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Sample records for cancer cell-derived microvesicles

  1. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  2. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations.

    PubMed

    Santana, Steven M; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A; Kirby, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  3. A Novel Mechanism of Bacterial Toxin Transfer within Host Blood Cell-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E.; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system. PMID:25719452

  4. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene K+ channels regulate shedding of leukemia cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang; Li, Juanjuan; Du, Wen; Wang, Ningfang; Li, Huiyu; Huang, Shiang

    2012-08-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are released by various cancer cells, including leukemia cells. They can "hijack" membrane components from their parental cells and exert pleiotropic effects on tumor progression. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) K(+) channels are highly expressed in cancer cells and appear of exceptional importance in favoring cancer development. Given the attributes of MVs and hERG1 K(+) channels in disease progression, we investigated the putative relationship between hERG1 K(+) channels and MVs in leukemia. The protein content of MVs isolated from K562 cell supernatants was significantly higher than that from HL-60 cells. The molecular profile of these MVs showed that in addition to the myeloid lineage antigen (CD11b), MVs contained hERG1 K(+) channels. Interestingly, inhibition of hERG1 K(+) channels rapidly reduced MV fractions in supernatants. Furthermore, MVs created positive feedback loops to facilitate leukemogenesis. Upon exposure to MVs, the plasma membrane expression of hERG1 protein was in turn up-regulated, the migration of leukemia cells was significantly increased, and the adhesion of leukemia cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was markedly enhanced. Importantly, hERG1 K(+) channel inhibitor E-4031 impaired these effects. We conclude that leukemia cell-derived MVs can "hijack" the plasma membrane hERG1 K(+) channels, which regulate the release of MVs and their biological effects upon leukemia cells. PMID:22292854

  5. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Baulch, Janet E; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L; Benke, Sarah N; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-04-26

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  6. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain

    PubMed Central

    Baulch, Janet E.; Acharya, Munjal M.; Allen, Barrett D.; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L.; Benke, Sarah N.; Parihar, Vipan K.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  7. Microvesicles as Potential Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Dolo, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of ovarian cancer is low (i.e., less than 5% in European countries), it is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and typically has a poor prognosis. To ensure optimal survival, it is important to diagnose this condition when the pathology is confined to the ovary. However, this is difficult to achieve because the first specific symptoms appear only during advanced disease stages. To date, the biomarker mainly used for the diagnosis and prognosis of ovarian cancer is CA125; however, this marker has a low sensitivity and specificity and is associated with several other physiological and pathological conditions. No other serum ovarian cancer markers appear to be able to replace or complement CA125, and the current challenge is therefore to identify novel markers for the early diagnosis of this disease. For this purpose, studies have focused on the microvesicles (MVs) released from tumor cells. MVs may represent an ideal biomarker because they can be easily isolated from blood, and they have particular features (mainly regarding microRNA profiles) that strongly correlate with ovarian cancer stage and may be effective for early diagnosis. PMID:23484144

  8. Longitudinal effects of menopausal hormone treatments on platelet characteristics and cell-derived microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M.; Lahr, Brian D.; Bailey, Kent R.; Heit, John A.; Harman, S. Mitchell; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Activated platelets serve as a catalyst for thrombin generation and a source of vasoactive and mitogenic factors affecting vascular remodeling. Oral menopausal hormone treatments (MHT) may carry greater thrombotic risk than transdermal products. This study compared effects of oral and transdermal MHT on platelet characteristics, platelet proteins, and platelet-derived microvesicles (MV) in recently menopausal women. Platelets and MV were prepared from blood of a subset of women (n = 117) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study prior to and after 48 months of treatment with either oral conjugated equine estrogen (0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (50 µg/day), each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg/day for 12 days a month), or placebo pills and patch. Platelet count and expression of platelet P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors were similar across groups. An aggregate measure of 4-year change in vasoactive and mitogenic factors in platelet lysate, by principle component analysis, indicated significantly lower values in both MHT groups compared to placebo. Increases in numbers of tissue factor positive and platelet-derived MV were significantly greater in the transdermal compared to placebo group. MHT was associated with significantly reduced platelet content of vasoactive and mitogenic factors representing a potential mechanism by which MHT may affect vascular remodeling. Various hormonal compositions and doses of MHT could differentially regulate nuclear transcription in bone marrow megakaryocytes and non-genomic pathways in circulating platelets thus determining numbers and characteristics of circulating MV. Thrombotic risk associated with oral MHT most likely involves liver-derived inflammatory/coagulation proteins rather than circulating platelets per se. PMID:25856160

  9. Longitudinal effects of menopausal hormone treatments on platelet characteristics and cell-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Lahr, Brian D; Bailey, Kent R; Heit, John A; Harman, S Mitchell; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Activated platelets serve as a catalyst for thrombin generation and a source of vasoactive and mitogenic factors affecting vascular remodeling. Oral menopausal hormone treatments (MHT) may carry greater thrombotic risk than transdermal products. This study compared effects of oral and transdermal MHT on platelet characteristics, platelet proteins, and platelet-derived microvesicles (MV) in recently menopausal women. Platelets and MV were prepared from blood of a subset of women (n = 117) enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study prior to and after 48 months of treatment with either oral conjugated equine estrogen (0.45 mg/day), transdermal 17β-estradiol (50 µg/day), each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg/day for 12 days a month), or placebo pills and patch. Platelet count and expression of platelet P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors were similar across groups. An aggregate measure of 4-year change in vasoactive and mitogenic factors in platelet lysate, by principle component analysis, indicated significantly lower values in both MHT groups compared to placebo. Increases in numbers of tissue factor positive and platelet-derived MV were significantly greater in the transdermal compared to placebo group. MHT was associated with significantly reduced platelet content of vasoactive and mitogenic factors representing a potential mechanism by which MHT may affect vascular remodeling. Various hormonal compositions and doses of MHT could differentially regulate nuclear transcription in bone marrow megakaryocytes and non-genomic pathways in circulating platelets thus determining numbers and characteristics of circulating MV. Thrombotic risk associated with oral MHT most likely involves liver-derived inflammatory/coagulation proteins rather than circulating platelets per se. PMID:25856160

  10. Tumor and Endothelial Cell-Derived Microvesicles Carry Distinct CEACAMs and Influence T-Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Muturi, Harrison T.; Dreesen, Janine D.; Nilewski, Elena; Jastrow, Holger; Giebel, Bernd; Ergun, Suleyman; Singer, Bernhard B.

    2013-01-01

    Normal and malignant cells release a variety of different vesicles into their extracellular environment. The most prominent vesicles are the microvesicles (MVs, 100-1 000 nm in diameter), which are shed of the plasma membrane, and the exosomes (70-120 nm in diameter), derivates of the endosomal system. MVs have been associated with intercellular communication processes and transport numerous proteins, lipids and RNAs. As essential component of immune-escape mechanisms tumor-derived MVs suppress immune responses. Additionally, tumor-derived MVs have been found to promote metastasis, tumor-stroma interactions and angiogenesis. Since members of the carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)-family have been associated with similar processes, we studied the distribution and function of CEACAMs in MV fractions of different human epithelial tumor cells and of human and murine endothelial cells. Here we demonstrate that in association to their cell surface phenotype, MVs released from different human epithelial tumor cells contain CEACAM1, CEACAM5 and CEACAM6, while human and murine endothelial cells were positive for CEACAM1 only. Furthermore, MVs derived from CEACAM1 transfected CHO cells carried CEACAM1. In terms of their secretion kinetics, we show that MVs are permanently released in low doses, which are extensively increased upon cellular starvation stress. Although CEACAM1 did not transmit signals into MVs it served as ligand for CEACAM expressing cell types. We gained evidence that CEACAM1-positive MVs significantly increase the CD3 and CD3/CD28-induced T-cell proliferation. All together, our data demonstrate that MV-bound forms of CEACAMs play important roles in intercellular communication processes, which can modulate immune response, tumor progression, metastasis and angiogenesis. PMID:24040308

  11. Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Dralle, Henning; Machens, Andreas; Basa, Johanna; Fatourechi, Vahab; Franceschi, Silvia; Hay, Ian D; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Pacini, Furio; Pasieka, Janice L; Sherman, Steven I

    2015-01-01

    Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cells in the thyroid gland, which secrete the iodine-containing thyroid hormones. Follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers can be classified into papillary thyroid cancer (80-85%), follicular thyroid cancer (10-15%), poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (<2%) and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancer (<2%), and these have an excellent prognosis with the exception of undifferentiated thyroid cancer. The advent and expansion of advanced diagnostic techniques has driven and continues to drive the epidemic of occult papillary thyroid cancer, owing to overdiagnosis of clinically irrelevant nodules. This transformation of the thyroid cancer landscape at molecular and clinical levels calls for the modification of management strategies towards personalized medicine based on individual risk assessment to deliver the most effective but least aggressive treatment. In thyroid cancer surgery, for instance, injuries to structures outside the thyroid gland, such as the recurrent laryngeal nerve in 2-5% of surgeries or the parathyroid glands in 5-10% of surgeries, negatively affect quality of life more than loss of the expendable thyroid gland. Furthermore, the risks associated with radioiodine ablation may outweigh the risks of persistent or recurrent disease and disease-specific mortality. Improvement in the health-related quality of life of survivors of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, which is decreased despite the generally favourable outcome, hinges on early tumour detection and minimization of treatment-related sequelae. Future opportunities include more widespread adoption of molecular and clinical risk stratification and identification of actionable targets for individualized therapies. PMID:27188261

  12. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Induce Gene Expression Changes in Müller Cells of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Katsman, Diana; Stackpole, Emma J.; Domin, Daniel R.; Farber, Debora B.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs) have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC) mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation. PMID:23226281

  13. Microvesicles as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that cancer cells generate large membrane-enclosed packets of epigenetic information, known as microvesicles (MVs), that can be transferred to other cells and influence their behavior (Antonyak et al., Small GTPases 3:219-224, 2012; Cocucci et al., Trends Cell Biol 19:43-51, 2009; Rak, Semin Thromb Hemost 36:888-906, 2010; Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008) has added a unique perspective to the classical paracrine signaling paradigm. This is largely because, in addition to growth factors and cytokines, MVs contain a variety of components that are not usually thought to be released into the extracellular environment by viable cells including plasma membrane-associated proteins, cytosolic- and nuclear-localized proteins, as well as nucleic acids, particularly RNA transcripts and micro-RNAs (Skog et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:1470-1476, 2008; Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008; Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Balaj et al., Nat Commun 2:180, 2011; Choi et al., J Proteome Res 6:4646-4655, 2007; Del Conde et al., Blood 106:1604-1611, 2005; Gallo et al., PLoS One 7:e30679, 2012; Graner et al., FASEB J 23:1541-1557, 2009; Grange et al., Cancer Res 71:5346-5356, 2011; Hosseini-Beheshti et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 11:863-885, 2012; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25:66-75, 2013; Noerholm et al., BMC Cancer 12:22, 2012; Zhuang et al., EMBO J 31:3513-3523, 2012). When transferred between cancer cells, MVs have been shown to stimulate signaling events that promote cell growth and survival (Al-Nedawi et al., Nat Cell Biol 10:619-624, 2008). Cancer cell-derived MVs can also be taken up by normal cell types that surround the tumor, an outcome that helps shape the tumor microenvironment, trigger tumor vascularization, and even confer upon normal recipient cells the transformed characteristics of a cancer cell (Antonyak et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:4852-4857, 2011; Martins et al., Curr Opin Oncol 25

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived CD34(+) Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Sun, Li; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Teng; Chen, Li; Zhao, Aiqi; Lei, Qian; Gao, Fei; Zou, Ping; Li, Qiubai; Guo, An-Yuan; Chen, Zhichao; Wang, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to support the characteristic properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. MSCs are used in coculture systems as a feeder layer for the ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (CB) to increase the relatively low number of HSPCs in CB. Findings increasingly suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs) play an important role in the biological functions of their parent cells. We speculate that MSC-MVs may recapitulate the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of their parent cells. In the current study, we found MSC-MVs containing microRNAs that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We also demonstrated that MSC-MVs could improve the expansion of CB-derived mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells and generate a greater number of primitive progenitor cells in vitro. Additionally, when MSC-MVs were added to the CB-MSC coculture system, they could improve the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of MSCs. These findings highlight the role of MSC-MVs in the ex vivo expansion of CB, which may offer a promising therapeutic approach in CB transplantation. PMID:27042183

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hui; Sun, Li; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Teng; Chen, Li; Zhao, Aiqi; Lei, Qian; Gao, Fei; Zou, Ping; Li, Qiubai; Guo, An-yuan; Chen, Zhichao; Wang, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to support the characteristic properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. MSCs are used in coculture systems as a feeder layer for the ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (CB) to increase the relatively low number of HSPCs in CB. Findings increasingly suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs) play an important role in the biological functions of their parent cells. We speculate that MSC-MVs may recapitulate the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of their parent cells. In the current study, we found MSC-MVs containing microRNAs that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We also demonstrated that MSC-MVs could improve the expansion of CB-derived mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells and generate a greater number of primitive progenitor cells in vitro. Additionally, when MSC-MVs were added to the CB-MSC coculture system, they could improve the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of MSCs. These findings highlight the role of MSC-MVs in the ex vivo expansion of CB, which may offer a promising therapeutic approach in CB transplantation. PMID:27042183

  16. Hepatic Stellate Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent Hepatocytes from Injury Induced by APAP/H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renwei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Yaolong; Liao, Xiaorong; Li, Mingyi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), previously described for liver-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), appear to contribute to liver regeneration. Microvesicles (MVs) are nanoscale membrane fragments, which can regulate target cell function by transferring contents from their parent cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HSC-derived MVs on xenobiotic-induced liver injury. Rat and human hepatocytes, BRL-3A and HL-7702, were used to build hepatocytes injury models by n-acetyl-p-aminophenol n-(APAP) or H2O2 treatment. MVs were prepared from human and rat HSCs, LX-2, and HST-T6 and, respectively, added to injured BRL-3A and HL-7702 hepatocytes. MTT assay was utilized to determine cell proliferation. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and hoechst33258 staining. Western blot was used for analyzing the expression of activated caspase-3. Liver injury indicators, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in culture medium were also assessed. Results showed that (1) HSC-MVs derived from LX-2 and HST-T6 were positive to CD90 and annexin V surface markers; (2) HSC-MVs dose-dependently improved the viability of hepatocytes in both injury models; (3) HSC-MVs dose-dependently inhibited the APAP/H2O2 induced hepatocytes apoptosis and activated caspase-3 expression and leakage of LDH, ALT, and AST. Our results demonstrate that HSC-derived MVs protect hepatocytes from toxicant-induced injury. PMID:27239205

  17. Cell-derived microvesicles mediate the delivery of miR-29a/c to suppress angiogenesis in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Bai, Ming; Deng, Ting; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xia; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Zhang, Le; Ning, Tao; Ge, Shaohua; Li, Hongli; Zhou, Likun; Liu, Yuchen; Huang, Dingzhi; Ying, Guoguang; Ba, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) secreted from cells have been found to mediate signal transduction between cells. In the tumor microenvironment, VEGF released from cancer cells plays a key role in promoting tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we characterized the inhibitory effect of MV-delivered miR-29a/c on angiogenesis and tumor growth in gastric cancer (GC). We found that the downregulation of miR-29a/c increases VEGF expression and release in GC cells, promoting the growth of vascular cells. By simulating the tumor microenvironment, the MV-delivered miR-29a/c significantly suppresses VEGF expression in GC cells, inhibiting vascular cell growth, metastasis, and tube formation. We also used a tumor implantation mouse model to show that secreted MVs containing overexpressed miR-29a/c significantly reduced the growth rate of the vasculature and tumors in vivo. To conclude, our results contribute to a novel anti-cancer strategy using miRNA-containing MVs to control tumor cell growth by blocking angiogenesis. PMID:27000664

  18. Different gDNA Content in the Subpopulations of Prostate Cancer Extracellular Vesicles: Apoptotic Bodies, Microvesicles, and Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Sanz-Garcia, Andres; Visakorpi, Tapio; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Siljander, Pia; Ayuso-Sacido, Ángel; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles. EVs contain several RNAs such as mRNA, microRNAs, and ncRNAs, but less is known of their genomic DNA (gDNA) content. It is also unknown whether the DNA cargo is randomly sorted or if it is systematically packed into specific EV subpopulations. The aim of this study was to analyze whether different prostate cancer (PCa) cell-derived EV subpopulations (apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes) carry different gDNA fragments. Methods EV subpopulations were isolated from three PCa cell lines (LNCaP, PC-3, and RC92a/hTERT) and the plasma of PCa patients and healthy donors, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis and total protein content. gDNA fragments of different genes were detected by real time quantitative PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Results We report that the concentration of EVs was higher in the cancer patients than in the healthy controls. EV subpopulations differed from each other in terms of total protein and DNA content. Analysis of gDNA fragments of MLH1, PTEN, and TP53 genes from the PCa cell-derived EV subpopulations showed that different EVs carried different gDNA content, which could even harbor specific mutations. Altogether, these results suggest that both nucleic acids and proteins are selectively and cell-dependently packed into the EV subtypes. Conclusions EVs derived from PCa cell lines and human plasma samples contain double-stranded gDNA fragments which could be used to detect specific mutations, making EVs potential biomarkers for cancer diagnostics and prognostics. PMID:25111183

  19. Detection and isolation of circulating exosomes and microvesicles for cancer monitoring and diagnostics using micro-/nano-based devices.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jina; Carpenter, Erica; Issadore, David

    2016-01-21

    In the last several years, nanoscale vesicles that originate from tumor cells and which can be found circulating in the blood (i.e. exosomes and microvesicles) have been discovered to contain a wealth of proteomic and genetic information to monitor cancer progression, metastasis, and drug efficacy. However, the use of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers to improve patient care has been limited by their small size (30 nm-1 μm) and the extensive sample preparation required for their isolation and measurement. In this Critical Review, we explore the emerging use of micro and nano-technology to isolate and detect exosomes and microvesicles in clinical samples and the application of this technology to the monitoring and diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26378496

  20. Microvesicles released constitutively from prostate cancer cells differ biochemically and functionally to stimulated microvesicles released through sublytic C5b-9

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Dan; Moore, Colin; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2015-05-08

    We have classified microvesicles into two subtypes: larger MVs released upon stimulation of prostate cancer cells, sMVs, and smaller cMVs, released constitutively. cMVs are released as part of cell metabolism and sMVs, released at 10-fold higher levels, produced upon activation, including sublytic C5b-9. From electron microscopy, nanosight tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry, cMVs (194–210 nm in diameter) are smaller than sMVs (333–385 nm). Furthermore, using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, an sMV and a cMV are estimated at 0.267 and 0.241 pg, respectively. sMVs carry more calcium and protein, express higher levels of lipid rafts, GPI-anchored CD55 and phosphatidylserine including deposited C5b-9 compared to cMVs. This may allude to biological differences such as increased bound C4BP on sMVs inhibiting complement more effectively. - Highlights: • Prostate cells release microvesicles constitutively (cMVs) or upon stimulus (sMVs). • sMVs are larger than cMVs and carry more protein, lipid rafts and surface PstSer. • sMVs inhibit complement more effectively than cMVs.

  1. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  2. Extracellular Vesicles in Cancer: Exosomes, Microvesicles and the Emerging Role of Large Oncosomes

    PubMed Central

    Minciacchi, Valentina R.; Freeman, Michael R.; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Since their first description, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the topic of avid study in a variety of physiologic contexts and are now thought to play an important role in cancer. The state of knowledge on biogenesis, molecular content and horizontal communication of diverse types of cancer EVs has expanded considerably in recent years. As a consequence, a plethora of information about EV composition and molecular pathways involved in the regulation of important biological processes has emerged, along with the notion that cancer cells rely on these particles to invade tissues and propagate oncogenic signals at distance. In vivo studies, designed to achieve a deeper understanding of the extent to which EV biology can be applied to clinically relevant settings, are increasing. This review will summarize recent studies on EVs functionally implicated in cancer, with a focus on a novel EV population referred to as large oncosomes, which originate from highly migratory, amoeboid tumor cells. Here we provide an overview about the biogenesis and composition of exosomes, microvesicles and large oncosomes, along with their cancer-specific and more general functions. We also discuss current challenges and emerging technologies that might improve EV detection in various systems. Further studies on the functional role of EVs in specific steps of cancer formation and progression will expand our understanding of the diversity of paracrine signaling mechanisms in malignant growth. PMID:25721812

  3. Extracellular vesicles in cancer: exosomes, microvesicles and the emerging role of large oncosomes.

    PubMed

    Minciacchi, Valentina R; Freeman, Michael R; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2015-04-01

    Since their first description, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been the topic of avid study in a variety of physiologic contexts and are now thought to play an important role in cancer. The state of knowledge on biogenesis, molecular content and horizontal communication of diverse types of cancer EVs has expanded considerably in recent years. As a consequence, a plethora of information about EV composition and molecular function has emerged, along with the notion that cancer cells rely on these particles to invade tissues and propagate oncogenic signals at distance. The number of in vivo studies, designed to achieve a deeper understanding of the extent to which EV biology can be applied to clinically relevant settings, is rapidly growing. This review summarizes recent studies on cancer-derived EV functions, with an overview about biogenesis and molecular cargo of exosomes, microvesicles and large oncosomes. We also discuss current challenges and emerging technologies that might improve EV detection in various biological systems. Further studies on the functional role of EVs in specific steps of cancer formation and progression will expand our understanding of the diversity of paracrine signaling mechanisms in malignant growth. PMID:25721812

  4. Identification and characterization of proteins isolated from microvesicles derived from human lung cancer pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Ok; Choi, Do-Young; Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Hee Joung; Kang, Jeong Won; Jung, Jae Hun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R; Lee, Kye Young; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2013-07-01

    Microvesicles (MVs, also known as exosomes, ectosomes, microparticles) are released by various cancer cells, including lung, colorectal, and prostate carcinoma cells. MVs released from tumor cells and other sources accumulate in the circulation and in pleural effusion. Although recent studies have shown that MVs play multiple roles in tumor progression, the potential pathological roles of MV in pleural effusion, and their protein composition, are still unknown. In this study, we report the first global proteomic analysis of highly purified MVs derived from human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pleural effusion. Using nano-LC-MS/MS following 1D SDS-PAGE separation, we identified a total of 912 MV proteins with high confidence. Three independent experiments on three patients showed that MV proteins from PE were distinct from MV obtained from other malignancies. Bioinformatics analyses of the MS data identified pathologically relevant proteins and potential diagnostic makers for NSCLC, including lung-enriched surface antigens and proteins related to epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings provide new insight into the diverse functions of MVs in cancer progression and will aid in the development of novel diagnostic tools for NSCLC. PMID:23585444

  5. Tumor-derived microvesicles mediate human breast cancer invasion through differentially glycosylated EMMPRIN

    PubMed Central

    Menck, Kerstin; Scharf, Christian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Dyck, Lydia; Rost, Ulrike; Wenzel, Dirk; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Siam, Laila; Pukrop, Tobias; Binder, Claudia; Klemm, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells secrete not only a variety of soluble factors, but also extracellular vesicles that are known to support the establishment of a favorable tumor niche by influencing the surrounding stroma cells. Here we show that tumor-derived microvesicles (T-MV) also directly influence the tumor cells by enhancing their invasion in a both autologous and heterologous manner. Neither the respective vesicle-free supernatant nor MV from benign mammary cells mediate invasion. Uptake of T-MV is essential for the proinvasive effect. We further identify the highly glycosylated form of the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) as a marker for proinvasive MV. EMMPRIN is also present at high levels on MV from metastatic breast cancer patients in vivo. Anti-EMMPRIN strategies, such as MV deglycosylation, gene knockdown, and specific blocking peptides, inhibit MV-induced invasion. Interestingly, the effect of EMMPRIN-bearing MV is not mediated by matrix metalloproteinases but by activation of the p38/MAPK signaling pathway in the tumor cells. In conclusion, T-MV stimulate cancer cell invasion via a direct feedback mechanism dependent on highly glycosylated EMMPRIN. PMID:25503107

  6. Microvesicles released constitutively from prostate cancer cells differ biochemically and functionally to stimulated microvesicles released through sublytic C5b-9.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Dan; Moore, Colin; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun; Inal, Jameel

    2015-05-01

    We have classified microvesicles into two subtypes: larger MVs released upon stimulation of prostate cancer cells, sMVs, and smaller cMVs, released constitutively. cMVs are released as part of cell metabolism and sMVs, released at 10-fold higher levels, produced upon activation, including sublytic C5b-9. From electron microscopy, nanosight tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and flow cytometry, cMVs (194-210 nm in diameter) are smaller than sMVs (333-385 nm). Furthermore, using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, an sMV and a cMV are estimated at 0.267 and 0.241 pg, respectively. sMVs carry more calcium and protein, express higher levels of lipid rafts, GPI-anchored CD55 and phosphatidylserine including deposited C5b-9 compared to cMVs. This may allude to biological differences such as increased bound C4BP on sMVs inhibiting complement more effectively. PMID:25817790

  7. Ultrasmall Magnetically Engineered Ag2Se Quantum Dots for Instant Efficient Labeling and Whole-Body High-Resolution Multimodal Real-Time Tracking of Cell-Derived Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yi-Ping; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Yu, Zi-Li; Tang, Bo; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-02-17

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are natural carriers that can transport biological molecules between cells, which are expected to be promising delivery vehicles for therapeutic purposes. Strategies to label MVs are very important for investigation and application of MVs. Herein, ultrasmall Mn-magnetofunctionalized Ag2Se quantum dots (Ag2Se@Mn QDs) integrated with excellent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging capabilities have been developed for instant efficient labeling of MVs for their in vivo high-resolution dual-mode tracking. The Ag2Se@Mn QDs were fabricated by controlling the reaction of Mn(2+) with the Ag2Se nanocrystals having been pretreated in 80 °C NaOH solution, with an ultrasmall size of ca. 1.8 nm, water dispersibility, high NIR fluorescence quantum yield of 13.2%, and high longitudinal relaxivity of 12.87 mM(-1) s(-1) (almost four times that of the commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA). The ultrasmall size of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs enables them to be directly and efficiently loaded into MVs by electroporation, instantly and reliably conferring both NIR fluorescence and MR traceability on MVs. Our method for labeling MVs of different origins is universal and free of unfavorable influence on intrinsic behaviors of MVs. The complementary imaging capabilities of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs have made the long-term noninvasive whole-body high-resolution dual-mode tracking of MVs in vivo realized, by which the dynamic biodistribution of MVs has been revealed in a real-time and in situ quantitative manner. This work not only opens a new window for labeling with QDs, but also facilitates greatly the investigation and application of MVs. PMID:26804745

  8. Permanently Blocked Stem Cells Derived from Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan B.; Rothermund, Kristi; Zhang, Fang; Dabbs, David J.; Latimer, Jean J.; Grant, Stephen G.; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be resistant to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and the inimical conditions of the tumor microenvironment. Obtaining CSCs in sufficient quantities and maintaining their undifferentiated state have been major hurdles to their further characterization and to the identification of new pharmaceuticals that preferentially target these cells. We describe here the tagging of CSC-like populations from four human breast cancer cell lines with green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Oct3/4 stem cell-specific promoter. As expected, GFP was expressed by the CSC-enriched populations. An unanticipated result, however, was that these cells remained blocked in a CSC-like state and tended to be resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs as well as acidotic and hypoxic conditions. These CSC-like cells possessed several other in vitro attributes of CSCs and were able to reproducibly generate tumors in immuno-compromised mice from as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the tumors derived from these cells were comprised almost exclusively of pure CSCs. The ability of the Oct3/4 promoter to block CSC differentiation underscores its potential general utility for obtaining highly purified CSC populations, although the mechanism by which it does so remains undefined and subject to further study. Nonetheless, such stable cell lines should be extremely valuable tools for studying basic questions pertaining to CSC biology and for the initial identification of novel CSC-specific chemotherapeutic agents, which can then be verified in primary CSCs. PMID:20506227

  9. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jonathan M; André, Fabrice; Amigorena, Sebastian; Soria, Jean-Charles; Eggermont, Alexander; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    DC-derived exosomes (Dex) are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that are secreted by the sentinel antigen-presenting cells of the immune system: DCs. Like DCs, the molecular composition of Dex includes surface expression of functional MHC-peptide complexes, costimulatory molecules, and other components that interact with immune cells. Dex have the potential to facilitate immune cell-dependent tumor rejection and have distinct advantages over cell-based immunotherapies involving DCs. Accordingly, Dex-based phase I and II clinical trials have been conducted in advanced malignancies, showing the feasibility and safety of the approach, as well as the propensity of these nanovesicles to mediate T and NK cell-based immune responses in patients. This Review will evaluate the interactions of Dex with immune cells, their clinical progress, and the future of Dex immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27035813

  10. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages. PMID:27599426

  11. Metabolic and Signaling Functions of Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, P; Vardaki, I; Occhionero, A; Panaretakis, T

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles have gained tremendous attention in the recent years as a novel mechanism of cell to cell communication. There are several types of extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles, exosome, like vesicles, apoptotic bodies that differ mainly in the mechanism of biogenesis and secretion. The most well studied type of extracellular vesicles are the exosomes which are endosome-derived vesicles with a diameter of 50-150nm and enriched in ESCRT proteins including Alix, TSG101, Hsp70, and tetraspanins. It is now well established that exosomes promote tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment, facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells in an organotropic manner, modulate immune responses, and mediate resistance to therapy. Exosomes have also been recently implicated in an emerging hallmark of cancer, the cancer cell metabolism. The metabolic state of the cell defines, to a certain extent, both the rate of secretion and the molecular content of tumor-derived exosomes. Furthermore, exosomes have been shown to possess intrinsic metabolic activity since they can synthesize ATP by glycolysis. It follows that exosomes carry a number of metabolic enzymes and metabolites, including lactate, PGE, LDH isoforms, pyruvate, and monocarboxylate transporters. Last but not the least, exosomes are implicated in fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism and are thought to be crucial for the transcellular metabolism procedure. Uptake of exosomes is thought to alter the intracellular metabolic state of the cell. In summary, we describe the state of the art on the role of metabolism in the secretion, uptake, and the biological effects of exosomes in the metabolism of recipient cells. PMID:27572129

  12. Rapid and comprehensive 'shotgun' lipidome profiling of colorectal cancer cell derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Lydic, Todd A; Townsend, Steven; Adda, Christopher G; Collins, Christine; Mathivanan, Suresh; Reid, Gavin E

    2015-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of the role that cancer cell derived exosomes play in intercellular signaling upon fusion or uptake with a target cell, including immune system evasion, tumor growth and metastasis. To date, however, although exosomal membrane and cargo lipids are expected to play a pivotal role in exosome biogenesis and secretion, as well as in fusion or uptake and target cell functional response, the detailed characterization of cancer cell derived exosome lipids across a range of different cancers has not yet been broadly explored. Here, a simple and straightforward lipidome analysis strategy consisting of optimized sample extraction and novel sample derivatization techniques, coupled with high-resolution 'shotgun' mass spectrometry and 'targeted' tandem mass spectrometry methods, is demonstrated for the rapid identification of >520 individual lipids in 36 lipid classes and sub classes from exosomes secreted by the colorectal cancer cell line, LIM1215. Relative quantification and comparison of exosome versus cellular lipid profiles reveals significant enrichment of certain lipid classes, as well as substantial lipid subclass remodeling and changes in abundance of individual lipids, including sphingolipids, sterol lipids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids, and particularly plasmalogen- and alkyl ether-containing glycerophospholipids. This analysis strategy therefore provides a platform for comprehensive lipidome profiling across a wide range of cancer cell or tissue derived exosomes, that will facilitate subsequent functional studies aimed at elucidating the role of specific cellular or exosome lipids in the onset and progression of colorectal cancer, or to identify specific lipid(s) that could serve as effective diagnostic or prognostic disease biomarkers. PMID:25907253

  13. Radioresistance of cancer stem-like cell derived from canine tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, A; Deguchi, T; Sato, T; Nemoto, Y; Maruo, T; Madarame, H; Shida, T; Naya, Y; Ogihara, K; Sahara, H

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a small subpopulation of cancer cells that are responsible for the initiation, recurrence and metastasis of cancer. We previously demonstrated that, using the Hoechst 33342 dye-based side population technique, CSCs/CICs in canine lung adenocarcinoma cell line exist. In this study, as CSCs/CICs are known to form spheres in anchorage-independent environment in vitro, we evaluated the stemness of spheroid cells derived from canine lung adenocarcinoma and osteosarcoma cells by expression of stemness markers, and investigated radioresistance. Spheroid cells showed greater expression of stemness markers Oct-4 and CD133 gene than those of adherent-cultured cells. In nude mouse xenograft models, spheroid cells showed higher tumourigenic ability than adherent-cultured cells. In addition, spheroid cells showed significantly resistant against radioactivity as compared with adherent-cultured cells. These results suggest that spheroid cells could possess stemness and provide a CSCs/CICs research tool to investigate CSCs/CICs of canine tumour cells. PMID:25070729

  14. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes as immunotherapies in the fight against cancer.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jonathan M; Charrier, Mélinda; Viaud, Sophie; André, Fabrice; Besse, Benjamin; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes are nanometric membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin released by most, if not all, cell types as a means of sophisticated intercellular communication. A multitude of studies showed how exosomes can mediate and regulate immune responses against tumors. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (Dex) have received much attention as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents since the discovery that they harbor functional MHC-peptide complexes, in addition to various other immune-stimulating components, that together facilitate immune cell-dependent tumor rejection. The therapeutic potential of Dex has been substantiated with their development and clinical testing in the treatment of cancer. This review focuses on mechanisms by which Dex interact with and influence immune cells and describes how they can be engineered to promote their immunogenic capacity as novel and dynamic anticancer agents. PMID:25049431

  15. Fas signal promotes lung cancer growth by recruiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells via cancer cell-derived PGE2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiuyan; Zhang, Minggang; Yu, Yizhi; Liu, Xia; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-03-15

    Fas/FasL system has been extensively investigated with respect to its capacity to induce cellular apoptosis. However, accumulated evidences show that Fas signaling also exhibits nonapoptotic functions, such as induction of cell proliferation and differentiation. Lung cancer is one of cancer's refractory to the immunotherapy, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we show that Fas overexpression does not affect in vitro growth of 3LL cells, but promotes lung cancer growth in vivo. However, such tumor-promoting effect is not observed in FasL-deficient (gld) mice, and also not observed in the immune competent mice once inoculation with domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, suggesting the critical role of Fas signal in the promotion of lung cancer growth in vivo. More accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells is found in tumors formed by inoculation with Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, but not domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells. Accordingly, Fas-ligated 3LL lung cancer cells can chemoattract more MDSC but not regulatory T cells in vitro. Furthermore, Fas ligation induces 3LL lung cancer cells to produce proinflammatory factor PGE(2) by activating p38 pathway, and in turn, 3LL cells-derived PGE(2) contribute to the Fas ligation-induced MDSC chemoattraction. Furthermore, in vivo administration of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can significantly reduce MDSC accumulation in the Fas-overexpressing tumor. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Fas signal can promote lung cancer growth by recruiting MDSC via cancer cell-derived PGE(2), thus providing new mechanistic explanation for the role of inflammation in cancer progression and immune escape. PMID:19265159

  16. Cancer Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Are Associated with Coagulopathy Causing Ischemic Stroke via Tissue Factor-Independent Way: The OASIS-CANCER Study

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Chung, Jong-Won; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Moon, Gyeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer and stroke, which are known to be associated with one another, are the most common causes of death in the elderly. However, the pathomechanisms that lead to stroke in cancer patients are not well known. Circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in cancer-associated thrombosis and tumor progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that cancer cell-derived EVs cause cancer-related coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke. Methods Serum levels of D-dimer and EVs expressing markers for cancer cells (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [CD326]), tissue factor (TF [CD142]), endothelial cells (CD31+CD42b-), and platelets (CD62P) were measured using flow cytometry in (a) 155 patients with ischemic stroke and active cancer (116 − cancer-related, 39 − conventional stroke mechanisms), (b) 25 patients with ischemic stroke without cancer, (c) 32 cancer patients without stroke, and (d) 101 healthy subjects. Results The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs correlated with the levels of D-dimer and TF+ EVs. The levels of cancer cell-derived EVs (CD326+ and CD326+CD142+) were higher in cancer-related stroke than in other groups (P<0.05 in all the cases). Path analysis showed that cancer cell-derived EVs are related to stroke via coagulopathy as measured by D-dimer levels. Poor correlation was observed between TF+ EV and D-dimer, and path analysis demonstrated that cancer cell-derived EVs may cause cancer-related coagulopathy independent of the levels of TF+ EVs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that cancer cell-derived EVs mediate coagulopathy resulting in ischemic stroke via TF-independent mechanisms. PMID:27427978

  17. Regulated Delivery of Molecular Cargo to Invasive Tumor-derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, James W.; Sedgwick, Alanna; Rosse, Carine; Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Raposo, Graca; Method, Michael; Chavrier, Philippe; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2015-01-01

    Cells release multiple, distinct, forms of extracellular vesicles including structures known as microvesicles which are known to alter the extracellular environment. Despite growing understanding of microvesicle biogenesis, function, and contents, mechanisms regulating cargo delivery and enrichment remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that in amoeboid-like invasive tumor cell lines, the v-SNARE, VAMP3, regulates delivery of microvesicle cargo such as the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease (MT1-MMP) to shedding microvesicles. MT1-MMP delivery to nascent microvesicles depends on the association of VAMP3 with the tetraspanin CD9 and facilitates the maintenance of amoeboid cell invasion. VAMP3-shRNA expression depletes shed vesicles of MT1-MMP and decreases cell invasiveness when embedded in cross-linked collagen matrices. Finally, we describe functionally similar microvesicles isolated from bodily fluids of ovarian cancer patients. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of microvesicle cargo sorting in matrix degradation and disease progression. PMID:25897521

  18. Nanomechanical sandwich assay for multiple cancer biomarkers in breast cancer cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Etayash, H; McGee, A R; Kaur, K; Thundat, T

    2016-08-18

    The use of exosomes as cancer diagnostic biomarkers is technically limited by their size, heterogeneity and the need for extensive purification and labelling. We report the use of cantilever arrays for simultaneous detection of multiple exosomal surface-antigens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Exosomes from breast cancer were selectively identified by detecting over-expressed membrane-proteins CD24, CD63, and EGFR. Excellent selectivity however, was achieved when targeting the cell-surface proteoglycan, Glypican-1 at extraordinary limits (∼200 exosomes per mL, ∼0.1 pg mL(-1)). PMID:27492928

  19. Microfluidic isolation and transcriptome analysis of serum microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chihchen; Skog, Johan; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Lessard, Ryan T; Balaj, Leonora; Wurdinger, Thomas; Carter, Bob S; Breakefield, Xandra O; Toner, Mehmet; Irimia, Daniel

    2010-02-21

    Microvesicles (exosomes) shed from both normal and cancerous cells may serve as means of intercellular communication. These microvesicles carry proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the host cell. Their isolation and analysis from blood samples have the potential to provide information about state and progression of malignancy and should prove of great clinical importance as biomarkers for a variety of disease states. However, current protocols for isolation of microvesicles from blood require high-speed centrifugation and filtration, which are cumbersome and time consuming. In order to take full advantage of the potential of microvesicles as biomarkers for clinical applications, faster and simpler methods of isolation will be needed. In this paper, we present an easy and rapid microfluidic immunoaffinity method to isolate microvesicles from small volumes of both serum from blood samples and conditioned medium from cells in culture. RNA of high quality can be extracted from these microvesicles providing a source of information about the genetic status of tumors to serve as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. PMID:20126692

  20. High-Throughput Single-Cell Derived Sphere Formation for Cancer Stem-Like Cell Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick N.; Fouladdel, Shamileh; McDermott, Sean P.; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S.; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that many malignancies are driven by a cellular compartment that displays stem cell properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) can be identified by expression of cell surface markers or enzymatic activity, but these methods are limited by phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of CSCs. An alternative phenotypic methodology based on in-vitro sphere formation has been developed, but it is typically labor-intensive and low-throughput. In this work, we present a 1,024-microchamber microfluidic platform for single-cell derived sphere formation. Utilizing a hydrodynamic capturing scheme, more than 70% of the microchambers capture only one cell, allowing for monitoring of sphere formation from heterogeneous cancer cell populations for identification of CSCs. Single-cell derived spheres can be retrieved and dissociated for single-cell analysis using a custom 96-gene panel to probe heterogeneity within the clonal CSC spheres. This microfluidic platform provides reliable and high-throughput sphere formation for CSC identification and downstream clonal analysis.

  1. High-Throughput Single-Cell Derived Sphere Formation for Cancer Stem-Like Cell Identification and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick N.; Fouladdel, Shamileh; McDermott, Sean P.; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S.; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that many malignancies are driven by a cellular compartment that displays stem cell properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) can be identified by expression of cell surface markers or enzymatic activity, but these methods are limited by phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of CSCs. An alternative phenotypic methodology based on in-vitro sphere formation has been developed, but it is typically labor-intensive and low-throughput. In this work, we present a 1,024-microchamber microfluidic platform for single-cell derived sphere formation. Utilizing a hydrodynamic capturing scheme, more than 70% of the microchambers capture only one cell, allowing for monitoring of sphere formation from heterogeneous cancer cell populations for identification of CSCs. Single-cell derived spheres can be retrieved and dissociated for single-cell analysis using a custom 96-gene panel to probe heterogeneity within the clonal CSC spheres. This microfluidic platform provides reliable and high-throughput sphere formation for CSC identification and downstream clonal analysis. PMID:27292795

  2. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L.; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable. PMID:26496034

  3. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Sun, Xu-Yong; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable. PMID:26496034

  4. A novel role for peptidylarginine deiminases in microvesicle release reveals therapeutic potential of PAD inhibition in sensitizing prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kholia, Sharad; Jorfi, Samireh; Thompson, Paul R.; Causey, Corey P.; Nicholas, Anthony P.; Inal, Jameel M.; Lange, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Protein deimination, defined as the post-translational conversion of protein-bound arginine to citrulline, is carried out by a family of 5 calcium-dependent enzymes, the peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) and has been linked to various cancers. Cellular microvesicle (MV) release, which is involved in cancer progression, and deimination have not been associated before. We hypothesize that elevated PAD expression, observed in cancers, causes increased MV release in cancer cells and contributes to cancer progression. Background We have previously reported that inhibition of MV release sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. PAD2 and PAD4, the isozymes expressed in patients with malignant tumours, can be inhibited with the pan-PAD-inhibitor chloramidine (Cl-am). We sought to investigate whether Cl-am can inhibit MV release and whether this pathway could be utilized to further increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to drug-directed treatment. Methods Prostate cancer cells (PC3) were induced to release high levels of MVs upon BzATP stimulation of P2X7 receptors. Western blotting with the pan-protein deimination antibody F95 was used to detect a range of deiminated proteins in cells stimulated to microvesiculate. Changes in deiminated proteins during microvesiculation were revealed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry identified deiminated target proteins with putative roles in microvesiculation. Conclusion We report for the first time a novel function of PADs in the biogenesis of MVs in cancer cells. Our results reveal that during the stimulation of prostate cancer cells (PC3) to microvesiculate, PAD2 and PAD4 expression levels and the deimination of cytoskeletal actin are increased. Pharmacological inhibition of PAD enzyme activity using Cl-am significantly reduced MV release and abrogated the deimination of cytoskeletal actin. We demonstrated that combined Cl-am and methotrexate (MTX) treatment of prostate cancer

  5. The Genomic and Proteomic Content of Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Meredith C.; Azorsa, David O.

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that have been proposed as an effective means to detect a variety of disease states, including cancer. The properties of exosomes, including stability in biological fluids, allow for their efficient isolation and make them an ideal vehicle for studies on early disease detection and evaluation. Much data has been collected over recent years regarding the messenger RNA, microRNA, and protein contents of exosomes. In addition, many studies have described the functional role that exosomes play in disease initiation and progression. Tumor cells have been shown to secrete exosomes, often in increased amounts compared to normal cells, and these exosomes can carry the genomic and proteomic signatures characteristic of the tumor cells from which they were derived. While these unique signatures make exosomes ideal for cancer detection, exosomes derived from cancer cells have also been shown to play a functional role in cancer progression. Here, we review the unique genomic and proteomic contents of exosomes originating from cancer cells as well as their functional effects to promote tumor progression. PMID:22649786

  6. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, Martin; Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of (131)I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  7. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of 131I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  8. Biomechanical profile of cancer stem-like cells derived from MHCC97H cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinghui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Bingyu; Shi, Yisong; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical properties and cytoskeletal organization of cancer cells are known to be closely related with their aggressive phenotype. In this study, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), we aimed to evaluate the mechanical property of liver cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) and compare it with human hepatoma cells (HHCs). LCSCs were enriched from human hepatoma cell line MHCC97H through a sphere culture system. AFM nanoindentation was investigated as a method for measuring the cell stiffness, and reflecting by Young׳s modulus. Microfilament bundles of F-actin were observed with immunofluorescence staining by confocal microscopy. We found that LCSCs show lower Young׳s modulus and higher migration ability compared to MHCC97H cells. Moreover, the decrease in Young׳s modulus is accompanied with a dramatic decline in F-actin content. These results demonstrated a close relationship between the cell Young׳s modulus and metastatic potential of HHCs, which suggest that Young׳s modulus detected by AFM can be used to evaluate metastatic potential of cancer cells. PMID:26627368

  9. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Solley, Travis N.; Wei, Caimiao; Parikh, Aaroh; Court, Laurence; Burks, Jared K.; Andreeff, Michael; Woodward, Wendy A.; Dadbin, Ali; Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Lu, Karen H.; Klopp, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO) changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC) and visceral (V-ASC) white adipose tissue(WAT) of lean(Le) and obese(Ob) mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination. PMID:26317219

  10. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions. PMID:23425702

  11. The regulation of cancer cell migration by lung cancer cell-derived exosomes through TGF-β and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUZHOU; YI, JUN; CHEN, XINGGUI; ZHANG, YING; XU, MENG; YANG, ZHIXIONG

    2016-01-01

    Tumorigenesis has been considered to be as a result of abnormal cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that exosomes act as communicators between tumors and their microenvironment and have been demonstrated to be involved in tumorigenesis and subsequent metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the role of exosomes in these processes remains elusive. The present study sought to determine the underlying mechanisms. Using two lung cancer cell lines, it was demonstrated that exosomes derived from metastatic small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H1688) have greater effects on cancer cell migration, compared with exosomes derived from primary non-small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H2228). Further characterization of the contents of the exosomes demonstrated that there were increased levels of TGF-β and IL-10 in exosomes from NCI-H1688 cells compared with exosomes derived from NCI-H2228 cells, in particular under hypoxia. Blockade of TGF-β and IL-10 with antibodies confirmed that these cytokines were essential for the regulation of cancer cell migration. Taken together, the results of the present study indicated that exosomes derived from cancer cells regulated the cellular migration of tumor cells through TGF-β and IL-10, which may provide a novel approach for developing therapeutic methods against cancer. PMID:26893774

  12. Intercellular transfer of tissue factor via the uptake of tumor-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Leal, Ana Carolina; Vargas, Gabriele; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-10-01

    Coagulation proteins play a critical role in numerous aspects of tumor biology. Cancer cells express tissue factor (TF), the protein that initiates blood clotting, which frequently correlates with processes related to cell aggressiveness, including primary tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. It has been demonstrated that TF gets incorporated into tumor-derived microvesicles (MVs), a process that has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Here, we describe the exchange of TF-bearing MVs between breast cancer cell lines with different aggressiveness potential. The highly invasive and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells displayed higher surface levels of functional TF compared with the less aggressive MCF-7 cells. MVs derived from MDA-MB-231 cells were enriched in TF and accelerated plasma coagulation, but MCF-7 cell-derived MVs expressed very low levels of TF. Incubating MCF-7 cells with MDA-MB-231 MVs significantly increased the TF activity. This phenomenon was not observed upon pretreatment of MVs with anti-TF or annexin-V, which blocks phosphatidylserine sites on the surface of MVs. Our data indicated that TF-bearing MVs can be transferred between different populations of cancer cells and may therefore contribute to the propagation of a TF-related aggressive phenotype among heterogeneous subsets of cells in a tumor. PMID:23993901

  13. Microvesicles released from tumor cells disrupt epithelial cell morphology and contractility.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Chan, Bryan; Antonyak, Marc A; Lampi, Marsha C; Cerione, Richard A; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-05-24

    During tumor progression, cancer cells interact and communicate with non-malignant cells within their local microenvironment. Microvesicles (MV) derived from human cancer cells play an important role in mediating this communication. Another critical aspect of cancer progression involves widespread ECM remodeling, which occur both at the primary and metastatic sites. ECM remodeling and reorganization within the tumor microenvironment is generally attributed to fibroblasts. Here, using MCF10a cells, a well-characterized breast epithelial cell line that exhibits a non-malignant epithelial phenotype, and MVs shed by aggressive MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cells, we show that non-malignant epithelial cells can participate in ECM reorganization of 3D collagen matrices following their treatment with cancer cell-derived MVs. In addition, MVs trigger several changes in epithelial cells under 3D culture conditions. Furthermore, we show that this ECM reorganization is associated with an increase in cellular traction force following MV treatment, higher acto-myosin contractility, and higher FAK activity. Overall, our findings suggest that MVs derived from tumor cells can contribute to ECM reorganization occurring within the tumor microenvironment by enhancing the contractility of non-malignant epithelial cells. PMID:26477404

  14. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs. PMID:22311724

  15. Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, I. K.; Bertazzo, S.; O'Callaghan, D. J. P.; Schlegel, A. A.; Kallepitis, C.; Antcliffe, D. B.; Gordon, A. C.; Stevens, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and

  16. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity. PMID:27177471

  17. MicroRNA-containing microvesicles regulating inflammation in association with atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Holvoet, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In addition to intracellular organelles, eukaryotic cells contain extracellular organelles which are released, or shed, into the microenvironment. In practice, most human studies have examined mixed populations containing both exosomes and shedding microvesicles (also called ectosomes or microparticles); only a few studies have rigorously distinguished between the two. Accordingly, in this review, exosomes and shedding microvesicles are collectively called microvesicles. The first aim of this review was to discuss the role of microvesicles in cell-to-cell communication in general and in specific interactions between cells in chronic inflammation associated with atherosclerotic disease. Hereby, we focused on cell-specific microvesicles derived from platelets, endothelial cells and monocyte and monocyte-derived cells. The latter were also found to be associated with inflammation in obesity and type 2 diabetes prior to atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Our second aim was to discuss specific changes in microvesicle content in relation with inflammation associated with metabolic and atherosclerotic disease, and cancer. Because many studies supported the putative diagnostic value of microRNAs, we emphasized therein changes in microRNA content rather than protein or lipid content. The most interesting microRNAs in inflammatory microvesicles in association with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases were found to be the let-7 family, miR-17/92 family, miR-21, miR-29, miR-126, miR-133, miR-146, and miR-155. These data warrant further investigation of the potential of microvesicles as putative biomarkers and as novel carriers for the cell-specific transfer of microRNAs and other therapeutic agents. PMID:23774505

  18. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor induce metastatic behavior in CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Na; Moon, Hyun-Hye; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis of cancer cells is a major cause of death in cancer patients. The process of cancer metastasis includes the proliferation of primary cancer cells, local invasion, intravasation and cancer cell survival in blood flow, extravasation and attachment to secondary organs and metastatic growth in a new environment. In these mechanisms of cancer metastasis, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand play an important role. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, also known as CXCL12) is well known as a ligand of CXCR4, and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) has recently become known as a ligand of CXCR4. In many types of cancers including breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancer (CRC), CXCR4/SDF-1α has been investigated in metastasis-related cancer behavior, which include cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion. However, CXCR4/MIF has rarely been investigated in the metastatic behavior of colon cancer cells. In this report, the effect of SDF-1α or MIF was studied on cell cycle, cell proliferation, adhesion and migration of the CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cell line SW480. SDF-1α or MIF caused a decrease in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in the numbers of cells in S and G2/M phases. In addition, SDF-1α or MIF caused an increase in cell proliferation, cell adhesion to fibronectin and migration. AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, attenuated these effects, which included increased cell proliferation, adhesion and migration due to treatment of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells with SDF-1α or MIF. In conclusion, SDF-1α or MIF affects the metastasis-related behaviors of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells. PMID:23023114

  19. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  20. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    PubMed

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  1. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, A.; Ullrich, P. V.; Cimniak, A. F. V.; Follo, M.; Nestel, S.; Heimrich, B.; Nazarenko, I.; Stark, G. B.; Bannasch, H.; Braig, D.; Eisenhardt, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  2. Blood/plasma secretome and microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Inal, Jameel M; Kosgodage, Uchini; Azam, Sarah; Stratton, Dan; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Lange, Sigrun

    2013-11-01

    A major but hitherto overseen component of the blood/plasma secretome is that of extracellular vesicles (EVs) which are shed from all blood cell types. These EVs are made up of microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. MVs, 100nm-1μm in diameter, are released from the cell surface, and are a rich source of non-conventionally secreted proteins lacking a conventional signal peptide, and thus not secreted by the classical secretory pathways. Exosomes are smaller vesicles (≤100nm) having an endocytic origin and released upon multivesicular body fusion with the plasma membrane. Both vesicle types play major roles in intercellular cross talk and constitute an important component of the secretome especially in the area of biomarkers for cancer. The release of EVs, which are found in all the bodily fluids, is enhanced in cancer and a major focus of cancer proteomics is therefore targeted at EVs. The blood/plasma secretome is also a source of EVs, potentially diagnostic of infectious disease, whether from EVs released from infected cells or from the pathogens themselves. Despite the great excitement in this field, as is stated here and in other parts of this Special issue entitled: An Updated Secretome, much of the EV research, whether proteomic or functional in nature, urgently needs standardisation both in terms of nomenclature and isolation protocols. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome. PMID:23590876

  3. Apoptosis and anergy of T cell induced by pancreatic stellate cells-derived galectin-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Gao, Jun; Wang, Sen; Yuan, Zhongxu; Ye, Nianyuan; Chong, Yang; Xu, Chuanqi; Jiang, Xuetong; Li, Bin; Yin, Wei; Miao, Yi; Wang, Daorong; Jiang, Kuirong

    2015-07-01

    Galectin-1, a β-galactoside-binding protein implicated in cancer cell immune privilege, was highly expressed in activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). This study was designed to investigate the relationship between PSC-derived galectin-1 and tumor immunity in pancreatic cancer. Isolated PSCs were identified as normal pancreas cells (hNPSCs) or pancreatic cancer cells (hCaPSCs) by immunohistochemical staining for α-SMA and vimentin, and galectin-1 expression was evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Apoptosis, caspase activity, and cytokine production (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-β, and IFN-γ) of T cells co-cultured with PSCs were evaluated, and immunohistochemical staining of galectin-1 was correlated with CD3 and clinicopathological variables in 66 pancreatic cancer and 10 normal pancreatic tissue samples. hCaPSCs exhibited higher galectin-1 expression than did hNPSCs, and hCaPSCs induced higher levels of apoptosis in T cells following co-culture. hCaPSCs activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and stimulated secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-6 and IL-10) but decreased secretion of Th1 cytokines (TNF-β and IFN-γ), compared with hNPSCs. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that galectin-1 and CD3 were more highly expressed in pancreatic cancer tissue. Galectin-1 expression was highest in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and lowest in well-differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and was associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, differentiation, and UICC stage. However, CD3 expression showed the opposite trend and was highest in well-differentiated pancreatic cancer cells and was associated with tumor differentiation and UICC stage. High expression of galectin-1 was associated with short survival, as was low expression of CD3. hCaPSC-derived galectin-1 enhanced apoptosis and anergy of T cells in pancreatic cancer, which contributes to the immune escape of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:25725585

  4. Cancer-initiating cells derived from human rectal adenocarcinoma tissues carry mesenchymal phenotypes and resist drug therapies.

