low and middle-income countries where survival rates are much lower than high-income countries. Challenges to successful treatment of paediatric cancers in these countries include late presentation, malnutrition, failure to complete treatment and less-intense supportive care leading to increased treatment-related mortality and the need to reduce the intensity of treatment. Clinical trials can contribute to improved care and survival by providing objective information on the number of patients treated, accuracy of diagnosis, causes of treatment failure and the efficacy of specific interventions. Clinical trials can also help to build capacity (salary support and training), improve facilities (equipment) and fund treatment or essential associated costs (social support, nutritional support and follow-up care). In this article, we discuss our experience with clinical trials in Malawi and sub-Saharan Africa with emphasis on the treatment of children with Wilms tumour. PMID:23897077

  13. [Professional practice of nurses who care for cancer patients in general hospitals].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Josiane Travençolo; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli; Fustinoni, Suzete Maria; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses a qualitative study which aimed to understand the typical of nurses' professional practice caring for patient with cancer in general hospitals. In order to find out the reasons that motivate nurse's action, and to put in evidence what is original, significant, specific and typical about this phenomenon, we have taken into consideration the premises of the philosopher Alfred Schütz, which provide us with subsidies to unveil them. The data collected through semi-structured interviews reported that nurses admit not having the required theoretical knowledge and experience or enough practice to take care of a cancer patient. Thus, they don't feel capable of developing actions which may positively influence care on patients and their family members. PMID:23032337

  14. Transitional Care Challenges of Rehospitalized Veterans: Listening to Patients and Providers

    PubMed Central

    Sackett, Nathan; Pierce, Read; Schopfer, David; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Moy, Nicholas; Bachhuber, Melissa; Wallhagen, Margaret I.; Lee, Sei J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Readmissions to the hospital are common and costly, often resulting from poor care coordination. Despite increased attention given to improving the quality and safety of care transitions, little is known about patient and provider perspectives of the transitional care needs of rehospitalized Veterans. As part of a larger quality improvement initiative to reduce hospital readmissions, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients and 14 of their interdisciplinary health care providers to better understand their perspectives of the transitional care needs and challenges faced by rehospitalized Veterans. Patients identified 3 common themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) knowledge gaps and deferred power; (2) difficulties navigating the health care system; and (3) complex psychiatric and social needs. Providers identified different themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) substance abuse and mental illness; (2) lack of social or financial support and homelessness; (3) premature discharge and poor communication; and (4) nonadherence with follow-up. Results underscore that rehospitalized Veterans have a complex overlapping profile of real and perceived physical, mental, and social needs. A paradigm of disempowerment and deferred responsibility appears to exist between patients and providers that contributes to ineffective care transitions, resulting in readmissions. These results highlight the cultural constraints on systems of care and suggest that process improvements should focus on increasing the sense of partnership between patients and providers, while simultaneously creating a culture of empowerment, ownership, and engagement, to achieve success in reducing hospital readmissions. (Population Health Management 2013;16:326–331) PMID:23560514

  15. Transitional care challenges of rehospitalized veterans: listening to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Caroline; Sackett, Nathan; Pierce, Read; Schopfer, David; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Moy, Nicholas; Bachhuber, Melissa; Wallhagen, Margaret I; Lee, Sei J

    2013-10-01

    Readmissions to the hospital are common and costly, often resulting from poor care coordination. Despite increased attention given to improving the quality and safety of care transitions, little is known about patient and provider perspectives of the transitional care needs of rehospitalized Veterans. As part of a larger quality improvement initiative to reduce hospital readmissions, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients and 14 of their interdisciplinary health care providers to better understand their perspectives of the transitional care needs and challenges faced by rehospitalized Veterans. Patients identified 3 common themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) knowledge gaps and deferred power; (2) difficulties navigating the health care system; and (3) complex psychiatric and social needs. Providers identified different themes that led to rehospitalization: (1) substance abuse and mental illness; (2) lack of social or financial support and homelessness; (3) premature discharge and poor communication; and (4) nonadherence with follow-up. Results underscore that rehospitalized Veterans have a complex overlapping profile of real and perceived physical, mental, and social needs. A paradigm of disempowerment and deferred responsibility appears to exist between patients and providers that contributes to ineffective care transitions, resulting in readmissions. These results highlight the cultural constraints on systems of care and suggest that process improvements should focus on increasing the sense of partnership between patients and providers, while simultaneously creating a culture of empowerment, ownership, and engagement, to achieve success in reducing hospital readmissions. PMID:23560514

  16. Optimal delivery of colorectal cancer follow-up care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Mikaela L; Young, Jane M; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. With population aging and increases in survival, the number of CRC survivors is projected to rise dramatically. The time following initial treatment is often described as a period of transition from intensive hospital-based care back into “regular life.” This review provides an overview of recommended follow-up care for people with CRC who have been treated with curative intent, as well as exploring the current state of the research that underpins these guidelines. For patients, key concerns following treatment include the development of recurrent and new cancers, late and long-term effects of cancer and treatment, and the interplay of these factors with daily function and general health. For physicians, survivorship care plans can be a tool for coordinating the surveillance, intervention, and prevention of these key patient concerns. Though much of the research in cancer survivorship to date has focused on surveillance for recurrent disease, many national guidelines differ in their conclusions about the frequency and timing of follow-up tests. Most CRC guidelines refer only briefly to the management of side effects, despite reports that many patients have a range of ongoing physiological, psychosocial, and functional needs. Guidance for surveillance and intervention is often limited by a small number of heterogeneous trials conducted in this patient group. However, recently released survivorship guidelines emphasize the potential for the effectiveness of secondary prevention strategies, such as physical activity, to improve patient outcomes. There is also emerging evidence for the role of primary care providers and nurse coordinated care to support the transition and increase the cost-effectiveness of follow-up. The shift in focus from recurrence alone to the assessment and management of a range of survivorship issues will be important for ensuring that this growing group of patients achieves optimal outcomes. PMID:26056501

  17. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...This interim final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to allow VA to enter into contracts or provider agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans and authorizes VA to use provider agreements to pay for such......

  18. Missed Opportunities: Patterns of Medical Care and Hospice Utilization Among Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alaina J.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Prescott, Lauren S.; Taylor, Jolyn S.; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess aggressive medical care, hospice utilization, and advance care documentation among ovarian cancer patients in the final thirty days of life. Methods Ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer patients registered at our institution during 2007–2011 were identified. Statistical analyses included Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney, Chi-square analysis, and multivariate analysis. Results 183 patients met inclusion criteria. Median age at diagnosis was 58. Most were white and had advanced ovarian cancer. Fifty percent had experienced at least one form of aggressive care during the last 30 days of life. Patients with provider recommendations to enroll in hospice were more likely to do so (OR 27.7, p=<0.001), with a median hospice stay of 18 days before death. Seventy-five percent had an in-hospital DNR and 33% had an out-of-hospital DNR order. These orders were created a median of 15 and 12 days prior to death, respectively. Twenty-eight percent had a Medical Power of Attorney and 20% had a Living Will. These documents were created a median of 381 and 378 days prior to death, respectively. Conclusions Many ovarian cancer patients underwent some form of aggressive medical care in the last 30 days of life. The time between hospice enrollment and death was short. Patients created Medical Power of Attorney and Living Will documents far in advance of death. DNR orders were initiated close to death. PMID:25192878