    PubMed

    Fan, C-W; Chen, T; Shang, Y-N; Gu, Y-Z; Zhang, S-L; Lu, R; OuYang, S-R; Zhou, X; Li, Y; Meng, W-T; Hu, J-K; Lu, Y; Sun, X-F; Bu, H; Zhou, Z-G; Mo, X-M

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are responsible for cancer initiation, relapse, and metastasis. Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is typically classified into proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancer. The gradual changes in CRC molecular features within the bowel may have considerable implications in colon and rectal CICs. Unfortunately, limited information is available on CICs derived from rectal cancer, although colon CICs have been described. Here we identified rectal CICs (R-CICs) that possess differentiation potential in tumors derived from patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. The R-CICs carried both CD44 and CD54 surface markers, while R-CICs and their immediate progenies carried potential epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristics. These R-CICs generated tumors similar to their tumor of origin when injected into immunodeficient mice, differentiated into rectal epithelial cells in vitro, and were capable of self-renewal both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, subpopulations of R-CICs resisted both 5-fluorouracil/calcium folinate/oxaliplatin (FolFox) and cetuximab treatment, which are the most common therapeutic regimens used for patients with advanced or metastatic rectal cancer. Thus, the identification, expansion, and properties of R-CICs provide an ideal cellular model to further investigate tumor progression and determine therapeutic resistance in these patients. PMID:24091671

  5. Protection of stromal cell-derived factor 2 by heat shock protein 72 prevents oxaliplatin-induced cell death in oxaliplatin-resistant human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Masako; Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Asuka; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Nagayama, Katsuya; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi; Shiota, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) is a molecular chaperone that assists in the folding of nascent polypeptides and in the refolding of denatured proteins. In many cancers, Hsp72 is constitutively expressed at elevated levels, which can result in enhanced stress tolerance. Similarly, following treatment with anticancer drugs, Hsp72 binds to denatured proteins that may be essential for survival. We therefore hypothesized that Hsp72 client proteins may play a crucial role in drug resistance. Here, we aimed to identify proteins that are critical for oxaliplatin (OXA) resistance by analyzing human gastric cancer cell lines, as well as OXA-resistant cells via a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach combined with affinity purification using anti-Hsp72 antibodies. Stromal cell-derived factor 2 (SDF-2) was identified as an Hsp72 client protein unique to OCUM-2M/OXA cells. SDF-2 was overexpressed in OXA-resistant cells and SDF-2 silencing promoted the apoptotic effects of OXA. Furthermore, Hsp72 prevented SDF-2 degradation in a chaperone activity-dependent manner. Together, our data demonstrate that Hsp72 protected SDF-2 to avoid OXA-induced cell death. We propose that inhibition of SDF-2 may comprise a novel therapeutic strategy to counteract OXA-resistant cancers. PMID:27157913

  6. Exosomes for Immunoregulation and Therapeutic Intervention in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Pei, Zenglin; Chen, Jinyun; Ji, Chunxia; Xu, Jianqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, as a subset of extracellular vesicles, function as a mode of intercellular communication and molecular transfer, and facilitate the direct extracellular transfer of proteins, lipids, and miRNAs/mRNAs/DNAs between cells. Cancers have adapted exosomes and related microvesicles as a pathway that can suppress the immune system and establish a fertile local and distant environment to support neoplastic growth, invasion, and metastasis; these tumor-derived exosomes affect immunoregulation mechanisms, including immune activation and immune suppression. Immune cell-derived exosomes can modulate the immune response in cancer, which supports the belief that these membranous vesicles are immunotherapeutic reagents. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the cancer immunotherapy, roles of exosomes in cancer, immunoregulation of tumor-derived exosomes, and immunomodulation by immune cell-derived exosomes. The topics covered here highlight novel insights into the development of efficient exosome-based cancer vaccines for cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27326251

  7. Exosomes for Immunoregulation and Therapeutic Intervention in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Pei, Zenglin; Chen, Jinyun; Ji, Chunxia; Xu, Jianqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, as a subset of extracellular vesicles, function as a mode of intercellular communication and molecular transfer, and facilitate the direct extracellular transfer of proteins, lipids, and miRNAs/mRNAs/DNAs between cells. Cancers have adapted exosomes and related microvesicles as a pathway that can suppress the immune system and establish a fertile local and distant environment to support neoplastic growth, invasion, and metastasis; these tumor-derived exosomes affect immunoregulation mechanisms, including immune activation and immune suppression. Immune cell-derived exosomes can modulate the immune response in cancer, which supports the belief that these membranous vesicles are immunotherapeutic reagents. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the cancer immunotherapy, roles of exosomes in cancer, immunoregulation of tumor-derived exosomes, and immunomodulation by immune cell-derived exosomes. The topics covered here highlight novel insights into the development of efficient exosome-based cancer vaccines for cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27326251

  8. Isolation of circulating microRNAs from microvesicles found in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Quackenbush, John F; Cassidy, Pamela B; Pfeffer, Lawrence M; Boucher, Kenneth M; Hawkes, Jason E; Pfeffer, Susan R; Kopelovich, Levy; Leachman, Sancy A

    2014-01-01

    Intact miRNAs can be isolated from the circulation in significant quantities despite the presence of extremely high levels of RNase activity. The remarkable stability of circulating miRNAs makes them excellent candidates for biomarkers in diagnostic applications as well as therapeutic targets in a variety of disease states including melanoma. Circulating RNA molecules are resistant to degradation by RNases because they are encapsulated in membrane-bound microvesicles. We describe a convenient method for the use of ExoQuick, a proprietary resin developed by Systems Biosciences (Mountain View, CA), whereby microvesicles can be purified under gentle conditions using readily available laboratory equipment. This protocol allows for isolation all microvesicles, regardless of their origin, and provides a convenient method for identifying potential cancer-specific biomarkers from biological fluids including serum and plasma. PMID:24259003

  9. Hybrid cells derived from breast epithelial cell/breast cancer cell fusion events show a differential RAF-AKT crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been linked to several characteristics of tumour progression, including an enhanced metastatogenic capacity and an enhanced drug resistance of hybrid cells. We demonstrated recently that M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics spontaneously fused with MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, thereby giving rise to stable M13MDA435 hybrid cells, which are characterised by a unique gene expression profile and migratory behaviour. Here we investigated the involvement of the PLC-β/γ1, PI3K/AKT and RAS-RAF-ERK signal transduction cascades in the EGF and SDF-1α induced migration of two M13MDA435 hybrid cell clones in comparison to their parental cells. Results Analysis of the migratory behaviour by using the three-dimensional collagen matrix migration assay showed that M13SV1-EGFP-Neo cells as well as M13MDA435 hybrid cells, but not the breast cancer cell line, responded to EGF stimulation with an increased locomotory activity. By contrast, SDF-1α solely stimulated the migration of M13SV1-EGFP-Neo cells, whereas the migratory activity of the other cell lines was blocked. Analysis of signal transduction cascades revealed a putative differential RAF-AKT crosstalk in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrid cell clones. The PI3K inhibitor Ly294002 effectively blocked the EGF induced migration of M13MDA435-3 hybrid cells, whereas the EGF induced locomotion of M13MDA435-1 hybrid cells was markedly increased. Analysis of RAF-1 S259 phosphorylation, being a major mediator of the negative regulation of RAF-1 by AKT, showed decreased pRAF-1 S259 levels in LY294002 treated M13MDA435-1 hybrid cells. By contrast, pRAF-1 S259 levels remained unaltered in the other cell lines. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT signalling by Ly294002 relieves the AKT mediated phosphorylation of RAF-1, thereby restoring MAPK signalling. Conclusions Here we show that hybrid cells could evolve exhibiting a differential active RAF

  10. Label-free real-time acoustic sensing of microvesicle release from prostate cancer (PC3) cells using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Dan; Lange, Sigrun; Kholia, Sharad; Jorfi, Samireh; Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Inal, Jameel

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Microvesiculating cells record loss of mass on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance. • Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance microvesicles are measured at 0.24 pg. • The QCM-D reveals loss in viscoelastic properties in microvesiculating cells. - Abstract: Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation monitoring, QCM-D (label-free system) measuring changes in resonant frequency (Δf) that equate to mass deposited on a sensor, we showed the attachment, over a 60 min period, of a monolayer of PC3 cells to the gold electrodes of the quartz crystal sensor, which had been rendered hydrophilic. That MVs were released upon BzATP stimulation of cells was confirmed by NTA analysis (average 250 nm diameter), flow cytometry, showing high phosphatidylserine exposition and by fluorescent (Annexin V Alexa Fluor® 488-positive) and electron microscopy. Over a period of 1000s (16.7 min) during which early apoptosis increased from 4% plateauing at 10% and late apoptosis rose to 2%, the Δf increased 20 Hz, thereupon remaining constant for the last 1000s of the experiment. Using the Sauerbrey equation, the loss in mass, which corresponded to the release of 2.36 × 10{sup 6} MVs, was calculated to be 23 ng. We therefore estimated the mass of an MV to be 0.24 pg. With the deposition on the QCM-D of 3.5 × 10{sup 7} MVs over 200s, the decrease in Δf (Hz) gave an estimate of 0.235 pg per MV.

  11. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 G801A polymorphism and the risk factors for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Andrzej; Misztal, Matthew; Sowińska, Anna; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-06-01

    Although certain studies have demonstrated no association between the stromal cell‑derived factor‑1 (SDF1‑3') G801A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and cervical carcinoma, the interactions between the SDF1‑3' G801A SNP and contraceptive use, menopausal status, parity and tobacco smoking remain to be fully elucidated. Using polymerase chain reaction‑restriction fragment length polymorphism, the distribution of SDF1‑3' G801A genotypes in patients with cervical cancer (n=462) against control groups (n=497) was investigated. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, tobacco smoking and menopausal status, did not identify the SDF1‑3' G801A polymorphism as a genetic risk factor for cervical cancer. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for patients with the A/G, vs. G/G genotype was 1.203, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.909‑1.591 (P=0.196). The adjusted OR for the A/A, vs. G/G genotype was 1.296 (95% CI=0.930‑1.807; P=0.125) and for the A/A or A/G, vs. G/G genotype was 1.262 (95% CI=0.964‑1.653; P=0.090)]. The P‑value of the χ2 test of the trend observed for the SDF1‑3' G801A polymorphism was at the borderline of being statistically significant (ptrend=0.0484). Stratified analyses between the distribution of the SDF1‑3' G801A genotypes and cervical cancer risks demonstrated that this polymorphism may be a risk factor for patients with a positive history of tobacco smoking (1.778; 95% CI=1.078‑2.934; P=0.0235). These findings suggested that the SDF1‑3' G801A polymorphism may be a genetic risk factor for cervical cancer in patients with a positive history of tobacco smoking. PMID:25672413

  12. Effect of hyperthermic CO2-treated dendritic cell-derived exosomes on the human gastric cancer AGS cell line

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JINLIN; WANG, ZHIYONG; MO, YANXIA; ZENG, ZHAOHUI; WEI, PEI; LI, TAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of hyperthermic CO2 (HT-CO2)-treated dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dex) on human gastric cancer AGS cells. Mouse-derived DCs were incubated in HT-CO2 at 43°C for 4 h. The exosomes in the cell culture supernatant were then isolated. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell apoptosis was observed using flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining and the analysis of caspase-3 activity. In addition, the proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated in xenotransplant nude mice. HT-CO2 markedly inhibited cell proliferation, as assessed by the CCK-8 assay, and also induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide flow cytometry, caspase-3 activity and morphological analysis using Hoechst fluorescent dye. It was also revealed that HT-CO2-treated Dex decreased the expression of heat shock protein 70 and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In conclusion, HT-CO2 exerted an efficacious immune-enhancing effect on DCs. These findings may provide a novel strategy for the elimination of free cancer cells during laparoscopic resection. However, the potential cellular mechanisms underlying this process require further investigation. PMID:26170979

  13. Stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana . E-mail: bajetto@cba.unige.it; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio . E-mail: florio@cba.unige.it; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1{alpha} treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1{alpha} induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer.

  14. Colorectal cancer cell-derived interleukin-6 enhances the phagocytic capacity and migration of THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wu, Tsung-Han; Wu, Tai-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages perform a versatile range of functions in response to environmental stimuli. In the present study, we evaluated whether interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine released from colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and associated with CRC pathogenesis and metastasis, modulates the phagocytic capacity and migratory ability of macrophages, using a monocyte-macrophage THP-1 cell model and human peripheral monocytes. We found that CRC cells enhanced the phagocytic capacity and migration of THP-1 cells and human peripheral monocytes. CRC cell culture supernatants and recombinant IL-6 neutralized with anti-IL-6 and anti-gp130 antibodies considerably decreased IL-6-mediated phagocytosis by and migration of THP-1 cells and human peripheral monocytes, via the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Our data suggest that CRC cells secreting IL-6 via STAT3 phosphorylation can enhance the phagocytic capacity and migration of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26775116

  15. Pulmonary epithelial cancer cells and their exosomes metabolize myeloid cell-derived leukotriene C4 to leukotriene D4.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Ana; Ji, Jie; Idborg, Helena; Samuelsson, Bengt; Palmberg, Lena; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Rådmark, Olof

    2016-09-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) play major roles in lung immune responses, and LTD4 is the most potent agonist for cysteinyl LT1, leading to bronchoconstriction and tissue remodeling. Here, we studied LT crosstalk between myeloid cells and pulmonary epithelial cells. Monocytic cells (Mono Mac 6 cell line, primary dendritic cells) and eosinophils produced primarily LTC4 In coincubations of these myeloid cells and epithelial cells, LTD4 became a prominent product. LTC4 released from the myeloid cells was further transformed by the epithelial cells in a transcellular manner. Formation of LTD4 was rapid when catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)1 in the A549 epithelial lung cancer cell line, but considerably slower when catalyzed by GGT5 in primary bronchial epithelial cells. When A549 cells were cultured in the presence of IL-1β, GGT1 expression increased about 2-fold. Also exosomes from A549 cells contained GGT1 and augmented LTD4 formation. Serine-borate complex (SBC), an inhibitor of GGT, inhibited conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 Unexpectedly, SBC also upregulated translocation of 5-lipoxygenase (LO) to the nucleus in Mono Mac 6 cells, and 5-LO activity. Our results demonstrate an active role for epithelial cells in biosynthesis of LTD4, which may be of particular relevance in the lung. PMID:27436590

  16. Natural Killer Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived NK Cells as an Immunotherapeutic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Eguizabal, Cristina; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Monge, Jorge; Santos, Silvia; Vesga, Miguel Angel; Maruri, Natalia; Arrieta, Arantza; Riñón, Marta; Tamayo-Orbegozo, Estibaliz; Amo, Laura; Larrucea, Susana; Borrego, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. Over the last years, the progress made in the NK-cell biology field and in deciphering how NK-cell function is regulated, is driving efforts to utilize NK-cell-based immunotherapy as a promising approach for the treatment of malignant diseases. Therapies involving NK cells may be accomplished by activating and expanding endogenous NK cells by means of cytokine treatment or by transferring exogenous cells by adoptive cell therapy and/or by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. NK cells that are suitable for adoptive cell therapy can be derived from different sources, including ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells, unstimulated or expanded allogeneic NK cells from peripheral blood, derived from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood, and NK-cell lines. Besides, genetically modified NK cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors or cytokines genes may also have a relevant future as therapeutic tools. Recently, it has been described the derivation of large numbers of functional and mature NK cells from pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, which adds another tool to the expanding NK-cell-based cancer immunotherapy arsenal. PMID:25309538

  17. Dendritic Cell (DC) Vaccine in Mouse Lung Cancer Minimal Residual Model; Comparison of Monocyte-derived DC vs. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Derived-DC.

    PubMed

    Baek, Soyoung; Lee, Seog Jae; Kim, Myoung Joo; Lee, Hyunah

    2012-12-01

    The anti-tumor effect of monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) vaccine was studied in lung cancer model with feasible but weak Ag-specific immune response and incomplete blocking of tumor growth. To overcome this limitation, the hematopoietic stem cell-derived DC (SDC) was cultured and the anti-tumor effect of MoDC & SDC was compared in mouse lung cancer minimal residual model (MRD). Therapeutic DCs were cultured from either CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells with GM-CSF, SCF and IL-4 for 14 days (SDC) or monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 7 days (MoDC). DCs were injected twice by one week interval into the peritoneum of mice that are inoculated with Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells (LLC) one day before the DC injection. Anti-tumor responses and the immune modulation were observed 3 weeks after the final DC injection. CD11c expression, IL-12 and TGF-β secretion were higher in SDC but CCR7 expression, IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion were higher in MoDC. The proportion of CD11c(+)CD8a(+) cells was similar in both DC cultures. Although both DC reduced the tumor burden, histological anti-tumor effect and the frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8(+) T cells were higher in SDC treated group than in MoDC. Conclusively, although both MoDC and SDC can induce the anti-tumor immunity, SDC may be better module as anti-tumor vaccine than MoDC in mouse lung cancer. PMID:23396889

  18. Microvesicles: What is the Role in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Carandini, Tiziana; Colombo, Federico; Finardi, Annamaria; Casella, Giacomo; Garzetti, Livia; Verderio, Claudia; Furlan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles are a recently described way of cell communication that has been implicated in a number of biological processes, including neuroinflammation. Widely investigated as biomarkers in oncology and neurological disorders, little is known of the role of microvesicles in the pathogenesis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Several evidences suggest that pro-inflammatory microglia and infiltrating macrophages release microvesicles that spread inflammatory signals and alter neuronal functions. We review here available information on microvesicles, with a special focus on microglia and macrophage microvesicles, in the pathogenesis of MS, and as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26074867

  19. Acoustic purification of extracellular microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-03-24

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose technical challenges in sample preparation, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nanofilter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation uses ultrasound standing waves to exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The "filter size-cutoff" can be controlled electronically in situ, which enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nanofilter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses. PMID:25672598

  20. Acoustic Purification of Extracellular Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungheon; Shao, Huilin; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are an increasingly important source for biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics. The small size of MVs and their presence in complex biological environment, however, pose practical technical challenges, particularly when sample volumes are small. We herein present an acoustic nano-filter system that size-specifically separates MVs in a continuous and contact-free manner. The separation is based on ultrasound standing waves that exert differential acoustic force on MVs according to their size and density. By optimizing the design of the ultrasound transducers and underlying electronics, we were able to achieve a high separation yield and resolution. The “filter size-cutoff” can be controlled electronically in situ and enables versatile MV-size selection. We applied the acoustic nano-filter to isolate nanoscale (<200 nm) vesicles from cell culture media as well as MVs in stored red blood cell products. With the capacity for rapid and contact-free MV isolation, the developed system could become a versatile preparatory tool for MV analyses. PMID:25672598

  1. Release of toxic microvesicles by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny, A; Behling, U H; Hammond, B; Lai, C H; Listgarten, M; Pham, P H; Sanavi, F

    1982-01-01

    Oral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (strain Y4) release spherical microvesicles in large numbers during normal growth. The biological activities of these products were studied, and it was estimated that approximately 1/10 of their dry weight was made up of heat- and proteolysis-resistant endotoxin. The chicken embryo lethality and bone-resorbing activity of the microvesicles were heat stable but proteolysis sensitive. Other laboratories have reported the presence of a heat- and proteolysis-sensitive leukotoxin in similar preparations. Accordingly, the microvesicles released by strain Y4 may contain, in addition to endotoxin, several potent substances which are highly toxic and active in bone resorption, and these may be significant factors in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. PMID:7049947

  2. Release of toxic microvesicles by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, A; Behling, U H; Hammond, B; Lai, C H; Listgarten, M; Pham, P H; Sanavi, F

    1982-07-01

    Oral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (strain Y4) release spherical microvesicles in large numbers during normal growth. The biological activities of these products were studied, and it was estimated that approximately 1/10 of their dry weight was made up of heat- and proteolysis-resistant endotoxin. The chicken embryo lethality and bone-resorbing activity of the microvesicles were heat stable but proteolysis sensitive. Other laboratories have reported the presence of a heat- and proteolysis-sensitive leukotoxin in similar preparations. Accordingly, the microvesicles released by strain Y4 may contain, in addition to endotoxin, several potent substances which are highly toxic and active in bone resorption, and these may be significant factors in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. PMID:7049947

  3. Platelet-derived microvesicles: multitalented participants in intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Aatonen, Maria; Grönholm, Mikaela; Siljander, Pia R-M

    2012-02-01

    Platelets can release a heterogeneous pool of vesicles which include plasma membrane-derived microparticles (PMPs) and multivesicular body-derived exosomes. As both vesicle types are generated upon activation and their distinction is complicated due to an overlap in their molecular properties and sizes, they are best discussed as an entity, the platelet-derived microvesicles (PMVs). PMPs can be formed through several induction pathways, which determine their different molecular profiles and facilitate tailor-made participation in intercellular communication. This dynamic variability may lie behind the multifaceted and sometimes very different observations of the PMPs in physiological and pathological settings. Currently, little is known of platelet-derived exosomes. In all, PMVs not only participate in several homeostatic multicellular processes, such as hemostasis, maintenance of vascular health, and immunity, but they also play a role in thrombotic and inflammatory diseases and cancer progression. In the past few years, the number of original articles and reviews on microvesicles has dramatically increased, but the data simultaneously raise further questions, the answers to which depend on forthcoming analytical improvements. In this article, the differential activation pathways and the molecular and functional properties of PMVs are reviewed in context with their sometimes paradoxical role in health and in disease. Also, the methodological issues of PMV detection and analysis are discussed in the light of recent advances within the field. PMID:22314608

  4. Exosomes and Microvesicles: Identification and Targeting By Particle Size and Lipid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kastelowitz, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are two classes of submicroscopic vesicle released by cells into the extracellular space. Collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles, these membrane containers facilitate important cell-cell communication by carrying a diverse array of signaling molecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Recently, the role of extracellular vesicle signaling in cancer progression has become a topic of significant interest. Methods to detect and target exosomes and microvesicles are needed to realize applications of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and, perhaps, therapeutic targets. Detection of exosomes and microvesicles is a complex problem as they are both submicroscopic and of heterogeneous cellular origins. In this Minireview, we highlight the basic biology of extracellular vesicles, and address available biochemical and biophysical detection methods. Detectible characteristics described here include lipid and protein composition, and physical properties such as the vesicle membrane shape and diffusion coefficient. In particular, we propose that detection of exosome and microvesicle membrane curvature with lipid chemical probes that sense membrane shape is a distinctly promising method for identifying and targeting these vesicles. PMID:24740901

  5. Epithelial cell-derived periostin functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14ARF/Mdm2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjun; Liu, Rui; Fu, Jiao; Yang, Qi; Shi, Jing; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Periostin is usually considered as an oncogene in diverse human cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, esophagus, and pancreas cancers, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression is decreased whereas stromal periostin expression is significantly increased as compared with normal gastric tissues. Moreover, periostin produced by stromal myofibroblasts markedly promotes gastric cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that periostin derived from different types of cells may play distinct biological roles in gastric tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell-derived periostin in gastric cancer. Our data showed that periglandular periostin was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric mucosa. In addition, its expression in metastatic lymph nodes was significantly lower than that in their primary cancer tissues. Our data also demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression was negatively associated with tumor stage. More importantly, restoration of periostin expression in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved revealed that periostin restoration enhanced Rb phosphorylation and sequentially activated the transcription of E2F1 target gene p14(ARF), leading to Mdm2 inactivation and the stabilization of p53 and E-cadherin proteins. Strikingly, these effects of periostin were abolished upon Rb deletion. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived periostin exerts tumor-suppressor activities in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14(ARF)/Mdm2 signaling pathway. PMID:25486483

  6. Enhanced cancer immunotherapy using STAT3-depleted dendritic cells with high Th1-inducing ability and resistance to cancer cell-derived inhibitory factors.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Kajihara, Tomoko; Sumimoto, Hidetoshi; Kawamura, Naoshi; Ueda, Ryo; Takahashi, Tomomi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Miyagishi, Makoto; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2011-07-01

    STAT3 signaling constitutes an important negative feedback mechanism for the maintenance of immune homeostasis, a suppressive signal for the Th1 immune response in murine macrophages, and a cancer immune evasion signal in various immune cells. The strategy for STAT3 signal inhibition should be considered, because these features could impede effective cancer immunotherapy. We have evaluated the effects of STAT3 inactivation in dendritic cells (DCs) on immune responses in mice and humans. DCs derived from LysMcre/STAT3(flox/flox) mice displayed higher cytokine production in response to TLR stimulation, activated T cells more efficiently, and were more resistant to the suppression of cytokine production by cancer-derived immunosuppressive factors compared with DCs from control littermates. Antitumor activities of STAT3-depleted and control DCs were compared by intratumoral administration of gp70 Ag peptide-pulsed DCs in the therapeutic MC38 tumor model. Intratumoral administration of STAT3-depleted DCs significantly inhibited MC38 tumor growth of both injected and nontreated remote tumors. The inhibition was accompanied by an increase in gp70-specific T cell response as well as in systemic Th1 immune response. STAT3-depleted human DCs with adenoviral STAT3 short hairpin RNA were also capable of producing more cytokines with TLR stimulation and more resistant to cancer-derived factors, and they induced tumor Ag-specific T cells more efficiently than control DCs. The identified role of DC STAT3 signaling in both in vivo therapeutic tumor models in mice and in vitro-specific T cell induction in humans indicates that STAT3-inactivated DCs may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21632716

  7. Detection of Tumor Cell-Specific mRNA and Protein in Exosome-Like Microvesicles from Blood and Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieping; Wei, Fang; Schafer, Christopher; Wong, David T. W.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of disease-specific biomarkers in oral fluids has revealed a new dimension in molecular diagnostics. Recent studies have reported the mechanistic involvement of tumor cells derived mediators, such as exosomes, in the development of saliva-based mRNA biomarkers. To further our understanding of the origins of disease-induced salivary biomarkers, we here evaluated the hypothesis that tumor-shed secretory lipidic vesicles called exosome-like microvesicles (ELMs) that serve as protective carriers of tissue-specific information, mRNAs, and proteins, throughout the vasculature and bodily fluids. RNA content was analyzed in cell free-saliva and ELM-enriched fractions of saliva. Our data confirmed that the majority of extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) in saliva were encapsulated within ELMs. Nude mice implanted with human lung cancer H460 cells expressing hCD63-GFP were used to follow the circulation of tumor cell specific protein and mRNA in the form of ELMs in vivo. We were able to identify human GAPDH mRNA in ELMs of blood and saliva of tumor bearing mice using nested RT-qPCR. ELMs positive for hCD63-GFP were detected in the saliva and blood of tumor bearing mice as well as using electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM). Altogether, our results demonstrate that ELMs carry tumor cell–specific mRNA and protein from blood to saliva in a xenografted mouse model of human lung cancer. These results therefore strengthen the link between distal tumor progression and the biomarker discovery of saliva through the ELMs. PMID:25397880

  8. A New Stem Cell Biology: The Continuum and Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Goldberg, Laura R.; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pereira, Mandy; Amaral, Ashley; Del Tatto, Michael M.; Hixson, Douglas C.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    The hierarchical models of stem cell biology have been based on work first demonstrating pluripotental spleen-colony-forming units, then showing progenitors with many differentiation fates assayed in in vitro culture; there followed the definition and separation of “stem cells” using monoclonal antibodies to surface epitopes and fluorescent-activated cell characterization and sorting (FACS). These studies led to an elegant model of stem cell biology in which primitive dormant G0 stem cells with tremendous proliferative and differentiative potential gave rise to progressively more restricted and differentiated classes of stem/progenitor cells, and finally differentiated marrow hematopoietic cells. The holy grail of hematopoietic stem cell biology became the purification of the stem cell and the clonal definition of this cell. Most recently, the long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) has been believed to be a lineage negative sca-1+C-kit+ Flk3- and CD150+ cell. However, a series of studies over the past 10 years has indicated that murine marrow stem cells continuously change phenotype with cell cycle passage. We present here studies using tritiated thymidine suicide and pyronin-Hoechst FACS separations indicating that the murine hematopoietic stem cell is a cycling cell. This would indicate that the hematopoietic stem cell must be continuously changing in phenotype and, thus, could not be purified. The extant data indicate that murine marrow stem cells are continually transiting cell cycle and that the purification has discarded these cycling cells. Further in vivo BrdU studies indicate that the “quiescent” LT-HSC in G0 rapidly transits cycle. Further complexity of the marrow stem cell system is indicated by studies on cell-derived microvesicles showing that they enter marrow cells and transcriptionally alter their cell fate and phenotype. Thus, the stem cell model is a model of continuing changing potential tied to cell cycle and

  9. Highly-purified exosomes and shed microvesicles isolated from the human colon cancer cell line LIM1863 by sequential centrifugal ultrafiltration are biochemically and functionally distinct.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Greening, David W; Rai, Alin; Ji, Hong; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    unambiguous protein identifications, respectively, with 256 proteins in common. A salient finding was the first report of 350 proteins uniquely identified in sMVs may of which have the potential to enable discrimination of this EV subtype from exosomes (notably, members of the septin family, kinesin-like protein (KIF23), exportin-2/chromosome segregation like-1 protein (CSE1L), and Rac GTPase-activating protein 1 (RACGAP1)). We report for the first time that both SCUF-Exos and SCUF-sMVs isolated from LIM1863 colon cancer cells induce invasion of recipient NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, the SCUF-sMVs promote invasion to a significantly greater extent (3-fold) than SCUF-Exos. This analytical SCUF method for fractionating EVs is potentially scalable using tangential flow filtration, thereby providing a solid foundation for future in-depth functional studies of EV subtypes using diverse cell types and functional assays. PMID:25890246

  10. Quantitation of HLA Class II Protein Incorporated into Human Immunodeficiency Type 1 Virions Purified by Anti-CD45 Immunoaffinity Depletion of Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Trubey, Charles M.; Chertova, Elena; Coren, Lori V.; Hilburn, Joanne M.; Hixson, Catherine V.; Nagashima, Kunio; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ott, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the many host cell-derived proteins found in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HLA class II (HLA-II) appears to be selectively incorporated onto virions and may contribute to mechanisms of indirect imunopathogenesis in HIV infection and AIDS. However, the amount of HLA-II on the surface of HIV-1 particles has not been reliably determined due to contamination of virus preparations by microvesicles containing host cell proteins, including HLA-II. Even rigorous sucrose density centrifugation is unable to completely separate HIV-1 from microvesicles. CD45, a leukocyte integral membrane protein, is found on microvesicles, yet appears to be excluded from HIV-1 particles. Exploiting this observation, we have developed a CD45-based immunoaffinity depletion method for removing CD45-containing microvesicles that yields highly purified preparations of virions. Examination of CD45-depleted HIV-1MN by high-pressure liquid chromatography, protein sequencing, and amino acid analyses determined a molar ratio of HLA-II to Gag of 0.04 to 0.05 in the purified virions, corresponding to an estimated average of 50 to 63 native HLA-II complexes (i.e., a dimer of α and β heterodimers) per virion. These values are approximately 5- to 10-fold lower than those previously determined for other virion preparations that contained microvesicles. Our observations demonstrate the utility of CD45 immunoaffinity-based approaches for producing highly purified retrovirus preparations for applications that would benefit from the use of virus that is essentially free of microvesicles. PMID:14610192

  11. Molecular pathways: tumor-derived microvesicles and their interactions with immune cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Pittet, Mikael J

    2013-05-15

    Cancer is not merely a cell-intrinsic genetic disease but also the result of complex cell-extrinsic interactions with host components, including immune cells. For example, effector T lymphocytes and natural killer cells are thought to participate in an immunosurveillance process, which eliminates neoplastic cells, whereas regulatory T lymphocytes and some myeloid cells, including macrophages, can create a milieu that prevents antitumor activity, supports tumor growth, and reduces survival of the host. Increasing evidence supports the notion that carcinoma cells communicate with immune cells directly, both within and away from the tumor stroma, and that this process fosters suppression of immunosurveillance and promotes tumor outgrowth. An important mode of communication between carcinoma cells and immune cells may involve tumor-derived microvesicles (tMV), also known as exosomes, ectosomes, or microparticles. These microvesicles carry lipids, proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs and travel short or long distances to deliver undegraded and undiluted material to other cells. Here, we consider the capacity of tMVs to control tumor-associated immune responses and highlight the known and unknown actions of tMVs in vivo. We also discuss why microvesicles may play a role in cancer diagnostics and prognostics and how they could be harnessed for anticancer therapy. PMID:23426276

  12. Role of Platelet-Derived Microvesicles As Crosstalk Mediators in Atherothrombosis and Future Pharmacology Targets: A Link between Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Badimon, Lina; Suades, Rosa; Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Padró, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Reports in the last decade have suggested that the role of platelets in atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications may be mediated, in part, by local secretion of platelet-derived microvesicles (pMVs), small cell blebs released during the platelet activation process. MVs are the most abundant cell-derived microvesicle subtype in the circulation. High concentrations of circulating MVs have been reported in patients with atherosclerosis, acute vascular syndromes, and/or diabetes mellitus, suggesting a potential correlation between the quantity of microvesicles and the clinical severity of the atherosclerotic disease. pMVs are considered to be biomarkers of disease but new information indicates that pMVs are also involved in signaling functions. pMVs evoke or promote haemostatic and inflammatory responses, neovascularization, cell survival, and apoptosis, processes involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. This review is focused on the complex cross-talk between platelet-derived microvesicles, inflammatory cells and vascular elements and their relevance in the development of the atherosclerotic disease and its clinical outcomes, providing an updated state-of-the art of pMV involvement in atherothrombosis and pMV potential use as therapeutic agent influencing cardiovascular biomedicine in the future.

  13. C-src Enriched Serum Microvesicles Are Generated in Malignant Plasma Cell Dyscrasia

    PubMed Central

    Zendrini, Andrea; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Caimi, Luigi; Ricotta, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are immunosecretory disorders that can lead to hematological malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM). MM accounts for 15% of all hematologic cancers, and those diagnosed with MM typically become severely ill and have a low life expectancy. Monoclonal immunoglobulin Free Light Chains (FLC) are present in the serum and urine of many patients with plasma cell diseases. The biological differences between monoclonal FLCs, produced under malignant or benign dyscrasias, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we show that endothelial and heart muscle cell lines internalize kappa and lambda FLCs. After internalization, FLCs are rerouted in the extracellular space via microvesicles and exosomes that can be re-internalized in contiguous cells. Only FLCs secreted from malignant B Lymphocytes were carried in Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src positive vesicles. In both MM and AL Amyloidosis patients we observed an increase in microvesicle and exosome production. Isolated serum vesicles from MM, AL Amyloidosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) patients contained FLCs. Furthermore MM and AL amyloidosis vesicles were strongly positive for Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src compared to MGUS and control patients. These are the first data implying that FLCs reroute via microvesicles in the blood stream, and also suggest a potential novel mechanism of c-src activation in plasma cell dyscrasia. PMID:23940647

  14. Measurement of microvesicle levels in human blood using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Wayne L

    2016-07-01

    Microvesicles are fragments of cells released when the cells are activated, injured, or apoptotic. Analysis of microvesicle levels in blood has the potential to shed new light on the pathophysiology of many diseases. Flow cytometry is currently the only method that can simultaneously separate true lipid microvesicles from other microparticles in blood, determine the cell of origin and other microvesicle characteristics, and handle large numbers of clinical samples with a reasonable effort, but expanded use of flow cytometric measurement of microvesicle levels as a clinical and research tool requires improved, standardized assays. The goal of this review is to aid investigators in applying current best practices to microvesicle measurements. First pre-analytical factors are evaluated and data summarized for anticoagulant effects, sample transport and centrifugation. Next flow cytometer optimization is reviewed including interference from background in buffers and reagents, accurate microvesicle counting, swarm interference, and other types of coincidence errors, size calibration, and detection limits using light scattering, impedance and fluorescence. Finally current progress on method standardization is discussed and a summary of current best practices provided. © 2016 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26606416

  15. Microvesicles provide a mechanism for intercellular communication by embryonic stem cells during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Laura M; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Cerione, Richard A; Antonyak, Marc A

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the inner cell mass (ICM) and the trophoblast layer of the blastocyst is known to occur, but its functional consequences on early developmental events is unclear. Here we demonstrate that embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from the ICM generate and shed microvesicles (MVs), a major class of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which influence trophoblast behaviour during the implantation process. The MV cargo proteins laminin and fibronectin interact with integrins along the surfaces of the trophoblasts, triggering the activation of two signalling kinases, JNK and FAK, and stimulating trophoblast migration. We further show that injecting MVs isolated from ES cells into blastocysts results in an increase in their implantation efficiency. Thus, these findings highlight a unique mechanism by which ES cells communicate with trophoblasts within the blastocyst to increase their ability to migrate into the uterus, thereby promoting one of the earliest and most important steps during pregnancy. PMID:27302045

  16. Microvesicles provide a mechanism for intercellular communication by embryonic stem cells during embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Desrochers, Laura M.; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Antonyak, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the inner cell mass (ICM) and the trophoblast layer of the blastocyst is known to occur, but its functional consequences on early developmental events is unclear. Here we demonstrate that embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from the ICM generate and shed microvesicles (MVs), a major class of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which influence trophoblast behaviour during the implantation process. The MV cargo proteins laminin and fibronectin interact with integrins along the surfaces of the trophoblasts, triggering the activation of two signalling kinases, JNK and FAK, and stimulating trophoblast migration. We further show that injecting MVs isolated from ES cells into blastocysts results in an increase in their implantation efficiency. Thus, these findings highlight a unique mechanism by which ES cells communicate with trophoblasts within the blastocyst to increase their ability to migrate into the uterus, thereby promoting one of the earliest and most important steps during pregnancy. PMID:27302045

  17. Resistin-induced stromal cell-derived factor-1 expression through Toll-like receptor 4 and activation of p38 MAPK/ NFκB signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) (CXC chemokine ligand-12)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is involved in the carcinogenesis of human gastric cancer, where it stimulates angiogenesis and favors metastasis of tumor cells to distant organs. In addition, resistin is suggested to be an important link between obesity and the development of gastric cancer. Resistin has identified as an important player in inflammatory responses, and emerged as a mediator in inflammation-associated cancer. A limited number of studies have investigated the association of resistin and SDF-1 with gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which resistin influences the expression of SDF-1 in gastric carcinoma cells. Results Human gastric cancer cell lines were exposed to doses of resistin; SDF-1 expression and secretion levels were then determined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analyses were performed to clarify molecular changes. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by a competitive antagonist inhibited resistin-induced SDF-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated that activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is critical for resistin-induced SDF-1 expression mediated by TLR4. The promoter activity and transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that resistin induced expression of SDF-1 mediated by NF-κB in gastric cancer cells. Inhibition of p38 MARK activation blocked the SDF-1-induced expression and the SDF-1 promoter activity in the cancer gastric cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that inhibition of p38 MARK activation also blocked the resistin-increased NF-κB-DNA-binding activity. Conclusions Resistin-induced SDF-1 upregulation by activation of TLR4, p38 MARK and NF-κB may explain a new role of resistin in the link of obesity and gastric cancer. PMID:24929539

  18. Lung tumor-associated dendritic cell-derived resistin promoted cancer progression by increasing Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1/Twist pathway.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hsin; Chen, Kuei-Fang; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Cheng, Da-En; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yang, Chih-Jen; Hung, Jen-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between tumors and their microenvironments leads to a vicious cycle, which strengthens both immune suppression and cancer progression. The present study demonstrates for the first time that tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs) are a source of resistin, which is responsible for increasing lung cancer epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, large amounts of resistin in the condition medium (CM) of TADCs increase cell migration and invasion, as well as the osteolytic bone metastatic properties of lung cancer cells. Neutralization of resistin from TADC-CM prevents the advanced malignancy-inducing features of TADC-CM. Significantly elevated levels of resistin have been observed in mice transplanted with lung cancer cells, tumor-infiltrating CD11c(+) DCs in human lung cancer samples and lung cancer patients' sera. Induction of lung cancer progression by TADC-derived resistin is associated with increased expression of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1), a histone methyltransferase. Resistin-induced WHSC1 increases the dimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 36 and decreases the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 on the promoter of Twist, resulting in an enhancement of the expression of Twist. Knockdown of WHSC1 by small interfering RNA transfection significantly decreases resistin-mediated cancer progression by decreasing the upregulation of Twist, suggesting that WHSC1 plays a critical role in the regulation of Twist by epigenetic modification. Furthermore, mice that received antiresistin antibodies showed a decreased incidence of cancer development and metastasis. These findings suggest that TADC-derived resistin may be a novel candidate in promoting the development of lung cancer. PMID:23955539

  19. Glioblastoma microvesicles promote endothelial cell proliferation through Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihai; Sun, Junfeng; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor cells release microvesicles, which contain mRNA, miRNA and angiogenic proteins. These tumor-derived microvesicles transfer genetic information and proteins to normal cells. Previous reports demonstrated that the increased microvesicles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with glioblastoma up-regulate procoagulant activity. The concentration of microvesicles was closely related to thromboembolism incidence and clinical therapeutic effects of glioblastoma patients. However, it is still not clear how CSF microvesicles and what factors affect glioblastoma development. In this study, we collected the plasma and CSF from glioblastoma patients and healthy volunteers. Microvesicles acquired from serum or CSF were added to cultured endothelial cells. And the effects of these microvesicles on endothelial cells were examined. Our results showed that microvesicles from CSF of patients, but not from circulating blood, promoted endothelial cells migration and proliferation in vitro. In addition, the degree of endothelial cell proliferation triggered by microvesicles from CSF was reduced when treated with siRNA targeting Akt/beta-catenin, suggesting that the Akt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the microvesicle-initiated endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioblastoma mainly affects microvesicles within CSF without showing significant impact on microvesicles in circulating blood. Microvesicles from the CSF of glioblastoma patients may initiate endothelial cell growth and thus promote cell invasion. This effect may be directly exerted by activated Akt/beta-catenin pathway. PMID:25197356

  20. Microvesicles preparation from mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Fariba; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Yari, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Saeed; Kheirandish, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles are particles ranged from 30 nm to 5μm and subcategorized into three groups; exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, each of which have different biological impact. Lack of a standard method for the detection and isolation of MVs has led to a challenging issue that is a worth considering. In this study, we isolated MVs from the conditioned medium of UC-MSCs by four different schemes of ultracentrifugation. Methods: We examined the efficacy of differential centrifugation ranging from 10,000×g to 60,000×g on UCMSCs- derived microvesicles yield and purity. The fractions were evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) method, total protein quantification and flow cytometry. Results: UC-MSCs were spindle cells that adhered to plastic culture flasks. These cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44 and CD73, whereas were negative for hematopoietic markers CD45 and CD34. UC-MSCparticles were successfully isolated. Particles were heterogeneous vesicles of approximately 50 to 1250 nm in diameter that bear the surface-expressed molecules UC-MSCs such as; CD90, CD106, CD166 and CD44, and negative for CD34, CD63, and CD9. According to the results of DLS method, centrifugation at 10,000, 20,000, 40,000 and 60,000 ×g, all gave MVs of less than 1000 nm. It is of notion that only at the centrifugation rates of 40,000 and 60,000×g, particles of less than 100 nm in diameter were also obtained. Conclusion: The choice of exact speed greatly influences the purity of MVs and their yield. Our findings indicate that centrifugation at 20,000×g is appropriate for the purification of UC-MSC-MVs. PMID:27579288

  1. Distinct functions of macrophage-derived and cancer cell-derived cathepsin Z combine to promote tumor malignancy via interactions with the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Leila; Gocheva, Vasilena; Kester, Jemila C.; Hunter, Karen E.; Quick, Marsha L.; Sevenich, Lisa; Wang, Hao-Wei; Peters, Christoph; Tang, Laura H.; Klimstra, David S.; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During the process of tumor progression, cancer cells can produce the requisite growth- and invasion-promoting factors and can also rely on noncancerous cells in the tumor microenvironment as an alternative, cell-extrinsic source. However, whether the cellular source influences the function of such tumor-promoting factors remains an open question. Here, we examined the roles of the cathepsin Z (CtsZ) protease, which is provided by both cancer cells and macrophages in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in humans and mice. We found that tumor proliferation was exclusively regulated by cancer cell-intrinsic functions of CtsZ, whereas tumor invasion required contributions from both macrophages and cancer cells. Interestingly, several of the tumor-promoting functions of CtsZ were not dependent on its described catalytic activity but instead were mediated via the Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) motif in the enzyme prodomain, which regulated interactions with integrins and the extracellular matrix. Together, these results underscore the complexity of interactions within the tumor microenvironment and indicate that cellular source can indeed impact molecular function. PMID:25274726

  2. Comparative regulation of gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cells derived from normal mammary tissue and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah G; Robilotto, Samantha; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Previous genomic profiling of immortalized, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells identified a set of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated genes with potential relevance to breast cancer prevention. In this report, we characterized the effect of 1,25D on a subset of these genes in six cell lines derived from mammary tissue and breast cancers. Non-tumorigenic cell lines included hTERT-HME1, HME and MCF10A cells which are often used to model normal breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines included MCF7 cells (a model of early stage, estrogen-dependent disease), DCIS.com cells (a derivative of MCF10A cells that models in situ breast cancer) and Hs578T cells (a model of metastatic disease). All of these cell lines express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and exhibit anti-cancer responses to 1,25D such as changes in proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, or invasion. Our comparative data demonstrate highly variable responses to 1,25D (100nM, 24h) between the cell lines. In both hTERT-HME1 and HME cell lines, CYP24A1, SLC1A1 and ITGB3 were up-regulated whereas KDR, GLUL and BIRC3 were down-regulated in response to 1,25D. In contrast, no changes in SLC1A1, ITGB3 or GLUL expression were detected in 1,25D treated MCF10A cells although KDR and BIRC3 were down-regulated by 1,25D. The effects of 1,25D on these genes in the breast cancer cell lines were blunted, with the DCIS.com cells exhibiting the most similar responses to the immortalized hTERT-HME1 and HME cells. The differences in cellular responses were not due to general impairment in VDR function as robust CYP24A1 induction was observed in all cell lines. Thus, our data indicate that the genomic changes induced by 1,25D are highly cell-type specific even in model cell lines derived from the same tissue. The implication of these findings is that genomic responses to changes in vitamin D status in vivo are likely to be distinct from individual to individual, particularly in neoplastic tissue. PMID

  3. Comparative regulation of gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cells derived from normal mammary tissue and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Sarah G; Robilotto, Samantha; Welsh, JoEllen

    2015-04-01

    Previous genomic profiling of immortalized, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells identified a set of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated genes with potential relevance to breast cancer prevention. In this report, we characterized the effect of 1,25D on a subset of these genes in six cell lines derived from mammary tissue and breast cancers. Non-tumorigenic cell lines included hTERT-HME1, HME and MCF10A cells which are often used to model normal breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines included MCF7 cells (a model of early stage, estrogen-dependent disease), DCIS.com cells (a derivative of MCF10A cells that models in situ breast cancer) and Hs578T cells (a model of metastatic disease). All of these cell lines express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and exhibit anti-cancer responses to 1,25D such as changes in proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, or invasion. Our comparative data demonstrate highly variable responses to 1,25D (100nM, 24h) between the cell lines. In both hTERT-HME1 and HME cell lines, CYP24A1, SLC1A1 and ITGB3 were up-regulated whereas KDR, GLUL and BIRC3 were down-regulated in response to 1,25D. In contrast, no changes in SLC1A1, ITGB3 or GLUL expression were detected in 1,25D treated MCF10A cells although KDR and BIRC3 were down-regulated by 1,25D. The effects of 1,25D on these genes in the breast cancer cell lines were blunted, with the DCIS.com cells exhibiting the most similar responses to the immortalized hTERT-HME1 and HME cells. The differences in cellular responses were not due to general impairment in VDR function as robust CYP24A1 induction was observed in all cell lines. Thus, our data indicate that the genomic changes induced by 1,25D are highly cell-type specific even in model cell lines derived from the same tissue. The implication of these findings is that genomic responses to changes in vitamin D status in vivo are likely to be distinct from individual to individual, particularly in neoplastic tissue. This

  4. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer. PMID:25977333

  5. May the remodeling of the Ca²⁺ toolkit in endothelial progenitor cells derived from cancer patients suggest alternative targets for anti-angiogenic treatment?

    PubMed

    Moccia, Francesco; Poletto, Valentina

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may be recruited from bone marrow to sustain the metastatic switch in a number of solid cancers, including breast cancer (BC) and renal cellular carcinoma (RCC). Preventing EPC mobilization causes tumor shrinkage. Novel anti-angiogenic treatments have been introduced in therapy to inhibit VEGFR-2 signaling; unfortunately, these drugs blocked tumor angiogenesis in pre-clinical murine models, but resulted far less effective in human patients. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EPC proliferation and tubulogenesis in cancer patients could outline novel targets for alternative anti-angiogenic treatments. Store-operated Ca²⁺ entry (SOCE) regulates the growth of human EPCs, and it is mediated by the interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-sensor, Stim1, and the plasmalemmal Ca²⁺ channels, Orai1 and TRPC1. EPCs do not belong to the neoplastic clone: thus, unlike tumor endothelium and neoplastic cells, they should not remodel their Ca²⁺ toolkit in response to tumor microenvironment. However, our recent work demonstrated that EPCs isolated from naïve RCC patients (RCC-EPCs) undergo a dramatic remodeling of their Ca²⁺ toolkit by displaying a remarkable drop in the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content, by down-regulating the expression of inositol-1,4,5-receptors (InsP3Rs), and by up-regulating Stim1, Orai1 and TRPC1. Moreover, EPCs are dramatically less sensitive to VEGF stimulation both in terms of Ca²⁺ signaling and of gene expression when isolated from tumor patients. Conversely, the pharmacological abolition of SOCE suppresses proliferation in these cells. These results question the suitability of VEGFR-2 as a therapeutically relevant target for anti-angiogenic treatments and hint at Orai1 and TRPC1 as more promising alternatives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:25447551

  6. Hybrid Cells Derived from Human Breast Cancer Cells and Human Breast Epithelial Cells Exhibit Differential TLR4 and TLR9 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Songül; Fried, Sabrina; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are important receptors of cells of the innate immune system since they recognize various structurally conserved molecular patterns of different pathogens as well as endogenous ligands. In cancer, the role of TLRs is still controversial due to findings that both regression and progression of tumors could depend on TLR signaling. In the present study, M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells, MDA-MB-435-Hyg human breast cancer cells and two hybrids M13MDA435-1 and -3 were investigated for TLR4 and TLR9 expression and signaling. RT-PCR data revealed that LPS and CpG-ODN induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in hybrid cells, but not parental cells. Interestingly, validation of RT-PCR data by Western blot showed detectable protein levels solely after LPS stimulation, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms are also controlled by TLR signaling. Analysis of pAKT and pERK1/2 levels upon LPS and CpG-ODN stimulation revealed a differential phosphorylation pattern in all cells. Finally, the migratory behavior of the cells was investigated showing that both LPS and CpG-ODN potently blocked the locomotory activity of the hybrid cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, hybrid cells exhibit differential TLR4 and TLR9 signaling. PMID:27187369

  7. Hybrid Cells Derived from Human Breast Cancer Cells and Human Breast Epithelial Cells Exhibit Differential TLR4 and TLR9 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Songül; Fried, Sabrina; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are important receptors of cells of the innate immune system since they recognize various structurally conserved molecular patterns of different pathogens as well as endogenous ligands. In cancer, the role of TLRs is still controversial due to findings that both regression and progression of tumors could depend on TLR signaling. In the present study, M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells, MDA-MB-435-Hyg human breast cancer cells and two hybrids M13MDA435-1 and -3 were investigated for TLR4 and TLR9 expression and signaling. RT-PCR data revealed that LPS and CpG-ODN induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in hybrid cells, but not parental cells. Interestingly, validation of RT-PCR data by Western blot showed detectable protein levels solely after LPS stimulation, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms are also controlled by TLR signaling. Analysis of pAKT and pERK1/2 levels upon LPS and CpG-ODN stimulation revealed a differential phosphorylation pattern in all cells. Finally, the migratory behavior of the cells was investigated showing that both LPS and CpG-ODN potently blocked the locomotory activity of the hybrid cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, hybrid cells exhibit differential TLR4 and TLR9 signaling. PMID:27187369

  8. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells transformed by tumor-derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting; Mizutani, Akifumi; Chen, Ling; Takaki, Mai; Hiramoto, Yuki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Kasai, Tomonari; Kudoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Masuda, Junko; Hendrix, Mary J C; Strizzi, Luigi; Salomon, David S; Fu, Li; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancer niche can perform an active role in the regulation of tumor cell maintenance and progression through extracellular vesicles-based intercellular communication. However, it has not been reported whether this vesicle-mediated communication affects the malignant transformation of normal stem cells/progenitors. We have previously reported that the conditioned medium derived from the mouse Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cell line can convert mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into cancer stem cells (CSCs), indicating that normal stem cells when placed in an aberrant microenvironment can give rise to functionally active CSCs. Here, we focused on the contribution of tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) that are secreted from LLC cells to induce the transformation of miPSCs into CSCs. We isolated tEVs from the conditioned medium of LLC cells, and then the differentiating miPSCs were exposed to tEVs for 4 weeks. The resultant tEV treated cells (miPS-LLCev) expressed Nanog and Oct3/4 proteins comparable to miPSCs. The frequency of sphere formation of the miPS-LLCev cells in suspension culture indicated that the self-renewal capacity of the miPS-LLCev cells was significant. When the miPS-LLCev cells were subcutaneously transplanted into Balb/c nude mice, malignant liposarcomas with extensive angiogenesis developed. miPS-LLCevPT and miPS-LLCevDT, the cells established from primary site and disseminated liposarcomas, respectively, showed their capacities to self-renew and differentiate into adipocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, we confirmed the secondary liposarcoma development when these cells were transplanted. Taken together, these results indicate that miPS-LLCev cells possess CSC properties. Thus, our current study provides the first evidence that tEVs have the potential to induce CSC properties in normal tissue stem cells/progenitors. PMID:25057308

  9. Characterization of Cancer Stem-Like Cells Derived from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Transformed by Tumor-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Mizutani, Akifumi; Chen, Ling; Takaki, Mai; Hiramoto, Yuki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Kasai, Tomonari; Kudoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Masuda, Junko; Hendrix, Mary J. C.; Strizzi, Luigi; Salomon, David S.; Fu, Li; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancer niche can perform an active role in the regulation of tumor cell maintenance and progression through extracellular vesicles-based intercellular communication. However, it has not been reported whether this vesicle-mediated communication affects the malignant transformation of normal stem cells/progenitors. We have previously reported that the conditioned medium derived from the mouse Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cell line can convert mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into cancer stem cells (CSCs), indicating that normal stem cells when placed in an aberrant microenvironment can give rise to functionally active CSCs. Here, we focused on the contribution of tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) that are secreted from LLC cells to induce the transformation of miPSCs into CSCs. We isolated tEVs from the conditioned medium of LLC cells, and then the differentiating miPSCs were exposed to tEVs for 4 weeks. The resultant tEV treated cells (miPS-LLCev) expressed Nanog and Oct3/4 proteins comparable to miPSCs. The frequency of sphere formation of the miPS-LLCev cells in suspension culture indicated that the self-renewal capacity of the miPS-LLCev cells was significant. When the miPS-LLCev cells were subcutaneously transplanted into Balb/c nude mice, malignant liposarcomas with extensive angiogenesis developed. miPS-LLCevPT and miPS-LLCevDT, the cells established from primary site and disseminated liposarcomas, respectively, showed their capacities to self-renew and differentiate into adipocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, we confirmed the secondary liposarcoma development when these cells were transplanted. Taken together, these results indicate that miPS-LLCev cells possess CSC properties. Thus, our current study provides the first evidence that tEVs have the potential to induce CSC properties in normal tissue stem cells/progenitors. PMID:25057308

  10. Characterization of cancer stem-like cells derived from a side population of a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-xing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Hao-lu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Xiao-bin; Li, Qi-wei; Chen, Yu-ying; Yi, Jing

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We sorted SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell lines, SGC-996. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells displayed higher proliferation and stronger clonal-generating capability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells showed more migratory and invasive abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP cells were more resistant and tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABCG2 might be a candidate as a marker for SP cells. -- Abstract: The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that CSCs, which can renew themselves proliferate infinitely, and escape chemotherapy, become the root of recurrence and metastasis. Previous studies have verified that side population (SP) cells, characterized by their ability to efflux lipophilic substrate Hoechst 33342, to share many characteristics of CSCs in multiplying solid tumors. The purpose of this study was to sort SP cells from a human gallbladder carcinoma cell line, SGC-996 and to preliminarily identify the biological characteristics of SP cells from the cell line. Using flow cytometry we effectively sorted SP cells from the cell line SGC-996. SP cells not only displayed higher proliferative, stronger clonal-generating, more migratory and more invasive capacities, but showed stronger resistance. Furthermore, our experiments demonstrated that SP cells were more tumorigenic than non-SP counterparts in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) was significantly higher in SP cells. Hence, these results collectively suggest that SP cells are progenitor/stem-like cells and ABCG2 might be a candidate marker for SP cells in human gallbladder cancer.

  11. Simplified protocol for flow cytometry analysis of fluorescently labeled exosomes and microvesicles using dedicated flow cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Pospichalova, Vendula; Svoboda, Jan; Dave, Zankruti; Kotrbova, Anna; Kaiser, Karol; Klemova, Dobromila; Ilkovics, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales; Crha, Igor; Jandakova, Eva; Minar, Lubos; Weinberger, Vit; Bryja, Vitezslav

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful method, which is widely used for high-throughput quantitative and qualitative analysis of cells. However, its straightforward applicability for extracellular vesicles (EVs) and mainly exosomes is hampered by several challenges, reflecting mostly the small size of these vesicles (exosomes: ~80–200 nm, microvesicles: ~200–1,000 nm), their polydispersity, and low refractive index. The current best and most widely used protocol for beads-free flow cytometry of exosomes uses ultracentrifugation (UC) coupled with floatation in sucrose gradient for their isolation, labeling with lipophilic dye PKH67 and antibodies, and an optimized version of commercial high-end cytometer for analysis. However, this approach requires an experienced flow cytometer operator capable of manual hardware adjustments and calibration of the cytometer. Here, we provide a novel and fast approach for quantification and characterization of both exosomes and microvesicles isolated from cell culture media as well as from more complex human samples (ascites of ovarian cancer patients) suitable for multiuser labs by using a flow cytometer especially designed for small particles, which can be used without adjustments prior to data acquisition. EVs can be fluorescently labeled with protein-(Carboxyfluoresceinsuccinimidyl ester, CFSE) and/or lipid- (FM) specific dyes, without the necessity of removing the unbound fluorescent dye by UC, which further facilitates and speeds up the characterization of microvesicles and exosomes using flow cytometry. In addition, double labeling with protein- and lipid-specific dyes enables separation of EVs from common contaminants of EV preparations, such as protein aggregates or micelles formed by unbound lipophilic styryl dyes, thus not leading to overestimation of EV numbers. Moreover, our protocol is compatible with antibody labeling using fluorescently conjugated primary antibodies. The presented methodology opens the possibility for

  12. Cavin-1/PTRF alters prostate cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicle content and internalization to attenuate extracellular vesicle-mediated osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Inder, Kerry L.; Ruelcke, Jayde E.; Petelin, Lara; Moon, Hyeongsun; Choi, Eunju; Rae, James; Blumenthal, Antje; Hutmacher, Dietmar; Saunders, Nicholas A.; Stow, Jennifer L.; Parton, Robert G.; Hill, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumour-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in tumour progression; however, the spectrum of molecular mechanisms regulating EV secretion and cargo selection remain to be fully elucidated. We have reported that cavin-1 expression in prostate cancer PC3 cells reduced the abundance of a subset of EV proteins, concomitant with reduced xenograft tumour growth and metastasis. Methods We examined the functional outcomes and mechanisms of cavin-1 expression on PC3-derived EVs (PC3-EVs). Results PC3-EVs were internalized by osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) in vitro, stimulating osteoclastogenesis 37-fold and hOB proliferation 1.5-fold, respectively. Strikin gly, EVs derived from cavin-1-expressing PC3 cells (cavin-1-PC3-EVs) failed to induce multinucleate osteoblasts or hOB proliferation. Cavin-1 was not detected in EVs, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. EV morphology, size and quantity were also not affected by cavin-1 expression, suggesting that cavin-1 modulated EV cargo recruitment rather than release. While cavin-1-EVs had no osteoclastogenic function, they were internalized by RAW264.7 cells but at a reduced efficiency compared to control EVs. EV surface proteins are required for internalization of PC3-EVs by RAW264.7 cells, as proteinase K treatment abolished uptake of both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs. Removal of sialic acid modifications by neuraminidase treatment increased the amount of control PC3-EVs internalized by RAW264.7 cells, without affecting cavin-1-PC3-EVs. This suggests that cavin-1 expression altered the glycosylation modifications on PC3-EV surface. Finally, cavin-1 expression did not affect EV in vivo tissue targeting as both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs were predominantly retained in the lung and bone 24 hours after injection into mice. Discussion Taken together, our results reveal a novel pathway for EV cargo sorting, and highlight the potential of utilizing cavin-1-mediated

  13. The Immunomodulatory Role of Syncytiotrophoblast Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Southcombe, Jennifer; Tannetta, Dionne; Redman, Christopher; Sargent, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Immune adaptation is a critical component of successful pregnancy. Of primary importance is the modification of cytokine production upon immune activation. With the discovery that normal pregnancy itself is a pro-inflammatory state, it was recognised that the classical Th1/Th2 cytokine paradigm, with a shift towards ‘type 2’ cytokine production (important for antibody production), and away from ‘type 1’ immunity (associated with cell mediated immunity and graft rejection), is too simplistic. It is now generally agreed that both arms of cytokine immunity are activated, but with a bias towards ‘type 2’ immunity. Many factors are released from the placenta that can influence the maternal cytokine balance. Here we focus on syncytiotrophoblast microvesicles (STBM) which are shed from the placenta into the maternal circulation. We show that STBM can bind to monocytes and B cells and induce cytokine release (TNFα, MIP-1α, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8). Other cytokines are down-modulated, such as IP-10 which is associated with ‘type 1’ immunity. Therefore STBM may aid the ‘type 2’ skewed nature of normal pregnancy. We also observed that PBMC from third trimester normal pregnant women produce more TNFα and IL-6 in response to STBM than PBMC from non-pregnant women, confirming that maternal immune cells are primed by pregnancy, possibly through their interaction with STBM. PMID:21633494

  14. Smart blood cell and microvesicle-based Trojan horse drug delivery: Merging expertise in blood transfusion and biomedical engineering in the field of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wen; Goubran, Hadi; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of nanomedicine are playing increasingly important roles in human health. Various types of synthetic nanoparticles, including liposomes, micelles, and other nanotherapeutic platforms and conjugates, are being engineered to encapsulate or carry drugs for treating diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, neurodegeneration, and inflammations. Nanocarriers are designed to increase the half-life of drugs, decrease their toxicity and, ideally, target pathological sites. Developing smart carriers with the capacity to deliver drugs specifically to the microenvironment of diseased cells with minimum systemic toxicity is the goal. Blood cells, and potentially also the liposome-like micro- and nano-vesicles they generate, may be regarded as ideally suited to perform such specific targeting with minimum immunogenic risks. Blood cell membranes are "decorated" with complex physiological receptors capable of targeting and communicating with other cells and tissues and delivering their content to the surrounding pathological microenvironment. Blood cells, such as erythrocytes, have been developed as permeable carriers to release drugs to diseased tissues or act as biofactory allowing enzymatic degradation of a pathological substrate. Interestingly, attempts are also being made to improve the targeting capacity of synthetic nanoparticles by "decorating" their surface with blood cell membrane receptor-like biochemical structures. Research is needed to further explore the benefits that blood cell-derived microvesicles, as a Trojan horse delivery systems, can bring to the arsenal of therapeutic micro- and nanotechnologies. This short review focuses on the therapeutic roles that red blood cells and platelets can play as smart drug-delivery systems, and highlights the benefits that blood transfusion expertise can bring to this exciting and novel biomedical engineering field. PMID:27179926

  15. Circulating membrane-derived microvesicles in redox biology.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael Craig; Hillery, Cheryl A; Hogg, Neil

    2014-08-01

    Microparticles or microvesicles (MVs) are subcellular membrane blebs shed from all cells in response to various stimuli. MVs carry a battery of signaling molecules, many of them related to redox-regulated processes. The role of MVs, either as a cause or as a result of cellular redox signaling, has been increasingly recognized over the past decade. This is in part due to advances in flow cytometry and its detection of MVs. Notably, recent studies have shown that circulating MVs from platelets and endothelial cells drive reactive species-dependent angiogenesis; circulating MVs in cancer alter the microenvironment and enhance invasion through horizontal transfer of mutated proteins and nucleic acids and harbor redox-regulated matrix metalloproteinases and procoagulative surface molecules; and circulating MVs from red blood cells and other cells modulate cell-cell interactions through scavenging or production of nitric oxide and other free radicals. Although our recognition of MVs in redox-related processes is growing, especially in the vascular biology field, much remains unknown regarding the various biologic and pathologic functions of MVs. Like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, MVs were originally believed to have a solely pathological role in biology. And like our understanding of reactive species, it is now clear that MVs also play an important role in normal growth, development, and homeostasis. We are just beginning to understand how MVs are involved in various biological processes-developmental, homeostatic, and pathological-and the role of MVs in redox signaling is a rich and exciting area of investigation. PMID:24751526

  16. Circulating Membrane-Derived Microvesicles in Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael Craig; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Hogg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles or microvesicles (MV) are sub-cellular membrane blebs shed from all cells in response to various stimuli. MVs carry a battery of signaling molecules, many of them related to redox-regulated processes. The role of MVs, either as a cause or result of cellular redox signaling has been increasingly recognized over the past decade. This is in part due to advances in flow cytometry and its detection of MVs. Notably, recent studies have shown circulating MVs from platelets and endothelial cells drive reactive species-dependent angiogenesis; circulating MVs in cancer alter the microenvironment and enhance invasion through horizontal transfer of mutated proteins and nucleic acids, and harbor redox-regulated matrix metalloproteinases and pro-coagulative surface molecules; and circulating MVs from RBCs and other cells modulate cell-cell interactions through scavenging or production of nitric oxide and other free radicals. While our recognition of MVs in redox-related processes is growing, especially in the vascular biology field, much remains unknown regarding the various biologic and pathologic functions of MVs. Like reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, MVs were originally believed to have a solely a pathological role in biology. And like our understanding of reactive species, it is now clear that MVs also play an important role in normal growth, development, and homeostasis. We are just beginning to understand how MVs are involved in various biological processes—developmental, homeostatic and pathological—and the role of MVs in redox signaling is an rich and exciting area of investigation. PMID:24751526

  17. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  18. Cell-derived microparticles and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Dario; Neri, Tommaso; Petrini, Silvia; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Cell-derived microparticles are small (0.1-1 μm) vesicles shed by most eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microparticles carry on their surface, and enclose within their cytoplasm, molecules derived from the parental cell, including proteins, DNA, RNA, microRNA and phospholipids. Microparticles are now considered functional units that represent a disseminated storage pool of bioactive effectors and participate both in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diseases. The mechanisms involved in microparticle generation include intracellular calcium mobilisation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, kinase phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear factor-κB. The role of microparticles in blood coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation, is well established in in vitro and animal models. The role of microparticles in human pulmonary diseases, both as pathogenic determinants and biomarkers, is being actively investigated. Microparticles of endothelial origin, suggestive of apoptosis, have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of patients with emphysema, lending support to the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a link with cardiovascular comorbidities. Microparticles also have potential roles in patients with asthma, diffuse parenchymal lung disease, thromboembolism, lung cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27581826

  19. Protein typing of circulating microvesicles allows real-time monitoring of glioblastoma therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Balaj, Leonora; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2013-03-01

    Glioblastomas shed large quantities of small, membrane-bound microvesicles (MVs) into the circulation. While these hold promise as potential biomarkers of therapeutic response, there remain hurdles to their identification and quantitation. Here, we describe a highly sensitive and rapid analytical technique for profiling circulating MVs directly from blood samples of glioblastoma patients. MVs, introduced onto a dedicated microfluidic chip, are labeled with target-specific magnetic nanoparticles and detected by a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance system. Compared with current standard assays (e.g., Western blotting, ELISA and flow cytometry), this integrated system has a much higher detection sensitivity, and can differentiate glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) MVs from non-tumor host cell-derived MVs. The system further showed that circulating GBM MVs could serve as a surrogate for primary tumor by reflecting its molecular signature and a predictor of treatment-induced changes. We expect that this converging nanotechnology platform would have a wide range of applications, providing both an earlier indicator of drug efficacy and a potential molecular stratifier for human clinical trials.

  20. Microvesicles as a potential biomarker of neoplastic diseases and their role in development and progression of neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kajdos, Magdalena; Janas, Łukasz; Kolasa-Zwierzchowska, Dorota; Wilczyński, Jacek R.

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic diseases together with cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of death in the Polish population. Cancers of reproductive organs with breast cancer are responsible for the highest morbidity and mortality in women suffering from neoplasm diseases. Asymptomatic dynamics of the development of a neoplasm and no deviations from the normal level of laboratory results contribute to the fact that malignant diseases are diagnosed too late. The aim of modern medicine is to diagnose cancer at the earliest stage, however, there is no sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker which can be used for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Cellular interactions play the main role in the development, angiogenesis and invasiveness of a tumor. Recent research suggests the possibility of microvesicles (MVs) involvement in communication between cells. The MVs ability to fuse with various cells is used in cell-to-cell contact. Microvesicles cargo may include growth factors, their receptors, protease, adhesion molecules, signaling molecules and the sequence of DNA, mRNA, and micro-RNA. Larger quantities of MVs released from neoplastic cells affect both the local environment and systematic range causing metastases and progression. The research on molecular mechanisms of MVs’ release and the presence of characteristic oncogenes in blood of patients with neoplasms is being carried out. Confirmation of MVs presence in patients’ serum can potentially serve as useful information for therapeutic purposes and as the biomarker of a neoplastic disease. PMID:26848301

  1. Isolation and identification of histone H3 protein enriched in microvesicles secreted from cultured sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ayako; Sato, Takashi; Akimoto, Noriko; Ito, Akira; Sumida, Michihiro

    2005-06-01

    Secretion of microvesicles, defined as sebosomes, containing lipid particles were discovered for the first time in cultured sebocytes. After reaching confluency, hamster-cloned sebocytes released bubble-like microvesicles with a diameter range of 0.5-5.0 microm. They had a complex structure containing multiple Oil Red O-stainable particles. The lipid components of the microvesicles were large amounts of squalene both of hamster-cloned and rat primary cultured sebocytes. The microvesicles contained a concentrated 17-kDa cationic protein, which was soluble in sulfate buffer including Nonidet P-40 at pH 1.5. As the protein bound tightly to heparin-Sepharose and eluted with 1.5 M NaCl, it was further purified from a SDS-PAGE gel. Peptide sequencing identified the protein to be histone H3. Polyclonal antibodies against the purified protein detected the antigen in the microvesicles both in the hamster-cloned and rat primary cultured sebocytes. The antibodies demonstrated a distribution of the protein within the nucleus, cytoplasm, and precursor microvesicles. When a gene construct encoding histone H3-enhanced green fluorescent protein was transfected to the sebocytes, fluorescence of the fusion proteins was detected within both the nucleus and the precursor microvesicles of the cytoplasm. The distribution of heparan sulfate was evident in the microvesicles, and it suggested the possibility that the histone H3 protein was recruited and then condensed to the secreted microvesicles by the molecules. In addition, the 14-3-3 protein, which was detected in the microvesicles, also may help incorporate the histone H3 protein in the microvesicles because it can bind to both histone and lipid particles. PMID:15746254

  2. Isolated microvesicles from peripheral blood and body fluids as observed by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mrvar-Brecko, Anita; Sustar, Vid; Jansa, Vid; Stukelj, Roman; Jansa, Rado; Mujagić, Emir; Kruljc, Peter; Iglic, Ales; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika

    2010-04-15

    Microvesicles are sub-micron structures shed from the cell membrane in a final step of the budding process. After being released into the microenvironment they are free to move and carry signaling molecules to distant cells, thereby they represent a communication system within the body. Since all cells shed microvesicles, it can be expected that they will be found in different body fluids. The potential diagnostic value of microvesicles has been suggested, however, a standardized protocol for isolation has not yet been agreed upon. It is unclear what is the content of the isolates and whether the isolated microvesicles were present in vivo or-have they been created within the isolation procedure. To present evidence in this direction, in this work we focus on the visualization of the material obtained by the microvesicle isolation procedure. We present scanning electronic microscope images of microvesicles isolated from blood, ascites, pleural fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, postoperative drainage fluid and chyloid fluid acquired from human and animal patients. Vesicular structures sized from 1microm downto 50nm are present in isolates of all considered body fluids, however, the populations differ in size and shape reflecting also the composition of the corresponding sediments. Isolates of microvesicles contain numerous cells which indicates that methods of isolation and determination of the number of microvesicles in the peripheral blood are to be elaborated and improved. PMID:20199878

  3. Microvesicles: Isolation, Characterization for In Vitro and In Vivo Procedures.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Karmele; Lecanda, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles and exosomes are released to the extracellular milieu and are detectable in body fluids. They act as unique vehicles for cargo transfer to other cells/tissues. They contain a set of membrane receptors, intracellular proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we describe basic techniques for their isolation and characterization from cell culture media or body fluids. We also describe critical techniques for characterizing their cargo (miRNAs) and their protein content. Finally, we present labeling methods for their use in in vitro procedures and for their in vivo delivery and subsequent analysis of their cargo transfer to multiple cell types. PMID:26530924

  4. Exosomes as Biomarker Enriched Microvesicles: Characterization of Exosomal Proteins Derived from a Panel of Prostate Cell Lines with Distinct AR Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Pham, Steven; Adomat, Hans; Li, Na; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading type of cancer diagnosed in men. In 2010, ∼217,730 new cases of prostate cancer were reported in the United States. Prompt diagnosis of the disease can substantially improve its clinical outcome. Improving capability for early detection, as well as developing new therapeutic targets in advanced disease are research priorities that will ultimately lead to better patient survival. Eukaryotic cells secrete proteins via distinct regulated mechanisms which are either ER/Golgi dependent or microvesicle mediated. The release of microvesicles has been shown to provide a novel mechanism for intercellular communication. Exosomes are nanometer sized cup-shaped membrane vesicles which are secreted from normal and cancerous cells. They are present in various biological fluids and are rich in characteristic proteins. Exosomes may thus have potential both in facilitating early diagnosis via less invasive procedures or be candidates for novel therapeutic approaches for castration resistance prostate cancer. Because exosomes have been shown previously to have a role in cell-cell communication in the local tumor microenvironment, conferring activation of numerous survival mechanisms, we characterized constitutive lipids, cholesterol and proteins from exosomes derived from six prostate cell lines and tracked their uptake in both cancerous and benign prostate cell lines respectively. Our comprehensive proteomic and lipidomic analysis of prostate derived exosomes could provide insight for future work on both biomarker and therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22723089

  5. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  6. Microvesicles shed by oligodendroglioma cells and rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts contain aggrecanase activity.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Majkowska, Iwona; Nagase, Hideaki; Di Liegro, Italia; Troeberg, Linda

    2012-05-01

    Membrane microvesicle shedding is an active process and occurs in viable cells with no signs of apoptosis or necrosis. We report here that microvesicles shed by oligodendroglioma cells contain an 'aggrecanase' activity, cleaving aggrecan at sites previously identified as targets for adamalysin metalloproteinases with disintegrin and thrombospondin domains (ADAMTSs). Degradation was inhibited by EDTA, the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 and by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-3, but not by TIMP-1 or TIMP-2. This inhibitor profile indicates that the shed microvesicles contain aggrecanolytic ADAMTS(s) or related TIMP-3-sensitive metalloproteinase(s). The oligodendroglioma cells were shown to express the three most active aggrecanases, namely Adamts1, Adamts4 and Adamts5, suggesting that one or more of these enzymes may be responsible for the microvesicle activity. Microvesicles shed by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts similarly degraded aggrecan in a TIMP-3-sensitive manner. Our findings raise the novel possibility that microvesicles may assist oligodendroglioma and rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts to invade through aggrecan-rich extracellular matrices. PMID:22406378

  7. Isolation of bovine milk-derived microvesicles carrying mRNAs and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hata, Taketoshi; Murakami, Kosuke; Nakatani, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasunari; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Aoki, Naohito

    2010-05-28

    By a series of centrifugation and ultracentrifugation, we could isolate microvesicles with approximately 100 nm in diameter from bovine milk. We also found that approximately 1700 and 1000 ng of total RNA, in which small RNAs were major components, was contained inside the microvesicles isolated from 6 ml of colostrum and mature milk, respectively, despite high RNase activity in the milk. Polyadenylated gene transcripts for major milk proteins and translation elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha) were present in the microvesicles, and integrity of some transcripts was confirmed by real-time PCR targeting 5'- and 3'-ends of mRNA and by in vitro translation analysis. Moreover, a considerable amount of mammary gland and immune-related microRNAs were present in the milk-derived microvesicles. Acidification of milk to mimic gastrointestinal tract did not mostly affected RNA yield and quality. The milk related gene transcripts were detected in cultured cells when incubated with milk-derived microvesicles, suggesting cellular uptake of the microvesicle contents including RNA. Our findings suggest that bovine breast milk contains RNAs capable for being transferred to living cells and involved in the development of calf's gastrointestinal and immune systems. PMID:20434431

  8. Chitosan-coated microvesicles: Effect of polysaccharide-phospholipid affinity on decafluorobutane dissolution.

    PubMed

    Picheth, Guilherme F; Pirich, Cleverton L; Dos Santos, Larissa A; Camarozano, Ana C; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Ocampos, Fernanda M; Barison, Andersson; Kaminski, Gabriel A; Pontarolo, Roberto; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    The stability of perfluorinated microvesicles is mainly determined by the presence of interfacial materials and their ability to hinder the gas component diffusibility into the bloodstream. The goal of this study is to increase the persistence of the gaseous-core by introducing chitosan-coated 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) microvesicles, reducing gas diffusion from microvesicles, and increasing for a long time ultrasonic signals. Our hypothesis was based on the irreversible adhesion of chitosan towards DSPC head groups observed in thin-films models. This affinity enhanced the stabilization of gaseous-core microvesicles, in which the polysaccharide effectively reduced the phospholipid phase transition enthalpy from 383±5.5Jmg(-1) for plain to 150±9.7Jmg(-1) for chitosan-coated microvesicles, providing a more stable structure that diminished the gaseous component lost and provided the persistence of intense (19)F-NMR signals after 48h, twice as long compared to plain samples. As a result, stronger and long-lasting ultrasonic signals were produced by the more stable chitosan-containing microvesicles, thus, presenting great potential to increase the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of perfluorocarbon carries. PMID:27561484

  9. The Impact of Lipoprotein-Associated Oxidative Stress on Cell-Specific Microvesicle Release in Patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, M. H.; Irvine, H.; Vedel, S.; Raungaard, B.; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Handberg, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Microvesicles (MVs) are small cell-derived particles shed upon activation. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) particularly when associated with Achilles tendon xanthomas (ATX) predisposes to atherosclerosis, possibly through oxLDL-C interaction with the CD36 receptor. To investigate the hypothesis that MVs derived from cells involved in atherosclerosis are increased in FH and that CD36 expressing MVs (CD36+ MVs) may be markers of oxLDL-C-induced cell activation, cell-specific MVs were measured in FH patients with and without ATX and their association with atherogenic lipid profile was studied. Approach and Results. Thirty FH patients with and without ATX and twenty-three controls were included. Plasma concentrations of MVs and CD36+ MVs derived from platelets (PMVs), erythrocytes (ErytMVs), monocytes (MMVs), and endothelial cells (EMVs), as well as tissue factor-positive cells (TF+ MVs), were measured by flow cytometry. Total MVs, MMVs, EMVs, ErytMVs, and TF+ MVs were significantly increased in FH patients, compared to controls. CD36+ MVs derived from endothelial cells and monocytes were significantly higher in FH patients and oxLDL-C predicted all the investigated cell-specific CD36+ MVs in FH patients with ATX. Conclusions. MVs derived from cells involved in atherosclerosis were increased in FH and may contribute to elevated atherothrombosis risk. The increased cell-specific CD36+ MVs observed in FH may represent markers of oxLDL-C-induced cell activation. PMID:26925191

  10. Development of an angiogenesis-promoting microvesicle-alginate-polycaprolactone composite graft for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Liming; Lei, Qian; Zhao, Aiqi; Wang, Hongxiang; Li, Qiubai; Chen, Zhichao; Zhang, WenJie

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges of bone tissue engineering applications is to construct a fully vascularized implant that can adapt to hypoxic environments in vivo. The incorporation of proangiogenic factors into scaffolds is a widely accepted method of achieving this goal. Recently, the proangiogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs) has been confirmed in several studies. In the present study, we incorporated MSC-MVs into alginate-polycaprolactone (PCL) constructs that had previously been developed for bone tissue engineering applications, with the aim of promoting angiogenesis and bone regeneration. MSC-MVs were first isolated from the supernatant of rat bone marrow-derived MSCs and characterized by scanning electron microscopic, confocal microscopic, and flow cytometric analyses. The proangiogenic potential of MSC-MVs was demonstrated by the stimulation of tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. MSC-MVs and osteodifferentiated MSCs were then encapsulated with alginate and seeded onto porous three-dimensional printed PCL scaffolds. When combined with osteodifferentiated MSCs, the MV-alginate-PCL constructs enhanced vessel formation and tissue-engineered bone regeneration in a nude mouse subcutaneous bone formation model, as demonstrated by micro-computed tomographic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses. This MV-alginate-PCL construct may offer a novel, proangiogenic, and cost-effective option for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27231660

  11. Development of an angiogenesis-promoting microvesicle-alginate-polycaprolactone composite graft for bone tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Lei, Qian; Zhao, Aiqi; Wang, Hongxiang; Li, Qiubai

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges of bone tissue engineering applications is to construct a fully vascularized implant that can adapt to hypoxic environments in vivo. The incorporation of proangiogenic factors into scaffolds is a widely accepted method of achieving this goal. Recently, the proangiogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs) has been confirmed in several studies. In the present study, we incorporated MSC-MVs into alginate-polycaprolactone (PCL) constructs that had previously been developed for bone tissue engineering applications, with the aim of promoting angiogenesis and bone regeneration. MSC-MVs were first isolated from the supernatant of rat bone marrow-derived MSCs and characterized by scanning electron microscopic, confocal microscopic, and flow cytometric analyses. The proangiogenic potential of MSC-MVs was demonstrated by the stimulation of tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. MSC-MVs and osteodifferentiated MSCs were then encapsulated with alginate and seeded onto porous three-dimensional printed PCL scaffolds. When combined with osteodifferentiated MSCs, the MV-alginate-PCL constructs enhanced vessel formation and tissue-engineered bone regeneration in a nude mouse subcutaneous bone formation model, as demonstrated by micro-computed tomographic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses. This MV-alginate-PCL construct may offer a novel, proangiogenic, and cost-effective option for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27231660

  12. Urinary extracellular microvesicles: isolation methods and prospects for urinary proteome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danqi; Sun, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Extracellular microvesicles (EVs) are membranous vesicles, which are released from diverse cells. These EVs have also been found in a wide range of body fluids. The cargo of EVs, including proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, can be stably preserved in EVs. Researchers have found that EVs can mediate intercellular communication by shuttling the cargo components. Therefore, EVs can be used for the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. As one class of EVs, urinary exosomes can reflect the status of the renal system. Moreover, urinary exosome analysis can minimize the interference of high abundant proteins in the whole urine sample. Therefore, urinary exosomes have gained much attention in recent years. In this review, we present a comprehensive summary of urinary exosome studies in recent years, including collection, storage, and isolation methods. The normal and disease proteomic analyses of urinary exosomes are also presented. Thus, this review may provide a valuable reference for future research. PMID:24962155

  13. Microvesicle-mediated Transfer of MicroRNA-150 from Monocytes to Endothelial Cells Promotes Angiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Yujing; Liu, Yuchen; Dai, Xin; Li, Wenyang; Cai, Xing; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Qiang; Xue, Yunxing; Wang, Cheng; Li, Dameng; Hou, Dongxia; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies by our group and others show that microRNAs can be actively secreted into the extracellular environment through microvesicles (MVs) and function as secretory signaling molecules that influence the recipient cell phenotypes. Here we investigate the role of monocyte-secreted miR-150 in promoting the capillary tube formation of endothelial cells and in enhancing angiogenesis. In vitro capillary tube formation and in vivo angiogenesis assays showed that monocyte-derived MVs have strong pro-angiogenic activities. By depleting miR-150 from monocytic MVs and increasing miR-150 in MVs derived from cells that normally contain low levels of miR-150, we further demonstrated that the miR-150 content accounted for the pro-angiogenic activity of monocytic MVs in these assays. Using tumor-implanted mice and ob/ob mice as models, we revealed that miR-150 secretion, which is increased for diseases such as cancers and diabetes, significantly promotes angiogenesis. The delivery of anti-miR-150 antisense oligonucleotides into tumor-implanted mice and ob/ob mice via MVs, however, strongly reduced angiogenesis in both types of mice. Our results collectively demonstrate that secretion of miR-150 via MVs can promote angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and we also present a novel microRNA-based therapeutic approach for disease treatment. PMID:23766514

  14. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially interact with both primary

  15. Comparison of three methods for isolation of urinary microvesicles to identify biomarkers of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Merchant, Michael L; Tamboer, Wim P M; Wilkey, Daniel W; Wetzels, Jack F M; Klein, Jon B

    2010-10-01

    Urinary microvesicles, such as 40-100 nm exosomes and 100-1000 nm microparticles, contain many proteins that may serve as biomarkers of renal disease. Microvesicles have been isolated by ultracentrifugation or nanomembrane ultrafiltration from normal urine; however, little is known about the efficiency of these methods in isolating microvesicles from patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria. Here we compared three techniques to isolate microvesicles from nephrotic urine: nanomembrane ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, and ultracentrifugation followed by size-exclusion chromatography (UC-SEC). Highly abundant urinary proteins were still present in sufficient quantity after ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation to blunt detection of less abundant microvesicular proteins by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The microvesicular markers neprilysin, aquaporin-2, and podocalyxin were highly enriched following UC-SEC compared with preparations by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation alone. Electron microscopy of the UC-SEC fractions found microvesicles of varying size, compatible with the presence of both exosomes and microparticles. Thus, UC-SEC following ultracentrifugation to further enrich and purify microparticles facilitates the search for prognostic biomarkers that might be used to predict the clinical course of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:20686450

  16. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  17. Microvesicles at the crossroads between infection and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jing; Miller, Virginia M.; Li, Yunman; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2011-01-01

    Observational and experimental studies continue to support the association of infection and infection-stimulated inflammation with development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) including atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Microvesicles (MV) are heterogeneous populations of sealed membrane-derived vesicles shed into circulation by activated mammalian cells and/or pathogenic microbes that may represent an interface between bacterial/microbial infection and increased risk of CVD. This review evaluates how MV act to modulate and intersect immunological and inflammatory responses to infection with particular attention to progression of CVD. While infection-related stimuli provoke release of MV from blood and vascular cells, MV express phosphatidylserine (PS) and other procoagulant factors on their surface which initiate and amplify blood coagulation. In addition, MV mediate cell-cell adhesion which may stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vascular cells, which in turn aggravate progression of CVD and propagate atherothrombosis. MV transfer membrane receptors, RNA and proteins among cells, and present auto-antigens from their cells of origin to proximal or remote target cells. Because MV harbor cell surface proteins and contain cytoplasmic components of the parent cell, they mediate biological messages and play a pivotal role in the crossroad between infection-stimulated inflammation and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21242813

  18. Microvesicles as cell-cell messengers in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Xavier; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Tedgui, Alain; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2014-01-17

    Cell-cell communication has proven to be even more complex than previously thought since the discovery that extracellular vesicles serve as containers of biological information on various pathophysiological settings. Extracellular vesicles are classified into exosomes, microvesicles/microparticles, or apoptotic bodies, originating from different subcellular compartments. The cellular machinery controlling their formation and composition, as well as the mechanisms regulating their extracellular release, remain unfortunately much unknown. Extracellular vesicles have been found in plasma, urine, saliva, and inflammatory tissues. Their biomarker potential has raised significant interest in the cardiovascular field because the vesicle composition and microRNA content are specific signatures of cellular activation and injury. More than simply cell dust, extracellular vesicles are capable of transferring biological information to neighboring cells and play an active role in inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. The molecular interactions regulating these effects involve specific receptor activation, proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species, or delivery of genetic information to target cells. Unraveling their mechanisms of action will likely open new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24436430

  19. Microvesicles and exosomes: new players in metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Charlotte; Vicencio, Jose M; Yellon, Derek M; Davidson, Sean M

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed an exponential increase in the number of publications referring to extracellular vesicles (EVs). For many years considered to be extracellular debris, EVs are now seen as novel mediators of endocrine signalling via cell-to-cell communication. With the capability of transferring proteins and nucleic acids from one cell to another, they have become an attractive focus of research for different pathological settings and are now regarded as both mediators and biomarkers of disease including cardio-metabolic disease. They also offer therapeutic potential as signalling agents capable of targeting tissues or cells with specific peptides or miRNAs. In this review, we focus on the role that microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes, the two most studied classes of EV, have in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction, coagulopathies, and polycystic ovary syndrome. We also provide an overview of current developments in MV/exosome isolation techniques from plasma and other fluids, comparing different available commercial and non-commercial methods. We describe different techniques for their optical/biochemical characterization and quantitation. We also review the signalling pathways that exosomes and MVs activate in target cells and provide some insight into their use as biomarkers or potential therapeutic agents. In summary, we give an updated focus on the role that these exciting novel nanoparticles offer for the endocrine community. PMID:26743452

  20. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance C.; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  1. Microvesicles/exosomes as potential novel biomarkers of metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers are of tremendous importance for the prediction, diagnosis, and observation of the therapeutic success of common complex multifactorial metabolic diseases, such as type II diabetes and obesity. However, the predictive power of the traditional biomarkers used (eg, plasma metabolites and cytokines, body parameters) is apparently not sufficient for reliable monitoring of stage-dependent pathogenesis starting with the healthy state via its initiation and development to the established disease and further progression to late clinical outcomes. Moreover, the elucidation of putative considerable differences in the underlying pathogenetic pathways (eg, related to cellular/tissue origin, epigenetic and environmental effects) within the patient population and, consequently, the differentiation between individual options for disease prevention and therapy – hallmarks of personalized medicine – plays only a minor role in the traditional biomarker concept of metabolic diseases. In contrast, multidimensional and interdependent patterns of genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic markers presumably will add a novel quality to predictive values, provided they can be followed routinely along the complete individual disease pathway with sufficient precision. These requirements may be fulfilled by small membrane vesicles, which are so-called exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) that are released via two distinct molecular mechanisms from a wide variety of tissue and blood cells into the circulation in response to normal and stress/pathogenic conditions and are equipped with a multitude of transmembrane, soluble and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, mRNAs, and microRNAs. Based on the currently available data, EMVs seem to reflect the diverse functional and dysfunctional states of the releasing cells and tissues along the complete individual pathogenetic pathways underlying metabolic diseases. A critical step in further validation of EMVs as biomarkers will rely on

  2. Elevated levels of procoagulant plasma microvesicles in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Burton, James O; Hamali, Hassan A; Singh, Ruchir; Abbasian, Nima; Parsons, Ruth; Patel, Amit K; Goodall, Alison H; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) death remains the largest cause of mortality in dialysis patients, unexplained by traditional risk factors. Endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) are elevated in patients with traditional CV risk factors and acute coronary syndromes while platelet MVs (PMVs) are associated with atherosclerotic disease states. This study compared relative concentrations of circulating MVs from endothelial cells and platelets in two groups of dialysis patients and matched controls and investigated their relative thromboembolic risk. MVs were isolated from the blood of 20 haemodialysis (HD), 17 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and 20 matched controls. Relative concentrations of EMVs (CD144(+ ve)) and PMVs (CD42b(+ ve)) were measured by Western blotting and total MV concentrations were measured using nanoparticle-tracking analysis. The ability to support thrombin generation was measured by reconstituting the MVs in normal plasma, using the Continuous Automated Thrombogram assay triggered with 1µM tissue factor. The total concentration of MVs as well as the measured sub-types was higher in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.05). MVs from HD and PD patients were able to generate more thrombin than the controls, with higher peak thrombin, and endogenous thrombin potential levels (p<0.02). However there were no differences in either the relative quantity or activity of MVs between the two patient groups (p>0.3). Dialysis patients have higher levels of circulating procoagulant MVs than healthy controls. This may represent a novel and potentially modifiable mediator or predictor of occlusive cardiovascular events in these patients. PMID:23936542

  3. Elevated Levels of Procoagulant Plasma Microvesicles in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burton, James O.; Hamali, Hassan A.; Singh, Ruchir; Abbasian, Nima; Parsons, Ruth; Patel, Amit K.; Goodall, Alison H.; Brunskill, Nigel J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) death remains the largest cause of mortality in dialysis patients, unexplained by traditional risk factors. Endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) are elevated in patients with traditional CV risk factors and acute coronary syndromes while platelet MVs (PMVs) are associated with atherosclerotic disease states. This study compared relative concentrations of circulating MVs from endothelial cells and platelets in two groups of dialysis patients and matched controls and investigated their relative thromboembolic risk. MVs were isolated from the blood of 20 haemodialysis (HD), 17 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and 20 matched controls. Relative concentrations of EMVs (CD144+ ve) and PMVs (CD42b+ ve) were measured by Western blotting and total MV concentrations were measured using nanoparticle-tracking analysis. The ability to support thrombin generation was measured by reconstituting the MVs in normal plasma, using the Continuous Automated Thrombogram assay triggered with 1µM tissue factor. The total concentration of MVs as well as the measured sub-types was higher in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.05). MVs from HD and PD patients were able to generate more thrombin than the controls, with higher peak thrombin, and endogenous thrombin potential levels (p<0.02). However there were no differences in either the relative quantity or activity of MVs between the two patient groups (p>0.3). Dialysis patients have higher levels of circulating procoagulant MVs than healthy controls. This may represent a novel and potentially modifiable mediator or predictor of occlusive cardiovascular events in these patients. PMID:23936542

  4. Epithelial Microvesicles Promote an Inflammatory Phenotype in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bi, J; Koivisto, L; Owen, G; Huang, P; Wang, Z; Shen, Y; Bi, L; Rokka, A; Haapasalo, M; Heino, J; Häkkinen, L; Larjava, H S

    2016-06-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are extracellular vesicles secreted by various cell types that are involved in intercellular communication. We hypothesized that in human periodontal disease, the pocket epithelium releases MVs, which then modulate gene expression in the underlying fibroblasts to control periodontal inflammation. MVs were isolated from culture medium of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) treated with oral bacterial biofilm extract or left untreated. Biofilm treatment significantly increased MV release from the GECs. Mass spectrometry of GEC-MVs identified a total of 2,173 proteins, of which about 80% were detected in MVs from both control and biofilm-treated GECs. Among 80 signature genes of human gingival fibroblasts, 20 were significantly regulated (P < 0.05) by MVs from control and biofilm-treated GECs in a similar manner. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 and interleukin 6 and 8 showed the strongest regulation at the mRNA and protein levels. Several cellular signaling pathways were activated by GEC-MVs in human gingival fibroblasts, including Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase-associated pathways ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. However, ERK1/2 signaling dominated in the MV-induced gene expression changes. The results demonstrate that GEC-MVs have a strong regulatory effect on the expression of fibroblast genes associated with inflammation and matrix degradation and that bacterial biofilm stimulates the generation of GEC-MVs. This suggests that bacterial biofilms can contribute to the initiation and progression of periodontal disease by promoting a tissue-destructive phenotype in gingival fibroblasts via the enhanced secretion of epithelial MVs. PMID:26912223

  5. Microvesicle-associated microRNA expression is altered upon particulate matter exposure in healthy workers and in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bollati, Valentina; Angelici, Laura; Rizzo, Giovanna; Pergoli, Laura; Rota, Federica; Hoxha, Mirjam; Nordio, Francesco; Bonzini, Matteo; Tarantini, Letizia; Cantone, Laura; Pesatori, Angela C; Apostoli, Pietro; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk has been consistently linked with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are released into plasma and transfer microRNAs (miRNAs) between tissues. MVs can be produced by the respiratory system in response to proinflammatory triggers, enter the circulatory system and remotely modify gene expression in cardiovascular tissues. However, whether PM affects MV signaling has never been investigated. In this study, we evaluated expression of microRNAs contained within plasma MVs upon PM exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo study, we isolated plasma MVs from healthy steel plant workers before and after workplace PM exposure. We measured the expression of 88 MV-associated miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To assess a possible source of the MV miRNAs identified in vivo, we measured their miRNA expression in PM-treated A549 pulmonary cell lines in vitro. MiRNA profiling of plasma MVs showed 5.62- and 13.95-fold increased expression of miR-128 and miR-302c, respectively, after 3 days of workplace PM exposure (P < 0.001). According to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, miR-128 is part of coronary artery disease pathways, and miR-302c is part of coronary artery disease, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure pathways. In vitro experiments confirmed a dose-dependent expression of miR-128 in MVs released from A549 cells after 6 h of PM treatment (P = 0.030). MiR-302c was expressed neither from A549 cells nor in reference lung RNA. These results suggest novel PM-activated molecular mechanisms that may mediate the effects of air pollution and could lead to the identification of new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are found in plasma and may transfer signals between tissues. In this article, we report in-vivo and in-vitro studies demonstrating that Particulate

  6. Egr-1 Activation by Cancer-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Promotes Endothelial Cell Migration via ERK1/2 and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Yoon, Chang Min; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Roh, Tae-Young; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-01-01

    Various mammalian cells, including cancer cells, shed extracellular vesicles (EVs), also known as exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play roles in tumor growth and metastasis by promoting angiogenesis. However, the detailed mechanism of how cancer-derived EVs elicit endothelial cell activation remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that early growth response-1 (Egr-1) activation in endothelial cells is involved in the angiogenic activity of colorectal cancer cell-derived EVs. Both RNA interference–mediated downregulation of Egr-1 and ERK1/2 or JNK inhibitor significantly blocked EV-mediated Egr-1 activation and endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, lipid raft-mediated endocytosis inhibitor effectively blocked endothelial Egr-1 activation and migration induced by cancer-derived EVs. Our results suggest that Egr-1 activation in endothelial cells may be a key mechanism involved in the angiogenic activity of cancer-derived EVs. These findings will improve our understanding regarding the proangiogenic activities of EVs in diverse pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25502753

  7. Impact of Biofluid Viscosity on Size and Sedimentation Efficiency of the Isolated Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Trachtenberg, Alexander J.; Hochberg, Fred H.; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the “gold standard” for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentrifugation when processing any biofluids. PMID:22661955

  8. Impact of biofluid viscosity on size and sedimentation efficiency of the isolated microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Hochberg, Fred H; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Microvesicles are nano-sized lipid vesicles released by all cells in vivo and in vitro. They are released physiologically under normal conditions but their rate of release is higher under pathological conditions such as tumors. Once released they end up in the systemic circulation and have been found and characterized in all biofluids such as plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, ascites, and urine. Microvesicles represent the status of the donor cell they are released from and they are currently under intense investigation as a potential source for disease biomarkers. Currently, the "gold standard" for isolating microvesicles is ultracentrifugation, although alternative techniques such as affinity purification have been explored. Viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to a deforming force by either shear or tensile stress. The different chemical and molecular compositions of biofluids have an effect on its viscosity and this could affect movements of the particles inside the fluid. In this manuscript we addressed the issue of whether viscosity has an effect on sedimentation efficiency of microvesicles using ultracentrifugation. We used different biofluids and spiked them with polystyrene beads and assessed their recovery using the Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis. We demonstrate that MVs recovery inversely correlates with viscosity and as a result, sample dilutions should be considered prior to ultracentrifugation when processing any biofluids. PMID:22661955

  9. Translocation of Endogenous Danger Signal HMGB1 From Nucleus to Membrane Microvesicles in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Li, Guangping; Liu, Yanxia; Werth, Victoria P; Williams, Kevin Jon; Liu, Ming-Lin

    2016-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that can be released from activated or dead cells. Extracellular HMGB1 can serve as a "danger signal" and novel cytokine that mediates sterile inflammation. In addition to its soluble form, extracellular HMGB1 can also be carried by membrane microvesicles. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for nuclear HMGB1 translocation to the plasma membrane and release onto membrane microvesicles have not been investigated. Tobacco smoking is a major cause of sterile inflammation in many diseases. Smoking also increases blood levels of HMGB1. In this study, we found that exposure of macrophages to tobacco smoke extract (TSE) stimulated HMGB1 expression, redistribution, and release into the extracellular milieu both as a soluble molecule and, surprisingly, as a microvesicle-associated form (TSE-MV). Inhibition of chromosome region maintenance-1 (CRM1), a nuclear exporter, attenuated TSE-induced HMGB1 redistribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and then its release on TSE-MVs. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism for the translocation of nuclear HMGB1 to the plasma membrane, and then its release in a microvesicle-associated form. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2319-2326, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26909509

  10. CD9-Positive Microvesicles Mediate the Transfer of Molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during Epididymal Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Julieta N.; Frenette, Gilles; Belleannée, Clémence; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30–120 nm) containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece) as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn2+ did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26. PMID:23785420

  11. Upregulation of lipid synthesis in small rat adipocytes by microvesicle-associated CD73 from large adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Günter; Schneider, Marion; Biemer-Daub, Gabriele; Wied, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Filling-up lipid stores is critical for size increase of mammalian adipocytes. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, CD73, is released from adipocytes into microvesicles in response to the lipogenic stimuli, palmitate, the antidiabetic sulfonylurea drug glimepiride, phosphoinositolglycans (PIG), and H(2)O(2). Upon incubation of microvesicles with adipocytes, CD73 is translocated to cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LD) and esterification is upregulated. The role of CD73-harboring microvesicles in coordinating esterification between differently sized adipocytes was studied here. Populations consisting of either small or large or of both small and large isolated rat adipocytes as well as native adipose tissue pieces from young and old rats were incubated with or depleted of endogenous microvesicles and analyzed for translocation of CD73 and esterification in response to the lipogenic stimuli. Large adipocytes exhibited higher and lower efficacy in releasing CD73 into microvesicles and in translocating CD73 to LD, respectively, compared to small adipocytes. Populations consisting of both small and large adipocytes were more active in esterification in response to the lipogenic stimuli than either small or large adipocytes. With both adipocytes and adipose tissue pieces from young rats esterification stimulation by the lipogenic stimuli was abrogated by depletion of CD73-harboring microvesicles from the incubation medium and interstitial spaces, respectively. In conclusion, stimulus-induced lipid synthesis between differently sized adipocytes is controlled by the release of microvesicle-associated CD73 from large cells and its subsequent translocation to LD of small cells. This information transfer via microvesicles harboring GPI-anchored proteins may shift the burden of triacylglycerol storage from large to small adipocytes. PMID:21372807

  12. The emerging role of extracellular vesicle-derived miRNAs: implication in cancer progression and stem cell related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiwei; Diamond, Michael P.; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment, diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles. A number of studies indicate that these extracellular vehicles (EVs) mediate the interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment; and thereby, play a critical role in the development of cancers. EVs contain cargo which consist of proteins, lipids, mRNAs, and miRNAs that can be delivered to different types of cells in nascent as well as distal locations. Discovery of this latter cargo has drawn an increasing amount of attention, due to their altering effects on the transcriptome, proteins, and subsequent cellular characteristics in recipient cells. Cancer cell derived exosomes (CCEs) have been identified in body fluids of cancer patients including urine, plasma and saliva. Because CCE content largely depends on tumor type and stage, they invariably lend great potential in serving as prognostic and diagnostic markers. Notably, accumulating evidence demonstrates that EV-derived miRNAs have key roles in regulating various aspects of cellular homeostasis, including proliferation, survival, migration, metastasis, and the immune system etc. More recently, diagnostic and therapeutic exploitation of stem cells derived EVs are under investigation. This review aims to summarize recent advances in EV-derived miRNAs in a variety of tumor types, and suggests that these cancer-derived exosomal miRNAs play a critical role in regulating cellular functions in surrounding and distant locations. It also discusses the role of adverse environmental exposure in altering stem cell exosomal miRNA profiling, which we believe leads to changes in the extracellular environment as well as a diverse range of biological processes. PMID:27099870

  13. Microvesicles Derived From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Alveolar Fluid Clearance in Human Lungs Rejected for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gennai, S.; Monsel, A.; Hao, Q.; Park, J.; Matthay, M. A.; Lee, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase the donor pool for lung transplantation is a major public health issue. We previously found that administration of mesenchymal stem cells “rehabilitated” marginal donor lungs rejected for transplantation using ex vivo lung perfusion. However, the use of stem cells has some inherent limitation such as the potential for tumor formation. In the current study, we hypothesized that microvesicles, small anuclear membrane fragments constitutively released from mesenchymal stem cells, may be a good alternative to using stem cells. Using our well established ex vivo lung perfusion model, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells increased alveolar fluid clearance (i.e. ability to absorb pulmonary edema fluid) in a dose-dependent manner, decreased lung weight gain following perfusion and ventilation, and improved airway and hemodynamic parameters compared to perfusion alone. Microvesicles derived from normal human lung fibroblasts as a control had no effect. Co-administration of microvesicles with anti-CD44 antibody attenuated these effects, suggesting a key role of the CD44 receptor in the internalization of the microvesicles into the injured host cell and its effect. In summary, microvesicles derived from human mesenchymal stem cells were as effective as the parent mesenchymal stem cells in rehabilitating marginal donor human lungs. PMID:25847030

  14. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheryl CY; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized. PMID:23807490

  15. miR-146b-5p within BCR-ABL1-Positive Microvesicles Promotes Leukemic Transformation of Hematopoietic Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Li, Qing; Zhu, Xiaojian; Liu, Wei; Hu, Hui; Liu, Teng; Cheng, Fanjun; You, Yong; Zhong, Zhaodong; Zou, Ping; Li, Qiubai; Chen, Zhichao; Guo, An-Yuan

    2016-05-15

    Evidence is accumulating that extracellular microvesicles (MV) facilitate progression and relapse in cancer. Using a model in which MVs derived from K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells transform normal hematopoietic transplants into leukemia-like cells, we defined the underlying mechanisms of this process through gene-expression studies and network analyses of transcription factors (TF) and miRNAs. We found that antitumor miRNAs were increased and several defense pathways were initiated during the early phases of oncogenic transformation. Later, oncomiRs and genes involved in cell cycle, DNA repair, and energy metabolism pathways were upregulated. Regulatory network analyses revealed that a number of TFs and miRNAs were responsible for the pathway dysregulation and the oncogenic transformation. In particular, we found that miR-146b-5p, which was highly expressed in MVs, coordinated the regulation of cancer-related genes to promote cell-transforming processes. Notably, treatment of recipient cells with MV derived from K562 cells expressing mimics of miR-146b-5p revealed that it accelerated the transformation process in large part by silencing the tumor-suppressor NUMB High levels of miR-146b-5p also enhanced reactive oxygen species levels and genome instability of recipient cells. Taken together, our finding showed how upregulation of oncogenic miRNAs in MVs promote hematopoetic cells to a leukemic state, as well as a demonstration for TF and miRNA coregulatory analysis in exploring the dysregulation of cancers and discovering key factors. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2901-11. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013199

  16. Peripheral blood microvesicles secretion is influenced by storage time, temperature, and anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Wisgrill, Lukas; Lamm, Christian; Hartmann, Julia; Preißing, Falk; Dragosits, Klaus; Bee, Annica; Hell, Lena; Thaler, Johannes; Ay, Cihan; Pabinger, Ingrid; Berger, Angelika; Spittler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are small membrane bound vesicles released from various cell types after activation or apoptosis. In the last decades, MVs received an increased interest as biomarkers in inflammation, coagulation and cancer. However, standardized pre-analytical steps are crucial for the minimization of artifacts in the MV analysis. Thus, this study evaluated the MV release in whole blood samples under the influence of different anticoagulants, storage time and various temperature conditions. Samples were collected from healthy probands and processed immediately, after 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours at room temperature (RT) or 4°C. To identify MV subpopulations, platelet free plasma (PFP) was stained with Annexin V, calcein AM, CD15, CD41 and CD235a. Analysis was performend on a CytoFLEX flow cytometer. Procoagulatory function of MVs was measured using a phospholipid dependent activity and a tissue factor MVactivity assay. Without prior storage, sodium citrate showed the lowest MV count compared to heparin and EDTA. Interestingly, EDTA showed a significant release of myeloid-derived MVs (MMVs) compared to sodium citrate. Sodium citrate showed a stable MV count at RT in the first 8 hours after blood collection. Total MV counts increased after 24 hours in sodium citrated or heparinzed blood which was related to all subpopulations. Interestingly, EDTA showed stable platelet-derived MV (PMV) and erythrocyte-derived MV (EryMV) count at RT over a 48 h period. In addition, the procoagulatory potential increased significantly after 8-hour storage. Based on both, this work and literature data, the used anticoagulant, storage time and storage temperature differently influence the analysis of MVs within 8 hours. To date, sodium citrated tubes are recommended for MV enumeration and functional analysis. EDTA tubes might be an option for the clinical routine due to stable PMV and EryMV counts. These new approaches need to be validated in a clinical laboratory setting before being

  17. Hierarchical, interface-induced self-assembly of diphenylalanine: formation of peptide nanofibers and microvesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Zhao, Jun; He, Zhimin

    2011-06-01

    To gain insight into the hierarchical self-assembly of peptides and the surface effect on assembly formation, an aromatic peptide of diphenylalanine (FF) was used in this study as the model peptide. We found that the diphenylalanine peptide could self-assemble into a core-branched nanostructure through non-covalent interactions in aqueous solution. The pre-assemblies further assembled into nanofibers and microvesicles on the glass surface and microporous membrane, respectively, showing a significant dependence on surface characteristics. The structural and morphological differences between nanofibers and microvesicles were investigated directly using several spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. Our results revealed a hierarchical and interface-induced assembly behavior of diphenylalanine peptide. The novel strategy based on the surface effect allows one to controllably fabricate various peptide-based nanostructures.