  19. Barriers and challenges in integration of anthroposophic medicine in supportive breast cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Levy, Moti; Raz, Orit Gressel; Barak, Yael; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more oncology centers are challenged with complementary medicine (CM) integration within supportive breast cancer care. Quality of life (QOL) improvement and attenuation of oncology treatment side effects are the core objectives of integrative CM programs in cancer care. Yet, limited research is available on the use of specific CM modalities in an integrative setting and on cancer patients' compliance with CM consultation. Studies are especially warranted to view the clinical application of researched CM modalities, such as anthroposophic medicine (AM), a unique CM modality oriented to cancer supportive care. Our objective was to characterize consultation patterns provided by physicians trained in CM following oncology health-care practitioners' referral of patients receiving chemotherapy. We aimed to identify characteristics of patients who consulted with AM and to explore patients' compliance to AM treatment. Of the 341 patients consulted with integrative physicians, 138 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Following integrative physician consultation, 56 patients were advised about AM treatment and 285 about other CM modalities. Logistic multivariate regression model found that, compared with patients receiving non-anthroposophic CM, the AM group had significantly greater rates of previous CM use [EXP(B)?=?3.25, 95% C.I. 1.64-6.29, p?=?0.001] and higher rates of cancer recurrence at baseline (p?=?0.038). Most AM users (71.4%) used a single AM modality, such as mistletoe (viscum album) injections, oral AM supplements, or music therapy. Compliance with AM modalities following physician recommendation ranged from 44% to 71% of patients. We conclude that AM treatment provided within the integrative oncology setting is feasible based on compliance assessment. Other studies are warranted to explore the effectiveness of AM in improving patients' QOL during chemotherapy. PMID:23961426

  20. From Dyadic Ties to Information Infrastructures: Care-Coordination between Patients, Providers, Students and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, S.; Biswas, R.; Jai Ganesh, A.U.; Otero, P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To share how an effectual merging of local and online networks in low resource regions can supplement and strengthen the local practice of patient centered care through the use of an online digital infrastructure powered by all stakeholders in healthcare. User Driven Health Care offers the dynamic integration of patient values and evidence based solutions for improved medical communication in medical care. Introduction This paper conceptualizes patient care-coordination through the lens of engaged stakeholders using digital infrastructures tools to integrate information technology. We distinguish this lens from the prevalent conceptualization of dyadic ties between clinician-patient, patient-nurse, clinician-nurse, and offer the holistic integration of all stakeholder inputs, in the clinic and augmented by online communication in a multi-national setting. Methods We analyze an instance of the user-driven health care (UDHC), a network of providers, patients, students and researchers working together to help manage patient care. The network currently focuses on patients from LMICs, but the provider network is global in reach. We describe UDHC and its opportunities and challenges in care-coordination to reduce costs, bring equity, and improve care quality and share evidence. Conclusion UDHC has resulted in coordinated global based local care, affecting multiple facets of medical practice. Shared information resources between providers with disparate knowledge, results in better understanding by patients, unique and challenging cases for students, innovative community based research and discovery learning for all. PMID:26123908

  1. Patient Perceptions and Expectations From Primary Health-care Providers in India

    PubMed Central

    Ardey, Rashmi; Ardey, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study of patient satisfaction at the primary care level has been mostly neglected in India. Aim: This objective of this study was to assess indices of Patient Satisfaction at the level of the family physician which is usually the first point of contact between the patient and the health-care system. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out at a Private Primary Health-Care Center in a semirural area in New Delhi, by exit interviews in the form of a questionnaire from patients randomly selected from people visiting the center during the study period. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results: The findings revealed that 83.58% of the patients were satisfied with the general experience and the behavior of the health-care provider and 85.9% were satisfied with the treatment and care provided, only 65.5% were satisfied with the physical environment of the clinic. However, the percentage of patients who would recommend the facility to their friends was overwhelming (94.6%). Conclusion: These results show that private health-care providers are still the first choice for any form of medical care. However, there was definitely a gap between the increasing expectations of the patients for more information, better Patient–Provider interaction, more control over the treatment process and better amenities even at the Primary Care level. It is this gap, which needs to be fulfilled to facilitate better utilization of Primary Health-Care Services in the community and reduce pressure on tertiary care services in order to ensure Universal Health Coverage. This study would also help us understand the challenges for Primary Care service providers, private and public, in a low socioeconomic urban setting. PMID:25810990

  2. Using routinely collected data to stratify prostate cancer patients into phases of care in the United Kingdom: implications for resource allocation and the cancer survivorship programme

    PubMed Central

    Yip, K; McConnell, H; Alonzi, R; Maher, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in British men. The increasing use of PSA screening test has resulted in many more patients being diagnosed with this condition. Advances in its treatment have improved the survival rate among these patients. By 2040, the prevalence of prostate cancer survivors is expected to reach 830?000. Many of them will require medical support for the management of their progressive disease or long-term toxicities from previous treatments. Successful implementation of the cancer survivorship programme among these patients depends on a good understanding of their demand on the health care system. The aim of this study is to segment the population of prostate cancer survivors into different needs groups and to quantify them with respect to their phase of care. Methods: Incidence, survival, prevalence and mortality data collected and reported by cancer registries across the United Kingdom have been used for the current study to provide indicative estimates as to the number of prostate cancer patients in each phase of the care pathway in a year. Results: The majority of prostate cancer patients are in the post-treatment monitoring phase. Around a fifth of the patients are either receiving treatment or in the recovery and readjustment phase having completed their treatment in the preceding year. Thirteen percent have not received any anticancer treatment, a further 12% (32?000) have developed metastatic disease and 4% are in the final stage of their lives. Conclusion: On the basis of our estimates, patients undergoing post-treatment monitoring phase will constitute the biggest group among prostate cancer survivors. The pressure to provide adequate follow-up care to these patients will be a challenge. There is limited data available to definitively quantify the number of prostate cancer patients who follow different pathways of care, and we hope this study has highlighted the importance of collecting and reporting of such data to help future health care planning for these patients. PMID:25791873

  3. Gender Differences in Rural and Urban Practice Location among Mid-Level Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Context: Mid-level providers comprise an increasing proportion of the health care workforce and play a key role in providing health services in rural and underserved areas. Although women comprise the majority of mid-level providers, they are less likely to work in a rural area than men. Maldistribution of health providers between urban and rural…

  4. An Investigation of Job Stability and Job Satisfaction among Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollin, Gail G.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated possible causes for the high turnover rate among family day-care (FDC) providers by examining the effects of perceived social support, job satisfaction, and the establishment of boundaries between the FDC provider's nuclear family and her FDC system. Stable providers were more likely than nonstable providers to report high job…

  5. Transition of Care for Young Adult Survivors of Childhood and Adolescent Cancer: Rationale and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Young adult survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer are an ever-growing population of patients, many of whom remain at lifelong risk for potentially serious complications of their cancer therapy. Yet research shows that many of these older survivors have deficient health-related knowledge and are not engaging in recommended health promotion and screening practices that could improve their long-term outcomes. The purpose of this review is to address these disparities by discussing how formal transition of care from pediatric to adult-focused survivorship services may help meet the unique medical, developmental, and psychosocial challenges of these young adults. Design Literature review and discussion. Results This article summarizes current research documenting the medical needs of young adult survivors, their suboptimal compliance with recommended follow-up, and the rationale, essential functions, current models, and innovative approaches for transition of follow-up care. Conclusion Systematic health care transition constitutes the standard of care for young adult survivors of childhood cancer. In developing a transitional care program, it is necessary to consider the scope of services to be provided, available resources, and other local exigencies that help determine the optimal model for use. Additional research is needed to improve health services delivery to this population. Effective advocacy is needed, particularly in the United States, to ensure the availability of uninterrupted health insurance coverage for survivorship services in young adulthood. PMID:20351333