  18. Hierarchical, interface-induced self-assembly of diphenylalanine: formation of peptide nanofibers and microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Zhao, Jun; He, Zhimin

    2011-06-17

    To gain insight into the hierarchical self-assembly of peptides and the surface effect on assembly formation, an aromatic peptide of diphenylalanine (FF) was used in this study as the model peptide. We found that the diphenylalanine peptide could self-assemble into a core-branched nanostructure through non-covalent interactions in aqueous solution. The pre-assemblies further assembled into nanofibers and microvesicles on the glass surface and microporous membrane, respectively, showing a significant dependence on surface characteristics. The structural and morphological differences between nanofibers and microvesicles were investigated directly using several spectroscopy and microscopy techniques. Our results revealed a hierarchical and interface-induced assembly behavior of diphenylalanine peptide. The novel strategy based on the surface effect allows one to controllably fabricate various peptide-based nanostructures. PMID:21543826

  19. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Induce, Expand and Up-Regulate Biological Activities of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg)

    PubMed Central

    Szajnik, Marta; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Mandapathil, Magis; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumor-derived microvesicles (TMV) or exosomes are present in body fluids of patients with cancer and might be involved in tumor progression. The frequency and suppressor functions of peripheral blood CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ Treg are higher in patients with cancer than normal controls. The hypothesis is tested that TMV contribute to induction/expansion/and activation of human Treg. Methodology/Principal Findings TMV isolated from supernatants of tumor cells but not normal cells induced the generation and enhanced expansion of human Treg. TMV also mediated conversion of CD4+CD25neg T cells into CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ Treg. Upon co-incubation with TMV, Treg showed an increased FasL, IL-10, TGF-β1, CTLA-4, granzyme B and perforin expression (p<0.05) and mediated stronger suppression of responder cell (RC) proliferation (p<0.01). Purified Treg were resistant to TMV-mediated apoptosis relative to other T cells. TMV also increased phospho-SMAD2/3 and phospho-STAT3 expression in Treg. Neutralizing Abs specific for TGF-β1 and/or IL-10 significantly inhibited TMV ability to expand Treg. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that TMV have immunoregulatory properties. They induce Treg, promote Treg expansion, up-regulate Treg suppressor function and enhance Treg resistance to apoptosis. Interactions of TMV with Treg represent a newly-defined mechanism that might be involved in regulating peripheral tolerance by tumors and in supporting immune evasion of human cancers. PMID:20661468

  20. Sensing protein antigen and microvesicle analytes using high-capacity biopolymer nano-carriers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saroj; Milani, Gloria; Takatsuki, Hideyo; Lana, Tobia; Persson, Malin; Frasson, Chiara; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Månsson, Alf

    2016-02-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems with molecular motor driven transport of analytes attached to cytoskeletal filament shuttles (actin filaments, microtubules) circumvent challenges with nanoscale liquid transport. However, the filaments have limited cargo-carrying capacity and limitations either in transportation speed (microtubules) or control over motility direction (actin). To overcome these constraints we here report incorporation of covalently attached antibodies into self-propelled actin bundles (nanocarriers) formed by cross-linking antibody conjugated actin filaments via fascin, a natural actin-bundling protein. We demonstrate high maximum antigen binding activity and propulsion by surface adsorbed myosin motors. Analyte transport capacity is tested using both protein antigens and microvesicles, a novel class of diagnostic markers. Increased incubation concentration with protein antigen in the 0.1-100 nM range (1 min) reduces the fraction of motile bundles and their velocity but maximum transportation capacity of >1 antigen per nm of bundle length is feasible. At sub-nanomolar protein analyte concentration, motility is very well preserved opening for orders of magnitude improved limit of detection using motor driven concentration on nanoscale sensors. Microvesicle-complexing to monoclonal antibodies on the nanocarriers compromises motility but nanocarrier aggregation via microvesicles shows unique potential in label-free detection with the aggregates themselves as non-toxic reporter elements. PMID:26617251

  1. Methodology for Isolation, Identification and Characterization of Microvesicles in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Miller, Virginia M.; Heit, John A.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Analyses of circulating cell membrane-derived microvesicles (MV) have come under scrutiny as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. However, methods to isolate, label and quantify MV have been neither systematized nor validated. Objective To determine how pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical factors affect plasma MV counts, markers for cell of origin and expression of procoagulant surface phosphatidylserine. Methods and Results Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. Effects of blood sample collection, anticoagulant and sample processing to platelet free plasma (PFP), and MV isolation, staining and storage (freeze-thaw) and cytometer design were evaluated with replicate samples from these populations. The key finding is that use of citrate or EDTA anticoagulants decreases or eliminates microvesicles from plasma by inducing adhesion of the microvesicles to platelets or other formed elements. Protease inhibitor anticoagulants, including heparin, preserve MV counts. A centrifugation protocol was developed in which recovery of isolated MV was high with resolution down to the equivalent light scatter of 0.2 micron latex beads. Each procedure was systematically evaluated for its impact on the MV counts and characteristics. Conclusion This study provides a systematic methodology for MV isolation, identification and quantification, essential for development of MV as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of disease. PMID:22075275

  2. Distinct RNA profiles in subpopulations of extracellular vesicles: apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Crescitelli, Rossella; Lässer, Cecilia; Szabó, Tamas G.; Kittel, Agnes; Eldh, Maria; Dianzani, Irma; Buzás, Edit I.; Lötvall, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies aiming to understand the biology of exosomes, as well as other extracellular vesicles. However, classification of membrane vesicles and the appropriate protocols for their isolation are still under intense discussion and investigation. When isolating vesicles, it is crucial to use systems that are able to separate them, to avoid cross-contamination. Method EVs released from three different kinds of cell lines: HMC-1, TF-1 and BV-2 were isolated using two centrifugation-based protocols. In protocol 1, apoptotic bodies were collected at 2,000×g, followed by filtering the supernatant through 0.8 µm pores and pelleting of microvesicles at 12,200×g. In protocol 2, apoptotic bodies and microvesicles were collected together at 16,500×g, followed by filtering of the supernatant through 0.2 µm pores and pelleting of exosomes at 120,000×g. Extracellular vesicles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and the RNA profiles were investigated using a Bioanalyzer®. Results RNA profiles showed that ribosomal RNA was primary detectable in apoptotic bodies and smaller RNAs without prominent ribosomal RNA peaks in exosomes. In contrast, microvesicles contained little or no RNA except for microvesicles collected from TF-1 cell cultures. The different vesicle pellets showed highly different distribution of size, shape and electron density with typical apoptotic body, microvesicle and exosome characteristics when analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of CD63 and CD81 in all vesicles investigated, as well as CD9 except in the TF-1-derived vesicles, as these cells do not express CD9. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that centrifugation-based protocols are simple and fast systems to distinguish subpopulations of extracellular vesicles. Different vesicles show different RNA profiles and morphological characteristics

  3. Structural Phenotyping of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Sheehy, Sean Paul; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural phenotyping based on classical image feature detection has been adopted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind genetically or pharmacologically induced changes in cell morphology. Here, we developed a set of 11 metrics to capture the increasing sarcomere organization that occurs intracellularly during striated muscle cell development. To test our metrics, we analyzed the localization of the contractile protein α-actinin in a variety of primary and stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes. Further, we combined these metrics with data mining algorithms to unbiasedly score the phenotypic maturity of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:25733020

  4. Thrombocyte adhesion and release of extracellular microvesicles correlate with surface morphology of adsorbent polymers for lipid apheresis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, René; Spittler, Andreas; Schmitz, Gerd; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2014-07-14

    Whole blood lipid apheresis is clinically applied to reduce low density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Here, we studied the correlation between physicochemical parameters, in particular, surface roughness and blood compatibility, of two polyacrylate-based and a dextran sulfate-based polymer for lipid apheresis. The adsorbent surface roughness was assessed by atomic force microscopy. Freshly isolated human thrombocytes were circulated over adsorbent columns downscaled equivalent to clinical use to study thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation. Quantification of thrombocytes and microvesicles in the flow-through of the columns revealed that both thrombocyte adhesion and microvesicle generation increased with increasing adsorbent surface roughness. Activation of thrombocytes with thrombin receptor-activating peptide-6 favored their adhesion to the adsorbents, as demonstrated by preferential depletion of CD62(+) and PAC-1(+) thrombocytes. Taken together, enhanced polymer surface roughness fostered cell adhesion and microvesicle release, underscoring the role of extracellular microvesicles as markers of cellular activation and of blood compatibility. PMID:24844344

  5. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  6. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release 'messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial 'apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50-120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  7. Lung epithelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles activate macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via ROCK1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H-G; Cao, Y; Yang, J; Lee, J H; Choi, H S; Jin, Y

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains poorly understood, thus impeding the development of effective treatment. Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lung epithelial cell death are prominent features of ARDS. Lung epithelial cells are the first line of defense after inhaled stimuli, such as in the case of hyperoxia. We hypothesized that lung epithelial cells release ‘messenger' or signaling molecules to adjacent or distant macrophages, thereby initiating or propagating inflammatory responses after noxious insult. We found that, after hyperoxia, a large amount of extracellular vesicles (EVs) were generated and released into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These hyperoxia-induced EVs were mainly derived from live lung epithelial cells as the result of hyperoxia-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These EVs were remarkably different from epithelial ‘apoptotic bodies', as reflected by the significantly smaller size and differentially expressed protein markers. These EVs fall mainly in the size range of the exosomes and smaller microvesicles (MVs) (50–120 nm). The commonly featured protein markers of apoptotic bodies were not found in these EVs. Treating alveolar macrophages with hyperoxia-induced, epithelial cell-derived EVs led to an increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). Robustly increased macrophage and neutrophil influx was found in the lung tissue of the mice intranasally treated with hyperoxia-induced EVs. It was determined that EV-encapsulated caspase-3 was largely responsible for the alveolar macrophage activation via the ROCK1 pathway. Caspase-3-deficient EVs induced less cytokine/MIP-2 release, reduced cell counts in BALF, less neutrophil infiltration and less inflammation in lung parenchyma, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the serum circulating EVs were increased and mainly derived from lung epithelial cells after

  8. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  9. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  10. Micropost arrays for measuring stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte contractility.

    PubMed

    Beussman, Kevin M; Rodriguez, Marita L; Leonard, Andrea; Taparia, Nikita; Thompson, Curtis R; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have the potential to be used to study heart disease and maturation, screen drug treatments, and restore heart function. Here, we discuss the procedures involved in using micropost arrays to measure the contractile forces generated by stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte contractility is needed for the heart to pump blood, so measuring the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes is a straightforward way to assess their function. Microfabrication and soft lithography techniques are utilized to create identical arrays of flexible, silicone microposts from a common master. Micropost arrays are functionalized with extracellular matrix protein to allow cardiomyocytes to adhere to the tips of the microposts. Live imaging is used to capture videos of the deflection of microposts caused by the contraction of the cardiomyocytes. Image analysis code provides an accurate means to quantify these deflections. The contractile forces produced by a beating cardiomyocyte are calculated by modeling the microposts as cantilever beams. We have used this assay to assess techniques for improving the maturation and contractile function of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:26344757

  11. Extracellular microvesicle microRNAs in children with sickle cell anaemia with divergent clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Connes, Phillippe; Romana, Marc; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Zhang, Chunling; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is the most frequent genetic haemoglobinopathy, which exhibits a highly variable clinical course characterized by hyper-coagulable and pro-inflammatory states, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Extracellular microvesicles are released into biological fluids and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. We hypothesized that potential differences in plasma-derived extracellular microvesicles (EV) function and cargo from SCA patients may underlie divergent clinical trajectories. Plasma EV from SCA patients with mild, intermediate and severe clinical disease course were isolated, and primary endothelial cell cultures were exposed. Endothelial cell activation, monocyte adhesion, barrier disruption and exosome cargo (microRNA microarrays) were assessed. EV disrupted the endothelial barrier and induced expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in a SCA severity-dependent manner compared to healthy children. Microarray approaches identified a restricted signature of exosomal microRNAs that readily distinguished severe from mild SCA, as well as from healthy children. The microRNA candidates were further validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays, and revealed putative gene targets. Circulating exosomal microRNAs may play important roles in predicting the clinical course of SCA, and in delineation of individually tailored, mechanistically-based clinical treatment approaches of SCA patients in the near future. PMID:27161653

  12. Keratinocyte Microvesicles Regulate the Expression of Multiple Genes in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Bi, Jiarui; Owen, Gethin R; Chen, Weimin; Rokka, Anne; Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells regulate many normal and pathological conditions. Little is known about the role of epidermal keratinocyte microvesicles (KC-MVs) in epithelial-stromal interaction that is essential for wound healing. We investigated, therefore, whether MV-like structures are present in human wounds and whether they affect wound healing-associated gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. In human wounds, MV-like vesicles were observed during active epithelial migration and early granulation tissue formation. When KC-MVs derived from keratinocyte-like cells (HaCaT) were added to fibroblast cultures, expression of 21 genes was significantly regulated (P<0.05) out of 80 genes investigated, including matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3, interleukin-6 and -8, and genes associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling. Similar changes were observed at the protein level. MVs from normal epidermal keratinocytes showed similar response to HaCaT cells. KC-MVs activated ERK1/2, JNK, Smad, and p38 signaling pathways in fibroblasts with ERK1/2 signaling having the most prominent role in the MV-induced gene expression changes. KC-MVs stimulated fibroblast migration and induced fibroblast-mediated endothelial tube formation but did not affect collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte microvesicles have a strong and a specific regulatory effect on fibroblasts that may modulate several aspects of wound healing. PMID:26288358

  13. Investigation of Soluble and Transmembrane CTLA-4 Isoforms in Serum and Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Laura; Hunter, Kara M. D.; Clark, Jan; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Stevens, Helen; Denesha, Jennifer; Duley, Simon; Dawson, Sarah; Coleman, Gillian; Nutland, Sarah; Bell, Gwynneth L.; Moran, Carla; Pekalski, Marcin; Todd, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the CTLA-4 gene is absolutely required for immune homeostasis, but aspects of its molecular nature remain undefined. In particular, the characterization of the soluble CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) protein isoform generated by an alternatively spliced mRNA of CTLA4 lacking transmembrane-encoding exon 3 has been hindered by the difficulty in distinguishing it from the transmembrane isoform of CTLA-4, Tm-CTLA-4. In the current study, sCTLA-4 has been analyzed using novel mAbs and polyclonal Abs specific for its unique C-terminal amino acid sequence. We demonstrate that the sCTLA-4 protein is secreted at low levels following the activation of primary human CD4+ T cells and is increased only rarely in the serum of autoimmune patients. Unexpectedly, during our studies aimed to define the kinetics of sCTLA-4 produced by activated human CD4+ T cells, we discovered that Tm-CTLA-4 is associated with microvesicles produced by the activated cells. The functional roles of sCTLA-4 and microvesicle-associated Tm-CTLA-4 warrant further investigation, especially as they relate to the multiple mechanisms of action described for the more commonly studied cell-associated Tm-CTLA-4. PMID:24928993

  14. CHK1 regulates NF-κB signaling upon DNA damage in p53- deficient cells and associated tumor-derived microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany L.; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered CHK1-Suppressed (CS) pathway is activated by inhibition or loss of the checkpoint kinase CHK1, promoting an apoptotic response to DNA damage mediated by caspase-2 in p53-deficient cells. Although functions of the CS-pathway have been investigated biochemically, it remains unclear whether and how CHK1 inhibition can be regulated endogenously and whether this constitutes a key component of the DNA damage response (DDR). Here, we present data that define the first endogenous activation of the CS-pathway whereby, upon DNA damage, wild type p53 acts as an endogenous regulator of CHK1 levels that modulates caspase-2 activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that persistence of CHK1 levels in response to DNA damage in p53-deficient cancer cells, leads to CHK1-mediated activation of NF-κB and induction of NF-κB-regulated genes in cells and in associated tumor-derived microvesicles (TMVs), both of which are abrogated by loss or inhibition of CHK1. These data define a novel role for CHK1 in the DDR pathway as a regulator NF-κB activity. Our data provide evidence that targeting CHK1 in p53-deficient cancers may abrogate NF-κB signaling that is associated with increased cellular survival and chemoresistance. PMID:26921248

  15. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  16. Coxsackievirus B Exits the Host Cell in Shed Microvesicles Displaying Autophagosomal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Mangale, Vrushali; Rahawi, Shahad; McIntyre, Laura L.; Williams, Wesley; Kha, Nelson; Cruz, Casey; Hancock, Bryan M.; Nguyen, David P.; Sayen, M. Richard; Hilton, Brett J.; Doran, Kelly S.; Segall, Anca M.; Wolkowicz, Roland; Cornell, Christopher T.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Feuer, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a member of the picornavirus family and enterovirus genus, causes viral myocarditis, aseptic meningitis, and pancreatitis in humans. We genetically engineered a unique molecular marker, “fluorescent timer” protein, within our infectious CVB3 clone and isolated a high-titer recombinant viral stock (Timer-CVB3) following transfection in HeLa cells. “Fluorescent timer” protein undergoes slow conversion of fluorescence from green to red over time, and Timer-CVB3 can be utilized to track virus infection and dissemination in real time. Upon infection with Timer-CVB3, HeLa cells, neural progenitor and stem cells (NPSCs), and C2C12 myoblast cells slowly changed fluorescence from green to red over 72 hours as determined by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometric analysis. The conversion of “fluorescent timer” protein in HeLa cells infected with Timer-CVB3 could be interrupted by fixation, suggesting that the fluorophore was stabilized by formaldehyde cross-linking reactions. Induction of a type I interferon response or ribavirin treatment reduced the progression of cell-to-cell virus spread in HeLa cells or NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3. Time lapse photography of partially differentiated NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3 revealed substantial intracellular membrane remodeling and the assembly of discrete virus replication organelles which changed fluorescence color in an asynchronous fashion within the cell. “Fluorescent timer” protein colocalized closely with viral 3A protein within virus replication organelles. Intriguingly, infection of partially differentiated NPSCs or C2C12 myoblast cells induced the release of abundant extracellular microvesicles (EMVs) containing matured “fluorescent timer” protein and infectious virus representing a novel route of virus dissemination. CVB3 virions were readily observed within purified EMVs by transmission electron microscopy, and infectious virus was identified within low

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 in Odontoblastic Cells Derived from Ips Cells: Unique Proliferation Response as Odontoblastic Cells Derived from ES Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hiyama, Taiki; Ozeki, Nobuaki; Mogi, Makio; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kawai, Rie; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Ayami; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates wound healing following dental pulp injury. In addition, we reported that a proinflammatory cytokine mixture (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and interferon-γ) induced MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potential unique physiological role in wound healing and regeneration of dental pulp in odontoblast-like cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of MMP-3 activity by IL-1β promotes proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) and ES cells. Each odontoblast-like cell was isolated and incubated with different concentrations of IL-1β. MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. MMP-3 activity was measured using immunoprecipitation and a fluorescence substrate. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using ELISA for BrdU and DNA fragmentation, respectively. siRNA was used to reduce MMP-3 transcripts in these cells. Treatment with IL-1β increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels, and MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells. Cell proliferation was found to markedly increase with no changes in apoptosis. Endogenous tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 were constitutively expressed during all experiments. The exocytosis inhibitor, Exo1, potently suppressed the appearance of MMP-3 in the conditioned medium. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 suppressed an IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity, and also suppressed cell proliferation, but unexpectedly increased apoptosis in these cells (P<0.05). Exogenous MMP-3 was found to induce cell proliferation in odontoblast-like cells derived from iPS cells and ES cells. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed with exogenous MMP-3 stimulation (P<0.05). Taken

  18. Functional Characterization of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Authors Glenn E.; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A.; Bruening-Wright, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is a leading contributor to late-stage attrition in the drug discovery process and to withdrawal of approved from the market. In vitro assays that enable earlier and more accurate testing for cardiac risk provide early stage predictive indicators that aid in mitigating risk. Human cardiomyocytes, the most relevant subjects for early stage testing, are severely limited in supply. But human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SC-hCM) are readily available from commercial sources and are increasingly used in academic research, drug discovery and safety pharmacology. As a result, SC-hCM electrophysiology has become a valuable tool to assess cardiac risk associated with drugs. This unit describes techniques for recording individual currents carried by sodium, calcium and potassium ions, as well as single cell action potentials, and impedance recordings from contracting syncytia of thousands of interconnected cells. PMID:25152802

  19. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  20. Stem cell-derived systems in toxicology assessment.

    PubMed

    Suter-Dick, Laura; Alves, Paula M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bremm, Klaus-Dieter; Brito, Catarina; Coecke, Sandra; Flick, Burkhard; Fowler, Paul; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Jennings, Paul; Kelm, Jens M; Manou, Irene; Mistry, Pratibha; Moretto, Angelo; Roth, Adrian; Stedman, Donald; van de Water, Bob; Beilmann, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Industrial sectors perform toxicological assessments of their potential products to ensure human safety and to fulfill regulatory requirements. These assessments often involve animal testing, but ethical, cost, and time concerns, together with a ban on it in specific sectors, make appropriate in vitro systems indispensable in toxicology. In this study, we summarize the outcome of an EPAA (European Partnership of Alternatives to Animal Testing)-organized workshop on the use of stem cell-derived (SCD) systems in toxicology, with a focus on industrial applications. SCD systems, in particular, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived, provide physiological cell culture systems of easy access and amenable to a variety of assays. They also present the opportunity to apply the vast repository of existing nonclinical data for the understanding of in vitro to in vivo translation. SCD systems from several toxicologically relevant tissues exist; they generally recapitulate many aspects of physiology and respond to toxicological and pharmacological interventions. However, focused research is necessary to accelerate implementation of SCD systems in an industrial setting and subsequent use of such systems by regulatory authorities. Research is required into the phenotypic characterization of the systems, since methods and protocols for generating terminally differentiated SCD cells are still lacking. Organotypical 3D culture systems in bioreactors and microscale tissue engineering technologies should be fostered, as they promote and maintain differentiation and support coculture systems. They need further development and validation for their successful implementation in toxicity testing in industry. Analytical measures also need to be implemented to enable compound exposure and metabolism measurements for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. The future of SCD toxicological tests will combine advanced cell culture technologies and biokinetic measurements to support regulatory and

  1. Initial evidence that blood-borne microvesicles are biomarkers for recurrence and survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sydney M; Putt, Mary; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Lustig, Robert A; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Williams, Dewight; Desai, Arati; Wolf, Ronald; Brem, Steven; Koch, Cameron J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether blood-borne microvesicles from newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients could be used as biomarkers. We collected 2.8 mL blood from 16 post-operative patients at the time that they were being simulated for chemoradiation therapy (radiation with concurrent temozolomide). Two additional samples were collected during chemoradiation therapy and a final sample was collected at the end of chemoradiation therapy. Patients continued with the therapy suggested by their physicians, based on tumor conference consensus and were followed for recurrence and overall survival. Microvesicles were isolated using serial centrifugation and stained for surface markers (Annexin V for phosphotidyl serine, CD41 for platelets, anti-EGFR for tumor cells, and CD235 for red blood cells). Flow cytometry analysis was performed. Our findings provide initial evidence that increases in Annexin V positive microvesicle levels during chemoradiation therapy are associated with earlier recurrence and shorter overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. The effect is dramatic, with over a four-fold increase in the hazard ratio for an individual at the 75th versus the 25th percentile. Moreover the pattern of Annexin V positive microvesicles remain significant after adjustment for confounding clinical variables that have previously been shown to be prognostic for recurrence and survival. Inclusion of neutrophil levels at the start of chemoradiation therapy in the model yielded the largest attenuation of the observed association. Further studies will be needed to verify and further investigate the association between these two entities. PMID:26746692

  2. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer.

    PubMed

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data integration in the field. In this review, we provide an updated view of the potential of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers and the available technologies for their isolation. PMID:27366992

  3. In vitro correction of disorders of lysosomal transport by microvesicles derived from baculovirus-infected Spodoptera cells.

    PubMed

    Thoene, Jess; Goss, Thomas; Witcher, Marc; Mullet, Jodi; N'Kuli, Francisca; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Courtoy, Pierre; Hahn, Si Houn

    2013-05-01

    Infection of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells by baculovirus (BV) is well established for transgene expression of soluble proteins, but few correctly folded transmembrane proteins have been so produced. We here report the use of the BV/Sf9 (BVES) method for the expression and transfer, via microvesicles, of the exclusive lysosomal exporters for cystine and sialic acid, human cystinosin and sialin. These proteins and their mRNA are released into the culture medium as very low-density microvesicles (~1.05 g/ml), which do not label for lysobisphosphatidic acid. The presence of the human transgene proteins in the vesicles was confirmed by western blotting and confirmed and quantified by mass spectrometry. Addition of vesicles to cultures of human fibroblast lines deficient in either cystinosin or sialin produced a progressive depletion of stored lysosomal cystine or sialic acid, respectively. The depletion effect was slow (T1/2 ~48 h), saturable (down to ~40% of initial after 4 days) and stable (>one week). Surprisingly, BV infection of Spodoptera appeared to induce expression and release into microvesicles of the insect orthologue of cystinosin, but not of sialin. We conclude that BVES is an effective method to express and transfer functional transmembrane proteins so as to study their properties in mammalian cells, and has a generic potential for transport protein replacement therapy. PMID:23465695

  4. MicroRNA and Protein Profiling of Brain Metastasis Competent Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Laura; Guerrero, Paola; Marchetti, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles released by most cell types including tumor cells. The intercellular exchange of proteins and genetic material via exosomes is a potentially effective approach for cell-to-cell communication and it may perform multiple functions aiding to tumor survival and metastasis. We investigated microRNA and protein profiles of brain metastatic (BM) versus non-brain metastatic (non-BM) cell-derived exosomes. We studied the cargo of exosomes isolated from brain-tropic 70W, MDA-MB-231BR, and circulating tumor cell brain metastasis-selected markers (CTC1BMSM) variants, and compared them with parental non-BM MeWo, MDA-MB-231P and CTC1P cells, respectively. By performing microRNA PCR array we identified one up-regulated (miR-210) and two down-regulated miRNAs (miR-19a and miR-29c) in BM versus non-BM exosomes. Second, we analyzed the proteomic content of cells and exosomes isolated from these six cell lines, and detected high expression of proteins implicated in cell communication, cell cycle, and in key cancer invasion and metastasis pathways. Third, we show that BM cell-derived exosomes can be internalized by non-BM cells and that they effectively transport their cargo into cells, resulting in increased cell adhesive and invasive potencies. These results provide a strong rationale for additional investigations of exosomal proteins and miRNAs towards more profound understandings of exosome roles in brain metastasis biogenesis, and for the discovery and application of non-invasive biomarkers for new therapies combating brain metastasis. PMID:24066071

  5. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  6. Large-scale generation of cell-derived nanovesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, W.; Kim, J.; Yoon, J.; Jeong, D.; Cho, S.; Jeong, H.; Yoon, Y. J.; Kim, S. C.; Gho, Y. S.; Park, J.

    2014-09-01

    Exosomes are enclosed compartments that are released from cells and that can transport biological contents for the purpose of intercellular communications. Research into exosomes is hindered by their rarity. In this article, we introduce a device that uses centrifugal force and a filter with micro-sized pores to generate a large quantity of cell-derived nanovesicles. The device has a simple polycarbonate structure to hold the filter, and operates in a common centrifuge. Nanovesicles are similar in size and membrane structure to exosomes. Nanovesicles contain intracellular RNAs ranging from microRNA to mRNA, intracellular proteins, and plasma membrane proteins. The quantity of nanovesicles produced using the device is 250 times the quantity of naturally secreted exosomes. Also, the quantity of intracellular contents in nanovesicles is twice that in exosomes. Nanovesicles generated from murine embryonic stem cells can transfer RNAs to target cells. Therefore, this novel device and the nanovesicles that it generates are expected to be used in exosome-related research, and can be applied in various applications such as drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

  7. Tracing Synaptic Connectivity onto Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Isabella; Huang, Longwen; Ung, Kevin; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.

    2012-01-01

    Transsynaptic circuit tracing using genetically modified Rabies virus (RV) is an emerging technology for identifying synaptic connections between neurons. Complementing this methodology, it has become possible to assay the basic molecular and cellular properties of neuronal lineages derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro, and these properties are under intense investigation towards devising cell replacement therapies. Here, we report the generation of a novel mouse ES cell (mESC) line that harbors the genetic elements to allow RV-mediated transsynaptic circuit tracing in ES cell-derived neurons and their synaptic networks. To facilitate transsynaptic tracing, we have engineered a new reporter allele by introducing cDNA encoding tdTomato, the Rabies-G glycoprotein, and the avian TVA receptor into the ROSA26 locus by gene targeting. We demonstrate high-efficiency differentiation of these novel mESCs into functional neurons, show their capacity to functionally connect with primary neuronal cultures as evidenced by immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological recordings, and show their ability to act as source cells for presynaptic tracing of neuronal networks in vitro and in vivo. Together, our data highlight the potential for using genetically engineered stem cells to investigate fundamental mechanisms of synapse and circuit formation with unambiguous identification of presynaptic inputs onto neuronal populations of interest. PMID:22996827

  8. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  9. Regulation of the expression of zinc finger protein genes by microRNAs enriched within acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Chen, X M; Tao, H M; Xiong, W; Jie, S H; Li, H Y

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are submicrometric membrane fragments that can "engulf" cytoplasmic contents such as microRNAs (miRNAs) from their cellular origin. The study of miRNAs carried within MVs might provide insights into the roles that miRNAs play in the underlying pathophysiologic processes of acute lymphoblastic leu-kemia (ALL). We identified numerous dysregulated MV miRNAs in patients with B- and T-cell ALL by using Agilent microarray analysis. Selected miRNAs obtained by microarray profiling were validated us-ing quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Us-ing bioinformatic tools, we found that 118 and 116 miRNAs from B- and T-ALL MVs, respectively, regulated the expression of zinc finger protein (ZFP) genes. For example, zinc finger protein 238 (ZNF238), known as a tumor suppressor, was regulated by miR-20b over-expres-sion. Conversely, ZNF267, a cancer-promoting factor, was mediated by downregulated miR-23a and miR-23b. Considering that miRNAs are generally believed to repress gene expression, antineoplastic ZNF238 was likely inhibited while the level of oncogenic ZNF267 was likely increased by miRNA dysregulation, leading to modifica-tion of the ALL microenvironment. In addition, gene ontology and sig-naling pathway analysis demonstrated that a subset of the ZFP genes targeted by altered MV miRNAs are involved in cellular biological processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. These findings indicated that cancer-associated MV miRNAs and their target ZFP genes might be novel pathogenic factors in ALL. However, the specific roles exerted by MV miRNAs and their target ZFP genes on the pathological mechanisms of ALL remain to be further understood. PMID:26505336

  10. TISSUE ENGINEERING WITH MENISCUS CELLS DERIVED FROM SURGICAL DEBRIS

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nathan, Ashwin S.; Huffman, G. Russell; Mauck, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Injuries to the avascular regions of the meniscus fail to heal and so are treated by resection of the damaged tissue. This alleviates symptoms but fails to restore normal load transmission in the knee. Tissue engineering functional meniscus constructs for re-implantation may improve tissue repair. While numerous studies have developed scaffolds for meniscus repair, the most appropriate autologous cell source remains to be determined. In this study, we hypothesized that the debris generated from common meniscectomy procedures would possess cells with potential for forming replacement tissue. We also hypothesized that donor age and the disease status would influence the ability of derived cells to generate functional, fibrocartilaginous matrix. Methods Meniscus derived cells (MDCs) were isolated from waste tissue of ten human donors (seven partial meniscectomies, three total knee arthroplasties) ranging in age from 18–84 years. MDCs were expanded in monolayer culture through passage two and seeded onto fiber-aligned biodegradable nanofibrous scaffolds and cultured in a chemically-defined media. Mechanical properties, biochemical content, and histological features were evaluated over ten weeks of culture. Results Results demonstrated that cells from every donor contributed to increasing biochemical content and mechanical properties of engineered constructs. Significant variability was observed in outcome parameters (cell infiltration, proteoglycan and collagen content, and mechanical properties) amongst donors, but these variations did not correlate with patient age or disease condition. Strong correlations were observed between the amount of collagen deposition within the construct and the tensile properties achieved. In scaffolds seeded with particularly robust cells, construct tensile moduli approached maxima of ~40MPa over the ten week culture period. Conclusions This study demonstrates that cells derived from surgical debris are a potent cell source

  11. Islet Endothelial Cells Derived From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    The islet endothelium comprises a specialized population of islet endothelial cells (IECs) expressing unique markers such as nephrin and α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) that are not found in endothelial cells in surrounding tissues. However, due to difficulties in isolating and maintaining a pure population of these cells, the information on these islet-specific cells is currently very limited. Interestingly, we have identified a large subpopulation of endothelial cells exhibiting IEC phenotype, while deriving insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These cells were identified by the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and were successfully isolated and subsequently expanded in endothelial cell culture medium. Further analysis demonstrated that the mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (mESC-ECs) not only express classical endothelial markers, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM1), thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but also IEC-specific markers such as nephrin and AAT. Moreover, mESC-ECs secrete basement membrane proteins such as collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin in culture and form tubular networks on a layer of Matrigel, demonstrating angiogenic activity. Further, mESC-ECs not only express eNOS, but also its eNOS expression is glucose dependent, which is another characteristic phenotype of IECs. With the ability to obtain highly purified IECs derived from pluripotent stem cells, it is possible to closely examine the function of these cells and their interaction with pancreatic β-cells during development and maturation in vitro. Further characterization of tissue-specific endothelial cell properties may enhance our ability to formulate new therapeutic angiogenic approaches for diabetes. PMID:25751085

  12. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes as maintenance immunotherapy after first line chemotherapy in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Benjamin; Charrier, Mélinda; Lapierre, Valérie; Dansin, Eric; Lantz, Olivier; Planchard, David; Le Chevalier, Thierry; Livartoski, Alain; Barlesi, Fabrice; Laplanche, Agnès; Ploix, Stéphanie; Vimond, Nadège; Peguillet, Isabelle; Théry, Clotilde; Lacroix, Ludovic; Zoernig, Inka; Dhodapkar, Kavita; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Viaud, Sophie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Reiners, Katrin S.; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Vély, Frédéric; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Eggermont, Alexander; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cell-derived exosomes (Dex) are small extracellular vesicles secreted by viable dendritic cells. In the two phase-I trials that we conducted using the first generation of Dex (IFN-γ-free) in end-stage cancer, we reported that Dex exerted natural killer (NK) cell effector functions in patients. A second generation of Dex (IFN-γ-Dex) was manufactured with the aim of boosting NK and T cell immune responses. We carried out a phase II clinical trial testing the clinical benefit of IFN-γ-Dex loaded with MHC class I- and class II-restricted cancer antigens as maintenance immunotherapy after induction chemotherapy in patients bearing inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without tumor progression. The primary endpoint was to observe at least 50% of patients with progression-free survival (PFS) at 4 mo after chemotherapy cessation. Twenty-two patients received IFN-γ-Dex. One patient exhibited a grade three hepatotoxicity. The median time to progression was 2.2 mo and median overall survival (OS) was 15 mo. Seven patients (32%) experienced stabilization of >4 mo. The primary endpoint was not reached. An increase in NKp30-dependent NK cell functions were evidenced in a fraction of these NSCLC patients presenting with defective NKp30 expression. Importantly, MHC class II expression levels of the final IFN-γ-Dex product correlated with expression levels of the NKp30 ligand BAG6 on Dex, and with NKp30-dependent NK functions, the latter being associated with longer progression-free survival. This phase II trial confirmed the capacity of Dex to boost the NK cell arm of antitumor immunity in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27141373

  13. Equine Amniotic Microvesicles and Their Anti-Inflammatory Potential in a Tenocyte Model In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Perrini, Claudia; Tasquier, Riccardo; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Camussi, Giovanni; Pascucci, Luisa; Marini, Maria Giovanna; Corradetti, Bruna; Bizzaro, Davide; De Vita, Bruna; Romele, Pietro; Parolini, Ornella; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2016-04-15

    Administration of horse amniotic mesenchymal cells (AMCs) and their conditioned medium (AMC-CM) improves the in vivo recovery of spontaneous equine tendon lesions and inhibits in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This process may involve microvesicles (MVs) as an integral component of cell-to-cell communication during tissue regeneration. In this study, the presence and type of MVs secreted by AMCs were investigated and the response of equine tendon cells to MVs was studied using a dose-response curve at different concentrations and times. Moreover, the ability of MVs to counteract in vitro inflammation of tendon cells induced by lipopolysaccharide was studied through the expression of some proinflammatory genes such as metallopeptidase (MPP) 1, 9, and 13 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Lastly, the immunomodulatory potential of MVs was investigated. Results show that AMCs secrete MVs ranging in size from 100 to 200 nm. An inverse relationship between concentration and time was found in their uptake by tendon cells: the maximal uptake occurred after 72 h at a concentration of 40 × 10(6) MVs/mL. MVs induced a downregulation of MMP1, MMP9, MMP13, and TNFα expression without affecting PBMC proliferation, contrary to CM and supernatant. Our data suggest that MVs contribute to in vivo healing of tendon lesions, alongside soluble factors in AMC-CM. PMID:26914245

  14. Microvesicles from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Involved in HPC-Microenvironment Crosstalk in Myelodysplastic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muntión, Sandra; Ramos, Teresa L.; Diez-Campelo, María; Rosón, Beatriz; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Preciado, Silvia; Sarasquete, María-Eugenia; de las Rivas, Javier; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; del Cañizo, María-Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles (MVs) provide a mechanism of intercellular communication. Our hypothesis was that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients could modify CD34+ cells properties by MVs. They were isolated from MSC from MDS patients and healthy donors (HD). MVs from 30 low-risk MDS patients and 27 HD were purified by ExoQuick-TC™ or ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry (FC) and western blot for CD63. Incorporation of MVs into CD34+ cells was analyzed by FC, and confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Changes in hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) properties were assessed from modifications in microRNAs and gene expression in CD34+ cells as well as viability and clonogenic assays of CD34+ cells after MVs incorporation. Some microRNAs were overexpressed in MVs from patients MSC and two of them, miR-10a and miR-15a, were confirmed by RT-PCR. These microRNAs were transferred to CD34+ cells, modifying the expression of MDM2 and P53 genes, which was evaluated by RT-PCR and western blot. Finally, examining CD34+ cells properties after incorporation, higher cell viability (p = 0.025) and clonogenic capacity (p = 0.037) were observed when MVs from MDS patients were incorporated. In summary, we show that BM-MSC release MVs with a different cargo in MDS patients compared with HD. These structures are incorporated into HPC and modify their properties. PMID:26836120

  15. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  16. Microvesicle formulations used in topical drugs and cosmetics affect product efficiency, performance and allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2010-01-01

    Attempts to improve the formulations of topical products are continuing processes (ie, to increase cosmetic performance, enhance effects, and protect ingredients from degradation). The development of micro- and nanovesicular systems has led to the marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics that use these technologies. Several articles have reported improved clinical efficacy by the encapsulation of pharmaceuticals in vesicular systems, and the numbers of publications and patents are rising. Some vesicular systems may deliver the drug deeper in the skin as compared to conventional vehicles, or even make transdermal delivery more efficient for a number of drugs. Vesicular systems may also allow a more precise drug delivery to the site of action (ie, the hair follicles) and thereby minimize the applied drug concentration, reducing potential side effects. On the other hand, this may increase the risk of other side effects. Few case reports have suggested that microvesicle formulations may affect the allergenicity of topical products. This article gives an overview of the current knowledge about the topical use of microvesicular systems and the dermatoallergologic aspects. PMID:20920408

  17. Complex N-Linked Glycans Serve as a Determinant for Exosome/Microvesicle Cargo Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yaxuan; Eng, William S.; Colquhoun, David R.; Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Graham, David R.; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, also known as microvesicles (EMVs), are nano-sized membranous particles secreted from nearly all mammalian cell types. These nanoparticles play critical roles in many physiological processes including cell-cell signaling, immune activation, and suppression and are associated with disease states such as tumor progression. The biological functions of EMVs are highly dependent on their protein composition, which can dictate pathogenicity. Although some mechanisms have been proposed for the regulation of EMV protein trafficking, little attention has been paid to N-linked glycosylation as a potential sorting signal. Previous work from our laboratory found a conserved glycan signature for EMVs, which differed from that of the parent cell membranes, suggesting a potential role for glycosylation in EMV biogenesis. In this study, we further explore the role of glycosylation in EMV protein trafficking. We identify EMV glycoproteins and demonstrate alteration of their recruitment as a function of their glycosylation status upon pharmacological manipulation. Furthermore, we show that genetic manipulation of the glycosylation levels of a specific EMV glycoprotein, EWI-2, directly impacts its recruitment as a function of N-linked glycan sites. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that N-linked glycosylation directs glycoprotein sorting into EMVs. PMID:25261472

  18. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis. PMID:16548331

  19. The Role of Microvesicles Derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Li, Chonghui; Chen, Liangan

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are membrane vesicles that are released by many types of cells and have recently been considered important mediators of cell-to-cell communication. MVs serve as a vehicle to transfer proteins and messenger RNA and microRNA (miRNA) to distant cells, which alters the gene expression, proliferation, and differentiation of the recipient cells. Several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to reverse acute and chronic lung injury in different experimental models through paracrine mechanisms. This paracrine action may be partially accounted for by MVs that are derived from MSCs. MSC-derived MVs may confer a stem cell-like phenotype to injured cells with the consequent activation of self-regenerative programmers. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and biological activities of MSC-derived MVs, and we describe their potential in novel therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine to repair damaged tissues. Additionally, we provide an overview of studies that have assessed the role of MSC-derived MVs in lung diseases, including the mechanisms that may account for their therapeutic potential. Finally, we discuss the clinical use of MSC-derived MVs with several suggestions for enhancing their therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26064975

  20. MSC Microvesicles for the Treatment of Lung Disease: A New Paradigm for Cell-Free Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sdrimas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), also known as chronic lung disease of infancy, is a major complication of preterm birth that, despite improvements in neonatal respiratory support and perinatal care, remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, often with severe adverse neurodevelopmental sequelae. Even with major advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease, BPD remains essentially without adequate treatment. Recent Advances: Cell-based therapies arose as a promising treatment for acute and chronic lung injury in many experimental models of disease. Currently, more than 3000 human clinical trials employing cell therapy for the treatment of diverse diseases, including cardiac, neurologic, immune, and respiratory conditions, are ongoing or completed. Among the treatments, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the most studied and have been extensively tested in experimental models of BPD, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, and acute lung injury. Critical Issues: Despite the promising potential, MSC therapy for human lung disease still remains at an experimental stage and optimal transplantation conditions need to be determined. Although the mechanism of MSC action can be manifold, accumulating evidence suggests a predominant paracrine, immunomodulatory, and cytoprotective effect. Future Directions: The current review summarizes the effect of MSC treatment in models of lung injury, including BPD, and focuses on the MSC secretome and, specifically, MSC-derived microvesicles as potential key mediators of therapeutic action that can be the focus of future therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1905–1915. PMID:24382303

  1. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. PMID:26961880

  2. Characterization of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Microvesicle Genesis, Morphology and Pluripotent Content

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Ghoroghi, Shima; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Wu, Hao; Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Einbond, Linda Saxe; Guariglia, Sara; Peinado, Hector; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) are lipid bilayer-covered cell fragments that range in diameter from 30 nm–1uM and are released from all cell types. An increasing number of studies reveal that MVs contain microRNA, mRNA and protein that can be detected in the extracellular space. In this study, we characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) MV genesis, content and fusion to retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro. Nanoparticle tracking revealed that iPSCs released approximately 2200 MVs cell/hour in the first 12 hrs with an average diameter of 122 nm. Electron and light microscopic analysis of iPSCs showed MV release via lipid bilayer budding. The mRNA content of iPSC MVs was characterized and revealed the presence of the transcription factors Oct-3/4, Nanog, Klf4, and C-Myc. The protein content of iPSCs MVs, detected by immunogold electron microscopy, revealed the presence of the Oct-3/4 and Nanog. Isolated iPSC MVs were shown to fuse with RPCs in vitro at multiple points along the plasma membrane. These findings demonstrate that the mRNA and protein cargo in iPSC MVs have established roles in maintenance of pluripotency. Building on this work, iPSC derived MVs may be shown to be involved in maintaining cellular pluripotency and may have application in regenerative strategies for neural tissue. PMID:26797168

  3. Horizontal transfer of RNA and proteins between cells by extracellular microvesicles: 14 years later.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Ratajczak, Janina

    2016-12-01

    Extracellular microvesicles (ExMVs) are part of the cell secretome, and evidence has accumulated for their involvement in several biological processes. Fourteen years ago our team demonstrated for the first time that ExMVs carry functional RNA species and proteins from one cell to another, an observation that opened up the new research field of horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules in cell-to-cell communication. Moreover, the presence of mRNA, noncoding RNA, and miRNA in ExMVs in blood and other biological fluids opened up the possibility of employing ExMVs as new detection markers for pathological processes, and ExMVs became a target for "liquid biopsy" approaches. While ExMV-derived mRNAs may be translated in target cells into appropriate proteins, miRNAs regulate expression of corresponding mRNA species, and both RNA-depended ExMV-mediated mechanisms lead to functional changes in the target cells. Following from this observation, several excellent papers have been published that confirm the existence of the horizontal transfer of RNA. Moreover, in addition to RNA, proteins, bioactive lipids, infectious particles and intact organelles such as mitochondria may follow a similar mechanism. In this review we will summarize the impressive progress in this field-14 years after initial report. PMID:26943717

  4. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  5. Modeling Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived-Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Agnes; Tan, Kim; Chai, Xiaoran; Sadananda, Singh N; Mehta, Ashish; Ooi, Jolene; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Shim, Winston; Brunham, Liam R

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious anti-cancer drug but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC) remain incompletely understood. We investigated the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of DIC in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). We found that doxorubicin causes dose-dependent increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell death, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased intracellular calcium concentration. We characterized genome-wide changes in gene expression caused by doxorubicin using RNA-seq, as well as electrophysiological abnormalities caused by doxorubicin with multi-electrode array technology. Finally, we show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of TOP2B, a gene implicated in DIC in mouse studies, significantly reduces the sensitivity of hPSC-CMs to doxorubicin-induced double stranded DNA breaks and cell death. These data establish a human cellular model of DIC that recapitulates many of the cardinal features of this adverse drug reaction and could enable screening for protective agents against DIC as well as assessment of genetic variants involved in doxorubicin response. PMID:27142468

  6. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions. PMID:26439175

  7. Modeling Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived-Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Agnes; Tan, Kim; Chai, Xiaoran; Sadananda, Singh N.; Mehta, Ashish; Ooi, Jolene; Hayden, Michael R.; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Shim, Winston; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious anti-cancer drug but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC) remain incompletely understood. We investigated the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of DIC in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). We found that doxorubicin causes dose-dependent increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell death, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased intracellular calcium concentration. We characterized genome-wide changes in gene expression caused by doxorubicin using RNA-seq, as well as electrophysiological abnormalities caused by doxorubicin with multi-electrode array technology. Finally, we show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of TOP2B, a gene implicated in DIC in mouse studies, significantly reduces the sensitivity of hPSC-CMs to doxorubicin-induced double stranded DNA breaks and cell death. These data establish a human cellular model of DIC that recapitulates many of the cardinal features of this adverse drug reaction and could enable screening for protective agents against DIC as well as assessment of genetic variants involved in doxorubicin response. PMID:27142468

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells: A leap toward personalized therapies.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason; Vallabhaneni, Krishna C; Penfornis, Patrice; Pochampally, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem/stromal cell (MSCs) transplantation procedures have been used since the 1960's to treat leukemia and other diseases, but due to the risks involved only patients with life threatening illnesses were typically subjected to the transplantation procedure until the last decade. Recent advancements in transplantation techniques have made it more feasible to use it for non-life-threatening diseases. However, the potential uses for stem cells are still limited by their rarity, and, in the case of allogeneic transplants, graft-vs.-host complications. An evolving alternative to conventional stem cell therapies is induced pluripotent stem-cell derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (iPSC- MSCs), which have a multi-lineage potential comparable to conventionally acquired MSCs with the added benefit of being less immunoreactive. However there are still many hurdles left to be overcome before they can be used regularly for personalized therapies. This review will focus on recent advancements that have been made regarding the role MSCs play in tumor development and the potential uses iPSC-MSCs may have in future cancer treatment. PMID:26423301

  9. Leukemia Stem Cell-Released Microvesicles Promote the Survival and Migration of Myeloid Leukemia Cells and These Effects Can Be Inhibited by MicroRNA34a Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Jing; Dong, Min

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play the major role in relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recent evidence indicates that microvesicles (MVs) released from cancer stem cells can promote tumor growth and invasion. In this study, we investigated whether LSCs-released MVs (LMVs) can regulate the malignance of AML cells and whether overexpression of tumor suppressive microRNA (miR), miR34a, is able to interrupt this process. LSCs were transfected with miRNA control (miRCtrl) or miR34a mimic for producing LMVs, respectively, defined as LMVsmiRCtrl and LMVsmiR34a. The effect of miR34a transfection on LSC proliferation and the effects of LMVsmiRCtrl or LMVsmiR34a on the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of AML cells (after LSC depletion) were determined. The levels of miR34a targets, caspase-3 and T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3), were analyzed. Results showed that (1) LMVsmiRCtrl promoted proliferation and migration and inhibited apoptosis of AML cells, which were associated with miR34a deficit; (2) transfection of miR34a mimic inhibited LSC proliferation and increased miR34a level in LMVsmiR34a; (3) LMVsmiR34a produced opposite effects as compared with LMVsmiRCtrl, which were associated with the changes of caspase-3 and Tim-3 levels. In summary, LMVs support AML cell malignance and modulating miR34a could offer a new approach for the management of AML. PMID:27127521

  10. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  11. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as a target in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Tacke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or CXCL12 is constitutively expressed in healthy liver. However, its expression increases following acute or chronic liver injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and malignant hepatocytes are important sources of SDF-1/CXCL12 in liver diseases. CXCL12 is able to activate two chemokine receptors with different downstream signaling pathways, CXCR4 and CXCR7. CXCR7 expression is relevant on LSEC, while HSC, mesenchymal stem cells, and tumor cells mainly respond via CXCR4. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of liver diseases involving this chemokine and its receptors. SDF-1-dependent signaling contributes to modulating acute liver injury and subsequent tissue regeneration. By activating HSC and recruiting mesenchymal cells from bone marrow, CXCL12 can promote liver fibrosis progression, while CXCL12-CXCR7 interactions endorse proregenerative responses in chronic injury. Moreover, the SDF-1 pathway is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and HCC metastasis. High hepatic CXCR4 expression has been suggested as a biomarker indicating poor prognosis of HCC patients. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) also express CXCR4 and migrate toward CXCL12. Thus CXCL12 inhibition might not only directly block HCC growth but also modulate the tumor microenvironment (angiogenesis, MDSC), thereby sensitizing HCC patients to conventional or emerging novel cancer therapies (e.g., sorafenib, regorafenib, nivolumab, pembrolizumab). We herein summarize the current knowledge on the complex interplay between CXCL12 and CXCR4/CXCR7 in liver diseases and discuss approaches on the therapeutic targeting of these axes in hepatitis, fibrosis, and liver cancer. PMID:27313175

  12. Smoking alters circulating plasma microvesicle pattern and microRNA signatures.

    PubMed

    Badrnya, S; Baumgartner, R; Assinger, A

    2014-07-01

    Circulating plasma microvesicles (PMVs) and their microRNA content are involved in the development of atherosclerosis and could serve as biomarkers for cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. However, little is known on how smoking influences the levels of PMVs and microRNA signatures in vivo. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of smoking on circulating PMV levels and CVD-related PMV-derived microRNAs in young, healthy smokers. Twenty young (10 female, 10 male; 25 ± 4 years) healthy smokers (16 ± 6 cigarettes per day for 8 ± 4 years) and age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. While complete blood count revealed no differences between both groups, smoking significantly enhanced intracellular reactive oxygen species in platelets and leukocytes as well as platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation. Total circulating PMV counts were significantly reduced in smokers, which could be attributed to decreased platelet-derived PMVs. While the number of endothelial PMVs remained unaffected, smoking propagated circulating leukocyte-derived PMVs. Despite reduced total PMVs, PMV-derived microRNA-profiling of six smoker/control pairs revealed a decrease of only a single microRNA, the major platelet-derived microRNA miR-223. Conversely, miR-29b, a microRNA associated with aortic aneurysm and fibrosis, and RNU6-2, a commonly used reference-RNA, were significantly up-regulated. Smoking leads to alterations in the circulating PMV profile and changes in the PMV-derived microRNA signature already in young, healthy adults. These changes may contribute to the development of smoking-related cardiovascular pathologies. Moreover, these smoking-related changes have to be considered when microRNA or PMV profiles are used as disease-specific biomarkers. PMID:24573468

  13. Influence of a low-carbohydrate diet on endothelial microvesicles in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, Antony L; Doyle, Lorna M; Fitzmaurice, Doreen; O'Donovan, Orla; Phelan, John P; Ross, Mark D; Cross, Keith S; Harrison, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Low-carbohydrate diets (LCD) are increasing in popularity, but their effect on vascular health has been questioned. Endothelial microvesicles (EMV) are membrane-derived vesicles with the potential to act as a sensitive prognostic biomarker of vascular health and endothelial function. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of a LCD on EMV and other endothelial biomarkers of protein origin. Twenty-four overweight women (age, 48.4 ± 0.6 years; height, 1.60 ± 0.07 m; body mass, 76.5 ± 9.1 kg; body mass index, 28.1 ± 2.7 kg·m(-2); waist circumference, 84.1 ± 7.4 cm; mean ± standard deviation) were randomised to either 24 weeks on their normal diet (ND) or a LCD, after which they crossed over to 24 weeks on the alternative diet. Participants were assisted in reducing carbohydrate intake, but not below 40 g·day(-1). Body composition and endothelial biomarkers were assessed at the crossover point and at the end of the study. Daily carbohydrate intake (87 ± 7 versus 179 ± 11 g) and the percentage of energy derived from carbohydrate (29% versus 44%) were lower (p < 0.05) on the LCD compared to the ND, but absolute fat and saturated fat intake were unchanged. Body mass and waist circumference were 3.7 ± 0.8 kg and 3.5 ± 1.0 cm lower (p < 0.05), respectively, after the LCD compared with the ND phases. CD31(+)CD41(-)EMV, soluble (s) thrombomodulin, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein were lower (p < 0.05) after the LCD compared to the ND, but serum lipids and apolipoproteins were not different. EMV along with a range of endothelial and inflammatory biomarkers are reduced by a LCD that involves modest weight loss. PMID:26963592

  14. Extracellular microvesicles from astrocytes contain functional glutamate transporters: regulation by protein kinase C and cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Meylan, Patrick; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT)-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes) and because the protein kinase C (PKC) family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI) is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release. PMID:24368897

  15. Stem Cells and Stem Cell-derived Tissues and Their Use in Safety Assessment*

    PubMed Central

    Kolaja, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Toxicology has long relied on animal models in a tedious approach to understanding risk of exposure to an uncharacterized molecule. Stem cell-derived tissues can be made in high purity, quality, and quantity to enable a new approach to this problem. Currently, stem cell-derived tissues are primarily “generic” genetic backgrounds; the future will see the integration of various genetic backgrounds and complex three-dimensional models to create truly unique in vitro organoids. This minireview focuses on the state of the art of a number of stem cell-derived tissues and details their application in toxicology. PMID:24362027

  16. Therapeutic Use of Stem Cell Transplantation for Cell Replacement or Cytoprotective Effect of Microvesicle Released from Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Moonhwan; Ban, Taehyun; Rhim, Taiyoun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common and severe type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), and which is currently no method was developed to restore normal structure and function. There are several reports on therapeutic effects of adult stem cell transplantations in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about how mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) can repair the IPF. In this study, we try to provide the evidence to show that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells directly replace fibrosis with normal lung cells using IPF model mice. As results, transplanted MSC successfully integrated and differentiated into type II lung cell which express surfactant protein. In the other hand, we examine the therapeutic effects of microvesicle treatment, which were released from mesenchymal stem cells. Though the therapeutic effects of MV treatment is less than that of MSC treatment, MV treat-ment meaningfully reduced the symptom of IPF, such as collagen deposition and inflammation. These data suggest that stem cell transplantation may be an effective strategy for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis via replacement and cytoprotective effect of microvesicle released from MSCs. PMID:24598998

  17. EMMPRIN Is Secreted by Human Uterine Epithelial Cells in Microvesicles and Stimulates Metalloproteinase Production by Human Uterine Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayger, C. A.; Mehrotra, P.; Belton, R. J.; Nowak, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial remodeling is a physiological process involved in the gynecological disease, endometriosis. Tissue remodeling is directed by uterine fibroblast production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Several MMPs are regulated directly by the protein extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and also by proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)1-α/β. We hypothesized that human uterine epithelial cells (HESs) secrete intact EMMPRIN to stimulate MMPs. Microvesicles from HES cell-conditioned medium (CM) expressed intact EMMPRIN protein. Treatment of HES cells with estradiol or phorbyl 12-myristate-13-acetate increased the release of EMMPRIN-containing microvesicles. The HES CM stimulated MMP-1, -2, and -3 messenger RNA levels in human uterine fibroblasts (HUFs) and EMMPRIN immunodepletion from HES-cell concentrated CM reduced MMP stimulation (P < .05). Treatment of HUF cells with low concentrations of IL-1β/α stimulated MMP production (P < .05). These results indicate that HES cells regulate MMP production by HUF cells by secretion of EMMPRIN, in response to ovarian hormones, proinflammatory cytokines as well as activation of protein kinase C. PMID:22729071

  18. Niacinamide pretreatment reduces microvesicle formation in hairless guinea pigs cutaneously exposed to sulfur mustard. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, J.J.; Clark, C.R.; Mitcheltree, L.W.

    1991-12-31

    It has been proposed that sulfur mustard (HD) may indirectly activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) by alkylating cellular DNA (Papirmeister et al., 1985). Activation of PADPRP results in the depletion of cellular NAD+ which initiates a series of biochemical processes that have been proposed to culminate in blister formation. Preventing PADPRP activation and NAD+ depletion should inhibit blister formation. Niacinamide is both an inhibitor of PADPRP and a precursor for NAD+ synthesis. The present study was undertaken to determine whether niacinamide can protect against HD-induced microvesication in cutaneously exposed hairless guinea pigs. Each site was exposed to HD for 8 min by means of a vapor cup. Niacinamide (750 mg/kg, ip) given as a 30-min pretreatment inhibited microvesicle formation by 50% after HD application. However, niacinamide given 2 hr after HD application did not reduce microvesicle formation. There was no benefit when niacinamide was given as both a pretreatment and treatment when compared to niacinamide given only as a pretreatment. The reduction in microvesication 24 hr after HD did not correlate with skin NAD+ content. Niacinamide did not reduce the degree of erythema or edema. Ballooning degeneration of basal epidermal cells was present in some niacinamide pretreated HD exposure sites.

  19. miR-210 and hypoxic microvesicles: Two critical components of hypoxia involved in the regulation of killer cells function.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Janji, Bassam; Berchem, Guy; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-09-28

    It has become clear that tumor stroma components are engaged in an active and complex molecular cross-talk that has serious implications for immunological recognition of tumor cells in shaping the microenvironment. Hypoxia which is a major component of tumor microenvironment influences the characteristics of neoplasia by favoring heterogeneity, invasiveness, metastatic potency and tumor progression. In this regard, an important mode of communication between carcinoma cells and immune cells may involve tumor-derived microvesicles, which are able to carry lipids, proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs. This review covers new evidence indicating that the efficacy of the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTLs and NK) may be dependent on hypoxia induced miRNA and microvesicles in the tumor microenvironment by inhibiting the efficacy of natural host anti-tumor immune response and improving the ability of tumors to avoid immunosurveillance. This emphasizes that hypoxic tumors actively develop additional mechanisms to suppress the sensing of the immunologic danger signals in order to survive and propagate without inciting anti-tumor immunity. PMID:26523672

  20. Membrane retrieval in the guinea-pig neurohypophysis. Isolation and characterization of secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles after radiolabel incorporation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saermark, T; Jones, P M; Robinson, I C

    1984-03-01

    We have developed small-scale methods for the isolation and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions from single guinea-pig posterior-pituitary glands. Secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles produced in this way were of similar purity to those isolated from large amounts of tissue by conventional ultracentrifugation. [35S]Cysteine injected into the hypothalamus was found in the soluble contents of secretory vesicles isolated from the neural lobes 24 h later. High-pressure liquid-chromatographic analysis revealed that the radiolabel was incorporated into the expected neurosecretory products (oxytocin, vasopressin and neurophysin) and also into a biosynthetic intermediate in the vasopressin system. The membranes of secretory vesicles were labelled with [3H]choline 24 h after its hypothalamic injection. Little or no [3H]choline could be demonstrated in coated microvesicles at this time, although these structures were labelled 5 days after injection. Stimulating hormone secretion by chronic dehydration produced a significant fall in [3H]choline content of the secretory-vesicle membranes without any transfer of label into coated microvesicles, suggesting that coated microvesicles are not involved in membrane retrieval in the neurohypophysis. PMID:6712633

  1. Membrane retrieval in the guinea-pig neurohypophysis. Isolation and characterization of secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles after radiolabel incorporation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Saermark, T; Jones, P M; Robinson, I C

    1984-01-01

    We have developed small-scale methods for the isolation and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions from single guinea-pig posterior-pituitary glands. Secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles produced in this way were of similar purity to those isolated from large amounts of tissue by conventional ultracentrifugation. [35S]Cysteine injected into the hypothalamus was found in the soluble contents of secretory vesicles isolated from the neural lobes 24 h later. High-pressure liquid-chromatographic analysis revealed that the radiolabel was incorporated into the expected neurosecretory products (oxytocin, vasopressin and neurophysin) and also into a biosynthetic intermediate in the vasopressin system. The membranes of secretory vesicles were labelled with [3H]choline 24 h after its hypothalamic injection. Little or no [3H]choline could be demonstrated in coated microvesicles at this time, although these structures were labelled 5 days after injection. Stimulating hormone secretion by chronic dehydration produced a significant fall in [3H]choline content of the secretory-vesicle membranes without any transfer of label into coated microvesicles, suggesting that coated microvesicles are not involved in membrane retrieval in the neurohypophysis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6712633

  2. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM. PMID:26671674

  3. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer ... have any symptoms. In certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, symptoms often do not start until the disease ...

  4. Microvesicle phenotypes are associated with transfusion requirements and mortality in subjects with severe injuries

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Holcomb, John B.; Kozar, Rosemary; Cardenas, Jessica C.; Wade, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe injury often results in substantial bleeding and mortality. Injury provokes cellular activation and release of extracellular vesicles. Circulating microvesicles (MVs) are predominantly platelet-derived and highly procoagulant. They support hemostasis and vascular function. The roles of MVs in survival after severe injury are largely unknown. We hypothesized that altered MV phenotypes would be associated with transfusion requirements and poor outcomes. Methods This single-centre study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The study cohort consisted of patients with major trauma requiring blood product transfusion and 26 healthy controls. Plasma samples for MVs were collected upon admission to the emergency department (n=169) and post-resuscitation (n=42), and analysed by flow cytometry for MV counts and cellular origin: platelet (PMV), erythrocyte (RMV), leukocyte (LMV), endothelial (EMV), tissue factor (TFMV), and annexin V (AVMV). Twenty-four hour mortality is the outcome measurement used to classify survivors versus non-survivors. Data were compared over time and analysed with demographic and clinical data. Results The median age was 34 (IQR 23, 51), 72% were male, Injury Severity Score was 29 (IQR 19, 36), and 24 h mortality was 13%. MV levels and phenotypes differed between patients and controls. Elevated admission EMVs were found both in survivors (409/µL) and non-survivors (393/µL) compared to controls (23/µL, p<0.001) and persisted over time. Admission levels of PMV, AVMV, RMV, and TFMV were significantly lower in patients who died compared to survivors, but were not independently associated with the 24 h mortality rate. Patients with low MV levels at admission received the most blood products within the first 24 h. AVMV and PMV levels either increased over time or stabilized in survivors but decreased in non-survivors, resulting in significantly lower levels at intensive care unit admission in non-survivors (1,048 vs. 1

  5. Impact of collection, isolation and storage methodology of circulating microvesicles on flow cytometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    KONG, FANCONG; ZHANG, LIMING; WANG, HONGXIANG; YUAN, GUOLIN; GUO, ANYUAN; LI, QIUBAI; CHEN, ZHICHAO

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles (MVs) in body fluids participate in a variety of physical and pathological processes, and are regarded as potential biomarkers for numerous diseases. Flow cytometry (FCM) is among the most frequently used techniques for MV detection. However, different handling methods unavoidably cause pre-analytical variations in the counts and sizes of MVs determined by FCM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of centrifugation, storage conditions and anticoagulant on MV measurements. Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy donors, including 4 women and 9 men. Calcein-AM staining was used to label MVs and assess the impact of pre-analytical preparation, including centrifugation, and storage conditions on MV measurements obtained using FCM. The range of factors investigated for comparison included: Platelet-free plasma (PFP) stored at −80°C for 1 or 4 weeks; MVs stored at 4°C for 3–4 days or 1 week; MVs frozen at −80°C for 1 or 4 weeks; and anticoagulants, either heparin or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). No statistically significant differences in MV counts were detected between the two centrifugation speeds (16,000 and 20,500 × g) or among the three centrifugation times (15, 30 and 60 min) investigated. Similarly, no significant differences were noted in MV counts between the two anticoagulants tested (heparin and EDTA). However, the storage of PFP or MVs in heparin-anticoagulated plasma for different periods markedly affected the detected MV counts and size distribution. The counts and sizes of MVs from EDTA-anticoagulated plasma were only affected when the MVs were frozen at −80°C for 4 weeks. In conclusion, calcein-AM is able to efficiently identify MVs from plasma and may be an alternative to Annexin V for MV staining. EDTA preserves the MV counts and size more accurately compared with heparin under calcein-AM staining. PFP centrifuged at 16,000 × g for 15 min is sufficient to isolate MVs, which enables the

  6. Leukocyte Cell-Derived Chemotaxin 2-Associated Amyloidosis: A Recently Recognized Disease with Distinct Clinicopathologic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Dogan, Ahmet; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-11-01

    Amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 is a recently recognized form of amyloidosis, and it has already been established as a frequent form of systemic amyloidosis in the United States, with predominant involvement of kidney and liver. The disease has a strong ethnic bias, affecting mainly Hispanics (particularly Mexicans). Additional ethnic groups prone to develop amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 include Punjabis, First Nations people in British Columbia, and Native Americans. Most patients are elderly who present with chronic renal insufficiency and bland urinary sediment. Proteinuria is variable, being absent altogether in about one third of patients. Liver involvement is frequently an incidental finding. Amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 deposits shows a characteristic distribution: in the kidney, there is consistent involvement of cortical interstitium, whereas in the liver, there is a preferential involvement of periportal and pericentral vein regions. Concurrent renal disease is frequent, with diabetic nephropathy and IgA nephropathy being the most common. Patient survival is excellent, likely because of the rarity of cardiac involvement, whereas renal survival is guarded, with a median renal survival of 62 months in those without concurrent renal disease. There is currently no efficacious therapy for amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 amyloidosis. Renal transplantation seems to be a reasonable treatment for patients with advanced renal failure, although the disease may recur in the allograft. The pathogenesis of amyloidosis derived from leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 amyloidosis has not yet been elucidated. It could be a result of leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 overexpression by hepatocytes either constitutively (controlled by yet-uncharacterized genetic defects) or secondary to hepatocellular damage. It is critical not to misdiagnose amyloidosis

  7. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity. PMID:27376738

  8. Biochemical and Biologic Characterization of Exosomes and Microvesicles as Facilitators of HIV-1 Infection in Macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Kadiu, Irena; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Dash, Prasanta K.; Zhang, Wei; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes and microvesicles are cell membranous sacs originating from multivesicular bodies and plasma membranes that facilitate long-distance intercellular communications. Lipidomic, proteomic and cell biologic approaches uncovered processes by which the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) can use exosomes and MV to facilitate its dissemination. Macrophage MV and exosomes were isolated by immunoaffinity and sucrose cushion centrifugation and characterized by morphologic, biochemical and molecular assays. HIV-1 was “entrapped” in exosome aggregates. Robust HIV-1 replication followed infection with exosome-enhanced fractions isolated from infected cell supernatants. MV and exosomes facilitated viral infection that was affected by a range of cell surface receptors and adhesion proteins. HIV-1 readily completed its life cycle in human monocyte-derived macrophages but not in CD4 negative cells. The data support a significant role for exosomes as facilitators of viral infection. PMID:22711894

  9. Extracellular vesicles: Emerging targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vader, Pieter; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Wood, Matthew J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released by almost all cell types, including tumour cells. Through transfer of their molecular contents, EVs are capable of altering the function of recipient cells. Increasing evidence suggests a key role for EV-mediated intercellular communication in a variety of cellular processes involved in tumour development and progression, including immune suppression, angiogenesis and metastasis. Aspects of EV biogenesis or function are therefore increasingly being considered as targets for anti-cancer therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the contributions of EVs to cancer pathogenesis and discuss novel therapeutic strategies to target EVs to prevent tumour growth and spread. PMID:24703619

  10. Isolated nerve endings (neurosecretosomes) from the posterior pituitary. Partial separation of vasopressin and oxytocin and the isolation of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Bindler, E; Labella, F S; Sanwal, M

    1967-07-01

    Subcellular fractions of the bovine posterior pituitary, including one composed almost exclusively of pinched-off nerve endings (neurosecretosomes), were characterized electron microscopically, hormonally, and enzymically. 15% of the nerve terminals in the gland were isolated as neurosecretosomes, as estimated from determinations of lactic dehydrogenase, a soluble, cytoplasmic enzyme. Neurosecretosomes were subdivided into three fractions by density-gradient centrifugation. The three subfractions, each shown to be nearly homogeneous populations of neurosecretosomes by means of electron microscopic and enzymic criteria, differed from each other in their vasopressin/oxytocin (VP/OT) ratios. The VP/OT ratio increased from the lightest to the densest fraction, indicating that VP is localized to denser and OT to lighter neurosecretosomes; similar results have been obtained previously for subfractions of neurosecretory granules (NSG). No morphological differences were apparent in neurosecretosomes among the three subfractions. Although complete separation of VP and OT was not achieved, the findings suggest that VP and OT are each stored in a different species of nerve ending and support the hypothesis that a given neurosecretory cell synthesizes, stores, and secretes only one of the peptide hormones. Microvesicles, 40-80 mmicro diameter and contained in typical neurosecretory cell terminals, are believed to be degradation products of membrane ghosts of depleted NSG; electron micrographs indicative of this transformation are presented. A fraction rich in microvesicles, but containing some NSG membranes, was prepared by density-gradient centrifugation of an osmolysate of neurosecretosomes. Smaller, apparently nonneurosecretory nerve endings, lacking NSG but filled with small vesicles, are occasionally seen in sections from whole gland. The vesicles in these atypical posterior pituitary nerve endings may be true neurohumor-containing, "synaptic" vesicles. PMID:6040535

  11. Isolation of syncytiotrophoblast microvesicles and exosomes and their characterisation by multicolour flow cytometry and fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dragovic, R A; Collett, G P; Hole, P; Ferguson, D J P; Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Tannetta, D S

    2015-10-01

    The human placenta releases multiple types and sizes of syncytiotrophoblast (STB) extracellular vesicles (EV) into the maternal circulation that exhibit diverse biological activities. The placental perfusion technique enables isolation of these STBEV, but conventional flow cytometry can only be used to phenotype EV down to ∼300 nm in size. Fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (fl-NTA) has the potential to phenotype EV down to ∼50 nm, thereby improving current characterisation techniques. The aims of this study were to prepare microvesicle and exosome enriched fractions from human placental perfusate (n=8) and improve fl-NTA STBEV detection. Differential centrifugation and filtration effectively removed contaminating red blood cells from fresh placental perfusates and pelleted a STB microvesicle (STBMV) fraction (10,000×g pellet - 10KP; NTA modal size 395±12 nm), enriched for the STB marker placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and a STB exosome (STBEX) fraction (150,000×g pellet - 150KP; NTA modal size 147±6 nm), enriched for PLAP and exosome markers Alix and CD63. The PLAP positivity of 'standard' 10KP and 150KP pools (four samples/pool), determined by immunobead depletion, was used to optimise fl-NTA camera settings. Individual 10KP and 150KP samples (n=8) were 54.5±5.7% (range 17.8-66.9%) and 30.6±5.6% (range 3.3-51.7%) PLAP positive, respectively. We have developed a reliable method for enriching STBMV and STBEX from placental perfusate. We also standardised fl-NTA settings and improved measurement of PLAP positive EV in STBMV. However, fl-NTA is not as sensitive as anti-PLAP Dynabead capture for STBEX detection, possibly due to STBEX having lower surface expression of PLAP. These important developments will facilitate more detailed studies of the role of STBMV and STBEX in normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:25843788

  12. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27063098

  13. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  14. Microvesicles but Not Exosomes from Pathfinder Cells Stimulate Functional Recovery of the Pancreas in a Mouse Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Model.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Dagmara; Anthony, Diana F; Moulisova, Vladimira; MacDonald, Alasdair I; MacIntyre, Alan; Thomson, Jacqueline; Nag, Abhijeet; Davies, R Wayne; Shiels, Paul G

    2016-06-01

    Pathfinder cells (PCs), a novel cell type derived from the pancreas of adult rats, have been demonstrated to stimulate recovery of tissue structure and function in two animal models of acute tissue damage to date-streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and ischemia-reperfusion damage to the kidney. In repaired tissue, PCs and their progeny typically represent only 0.02% of the repaired tissue, suggesting that they act via a paracrine mechanism on native cells in the damaged area. Extracellular vesicles are strong candidates for mediating such a paracrine effect. Therefore, we studied the effects of two PC-derived extracellular vesicle fractions on tissue repair in the STZ diabetes model, one containing primarily microvesicles and the second containing predominantly exosomes. Treatment of STZ-induced diabetic mice with the microvesicles preparation led to blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, and C-peptide levels similar to those found with PC treatment. Furthermore, analysis of the histopathology of the pancreas indicated islet regeneration. In contrast, the exosome fraction demonstrated no repair activity, and STZ diabetic mice treated with exosome preparations had blood glucose values that were indistinguishable from those of vehicle-only treated controls. Therefore, we conclude that exosomes play no part in PC action as detected by this assay, whereas microvesicles provide all or a large component of the paracrine activity of PCs. Because they act to stimulate repair of multiple tissues, PC-derived microvesicles may similarly have the potential to stimulate repair of many damaged tissues, identifying a very significant cell-free therapeutic opportunity in regenerative medicine. PMID:26414011

  15. Compound K attenuates stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1)-induced migration of C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuck; Roh, Hyo Sun; Kim, Jai Eun; Park, Sun Dong; Park, Won Hwan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1), also known as chemokine ligand 12, and chemokine receptor type 4 are involved in cancer cell migration. Compound K (CK), a metabolite of protopanaxadiol-type ginsenoside by gut microbiota, is reported to have therapeutic potential in cancer therapy. However, the inhibitory effect of CK on SDF-1 pathway-induced migration of glioma has not yet been established. MATERIALS/METHODS Cytotoxicity of CK in C6 glioma cells was determined using an EZ-Cytox cell viability assay kit. Cell migration was tested using the wound healing and Boyden chamber assay. Phosphorylation levels of protein kinase C (PKC)α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were measured by western blot assay, and matrix metallopeptidases (MMP) were measured by gelatin-zymography analysis. RESULTS CK significantly reduced the phosphorylation of PKCα and ERK1/2, expression of MMP9 and MMP2, and inhibited the migration of C6 glioma cells under SDF-1-stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS CK is a cell migration inhibitor that inhibits C6 glioma cell migration by regulating its downstream signaling molecules including PKCα, ERK1/2, and MMPs. PMID:27247721

  16. Maturation of Stem Cell-Derived Beta-cells Guided by the Expression of Urocortin 3

    PubMed Central

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Huising, Mark O.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating disease precipitated by an autoimmune response directed at the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas for which no cure exists. Stem cell-derived beta-cells show great promise for a cure as they have the potential to supply unlimited numbers of cells that could be derived from a patient's own cells, thus eliminating the need for immunosuppression. Current in vitro protocols for the differentiation of stem cell-derived beta-cells can successfully generate pancreatic endoderm cells. In diabetic rodents, such cells can differentiate further along the beta-cell lineage until they are eventually capable of restoring normoglycemia. While these observations demonstrate that stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm has the potential to differentiate into mature, glucose-responsive beta-cells, the signals that direct differentiation and maturation from pancreatic endoderm onwards remain poorly understood. In this review, we analyze the sequence of events that culminates in the formation of beta-cells during embryonic development. and summarize how current protocols to generate beta-cells have sought to capitalize on this ontogenic template. We place particular emphasis on the current challenges and opportunities which occur in the later stages of beta-cell differentiation and maturation of transplantable stem cell-derived beta-cells. Another focus is on the question how the use of recently identified maturation markers such as urocortin 3 can be instrumental in guiding these efforts. PMID:25148370

  17. Bioenergetic phenotypes and metabolic stress responses in cells derived from ecologically and commercially important fish species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various stressors negatively affect wild and cultured fish and can result in metabolic disturbances that first manifest at the level of the cell. In the present study, we sought to further our understanding of cellular metabolism in fish by examining the stress responses of cells derived from three...

  18. Molecular and In Vivo Characterization of Cancer-Propagating Cells Derived from MYCN-Dependent Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zai; Jasnos, Lukasz; Gil, Veronica; Howell, Louise; Hallsworth, Albert; Petrie, Kevin; Sawado, Tomoyuki; Chesler, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. While the pathways that are deregulated in MB remain to be fully characterized, amplification and/or overexpression of the MYCN gene, which is has a critical role in cerebellar development as a regulator of neural progenitor cell fate, has been identified in several MB subgroups. Phenotypically, aberrant expression of MYCN is associated with the large-cell/anaplastic MB variant, which accounts for 5-15% of cases and is associated with aggressive disease and poor clinical outcome. To better understand the role of MYCN in MB in vitro and in vivo and to aid the development of MYCN-targeted therapeutics we established tumor-derived neurosphere cell lines from the GTML (Glt1-tTA/TRE-MYCN-Luc) genetically engineered mouse model. A fraction of GTML neurospheres were found to be growth factor independent, expressed CD133 (a marker of neural stem cells), failed to differentiate upon MYCN withdrawal and were highly tumorigenic when orthotopically implanted into the cerebellum. Principal component analyzes using single cell RNA assay data suggested that the clinical candidate aurora-A kinase inhibitor MLN8237 converts GTML neurospheres to resemble non-MYCN expressors. Correlating with this, MLN8237 significantly extended the survival of mice bearing GTML MB allografts. In summary, our results demonstrate that MYCN plays a critical role in expansion and survival of aggressive MB-propagating cells, and establish GTML neurospheres as an important resource for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25785590

  19. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  20. Pluripotent stem cell-derived natural killer cells for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an accessible, genetically tractable and homogenous starting cell populations to efficiently study human blood cell development. These cell populations provide platforms to develop new cell-based therapies to treat both malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. Our group has previously demonstrated the ability of hESC-derived hematopoietic precursors to produce functional natural killer (NK) cells as well as an explanation of the underlying mechanism responsible for inefficient development of T and B cells from hESCs. hESCs and iPSCs, which can be reliably engineered in vitro, provide an important new model system to study human lymphocyte development and produce enhanced cell-based therapies with potential to serve as a “universal” source of anti-tumor lymphocytes for novel clinical therapies. This review will focus on the application of hESC-derived NK cells with currently used and novel therapeutics for clinical trials, current barriers to translation, and future applications through genetic engineering approaches. PMID:20801411

  1. Microfluidic fabrication of cell-derived nanovesicles as endogenous RNA carriers.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonju; Jeong, Dayeong; Kim, Junho; Cho, Siwoo; Jang, Su Chul; Han, Chungmin; Kang, Ji Yoon; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2014-04-01

    Exosomes/microvesicles are known to shuttle biological signals between cells, possibly by transferring biological signal components such as encapsulated RNAs and proteins, plasma membrane proteins, or both. Therefore exosomes are being considered for use as RNA and protein delivery vehicles for various therapeutic applications. However, living cells in nature secrete only a small number of exosomes, and procedures to collect them are complex; these complications impede their use in mass delivery of components to targeted cells. We propose a novel and efficient method that forces cells through hydrophilic microchannels to generate artificial nanovesicles. These mimetic nanovesicles contain mRNAs, intracellular proteins and plasma membrane proteins, and are shaped like cell-secreted exosomes. When recipient cells are exposed to nanovesicles from embryonic stem cells, mRNAs of Oct 3/4 and Nanog are transferred from embryonic stem cells to the target cells. This result suggests that mimetic nanovesicles can be used as vehicles to deliver RNA. This nanovesicle formation method is expected to be used in exosome research and to have applications in drug and RNA-delivery systems. PMID:24493004

  2. Transgene Reactivation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives and Reversion to Pluripotency of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Galat, Vasiliy; Galat, Yekaterina; Perepitchka, Mariana; Jennings, Lawrence J; Iannaccone, Philip M; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2016-07-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have enormous potential in regenerative medicine and disease modeling. It is now felt that clinical trials should be performed with iPSCs derived with nonintegrative constructs. Numerous studies, however, including those describing disease models, are still being published using cells derived from iPSCs generated with integrative constructs. Our experimental work presents the first evidence of spontaneous transgene reactivation in vitro in several cellular types. Our results show that the transgenes were predominantly silent in parent iPSCs, but in mesenchymal and endothelial iPSC derivatives, the transgenes experienced random upregulation of Nanog and c-Myc. Additionally, we provide evidence of spontaneous secondary reprogramming and reversion to pluripotency in mesenchymal stem cells derived from iPSCs. These findings strongly suggest that the studies, which use cellular products derived from iPSCs generated with retro- or lentiviruses, should be evaluated with consideration of the possibility of transgene reactivation. The in vitro model described here provides insight into the earliest events of culture transformation and suggests the hypothesis that reversion to pluripotency may be responsible for the development of tumors in cell replacement experiments. The main goal of this work, however, is to communicate the possibility of transgene reactivation in retro- or lenti-iPSC derivatives and the associated loss of cellular fidelity in vitro, which may impact the outcomes of disease modeling and related experimentation. PMID:27193052

  3. Transgene Reactivation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives and Reversion to Pluripotency of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galat, Yekaterina; Perepitchka, Mariana; Jennings, Lawrence J.; Iannaccone, Philip M.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have enormous potential in regenerative medicine and disease modeling. It is now felt that clinical trials should be performed with iPSCs derived with nonintegrative constructs. Numerous studies, however, including those describing disease models, are still being published using cells derived from iPSCs generated with integrative constructs. Our experimental work presents the first evidence of spontaneous transgene reactivation in vitro in several cellular types. Our results show that the transgenes were predominantly silent in parent iPSCs, but in mesenchymal and endothelial iPSC derivatives, the transgenes experienced random upregulation of Nanog and c-Myc. Additionally, we provide evidence of spontaneous secondary reprogramming and reversion to pluripotency in mesenchymal stem cells derived from iPSCs. These findings strongly suggest that the studies, which use cellular products derived from iPSCs generated with retro- or lentiviruses, should be evaluated with consideration of the possibility of transgene reactivation. The in vitro model described here provides insight into the earliest events of culture transformation and suggests the hypothesis that reversion to pluripotency may be responsible for the development of tumors in cell replacement experiments. The main goal of this work, however, is to communicate the possibility of transgene reactivation in retro- or lenti-iPSC derivatives and the associated loss of cellular fidelity in vitro, which may impact the outcomes of disease modeling and related experimentation. PMID:27193052

  4. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  5. Endometrial Exosomes/Microvesicles in the Uterine Microenvironment: A New Paradigm for Embryo-Endometrial Cross Talk at Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, York Hunt; Rome, Sophie; Jalabert, Audrey; Forterre, Alexis; Singh, Harmeet; Hincks, Cassandra L.; Salamonsen, Lois A.

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanoparticles (∼100 nm diameter) released from cells, which can transfer small RNAs and mRNA via the extracellular environment to cells at distant sites. We hypothesised that exosomes or the slightly larger microvesicles (100–300 nm) are released from the endometrial epithelium into the uterine cavity, and that these contain specific micro (mi)RNA that could be transferred to either the trophectodermal cells of the blastocyst or to endometrial epithelial cells, to promote implantation. The aim of this study was to specifically identify and characterise exosomes/microvesicles (mv) released from endometrial epithelial cells and to determine whether exosomes/mv are present in uterine fluid. Immunostaining demonstrated that the tetraspanins, CD9 and CD63 used as cell surface markers of exosomes are present on the apical surfaces of endometrial epithelial cells in tissue sections taken across the menstrual cycle: CD63 showed cyclical regulation. Exosome/mv pellets were prepared from culture medium of endometrial epithelial cell (ECC1 cells) and from uterine fluid and its associated mucus by sequential ultracentifugation. Exosomes/mv were positively identified in all preparations by FACS and immunofluorescence staining following exosome binding to beads. Size particle analysis confirmed the predominance of particles of 50–150 nm in each of these fluids. MiRNA analysis of the ECC1 cells and their exosomes/mv demonstrated sorting of miRNA into exosomes/mv: 13 of the 227 miRNA were specific to exosomes/mv, while a further 5 were not present in these. The most abundant miRNA in exosomes/mv were hsa-miR-200c, hsa-miR-17 and hsa-miR-106a. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the exosome/mv-specific miRNAs have potential targets in biological pathways highly relevant for embryo implantation. Thus exosomes/mv containing specific miRNA are present in the microenvironment in which embryo implantation occurs and may contribute to the endometrial-embryo cross talk

  6. Isolation of syncytiotrophoblast microvesicles and exosomes and their characterisation by multicolour flow cytometry and fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dragovic, R.A.; Collett, G.P.; Hole, P.; Ferguson, D.J.P.; Redman, C.W.; Sargent, I.L.; Tannetta, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    The human placenta releases multiple types and sizes of syncytiotrophoblast (STB) extracellular vesicles (EV) into the maternal circulation that exhibit diverse biological activities. The placental perfusion technique enables isolation of these STBEV, but conventional flow cytometry can only be used to phenotype EV down to ∼300 nm in size. Fluorescence Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (fl-NTA) has the potential to phenotype EV down to ∼50 nm, thereby improving current characterisation techniques. The aims of this study were to prepare microvesicle and exosome enriched fractions from human placental perfusate (n = 8) and improve fl-NTA STBEV detection. Differential centrifugation and filtration effectively removed contaminating red blood cells from fresh placental perfusates and pelleted a STB microvesicle (STBMV) fraction (10,000×g pellet – 10KP; NTA modal size 395 ± 12 nm), enriched for the STB marker placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and a STB exosome (STBEX) fraction (150,000×g pellet – 150KP; NTA modal size 147 ± 6 nm), enriched for PLAP and exosome markers Alix and CD63. The PLAP positivity of ‘standard’ 10KP and 150KP pools (four samples/pool), determined by immunobead depletion, was used to optimise fl-NTA camera settings. Individual 10KP and 150KP samples (n = 8) were 54.5 ± 5.7% (range 17.8–66.9%) and 30.6 ± 5.6% (range 3.3–51.7%) PLAP positive, respectively. We have developed a reliable method for enriching STBMV and STBEX from placental perfusate. We also standardised fl-NTA settings and improved measurement of PLAP positive EV in STBMV. However, fl-NTA is not as sensitive as anti-PLAP Dynabead capture for STBEX detection, possibly due to STBEX having lower surface expression of PLAP. These important developments will facilitate more detailed studies of the role of STBMV and STBEX in normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:25843788

  7. Concise review: the relevance of human stem cell-derived organoid models for epithelial translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Hynds, Robert E; Giangreco, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial organ remodeling is a major contributing factor to worldwide death and disease, costing healthcare systems billions of dollars every year. Despite this, most fundamental epithelial organ research fails to produce new therapies and mortality rates for epithelial organ diseases remain unacceptably high. In large part, this failure in translating basic epithelial research into clinical therapy is due to a lack of relevance in existing preclinical models. To correct this, new models are required that improve preclinical target identification, pharmacological lead validation, and compound optimization. In this review, we discuss the relevance of human stem cell-derived, three-dimensional organoid models for addressing each of these challenges. We highlight the advantages of stem cell-derived organoid models over existing culture systems, discuss recent advances in epithelial tissue-specific organoids, and present a paradigm for using organoid models in human translational medicine. PMID:23203919

  8. Autonomous beating rate adaptation in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W; Protas, Lev; Gagliardi, Mark; Brown, Kristy; Kass, Robert S; Keller, Gordon; Robinson, Richard B; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic success of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes critically depends on their ability to respond to and integrate with the surrounding electromechanical environment. Currently, the immaturity of human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells limits their utility for regenerative medicine and biological research. We hypothesize that biomimetic electrical signals regulate the intrinsic beating properties of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that electrical conditioning of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in three-dimensional culture promotes cardiomyocyte maturation, alters their automaticity and enhances connexin expression. Cardiomyocytes adapt their autonomous beating rate to the frequency at which they were stimulated, an effect mediated by the emergence of a rapidly depolarizing cell population, and the expression of hERG. This rate-adaptive behaviour is long lasting and transferable to the surrounding cardiomyocytes. Thus, electrical conditioning may be used to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and establish their automaticity, with implications for cell-based reduction of arrhythmia during heart regeneration. PMID:26785135

  9. Autonomous beating rate adaptation in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W.; Protas, Lev; Gagliardi, Mark; Brown, Kristy; Kass, Robert S.; Keller, Gordon; Robinson, Richard B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic success of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes critically depends on their ability to respond to and integrate with the surrounding electromechanical environment. Currently, the immaturity of human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells limits their utility for regenerative medicine and biological research. We hypothesize that biomimetic electrical signals regulate the intrinsic beating properties of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that electrical conditioning of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in three-dimensional culture promotes cardiomyocyte maturation, alters their automaticity and enhances connexin expression. Cardiomyocytes adapt their autonomous beating rate to the frequency at which they were stimulated, an effect mediated by the emergence of a rapidly depolarizing cell population, and the expression of hERG. This rate-adaptive behaviour is long lasting and transferable to the surrounding cardiomyocytes. Thus, electrical conditioning may be used to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and establish their automaticity, with implications for cell-based reduction of arrhythmia during heart regeneration. PMID:26785135

  10. Glucose responsive insulin production from human embryonic germ (EG) cell derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Gregory O.; Yochem, Robert L.; Axelman, Joyce; Sheets, Timothy P.; Kaczorowski, David J.; Shamblott, Michael J. . E-mail: mshambl1@jhmi.edu

    2007-05-11

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects millions to a daily burden of disease management, life threatening hypoglycemia and long-term complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, heart disease, and stroke. Cell transplantation therapies providing a glucose-regulated supply of insulin have been implemented clinically, but are limited by safety, efficacy and supply considerations. Stem cells promise a plentiful and flexible source of cells for transplantation therapies. Here, we show that cells derived from human embryonic germ (EG) cells express markers of definitive endoderm, pancreatic and {beta}-cell development, glucose sensing, and production of mature insulin. These cells integrate functions necessary for glucose responsive regulation of preproinsulin mRNA and expression of insulin C-peptide in vitro. Following transplantation into mice, cells become insulin and C-peptide immunoreactive and produce plasma C-peptide in response to glucose. These findings suggest that EG cell derivatives may eventually serve as a source of insulin producing cells for the treatment of diabetes.

  11. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine. PMID:27373602

  12. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. PMID:24232694

  13. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kittel, A; Falus, A; Buzás, E

    2013-06-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems. PMID:24265924

  14. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Falus, A.; Buzás, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems. PMID:24265924

  15. Argonaute 2 in Cell-Secreted Microvesicles Guides the Function of Secreted miRNAs in Recipient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Li, Limin

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) secreted by cells into microvesicles (MVs) form a novel class of signal molecules that mediate intercellular communication. However, several fundamental aspects of secreted miRNAs remain unknown, particularly the mechanism that governs the function or fate of exogenous miRNAs in recipient cells. In the present study, we provide evidence indicating that Argonaute 2 (Ago2) plays a role in stabilizing miRNAs and facilitating the packaging of secreted miRNAs into MVs. More importantly, Ago2 in origin cell-secreted MVs (but not in recipient cells) directs the function of secreted miRNAs. First, Ago2 overexpression clearly increased the level of miR-16 in cells transfected with a miR-16 mimic by protecting the miRNAs from degradation in lysosomes. Second, Ago2 overexpression increased the level of miR-16 in cell-secreted MVs, suggesting that Ago2 may facilitate the packaging of secreted miRNAs into MVs. Third, exogenous miR-16 delivered by MVs within the origin cells significantly reduced the Bcl2 protein level in recipient cells, and miR-16 and Bcl2 mRNA were physically associated with exogenous HA-tagged Ago2 (HA-Ago2). Finally, the effect of MV-delivered miR-16 on the production of the Bcl2 protein in recipient cells was not abolished by knocking down Ago2 in the recipient cells. PMID:25072345

  16. Di-Leucine Signals Mediate Targeting of Tyrosinase and Synaptotagmin to Synaptic-like Microvesicles within PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blagoveshchenskaya, Anastasiya D.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Cutler, Daniel F.

    1999-01-01

    One pathway in forming synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMV) involves direct budding from the plasma membrane, requires adaptor protein 2 (AP2) and is brefeldin A (BFA) resistant. A second route leads from the plasma membrane to an endosomal intermediate from which SLMV bud in a BFA-sensitive, AP3-dependent manner. Because AP3 has been shown to bind to a di-leucine targeting signal in vitro, we have investigated whether this major class of targeting signals is capable of directing protein traffic to SLMV in vivo. We have found that a di-leucine signal within the cytoplasmic tail of human tyrosinase is responsible for the majority of the targeting of HRP-tyrosinase chimeras to SLMV in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we have discovered that a Met-Leu di-hydrophobic motif within the extreme C terminus of synaptotagmin I supports 20% of the SLMV targeting of a CD4-synaptotagmin chimera. All of the traffic to the SLMV mediated by either di-Leu or Met-Leu is BFA sensitive, strongly suggesting a role for AP3 and possibly for an endosomal intermediate in this process. The differential reduction in SLMV targeting for HRP-tyrosinase and CD4-synaptotagmin chimeras by di-alanine substitutions or BFA treatment implies that different proteins use the two routes to the SLMV to differing extents. PMID:10564285

  17. Multilayer Membranes of Glycosaminoglycans and Collagen I Biomaterials Modulate the Function and Microvesicle Release of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bingyan; Pan, Qunwen; Li, Zhanghua; Zhao, Mingyan; Liao, Xiaorong; Wu, Keng; Ma, Xiaotang

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer composite membrane of biomaterials can increase the function of adipose stem cells or osteoprogenitor cells. Recent evidence indicates endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and EPCs released microvesicles (MVs) play important roles in angiogenesis and vascular repair. Here, we investigated the effects of biomaterial multilayer membranes of hyaluronic acid (HA) or chondroitin sulfate (CS) and Collagen I (Col I) on the functions and MVs release of EPCs. Layer-by-layer (LBL) technology was applied to construct the multilayer composite membranes. Four types of the membranes constructed by adsorbing either HA or CS and Col I alternatively with different top layers were studied. The results showed that all four types of multilayer composite membranes could promote EPCs proliferation and migration and inhibit cell senility, apoptosis, and the expression of activated caspase-3. Interestingly, these biomaterials increased the release and the miR-126 level of EPCs-MVs. Moreover, the CS-Col I membrane with CS on the top layer showed the most effects on promoting EPCs proliferation, EPCs-MV release, and miR-126 level in EPCs-MVs. In conclusion, HA/CS and Collagen I composed multilayer composite membranes can promote EPCs functions and release of miR-126 riched EPCs-MVs, which provides a novel strategy for tissue repair treatment. PMID:27190523

  18. Microvesicles Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Stimulated by Hypoxia Promote Angiogenesis Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Chao; Liu, Xin-Bin; Huang, Shu; Bi, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Heng-Xiang; Xie, Li-Xian; Wang, Yong-Qi; Cao, Xiao-Fang; Lv, Jun; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been increasingly trialed to treat a variety of diseases, the underlying mechanisms remain still elusive. In this study, human umbilical cord (UC)-derived MSCs were stimulated by hypoxia, and the membrane microvesicles (MVs) in the supernatants were collected by ultracentrifugation, observed under an electron microscope, and the origin was identified with the flow cytometric technique. The results showed that upon hypoxic stimulus, MSCs released a large quantity of MVs of ∼100 nm in diameter. The MVs were phenotypically similar to the parent MSCs, except that the majority of them were negative for the receptor of platelet-derived growth factor. DiI-labeling assay revealed that MSC-MVs could be internalized into human UC endothelial cells (UC-ECs) within 8 h after they were added into the culture medium. Carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-labeling technique and MTT test showed that MSC-MVs promoted the proliferation of UC-ECs in a dose-dependent manner. Further, MVs could enhance in vitro capillary network formation of UC-ECs in a Matrigel matrix. In a rat hindlimb ischemia model, both MSCs and MSC-MVs were shown to improve significantly the blood flow recovery compared with the control medium (P<0.0001), as assessed by laser Doppler imaging analysis. These data indicate that MV releasing is one of the major mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of MSC therapy by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:22839741

  19. Microvesicles from brain-extract-treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  20. Microvesicles from brain-extract—treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  1. Methods for Assessing the Electromechanical Integration of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Filice, Dominic; Palpant, Nathan J.; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells show tremendous promise for the replacement of myocardium and contractile function lost to infarction. However, until recently, no methods were available to directly determine whether these stem cell-derived grafts actually couple with host myocardium and fire synchronously following transplantation in either intact or injured hearts. To resolve this uncertainty, our group has developed techniques for the intravital imaging of hearts engrafted with stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that have been modified to express the genetically encoded protein calcium sensor, GCaMP. When combined with the simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram, this protocol allows one to make quantitative assessments as to the presence and extent of host–graft electrical coupling as well as the timing and pattern of graft activation. As described here, this system has been employed to investigate the electromechanical integration of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in a guinea pig model of cardiac injury, but analogous approaches should be applicable to other human graft cell types and animal models. PMID:25070341

  2. Learning-induced synaptic potentiation in implanted neural precursor cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungjoon; Heo, Hwon; Han, Ma Eum; Choi, Kyuhyun; Yi, Jee Hyun; Kang, Shin Jung; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Shin, Ki Soon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke results in cognitive dysfunctioning. Implantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can improve the brain function by replacing lost neurons. Proper synaptic integration following neuronal differentiation of implanted cells is believed to be a prerequisite for the functional recovery. In the present study, we characterized the functional properties of immortalized neural progenitor HiB5 cells implanted into the rat hippocampus with chemically induced lesion. The implanted HiB5 cells migrated toward CA1 pyramidal layer and differentiated into vGluT1-positive glutamatergic neurons with morphological and electrophysiological properties of endogenous CA1 pyramidal cells. Functional synaptic integration of HiB5 cell-derived neurons was also evidenced by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data. Lesion-caused memory deficit was significantly recovered after the implantation when assessed by inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning. Remarkably, IA learning preferentially produced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the synapses onto HiB5 cell-derived neurons, which occluded paring protocol-induced LTP ex vivo. We conclude that the implanted HiB5 cell-derived neurons actively participate in learning process through LTP formation, thereby counteracting lesion-mediated memory impairment. PMID:26634434

  3. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John; Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics. PMID:26904130

  4. Angiogenic activity mediates bone repair from human pluripotent stem cell-derived osteogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li; Chen, Qingshan; Quanbeck, Zachary; Bechtold, Joan E.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a standardized resource for bone repair. However, criteria to determine which exogenous cells best heal orthopedic injuries remain poorly defined. We evaluated osteogenic progenitor cells derived from both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Phenotypic and genotypic analyses demonstrated that these hESCs/hiPSCs are similar in their osteogenic differentiation efficiency and they generate osteogenic cells comparable to osteogenic cells derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). However, expression of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in these osteogenic progenitor cells are markedly different, suggesting distinct pro-angiogenic potential of these stem cell derivatives. Studies to repair a femur non-union fracture demonstrate only osteogenic progenitor cells with higher pro-angiogenic potential significantly enhance bone repair in vivo. Together, these studies highlight a key role of pro-angiogenic potential of transplanted osteogenic cells for effective cell-mediated bone repair. PMID:26980556

  5. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Burke, John; Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics. PMID:26904130

  6. A strategy to ensure safety of stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Parul; Whiting, Paul John

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement and regenerative therapy using embryonic stem cell-derived material holds promise for the treatment of several pathologies. However, the safety of this approach is of prime importance given the teratogenic potential of residual stem cells, if present in the differentiated cell product. Using the example of embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, we present a novel strategy for ensuring the absence of stem cells in the RPE population. Based on an unbiased screening approach, we identify and validate the expression of CD59, a cell surface marker expressed on RPE but absent on stem cells. We further demonstrate that flow sorting on the basis of CD59 expression can effectively purify RPE and deplete stem cells, resulting in a population free from stem cell impurity. This purification helps to ensure removal of stem cells and hence increases the safety of cells that may be used for clinical transplantation. This strategy can potentially be applied to other pluripotent stem cell-derived material and help mitigate concerns of using such cells for therapy. PMID:27590276

  7. [Research progress of relationship between exosomes and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Bi, Tao-Ling; Sun, Jin-Jian; Tian, Yu-Zi; Zhou, Ye-Fang

    2016-06-25

    Exosomes are nanosized small membrane microvesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types. Exosomes, through its carrying protein or RNA from derived cells, affect gene regulation networks or epigenetic reorganization of receptor cell, and then modulate the physiological processes of cells. Studies have shown that external exosomes secreted by breast cancer cells or other cells play an important role in the development of tumor, including cell migration, cell differentiation and the immune response, etc. In this article, the latest studies were summarized to provide an overview of current understanding of exosomes in breast cancer. PMID:27350208

  8. Immunotherapy against Metastatic Melanoma with Human iPS Cell-Derived Myeloid Cell Lines Producing Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Azusa; Fukushima, Satoshi; Nakahara, Satoshi; Kubo, Yosuke; Tokuzumi, Aki; Yamashita, Junji; Aoi, Jun; Haruta, Miwa; Senju, Satoru; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, immunotherapy for advanced melanoma has been gaining increased attention. The efficacy of anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 antibodies, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibodies, and the BRAF(V600E) kinase inhibitor has been proven in metastatic melanoma. At the same time, adoptive cell transfer has significant effects against metastatic melanoma; however, it is difficult to apply on a broad scale because of the problems related to cell preparation. To overcome these problems, we developed immune cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The benefit of our method is that a large number of cells can be readily obtained. We focused on macrophages for immune cell therapy because macrophage infiltration is frequently observed in solid cancers. In this study, the efficacy of human iPS cell-derived myeloid cell lines (iPS-ML) genetically modified to express type I IFNs against human melanoma cells was examined. The morphology, phagocytic ability, and surface markers of iPS-ML were similar to those of macrophages. The iPS-ML that express type I IFNs (iPS-ML-IFN) showed significant effects in inhibiting the growth of disseminated human melanoma cells in SCID mice. The infiltration of iPS-ML into the tumor nests was confirmed immunohistologically. The iPS-ML-IFNs increased the expression of CD169, a marker of M1 macrophages that can activate antitumor immunity. The iPS-ML-IFNs could infiltrate into tumor tissue and exert anticancer effects in the local tumor tissue. In conclusion, this method will provide a new therapeutic modality for metastatic melanoma. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(3); 248-58. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26714554

  9. Tumor-derived microvesicles in sera of patients with head and neck cancer and their role in tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Christoph; Strauss, Laura; Wieckowski, Eva; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Albers, Andreas; Wang, Yun; Zeidler, Reinhard; Lang, Stephan; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Tumor-derived membranous vesicles (MV) isolated from HNSCC patients' sera induce apoptosis of activated CD8+ T cells. We tested if MV molecular profile and activity correlate with disease progression. Methods: CD8+ Jurkat cells were incubated with MAGE 3/6+, FasL+, MHC class I+ MV isolated from sera of 60 HNSCC patients and 25 normal controls (NC) by exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. Z-VAD-FITC binding to Jurkat was measured and correlated with clinical data. Results: MV from patients' but not from NC sera induced Jurkat cell apoptosis. 45% T cells+MV from N1–N3 patients were apoptotic vs. 18% T cells+MV from N0 patients (p<0.008). MV from patients with active disease (AD) expressed higher FasL levels than MV from patients with no evident disease (NED) or NC (p≤0.01). Conclusion: MAGE 3/6+, FasL+ and MHCI+ MV in sera of patients induced T-cell apoptosis which correlated with disease activity and the presence of LN metastases. PMID:19073006

  10. IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling has distinct effects on Sox1, Irx3, and Six3 expressions during ES cell derived-neuroectoderm development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takata, Nozomu; Sakakura, Eriko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are involved in growth and tissue development, including diseases such as type-2 diabetes and cancers. However, their roles in lineage specification, especially in early mammalian neural development, are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the protein expression of IGF-2 in early mouse embryo, and it was preferentially detected in anterior mesodermal tissue, adjacent to the neural plate. We utilized a self-organizing neural tissue culture system and analyzed the direct effect of IGF-2 on the general neural marker Sox1. Interestingly, using recombinant IGF-2 and a chemical inhibitor of its receptor (IGF-1R), we found that the IGF-2/IGF-1R pathway positively regulated Sox1 expression in embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural tissue. Furthermore, to visualize the expression patterns of other neural markers, we used reporter ES cell lines and we found that the IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling upregulated the expression of the posterior neural marker Irx3. In contrast, the anterior neural marker Six3 was downregulated by IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling. Together, our results demonstrate that IGF-2/IGF-1R signaling has different effects on neural marker expression, which may influence the early regional identity of ES cell-derived neural tissues. PMID:26956358

  11. A Stem Cell-Derived Platform for Studying Single Synaptic Vesicles in Dopaminergic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haigang; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Koktysh, Dmitry; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The exocytotic release of dopamine is one of the most characteristic but also one of the least appreciated processes in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Fluorescence imaging has yielded rich information about the properties of synaptic vesicles and the release of neurotransmitters in excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In contrast, imaging-based studies for in-depth understanding of synaptic vesicle behavior in dopamine neurons are lagging largely because of a lack of suitable preparations. Midbrain culture has been one of the most valuable preparations for the subcellular investigation of dopaminergic transmission; however, the paucity and fragility of cultured dopaminergic neurons limits their use for live cell imaging. Recent developments in stem cell technology have led to the successful production of dopamine neurons from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Although the dopaminergic identity of these stem cell-derived neurons has been characterized in different ways, vesicle-mediated dopamine release from their axonal terminals has been barely assessed. We report a more efficient procedure to reliably generate dopamine neurons from embryonic stem cells, and it yields more dopamine neurons with more dopaminergic axon projections than midbrain culture does. Using a collection of functional measurements, we show that stem cell-derived dopamine neurons are indistinguishable from those in midbrain culture. Taking advantage of this new preparation, we simultaneously tracked the turnover of hundreds of synaptic vesicles individually using pH-sensitive quantum dots. By doing so, we revealed distinct fusion kinetics of the dopamine-secreting vesicles, which is consistent within both preparations. Significance For the use of stem cell-derived neurons in clinical applications, improved differentiation efficiency and more careful characterization of resultant cells are needed. A procedure has been refined for differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into

  12. The effect of PVDF-TrFE scaffolds on stem cell derived cardiovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Hitscherich, Pamela; Wu, Siliang; Gordan, Richard; Xie, Lai-Hua; Arinzeh, Treena; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-07-01

    Recently, electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) scaffolds have been developed for tissue engineering applications. These materials have piezoelectric activity, wherein they can generate electric charge with minute mechanical deformations. Since the myocardium is an electroactive tissue, the unique feature of a piezoelectric scaffold is attractive for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. In this study, we examined the cytocompatibility and function of pluripotent stem cell derived cardiovascular cells including mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mES-CM) and endothelial cells (mES-EC) on PVDF-TrFE scaffolds. MES-CM and mES-EC adhered well to PVDF-TrFE and became highly aligned along the fibers. When cultured on scaffolds, mES-CM spontaneously contracted, exhibited well-registered sarcomeres and expressed classic cardiac specific markers such as myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, and connexin43. Moreover, mES-CM cultured on PVDF-TrFE scaffolds responded to exogenous electrical pacing and exhibited intracellular calcium handling behavior similar to that of mES-CM cultured in 2D. Similar to cardiomyocytes, mES-EC also demonstrated high viability and maintained a mature phenotype through uptake of low-density lipoprotein and expression of classic endothelial cell markers including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and the arterial specific marker, Notch-1. This study demonstrates the feasibility of PVDF-TrFE scaffold as a candidate material for developing engineered cardiovascular tissues utilizing stem cell-derived cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1577-1585. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26705272

  13. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Podocytes Mature into Vascularized Glomeruli upon Experimental Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sazia; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Kaku, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Ohmori, Tomoko; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mukoyama, Masashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kurihara, Hidetake; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2016-06-01

    Glomerular podocytes express proteins, such as nephrin, that constitute the slit diaphragm, thereby contributing to the filtration process in the kidney. Glomerular development has been analyzed mainly in mice, whereas analysis of human kidney development has been minimal because of limited access to embryonic kidneys. We previously reported the induction of three-dimensional primordial glomeruli from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here, using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated homologous recombination, we generated human iPS cell lines that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the NPHS1 locus, which encodes nephrin, and we show that GFP expression facilitated accurate visualization of nephrin-positive podocyte formation in vitro These induced human podocytes exhibited apicobasal polarity, with nephrin proteins accumulated close to the basal domain, and possessed primary processes that were connected with slit diaphragm-like structures. Microarray analysis of sorted iPS cell-derived podocytes identified well conserved marker gene expression previously shown in mouse and human podocytes in vivo Furthermore, we developed a novel transplantation method using spacers that release the tension of host kidney capsules, thereby allowing the effective formation of glomeruli from human iPS cell-derived nephron progenitors. The human glomeruli were vascularized with the host mouse endothelial cells, and iPS cell-derived podocytes with numerous cell processes accumulated around the fenestrated endothelial cells. Therefore, the podocytes generated from iPS cells retain the podocyte-specific molecular and structural features, which will be useful for dissecting human glomerular development and diseases. PMID:26586691

  14. Hepatic Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Pigtail Macaques Support Hepatitis C Virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sourisseau, Marion; Goldman, Orit; He, Wenqian; Gori, Jennifer L.; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Evans, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The narrow species tropism of hepatitis C virus (HCV) limits animal studies. We found that pigtail macaque (Macaca nemestrina) hepatic cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells support the entire HCV life cycle, although infection efficiency was limited by defects in the HCV cell entry process. This block was overcome by either increasing occludin expression, complementing the cells with human CD81, or infecting them with a strain of HCV with less-restricted requirements for CD81. Using this system, we can modify viral and host cell genetics to make pigtail macaques a suitable, clinically relevant model for the study of HCV infection. PMID:23891978

  15. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives.Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained

  16. Procoagulant and platelet-derived microvesicle absolute counts determined by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Lisa; Harrison, Paul; Kohler, Malcolm; Ferry, Berne

    2014-01-01

    Background Flow cytometry is the most commonly used technology to measure microvesicles (MVs). Despite reported limitations of this technique, MV levels obtained using conventional flow cytometry have yielded many clinically relevant findings, such as associations with disease severity and ability to predict clinical outcomes. This study aims to determine if MV enumeration by flow cytometry correlates with a measurement of their functional capacity, as this may explain how flow cytometry generates clinically relevant results. Methods One hundred samples from healthy individuals and patients with obstructive sleep apnoea were analysed by conventional flow cytometry (FACSCalibur) and by three functional MV assays: Zymuphen MP-activity in which data were given as phosphatidylserine equivalent, STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay expressed as clotting time and Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) reflecting in vitro thrombin generation. Correlations were determined by Spearman correlation. Results Absolute counts of lactadherin+ procoagulant MVs generated by flow cytometry weakly correlated with the results obtained from the Zymuphen MP-activity (r=0.5370, p<0.0001); correlated with ETP (r=0.7444, p<0.0001); negatively correlated with STA® Phospholipid Procoag Assay clotting time (−0.7872, p<0.0001), reflecting a positive correlation between clotting activity and flow cytometry. Levels of Annexin V+ procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs were also associated with functional assays. Absolute counts of MVs derived from other cell types were not correlated with the functional results. Conclusions Quantitative results of procoagulant and platelet-derived MVs from conventional flow cytometry are associated with the functional capability of the MVs, as defined by three functional MV assays. Flow cytometry is a valuable technique for the quantification of MVs from different cellular origins; however, a combination of several analytical techniques may give the most comprehensive

  17. Paracrine Diffusion of PrPC and Propagation of Prion Infectivity by Plasma Membrane-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Garofalo, Tina; Longo, Agostina; Boller, Klaus; Löwer, Johannes; Misasi, Roberta; Montrasio, Fabio; Sorice, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPc) is a physiological constituent of eukaryotic cells. The cellular pathways underlying prions spread from the sites of prions infection/peripheral replication to the central nervous system are still not elucidated. Membrane-derived microvesicles (MVs) are submicron (0.1–1 µm) particles, that are released by cells during plasma membrane shedding processes. They are usually liberated from different cell types, mainly upon activation as well as apoptosis, in this case, one of their hallmarks is the exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer leaflet of the membrane. MVs are also characterized by the presence of adhesion molecules, MHC I molecules, as well as of membrane antigens typical of their cell of origin. Evidence exists that MVs shedding provide vehicles to transfer molecules among cells, and that MVs are important modulators of cell-to-cell communication. In this study we therefore analyzed the potential role of membrane-derived MVs in the mechanism(s) of PrPC diffusion and prion infectivity transmission. We first identified PrPC in association with the lipid raft components Fyn, flotillin-2, GM1 and GM3 in MVs from plasma of healthy human donors. Similar findings were found in MVs from cell culture supernatants of murine neuronal cells. Furthermore we demonstrated that PrPSc is released from infected murine neuronal cells in association with plasma membrane-derived MVs and that PrPSc-bearing MVs are infectious both in vitro and in vivo. The data suggest that MVs may contribute both to the intercellular mechanism(s) of PrPC diffusion and signaling as well as to the process of prion spread and neuroinvasion. PMID:19337375

  18. Microvesicles derived from Alde-Low EPCs support the wound healing capacity of AT-MSCs.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tran Cam; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Kato, Toshiki; Nagano, Masumi; Trinh, Nhu Thuy; Hamada, Hiromi; Sato, Fujio; Ohneda, Kinuko; Matsuo-Takasaki, Mami; Ohneda, Osamu

    2016-08-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as multipotent cells that can give rise to various kinds of differentiated mesenchymal cells, and are thus considered to be useful for clinical therapy. However, the big hurdles of MSC therapy are the inability of MSCs to reach the appropriate tissues or sites with high efficiency and engraftment after transplantation. In this study, we investigated how adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) improve their homing ability after intravenous injection. We previously found that human endothelial progenitor cells with low aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (Alde-Low EPCs) are suitable for the treatment of ischemic tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that microvesicles (MVs) derived from Alde-Low EPCs possessed the ability to improve the homing ability of non-functional Alde-High EPCs, resulting in wound healing. We initially transfected MVs derived from Alde-Low EPCs (EMVs) to human AT-MSCs, which were originally unable to cure ischemic tissues by intravenous transplantation. Remarkably, AT-MSC transfected EMVs dramatically repaired the ischemic skin flap compared with AT-MSC derived-MV (MMVs) transfected AT-MSCs or control AT-MSCs. We then found that the expression of CXCR4, an important chemokine receptor for cell migration, was highly elevated in EMV-transfected AT-MSCs. Moreover, AT-MSCs transfected with EMVs, but not control AT-MSCs, migrated to wound sites after intravenous injection. Consequently, CD45(+) inflammatory cells were successfully recruited at the wound sites after the injection of EMV-transfected AT-MSCs. These results demonstrate that EMVs are a useful source to improve the homing ability and wound healing ability of MSCs at the wound sites. PMID:27282479

  19. Human mesenchymal stem cell microvesicles for treatment of Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Gang; Feng, Xiao-Mei; Abbott, Jason; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Hao, Qi; Monsel, Antoine; Qu, Jie-Ming; Matthay, Michael A; Lee, Jae W

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or its conditioned medium restored lung protein permeability and reduced alveolar inflammation following Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in an ex vivo perfused human lung in part through the secretion of soluble factors such as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Recently, MSC were found to release microvesicles (MVs) that were biologically active because of the presence of mRNA or miRNA with reparative properties. MVs are circular fragments of membrane released from the endosomal compartment as exosomes or shed from the surface membranes. These studies were designed to determine if MVs released by human bone marrow derived MSCs would be effective in restoring lung protein permeability and reducing inflammation in E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in C57BL/6 mice. The intratracheal instillation of MVs improved several indices of ALI at 48 hours. Compared to endotoxin-injured mice, MVs reduced extravascular lung water by 43% and reduced total protein levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid by 35%, demonstrating a reduction in pulmonary edema and lung protein permeability. MVs also reduced the influx of neutrophils and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels in the BAL fluid by 73% and 49%, respectively, demonstrating a reduction in inflammation. KGF siRNA-pretreatment of MSC partially eliminated the therapeutic effects of MVs released by MSCs, suggesting that KGF protein expression was important for the underlying mechanism. In summary, human MSC-derived MVs were therapeutically effective following E. coli endotoxin-induced ALI in mice in part through the expression of KGF mRNA in the injured alveolus. PMID:23939814

  20. Microvesicles as a Biomarker for Tumor Progression versus Treatment Effect in Radiation/Temozolomide-Treated Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cameron J.; Lustig, Robert A.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, Walter T.; Wolf, Ronald L.; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Desai, Arati; Williams, Dewight; Evans, Sydney M.