  6. Dying to be Screened: Exploring the Unequal Burden of Head and Neck Cancer in Health Provider Shortage Areas.

    PubMed

    Rereddy, Shruthi K; Jordan, Demetrice R; Moore, Charles E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple factors contribute to disparities in head and neck cancer prevalence across the sociodemographic spectrum, including a lack of screening efforts in mostly underserved minority communities. African Americans and other ethnic minorities are at greater risk for late-stage diagnoses due to the lack of routine screenings and examinations. Advanced stage diagnosis profoundly limits treatment options, disease recovery, and survivorship. Differential access to care is frequently cited as contributing to delayed diagnosis in minority patients. Access to care is a complex concept that includes not only insurance status but also the equitable spatial distribution of health-care services. Recognizing this complexity, we explored the distribution of head and neck cancer cases seen at Grady Health System from 2010 to 2012 in order to identify geographic trends in disease prevalence compared to the distribution of oral health-care providers at the zip code level. We identified 53 cases of head and neck cancer spread across 36 zip codes primarily in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Geographic information systems analysis showed a spatial mismatch: increased disease prevalence and provider shortage in the mostly minority zip codes, and decreased disease prevalence and greater provider presence in the majority zip codes. PMID:25420766

  7. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  8. Follow-up care for men with prostate cancer and the role of primary care: a systematic review of international guidelines

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, H M; Neal, R D; Rose, P; Watson, E; Wilkinson, C; Weller, D; Campbell, C

    2009-01-01

    The optimal role for primary care in providing follow-up for men with prostate cancer is uncertain. A systematic review of international guidelines was undertaken to help identify key elements of existing models of follow-up care to establish a theoretical basis for evaluating future complex interventions. Many guidelines provide insufficient information to judge the reliability of the recommendations. Although the PSA test remains the cornerstone of follow-up, the diversity of recommendations on the provision of follow-up care reflects the current lack of research evidence on which to base firm conclusions. The review highlights the importance of transparent guideline development procedures and the need for robust primary research to inform future evidence-based models of follow-up care for men with prostate cancer. PMID:19436297

  9. Coverage and Quality of Antenatal Care Provided at Primary Health Care Facilities in the ‘Punjab’ Province of ‘Pakistan’

    PubMed Central

    Majrooh, Muhammad Ashraf; Hasnain, Seema; Akram, Javaid; Siddiqui, Arif; Memon, Zahid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Antenatal care is a very important component of maternal health services. It provides the opportunity to learn about risks associated with pregnancy and guides to plan the place of deliveries thereby preventing maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. In ‘Pakistan’ antenatal services to rural population are being provided through a network of primary health care facilities designated as 'Basic Health Units and Rural Health Centers. Pakistan is a developing country, consisting of four provinces and federally administered areas. Each province is administratively subdivided in to ‘Divisions’ and ‘Districts’. By population ‘Punjab’ is the largest province of Pakistan having 36 districts. This study was conducted to assess the coverage and quality antenatal care in the primary health care facilities in ‘Punjab’ province of ‘Pakistan’. Methods Quantitative and Qualitative methods were used to collect data. Using multistage sampling technique nine out of thirty six districts were selected and 19 primary health care facilities of public sector (seventeen Basic Health Units and two Rural Health Centers were randomly selected from each district. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with clients, providers and health managers. Results The overall enrollment for antenatal checkup was 55.9% and drop out was 32.9% in subsequent visits. The quality of services regarding assessment, treatment and counseling was extremely poor. The reasons for low coverage and quality were the distant location of facilities, deficiency of facility resources, indifferent attitude and non availability of the staff. Moreover, lack of client awareness about importance of antenatal care and self empowerment for decision making to seek care were also responsible for low coverage. Conclusion The coverage and quality of the antenatal care services in ‘Punjab’ are extremely compromised. Only half of the expected pregnancies are enrolled and out of those 1/3 drop out in follow-up visits. PMID:25409502

  10. Grandparents Providing Care to Grandchildren: A Population-Based Study of Continuity and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ye; LaPierre, Tracey A.; Hughes, Mary Elizabeth; Waite, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines transitions in grandchild care and the characteristics of grandparents making these transitions, using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 13,626 grandparents in the 1998-2008 Health and Retirement Study. More than 60% of grandparents provided grandchild care over the 10-year period; more than 70% of…

  11. The Relationship between Practices and Child Care Providers' Beliefs Related to Child Feeding and Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between child care practices and child care provider knowledge and beliefs about their role in supporting children's healthful eating. Design: Longitudinal design using survey and observation data from baseline and year 1 of the Encouraging Healthy Activity and Eating in Childcare Environments (ENHANCE) pilot…

  12. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  13. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  14. Burnout Prevention among Health Care Providers Working with the Terminally Ill: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, Richard J.; Saltzer, Sandra K.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on burnout and its prevention among caregivers to dying. Concludes that health care providers working with dying experience stressors unique to their specialty but also experience stressors common to other health care workers. Summarizes external and internal stressors common to specialty field and offers suggestions for…

  15. Ethnicity and Health: Mexican Americans. A Guide for Health Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Robert E.

    Several characteristics and perspectives of how Mexican Americans regard health care are presented for health care providers. Following a brief discussion of culture and health, the guide describes the traditional and modern value orientations of Hispanics and the external forces that contribute to their adoption. Four key concepts to…

  16. Follow-Up Care Experiences and Perceived Quality of Care Among Long-Term Survivors of Breast, Prostate, Colorectal, and Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kathryn E.; Aziz, Noreen M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Forsythe, Laura P.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Keel, Gretchen; Bellizzi, Keith M.; Rowland, Julia H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Post-treatment follow-up represents a crucial aspect of quality cancer care; however, data are lacking regarding follow-up care experiences, perception of provider involvement in care, and perceived quality of care from diverse samples of long-term survivors diagnosed as adults. Methods: Questionnaires were mailed in 2005 to 2006 to breast, prostate, colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancer survivors (4 to 14 years after diagnosis), sampled from California SEER cancer registries. Results: Most survivors (n = 1,490) reported recent follow-up care (68.7%), generally from oncology specialists only (47.4%) or shared between oncology and primary care providers (PCPs; 27.6%). Most survivors reported follow-up care advice (79.9%); fewer reported late-effects advice or receipt of a treatment summary (41.7% and 19.9%, respectively). Survivors who identified a PCP as their main follow-up care physician were as likely as those identifying an oncology specialist to rate their care as high quality (odds ratio [OR], 2.56; 95% CI, 0.98 to 6.74); however, survivors who could not identify a main follow-up care provider were less likely to report high-quality care (OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.50). Compared with follow-up care by an oncology specialist only, care by a PCP only was associated with a lower quality-of-care rating (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.91), but there was no significant difference in quality rating by survivors when care was shared by an oncology specialist and PCP compared with an oncology specialist only. Conclusion: Long-term survivors commonly report follow-up care years after their diagnosis; however, many patients' follow-up lacks important components. Care is more likely to be rated as high quality when one main provider is identified and an oncology specialist is involved. PMID:24695901

  17. Estimating the cost of caring for people with cancer at the end of life: A modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Round, Jeff; Jones, Louise; Morris, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with advanced cancer require a range of health, social and informal care during the final phases of life. The cost of providing care to this group as they approach the end of their lives is unknown, but represents a significant cost to health and social care systems, charities patients and their families. Aim: In this study, we estimate the direct and indirect costs for lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patients at the end of life (from the start of strong opioids to death) in England and Wales. Methods: We use a modelling-based approach to estimate the costs of care. Data are estimated from the literature and publicly available data sets. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis is used to reflect uncertainty in model estimates. Results: Total estimated costs for treating people with these four cancers at the end of life are £641?million. Breast and prostate cancer patients have the highest expected cost per person at £12,663 (95% credible interval (CI): £1249–£38,712) and £14,859 (95% CI: £1391–£46,424), respectively. Lung cancer has the highest expected total cost (£226m). The value of informal care giving accounts for approximately one-third of all costs. Conclusion: The cost to society of providing care to people at the end of their lives is significant. Much of this cost is borne by informal care givers. The cost to formal care services of replacing this care with paid care giving would be significant and demand for care will increase as the demographic profile of the population ages. PMID:26199134

  18. Patient-centered Communication in Cancer Care Symposium

    Cancer.gov

    On May 15-16, 2006, the Outcomes Research Branch (ORB) and the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) organized a symposium on Patient-centered Communication (PCC) in Bethesda, MD. Participants included more than 25 researchers and practitioners from federal agencies, private sector healthcare systems, cancer centers, and other academic departments. The expert panel of researchers and practitioners represented various areas of expertise, including oncology, nursing, primary care, health services research, large delivery systems, communication and behavioral sciences, and patient advocacy.