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for glioblastoma (GB) is surgery followed by concurrent radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) and then adjuvant TMZ. This regime is associated with increased survival but also increased occurrence of equivocal imaging findings, e.g., tumor progression (TP) versus treatment effect (TE), which is also referred to as pseudoprogression (PsP). Equivocal findings make decisions regarding further treatment difficult and often delayed. Because none of the current imaging assays have proven sensitive and specific for differentiation of TP versus TE/PsP, we investigated whether blood-derived microvesicles (MVs) would be a relevant assay. METHODS: 2.8 ml of citrated blood was collected from patients with GB at the time of their RT simulation, at the end of chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and multiple times following treatment. MVs were collected following multiple centrifugations (300g, 2500g, and 15,000g). The pellet from the final spin was analyzed using flow cytometry. A diameter of approximately 300 nm or greater and Pacific Blue–labeled Annexin V positivity were used to identify the MVs reported herein. RESULTS: We analyzed 19 blood samples from 11 patients with GB. MV counts in the patients with stable disease or TE/PsP were significantly lower than patients who developed TP (P = .014). CONCLUSION: These preliminary data suggest that blood analysis for MVs from GB patients receiving CRT may be useful to distinguish TE/PsP from TP. MVs may add clarity to standard imaging for decision making in patients with equivocal imaging findings. PMID:25500085

  1. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  2. The case for induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in pharmacological screening

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Jaffar M; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E

    2013-01-01

    The current drug screening models are deficient, particularly in detecting cardiac side effects. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes could aid both early cardiotoxicity detection and novel drug discovery. Work over the last decade has generated human embryonic stem cells as potentially accurate sources of human cardiomyocytes, but ethical constraints and poor efficacy in establishing cell lines limit their use. Induced pluripotent stem cells do not require the use of human embryos and have the added advantage of producing patient-specific cardiomyocytes, allowing both generic and disease- and patient-specific pharmacological screening, as well as drug development through disease modelling. A critical question is whether sufficient standards have been achieved in the reliable and reproducible generation of ‘adult-like’ cardiomyocytes from human fibroblast tissue to progress from validation to safe use in practice and drug discovery. This review will highlight the need for a new experimental system, assess the validity of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and explore what the future may hold for their use in pharmacology. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Regenerative Medicine and Pharmacology: A Look to the Future. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-2 PMID:22845396

  3. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  4. Generation of stem cell-derived β-cells from patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Millman, Jeffrey R; Xie, Chunhui; Van Dervort, Alana; Gürtler, Mads; Pagliuca, Felicia W; Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the scalable in vitro production of functional stem cell-derived β-cells (SC-β cells). Here we extend this approach to generate the first SC-β cells from type 1 diabetic patients (T1D). β-cells are destroyed during T1D disease progression, making it difficult to extensively study them in the past. These T1D SC-β cells express β-cell markers, respond to glucose both in vitro and in vivo, prevent alloxan-induced diabetes in mice and respond to anti-diabetic drugs. Furthermore, we use an in vitro disease model to demonstrate the cells respond to different forms of β-cell stress. Using these assays, we find no major differences in T1D SC-β cells compared with SC-β cells derived from non-diabetic patients. These results show that T1D SC-β cells could potentially be used for the treatment of diabetes, drug screening and the study of β-cell biology. PMID:27163171

  5. Functional Properties of Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weick, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-derived neurons from various source materials present unique model systems to examine the fundamental properties of central nervous system (CNS) development as well as the molecular underpinnings of disease phenotypes. In order to more accurately assess potential therapies for neurological disorders, multiple strategies have been employed in recent years to produce neuronal populations that accurately represent in vivo regional and transmitter phenotypes. These include new technologies such as direct conversion of somatic cell types into neurons and glia which may accelerate maturation and retain genetic hallmarks of aging. In addition, novel forms of genetic manipulations have brought human stem cells nearly on par with those of rodent with respect to gene targeting. For neurons of the CNS, the ultimate phenotypic characterization lies with their ability to recapitulate functional properties such as passive and active membrane characteristics, synaptic activity, and plasticity. These features critically depend on the coordinated expression and localization of hundreds of ion channels and receptors, as well as scaffolding and signaling molecules. In this review I will highlight the current state of knowledge regarding functional properties of human stem cell-derived neurons, with a primary focus on pluripotent stem cells. While significant advances have been made, critical hurdles must be overcome in order for this technology to support progression toward clinical applications. PMID:27274733

  6. Atomic force microscopy combined with human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes for biomechanical sensing.

    PubMed

    Pesl, Martin; Pribyl, Jan; Acimovic, Ivana; Vilotic, Aleksandra; Jelinkova, Sarka; Salykin, Anton; Lacampagne, Alain; Dvorak, Petr; Meli, Albano C; Skladal, Petr; Rotrekl, Vladimir

    2016-11-15

    Cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation are important parameters of cardiac function altered in many heart pathologies. Biosensing of these parameters represents an important tool in drug development and disease modeling. Human embryonic stem cells and especially patient specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are well established as cardiac disease model.. Here, a live stem cell derived embryoid body (EB) based cardiac cell syncytium served as a biorecognition element coupled to the microcantilever probe from atomic force microscope thus providing reliable micromechanical cellular biosensor suitable for whole-day testing. The biosensor was optimized regarding the type of cantilever, temperature and exchange of media; in combination with standardized protocol, it allowed testing of compounds and conditions affecting the biomechanical properties of EB. The studied effectors included calcium , drugs modulating the catecholaminergic fight-or-flight stress response such as the beta-adrenergic blocker metoprolol and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Arrhythmogenic effects were studied using caffeine. Furthermore, with EBs originating from patient's stem cells, this biosensor can help to characterize heart diseases such as dystrophies. PMID:27266660

  7. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essential roles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond to pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication in the eye of diabetic patients, retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGF is expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müller glia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina, it has been a great challenge to reveal the function of VEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced by Müller cells. With the development of conditional gene targeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the function of Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo. By using conditional gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müller glia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic mice and Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role in the alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration, which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization, vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathological changes in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potential cellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading cause of blindness. PMID:26069721

  8. Possible roles of mast cell-derived chymase for skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Amano, Nobuyuki; Takai, Shinji; Jin, Denan; Ueda, Koichi; Miyazaki, Mizuo

    2009-03-01

    The relationships between mast cell-derived chymase, angiotensin II, and extracellular matrix production in the skin after intense pulsed light (IPL) were clarified in hamsters. Dorsal areas of the hamsters were irradiated once or twice a week by IPL. The index of extracellular matrix production in the skin was defined as the depth stained with Azan-Mallory stain from the epidermis to the dermis at the point of maximum thickness. The index had significantly increased 7 days after IPL irradiation in sections treated once or twice with IPL compared with that of untreated control sections. The numbers of mast cells, chymase-positive cells, and angiotensin II-positive cells had also significantly increased in IPL-irradiated areas. Significant increases in chymase and angiotensin II activities were observed in the extracts obtained from IPL-irradiated skin. Mast cell-derived chymase may be involved via angiotensin II formation in the dermal extracellular matrix production that occurs after IPL irradiation. PMID:18408985

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell therapies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee-Kubli, Corinne A; Lu, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The greatest challenge to successful treatment of spinal cord injury is the limited regenerative capacity of the central nervous system and its inability to replace lost neurons and severed axons following injury. Neural stem cell grafts derived from fetal central nervous system tissue or embryonic stem cells have shown therapeutic promise by differentiation into neurons and glia that have the potential to form functional neuronal relays across injured spinal cord segments. However, implementation of fetal-derived or embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cell therapies for patients with spinal cord injury raises ethical concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated from adult somatic cells and differentiated into neural stem cells suitable for therapeutic use, thereby providing an ethical source of implantable cells that can be made in an autologous fashion to avoid problems of immune rejection. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury, as well as addressing potential mechanisms, future perspectives and challenges. PMID:25788906

  10. In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ok

    2014-03-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices. PMID:24532496

  11. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L; Burns, Alan R; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A

    2007-03-13

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute approximately 60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the differentiation of hES cells into an essentially pure (>99%) population of ATII cells (hES-ATII). Purity, as well as biological features and morphological characteristics of normal ATII cells, was demonstrated for the hES-ATII cells, including lamellar body formation, expression of surfactant proteins A, B, and C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor, as well as the synthesis and secretion of complement proteins C3 and C5. Collectively, these data document the successful generation of a pure population of ATII cells derived from hES cells, providing a practical source of ATII cells to explore in disease models their potential in the regeneration and repair of the injured alveolus and in the therapeutic treatment of genetic diseases affecting the lung. PMID:17360544

  12. Generation of stem cell-derived β-cells from patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Jeffrey R.; Xie, Chunhui; Van Dervort, Alana; Gürtler, Mads; Pagliuca, Felicia W.; Melton, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the scalable in vitro production of functional stem cell-derived β-cells (SC-β cells). Here we extend this approach to generate the first SC-β cells from type 1 diabetic patients (T1D). β-cells are destroyed during T1D disease progression, making it difficult to extensively study them in the past. These T1D SC-β cells express β-cell markers, respond to glucose both in vitro and in vivo, prevent alloxan-induced diabetes in mice and respond to anti-diabetic drugs. Furthermore, we use an in vitro disease model to demonstrate the cells respond to different forms of β-cell stress. Using these assays, we find no major differences in T1D SC-β cells compared with SC-β cells derived from non-diabetic patients. These results show that T1D SC-β cells could potentially be used for the treatment of diabetes, drug screening and the study of β-cell biology. PMID:27163171

  13. In-Vitro Stem Cell Derived Red Blood Cells for Transfusion: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices. PMID:24532496

  14. Gene expression profiling in multipotent DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Hiromasa; Oki, Yoshinao; Bono, Hidemasa; Kano, Koichiro

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Adipocyte dedifferentiation is evident in a significant decrease in typical genes. {yields} Cell proliferation is strongly related to adipocyte dedifferentiation. {yields} Dedifferentiated adipocytes express several lineage-specific genes. {yields} Comparative analyses using publicly available datasets boost the interpretation. -- Abstract: Cellular dedifferentiation signifies the withdrawal of cells from a specific differentiated state to a stem cell-like undifferentiated state. However, the mechanism of dedifferentiation remains obscure. Here we performed comparative transcriptome analyses during dedifferentiation in mature adipocytes (MAs) to identify the transcriptional signatures of multipotent dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from MAs. Using microarray systems, we explored similarly expressed as well as significantly differentially expressed genes in MAs during dedifferentiation. This analysis revealed significant changes in gene expression during this process, including a significant reduction in expression of genes for lipid metabolism concomitantly with a significant increase in expression of genes for cell movement, cell migration, tissue developmental processes, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell morphogenesis, altered cell shape, and cell differentiation. Our observations indicate that the transcriptional signatures of DFAT cells derived from MAs are summarized in terms of a significant decrease in functional phenotype-related genes and a parallel increase in cell proliferation, altered cell morphology, and regulation of the differentiation of related genes. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in dedifferentiation may enable scientists to control and possibly alter the plasticity of the differentiated state, which may lead to benefits not only in stem cell research but also in regenerative medicine.

  15. Data on importance of hematopoietic cell derived Lipocalin 2 against gut inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Piu; Singh, Vishal; Xiao, Xia; Yeoh, Beng San; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-09-01

    The data herein is related to the research article entitled "Microbiota-inducible innate immune siderophore binding protein Lipocalin 2 is critical for intestinal homeostasis" (Singh et al., 2016) [1]. In the present article, we monitored dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis development upon Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) neutralization, and examined the survival of Lcn2 deficient (Lcn2KO) mice and their WT littermates upon DSS challenge. To dissect the relative contribution of immune and non-immune cells-derived Lcn2 in mediating protection against gut inflammation, we generated respective bone marrow chimera and evaluated their susceptibility to IL-10 receptor neutralization-induced chronic colitis. Neutralization of Lcn2 in WT mice resulted in exacerbated DSS-induced colitis. Notably, mice lacking Lcn2 exhibited 100% mortality whereas only 20% mortality was observed in WT mice upon DSS challenge. Further, data from bone marrow chimera showed that immune cell-derived Lcn2 is the major contributor in conferring protection against colitis. PMID:27500193

  16. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  17. Lipocalin 2 from macrophages stimulated by tumor cell-derived sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes lymphangiogenesis and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michaela; Ören, Bilge; Mora, Javier; Mertens, Christina; Dziumbla, Sarah; Popp, Rüdiger; Weigert, Andreas; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Brüne, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived factors skew macrophages toward a tumor-supporting phenotype associated with the secretion of protumorigenic mediators. Apoptosing tumor cells release sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which stimulates the production of lipocalin 2 (LCN2) in tumor-associated macrophages and is associated with tumor metastasis. We explored the mechanism by which S1P induces LCN2 in macrophages and investigated how this contributed to tumor growth and metastasis. Knockdown of S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1) in primary human macrophages and experiments with bone marrow-derived macrophages from S1PR1-deficient mice showed that S1P signaled through S1PR1 to induce LCN2 expression. The LCN2 promoter contains a consensus sequence for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and deletion of the STAT3 recognition sequence reduced expression of an LCN2-controlled reporter gene. Conditioned medium from coculture experiments indicated that the release of LCN2 from macrophages induced tube formation and proliferation in cultures of primary human lymphatic endothelial cells in a manner dependent on the kinase PI3K and subsequent induction of the growth factor VEGFC, which functioned as an autocrine signal stimulating the receptor VEGFR3. Knockout of Lcn2 attenuated tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis and breast tumor metastasis both in the breast cancer model MMTV-PyMT mice and in mice bearing orthotopic wild-type tumors. Our findings indicate that macrophages respond to dying tumor cells by producing signals that promote lymphangiogenesis, which enables metastasis. PMID:27353364

  18. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  19. The age- and shorter telomere-dependent TERT promoter mutation in follicular thyroid cell-derived carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Wang, N; Cao, J; Sofiadis, A; Dinets, A; Zedenius, J; Larsson, C; Xu, D

    2014-10-16

    Telomerase activation through induction of its catalytic component telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is essential for malignant transformation. TERT promoter mutations namely C228T and C250T that stimulate TERT transcription and telomerase activation have recently been identified in many human malignancies. We thus determined these mutations and their biological and clinical implications in thyroid carcinomas in the present study. The TERT promoter was sequenced in 10 thyroid cancer cell lines and 144 tumors from 20 patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), 51 with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 36 with follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC), and 37 with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). We identified C228T or C250T mutation in 6/8 of ATC cell lines, as well as in tumor tissue from 10/20, 13/51, 8/36 and 0/37 patients with ATC, PTC, FTC and MTC, respectively. In PTC patients, these mutations were exclusively present in the group with age >45 years (P<0.0001), and highly correlated shorter telomeres (P<0.0001) and distant metastasis (P=0.028). The previous radioactivity exposure did not induce the mutation. The presence of C228T or C250T was an independent predictor associated with shorter disease-related survival (DRS) in the entire cohort (P<0.0001), as well as among patients >45 years (P=0.021). ATC patients carrying the mutation survived shorter than those without mutations, although not statistically significant (P=0.129). The TERT promoter mutation was associated with overall survival (P=0.038) and DRS (P=0.058) of FTC patients. Taken together, age- and shorter telomere-dependent TERT promoter mutations occur frequently in follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma (ATC, PTC and FTC) but not in parafollicular cell-originated MTC, and may serve as a marker for aggressive disease and poor outcome. PMID:24141777

  20. Lower Oncogenic Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Cord Blood Compared to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, T.; Najmi, M.; Kazemi, N.; Hasanlou, M.; Pedram, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In regenerative medicine, use of each of the mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, cord blood, and adipose tissue, has several cons and pros. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from cord blood have been considered the best source for precursor transplantation. Direct reprogramming of a somatic cell into induced pluripotent stem cells by over-expression of 6 transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, lin28, Nanog, and c-Myc has great potential for regenerative medicine, eliminating the ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and the rejection problems of using non-autologous cells. Objective: To compare reprogramming and pluripotent markers OCT4, Sox-2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog, and lin28 in mesenchymal stem cells derived from cord blood and induced pluripotent stem cells. Methods: We analyzed the expression level of OCT4, Sox-2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog and lin28 genes in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from cord blood and induced pluripotent stem cells by cell culture and RT-PCR. Results: The expression level of pluripotent genes OCT4 and Sox-2, Nanog and lin28 in mesenchymal stem cells derived from cord blood were significantly higher than those in induced pluripotent stem cells. In contrast to OCT-4A and Sox-2, Nanog and lin28, the expression level of oncogenic factors c-Myc and Klf4 were significantly higher in induced pluripotent stem cells than in mesenchymal stem cells derived from cord blood. Conclusion: It could be concluded that mesenchymal stem cells derived from human cord blood have lower oncogenic potential compared to induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26306155

  1. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  2. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Lutton, Evan M.; Merkel, Steven F.; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  3. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction. PMID:24486314

  4. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bayzigitov, Daniel R.; Medvedev, Sergey P.; Dementyeva, Elena V.; Bayramova, Sevda A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Karaskov, Alexander M.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:27110425

  5. Stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on thin-film microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Jouko; Heimala, Päivi; Hokkanen, Ari; Iljin, Kristiina; Kerkelä, Erja; Kolari, Kai; Kattelus, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    We describe successful long-term stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters on thin-film microelectrode structures in vitro. Interdigitated electrode structures were constructed using plain titanium on glass as the electrode material. Titanium rapidly oxidizes in atmospheric conditions to produce an insulating TiO(χ) layer with high relative permittivity. Capacitive coupling to the incubation medium and to the cells adherent to the electrodes was still efficient, and the dielectric layer prevented electrolysis, allowing a wider window of possible stimulation amplitudes to be used, relative to conducting surfaces. A common hypothesis suggests that to achieve proper differentiation of electroactive cells from the stem cells electrical stimuli are also needed. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocyte clusters were seeded on the glass-electrode surfaces, and we successfully altered and resynchronized a clearly different beat interval. The new pace was reliably maintained for extended periods of several tens of minutes. PMID:21416608

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-03-15

    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize antiarrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome, or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  7. PDX1-engineered embryonic stem cell-derived insulin producing cells regulate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes can be treated by the transplantation of cadaveric whole pancreata or isolated pancreatic islets. However, this form of treatment is hampered by the chronic shortage of cadaveric donors. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived insulin producing cells (IPCs) offer a potentially novel source of unlimited cells for transplantation to treat type 1 and possibly type 2 diabetes. However, thus far, the lack of a reliable protocol for efficient differentiation of ES cells into IPCs has hindered the clinical exploitation of these cells. Methods To efficiently generate IPCs using ES cells, we have developed a double transgenic ES cell line R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc that constitutively expresses pancreatic β-cell-specific transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (Pdx1) as well as rat insulin promoter (RIP) driven luciferase reporter. We have established several protocols for the reproducible differentiation of ES cells into IPCs. The differentiation of ES cells into IPCs was monitored by immunostaining as well as real-time quantitative RT-PCR for pancreatic β-cell-specific markers. Pancreatic β-cell specific RIP became transcriptionally active following the differentiation of ES cells into IPCs and induced the expression of the luciferase reporter. Glucose stimulated insulin secretion by the ES cell-derived IPCs was measured by ELISA. Further, we have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of ES cell-derived IPCs to correct hyperglycemia in syngeneic streptozotocin (STZ)-treated diabetic mice. The long term fate of the transplanted IPCs co-expressing luciferase in syngeneic STZ-induced diabetic mice was monitored by real time noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results We have recently demonstrated that spontaneous in vivo differentiation of R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc ES cell-derived pancreatic endoderm-like cells (PELCs) into IPCs corrects hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Here, we investigated whether R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc ES cells

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived fiber-shaped cardiac tissue on a chip.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Mori, S; Sakai, F; Takeuchi, S

    2016-06-21

    We propose a method for the production of a fiber-shaped three-dimensional (3D) cellular construct of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) for the quantification of the contractile force. By culturing the cardiomyocytes in a patterned hydrogel structure with fixed edges, we succeeded in fabricating hiPS-CM fibers with aligned cardiomyocytes. The fiber generated contractile force along the fiber direction due to the hiPS-CM alignment, and we were able to measure its contractile force accurately. Furthermore, to demonstrate the drug reactivity of hiPS-CM fibers, the changes in the contractile frequency and force following treatment with isoproterenol and propranolol were observed. We believe that hiPS-CM fibers will be a useful tool for pharmacokinetic analyses during drug development. PMID:27217209

  9. In vitro production of functional immune cells derived from human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Payuhakrit, Witchuda; Panichakul, Tasanee; Charoenphon, Natthawut; Chalermsaenyakorn, Panus; Jaovisidha, Adithep; Wongborisuth, Chokdee; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from cord blood are potentially high sources for transplantation due to their low immunogenicity and the presence of the multipotent cells. These cells are capable of differentiating to produce various lineages of blood cells under specific conditions. We have enriched highly purified CD34+ cells from cord blood, determined in vitro growth of the cells in culture systems in the absence (condition A) or presence of GM-CSF and G-CSF (condition B), and determined the profile of immune cells during the period of cultivation by using flow cytometry. PhytohemagglutininA (PHA) was used as a mitogen to stimulate T lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells. GM-CSF and G-CSF prolonged the survival of the growing cells and also maintained expansion of cells in blastic stage. By day 12 of cultivation, when cell numbers peaked, various types of immune cells had appeared (CD14+ cells, CD40+HLA-DR+ cells, CD3+CD56+ cells, CD19+ cells, CD3+CD4+ cells, CD3+CD8+cells and CD3-CD56+). A significantly higher percentage of monocytes (p = 0.002) were observed under culture with GM-CSF, G-CSF when compared with culture without GM-CSF, G-CSF. In addition, T lymphocytes derived from HSC responded to 50 µg/ml of PHA. This is the first report showing the complete differentiation and proliferation of immune cells derived from CD34+ HSC under in vitro culture conditions. Lymphocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells and polymorph nuclear cells derived from HSC in vitro are unique, and thus may benefit various studies such as innate immunity and pathophysiology of immune disorders. PMID:26933404

  10. Suppression of Th1-Mediated Autoimmunity by Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tokunori; Hirata, Shinya; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Haruta, Miwa; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Ito, Takaaki; Uchino, Makoto; Ando, Yukio; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs) using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25522369

  11. Effects of tacrolimus on morphology, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from gingiva tissue

    PubMed Central

    HA, DONG-HO; YONG, CHUL SOON; KIM, JONG OH; JEONG, JEE-HEON; PARK, JUN-BEOM

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus is a 23-membered macrolide lactone with potent immunosuppressive activity that is effective in the prophylaxis of organ rejection following kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Tacrolimus also exerts a variety of actions on bone metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of tacrolimus on the morphology and viability of human stem cells derived from the gingiva. Gingival-derived stem cells were grown in the presence of tacrolimus at final concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 100 µg/ml. The morphology of the cells was viewed under an inverted microscope and the cell viability was analyzed using Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Alizarin Red S staining was used to assess mineralization of treated cells. The control group showed spindle-shaped, fibroblast-like morphology and the shapes of the cells in 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml tacrolimus were similar to those of the control group. All groups except the 100 µg/ml group showed increased cell proliferation over time. Cultures grown in the presence of tacrolimus at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml were not identified to be significantly different compared with the control at days 1, 3 and 5 using the CCK-8 assays. Increased mineralized deposits were noted with increased incubation time. Treatment with tacrolimus from 0.001 to 1 µg/ml led to an increase in mineralization compared with the control group. Within the limits of this study, tacrolimus at the tested concentrations (ranging from 0.001 to 10 µg/ml) did not result in differences in the viability of stem cells derived from gingiva; however it did enhance osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. PMID:27177273

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors Differentiate to Cardiomyocytes and Form Biosynthetic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Chellapan, Malathi; Bursac, Nenad; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart has little capacity to regenerate, and following injury the myocardium is replaced by non-contractile scar tissue. Consequently, increased wall stress and workload on the remaining myocardium leads to chamber dilation, dysfunction, and heart failure. Cell-based therapy with an autologous, epigenetically reprogrammed, and cardiac-committed progenitor cell source could potentially reverse this process by replacing the damaged myocardium with functional tissue. However, it is unclear whether cardiac progenitor cell-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of attaining levels of structural and functional maturity comparable to that of terminally-fated cardiomyocytes. Here, we first describe the derivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which once differentiated allow for the enrichment of Nkx2-5(+) cardiac progenitors, and the cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the red fluorescent protein. We show that the cardiac progenitors are multipotent and capable of differentiating into endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac progenitor selection corresponds to cKit(+) cell enrichment, while cardiomyocyte cell-lineage commitment is concomitant with dual expression of either cKit/Flk1 or cKit/Sca-1. We proceed to show that the cardiac progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of forming electrically and mechanically coupled large-scale 2D cell cultures with mature electrophysiological properties. Finally, we examine the cell progenitors’ ability to form electromechanically coherent macroscopic tissues, using a physiologically relevant 3D culture model and demonstrate that following long-term culture the cardiomyocytes align, and form robust electromechanical connections throughout the volume of the biosynthetic tissue construct. We conclude that the iPS cell-derived cardiac progenitors are a robust cell source for tissue engineering applications and a 3D culture platform for pharmacological screening and

  13. In vitro and in vivo analyses of human embryonic stem cell-derived dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Hwan; Minn, Yang-Ki; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Dong Ho; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Shim, Jae-Won; Ko, Ji-Yun; Koh, Hyun-Chul; Kang, Min Jeong; Kang, Jin Sun; Rhie, Duck-Joo; Lee, Yong-Sung; Son, Hyeon; Moon, Shin Yong; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2005-03-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells, due to their capacity of multipotency and self-renewal, may serve as a valuable experimental tool for human developmental biology and may provide an unlimited cell source for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess the developmental potential of hES cells to replace the selectively lost midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the development of an in vitro differentiation protocol to derive an enriched population of midbrain DA neurons from hES cells. Neural induction of hES cells co-cultured with stromal cells, followed by expansion of the resulting neural precursor cells, efficiently generated DA neurons with concomitant expression of transcriptional factors related to midbrain DA development, such as Pax2, En1 (Engrailed-1), Nurr1, and Lmx1b. Using our procedure, the majority of differentiated hES cells (> 95%) contained neuronal or neural precursor markers and a high percentage (> 40%) of TuJ1+ neurons was tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+, while none of them expressed the undifferentiated ES cell marker, Oct 3/4. Furthermore, hES cell-derived DA neurons demonstrated functionality in vitro, releasing DA in response to KCl-induced depolarization and reuptake of DA. Finally, transplantation of hES-derived DA neurons into the striatum of hemi-parkinsonian rats failed to result in improvement of their behavioral deficits as determined by amphetamine-induced rotation and step-adjustment. Immunohistochemical analyses of grafted brains revealed that abundant hES-derived cells (human nuclei+ cells) survived in the grafts, but none of them were TH+. Therefore, unlike those from mouse ES cells, hES cell-derived DA neurons either do not survive or their DA phenotype is unstable when grafted into rodent brains. PMID:15715675

  14. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokunori; Hirata, Shinya; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Haruta, Miwa; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Ito, Takaaki; Uchino, Makoto; Ando, Yukio; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs) using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25522369

  15. Effects of tacrolimus on morphology, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from gingiva tissue.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dong-Ho; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-07-01

    Tacrolimus is a 23-membered macrolide lactone with potent immunosuppressive activity that is effective in the prophylaxis of organ rejection following kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Tacrolimus also exerts a variety of actions on bone metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of tacrolimus on the morphology and viability of human stem cells derived from the gingiva. Gingival‑derived stem cells were grown in the presence of tacrolimus at final concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 100 µg/ml. The morphology of the cells was viewed under an inverted microscope and the cell viability was analyzed using Cell Counting kit‑8 (CCK‑8) on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Alizarin Red S staining was used to assess mineralization of treated cells. The control group showed spindle‑shaped, fibroblast‑like morphology and the shapes of the cells in 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml tacrolimus were similar to those of the control group. All groups except the 100 µg/ml group showed increased cell proliferation over time. Cultures grown in the presence of tacrolimus at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µg/ml were not identified to be significantly different compared with the control at days 1, 3 and 5 using the CCK‑8 assays. Increased mineralized deposits were noted with increased incubation time. Treatment with tacrolimus from 0.001 to 1 µg/ml led to an increase in mineralization compared with the control group. Within the limits of this study, tacrolimus at the tested concentrations (ranging from 0.001 to 10 µg/ml) did not result in differences in the viability of stem cells derived from gingiva; however it did enhance osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. PMID:27177273

  16. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S.; Mills, Robert W.; Macri, Vincenzo S.; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Milan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  17. Rapid cellular phenotyping of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes using a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Leyton-Mange, Jordan S; Mills, Robert W; Macri, Vincenzo S; Jang, Min Young; Butte, Faraz N; Ellinor, Patrick T; Milan, David J

    2014-02-11

    In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24527390

  18. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  19. Label-free imaging of metabolism and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupsa; Heylman, Christopher; George, Steven C.; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate a label-free optical imaging technique to assess metabolic status and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous fluorophores. Our results show the sensitivity of this method to detect shifts in metabolism and oxidative stress in the cardiomyocytes upon pathological stimuli of hypoxia and cardiotoxic drugs. This non-invasive imaging technique could prove beneficial for drug development and screening, especially for in vitro cardiac models created from stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and to study the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases and therapy. PMID:27231614

  20. A Non-invasive Platform for Functional Characterization of Stem-Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Applications in Cardiotoxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Maddah, Mahnaz; Heidmann, Julia D.; Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Walker, Chase D.; Bolouki, Sara; Conklin, Bruce R.; Loewke, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a non-invasive method to characterize the function of pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes based on video microscopy and image analysis. The platform, called Pulse, generates automated measurements of beating frequency, beat duration, amplitude, and beat-to-beat variation based on motion analysis of phase-contrast images captured at a fast frame rate. Using Pulse, we demonstrate recapitulation of drug effects in stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes without the use of exogenous labels and show that our platform can be used for high-throughput cardiotoxicity drug screening and studying physiologically relevant phenotypes. PMID:25801505

  1. Label-free imaging of metabolism and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Datta, Rupsa; Heylman, Christopher; George, Steven C; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    In this work we demonstrate a label-free optical imaging technique to assess metabolic status and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous fluorophores. Our results show the sensitivity of this method to detect shifts in metabolism and oxidative stress in the cardiomyocytes upon pathological stimuli of hypoxia and cardiotoxic drugs. This non-invasive imaging technique could prove beneficial for drug development and screening, especially for in vitro cardiac models created from stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and to study the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases and therapy. PMID:27231614

  2. Use of human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to examine sunitinib mediated cardiotoxicity and electrophysiological alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.D.; Babiarz, J.E.; Abrams, R.M.; Guo, L.; Kameoka, S.; Chiao, E.; Taunton, J.; Kolaja, K.L.

    2011-11-15

    Sunitinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stroma tumor, is associated with clinical cardiac toxicity. Although the precise mechanism of sunitinib cardiotoxicity is not known, both the key metabolic energy regulator, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and ribosomal S 6 kinase (RSK) have been hypothesized as causative, albeit based on rodent models. To study the mechanism of sunitinib-mediated cardiotoxicity in a human model, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) having electrophysiological and contractile properties of native cardiac tissue were investigated. Sunitinib was cardiotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with an IC{sub 50} in the low micromolar range, observed by a loss of cellular ATP, an increase in oxidized glutathione, and induction of apoptosis in iPSC-CMs. Pretreatment of iPSC-CMs with AMPK activators AICAR or metformin, increased the phosphorylation of pAMPK-T172 and pACC-S79, but only marginally attenuated sunitinib mediated cell death. Furthermore, additional inhibitors of AMPK were not directly cytotoxic to iPSC-CMs up to 250 {mu}M concentrations. Inhibition of RSK with a highly specific, irreversible, small molecule inhibitor (RSK-FMK-MEA) did not induce cytotoxicity in iPSC-CMs below 250 {mu}M. Extensive electrophysiological analysis of sunitinib and RSK-FMK-MEA mediated conduction effects were performed. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibition of AMPK and RSK are not a major component of sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Although the exact mechanism of cardiotoxicity of sunitinib is not known, it is likely due to inhibition of multiple kinases simultaneously. These data highlight the utility of human iPSC-CMs in investigating the potential molecular mechanisms underlying drug-induced cardiotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytoxic effect of sunitinib on human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes Black

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cultured skin fibroblast cells derived from patients with triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV) is a rare disease, characterized by the massive accumulation of triglyceride (TG) in multiple tissues, especially skeletal muscle, heart muscle and the coronary artery. TGCV is caused by mutation of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is an essential molecule for the hydrolysis of TG. TGCV is at high risk for skeletal myopathy and heart dysfunction, and therefore premature death. Development of therapeutic methods for TGCV is highly desirable. This study aims to discover specific molecules responsible for TGCV pathogenesis. Methods To identify differentially expressed proteins in TGCV patient cells, the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method coupled with LC-MS/MS was performed using skin fibroblast cells derived from two TGCV patients and three healthy volunteers. Altered protein expression in TGCV cells was confirmed using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis was simultaneously performed to identify changes in gene expression in TGCV cells. Results Using SILAC proteomics, 4033 proteins were quantified, 53 of which showed significantly altered expression in both TGCV patient cells. Twenty altered proteins were chosen and confirmed using SRM. SRM analysis successfully quantified 14 proteins, 13 of which showed the same trend as SILAC proteomics. The altered protein expression data set was used in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), and significant networks were identified. Several of these proteins have been previously implicated in lipid metabolism, while others represent new therapeutic targets or markers for TGCV. Microarray analysis quantified 20743 transcripts, and 252 genes showed significantly altered expression in both TGCV patient cells. Ten altered genes were chosen, 9 of which were successfully confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Biological networks of altered genes were analyzed using an IPA search. Conclusions We

  4. Resveratrol-Induced Apoptosis and Increased Radiosensitivity in CD133-Positive Cells Derived From Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, C.-L.; Huang, P.-I; Tsai, P.-H.; Tsai, M.-L.; Lo, J.-F.; Lee, Y.-Y.; Chen, Y.-J.; Chen, Y.-W.; Chiou, S.-H.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: CD133 has recently been proposed as a marker for cancer stem-like cells (CSC) in brain tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of resveratrol (RV) in radiosensitivity of CD133-positive/-negative cells derived from atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT-CD133{sup +/-}). Materials and Methods: AT/RT-CD133{sup +/-} were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and then treated with RV at different doses. Migratory ability, colony formation, apoptotic activity, and xenotransplantation were assessed for RV alone, ionizing radiation (IR) alone, and IR with RV conditions. Results: AT/RT-CD133{sup +} displayed enhanced self-renewal and highly coexpressed 'stem cell' genes and drug-resistant genes, in addition to showing significant resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy as compared with CD133{sup -} cells. After treatment with 200 {mu}M RV, the in vitro proliferation rates and in vivo tumor restoration abilities of ATRT-CD133{sup +} were dramatically inhibited. Importantly, treatment with 150 {mu}M RV can effectively inhibit the expression of drug-resistant genes in AT/RT-CD133{sup +}, and further facilitate to the differentiation of CD133{sup +} into CD133{sup -}. In addition, treatment with 150 {mu}M RV could significantly enhance the radiosensitivity and IR-mediated apoptosis in RV-treated ATRT-CD133{sup +/-}. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that the mean survival rate of mice with ATRT-CD133{sup +} that were treated with IR could be significantly improved when IR was combined with 150 {mu}M RV treatment. Conclusions: AT/RT-CD133{sup +} exhibit CSC properties and are refractory to IR treatment. Our results suggest that RV treatment plays crucial roles in antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and radiosensitizing effects on treated-CD133{sup +/-}; RV may therefore improve the clinical treatment of AT/RT.

  5. Tolerance of human embryonic stem cell derived islet progenitor cells to vitrification-relevant solutions.

    PubMed

    Lahmy, Reyhaneh; Bolyukh, Vladimir F; Castilla, Sergio Mora; Laurent, Louise C; Katkov, Igor I; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2015-06-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell derived islet progenitors (hESC-IPs), encapsulated inside an immunoprotective device, mature in vivo and ameliorate diabetes in mice. The ability to cryopreserve hESC-IPs preloaded in these devices would enhance consistency and portability, but traditional 'slow freezing' methods did not work well for cells encapsulated in the device. Vitrification is an attractive alternative cryopreservation approach. To assess the tolerance of hESC-IPs to vitrification relevant conditions, we here are reporting cell survival following excursions in tonicity, exposure to fifteen 40% v/v combinations of 4 cryoprotectants, and varied methods for addition and elution. We find that 78% survival is achieved using a protocol in which cells are abruptly (in one step) exposed to a solution containing 10% v/v each dimethyl sulfoxide, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol on ice, and eluted step-wise with DPBS+0.5M sucrose at 37°C. Importantly, the hESC-IPs also maintain expression of the critical islet progenitor markers PDX-1, NKX6.1, NGN3 and NEURO-D1. Thus, hESC-IPs exhibit robust tolerance to exposure to vitrification solutions in relevant conditions. PMID:25817378

  6. Automated Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Evaluation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Divya; Kalra, Spandan; Duc Hoang, Minh; George, Vinoj; Staniforth, Andrew; Russell, Hugh; Yang, Xuebin

    2016-01-01

    Automated planar patch clamp systems are widely used in drug evaluation studies because of their ability to provide accurate, reliable, and reproducible data in a high-throughput manner. Typically, CHO and HEK tumorigenic cell lines overexpressing single ion channels are used since they can be harvested as high-density, homogenous, single-cell suspensions. While human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) are physiologically more relevant, these cells are fragile, have complex culture requirements, are inherently heterogeneous, and are expensive to produce, which has restricted their use on automated patch clamp (APC) devices. Here, we used high efficiency differentiation protocols to produce cardiomyocytes from six different hPSC lines for analysis on the Patchliner (Nanion Technologies GmbH) APC platform. We developed a two-step cell preparation protocol that yielded cell catch rates and whole-cell breakthroughs of ∼80%, with ∼40% of these cells allowing electrical activity to be recorded. The protocol permitted formation of long-lasting (>15 min), high quality seals (>2 GΩ) in both voltage- and current-clamp modes. This enabled density of sodium, calcium, and potassium currents to be evaluated, along with dose–response curves to their respective channel inhibitors, tetrodotoxin, nifedipine, and E-4031. Thus, we show the feasibility of using the Patchliner platform for automated evaluation of the electrophysiology and pharmacology of hPSC-CMs, which will enable considerable increase in throughput for reliable and efficient drug evaluation. PMID:26906236

  7. Generation of a functional liver tissue mimic using adipose stromal vascular fraction cell-derived vasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, S. S.; Maijub, J. G.; Krishnan, L.; Ramakrishnan, V. M.; Clayton, L. R.; Williams, S. K.; Hoying, J. B.; Boyd, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cell implantation therapies is to promote integration of the microcirculation between the implanted cells and the host. We used adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to vascularize a human liver cell (HepG2) implant. We hypothesized that the SVF cells would form a functional microcirculation via vascular assembly and inosculation with the host vasculature. Initially, we assessed the extent and character of neovasculatures formed by freshly isolated and cultured SVF cells and found that freshly isolated cells have a higher vascularization potential. Generation of a 3D implant containing fresh SVF and HepG2 cells formed a tissue in which HepG2 cells were entwined with a network of microvessels. Implanted HepG2 cells sequestered labeled LDL delivered by systemic intravascular injection only in SVF-vascularized implants demonstrating that SVF cell-derived vasculatures can effectively integrate with host vessels and interface with parenchymal cells to form a functional tissue mimic. PMID:23828203

  8. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Corneal Endothelial Cells by Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Chiswell, Brian P.; Xia, Xin; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aim To generate human embryonic stem cell derived corneal endothelial cells (hESC-CECs) for transplantation in patients with corneal endothelial dystrophies. Materials and Methods Feeder-free hESC-CECs were generated by a directed differentiation protocol. hESC-CECs were characterized by morphology, expression of corneal endothelial markers, and microarray analysis of gene expression. Results hESC-CECs were nearly identical morphologically to primary human corneal endothelial cells, expressed Zona Occludens 1 (ZO-1) and Na+/K+ATPaseα1 (ATPA1) on the apical surface in monolayer culture, and produced the key proteins of Descemet’s membrane, Collagen VIIIα1 and VIIIα2 (COL8A1 and 8A2). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed expression of all corneal endothelial pump transcripts. hESC-CECs were 96% similar to primary human adult CECs by microarray analysis. Conclusion hESC-CECs are morphologically similar, express corneal endothelial cell markers and express a nearly identical complement of genes compared to human adult corneal endothelial cells. hESC-CECs may be a suitable alternative to donor-derived corneal endothelium. PMID:26689688

  9. Muse Cells, a New Type of Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived from Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ru-zhi; Li, Di; Cheng, Sai; Yang, Yu-hua; Tian, Ting; Pan, Xiao-ru

    2016-04-01

    A new type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that expresses stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3) and the mesenchymal cell marker CD105 are known as multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells. Studies have shown that stem cells in suspension cultures are more likely to generate embryoid body-like stem cell spheres and maintain an undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency. We separated Muse cells derived from human dermal fibroblasts by long-term trypsin incubation (LTT) through suspension cultures in methylcellulose. The Muse cells obtained expressed several pluripotency markers, including Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, and SSEA-3, and could differentiate in vitro into cells of the three germ layers, such as hepatocytes (endodermal), neural cells (ectodermal) and adipocytes, and osteocytes (mesodermal cells). These cells showed a low level of DNA methylation and a high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio. Our study provides an innovative and exciting platform for exploring the potential cell-based therapy of various human diseases using Muse cells as well as their great possibility for regenerative medicine. PMID:27055628

  10. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  11. Endothelial differentiation in multipotent cells derived from mouse and human white mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Abdmaulen, Raushan; Urs, Sumithra; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Jordan, Maria C; Roos, Kenneth P; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I

    2012-12-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to multipotent cells, so-called de-differentiated fat (DFAT) cells, when losing their fat in culture. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of DFAT cells to give rise to endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and vivo. We demonstrate that mouse and human DFAT cells, derived from adipose tissue and lipospirate, respectively, initially lack expression of CD34, CD31, CD146, CD45 and pericyte markers, distinguishing them from progenitor cells previously identified in adipose stroma. The DFAT cells spontaneously differentiate into vascular ECs in vitro, as determined by real-time PCR, fluorescence activated cell sorting, immunostaining, and formation of tube structures. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4 and BMP9, important in regulating angiogenesis, significantly enhances the EC differentiation. Furthermore, adipocyte-derived cells from Green Fluorescent Protein-transgenic mice were detected in the vasculature of infarcted myocardium up to 6 weeks after ligation of the left anterior descending artery in mice. We conclude that adipocyte-derived multipotent cells are able to spontaneously give rise to ECs, a process that is promoted by BMPs and may be important in cardiovascular regeneration and in physiological and pathological changes in fat and other tissues. PMID:22999861

  12. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  13. Long Term Liver Engraftment of Functional Hepatocytes Obtained from Germline Cell-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Famulari, Elvira Smeralda; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tolosano, Emanuela; Altruda, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in liver gene and cell therapy is availability of ex vivo-expanded hepatocytes. Pluripotent stem cells are an attractive alternative. Here, we show that hepatocyte precursors can be isolated from male germline cell-derived pluripotent stem cells (GPSCs) using the hepatoblast marker, Liv2, and induced to differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. These cells expressed hepatic-specific genes and were functional as demonstrated by their ability to secrete albumin and produce urea. When transplanted in the liver parenchyma of partially hepatectomised mice, Liv2-sorted cells showed regional and heterogeneous engraftment in the injected lobe. Moreover, approximately 50% of Y chromosome-positive, GPSC-derived cells were found in the female livers, in the region of engraftment, even one month after cell injection. This is the first study showing that Liv2-sorted GPSCs-derived hepatocytes can undergo long lasting engraftment in the mouse liver. Thus, GPSCs might offer promise for regenerative medicine. PMID:26323094

  14. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  15. Automated Electrophysiological and Pharmacological Evaluation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rajamohan, Divya; Kalra, Spandan; Duc Hoang, Minh; George, Vinoj; Staniforth, Andrew; Russell, Hugh; Yang, Xuebin; Denning, Chris

    2016-03-15

    Automated planar patch clamp systems are widely used in drug evaluation studies because of their ability to provide accurate, reliable, and reproducible data in a high-throughput manner. Typically, CHO and HEK tumorigenic cell lines overexpressing single ion channels are used since they can be harvested as high-density, homogenous, single-cell suspensions. While human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) are physiologically more relevant, these cells are fragile, have complex culture requirements, are inherently heterogeneous, and are expensive to produce, which has restricted their use on automated patch clamp (APC) devices. Here, we used high efficiency differentiation protocols to produce cardiomyocytes from six different hPSC lines for analysis on the Patchliner (Nanion Technologies GmbH) APC platform. We developed a two-step cell preparation protocol that yielded cell catch rates and whole-cell breakthroughs of ∼80%, with ∼40% of these cells allowing electrical activity to be recorded. The protocol permitted formation of long-lasting (>15 min), high quality seals (>2 GΩ) in both voltage- and current-clamp modes. This enabled density of sodium, calcium, and potassium currents to be evaluated, along with dose-response curves to their respective channel inhibitors, tetrodotoxin, nifedipine, and E-4031. Thus, we show the feasibility of using the Patchliner platform for automated evaluation of the electrophysiology and pharmacology of hPSC-CMs, which will enable considerable increase in throughput for reliable and efficient drug evaluation. PMID:26906236

  16. Hydrogen sulfide induces apoptosis in epithelial cells derived from human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Murata, T; Yaegaki, K; Qian, W; Herai, M; Calenic, B; Imai, T; Sato, T; Tanaka, T; Kamoda, T; Ii, H

    2008-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is not only one of the main causes of halitosis but is also an agent of toxicity against periodontal cells and tissues in biofilm-related periodontal diseases. Also, apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells may play an important role in the onset and progress of periodontitis. We examined the effect of H(2)S on the induction of apoptosis, using human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and keratinocyte-like Ca9-22 cells derived from human gingiva. The cells were incubated with H(2)S (100 ng ml(-1)) for 24, 48 or 72 h by adding H(2)S to air containing 5% CO(2), supplied constantly to the culture environment during incubation. The incidence of apoptosis caused by H(2)S was determined with Annexin V staining by flow cytometry. The proportion of apoptotic cells was significantly increased by exposure to H(2)S for 48 h in comparison with the control in both Ca9-22 cells and HGF. A concentration of 100 ng ml(-1) H(2)S in air is possible in the gingival sulcus. This study indicates that apoptosis in gingival epithelial cells and HGF by H(2)S may occur in the oral cavity, which may cause a periodontal condition. PMID:21386151

  17. Modulating Innate Immunity Improves Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Replication in Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Angus, Allan G.N.; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Cameron, Kate; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Patel, Arvind H.; Hay, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this study, human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps) were investigated for their ability to support hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and replication. hESC-Heps were capable of supporting the full viral life cycle, including the release of infectious virions. Although supportive, hESC-Hep viral infection levels were not as great as those observed in Huh7 cells. We reasoned that innate immune responses in hESC-Heps may lead to the low level of infection and replication. Upon further investigation, we identified a strong type III interferon response in hESC-Heps that was triggered by HCV. Interestingly, specific inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway led to an increase in HCV infection and replication in hESC-Heps. Of note, the interferon response was not evident in Huh7 cells. In summary, we have established a robust cell-based system that allows the in-depth study of virus-host interactions in vitro. PMID:25068132

  18. Isolation and Mechanical Measurements of Myofibrils from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pioner, Josè Manuel; Racca, Alice W; Klaiman, Jordan M; Yang, Kai-Chun; Guan, Xuan; Pabon, Lil; Muskheli, Veronica; Zaunbrecher, Rebecca; Macadangdang, Jesse; Jeong, Mark Y; Mack, David L; Childers, Martin K; Kim, Deok-Ho; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; Murry, Charles E; Regnier, Michael

    2016-06-14

    Tension production and contractile properties are poorly characterized aspects of excitation-contraction coupling of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). Previous approaches have been limited due to the small size and structural immaturity of early-stage hiPSC-CMs. We developed a substrate nanopatterning approach to produce hiPSC-CMs in culture with adult-like dimensions, T-tubule-like structures, and aligned myofibrils. We then isolated myofibrils from hiPSC-CMs and measured the tension and kinetics of activation and relaxation using a custom-built apparatus with fast solution switching. The contractile properties and ultrastructure of myofibrils more closely resembled human fetal myofibrils of similar gestational age than adult preparations. We also demonstrated the ability to study the development of contractile dysfunction of myofibrils from a patient-derived hiPSC-CM cell line carrying the familial cardiomyopathy MYH7 mutation (E848G). These methods can bring new insights to understanding cardiomyocyte maturation and developmental mechanical dysfunction of hiPSC-CMs with cardiomyopathic mutations. PMID:27161364

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injection enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells derived from cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhao, Xian-Lan; Wang, Fei; Huang, Lan; Wang, Meng; Chen, Xin-Feng; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Cord blood (CB) is becoming an extensive source of cytokine-induced killer cells. It had been used in several clinical settings and proven to be efficacious and safe. Therefore, we investigated the possibility of combining CIK cells derived from cord blood (CB-CIK) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa injection (PA-MSHA) in order to enhance the cytotoxicity of CB-CIK cells against tumors. Compared with the CB-CIK cells, the PA-MSHA-treated CB-CIK cells demonstrated with increased proliferation rates, higher expression of activated cell surface marker CD28 and lower expression of inhibited cell surface markers PD-1 and CTLA-4. Furthermore, PA-MSHA-treated CB-CIK cells exhibited more effectively for secreting pro-inflammatory cytokine such as IFN-γ and expressing high levels of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6. The expression of CD107a was higher in the CD3(+)CD56(+) subset of PA-MSHA-treated CB-CIK cells. Our results indicate that the PA-MSHA-treated CB-CIK cells exhibited a more potent in cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Thus, PA-MSHA enhanced the antitumor ability of CB-CIK cells. PMID:25465152

  20. Osteocyte specific responses to soluble and mechanical stimuli in a stem cell derived culture model

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Uzer, Gunes; Brobst, Kaitlyn E.; Xie, Zhihui; Sen, Buer; Yen, Sherwin S.; Styner, Maya; Rubin, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Studying osteocyte behavior in culture has proven difficult because these embedded cells require spatially coordinated interactions with the matrix and surrounding cells to achieve the osteocyte phenotype. Using an easily attainable source of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, we generated cells with the osteocyte phenotype within two weeks. These “stem cell derived-osteocytes” (SCD-O) displayed stellate morphology and lacunocanalicular ultrastructure. Osteocytic genes Sost, Dmp1, E11, and Fgf23 were maximally expressed at 15 days and responded to PTH and 1,25(OH)2D3. Production of sclerostin mRNA and protein, within 15 days of culture makes the SCD-O model ideal for elucidating regulatory mechanisms. We found sclerostin to be regulated by mechanical factors, where low intensity vibration significantly reduced Sost expression. Additionally, this model recapitulates sclerostin production in response to osteoactive hormones, as PTH or LIV repressed secretion of sclerostin, significantly impacting Wnt-mediated Axin2 expression, via β-catenin signaling. In summary, SCD-O cells produce abundant matrix, rapidly attain the osteocyte phenotype, and secrete functional factors including sclerostin under non-immortalized conditions. This culture model enables ex vivo observations of osteocyte behavior while preserving an organ-like environment. Furthermore, as marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can be obtained from transgenic animals; our model enables study of genetic control of osteocyte behaviors. PMID:26056071