  19. Continuity of Care in Children's Mental Health: Parent, Youth and Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tobon, Juliana I; Reid, Graham J; Brown, Judith B

    2015-11-01

    Continuity of care, how individuals experience care over time as coherent and linked, is considered an ethical principle of care. While continuity has been examined extensively in the adult health literature, there is a paucity of studies examining continuity in children's mental health care. Using qualitative semi-structured interviews with parents, youth, and service providers, the current study found themes and issues unique to this healthcare context, such as coordination across sectors; risks to discontinuity, such as transitions; and consequences of discontinuity, such as parents acting as liaisons. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25827303

  20. The role of a public-private partnership: translating science to improve cancer care in the community.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Donna M; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2014-01-01

    Health reform is bringing about changes in the healthcare environment, but an equally significant transformation is occurring in science with the sequencing of the human genome and the increasing role of personalized medicine in the delivery of new cancer therapies. These changes directly affect the ability of hospitals to provide value-based, state-of-the-art care and represent major strategic decisions that must be made by management. In the United States, an estimated 85% of cancer patients receive care in community settings, but patients' outcomes are often not equivalent to those achieved in academic health centers. Care of cancer patients in the community is often fragmented, as most oncologists are in private practice and have limited access to formal mechanisms for coordinating care across specialties or with primary care physicians. Furthermore, genetic analysis, advanced diagnostic tests, and clinical trials are not always available to patients in these settings. The evolution of cancer care requires a reconfiguration of processes and investment in new services. In response, the National Cancer Institute launched the Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 as a public-private partnership with 16 community hospitals. This article draws on the results of an external evaluation of the pilot program and assesses the role of such a partnership as a means of facilitating the translation of the developing science to the community setting, with reference to the role of management in the implementation of such partnerships. PMID:24611422

  1. Communication about symptoms and quality of life issues in patients with cancer: Provider perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Halpenny, Barbara; Berry, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study used qualitative data collection and analysis methods to describe provider perceptions of addressing patient-initiated communication about common or sensitive symptom and quality of life issues (SQIs) in oncology. Eligible participants were healthcare providers who had participated in a larger trial testing a patient-centered technology to assess cancer SQIs and support self care. Audio-recorded vignettes were simulated based on recorded clinic visits from the larger trial and presented during semi-structured cognitive interviews with each participant. Transcripts of the interviews were content analyzed. Twelve providers participated. Participants’ responses included four themes: the institutional and clinical context, the complexity of addressing SQIs, strategies used to understand SQIs, and creating a plan to address SQIs. Participants felt that approaching SQIs inside and outside of the clinic required ongoing communication within a multidisciplinary team both to gather information and manage the SQI. Forming a relationship with the patient was one strategy to facilitate assessing SQIs. Most participants expressed a need for guidance about effective SQI communication. Providers perceived approaching SQIs as a routine part of interdisciplinary clinical care. The specific symptom and the complexity of its management influenced the process of assessing and managing SQIs. Findings have implications for institutional processes, training, evaluation, and program development. PMID:24748096

  2. A qualitative cancer screening study with childhood sexual abuse survivors: experiences, perspectives and compassionate care

    PubMed Central

    Gesink, Dionne; Nattel, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The childhood sexual abuse (CSA) survivor population is substantial and survivors have been identified as part of the population who were under-screened or never-screened for breast, cervical and colon cancer. Our objective was to learn CSA survivor perspectives on, and experiences with, breast, cervical and colon cancer screening with the intention of generating recommendations to help healthcare providers improve cancer screening participation. Design A pragmatic constructivist qualitative study involving individual, semistructured, in-depth interviews was conducted in January 2014. Thematic analysis was used to describe CSA survivor perspectives on cancer screening and identify potential facilitators for screening. Participants A diverse purposive sample of adult female CSA survivors was recruited. The inclusion criteria were: being a CSA survivor, being in a stable living situation, where stable meant able to meet one's financial needs independently, able to maintain supportive relationships, having participated in therapy to recover from past abuse, and living in a safe environment. 12 survivors were interviewed whose ages ranged from the early 40s to mid-70s. Descriptive saturation was reached after 10 interviews. Setting Interviews were conducted over the phone or Internet. CSA survivors were primarily from urban and rural Ontario, but some resided elsewhere in Canada and the USA. Results The core concept that emerged was that compassionate care at every level of the healthcare experience could improve cancer screening participation. Main themes included: desire for holistic care; unique needs of patients with dissociative identity disorder; the patient-healthcare provider relationship; appointment interactions; the cancer screening environment; and provider assumptions about patients. Conclusions Compassionate care can be delivered by: building a relationship; practising respect; focusing attention on the patient; not rushing the appointment; keeping the environment positive and comfortable; maintaining patient dignity; sharing control whenever possible; explaining procedures; and using laughter to reduce power imbalance through shared humanity. PMID:26246075

  3. Provider-Patient Relationship | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  4. Using the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to identify practice patterns.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; Funderburk, Jennifer S; King, Paul R; Wade, Michael; Possemato, Kyle

    2015-12-01

    Primary care-mental health integration (PC-MHI) is growing in popularity. To determine program success, it is essential to know if PC-MHI services are being delivered as intended. The investigation examines responses to the Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Adherence Questionnaire (PPAQ) to explore PC-MHI provider practice patterns. Latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of PC-MHI providers based on their self-report of adherence on the PPAQ. Analysis revealed five provider clusters with varying levels of adherence to PC-MHI model components. Across clusters, adherence was typically lowest in relation to collaboration with other primary care staff. Clusters also differed significantly in regard to provider educational background and psychotherapy approach, level of clinic integration, and previous PC-MHI training. The PPAQ can be used to identify PC-MHI provider practice patterns that have relevance for future clinical effectiveness studies, development of provider training, and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26622911

  5. Professionalism in global, personalized cancer care: restoring authenticity and integrity.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing cancer care and creating new expectations among oncologists and patients. At present the benefit is still marginal, however, and must be understood as incremental. In addition, cultural and resource disparities limit the sustainability of new cancer therapies on a global scale. Adequate instruments are needed to enable our exercise of sound and honest judgment in distinguishing breakthrough treatments from those that yield only marginal or doubtful improvements, and to develop strategies for formulation and correct application of balanced guidelines for sustainable cancer care. Professionalism requires that the acquisition of knowledge and skills go hand in hand with moral education in the intellectual virtues of humility, perseverance, adaptability, communicativeness, and commitment to resist self-deception or conflicts of interest. Hidden curricula undermine the moral values of medicine: these must be understood and uncovered. We should possess a special body of knowledge, skills, and values that allow us to change our practices when appropriate and to be stewards of society's limited resources through proper communication with our patients and families. In the era of personalized oncology and global issues of sustainability, professional authenticity and integrity in cancer clinical practice are key to bridging the gaps between true and false expectations of patients and the public. PMID:23714485

  6. On Belay: Providing Connection, Support, and Empowerment to Children Who Have a Parent with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Anita R.; Sugerman, Deb; Zelov, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Focus groups with youth and their parents were used in this research study to better understand the impact of the On Belay Program, an adventure-based support group for youth whose parents have cancer. Results demonstrated that challenge course programs reduce isolation in youth by creating a caring community and normalizing the cancer experience.…

  7. 42 CFR 433.56 - Classes of health care services and providers defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classes of health care services and providers...Section 433.56 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy, respiratory...