  1. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael P; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J; Santos Costa, Vitor; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C David; Murphy, William L; Thomson, James A

    2015-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial. PMID:26392547

  2. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  3. "Kill" the messenger: Targeting of cell-derived microparticles in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-07-01

    Immune complex (IC) deposition in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a key early pathogenic event in lupus nephritis (LN). The clarification of the mechanisms behind IC deposition will enable targeted therapy in the future. Circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been proposed as major sources of extracellular autoantigens and ICs and triggers of autoimmunity in LN. The overabundance of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) along with immunoglobulins and a few other proteins specifically distinguish circulating MPs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and this is most pronounced in patients with active LN. G3BP co-localizes with deposited ICs in renal biopsies from LN patients supporting a significant presence of MPs in the IC deposits. G3BP binds strongly to glomerular basement membrane proteins and integrins. Accordingly, MP surface proteins, especially G3BP, may be essential for the deposition of ICs in kidneys and thus for the ensuing formation of MP-derived electron dense structures in the GBM, and immune activation in LN. This review focuses on the notion of targeting surface molecules on MPs as an entirely novel treatment strategy in LN. By targeting MPs, a double hit may be achieved by attenuating both the autoantigenic fueling of immune complexes and the triggering of the adaptive immune system. Thereby, early pathogenic events may be blocked in contrast to current treatment strategies that primarily target and modulate later events in the cellular and humoral immune response. PMID:26970484

  4. Human ES-cell-derived cardiomyocytes electrically couple and suppress arrhythmias in injured hearts.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Yuji; Fernandes, Sarah; Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Filice, Dominic; Muskheli, Veronica; Kim, Jonathan; Palpant, Nathan J; Gantz, Jay; Moyes, Kara White; Reinecke, Hans; Van Biber, Benjamin; Dardas, Todd; Mignone, John L; Izawa, Atsushi; Hanna, Ramy; Viswanathan, Mohan; Gold, Joseph D; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Sarvazyan, Narine; Kay, Matthew W; Murry, Charles E; Laflamme, Michael A

    2012-09-13

    Transplantation studies in mice and rats have shown that human embryonic-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can improve the function of infarcted hearts, but two critical issues related to their electrophysiological behaviour in vivo remain unresolved. First, the risk of arrhythmias following hESC-CM transplantation in injured hearts has not been determined. Second, the electromechanical integration of hESC-CMs in injured hearts has not been demonstrated, so it is unclear whether these cells improve contractile function directly through addition of new force-generating units. Here we use a guinea-pig model to show that hESC-CM grafts in injured hearts protect against arrhythmias and can contract synchronously with host muscle. Injured hearts with hESC-CM grafts show improved mechanical function and a significantly reduced incidence of both spontaneous and induced ventricular tachycardia. To assess the activity of hESC-CM grafts in vivo, we transplanted hESC-CMs expressing the genetically encoded calcium sensor, GCaMP3 (refs 4, 5). By correlating the GCaMP3 fluorescent signal with the host ECG, we found that grafts in uninjured hearts have consistent 1:1 host–graft coupling. Grafts in injured hearts are more heterogeneous and typically include both coupled and uncoupled regions. Thus, human myocardial grafts meet physiological criteria for true heart regeneration, providing support for the continued development of hESC-based cardiac therapies for both mechanical and electrical repair. PMID:22864415

  5. Simvastatin modulates mouse embryonic stem cell-derived chondrogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kramer, J; Bartsch, M; Krug, D; Klinger, M; Nitschke, M; Rohwedel, J

    2012-10-01

    It has been studied in detail that cellular differentiation during chondrogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro by differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells as embryoid bodies (EBs). We here used this model system of cartilage development to analyze the effect of simvastatin, a potentially embryotoxic substance. Statins are a group of drugs used to treat hypercholesterolaemia. We found that simvastatin activated cartilage nodule formation during EB differentiation. Extended application of simvastatin resulted in enhanced expression of cartilage marker molecules and prolonged persistence of cartilage nodules. Expression of collagen type II was upregulated during simvastatin-induced chondrogenic ES cell differentiation as demonstrated by quantitative real time PCR. However, immunostaining for cartilage marker molecules revealed that cartilage nodules within simvastatin-treated EBs were defective, bearing cavities of cell loss. Furthermore, caspase activity was reduced in comparison to untreated controls indicating reduced apoptosis. Taken together, we may speculate that simvastatin prolongs survival of chondrocytes and disrupts cellular integrity of cartilage nodules during EB development by affecting apoptotic mechanisms. The study underlines that ES cell-derived EBs are a useful in vitro model to screen substances for their embryotoxic and teratogenic potential. PMID:22771337

  6. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  7. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process. PMID:26074441

  8. Cell-derived matrices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications1

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Lindsay E.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    The development and application of decellularized extracellular matrices (ECM) has grown rapidly in the fields of cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in recent years. Similar to decellularized tissues and whole organs, cell-derived matrices (CDMs) represent bioactive, biocompatible materials consisting of a complex assembly of fibrillar proteins, matrix macromolecules and associated growth factors that often recapitulate, at least to some extent, the composition and organization of native ECM microenvironments. The unique ability to engineer CDMs de novo based on cell source and culture methods makes them an attractive alternative to conventional allogeneic and xenogeneic tissue-derived matrices that are currently harvested from cadaveric sources, suffer from inherent heterogeneity, and have limited ability for customization. Although CDMs have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications, including adhesive cell culture substrates, synthetic scaffold coatings, and tissue engineered products, such as heart valves and vascular grafts, the state of the field is still at a relatively nascent stage of development. In this review, we provide an overview of the various applications of CDM and discuss successes to date, current limitations and future directions. PMID:25530850

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Increased Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Expression Enhanced Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chih-Yuan; Hua, Jia; Coathup, Melanie; Kalia, Priya; Blunn, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of critical size bone defects pose a challenge in orthopedics. Stem cell therapy together with cytokines has the potential to improve bone repair as they cause the migration and homing of stem cells to the defect site. However, the engraftment, participation, and recruitment of other cells within the regenerating tissue are important. To enhance stem cell involvement, this study investigated overexpression of stem cells with stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) using an adenovirus. We hypothesized that these engineered cells would effectively increase the migration of native cells to the site of fracture, enhancing bone repair. Before implantation, we showed that SDF-1 secreted by transfected cells increased the migration of nontransfected cells. In a rat defect bone model, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing SDF-1 showed significantly (p=0.003) more new bone formation within the gap and less bone mineral loss at the area adjacent to the defect site during the early bone healing stage. In conclusion, SDF-1 was shown to play an important role in accelerating fracture repair and contributing to bone repair in rat models, by recruiting more host stem cells to the defect site and encouraging osteogenic differentiation and production of bone. PMID:25251779

  10. Tuft-cell-derived IL-25 regulates an intestinal ILC2-epithelial response circuit.

    PubMed

    von Moltke, Jakob; Ji, Ming; Liang, Hong-Erh; Locksley, Richard M

    2016-01-14

    Parasitic helminths and allergens induce a type 2 immune response leading to profound changes in tissue physiology, including hyperplasia of mucus-secreting goblet cells and smooth muscle hypercontractility. This response, known as 'weep and sweep', requires interleukin (IL)-13 production by tissue-resident group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and recruited type 2 helper T cells (TH2 cells). Experiments in mice and humans have demonstrated requirements for the epithelial cytokines IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-25 in the activation of ILC2s, but the sources and regulation of these signals remain poorly defined. In the small intestine, the epithelium consists of at least five distinct cellular lineages, including the tuft cell, whose function is unclear. Here we show that tuft cells constitutively express IL-25 to sustain ILC2 homeostasis in the resting lamina propria in mice. After helminth infection, tuft-cell-derived IL-25 further activates ILC2s to secrete IL-13, which acts on epithelial crypt progenitors to promote differentiation of tuft and goblet cells, leading to increased frequencies of both. Tuft cells, ILC2s and epithelial progenitors therefore comprise a response circuit that mediates epithelial remodelling associated with type 2 immunity in the small intestine, and perhaps at other mucosal barriers populated by these cells. PMID:26675736

  11. Potential of laryngeal muscle regeneration using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dirja, Bayu Tirta; Yoshie, Susumu; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Nomoto, Yukio; Wada, Ikuo; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may be a new potential cell source for laryngeal muscle regeneration in the treatment of vocal fold atrophy after recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objectives Unilateral vocal fold paralysis can lead to degeneration, atrophy, and loss of force of the thyroarytenoid muscle. At present, there are some treatments such as thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and vocal fold injection. However, such treatments cannot restore reduced mass of the thyroarytenoid muscle. iPS cells have been recognized as supplying a potential resource for cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the use of iPS cells for the regeneration of laryngeal muscle through the evaluation of both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were generated from tdTomato-labeled iPS cells using embryoid body formation. Differentiation into skeletal muscle cells was analyzed by gene expression and immunocytochemistry. The tdTomato-labeled iPS cell-derived skeletal muscle cells were transplanted into the left atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle. To evaluate the engraftment of these cells after transplantation, immunohistochemistry was performed. Results The tdTomato-labeled iPS cells were successfully differentiated into skeletal muscle cells through an in vitro experiment. These cells survived in the atrophied thyroarytenoid muscle after transplantation. PMID:26824385

  12. Dedifferentiated follicular granulosa cells derived from pig ovary can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Yoshinao; Ono, Hiromasa; Motohashi, Takeharu; Sugiura, Nobuki; Nobusue, Hiroyuki; Kano, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Transdifferentiation is the conversion of cells from one differentiated cell type into another. How functionally differentiated cells already committed to a specific cell lineage can transdifferentiate into other cell types is a key question in cell biology and regenerative medicine. In the present study we show that porcine ovarian follicular GCs (granulosa cells) can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo. Pure GCs isolated and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 20% FBS (fetal bovine serum) proliferated and dedifferentiated into fibroblast-like cells. We referred to these cells as DFOG (dedifferentiated follicular granulosa) cells. Microarray analysis showed that DFOG cells lost expression of GC-specific marker genes, but gained the expression of osteogenic marker genes during dedifferentiation. After osteogenic induction, DFOG cells underwent terminal osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization in vitro. Furthermore, when DFOG cells were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice, these cells formed ectopic osteoid tissue. These results indicate that DFOG cells derived from GCs can differentiate into osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that GCs provide a useful model for studying the mechanisms of transdifferentiation into other cell lineages in functionally differentiated cells. PMID:22839299

  13. Functional Kidney Bioengineering with Pluripotent Stem-Cell-Derived Renal Progenitor Cells and Decellularized Kidney Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Du, Chan; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leong, Meng Fatt; Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin; Chua, Ying Ping; Khoo, Vanessa Mei Hui; Wan, Andrew C A

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in developmental biology and stem cell technology have led to the engineering of functional organs in a dish. However, the limited size of these organoids and absence of a large circulatory system poses limits to its clinical translation. To overcome these issues, decellularized whole kidney scaffolds with native microstructure and extracellular matrix (ECM) are employed for kidney bioengineering, using human-induced pluripotent-stem-cell-derived renal progenitor cells and endothelial cells. To demonstrate ECM-guided cellular assembly, the present work is focused on generating the functional unit of the kidney, the glomerulus. In the repopulated organ, the presence of endothelial cells broadly upregulates the expression level of genes related to renal development. When the cellularized native scaffolds are implanted in SCID mice, glomeruli assembly can be achieved by co-culture of the renal progenitors and endothelial cells. These individual glomerular units are shown to be functional in the context of the whole organ using a simulated bio-reactor set-up with urea and creatinine excretion and albumin reabsorption. Our results indicate that the repopulation of decellularized native kidney using clinically relevant, expandable patient-specific renal progenitors and endothelial cells may be a viable approach for the generation of a functional whole kidney. PMID:27294565

  14. Reversal of diabetes with insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Alireza; Bruin, Jennifer E; Arora, Payal; Rubin, Allison; Batushansky, Irina; Asadi, Ali; O'Dwyer, Shannon; Quiskamp, Nina; Mojibian, Majid; Albrecht, Tobias; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Johnson, James D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic progenitors or insulin-secreting cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been proposed as a therapy for diabetes. We describe a seven-stage protocol that efficiently converts hESCs into insulin-producing cells. Stage (S) 7 cells expressed key markers of mature pancreatic beta cells, including MAFA, and displayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion similar to that of human islets during static incubations in vitro. Additional characterization using single-cell imaging and dynamic glucose stimulation assays revealed similarities but also notable differences between S7 insulin-secreting cells and primary human beta cells. Nevertheless, S7 cells rapidly reversed diabetes in mice within 40 days, roughly four times faster than pancreatic progenitors. Therefore, although S7 cells are not fully equivalent to mature beta cells, their capacity for glucose-responsive insulin secretion and rapid reversal of diabetes in vivo makes them a promising alternative to pancreatic progenitor cells or cadaveric islets for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:25211370

  15. Functional differentiation of stem cell-derived neurons from different murine backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E.

    2014-01-01

    Murine stem cell-derived neurons have been used to study a wide variety of neuropsychiatric diseases with a hereditary component, ranging from autism to Alzheimer’s. While a significant amount of data on their molecular biology has been generated, there is little data on the physiology of these cultures. Different mouse strains show clear differences in behavioral and other neurobiologically relevant readouts. We have studied the physiology of early differentiation and network formation in neuronal cultures derived from three different mouse embryonic stem cell lines. We have found largely overlapping patterns with some significant differences in the timing of the functional milestones. Neurons from R1 showed the fastest development of intrinsic excitability, while E14Tg2a and J1 were slower. This was also reflected in an earlier appearance of synaptic activity in R1 cultures, while E14Tg2a and J1 were delayed by up to 2 days. In conclusion, stem cells from all backgrounds could be successfully differentiated into functioning neural networks with similar developmental patterns. Differences in the timing of specific milestones, suggest that control cell lines and time-points should be carefully chosen when investigating genetic alterations that lead to subtle deficits in neuronal function. PMID:24600351

  16. Process Extension from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neurons through Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Daniel Devaud

    This thesis focuses on studying the extension of motor axons through synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) PEG hydrogels that have been modified with biochemical functionalities to render them more biologically relevant. Specifically, the research strategy is to encapsulate embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ESMNs) in synthetic PEG hydrogels crosslinked through three different chemistries providing three mechanisms for dynamically tuning material properties. First, a covalently crosslinked, enzymatically degradable hydrogel is developed and exploited to study the biophysical dynamics of axon extension and matrix remodeling. It is demonstrated that dispersed motor neurons require a battery of adhesive peptides and growth factors to maintain viability and extend axons while those in contact with supportive neuroglial cells do not. Additionally, cell-degradable crosslinker peptides and a soft modulus mimicking that of the spinal cord are requirements for axon extension. However, because local degradation of the hydrogel results in a cellular environment significantly different than that of the bulk, enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinkers were replaced with reversible covalent hydrazone bonds to study the effect of hydrogel modulus on axon extension. This material is characterized in detail and used to measure forces involved in axon extension. Finally, a hydrogel with photocleavable linkers incorporated into the network structure is exploited to explore motor axon response to physical channels. This system is used to direct the growth of motor axons towards co-cultured myotubes, resulting in the formation of an in vitro neural circuit.

  17. Engineered Microenvironments for the Maturation and Observation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salick, Max R.

    The human heart is a dynamic system that undergoes substantial changes as it develops and adapts to the body's growing needs. To better understand the physiology of the heart, researchers have begun to produce immature heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, from pluripotent stem cell sources with remarkable efficiency. These stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes hold great potential in the understanding and treatment of heart disease; however, even after prolonged culture, these cells continue to exhibit an immature phenotype, as indicated by poor sarcomere organization and calcium handling, among other features. The lack of maturation that is observed in these cardiomyocytes greatly limits their applicability towards drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy applications. The mechanical environment surrounding a cell has been repeatedly shown to have a large impact on that cell's behavior. For this reason, we have implemented micropatterning methods to mimic the level of alignment that occurs in the heart in vivo in order to study how this alignment may help the cells to produce a more mature sarcomere phenotype. It was discovered that the level of sarcomere organization of a cardiomyocyte can be strongly influenced by the micropattern lane geometry on which it adheres. Steps were taken to optimize this micropattern platform, and studies of protein organization, gene expression, and myofibrillogenesis were conducted. Additionally, a set of programs was developed to provide quantitative analysis of the level of sarcomere organization, as well as to assist with several other tissue engineering applications.

  18. Evaluation of MDCK Cell-Derived Influenza H7N9 Vaccine Candidates in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Fen; Weng, Tsai-Chuan; Lai, Chia-Chun; Lin, Jun-Yang; Chen, Po-Ling; Wang, Ya-Fang; Chao, Sin-Ru; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Hwang, Yi-Shiuh; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Yee-Chun; Su, Ih-Jen; Lee, Min-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) viruses emerged as human pathogens in China in early 2013 and have killed >100 persons. Influenza vaccines are mainly manufactured using egg-based technology which could not meet the surging demand during influenza pandemics. In this study, we evaluated cell-based influenza H7N9 vaccines in ferrets. An egg-derived influenza H7N9 reassortant vaccine virus was adapted in MDCK cells. Influenza H7N9 whole virus vaccine antigen was manufactured using a microcarrier-based culture system. Immunogenicity and protection of the vaccine candidates with three different formulations (300μg aluminum hydroxide, 1.5μg HA, and 1.5μg HA plus 300μg aluminum hydroxide) were evaluated in ferrets. In ferrets receiving two doses of vaccination, geometric mean titers of hemagglutination (HA) inhibition and neutralizing antibodies were <10 and <40 for the control group (adjuvant only), 17 and 80 for the unadjuvanted (HA only) group, and 190 and 640 for the adjuvanted group (HA plus adjuvant), respectively. After challenge with wild-type influenza H7N9 viruses, virus titers in respiratory tracts of the adjuvanted group were significantly lower than that in the control, and unadjuvanted groups. MDCK cell-derived influenza H7N9 whole virus vaccine candidate is immunogenic and protective in ferrets and clinical development is highly warranted. PMID:25799397

  19. Tuft-cell-derived IL-25 regulates an intestinal ILC2–epithelial response circuit

    PubMed Central

    von Moltke, Jakob; Ji, Ming; Liang, Hong-Erh; Locksley, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic helminths and allergens induce a type 2 immune response leading to profound changes in tissue physiology, including hyperplasia of mucus-secreting goblet cells1 and smooth muscle hypercontractility2. This response, known as ‘weep and sweep’, requires interleukin (IL)-13 production by tissue-resident group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and recruited type 2 helper T cells (TH2 cells)3. Experiments in mice and humans have demonstrated requirements for the epithelial cytokines IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-25 in the activation of ILC2s4–11, but the sources and regulation of these signals remain poorly defined. In the small intestine, the epithelium consists of at least five distinct cellular lineages12, including the tuft cell, whose function is unclear. Here we show that tuft cells constitutively express IL-25 to sustain ILC2 homeostasis in the resting lamina propria in mice. After helminth infection, tuft-cell-derived IL-25 further activates ILC2s to secrete IL-13, which acts on epithelial crypt progenitors to promote differentiation of tuft and goblet cells, leading to increased frequencies of both. Tuft cells, ILC2s and epithelial progenitors therefore comprise a response circuit that mediates epithelial remodelling associated with type 2 immunity in the small intestine, and perhaps at other mucosal barriers populated by these cells. PMID:26675736

  20. Transcriptional and Functional Profiling of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Fu, Ji-Dong; Drukker, Micha; Lee, Andrew; Li, Ronald A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can serve as a potentially limitless source of cells that may enable regeneration of diseased tissue and organs. Here we investigate the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in promoting recovery from cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury in a mouse model. Using microarrays, we have described the hESC-CM transcriptome within the spectrum of changes that occur between undifferentiated hESCs and fetal heart cells. The hESC-CMs expressed cardiomyocyte genes at levels similar to those found in 20-week fetal heart cells, making this population a good source of potential replacement cells in vivo. Echocardiographic studies showed significant improvement in heart function by 8 weeks after transplantation. Finally, we demonstrate long-term engraftment of hESC-CMs by using molecular imaging to track cellular localization, survival, and proliferation in vivo. Taken together, global gene expression profiling of hESC differentiation enables a systems-based analysis of the biological processes, networks, and genes that drive hESC fate decisions, and studies such as this will serve as the foundation for future clinical applications of stem cell therapies. PMID:18941512

  1. Isolation and characterization of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Maass, Karen; Shekhar, Akshay; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; See, Fiona; Kim, Eugene E; Delgado, Camila; Shen, Steven; Cohen, Lisa; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-04-01

    The cardiac Purkinje fiber network is composed of highly specialized cardiomyocytes responsible for the synchronous excitation and contraction of the ventricles. Computational modeling, experimental animal studies, and intracardiac electrical recordings from patients with heritable and acquired forms of heart disease suggest that Purkinje cells (PCs) may also serve as critical triggers of life-threatening arrhythmias. Nonetheless, owing to the difficulty in isolating and studying this rare population of cells, the precise role of PC in arrhythmogenesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for their proarrhythmic behavior are not fully characterized. Conceptually, a stem cell-based model system might facilitate studies of PC-dependent arrhythmia mechanisms and serve as a platform to test novel therapeutics. Here, we describe the generation of murine embryonic stem cells (ESC) harboring pan-cardiomyocyte and PC-specific reporter genes. We demonstrate that the dual reporter gene strategy may be used to identify and isolate the rare ESC-derived PC (ESC-PC) from a mixed population of cardiogenic cells. ESC-PC display transcriptional signatures and functional properties, including action potentials, intracellular calcium cycling, and chronotropic behavior comparable to endogenous PC. Our results suggest that stem-cell derived PC are a feasible new platform for studies of developmental biology, disease pathogenesis, and screening for novel antiarrhythmic therapies. PMID:25524238

  2. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michael P.; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E.; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M.; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C. David; Murphy, William L.; Thomson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial. PMID:26392547

  3. Accurate Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Injury Using Stem Cell-Derived Populations

    PubMed Central

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Storck, Christopher; Zhou, Wenli; Iredale, John P.; Flint, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Despite major progress in the knowledge and management of human liver injury, there are millions of people suffering from chronic liver disease. Currently, the only cure for end-stage liver disease is orthotopic liver transplantation; however, this approach is severely limited by organ donation. Alternative approaches to restoring liver function have therefore been pursued, including the use of somatic and stem cell populations. Although such approaches are essential in developing scalable treatments, there is also an imperative to develop predictive human systems that more effectively study and/or prevent the onset of liver disease and decompensated organ function. We used a renewable human stem cell resource, from defined genetic backgrounds, and drove them through developmental intermediates to yield highly active, drug-inducible, and predictive human hepatocyte populations. Most importantly, stem cell-derived hepatocytes displayed equivalence to primary adult hepatocytes, following incubation with known hepatotoxins. In summary, we have developed a serum-free, scalable, and shippable cell-based model that faithfully predicts the potential for human liver injury. Such a resource has direct application in human modeling and, in the future, could play an important role in developing renewable cell-based therapies. PMID:24375539

  4. Paracrine Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue in Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Linero, Itali; Chaparro, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has proved to be a promising strategy in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Although their mechanism of action is not completely clear, it has been suggested that their therapeutic activity may be mediated by a paracrine effect. The main goal of this study was to evaluate by radiographic, morphometric and histological analysis the ability of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue (Ad-MSC) and their conditioned medium (CM), to repair surgical bone lesions using an in vivo model (rabbit mandibles). The results demonstrated that both, Ad-MSC and CM, induce bone regeneration in surgically created lesions in rabbit's jaws, suggesting that Ad-MSC improve the process of bone regeneration mainly by releasing paracrine factors. The evidence of the paracrine effect of MSC on bone regeneration has a major impact on regenerative medicine, and the use of their CM can address some issues and difficulties related to cell transplants. In particular, CM can be easily stored and transported, and is easier to handle by medical personnel during clinical procedures. PMID:25198551

  5. Mast cell-derived neurotrophin 4 mediates allergen-induced airway hyperinnervation in early life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kruti R.; Aven, Linh; Shao, Fengzhi; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Duvall, Melody G.; Levy, Bruce D.; Ai, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Asthma often progresses from early episodes of insults. How early life events connect to long-term airway dysfunction remains poorly understood. We demonstrated previously that increased neurotrophin 4 (NT4) levels following early life allergen exposure cause persistent changes in airway smooth muscle (ASM) innervation and airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in mice. Herein, we identify pulmonary mast cells as a key source of aberrant NT4 expression following early insults. NT4 is selectively expressed by ASM and mast cells in mice, nonhuman primates and humans. We show in mice that mast cell-derived NT4 is dispensable for ASM innervation during development. However, upon insults, mast cells expand in number and degranulate to release NT4 and thus become the major source of NT4 under pathological condition. Adoptive transfer of wild type mast cells, but not NT4−/− mast cells restores ASM hyperinnervation and AHR in KitW-sh/W-sh mice following early life insults. Notably, an infant nonhuman primate model of asthma also exhibits ASM hyperinnervation associated with the expansion and degranulation of mast cells. Together, these findings identify an essential role of mast cells in mediating ASM hyperinnervation following early life insults by producing NT4. This role may be evolutionarily conserved in linking early insults to long-term airway dysfunction. PMID:26860818

  6. Engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived myogenic progenitors in a dominant model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Radbod; Baik, June; Clee, Mark; Kyba, Michael; Tupler, Rossella; Perlingeiro, Rita C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) consist of a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, recessive or dominant, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening. To date, no effective treatment is available. Experimental strategies pursuing muscle regeneration through the transplantation of stem cell preparations have brought hope to patients affected by this disorder. Efficacy has been demonstrated in recessive MD models through contribution of wild-type nuclei to the muscle fiber heterokaryon, however to date, there has been no study investigating the efficacy of a cell therapy in a dominant model of MD. We have recently demonstrated that Pax3-induced embryonic stem (ES) cell- derived myogenic progenitors are able to engraft and improve muscle function in mdx mice, a recessive mouse model for Duchenne MD. To assess whether this therapeutic effect can be extended to a dominant type of muscle disorder, here we transplanted these cells into FRG1 transgenic mice, a dominant model that has been associated with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Our results show that Pax3-induced ES-derived myogenic progenitors are capable of significant engraftment after intramuscular or systemic transplantation into Frg1 mice. Analyses of contractile parameters revealed functional improvement in treated muscles of male mice, but not females, which are less severely affected. This study is the first to use Frg1 transgenic mice to assess muscle regeneration as well as to support the use of a cell-based therapy for autosomal dominant types of MD. PMID:19682990

  7. Pathogen Sensing Pathways in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived-Endothelial Cells: Role of NOD1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Daniel M.; Foldes, Gabor; Gatheral, Timothy; Paschalaki, Koralia E.; Lendvai, Zsuzsanna; Bagyura, Zsolt; Nemeth, Tamas; Skopal, Judit; Merkely, Bela; Telcian, Aurica G.; Gogsadze, Leila; Edwards, Michael R.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Harding, Sian E.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC), as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD)-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC), and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage. PMID:24690886

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  9. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  10. [The micro-particles of blood plasma, micro-vesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies and Kupffer macrophage in liver: late in phylogenesis system of realization of biological function of endoecology].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-07-01

    Probably, at early stages of phylogenesis and on the stage of first contacts of single cells in environment the mode of intercommunication was developed via formation of micro-vesicles. It is quite possible that this so complicated way was used during billions of years to develop the very early cenosises of functionally different cells. Later on, diffusion of humoral mediators within the framework of group of cells but without vesicles resulted in formation of very early regulated cenosises of various cells. In billions years, these paracrin regulated cenosises became structural and functional units of every organ. It is difficult to imagine that mode of early in phylogenesis humoral intercommunication of cells could preserve its significance in present conditions. At the same time, according to methodological approach of biological continuity in becoming of biological functions and biological reactions, micro-vesicles continue to function but with somehow different purposes. It is surmised that microparticles of blood plasma consist a heterogeneous population of micro-vesicles initially formed by cells, exosomes and apoptotic bodies. This population is a foundation of spontaneous, physical chemical formation of complexes in blood plasma on principles of absorption, hydrophobicity and ionic interaction of structural cells'components insoluble in water medium. It is assumed that presently formation of micro-particles in blood is functionally a kind of realization of phylogenetically late variant of biological function of endoecology, in inter-cellular medium, in local pool of intravascular blood plasma. This variant includes: a) microparticles, micro-vesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies as elements of biological reaction of support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium; b) in many respects highly specialized variant of phagocytosis of micro-particles by Kupffer macrophages in liver In the aggregate, this is a phylogenetically late medium of realization of

  11. A role for T cell-derived interleukin 22 in psoriatic skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, K; Guignouard, E; Pedretti, N; Garcia, M; Delwail, A; Bernard, F-X; Nau, F; Guillet, G; Dagregorio, G; Yssel, H; Lecron, J-C; Morel, F

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a T cell-derived cytokine that has been reported recently to induce cutaneous inflammation in an experimental murine model of psoriasis, and to induce in vitro an inflammatory-like phenotype. In the present study, we assessed the presence of IL-22 and the IL-22 receptor 1 (IL-22R1) in skin lesions, skin-derived T cells, as well as IL-22 levels in sera from patients with psoriasis. IL-22R1 and IL-10R2 transcripts are expressed at a similar level in psoriatic and healthy skin. In contrast, IL-22 mRNA expression was up-regulated in psoriatic skin lesions compared to normal skin, whereas IL-22 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from psoriatic patients and normal subjects were similar. Circulating IL-22 levels were significantly higher in psoriatic patients than in normal subjects. T cells isolated from psoriatic skin produced higher levels of IL-22 in comparison to peripheral T cells isolated from the same patients. IL-10 was expressed at similar levels in skin biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of psoriatic patients and normal subjects. Finally, we show here that supernatants of lesional psoriatic skin-infiltrating T cells induce an inflammatory response by normal human epidermal keratinocytes, resembling that observed in psoriatic lesions. Taken together, the results reported in this study indicate that IL-22 is a cytokine produced by skin-infiltrating lymphocytes that is potentially involved in initiation and/or maintenance of the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:17900301

  12. Functionally Enhanced Human Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes in Galactosylated Cellulosic Sponges for Hepatotoxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Tasnim, Farah; Toh, Yi-Chin; Qu, Yinghua; Li, Huan; Phan, Derek; Narmada, Balakrishnan C; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Mittal, Nikhil; Meng, Ryan Q; Yu, Hanry

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocyte-like cells (hPSC-HLCs) are an attractive alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) used in applications ranging from therapeutics to drug safety testing studies. It would be critical to improve and maintain mature hepatocyte functions of the hPSC-HLCs, especially for long-term studies. If 3D culture systems were to be used for such purposes, it would be important that the system can support formation and maintenance of optimal-sized spheroids for long periods of time, and can also be directly deployed in liver drug testing assays. We report the use of 3-dimensional (3D) cellulosic scaffold system for the culture of hPSC-HLCs. The scaffold has a macroporous network which helps to control the formation and maintenance of the spheroids for weeks. Our results show that culturing hPSC-HLCs in 3D cellulosic scaffolds increases functionality, as demonstrated by improved urea production and hepatic marker expression. In addition, hPSC-HLCs in the scaffolds exhibit a more mature phenotype, as shown by enhanced cytochrome P450 activity and induction. This enables the system to show a higher sensitivity to hepatotoxicants and a higher degree of similarity to PHHs when compared to conventional 2D systems. These results suggest that 3D cellulosic scaffolds are ideal for the long-term cultures needed to mature hPSC-HLCs. The mature hPSC-HLCs with improved cellular function can be continually maintained in the scaffolds and directly used for hepatotoxicity assays, making this system highly attractive for drug testing applications. PMID:27157693

  13. Inflammation-induced endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles modulate the cellular status of pericytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Niida, Shumpei; Azuma, Erika; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masashi; Huang, Ting Ting; Sagara, Hiroshi; Higaki, Sayuri; Ikutani, Masashi; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Kenji; Hamashima, Takeru; Mori, Hisashi; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Emerging lines of evidence have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate cell-to-cell communication by exporting encapsulated materials, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), to target cells. Endothelial cell-derived EVs (E-EVs) are upregulated in circulating blood in different pathological conditions; however, the characteristics and the role of these E-EVs are not yet well understood. In vitro studies were conducted to determine the role of inflammation-induced E-EVs in the cell-to-cell communication between vascular endothelial cells and pericytes/vSMCs. Stimulation with inflammatory cytokines and endotoxin immediately induced release of shedding type E-EVs from the vascular endothelial cells, and flow cytometry showed that the induction was dose dependent. MiRNA array analyses revealed that group of miRNAs were specifically increased in the inflammation-induced E-EVs. E-EVs added to the culture media of cerebrovascular pericytes were incorporated into the cells. The E-EV-supplemented cells showed highly induced mRNA and protein expression of VEGF-B, which was assumed to be a downstream target of the miRNA that was increased within the E-EVs after inflammatory stimulation. The results suggest that E-EVs mediate inflammation-induced endothelial cell-pericyte/vSMC communication, and the miRNAs encapsulated within the E-EVs may play a role in regulating target cell function. E-EVs may be new therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25687367

  14. Inhibition of pluripotent stem cell-derived teratoma formation by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Ok; Moon, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Yi, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Tae-Hee; Shim, Sung Han; Rhee, Yong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Oh, Seok-Jeong; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Han, Min-Joon; Cho, Yee Sook; Chung, Hyung-Min; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2013-08-27

    The future of safe cell-based therapy rests on overcoming teratoma/tumor formation, in particular when using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Because the presence of a few remaining undifferentiated hPSCs can cause undesirable teratomas after transplantation, complete removal of these cells with no/minimal damage to differentiated cells is a prerequisite for clinical application of hPSC-based therapy. Having identified a unique hESC signature of pro- and antiapoptotic gene expression profile, we hypothesized that targeting hPSC-specific antiapoptotic factor(s) (i.e., survivin or Bcl10) represents an efficient strategy to selectively eliminate pluripotent cells with teratoma potential. Here we report the successful identification of small molecules that can effectively inhibit these antiapoptotic factors, leading to selective and efficient removal of pluripotent stem cells through apoptotic cell death. In particular, a single treatment of hESC-derived mixed population with chemical inhibitors of survivin (e.g., quercetin or YM155) induced selective and complete cell death of undifferentiated hPSCs. In contrast, differentiated cell types (e.g., dopamine neurons and smooth-muscle cells) derived from hPSCs survived well and maintained their functionality. We found that quercetin-induced selective cell death is caused by mitochondrial accumulation of p53 and is sufficient to prevent teratoma formation after transplantation of hESC- or hiPSC-derived cells. Taken together, these results provide the "proof of concept" that small-molecule targeting of hPSC-specific antiapoptotic pathway(s) is a viable strategy to prevent tumor formation by selectively eliminating remaining undifferentiated pluripotent cells for safe hPSC-based therapy. PMID:23918355

  15. The nature of activatory and tolerogenic dendritic cell-derived signal II

    PubMed Central

    Bakdash, Ghaith; Sittig, Simone P.; van Dijk, Tjeerd; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central in maintaining the intricate balance between immunity and tolerance by orchestrating adaptive immune responses. Being the most potent antigen presenting cells, DCs are capable of educating naïve T cells into a wide variety of effector cells ranging from immunogenic CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells to tolerogenic regulatory T cells. This education is based on three fundamental signals. Signal I, which is mediated by antigen/major histocompatibility complexes binding to antigen-specific T cell receptors, guarantees antigen specificity. The co-stimulatory signal II, mediated by B7 family molecules, is crucial for the expansion of the antigen-specific T cells. The final step is T cell polarization by signal III, which is conveyed by DC-derived cytokines and determines the effector functions of the emerging T cell. Although co-stimulation is widely recognized to result from the engagement of T cell-derived CD28 with DC-expressed B7 molecules (CD80/CD86), other co-stimulatory pathways have been identified. These pathways can be divided into two groups based on their impact on primed T cells. Whereas pathways delivering activatory signals to T cells are termed co-stimulatory pathways, pathways delivering tolerogenic signals to T cells are termed co-inhibitory pathways. In this review, we discuss how the nature of DC-derived signal II determines the quality of ensuing T cell responses and eventually promoting either immunity or tolerance. A thorough understanding of this process is instrumental in determining the underlying mechanism of disorders demonstrating distorted immunity/tolerance balance, and would help innovating new therapeutic approaches for such disorders. PMID:23450201

  16. Bioactive cell-derived matrices combined with polymer mesh scaffold for osteogenesis and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Gul; Hwang, Mintai P; Du, Ping; Ko, Jaehoon; Ha, Chul-won; Do, Sun Hee; Park, Kwideok

    2015-05-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering generally requires an osteoconductive scaffold that consists of extracellular matrix (ECM) to mimic the natural environment. In this study, we developed a PLGA/PLA-based mesh scaffold coated with cell-derived extracellular matrix (CDM) for the delivery of bone morphogenic protein (BMP-2), and assessed the capacity of this system to provide an osteogenic microenvironment. Decellularized ECM from human lung fibroblasts (hFDM) was coated onto the surface of the polymer mesh scaffolds, upon which heparin was then conjugated onto hFDM via EDC chemistry. BMP-2 was subsequently immobilized onto the mesh scaffolds via heparin, and released at a controlled rate. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) were cultured in such scaffolds and subjected to osteogenic differentiation for 28 days in vitro. The results showed that alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and osteogenic marker expression were significantly improved with hPMSCs cultured in the hFDM-coated mesh scaffolds compared to the control and fibronectin-coated ones. In addition, a mouse ectopic and rat calvarial bone defect model was used to examine the feasibility of current platform to induce osteogenesis as well as bone regeneration. All hFDM-coated mesh groups exhibited a significant increase of newly formed bone and in particular, hFDM-coated mesh scaffold loaded with a high dose of BMP-2 exhibited a nearly complete bone defect healing as confirmed via micro-CT and histological observation. This work proposes a great potency of using hFDM (biophysical) coupled with BMP-2 (biochemical) as a promising osteogenic microenvironment for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25736498

  17. A novel broadband impedance method for detection of cell-derived microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lvovich, Vadim; Srikanthan, Sowmya; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel label-free method is presented to detect and quantify cell-derived microparticles (MPs) by the electrochemical potential-modulated electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). MPs are present in elevated concentrations during pathological conditions and play a major role in the establishment and pathogenesis of many diseases. Considering this, accurate detection and quantification of MPs is very important in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. A combination of bulk solution electrokinetic sorting and interfacial impedance responses allows achieving detection limits as low as several MPs per µL. By fitting resulting EIS spectra with an equivalent electrical circuit, the bulk solution electrokinetic and interfacial impedance responses were characterized. In the bulk solution two major relaxations were prominent - β-relaxation in low MHz region due to the MP capacitive membrane bridging, and α-relaxation at ∼ 10 kHz due to counter ions diffusion. At low frequencies (10-0.1 Hz) at electrochemical potentials exceeding −100 mV, a facile interfacial Faradaic process of oxidation in MPs coupled with diffusion and non Faradaic double layer charging dominate, probably due to oxidation of phospholipids and/or proteins on the MP surface and MP lysis. Buffer influence on the MP detection demonstrated that that a relatively low conductivity Tyrode’s buffer background solution is preferential for the MP electrokinetic separation and characterization. This study also demonstrated that standard laboratory methods such as flow cytometry underestimate MP concentrations, especially those with smaller average sizes, by as much as a factor of 2 to 40. PMID:20729061

  18. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  19. Stem cell-derived motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Grunseich, Christopher; Zukosky, Kristen; Kats, Ilona R; Ghosh, Laboni; Harmison, George G; Bott, Laura C; Rinaldi, Carlo; Chen, Ke-lian; Chen, Guibin; Boehm, Manfred; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2014-10-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy's disease) is a motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine repeat expansion in the androgen receptor. Although degeneration occurs in the spinal cord and muscle, the exact mechanism is not clear. Induced pluripotent stem cells from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patients provide a useful model for understanding the disease mechanism and designing effective therapy. Stem cells were generated from six patients and compared to control lines from three healthy individuals. Motor neurons from four patients were differentiated from stem cells and characterized to understand disease-relevant phenotypes. Stem cells created from patient fibroblasts express less androgen receptor than control cells, but show androgen-dependent stabilization and nuclear translocation. The expanded repeat in several stem cell clones was unstable, with either expansion or contraction. Patient stem cell clones produced a similar number of motor neurons compared to controls, with or without androgen treatment. The stem cell-derived motor neurons had immunoreactivity for HB9, Isl1, ChAT, and SMI-32, and those with the largest repeat expansions were found to have increased acetylated α-tubulin and reduced HDAC6. Reduced HDAC6 was also found in motor neuron cultures from two other patients with shorter repeats. Evaluation of stably transfected mouse cells and SBMA spinal cord showed similar changes in acetylated α-tubulin and HDAC6. Perinuclear lysosomal enrichment, an HDAC6 dependent process, was disrupted in motor neurons from two patients with the longest repeats. SBMA stem cells present new insights into the disease, and the observations of reduced androgen receptor levels, repeat instability, and reduced HDAC6 provide avenues for further investigation of the disease mechanism and development of effective therapy. PMID:24925468

  20. The isolation of cell derived extracellular matrix constructs using sacrificial open-cell foams.

    PubMed

    Wolchok, Jeffrey C; Tresco, Patrick A

    2010-12-01

    Extracellular matrix derived from human and animal tissues is being used to repair and reconstruct a variety of tissues clinically. The utility of such constructs is limited by the geometry, composition and constitutive properties of the tissue or organ from which the ECM is harvested. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach to isolate extracellular matrix in bulk from populations of living cells grown in culture on three-dimensional substrates. Human biopsy derived fibroblasts were seeded within open-cell foams and cultured in-vitro for periods up to three weeks, after which the synthetic component was removed by incubation in a water miscible solvent. After several wash steps and lyophilization, a white, lacy, multi-molecular construct was isolated. Tandem mass spectroscopy showed that it contained 22 extracellular matrix constituents, including such proteins and proteoglycans as collagen type I and type III, fibronectin, transforming growth factor beta, decorin and biglycan among others. On average 47 mg of construct was isolated for each gram of synthetic substrate initially seeded with cells. The biomaterial harvested from human tracheal fibroblasts had an elastic modulus (250 kPa) and a composition similar to that of human vocal fold tissue, and supported reseeding with human tracheal derived fibroblasts. An important finding was that the approach was useful in isolating ECM from a variety of cell lineages and developmental stages including skin fibroblasts, brain derived astrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. The results, together with the archival literature, suggest that the approach can be used to produce a range of cell derived constructs with unique physical and chemical attributes for a variety of research and medical applications. PMID:20950855

  1. Exposure to Phthalates Affects Calcium Handling and Intercellular Connectivity of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Posnack, Nikki Gillum; Idrees, Rabia; Ding, Hao; Jaimes III, Rafael; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Karabekian, Zaruhi; Laflamme, Michael A.; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2015-01-01

    Background The pervasive nature of plastics has raised concerns about the impact of continuous exposure to plastic additives on human health. Of particular concern is the use of phthalates in the production of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products. Di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate (DEHP) is a commonly used phthalate ester plasticizer that imparts flexibility and elasticity to PVC products. Recent epidemiological studies have reported correlations between urinary phthalate concentrations and cardiovascular disease, including an increased risk of high blood pressure and coronary risk. Yet, there is little direct evidence linking phthalate exposure to adverse effects in human cells, including cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results The effect of DEHP on calcium handling was examined using monolayers of gCAMP3 human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, which contain an endogenous calcium sensor. Cardiomyocytes were exposed to DEHP (5 – 50 μg/mL), and calcium transients were recorded using a Zeiss confocal imaging system. DEHP exposure (24 – 72 hr) had a negative chronotropic and inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes, increased the minimum threshold voltage required for external pacing, and modified connexin-43 expression. Application of Wy-14,643 (100 μM), an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, did not replicate DEHP’s effects on calcium transient morphology or spontaneous beating rate. Conclusions Phthalates can affect the normal physiology of human cardiomyocytes, including DEHP elicited perturbations in cardiac calcium handling and intercellular connectivity. Our findings call for additional studies to clarify the extent by which phthalate exposure can alter cardiac function, particularly in vulnerable patient populations who are at risk for high phthalate exposure. PMID:25799571

  2. Pharmacoelectrophysiology of viral-free induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ashish; Chung, YingYing; Sequiera, Glen Lester; Wong, Philip; Liew, Reginald; Shim, Winston

    2013-02-01

    Development of pharmaceutical agents for cardiac indication demands elaborate safety screening in which assessing repolarization of cardiac cells remains a critical path in risk evaluations. An efficient platform for evaluating cardiac repolarization in vitro significantly facilitates drug developmental programs. In a proof of principle study, we examined the effect of antiarrhythmogenic drugs (Vaughan Williams class I-IV) and noncardiac active drugs (terfenadine and cisapride) on the repolarization profile of viral-free human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). Extracellular field potential (FP) recording using microelectrode arrays demonstrated significant delayed repolarization as prolonged corrected FP durations (cFPDs) by class I (quinidine and flecainide), class III (sotalol and amiodarone), and class IV (verapamil), whereas class II drugs (propranolol and nadolol) had no effects. Consistent with their sodium channel-blocking ability, class I drugs also significantly reduced FPmin and conduction velocity. Although lidocaine (class IB) had no effects on cFPDs, verapamil shortened cFPD and FPmin by 25 and 50%, respectively. Furthermore, verapamil reduced beating frequencies drastically. Importantly, the examined drugs exhibited dose-response curve on prolongation of cFPDs at an effective range that correlated significantly with therapeutic plasma concentrations achieved clinically. Consistent with clinical outcomes, drug-induced arrhythmia of tachycardia and bigeminy-like waveforms by quinidine, flecainide, and sotalol was demonstrated at supraphysiological concentrations. Furthermore, off-target effects of terfenadine and cisapride on cFPD and Na( + ) channel blockage were similarly revealed. These results suggest that hiPSC-CMs may be useful for safety evaluation of cardioactive and noncardiac acting drugs for personalized medicine. PMID:23091167

  3. Insulin - producing cells derived from stem cells: recent progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Santana, A; Enseñat - Waser, R; Arribas, Maria Isabel; Reig, J A; Roche, E

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β-cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology which, in addition to β-cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β-cell dedifferentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. β-Cells are responsible for insulin production, storage and secretion in accordance to the demanding concentrations of glucose and fatty acids. The absence of insulin results in death and therefore diabetic patients require daily injections of the hormone for survival. However, they cannot avoid the appearance of secondary complications affecting the peripheral nerves as well as the eyes, kidneys and cardiovascular system. These afflictions are caused by the fact that external insulin injection does not mimic the tight control that pancreaticderived insulin secretion exerts on the body’s glycemia. Restoration of damaged β-cells by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endocrine pancreas regeneration would be ideal therapeutic options. In this context, stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin (including β-cell/islet progenitors) offer some interesting alternatives, taking into account the recent data indicating that these cells could be the building blocks from which insulin secreting cells could be generated in vitro under appropriate culture conditions. Although in many cases insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells have been shown to reverse experimentally induced diabetes in animal models, several concerns need to be solved before finding a definite medical application. These refer mainly to the obtainment of a cell population as similar as possible to pancreatic β-cells, and to the problems related with the immune compatibility and tumor formation. This review will summarize the different approaches that have been used to obtain insulin-producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells, and the main problems that hamper the clinical

  4. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  5. Analysis of Signaling Endosome Composition and Dynamics Using SILAC in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Debaisieux, Solène; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons require efficient transport mechanisms such as fast axonal transport to ensure neuronal homeostasis and survival. Neurotrophins and their receptors are conveyed via fast axonal retrograde transport of signaling endosomes to the soma, where they elicit transcriptional responses. Despite the essential roles of signaling endosomes in neuronal differentiation and survival, little is known about their molecular identity, dynamics, and regulation. Gaining a better mechanistic understanding of these organelles and their kinetics is crucial, given the growing evidence linking vesicular trafficking deficits to neurodegeneration. Here, we exploited an affinity purification strategy using the binding fragment of tetanus neurotoxin (HCT) conjugated to monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs), which in motor neurons, is transported in the same carriers as neurotrophins and their receptors. To quantitatively assess the molecular composition of HCT-containing signaling endosomes, we have developed a protocol for triple Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons. After HCT internalization, retrograde carriers were magnetically isolated at different time points and subjected to mass-spectrometry and Gene Ontology analyses. This purification strategy is highly specific, as confirmed by the presence of essential regulators of fast axonal transport in the make-up of these organelles. Our results indicate that signaling endosomes undergo a rapid maturation with the acquisition of late endosome markers following a specific time-dependent kinetics. Strikingly, signaling endosomes are specifically enriched in proteins known to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinfection. Moreover, we highlighted the presence of novel components, whose precise temporal recruitment on signaling endosomes might be essential for proper sorting and/or transport of these organelles. This study provides the first

  6. Profiling ethanol-targeted transcription factors in human carcinoma cell-derived embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Halder, Debasish; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-15

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a collective term that represents fetal abnormalities associated with maternal alcohol consumption. Prenatal alcohol exposure and related anomalies are well characterized, but the molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not yet understood. Few insights have been gained from genetic and epigenetic studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Our aim was to profile the important molecular regulators of ethanol-related alterations of the genome. For this purpose, we have analyzed the gene expression pattern of human carcinoma cell-derived embryoid bodies in the absence or presence of ethanol. A cDNA microarray analysis was used to profile mRNA expression in embryoid bodies at day 7 with or without ethanol treatment. A total of 493 differentially expressed genes were identified in response to 50 mM ethanol exposure. Of these, 111 genes were up-regulated, and 382 were down-regulated. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that these genes are involved in important biological processes: neurological system processes, cognition, behavior, sensory perception of smell, taste and chemical stimuli and synaptic transmission. Similarly, the enrichment of disease-related genes included relevant categories such as neurological diseases, developmental disorders, skeletal and muscular disorders, and connective tissue disorders. Furthermore, we have identified a group of 26 genes that encode transcription factors. We validated the relative gene expression of several transcription factors using quantitative real time PCR. We hope that our study substantially contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of alcohol-mediated anomalies and facilitates further research. PMID:26456191

  7. Insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells: recent progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Santana, A; Enseñat-Waser, R; Arribas, María Isabel; Reig, J A; Roche, E

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic beta-cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology which, in addition to beta-cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes beta-cell dedifferentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. beta-Cells are responsible for insulin production, storage and secretion in accordance to the demanding concentrations of glucose and fatty acids. The absence of insulin results in death and therefore diabetic patients require daily injections of the hormone for survival. However, they cannot avoid the appearance of secondary complications affecting the peripheral nerves as well as the eyes, kidneys and cardiovascular system. These afflictions are caused by the fact that external insulin injection does not mimic the tight control that pancreatic-derived insulin secretion exerts on the body's glycemia. Restoration of damaged beta-cells by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endocrine pancreas regeneration would be ideal therapeutic options. In this context, stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin (including beta-cell/islet progenitors) offer some interesting alternatives, taking into account the recent data indicating that these cells could be the building blocks from which insulin secreting cells could be generated in vitro under appropriate culture conditions. Although in many cases insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells have been shown to reverse experimentally induced diabetes in animal models, several concerns need to be solved before finding a definite medical application. These refer mainly to the obtainment of a cell population as similar as possible to pancreatic beta-cells, and to the problems related with the immune compatibility and tumor formation. This review will summarize the different approaches that have been used to obtain insulin-producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells, and the main problems that hamper the

  8. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Jan P.; Prudat, Yann; Marcu, Irene C.; Azzarito, Michela; Ullrich, Nina D.