  8. Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of prenatal visits to non-ob/gyn providers did not differ by race and ethnicity group in ... Generally, women of different race and ethnicity groups did not differ in the percentage of prenatal care ...

  9. Ten Things Transgender Persons Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conference Newsroom Support GLMA Site Search Ten Things Transgender Persons Should discuss with Their Healthcare Care Provider ( ... have identified as most commonly of concern for transgender persons. While not all of these items apply ...

  10. Talk With Your Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attack

    MedlinePLUS

    ... q What are my chances of having a heart attack? q Would I benefit from taking aspirin? q ... Health Care Provider About Taking Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks Did you know that aspirin can be an ...

  11. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ...108 June 6, 2011 Part III Department of Health and Human Services...Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care-Acquired Conditions; Final Rule...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for...

  12. Primary care physicians' knowledge, attitudes and practices related to cancer screening and cancer prevention clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ka'ano'i, Momi E; Braun, Kathryn L; Gotay, Carolyn C

    2004-09-01

    Native Hawaiians have high cancer incidence and mortality rates, thus would benefit from timely cancer screening and opportunities to participate in cancer prevention clinical trials. Two-hundred-fifty-four (254) primary care physicians (PCPs) were surveyed for their knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to cancer screening and prevention, clinical trials and participation of Native Hawaiians in them. More than 90% of responding PCPs follow guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening and counsel patients on smoking cessation, and 75% or greater follow guidelines for colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy testing and counsel patients on exercise, diet, and weight management. About 60% reported familiarity with at least one of three prevention trials offered at the time of the survey, and 28% reported having referred or recommended patients to cancer prevention trials in the past. Major barriers to discussing trials with patients included lack of awareness on the part of physicians and patients, limited support staff, and time constraints. Less than 30% of respondents were aware of community resources supporting cancer research. This study indicated that Hawai'i PCPs follow national guidelines for cancer screening, and many are aware of ongoing prevention trials. However, additional participation in cancer screening and prevention activities will require attention to reducing logistical barriers and increasing awareness of cancer information and research services. PMID:16281694

  13. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease. PMID:24882441

  14. Measuring cancer care coordination: development and validation of a questionnaire for patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Improving the coordination of cancer care is a priority area for service improvement. However, quality improvement initiatives are hindered by the lack of accurate and reliable measures of this aspect of cancer care. This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire to measures patients' experience of cancer care coordination and to assess the psychometric properties of this instrument. Methods Questionnaire items were developed on the basis of literature review and qualitative research involving focus groups and interviews with cancer patients, carers and clinicians. The draft instrument was completed 686 patients who had been recently treated for a newly diagnosed cancer, including patients from metropolitan, regional and rural areas of New South Wales, Australia. To assess test-retest reliability, 119 patients completed the questionnaire twice. Unreliable items those with limited variability or high levels of missing data were eliminated. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to define the underlying factor structure of the remaining items and subscales were constructed. Correlations between these and global measures of the experience of care coordination and the quality of care were assessed. Results Of 40 items included in the draft questionnaire, 20 were eliminated due to poor test-retest reliability (n = 4), limited response distributions (n = 8), failure to load onto a factor (n = 7) or detrimental effect on the internal consistency of the scale (n = 1). The remaining 20 items loaded onto two factors named 'Communication' and 'Navigation', which explained 91% of the common variance. Internal consistency was with high for the instrument (Cronbach's alpha 0.88) and each subscale (Cronbach's alpha 0.87 and 0.73 respectively). There was no apparent 'floor' or 'ceiling' effect for the total score or the Communication subscale, but evidence of a ceiling effect for the Navigation subscale with 21% of respondents achieving the highest possible score. There were moderate positive associations between the total score and global measures of care coordination (r = 0.57) and quality of care (r = 0.53). Conclusions The instrument developed in this study demonstrated consistency and robust psychometric properties. It may provide a useful tool to measure patients' experience of cancer care coordination in future surveys and intervention studies. PMID:21756360

  15. Home Care Providers to the Rescue: A Novel First-Responder Programme

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steen M.; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe; Rasmussen, Susanne R.; Kvist, Birgitte; Christensen, Anette; Lyng, Charlotte; Lindberg, Jan; Lauritsen, Torsten L. B.; Lippert, Freddy K.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Poul A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. Results Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases and shock was delivered in one case. For 26 of the 28 cases, the cardiac arrest occurred in a private home. Ninety-five per cent of the providers who had been dispatched to a cardiac arrest reported feeling prepared for managing the initial resuscitation, including use of AED. Conclusion Home care providers are suited to act as first-responders in predominantly rural and residential districts. Future follow-up will allow further evaluation of home care provider arrivals and patient survival. PMID:26509532

  16. [Nursing Experience With Providing Wound Care for a Newborn With Epidermolysis Bullosa].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Yi; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare hereditary, chromosomal disease of the skin. Life-threatening septicemia may result if appropriate care is not provided to alleviate the extensive skin irritation that is the main symptom of this disease. This case report describes the experience of the author in nursing a wound area on a newborn that was suspected of being caused by EB. This wound area comprised blisters and peeling skin that covered 30% of the entire skin area of the infant. A holistic assessment conducted from December 1st, 2013 to January 7th, 2014 revealed that this large of an area of damage to the skin and mucosa considerably complicated the task of wound care and caused severe pain to the infant. In response to the special needs of this case, our medical team conducted a literature review of wound care for this rare disease. Based on the suggestions of previous empirical studies, nursing measures for the skin, mucosa, and wounds of the newborn were then administered through inter-team cooperation. These actions effectively reduced the pain, controlled the infection, and accelerated wound healing. In addition, progressive contact was used to guide the primary caregivers of the newborn, which alleviated their physical and psychological stresses effectively. The caregivers were educated systematically on wound care and guided to learn techniques for nursing and dressing wounds. Thus, these caregivers were better prepared to continue providing wound care at home. We suggest that healthcare professionals reference empirical studies when providing care to EB newborns during the acute-care period and provide wound care and supportive therapies to control the occurrence of complications using a multidisciplinary team-care model. In addition, social resources should be used effectively in nursing care plans to mitigate the effect of this rare disease on families. PMID:26645451

  17. Pay for Performance for Salaried Health Care Providers: Methodology, Challenges, and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Britton, John R

    2014-01-01

    Pay for performance has been recommended by the Institute of Medicine as an incentive to improve the quality of health care. Traditional quality-improvement methods may be adapted to evaluate performance of salaried providers, but it is important to separate provider contributions from other influencing factors within the health care system. Accurate recording, extraction, and analysis of data together with careful selection and measurement of indicators of performance are crucial for meaningful assessment. If appropriate methodology is not used, much time, effort, and money may be expended gathering data that may be potentially misleading or even useless, with the possibility that good performance may go unrecognized and mediocre performance rewarded. PMID:24626075

  18. Diffusion of positive AIDS care messages among service providers in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Cao, Haijun; Wu, Zunyou; Wu, Sheng; Xiao, Lin

    2007-12-01

    There is great potential in adapting the popular opinion leader (POL) intervention model to address HIV-related stigma and quality of care among service providers in China. Using a representative sample of 1,101 service providers in China, this study provides preliminary descriptions of POL provider characteristics. Multiple regression analyses revealed that diffusion of positive AIDS care messages among service providers in China was associated with factors such as gender, ethnicity, medical education, level of care, personal contact with people living with HIV/AIDS, and HIV-related training. Those who were more knowledgeable about HIV and those with a lower level of discriminatory attitude at work were more likely to diffuse the positive messages to co-workers and friends. Reported characteristics of a potential provider opinion leader in China will inform the design and implementation of future intervention programs. PMID:18190275

  19. Performance of the measures of processes of care for adults and service providers in rehabilitation settings

    PubMed Central

    Bamm, Elena L; Rosenbaum, Peter; Wilkins, Seanne; Stratford, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, client-centered care has been embraced as a new philosophy of care by many organizations around the world. Clinicians and researchers have identified the need for valid and reliable outcome measures that are easy to use to evaluate success of implementation of new concepts. Objective The current study was developed to complete adaptation and field testing of the companion patient-reported measures of processes of care for adults (MPOC-A) and the service provider self-reflection measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Design A validation study Settings In-patient rehabilitation facilities. Main outcome measures MPOC-A and measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Results Three hundred and eighty-four health care providers, 61 patients, and 16 family members completed the questionnaires. Good to excellent internal consistency (0.71–0.88 for health care professionals, 0.82–0.90 for patients, and 0.87–0.94 for family members), as well as moderate to good correlations between domains (0.40–0.78 for health care professionals and 0.52–0.84 for clients) supported internal reliability of the tools. Exploratory factor analysis of the MPOC-SP(A) responses supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaire. Conclusion MPOC-A and MPOC-SP(A) are valid and reliable tools to assess patient and service-provider accounts, respectively, of the extent to which they experience, or are able to provide, client-centered service. Research should now be undertaken to explore in more detail the relationships between client experience and provider reports of their own behavior. PMID:26089710

  20. Quality of care provided by mid-level health workers: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lassi, Zohra S; Cometto, Giorgio; Huicho, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers. Methods Experimental and observational studies comparing mid-level health workers and higher level health workers were identified by a systematic review of the scientific literature. The quality of the evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria and data were analysed using Review Manager. Findings Fifty-three studies, mostly from high-income countries and conducted at tertiary care facilities, were identified. In general, there was no difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers in the areas of maternal and child health and communicable and noncommunicable diseases and that provided by higher level health workers. However, the rates of episiotomy and analgesia use were significantly lower in women giving birth who received care from midwives alone than in those who received care from doctors working in teams with midwives, and women were significantly more satisfied with care from midwives. Overall, the quality of the evidence was low or very low. The search also identified six observational studies, all from Africa, that compared care from clinical officers, surgical technicians or non-physician clinicians with care from doctors. Outcomes were generally similar. Conclusion No difference between the effectiveness of care provided by mid-level health workers and that provided by higher level health workers was found. However, the quality of the evidence was low. There is a need for studies with a high methodological quality, particularly in Africa – the region with the greatest shortage of health workers. PMID:24347706

  1. Tendency to adhere to provider-recommended treatments and subsequent pain severity among individuals with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jerant, Anthony; Franks, Peter; Tancredi, Daniel J; Saito, Naomi; Kravitz, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients’ general tendency to adhere to health care provider-recommended treatments is associated with a number of health outcomes, but whether it influences pain severity over time among individuals with cancer is unclear. We explored the relationship between adherence tendency and subsequent pain severity among cancer patients participating in a randomized controlled trial of coaching to enhance communication with physicians and reduce pain severity. Methods Associations between baseline Medical Outcomes Study general adherence measure score and pain severity over 12 weeks were examined with repeated-measures regression models. Model 1 included sociodemographics, study group and site, follow-up point, and baseline pain; Model 2 included these variables plus partner status, physical and mental health status (12-item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12®]), and pain control self-efficacy. Results Of 307 patients randomized, 224 (73%) had at least one follow-up pain severity assessment plus complete data for other model variables and were included in the analyses. In Model 1, adherence tendency was associated with less subsequent pain severity: a one standard deviation increase in adherence tendency was associated with a 0.22-point adjusted mean decrease in pain severity on a 0–10 scale (95% confidence interval 0.40, 0.03). The association was diminished and not statistically significant in Model 2, primarily due to adjustment for the SF-12. Conclusion Tendency to adhere to provider-recommended treatments was associated with subsequent pain severity among individuals with cancer, suggesting a potential way of predicting and intervening to improve cancer pain control. However, the association was attenuated after adjusting for health status, suggesting mediation or confounding of the relationship by health status. PMID:21311699

  2. Rural Indian women's care-seeking behavior and choice of provider for gynecological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rani, Manju; Bonu, Sekhar

    2003-09-01

    This study uses data from the India National Family and Health Survey-2 conducted in 1998-99 to investigate the level and correlates of care-seeking and choice of provider for gynecological symptoms among currently married women in rural India. Of the symptomatic women surveyed, 31 percent sought care, overwhelmingly from private providers (70 percent). Only 8 percent of women consulted frontline paramedical health workers. Care-seeking behavior and type of providers consulted varied significantly across different Indian states. Significant differentials in care-seeking by age, caste, religion, education, household wealth, and women's autonomy suggest the existence of multiple cultural, economic, and demand-side barriers to care-seeking. Although socially disadvantaged women were less likely than better-off women to consult private providers, the majority of even the poorest, uneducated, and lower-caste women consulted private providers. Geographical access to public health facilities had no significant association with choice of provider, whereas access to private providers had only a moderately significant association with that choice. The predominance of use of private services for self-perceived gynecological morbidity warrants the inclusion of private providers in the national reproductive health strategy to enhance its effectiveness. PMID:14558320

  3. The challenges of providing eye care for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Li, Josephine Ch; Wong, Katrina; Park, Adela Sy; Fricke, Timothy R; Jackson, A Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    This review is intended to raise awareness of the importance of providing high-quality eye care for people with intellectual disabilities and the increasing need for this eye care to be community-based. We describe the challenges to the provision of high-quality community-based eye care for people with intellectual disabilities and ideas, evidence and methods for overcoming them. The prevalence of visual impairment in people with intellectual disabilities has been reported to be at least 40 per cent, rising to as high as 100 per cent in those with profound and severe disabilities. A progressive move toward deinstitutionalisation has shifted the provision of care for people with intellectual disabilities. Individuals can have the freedom to access health-care services of their choice. This has posed challenges to the health-care system, including how to deliver high-quality community-based eye care, creating a current significant unmet need for eye-care services. Undiagnosed refractive error and under-prescription of spectacles are major reasons for avoidable visual impairment among people with disabilities. There is an apparent reluctance of optometrists to engage in this work due to the perceived difficulties of working with people with intellectual and multiple disabilities. There are challenges associated with diagnosis and management of ocular conditions in people with intellectual disabilities and the demand is clear. Small shifts in training, knowledge and awareness would place optometry well to meet the challenges of this specialised area of eye care. PMID:26390904

  4. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore’s primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the ‘PAIR UP’ approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore. PMID:24664374

  5. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

  6. Uncompensated and undercompensated care provided by San Francisco Medical Society physicians.

    PubMed

    Hogeland, S

    1988-09-01

    Practicing physician members of the San Francisco Medical Society were surveyed regarding reimbursement rates for medical care provided to underinsured and uninsured patients. Of 394 respondents, about $51,000 per physician practice was written off as uncompensated care or services not billed for in 1985. An average of 7% of each physician's patients was estimated to be "no-pay" or charity patients, accounting for $19,000 of this total. Almost $32,000 was reported as being uncompensated care, or that which is billed but not paid. In addition to these amounts, an average of $32,000 was reported as being discounted from the usual fee levels by government insurance programs. Extrapolating these results to the physician membership of the local medical society indicates that physicians in San Francisco may be providing as much as $81 million in uncompensated or charity care annually. These results emphasize that private practitioners are providing a significant amount of medical care at reduced or charity rates, an amount that can be expected to increase given present trends. Substantial changes are needed if the burden of providing medical care to poor and uninsured Americans is not to fall disproportionately on private providers. PMID:3176502

  7. Trust in Medical Technology by Patients and Health Care Providers in Obstetric Work Systems

    PubMed Central

    Winchester, Woodrow W.; Kleiner, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple types of users (i.e. patients and care providers) have experiences with the same technologies in health care environments and may have different processes for developing trust in those technologies. The objective of this study was to assess how patients and care providers make decisions about the trustworthiness of mutually used medical technology in an obstetric work system. Using a grounded theory methodology, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 patients who had recently given birth and 12 obstetric health care providers to examine the decision-making process for developing trust in technologies used in an obstetric work system. We expected the two user groups to have similar criteria for developing trust in the technologies, though we found patients and physicians differed in processes for developing trust. Trust in care providers, the technologies’ characteristics and how care providers used technology were all related to trust in medical technology for the patient participant group. Trustworthiness of the system and trust in self were related to trust in medical technology for the physician participant group. Our findings show that users with different perspectives of the system have different criteria for developing trust in medical technologies. PMID:20802836

  8. Performance of new alternative providers of primary care services in England: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Felix; Laverty, Anthony A; Pape, Utz; Ratneswaren, Anenta; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Health system reforms in England are opening broad areas of clinical practice to new providers of care. As part of these reforms, new entrants – including private companies – have been allowed into the primary care market under ‘alternative provider of medical services’ contracting mechanisms since 2004. The characteristics and performance of general practices working under new alternative provider contracts are not well described. We sought to compare the quality of care provided by new entrant providers to that provided by the traditional model of general practice. Design Open cohort study of English general practices. We used linear regression in cross-sectional and time series analyses, adjusting for practice and population characteristics, to compare quality in practices using alternative provider contracts to traditional practices. We created regression models using practice fixed effects to estimate the impact of practices changing to the new contract type. Setting The English National Health Service. Participants All general practices open from 2008/2009 to 2012/2013. Main outcome measures Seventeen established quality indicators – covering clinical effectiveness, efficiency, access and patient experience. Results In total, 4.1% (347 of 8300) of general practices in England were run by alternative contract providers. These practices tended to be smaller, and serve younger, more diverse and more deprived populations than traditional providers. Practices run by alternative providers performed worse than traditional providers on 15 of 17 indicators after adjusting for practice and population characteristics (p?provider contract did not result in improved performance. Conclusions The introduction of new alternative providers to deliver primary care services in England has not led to improvements in quality and may have resulted in worse care. Regulators should ensure that new entrants to clinical provider markets are performing to adequate standards and at least as well as traditional providers. PMID:25908312

  9. A conceptual framework for understanding and reducing overuse by primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Powell, Adam A; Bloomfield, Hanna E; Burgess, Diana J; Wilt, Timothy J; Partin, Melissa R

    2013-10-01

    Primary care providers frequently recommend, administer, or prescribe health care services that are unlikely to benefit their patients. Yet little is known about how to reduce provider overuse behavior. In the absence of a theoretically grounded causal framework, it is difficult to predict the contexts under which different types of interventions to reduce provider overuse will succeed and under which they will fail. In this article, we present a framework based on the theory of planned behavior that is designed to guide overuse research and intervention development. We describe categories of primary care provider beliefs that lead to the formation of intentions to assess the appropriateness of services, and propose factors that may affect whether the presence of assessment intentions results in an appropriate recommendation. Interventions that have been commonly used to address provider overuse behavior are reviewed within the context of the framework. PMID:23916984

  10. Lung and colorectal cancer treatment and outcomes in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Zullig, Leah L; Williams, Christina D; Fortune-Britt, Alice G

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the second- and third-most commonly diagnosed cancers in the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. While many studies have evaluated the treatment quality and outcomes of various aspects of VA LC and CRC care, there are no known reviews synthesizing this information across studies. The purpose of this literature review was to describe LC and CRC treatment (ie, surgical and nonsurgical) and outcomes (eg, mortality, psychosocial, and other) in the VA health care system as reported in the existing peer-reviewed scientific literature. We identified potential articles through a search of published literature using the PubMed electronic database. Our search strategy identified articles containing Medical Subject Headings terms and keywords addressing veterans or veterans’ health and LC and/or CRC. We limited articles to those published in the previous 11 years (January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2013). A total of 230 articles were retrieved through the search. After applying the selection criteria, we included 74 studies (34 LC, 47 CRC, and seven both LC and CRC). VA provides a full array of treatments, often with better outcomes than other health care systems. More work is needed to assess patient-reported outcomes. PMID:25609998

  11. How can innovative forms of clinical research contribute to deliver affordable cancer care in an evolving health care environment?

    PubMed

    Burock, Susen; Meunier, Françoise; Lacombe, Denis

    2013-09-01

    As health care costs are constantly rising and governments are reforming their healthcare systems there is an urgent need to reshape the European clinical research landscape. To bridge the translational gap extensive research to understand the mechanism of the agents and of the disease has to be performed and the real benefit of drugs needs to be assessed independently. Furthermore, meaningful data for reimbursement strategies will be a major goal of future clinical trials as well. Therefore, a new integrated model of clinical cancer research is needed to optimise the R&D process. Strategies to ensure that we can gather robust and relevant data about the effectiveness of various healthcare interventions have to be developed to provide optimal patient care within the limits of a healthcare budget. PMID:23777742

  12. Accountable Communities for Health: Moving From Providing Accountable Care to Creating Health.

    PubMed

    Tipirneni, Renuka; Vickery, Katherine Diaz; Ehlinger, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Lessons from community-oriented primary care in the United States can offer insights into how we could improve population health by integrating the public health, social service, and health care sectors to form accountable communities for health (ACHs). Unlike traditional accountable care organizations (ACOs) that address population health from a health care perspective, ACHs address health from a community perspective and consider the total investment in health across all sectors. The approach embeds the ACO in a community context where multiple stakeholders come together to share responsibility for tackling multiple determinants of health. ACOs using the ACH model provide a roadmap for embedding health care in communities in a way that uniquely addresses local social determinants of health. PMID:26195684

  13. Provider-sponsored coordinated care organizations: designing systems for patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, R E

    1996-01-01

    PCCOs should take inventory of the information demands in the critical areas of quality, resource, and outcomes management, and standardize the data elements and definitions as the enterprise data model. The focus must be on internal and external reporting requirements as, ultimately, the data model must expedite clinical practice improvement initiatives. The Informational Processing Architecture utilizes the data warehouse for enterprise decision support to derive clinical/business rules and the operational data store/applications for clinical decision support to deploy those same rules at the point of care. As a result, clinical and financial systems should be tightly linked, associating outcomes, process, and cost. In designing these systems, the Systems Development Life Cycle methodology has the advantages of documented deliverables and a well proven methodology for outlining requirements put forth in an RFP, which is indispensable for vendor evaluation and selection. Employing these techniques ensures a user driven process that has the best chance of implementing the complex requirements of PCCOs. PMID:10163171

  14. Involvement of a Case Manager in Palliative Care Reduces Hospitalisations at the End of Life in Cancer Patients; A Mortality Follow-Back Study in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Annicka G. M.; Vissers, Kris C.; Francke, Anneke L.; Donker, Gé A.; Jansen, Wim J. J.; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Case managers have been introduced in primary palliative care in the Netherlands; these are nurses with expertise in palliative care who offer support to patients and informal carers in addition to the care provided by the general practitioner (GP) and home-care nurse. Objectives To compare cancer patients with and without additional support from a case manager on: 1) the patients’ general characteristics, 2) characteristics of care and support given by the GP, 3) palliative care outcomes. Methods This article is based on questionnaire data provided by GPs participating in two different studies: the Sentimelc study (280 cancer patients) and the Capalca study (167 cancer patients). The Sentimelc study is a mortality follow-back study amongst a representative sample of GPs that monitors the care provided via GPs to a general population of end-of-life patients. Data from 2011 and 2012 were analysed. The Capalca study is a prospective study investigating the implementation and outcome of the support provided by case managers in primary palliative care. Data were gathered between March 2011 and December 2013. Results The GP is more likely to know the preferred place of death (OR 7.06; CI 3.47-14.36), the place of death is more likely to be at the home (OR 2.16; CI 1.33-3.51) and less likely to be the hospital (OR 0.26; CI 0.13-0.52), and there are fewer hospitalisations in the last 30 days of life (none: OR 1.99; CI 1.12-3.56 and one: OR 0.54; CI 0.30-0.96), when cancer patients receive additional support from a case manager compared with patients receiving the standard GP care. Conclusions Involvement of a case manager has added value in addition to palliative care provided by the GP, even though the role of the case manager is ‘only’ advisory and he or she does not provide hands-on care or prescribe medication. PMID:26208099

  15. 76 FR 55570 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... veteran receiving nursing home care, domiciliary care, and adult day health care in State home facilities... document published in the Federal Register on March 23, 2011 (76 FR 16354), VA proposed to amend those... continues to provide care. VA provided a 60-day comment period that ended May 23, 2011. VA received...

  16. Perceptions of misoprostol among providers and women seeking post-abortion care in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Maternowska, M Catherine; Mashu, Alexio; Moyo, Precious; Withers, Mellissa; Chipato, Tsungai

    2015-02-01

    In Zimbabwe, abortions are legally restricted and complications from unsafe abortions are a major public health concern. This study in 2012 explored women's and providers' perspectives in Zimbabwe on the acceptability of the use of misoprostol as a form of treatment for complications of abortion in post-abortion care. In-depth interviews were conducted with 115 participants at seven post-abortion care facilities. Participants included 73 women of reproductive age who received services for incomplete abortion and 42 providers, including physicians, nurses, midwives, general practitioners and casualty staff. Only 29 providers had previously used misoprostol with their own patients, and only 21 had received any formal training in its use. Nearly all women and providers preferred misoprostol to surgical abortion methods because it was perceived as less invasive, safer and more affordable. Women also generally preferred the non-surgical method, when given the option, as fears around surgery and risk were high. Most providers favoured removing legal restrictions on abortion, particularly medical abortion. Approving use of misoprostol for post-abortion care in Zimbabwe is important in order to reduce unsafe abortion and its related sequelae. Legal, policy and practice reforms must be accompanied by effective reproductive health curricula updates in medical, nursing and midwifery schools, as well as through updated training for current and potential providers of post-abortion care services nationwide. Our findings support the use of misoprostol in national post-abortion care programmes, as it is an acceptable and potentially life-saving treatment option. PMID:25702065

  17. Hospital Admission of Cancer Patients: Avoidable Practice or Necessary Care?

    PubMed Central

    Numico, Gianmauro; Cristofano, Antonella; Mozzicafreddo, Alessandro; Cursio, Olga Elisabetta; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Courthod, Giulia; Trogu, Antonio; Malossi, Alessandra; Cucchi, Mariella; Sirotovà, Zuzana; Alvaro, Maria Rosa; Stella, Anna; Grasso, Fulvia; Spinazzé, Silvia; Silvestris, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer patients are frequently admitted to hospital due to acute conditions or refractory symptoms. This occurs through the emergency departments and requires medical oncologists to take an active role. The use of acute-care hospital increases in the last months of life. Patients and methods We aimed to describe the admissions to a medical oncology inpatient service within a 16-month period with respect to patients and tumor characteristics, and the outcome of the hospital stay. Results 672 admissions of 454 patients were analysed. The majority of admissions were urgent (74.1%), and were due to uncontrolled symptoms (79.6%). Among the chief complaints, dyspnoea occurred in 15.7%, pain in 15.2%, and neurological symptoms in 14.5%. The majority of the hospitalizations resulted in discharge to home (60.6%); in 26.5% the patient died and in 11.0% was transferred to a hospice. Admissions due to symptoms correlated with a longer hospital stay and a higher incidence of in-hospital death. Conclusion We suggest that hospital use is not necessarily a sign of inappropriately aggressive care: inpatient care is probably an unavoidable step in the cancer trajectory. Optimization of inpatient supportive procedures should be a specific task of modern medical oncology. PMID:25812117

  18. Cancer Screening: Should Cancer Screening be Essential Component of Primary Health Care in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Balasubramanium, Ganesh; Kumar, Abhinendra; Jain, Aanchal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a fatal disease and is on the rise across the globe. In India, breast, cervix and the oral cavity are the leading cancer sites, but, unfortunately, in-spite of availability of screening tools, there is no organized cancer screening program in India. The main objective of this study was to review the performance of various cancer screening modalities in a resource poor setting. Methods: MEDLINE and web of science electronic database was searched from January 1990 to December 2013, using keywords such as “breast cancer, cervical cancer, oral cancer and their corresponding mesh terms were also used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND.” Two authors independently selected studies published in English and conducted in India. A total of 16 studies was found relevant and eligible for the review. The data on sensitivity and specificity of various screening tool was extracted and analyzed. Results: Most of the reported screening trails in India are on cervical cancer and few on breast and oral cancer screening. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity of cervical cancer screening test such as visual inspection with acetic acid, magnified visual inspection with acetic acid, visual inspection with Lugol's iodine, cytology (Papanicolaou smear) and human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid was found to be 68.76% and 84.02%, 63.27% and 85.43%, 81.86% and 87.03%, 63.25% and 93.17% and 75.04% and 91.66%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical breast examination was found to be 94.30% and 94.30%, respectively. Oral cancer screening through visual inspection by trained health care worker was found to have 87.90% sensitivity and 92.05% specificity. Conclusions: Our study highlights the availability and success of visual screening tools in early detection and mortality reduction of major neoplasia in resource-poor health care settings and recommends implementation of oral and cervical cancer screening as part of assured primary health care package in developing countries. PMID:26236443

  19. Primary Care Providers’ Perspectives on Online Weight-Loss Programs: A Big Wish List

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Heather L; Chen, Monica C; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Forjuoh, Samuel N; Poger, Jennifer M; McTigue, Kathleen M; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrating online weight-loss programs into the primary care setting could yield substantial public health benefit. Little is known about primary care providers’ perspectives on online weight-loss programs. Objective To assess primary care providers’ perspectives on online weight-loss programs. Methods We conducted focus group discussions with providers in family medicine, internal medicine, and combined internal medicine/pediatrics in Texas and Pennsylvania, USA. Open-ended questions addressed their experience with and attitudes toward online weight-loss programs; useful characteristics of existing online weight-loss programs; barriers to referring patients to online weight-loss programs; and preferred characteristics of an ideal online weight-loss program. Transcripts were analyzed with the grounded theory approach to identify major themes. Results A total of 44 primary care providers participated in 9 focus groups. The mean age was 45 (SD 9) years. Providers had limited experience with structured online weight-loss programs and were uncertain about their safety and efficacy. They thought motivated, younger patients would be more likely than others to respond to an online weight-loss program. According to primary care providers, an ideal online weight-loss program would provide—at no cost to the patient—a structured curriculum addressing motivation, psychological issues, and problem solving; tools for tracking diet, exercise, and weight loss; and peer support monitored by experts. Primary care providers were interested in receiving reports about patients from the online weight-loss programs, but were concerned about the time required to review and act on the reports. Conclusions Primary care providers have high expectations for how online weight-loss programs should deliver services to patients and fit into the clinical workflow. Efforts to integrate online weight-loss programs into the primary care setting should address efficacy and safety of online weight-loss programs in clinic-based populations; acceptable methods of sending reports to primary care providers about their patients’ progress; and elimination or reduction of costs to patients. PMID:22262726

  20. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients’ homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Results Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Conclusions Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority were single site studies incorporating small patient populations. There are gaps in the literature regarding the utility of providing home care to CKD patients and the impact this has on healthcare resources. PMID:25033891