    2015-01-01

    Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs). However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs) and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV) was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands. CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5 ± 1.5 cm/s, n = 11) as compared to PCMs (34.9 ± 2.9 cm/s, n = 21) at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122 ± 25 ms, n = 9; 100% PCMs: 139 ± 67 ms, n = 14). In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV. These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias. PMID:26442264

  9. Effects of cardioactive drugs on human induced pluripotent stem cell derived long QT syndrome cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuusela, Jukka; Kujala, Ville J; Kiviaho, Anna; Ojala, Marisa; Swan, Heikki; Kontula, Kimmo; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) have enabled a major step forward in pathophysiologic studies of inherited diseases and may also prove to be valuable in in vitro drug testing. Long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolonged cardiac repolarization and risk of sudden death, may be inherited or result from adverse drug effects. Using a microelectrode array platform, we investigated the effects of six different drugs on the electrophysiological characteristics of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as well as hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from control subjects and from patients with type 1 (LQT1) and type 2 (LQT2) of LQTS. At baseline the repolarization time was significantly longer in LQTS cells compared to controls. Isoprenaline increased the beating rate of all cell lines by 10-73 % but did not show any arrhythmic effects in any cell type. Different QT-interval prolonging drugs caused prolongation of cardiac repolarization by 3-13 % (cisapride), 10-20 % (erythromycin), 8-23 % (sotalol), 16-42 % (quinidine) and 12-27 % (E-4031), but we did not find any systematic differences in sensitivity between the control, LQT1 and LQT2 cell lines. Sotalol, quinidine and E-4031 also caused arrhythmic beats and beating arrests in some cases. In summary, the drug effects on these patient-specific cardiomyocytes appear to recapitulate clinical observations and provide further evidence that these cells can be applied for in vitro drug testing to probe their vulnerability to arrhythmia. PMID:27026928

  10. Extracellular Vesicles: Satellites of Information Transfer in Cancer and Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Laura M; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2016-05-23

    The generation and shedding of extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles (MVs), by cells has emerged as a form of intercellular communication with important roles in several physiological processes and diseases such as cancer. These membrane-enclosed packets can transfer specific proteins, RNA transcripts, microRNAs, and even DNA to target cells, thereby altering their function. Despite the exponential growth of the EV field, a great deal remains unclear about the mechanisms that regulate exosome and MV biogenesis, as well as about how to isolate different classes of EVs and how to best take advantage of them for clinical applications. PMID:27219060

  11. Stem cell-derived angiogenic/vasculogenic cells: possible therapies for tissue repair and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zwaginga, J J; Doevendans, P

    2003-11-01

    1. The recent ability to isolate stem cells and study their specific capacity of self-renewal with the formation of different cell types has opened up exciting vistas to help the repair of damaged tissue and even the formation of new tissue. In the present review, we deal with the characteristics and sources that stem cells can be derived and cultured from. 2. We focus on the role that stem cell-derived vascular cells or endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may play in (re)vascularization of ischaemic and engineered tissues. This so-called vasculogenesis resembles the embryological process in which 'haemangioblasts' differentiate in blood cells, as well as in primitive vessels. Although also derived from the blood-forming bone marrow, in adult life vasculogenic stem cells contribute only little to the regular vascular repair mechanisms: namely (i) angiogenesis (outgrowth of vessels from existing vessels); and (ii) arteriogenesis (monocyte-aided increase in the calibre of existing arteriolar collaterals). 3. Most attempts to increase vascular repair by stem cells involve the use of growth factors, which mobilize stem cells from bone marrow into the blood, sometimes combined with isolation and reinfusion of these cells after ex vivo expansion and differentiation into EPC. 4. Clear improved perfusion of ischaemic sites and new vasculature has been observed in vivo mostly in animal models. Specific homing or administration of these cells and regulated and quantitative expansion and (final) differentiation at these vascular (repair) sites are less studied, but are paramount for efficacy and safety. 5. In conclusion, the use of embryonic stem cells will still encounter ethical objections. Moreover, special attention and measures are needed to cope with the allogeneic barriers that these cells usually encounter. In general, the long and complicated ex vivo cultures to obtain sufficient offspring from the very small numbers of stem cells that can be obtained as starting

  12. Endothelial cells derived from embryonic stem cells respond to cues from topographical surface patterns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The generation of micro- and nano-topography similar to those found in the extra cellular matrix of three-dimensional tissues is one technique used to recapitulate the cell-tissue physiology found in the native tissues. Despite the fact that ample studies have been conducted on the physiological significance of endothelial cells alignment parallel to shear stress, as this is the normal physiologic arrangement for healthy arterial EC, very few studies have examined the use of topographical signals to initiate endothelial cell alignment. Here, we have examined the ability for our mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (ESC-EC) to align on various microchip topographical systems. Briefly, we generated metal molds with ‘wrinkled’ topography using 1) 15 nm and 2) 30 nm of gold coating on the pre-strained polystryene (PS) sheets. After thermal-induced shrinkage of the PS sheets, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchips were then generated from the wrinkled molds. Using similar Shrink™-based technology, 3) larger selectively crazed acetone-etched lines in the PS sheets, and 4) fully crazed acetone-treated PS sheets of stochastic topographical morphology were also generated. The 15 nm and 30 nm gold coating generated ‘wrinkles’ of uniaxial anisotropic channels at nano-scaled widths while the crazing generated micron-sized channels. The ESC-EC were able to respond and align on the 320 nm, 510 nm, and the acetone-etched 10.5 μm channels, but not on the fully ‘crazed’ topographies. Moreover, the ESC-EC aligned most robustly on the wrinkles, and preferentially to ridge edges on the 10.5 μm-sized channels. The ability to robustly align EC on topographical surfaces enables a variety of controlled physiological studies of EC-EC and EC-ECM contact guidance, as well as having potential applications for the rapid endothelialization of stents and vascular grafts. PMID:23819656

  13. Maximum Diastolic Potential of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Depends Critically on IKr

    PubMed Central

    Goodrow, Robert J.; Wu, Yuesheng; Cordeiro, Jonathan M.; Nesterenko, Vladislav V.; Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Urrutia, Janire; Desai, Mayurika; Treat, Jacqueline A.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) hold promise for therapeutic applications. To serve these functions, the hiPSC-CM must recapitulate the electrophysiologic properties of native adult cardiomyocytes. This study examines the electrophysiologic characteristics of hiPSC-CM between 11 and 121 days of maturity. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from hiPS cell line reprogrammed with Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Sox2. Sharp microelectrodes were used to record action potentials (AP) from spontaneously beating clusters (BC) micro-dissected from the EBs (n = 103; 37°C) and to examine the response to 5 µM E-4031 (n = 21) or BaCl2 (n = 22). Patch-clamp techniques were used to record IKr and IK1 from cells enzymatically dissociated from BC (n = 49; 36°C). Spontaneous cycle length (CL) and AP characteristics varied widely among the 103 preparations. E-4031 (5 µM; n = 21) increased Bazett-corrected AP duration from 291.8±81.2 to 426.4±120.2 msec (p<0.001) and generated early afterdepolarizations in 8/21 preparations. In 13/21 BC, E-4031 rapidly depolarized the clusters leading to inexcitability. BaCl2, at concentrations that selectively block IK1 (50–100 µM), failed to depolarize the majority of clusters (13/22). Patch-clamp experiments revealed very low or negligible IK1 in 53% (20/38) of the cells studied, but presence of IKr in all (11/11). Consistent with the electrophysiological data, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed relatively poor mRNA and protein expression of IK1 in the majority of cells, but robust expression of IKr. In contrast to recently reported studies, our data point to major deficiencies of hiPSC-CM, with remarkable diversity of electrophysiologic phenotypes as well as pharmacologic responsiveness among beating clusters and cells up to 121 days post-differentiation (dpd). The vast majority have a maximum diastolic potential that depends critically on IKr due to the absence of IK1. Thus

  14. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  15. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Wright, Megan C.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  16. Endothelial cells derived from embryonic stem cells respond to cues from topographical surface patterns.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Rachel; Mercurio, Kevin; Luna, Jesus Isaac; Glaser, Drew E; Leppert, Valerie J; McCloskey, Kara E

    2013-01-01

    The generation of micro- and nano-topography similar to those found in the extra cellular matrix of three-dimensional tissues is one technique used to recapitulate the cell-tissue physiology found in the native tissues. Despite the fact that ample studies have been conducted on the physiological significance of endothelial cells alignment parallel to shear stress, as this is the normal physiologic arrangement for healthy arterial EC, very few studies have examined the use of topographical signals to initiate endothelial cell alignment. Here, we have examined the ability for our mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (ESC-EC) to align on various microchip topographical systems. Briefly, we generated metal molds with 'wrinkled' topography using 1) 15 nm and 2) 30 nm of gold coating on the pre-strained polystryene (PS) sheets. After thermal-induced shrinkage of the PS sheets, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchips were then generated from the wrinkled molds. Using similar Shrink™-based technology, 3) larger selectively crazed acetone-etched lines in the PS sheets, and 4) fully crazed acetone-treated PS sheets of stochastic topographical morphology were also generated. The 15 nm and 30 nm gold coating generated 'wrinkles' of uniaxial anisotropic channels at nano-scaled widths while the crazing generated micron-sized channels. The ESC-EC were able to respond and align on the 320 nm, 510 nm, and the acetone-etched 10.5 μm channels, but not on the fully 'crazed' topographies. Moreover, the ESC-EC aligned most robustly on the wrinkles, and preferentially to ridge edges on the 10.5 μm-sized channels. The ability to robustly align EC on topographical surfaces enables a variety of controlled physiological studies of EC-EC and EC-ECM contact guidance, as well as having potential applications for the rapid endothelialization of stents and vascular grafts. PMID:23819656

  17. G-protein Coupled Receptor Signaling in Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiovascular Cells: Implications for Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshad, Nazanin F.; Hellen, Nicola; Jabbour, Richard J.; Harding, Sian E.; Földes, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell derivatives show promise as an in vitro platform to study a range of human cardiovascular diseases. A better understanding of the biology of stem cells and their cardiovascular derivatives will help to understand the strengths and limitations of this new model system. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of stem cell maintenance and differentiation and have an important role in cardiovascular cell signaling. In this review, we will therefore describe the state of knowledge concerning the regulatory role of GPCRs in both the generation and function of pluripotent stem cell derived-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial, and -vascular smooth muscle cells. We will consider how far the in vitro disease models recapitulate authentic GPCR signaling and provide a useful basis for discovery of disease mechanisms or design of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26697426

  18. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; van Meer, Berend; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Passier, Robert; Tertoolen, Leon G J; Mummery, Christine L; Casini, Simona

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation. PMID:26456652

  19. Microvesicles derived from human Wharton’s Jelly mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats by suppressing CX3CL1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) could reverse acute and chronic kidney injury by a paracrine or endocrine mechanism, and microvesicles (MVs) have been regarded as a crucial means of intercellular communication. In the current study, we focused on the therapeutic effects of human Wharton-Jelly MSCs derived microvesicles (hWJMSC-MVs) in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury and its potential mechanisms. Methods MVs isolated from conditioned medium were injected intravenously in rats immediately after ischemia of the left kidney for 60 minutes. The animals were sacrificed at 24 hours, 48 hours and 2 weeks after reperfusion. The infiltration of inflammatory cells was identified by the immunostaining of CD68+ cells. ELISA was employed to determine the inflammatory factors in the kidney and serum von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Tubular cell proliferation and apoptosis were identified by immunostaining. Renal fibrosis was assessed by Masson’s tri-chrome straining and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) staining. The CX3CL1 expression in the kidney was measured by immunostaining and Western blot, respectively. In vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with or without MVs for 24 or 48 hours under hypoxia injury to test the CX3CL1 by immunostaining and Western blot. Results After administration of hWJMSC-MVs in acute kidney injury (AKI) rats, renal cell apoptosis was mitigated and proliferation was enhanced, inflammation was also alleviated in the first 48 hours. MVs also could suppress the expression of CX3CL1 and decrease the number of CD68+ macrophages in the kidney. In the late period, improvement of renal function and abrogation of renal fibrosis were observed. In vitro, MVs could down-regulate the expression of CX3CL1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells under hypoxia injury at 24 or 48 hours. Conclusions A single administration of MVs immediately after ischemic AKI could ameliorate renal injury in

  20. Loss of Tie2 receptor compromises embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial but not hematopoietic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Isao; Morisada, Tohru; Azuma, Masaki; Murakami, Kyoko; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Mizukami, Takuo; Ohbo, Kazuyuki; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Oike, Yuichi; Dumont, Daniel J; Suda, Toshio

    2006-02-01

    Tie2 is a receptor-type tyrosine kinase expressed on hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial cells. We used cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells to determine the function of Tie2 during early vascular development and hematopoiesis. Upon differentiation, the ES cell-derived Tie2+ Flk1+ fraction was enriched for hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells. To investigate lymphatic differentiation, we used a monoclonal antibody against LYVE-1 and found that LYVE-1+ cells derived from Tie2+ Flk1+ cells possessed various characteristics of lymphatic endothelial cells. To determine whether Tie2 played a role in this process, we analyzed differentiation of Tie2-/- ES cells. Although the initial numbers of LYVE-1+ and PECAM-1+ cells derived from Tie2-/- cells did not vary significantly, the number of both decreased dramatically upon extended culturing. Such decreases were rescued by treatment with a caspase inhibitor, suggesting that reductions were due to apoptosis as a consequence of a lack of Tie2 signaling. Interestingly, Tie2-/- ES cells did not show measurable defects in development of the hematopoietic system, suggesting that Tie2 is not essential for hematopoietic cell development. PMID:16219799

  1. Growth and turning properties of adult glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 nonpeptidergic sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, GuiFang; Singh, Vandana; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    An overlapping population of adult primary sensory neurons that innervate the skin express the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 (GFRα1), the lectin IB4, and the "regenerative brake" phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10. Using an adapted turning and growth assay, we analyzed the growth cone behavior of adult immunoselected GFRα1 sensory neurons. These neurons had less robust baseline growth and reluctant responsiveness to individual growth factors but responded to synergistic types of input from glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, a phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor, or a downstream Rho kinase inhibitor. Hepatocyte growth factor and the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor were associated with growth cone turning. A gradient of protein extracted from skin samples, a primary target of GFRα1 axons, replicated the impact of synergistic support. Within the skin, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed within epidermal axons, indicating an autocrine role accompanying local hepatocyte growth factor synthesis. Taken together, our findings identify unique growth properties and plasticity of a distinct population of epidermal axons that are relevant to neurologic repair and skin reinnervation. PMID:25101700

  2. Functional Integration of Grafted Neural Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons Monitored by Optogenetics in an In Vitro Parkinson Model

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L.; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Andersson, Angelica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Deisseroth, Karl; Arenas, Ernest; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2011-01-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D2 autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD. PMID:21394212

  3. Finding the rhythm of sudden cardiac death: new opportunities using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T; Houser, Steven R; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations, or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology, including ion channel expression. Most commonly used cellular models are cellular transfection models, which are able to mimic the expression of a single-ion channel offering incomplete insight into changes of the action potential profile. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes resemble, but are not identical, adult human cardiomyocytes and provide a new platform for studying arrhythmic disorders leading to sudden cardiac death. A variety of platforms exist to phenotype cellular models, including conventional and automated patch clamp, multielectrode array, and computational modeling. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have been used to study long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and other hereditary cardiac disorders. Although induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are distinct from adult cardiomyocytes, they provide a robust platform to advance the science and clinical care of sudden cardiac death. PMID:26044252

  4. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  5. Nano-zymography Using Laser-Scanning Confocal Microscopy Unmasks Proteolytic Activity of Cell-Derived Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Briens, Aurélien; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Montaner, Joan; Vivien, Denis; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are nano-sized vesicles released by activated cells in the extracellular milieu. They act as vectors of biological activity by carrying membrane-anchored and cytoplasmic constituents of the parental cells. Although detection and characterization of cell-derived MPs may be of high diagnostic and prognostic values in a number of human diseases, reliable measurement of their size, number and biological activity still remains challenging using currently available methods. In the present study, we developed a protocol to directly image and functionally characterize MPs using high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Once trapped on annexin-V coated micro-wells, we developed several assays using fluorescent reporters to measure their size, detect membrane antigens and evaluate proteolytic activity (nano-zymography). In particular, we demonstrated the applicability and specificity of this method to detect antigens and proteolytic activities of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), urokinase and plasmin at the surface of engineered MPs from transfected cell-lines. Furthermore, we were able to identify a subset of tPA-bearing fibrinolytic MPs using plasma samples from a cohort of ischemic stroke patients who received thrombolytic therapy and in an experimental model of thrombin-induced ischemic stroke in mice. Overall, this method is promising for functional characterization of cell-derived MPs. PMID:27022410

  6. Podoplanin is a component of extracellular vesicles that reprograms cell-derived exosomal proteins and modulates lymphatic vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Ramírez, Patricia; Greening, David W; Andrés, Germán; Gopal, Shashi K; Martín-Villar, Ester; Renart, Jaime; Simpson, Richard J; Quintanilla, Miguel

    2016-03-29

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays crucial roles in embryonic development, the immune response, and malignant progression. Here, we report that cells ectopically or endogenously expressing PDPN release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain PDPN mRNA and protein. PDPN incorporates into membrane shed microvesicles (MVs) and endosomal-derived exosomes (EXOs), where it was found to colocalize with the canonical EV marker CD63 by immunoelectron microscopy. We have previously found that expression of PDPN in MDCK cells induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Proteomic profiling of MDCK-PDPN cells compared to control cells shows that PDPN-induced EMT is associated with upregulation of oncogenic proteins and diminished expression of tumor suppressors. Proteomic analysis of exosomes reveals that MDCK-PDPN EXOs were enriched in protein cargos involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction and, importantly, intracellular trafficking and EV biogenesis. Indeed, expression of PDPN in MDCK cells stimulated both EXO and MV production, while knockdown of endogenous PDPN in human HN5 squamous carcinoma cells reduced EXO production and inhibited tumorigenesis. EXOs released from MDCK-PDPN and control cells both stimulated in vitro angiogenesis, but only EXOs containing PDPN were shown to promote lymphatic vessel formation. This effect was mediated by PDPN on the surface of EXOs, as demonstrated by a neutralizing specific monoclonal antibody. These results contribute to our understanding of PDPN-induced EMT in association to tumor progression, and suggest an important role for PDPN in EV biogenesis and/or release and for PDPN-EXOs in modulating lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26893367

  7. Podoplanin is a component of extracellular vesicles that reprograms cell-derived exosomal proteins and modulates lymphatic vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Germán; Gopal, Shashi K.; Martín-Villar, Ester; Renart, Jaime; Simpson, Richard J.; Quintanilla, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays crucial roles in embryonic development, the immune response, and malignant progression. Here, we report that cells ectopically or endogenously expressing PDPN release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain PDPN mRNA and protein. PDPN incorporates into membrane shed microvesicles (MVs) and endosomal-derived exosomes (EXOs), where it was found to colocalize with the canonical EV marker CD63 by immunoelectron microscopy. We have previously found that expression of PDPN in MDCK cells induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Proteomic profiling of MDCK-PDPN cells compared to control cells shows that PDPN-induced EMT is associated with upregulation of oncogenic proteins and diminished expression of tumor suppressors. Proteomic analysis of exosomes reveals that MDCK-PDPN EXOs were enriched in protein cargos involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction and, importantly, intracellular trafficking and EV biogenesis. Indeed, expression of PDPN in MDCK cells stimulated both EXO and MV production, while knockdown of endogenous PDPN in human HN5 squamous carcinoma cells reduced EXO production and inhibited tumorigenesis. EXOs released from MDCK-PDPN and control cells both stimulated in vitro angiogenesis, but only EXOs containing PDPN were shown to promote lymphatic vessel formation. This effect was mediated by PDPN on the surface of EXOs, as demonstrated by a neutralizing specific monoclonal antibody. These results contribute to our understanding of PDPN-induced EMT in association to tumor progression, and suggest an important role for PDPN in EV biogenesis and/or release and for PDPN-EXOs in modulating lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26893367

  8. A multi-parameter in vitro screen in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes identifies ponatinib-induced structural and functional cardiac toxicity.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Dominique R; Doherty, Kimberly R; Trusk, Patricia B; Moran, Diarmuid M; Shell, Scott A; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Ponatinib, a multi-targeted TKI and potent pan-ABL inhibitor, approved for the treatment of Ph + ALL and CML, was temporarily withdrawn from the U.S. market due to severe vascular adverse events. Cardiac-specific toxicities including myocardial infarction, severe congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias have also been shown with ponatinib. Targeted oncology agents such as ponatinib have transformed cancer treatment but often induce toxicity due to inhibition of survival pathways shared by both cancer and cardiac cells. These toxicities are often missed by the standard preclinical toxicity assessment methods, which include human Ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) and animal toxicity testing. In this study, we show that a multiparameter in vitro toxicity screening approach using human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM) accurately predicted the cardiac toxicity potential of ponatinib. This in vitro model evaluated ponatinib's effect on the overall cell health, mitochondrial stress, and function of hiPSC-CM and also provided mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways and cellular structures altered with treatment. We show here that ponatinib rapidly inhibits prosurvival signaling pathways, induces structural cardiac toxicity (as shown by actin cytoskeleton damage, mitochondrial stress, cell death, and troponin secretion), and disrupts cardiac cell beating. Most of these effects occurred at doses between 10× and 50× ponatinib's Cmax, a dose range shown to be relevant for accurate prediction of in vivo toxicity. Together these studies show that a comprehensive in vitro screening tool in a more relevant human cardiac cell model can improve the detection of cardiac toxicity with targeted oncology agents such as ponatinib. PMID:25304212

  9. Analyses of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells Released Microvesicles by Using Microbead and Q-dot Based Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinju; Zhong, Yun; Ma, Xiaotang; Xiao, Xiang; Cheng, Chuanfang; Chen, Yusen; Iwuchukwu, Ifeanyi; Gaines, Kenneth J.; Bin Zhao; Liu, Shiming; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Bihl, Ji C.; Chen, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate analysis of specific microvesicles (MVs) from biofluids is critical and challenging. Here we described novel methods to purify and detect MVs shed from endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by combining microbeads with fluorescence quantum dots (Q-dots) coupled nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In the in vitro screening systems, we demonstrated that 1) anti-CD105 (EC marker) and anti-CD34 (EPC marker) conjugated-microbeads had the highest sensitivity and specificity for isolating respective MVs, which were confirmed with negative controls, CD41 and CD235a; 2) anti-CD144 (EC marker) and anti-KDR (EPC marker) conjugated-Q-dots exhibited the best sensitivity and specificity for their respective MV NTA detection, which were confirmed with positive control, anti-Annexin V (MV universal marker). The methods were further validated by their ability to efficiently recover the known amount of EC-MVs and EPC-MVs from particle-depleted plasma, and to detect the dynamical changes of plasma MVs in ischemic stroke patients, as compared with traditional flow cytometry. These novel methods provide ideal approaches for functional analysis and biomarker discovery of ECs- and EPCs- derived MVs. PMID:27094208

  10. Microvesicles enhance the mobility of human diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and improve wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Nhu Thuy; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Tu, Tran Cam; Kato, Toshiki; Ohneda, Kinuko; Sato, Fujio; Ohneda, Osamu

    2016-05-13

    Microvesicles (MVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells showed the ability to alter the cell phenotype and function. We previously demonstrated that type 2 diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dAT-MSCs) increase in cell aggregation and adhesion in vitro and impair wound healing in vivo. However, the characterization and function of MVs derived from human non-diabetic AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs) remain unknown. In this study, we characterized nAT-MSC-derived MVs and their function after the transfection of dAT-MSCs with MVs using the scratch assay and a flap mouse model. We found that human nAT-MSC-derived MVs expressed MSC-surface markers and improved dAT-MSC functions by altering the expression of genes associated with cell migration, survival, inflammation, and angiogenesis as well as miR29c and miR150. Remarkably, the transfection of dAT-MSCs with nAT-MSC-derived MVs improved their migration ability in vitro and wound healing ability in a flap mouse model. These results demonstrate a promising opportunity to modify the function of dAT-MSCs for therapeutic stem cell application in diabetic patients. PMID:27063802

  11. Microvesicles Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Tubular Epithelial Cell Dedifferentiation and Growth via Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuai; Zou, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Guang-yuan; Gu, Di; Miao, Shuai; Zhu, Ying-jian; Sun, Jie; Du, Tao

    2015-01-01

    During acute kidney injury (AKI), tubular cell dedifferentiation initiates cell regeneration; hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in modulating cell dedifferentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived microvesicles (MVs) deliver RNA into injured tubular cells and alter their gene expression, thus regenerating these cells. We boldly speculated that MVs might induce HGF synthesis via RNA transfer, thereby facilitating tubular cell dedifferentiation and regeneration. In a rat model of unilateral AKI, the administration of MVs promoted kidney recovery. One of the mechanisms of action is the acceleration of tubular cell dedifferentiation and growth. Both in vivo and in vitro, rat HGF expression in damaged rat tubular cells was greatly enhanced by MV treatment. In addition, human HGF mRNA present in MVs was delivered into rat tubular cells and translated into the HGF protein as another mechanism of HGF induction. RNase treatment abrogated all MV effects. In the in vitro experimental setting, the conditioned medium of MV-treated injured tubular cells, which contains a higher concentration of HGF, strongly stimulated cell dedifferentiation and growth, as well as Erk1/2 signaling activation. Intriguingly, these effects were completely abrogated by either c-Met inhibitor or MEK inhibitor, suggesting that HGF induction is a crucial contributor to the acceleration of cell dedifferentiation and growth. All these findings indicate that MV-induced HGF synthesis in damaged tubular cells via RNA transfer facilitates cell dedifferentiation and growth, which are important regenerative mechanisms. PMID:25793303

  12. An overview of the role of microparticles/microvesicles in blood components: Are they clinically beneficial or harmful?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Chou, Ming-Li; Goubran, Hadi; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2015-10-01

    Blood cells and tissues generate heterogeneous populations of cell-derived vesicles, ranging from approximately 50 nm to 1 µm in diameter. Under normal physiological conditions and as an essential part of an energy-dependent natural process, microparticles (MPs) are continuously shed into the circulation from membranes of all viable cells such as megakaryocytes, platelets, red blood cells, white blood cells and endothelial cells. MP shedding can also be triggered by pathological activation of inflammatory processes and activation of coagulation or complement systems, or even by shear stress in the circulation. Structurally, MPs have a bilayered phospholipid structure exposing coagulant-active phosphatidylserine and expressing various membrane receptors, and they serve as cell-to-cell shuttles for bioactive molecules such as lipids, growth factors, microRNAs, and mitochondria. It was established that ex vivo processing of blood into its components, involving centrifugation, processing by various apheresis procedures, leucoreduction, pathogen reduction, and finally storage in different media and different types of blood bags, can impact MP generation and content. This is mostly due to exposure of the collected blood to anticoagulant/storage media and due to shear stresses or activation, contact with artificial surfaces, or exposure to various leucocyte-removal filters and pathogen-reduction treatments. Such artificially generated MPs, which are added to the original pool of MPs collected from the donor, may exhibit specific functional characteristics, as MPs are not an inert element of blood components. Not surprisingly, MPs' roles and functionality are therefore increasingly seen to be fully relevant to the field of transfusion medicine, and as a parameter of blood safety that must be considered in haemovigilance programmes. Continual advancements in assessment methods of MPs and storage lesions are gradually leading to a better understanding of the impacts of

  13. Tumour resistance in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from naked mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Shingo; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Oiwa, Yuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Koya, Ikuko; Okada, Yohei; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Narita, Minoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seino, Ken-Ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber), which is the longest-lived rodent species, exhibits extraordinary resistance to cancer. Here we report that NMR somatic cells exhibit a unique tumour-suppressor response to reprogramming induction. In this study, we generate NMR-induced pluripotent stem cells (NMR-iPSCs) and find that NMR-iPSCs do not exhibit teratoma-forming tumorigenicity due to the species-specific activation of tumour-suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) and a disruption mutation of the oncogene ES cell-expressed Ras (ERAS). The forced expression of Arf in mouse iPSCs markedly reduces tumorigenicity. Furthermore, we identify an NMR-specific tumour-suppression phenotype-ARF suppression-induced senescence (ASIS)-that may protect iPSCs and somatic cells from ARF suppression and, as a consequence, tumorigenicity. Thus, NMR-specific ARF regulation and the disruption of ERAS regulate tumour resistance in NMR-iPSCs. Our findings obtained from studies of NMR-iPSCs provide new insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenicity in iPSCs and cancer resistance in the NMR. PMID:27161380

  14. Tumour cell-derived Wnt7a recruits and activates fibroblasts to promote tumour aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Iravani, Marjan; Robertson, David; Fearns, Antony; Gao, Qiong; Klingbeil, Pamela; Hanby, Andrew M.; Speirs, Valerie; Sahai, Erik; Calvo, Fernando; Isacke, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast recruitment to tumours and activation to a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype has been implicated in promoting primary tumour growth and progression to metastatic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the tumour:fibroblast crosstalk that drive the intertumoural stromal heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Using in vivo models we identify Wnt7a as a key factor secreted exclusively by aggressive breast tumour cells, which induces CAF conversion. Functionally, this results in extracellular matrix remodelling to create a permissive environment for tumour cell invasion and promotion of distant metastasis. Mechanistically, Wnt7a-mediated fibroblast activation is not dependent on classical Wnt signalling. Instead, we demonstrate that Wnt7a potentiates TGFβ receptor signalling both in 3D in vitro and in vivo models, thus highlighting the interaction between two of the key signalling pathways in development and disease. Importantly, in clinical breast cancer cohorts, tumour cell Wnt7a expression correlates with a desmoplastic, poor-prognosis stroma and poor patient outcome. PMID:26777421

  15. Tumour resistance in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from naked mole-rats

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, Shingo; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Oiwa, Yuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Koya, Ikuko; Okada, Yohei; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Narita, Minoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seino, Ken-ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber), which is the longest-lived rodent species, exhibits extraordinary resistance to cancer. Here we report that NMR somatic cells exhibit a unique tumour-suppressor response to reprogramming induction. In this study, we generate NMR-induced pluripotent stem cells (NMR-iPSCs) and find that NMR-iPSCs do not exhibit teratoma-forming tumorigenicity due to the species-specific activation of tumour-suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) and a disruption mutation of the oncogene ES cell-expressed Ras (ERAS). The forced expression of Arf in mouse iPSCs markedly reduces tumorigenicity. Furthermore, we identify an NMR-specific tumour-suppression phenotype—ARF suppression-induced senescence (ASIS)—that may protect iPSCs and somatic cells from ARF suppression and, as a consequence, tumorigenicity. Thus, NMR-specific ARF regulation and the disruption of ERAS regulate tumour resistance in NMR-iPSCs. Our findings obtained from studies of NMR-iPSCs provide new insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenicity in iPSCs and cancer resistance in the NMR. PMID:27161380

  16. Transcriptional and functional defects of dendritic cells derived from the MUTZ-3 leukaemia line

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Kellam, Paul; Chain, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) generated from MUTZ-3, an immortalized acute myeloid leukaemia-derived cell line, have potential application as a model for the study of human DC, and as a tool with which to stimulate immunotherapeutic responses to cancer. However, the relationship of MUTZ-3 DC to their non-transformed counterparts remains incompletely understood. Immunoselected CD14+ MUTZ-3 cells were used to generate a homogeneous population of DC (M3DC). These cells had a cell surface phentoype and morphology characteristic of conventional monocyte-derived DC (MDDC). Whole genome transcriptome comparison of M3DC and MDDC however, revealed extensive differences between these two cell types. Functional ontology-based data analysis revealed three enriched clusters of genes downregulated in M3DC, with functions in pathogen recognition, DC maturation and cytokine/chemokine signalling. Downregulation of protein expression was confirmed for several of these genes. The molecular differences were accompanied by a profoundly impaired phenotypic and functional response of M3DC to microbial stimulation. The immortalized phenotype of MUTZ-3 therefore reflects not only deregulated proliferative capacity, but substantial perturbation of normal antigen-presenting cell function. These results have important implications for studies using MUTZ-3 as a model of MDDC or for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:19538250

  17. Transcriptional and functional defects of dendritic cells derived from the MUTZ-3 leukaemia line.

    PubMed

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Kellam, Paul; Chain, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) generated from MUTZ-3, an immortalized acute myeloid leukaemia-derived cell line, have potential application as a model for the study of human DC, and as a tool with which to stimulate immunotherapeutic responses to cancer. However, the relationship of MUTZ-3 DC to their non-transformed counterparts remains incompletely understood. Immunoselected CD14+ MUTZ-3 cells were used to generate a homogeneous population of DC (M3DC). These cells had a cell surface phentoype and morphology characteristic of conventional monocyte-derived DC (MDDC). Whole genome transcriptome comparison of M3DC and MDDC however, revealed extensive differences between these two cell types. Functional ontology-based data analysis revealed three enriched clusters of genes downregulated in M3DC, with functions in pathogen recognition, DC maturation and cytokine/chemokine signalling. Downregulation of protein expression was confirmed for several of these genes. The molecular differences were accompanied by a profoundly impaired phenotypic and functional response of M3DC to microbial stimulation. The immortalized phenotype of MUTZ-3 therefore reflects not only deregulated proliferative capacity, but substantial perturbation of normal antigen-presenting cell function. These results have important implications for studies using MUTZ-3 as a model of MDDC or for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:19538250

  18. Single cell-derived clonal analysis of human glioblastoma links functional and genomic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Mona; Reimand, Jüri; Lan, Xiaoyang; Head, Renee; Zhu, Xueming; Kushida, Michelle; Bayani, Jane; Pressey, Jessica C.; Lionel, Anath C.; Clarke, Ian D.; Cusimano, Michael; Squire, Jeremy A.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bernstein, Mark; Woodin, Melanie A.; Bader, Gary D.; Dirks, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a cancer comprised of morphologically, genetically, and phenotypically diverse cells. However, an understanding of the functional significance of intratumoral heterogeneity is lacking. We devised a method to isolate and functionally profile tumorigenic clones from patient glioblastoma samples. Individual clones demonstrated unique proliferation and differentiation abilities. Importantly, naïve patient tumors included clones that were temozolomide resistant, indicating that resistance to conventional GBM therapy can preexist in untreated tumors at a clonal level. Further, candidate therapies for resistant clones were detected with clone-specific drug screening. Genomic analyses revealed genes and pathways that associate with specific functional behavior of single clones. Our results suggest that functional clonal profiling used to identify tumorigenic and drug-resistant tumor clones will lead to the discovery of new GBM clone-specific treatment strategies. PMID:25561528

  19. Cell-derived extracellular vesicles as a platform to identify low-invasive disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    González, Esperanza; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers are of great importance for prediction, diagnosis and monitoring the progression and therapeutic success of a disease. Whole body fluids, such as blood or urine, constitute the main desired biological source to identify these markers, mostly due to the minimally invasive procedures used to collect them. An additional benefit of studying these biological fluids that has been demonstrated by many different groups is that they contain cell-released extracellular vesicles, carrying a cargo of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids that reflects cell/tissue origin and, remarkably, cellular status. In this review, the information obtained from the characterization of this body fluid compartment in human samples is discussed in the context of its usefulness as diagnostic resource for several pathologies, including cancer, inflammatory, vascular and metabolic diseases. The review shows the great variety of methods used for this purpose as well as the different types of molecules that could serve as specific or common disease markers. PMID:25948243

  20. Expression of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 and of Its Receptor CXCR4 in Liver Regeneration from Oval Cells in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mavier, Philippe; Martin, Nadine; Couchie, Dominique; Préaux, Anne-Marie; Laperche, Yannick; Zafrani, Elie Serge

    2004-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 is a chemokine that plays a major role during embryogenesis. Since stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its unique receptor CXCR4 are involved in the differentiation of progenitor cells, we studied the expression of this chemokine and of its receptor in hepatic regeneration from precursor oval cells. Hepatic regeneration was induced by treating rats with 2-acetylaminofluorene, and followed by partial hepatectomy. Oval cell accumulation, which predominated in periportal regions, reached a maximum at days 9 to 14 after hepatectomy and declined thereafter. Oval cells strongly expressed stromal cell-derived factor-1 protein and mRNA. CXCR4 mRNA hepatic level paralleled the number of oval cells and in situ hybridization showed CXCR4 mRNA expression by these cells. Treatment of rats with fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide which binds to stromal cell-derived factor-1 and blocks its biological effects, markedly decreased oval cell accumulation in five of the seven treated rats. In conclusion, our data demonstrate an expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and of its receptor CXCR4 in oval cells during hepatic regeneration and strongly suggest that stromal cell-derived factor-1 stimulates the proliferation of these precursor cells through an autocrine/paracrine pathway. PMID:15579440

  1. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W; Cross, Michael J; Sidaway, James E

    2016-07-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca(2+ )transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca(2+ )handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  2. Optimization of surface-immobilized extracellular matrices for the proliferation of neural progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takashi; Kato, Koichi; Konagaya, Shuhei; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-01

    Neural progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells have been considered as a potential source for cell-transplantation therapy of central nervous disorders. However, efficient methods to expand neural progenitor cells are further required for their clinical applications. In this study, a protein array was fabricated with nine extracellular matrices and used to screen substrates suitable for the expansion of neural progenitor cells derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells. The results showed that neural progenitor cells efficiently proliferated on substrates with immobilized laminin-1, laminin-5, or Matrigel. Based on this result, further attempts were made to develop clinically compliant substrates with immobilized polypeptides that mimic laminin-1, one of the most effective extracellular matrices as identified in the array-based screening. We used here recombinant DNA technology to prepare polypeptide containing the globular domain 3 of laminin-1 and immobilized it onto glass-based substrates. Our results showed that neural progenitor cells selectively proliferated on substrate with the immobilized polypeptide while maintaining their differentiated state. PMID:25943789

  3. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  4. Identification of nephrotoxic compounds with embryonic stem-cell-derived human renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Chuah, Jacqueline Kai Chin; Lam, Yue Ning; Toh, Wei Seong; Oo, Zay Yar; Zink, Daniele

    2014-07-01

    The kidney is a major target for drug-induced toxicity, and the renal proximal tubule is frequently affected. Nephrotoxicity is typically detected only late during drug development, and the nephrotoxic potential of newly approved drugs is often underestimated. A central problem is the lack of preclinical models with high predictivity. Validated in vitro models for the prediction of nephrotoxicity are not available. Major problems are related to the identification of appropriate cell models and end points. As drug-induced kidney injury is associated with inflammatory reactions, we explored the expression of inflammatory markers as end point for renal in vitro models. In parallel, we developed a new cell model. Here, we combined these approaches and developed an in vitro model with embryonic stem-cell-derived human renal proximal tubular-like cells that uses the expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 as end points. The predictivity of the model was evaluated with 41 well-characterized compounds. The results revealed that the model predicts proximal tubular toxicity in humans with high accuracy. In contrast, the predictivity was low when well-established standard in vitro assays were used. Together, the results show that high predictivity can be obtained with in vitro models employing pluripotent stem cell-derived human renal proximal tubular-like cells. PMID:24495215

  5. Akt Suppression of TGFβ Signaling Contributes to the Maintenance of Vascular Identity in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Israely, Edo; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel; Ding, Bi-Sen; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Rafii, Shahin; Rabbany, Sina Y

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate and maintain stable in vitro cultures of mouse endothelial cells (EC) has great potential for genetic dissection of the numerous pathologies involving vascular dysfunction as well as therapeutic applications. However, previous efforts at achieving sustained cultures of primary stable murine vascular cells have fallen short, and the cellular requirements for EC maintenance in vitro remain undefined. In this study, we have generated vascular ECs from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and show that active Akt is essential to their survival and propagation as homogeneous monolayers in vitro. These cells harbor the phenotypical, biochemical, and functional characteristics of ECs, and expand throughout long-term cultures, while maintaining their angiogenic capacity. Moreover, Akt-transduced embryonic ECs form functional perfused vessels in vivo that anastomose with host blood vessels. We provide evidence for a novel function of Akt in stabilizing EC identity, whereby the activated form of the protein protects mouse ES cell-derived ECs from TGFβ-mediated transdifferentiation by downregulating SMAD3. These findings identify a role for Akt in regulating the developmental potential of ES cell-derived ECs, and demonstrate that active Akt maintains endothelial identity in embryonic ECs by interfering with active TGFβ-mediated processes that would ordinarily usher these cells to alternate fates. PMID:23963623

  6. Defined MicroRNAs Induce Aspects of Maturation in Mouse and Human Embryonic-Stem-Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Desy S; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Lundy, David J; Liu, Chung-Hung; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Pabon, Lil; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Chen, Chien-Chang; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Yan, Yu-Ting; Lee, Sho-Tone; Chiang, Po-Min; Chien, Shu; Murry, Charles E; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2015-09-29

    Pluripotent-cell-derived cardiomyocytes have great potential for use in research and medicine, but limitations in their maturity currently constrain their usefulness. Here, we report a method for improving features of maturation in murine and human embryonic-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes (m/hESC-CMs). We found that coculturing m/hESC-CMs with endothelial cells improves their maturity and upregulates several microRNAs. Delivering four of these microRNAs, miR-125b-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-221, and miR-222 (miR-combo), to m/hESC-CMs resulted in improved sarcomere alignment and calcium handling, a more negative resting membrane potential, and increased expression of cardiomyocyte maturation markers. Although this could not fully phenocopy all adult cardiomyocyte characteristics, these effects persisted for two months following delivery of miR-combo. A luciferase assay demonstrated that all four miRNAs target ErbB4, and siRNA knockdown of ErbB4 partially recapitulated the effects of miR-combo. In summary, a combination of miRNAs induced via endothelial coculture improved ESC-CM maturity, in part through suppression of ErbB4 signaling. PMID:26365191

  7. Pulmonary Epithelial Cell-Derived Cytokine TGF-β1 Is a Critical Cofactor for Enhanced Innate Lymphoid Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Denney, Laura; Byrne, Adam J.; Shea, Thomas J.; Buckley, James S.; Pease, James E.; Herledan, Gaelle M.F.; Walker, Simone A.; Gregory, Lisa G.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial cells orchestrate pulmonary homeostasis and pathogen defense and play a crucial role in the initiation of allergic immune responses. Maintaining the balance between homeostasis and inappropriate immune activation and associated pathology is particularly complex at mucosal sites that are exposed to billions of potentially antigenic particles daily. We demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived cytokine TGF-β had a central role in the generation of the pulmonary immune response. Mice that specifically lacked epithelial cell-derived TGF-β1 displayed a reduction in type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), resulting in suppression of interleukin-13 and hallmark features of the allergic response including airway hyperreactivity. ILCs in the airway lumen were primed to respond to TGF-β by expressing the receptor TGF-βRII and ILC chemoactivity was enhanced by TGF-β. These data demonstrate that resident epithelial cells instruct immune cells, highlighting the central role of the local environmental niche in defining the nature and magnitude of immune reactions. PMID:26588780

  8. Teratocarcinomas Arising from Allogeneic Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Tissue Constructs Provoked Host Immune Rejection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ai; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Takuji; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Ito, Emiko; Watabe, Tadashi; Masuda, Shigeo; Toda, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun; Morii, Eiichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs is a promising regenerative treatment for cardiac failure: however, its tumourigenic potential is concerning. We hypothesised that the tumourigenic potential may be eliminated by the host immune response after allogeneic cell transplantation. Scaffold-free iPSC-derived cardaic tissue sheets of C57BL/6 mouse origin were transplanted into the cardiac surface of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and allogeneic BALB/c mice with or without tacrolimus injection. Syngeneic mice and tacrolimus-injected immunosuppressed allogeneic mice formed teratocarcinomas with identical phenotypes, characteristic, and time courses, as assessed by imaging tools including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. In contrast, temporarily immunosuppressed allogeneic mice, following cessation of tacrolimus injection displayed diminished progression of the teratocarcinoma, accompanied by an accumulation of CD4/CD8-positive T cells, and finally achieved complete elimination of the teratocarcinoma. Our results indicated that malignant teratocarcinomas arising from induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissue constructs provoked T cell-related host immune rejection to arrest tumour growth in murine allogeneic transplantation models. PMID:26763872

  9. Thrombin mitogenic responses and protein phosphorylation are different in cultured human endothelial cells derived from large and microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, E.; Bikfalvi, A.; Rendu, F.; Toledano, S.L.; Tobelem, G. )

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that thrombin induces various biological responses in endothelial cells derived from large vessels. However, little is known about the effects of thrombin on the microvasculature. Protein phosphorylation may be one of the mechanisms by which an extracellular stimulus initiates cellular events like proliferation. Therefore, we have compared the effects of either human alpha-thrombin or phorbol esters (TPA) on the proliferation or protein phosphorylation in endothelial cells derived from large vessels (umbilical vein, HUVEC) or microvessels (omental tissue, HOMEC). In HOMEC, thrombin did not stimulate cell proliferation and protein phosphorylation while TPA slightly reduced the cell proliferation and induced the phosphorylation of a 27-kDa protein. In contrast, in HUVEC, thrombin or TPA markedly enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated the phosphorylation of a 59-kDa protein. These data indicate that endothelial cells from large and small vessels respond differently to thrombin and there is a complex and as yet unclear relationship between the proliferation and the protein phosphorylation induced by thrombin.

  10. The Production of Interleukin-11 and Decidualization Are Compromised in Endometrial Stromal Cells Derived from Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Karpovich, Natalia; Klemmt, Petra; McVeigh, J. Enda; Barlow, David H.; Mardon, Helen J.; Hwang, Jung Hye; Heath, John K.

    2006-01-01

    IL-11 signaling is critical for decidualization of the endometrial stroma in early pregnancy in the mouse. In this study, we investigate the function of IL-11 signaling in cAMP-induced decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. We show that treatment of endometrial stromal cells with 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) results in an increase in the levels of secreted IL-11, whereas levels of cell surface IL-11 receptor α are similar with or without 8-Br-cAMP treatment. The production of IL-11 correlates with the production of molecular markers of decidualization, prolactin and IGF-binding protein-1. The expression of these markers is inhibited when IL-11 signaling is specifically blocked in decidualizing endometrial stromal cells by the IL-11 antagonist W147A. We demonstrate that 8-Br-cAMP-induced endometrial stromal cells derived from patients with primary infertility produce lower levels of prolactin, IGF-binding protein-1, and IL-11 than cells derived from fertile women. Our results suggest that IL-11 expression is critically important during decidualization in the human endometrium, and that aberrant regulation of endometrial IL-11 production may be associated with some types of infertility. PMID:15613426

  11. Mast Cell-Derived Tumor Necrosis Factor Can Promote Nerve Fiber Elongation in the Skin during Contact Hypersensitivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakurai, Maki; Monteforte, Rossella; Suto, Hajime; Tsai, Mindy; Nakae, Susumu; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, lesions of contact eczema or atopic dermatitis can exhibit increases in epidermal nerves, but the mechanism resulting in such nerve elongation are not fully understood. We found that contact hypersensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mice were associated with significant increases in the length of nerves in the epidermis and dermis. Using genetically mast cell-deficient c-kit mutant mice selectively repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency with either wild-type or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mast cells, we found that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, significantly contributed to the elongation of epidermal and dermal PGP 9.5+ nerves and dermal CGRP+ nerves, as well as to the inflammation observed at sites of contact hypersensitivity in response to oxazolone. Moreover, the percentage of mast cells in close proximity to dermal PGP 9.5+ nerve fibers was significantly higher in wild-type mice and in c-kit mutant mice repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency by the adoptive transfer of wild-type mast cells than in TNF-deficient mice or in TNF−/− mast cell-engrafted c-kit mutant mice. These observations show that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, can promote the elongation of cutaneous nerve fibers during contact hypersensitivity in the mouse. PMID:17071594

  12. T cell derived IL-10 is dispensable for tolerance induction in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefanie; Dolch, Anja; Surianarayanan, Sangeetha; Dorn, Britta; Bewersdorff, Mayte; Alessandrini, Francesca; Behrendt, Rayk; Karp, Christopher L; Muller, Werner; Martin, Stefan F; Roers, Axel; Jakob, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory mechanisms initiated by allergen-specific immunotherapy are mainly attributed to T cell derived IL-10. However, it has not been shown that T cell derived IL-10 is required for successful tolerance induction (TI). Here, we analyze cellular sources and the functional relevance of cell type specific IL-10 during TI in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. While TI was effective in IL-10 competent mice, neutralizing IL-10 prior to tolerogenic treatment completely abrogated the beneficial effects. Cellular sources of IL-10 during TI were identified by using transcriptional reporter mice as T cells, B cells, and to a lesser extent DCs. Interestingly, TI was still effective in mice with T cell, B cell, B and T cell, or DC-specific IL-10 deficiency. In contrast, TI was not possible in mice lacking IL-10 in all hematopoetic cells, while it was effective in bone marrow (BM) chimera that lacked IL-10 only in nonhematopoetic cells. Taken together, allergen-specific tolerance depends on IL-10 from hematopoetic sources. The beneficial effects of allergen-specific immunotherapy cannot solely be attributed to IL-10 from T cells, B cells, or even DCs, suggesting a high degree of cellular redundancy in IL-10-mediated tolerance. PMID:27287239

  13. Stromal cell-derived CSF-1 blockade prolongs xenograft survival of CSF-1-negative neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Dietmar; Zins, Karin; Sioud, Mouldy; Lucas, Trevor; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E. Richard; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of tumor–host interactions that render neuroblastoma (NB) cells highly invasive are unclear. Cancer cells upregulate host stromal cell colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) production to recruit tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and accelerate tumor growth by affecting extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. By coculturing NB with stromal cells in vitro, we showed the importance of host CSF-1 expression for macrophage recruitment to NB cells. To examine this interaction in NB in vivo, mice bearing human CSF-1-expressing SK-N-AS and CSF-1-negative SK-NDZ NB xenografts were treated with intratumoral injections of small interfering RNAs directed against mouse CSF-1. Significant suppression of both SK-N-AS and SK-N-DZ NB growth by these treatments was associated with decreased TAM infiltration, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-12 levels and angiogenesis compared to controls, while expression of tissue inhibitors of MMPs increased following mouse CSF-1 blockade. Furthermore, Tie-2-positive and -negative TAMs recruited by host CSF-1 were identified in NB tumor tissue by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. However, host-CSF-1 blockade prolonged survival only in CSF-1-negative SK-N-DZ NB. These studies demonstrated that increased CSF-1 production by host cells enhances TAM recruitment and NB growth and that the CSF-1 phenotype of NB tumor cells adversely affects survival. PMID:19711348

  14. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  15. Aquaporin 3 is regulated by estrogen in the chicken oviduct and is involved in progression of epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Lim, W; Bae, H; Song, G

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that passively deliver water across the plasma membrane to play an important role in maintaining cell shape. Members of the AQP family are distributed in most of the tissues in the human body and perform a variety of functions based on the water homeostasis suitable for each organ. However, there is little known about the expression and regulation of AQP family members in chickens. Therefore, we determined the expression of AQPs in various tissues of chickens. Among 13 isotypes, AQP3 was highly expressed in the chicken oviduct. Expression of AQP3 messenger RNA (mRNA) increased in the magnum (P < 0.001) and isthmus (P < 0.001) of chick oviducts treated with diethylstilbestrol. Consistent with these results, the localization of AQP3 was detected in the glandular and luminal epithelia of the magnum and isthmus of oviducts of diethylstilbestrol-treated chicks. In addition, the pattern of expression of AQP3 changed in an estrogen-dependent manner during the molting period. During the regenerative period of the oviduct after molting, expression of AQP3 mRNA increased coordinately with increasing concentrations of estradiol (P < 0.001), whereas expression of AQP3 mRNA decreased as concentrations of estradiol in plasma decreased in response to induced molting (P < 0.001). Also, expression of the AQP3 increased (P < 0.001) in cancerous ovaries of laying hens. In conclusion, AQP3 does not simply function to transport water into and out of cells but also appears to be closely involved in development of the chicken oviduct, which is regulated by estrogens. Furthermore, our results suggest AQP3 as a new diagnostic for early detection and treatment of epithelial cell-derived ovarian carcinomas. PMID:26808975

  16. The effects of microvesicles on endothelial progenitor cells are compromised in type 2 diabetic patients via downregulation of the miR-126/VEGFR2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Keng; Yang, Yi; Zhong, Yun; Ammar, Hala Mustafa; Zhang, Peihua; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Hua; Cheng, Chuanfang; Koroscil, Thomas M; Chen, Yanfang; Liu, Shiming; Bihl, Ji C

    2016-05-15

    Our previous study showed that circulating microvesicles (cMVs) of diabetic mice have negative effects on the function of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Whether this is true in diabetic patients deserves further study. In this study, the effects of cMVs and EPC-derived MVs (EPC-MVs) on EPC migration, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in healthy controls, well-controlled, and uncontrolled diabetic patients were investigated. The levels of miR-126 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in cMVs, EPC-MVs, and/or EPCs were analyzed. Moreover, miR-126 inhibitor or mimic was applied to EPCs to modulate the miR-126 level in EPC-MVs. We found the following: 1) the circulating EPC level was reduced but the circulating EPC-MV level increased in uncontrolled diabetic patients; 2) the cMVs and EPC-MVs of healthy controls had beneficial effects on EPCs (migration, apoptosis, ROS), whereas the effects were reversely changed in the cMVs and EPC-MVs of uncontrolled diabetic patients; and 3) the cMVs and EPC-MVs of uncontrolled diabetic patients carried less miR-126 and had downregulated VEGFR2 expression in EPCs. Manipulating the miR-126 level in EPC-MVs with inhibitor or mimic changed their function. The effects of cMVs and EPC-MVs are compromised in diabetes due to the reduction of their carried miR-126, which might provide a therapy target for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26956185

  17. Microvesicle-shuttled miR-130b reduces fat deposition in recipient primary cultured porcine adipocytes by inhibiting PPAR-g expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shifeng; Yang, Xiaojing; Jia, Yimin; Li, Runsheng; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Consequently, the development of safe and effective anti-obesity drugs is an area of ongoing clinical interest. MicroRNAs play a vital role in anti-obesity by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and lipogenesis. However, the clinical application of miRNAs has been limited by a lack of appropriate delivery systems. The discovery of microvesicles (MVs) has shed new light on the search for more efficient drug transport tools. In a previous study, we demonstrated that miRNA-130b suppressed fat deposition by inhibiting PPAR-g expression. In order to demonstrate whether miRNA-130b can be packaged into MVs and function as an endogenous form of miRNA-130b in recipient cells, we transfected HeLa-229 cells with plasmid to overexpress miRNA-130b. This enabled HeLa-229 cells to selectively package miRNA-130b into MVs and actively secrete the miRNA-130b enriched MVs into the culture media. We further verified that MVs enriched with miRNA-130b contain elevated concentrations of Argonaute 2 and heat shock protein 90a which are known to protect the circulating miRNAs from degradation. Exposure of primary cultured porcine adipocytes to purified, miRNA-130b-enriched MVs resulted in a significant down-regulation of PPAR-g expression which was associated with reduced adipogenesis and lipogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that MVs may provide an effective transport systems for the deliver of miRNAs for therapeutic use. We also showed that MV-shuttled miRNA-130b inhibited adipogenesis and lipogenesis, and reduced fat deposition in recipient adipocytes by targeting PPAR-g. PMID:24311275

  18. Surface Phosphatidylserine Is Responsible for the Internalization on Microvesicles Derived from Hypoxia-Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaozhong; Wang, Lisheng; Xiao, Fengjun; Zhang, Hongchao

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous data have proven that microvesicles derived from hypoxia-induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-MVs) can be internalized into endothelial cells, enhancing their proliferation and vessel structure formation and promoting in vivo angiogenesis. However, there is a paucity of information about how the MSC-MVs are up-taken by endothelial cells. Methods MVs were prepared from the supernatants of human bone marrow MSCs that had been exposed to a hypoxic and/or serum-deprivation condition. The incorporation of hypoxia-induced MSC-MVs into human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) was observed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy in the presence or absence of recombinant human Annexin-V (Anx-V) and antibodies against human CD29 and CD44. Further, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted at Anx-V and PSR was delivered into HUVECs, or HUVECs were treated with a monoclonal antibody against phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) and the cellular internalization of MVs was re-assessed. Results The addition of exogenous Anx-V could inhibit the uptake of MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells by HUVECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, while the anti-CD29 and CD44 antibodies had no effect on the internalization process. The suppression was neither observed in Anx-V siRNA-transfected HUVECs, however, addition of anti-PSR antibody and PSR siRNA-transfected HUVECs greatly blocked the incorporation of MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells into HUVECs. Conclusion PS on the MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells is the critical molecule in the uptake by HUVECs. PMID:26808539

  19. BI-08MICROVESICLES CAN DISTINGUISH BETWEEN TUMOR PROGRESSION AND TREATMENT EFFECT/PSEUDOPROGRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA PATIENTS TREATED WITH RADIATION AND TEMOZOLOMIDE

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.; Lustig, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for glioblastoma (GB) is radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) following optimal surgery. This regimen has been accompanied by an increase in the occurrence of equivocal imaging findings, e.g. tumor progression vs. treatment effect (TE), which includes pseudoprogression (PsP). Thus decisions regarding further treatment are difficult and often delayed. None of the current imaging methods for identifying TE/PsP have proven sensitive and specific. Therefore, we developed a method to isolate microvesicles (MV) from blood sample in patients with GB. MV are defined herein as lipid membrane-bound sacs with a diameter >300 nm. METHODS: 3 ml citrated blood was collected from GB patients at their RT simulation and at multiple times during and following treatment. MV were isolated during multiple centrifugations (300g, 2500g, 15,000g). The pellet from the final spin was analyzed using flow cytometry. Antibodies to phosphotidylserine were used to identify the MV. RESULTS: We analyzed 16 blood samples from 10 GB patients that met analysis criteria: the MV sample was obtained at or following the completion of CRT and, a definitive diagnosis (TP, TE or PSP) was reached within 60 days of the date of the sample. MV counts in the patients with stable disease or TE/PsP were significantly lower than patients who developed recurrence or died of their disease (p = 0.0385). Based on MRI and/or pathological assessment, 2 patients have died of their disease, 1 patient is alive with recurrence, 3 patients have stable disease and 4 patients are being followed for PsP vs. tumor progression (TP). SUMMARY/CONCLUSION: These preliminary data suggest that the analysis of blood (liquid biopsy) for MV may be useful to distinguish TE/PsP from TP in GB patients. MVs may be valuable in addition to standard imaging for decision making in patients with equivocal imaging findings.

  20. Modeling human development and disease in pluripotent stem cell-derived gastric organoids

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Catá, Emily M.; Crawford, Calyn M.; Sinagoga, Katie L.; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Spence, Jason R.; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world’s population and are largely due to chronic H. pylori infection1–3. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis4, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We identified that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signaling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signaling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signaling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a novel and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease. PMID:25363776

  1. Am80 inhibits stromal cell-derived factor-1-induced chemotaxis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Taichi; Jimi, Shiro; Hara, Shuuji; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) play a potent role in metastasis and infiltration of many types of tumors, including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), into the central nervous system or lymph nodes. Although higher levels of CXCR4 expression have been shown to correlate with shorter survival of patients, effective drugs affecting cell surface CXCR4 expression are still unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid Am80 on CXCR4 expression of cultured T-ALL cells, such as Jurkat. Am80 inhibited surface CXCR4 expression and SDF-1-induced chemotaxis by the acceleration of CXCR4 internalization via activation of conventional PKC. Am80 may be an effective drug to inhibit the extramedullary infiltration of T-ALL cells. PMID:20141446

  2. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors Develop Into Neurons and Integrate Into the Host Brain

    PubMed Central

    Guillaume, Daniel J.; Johnson, M. Austin; Li, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how in-vitro-produced human neural precursors mature and integrate into the brain are crucial to the utility of human embryonic stem (hES) cells in treating neurological disorders. After transplantation into the ventricles of neonatal immune-deficient mice, hES-cell-derived neural precursors stopped expressing the cell division marker Ki67, except in neurogenic areas, and differentiated into neurons and then glia in a temporal course intrinsic to that of human cells regardless of location. The human cells located in the gray matter became neurons in the olfactory bulb and striatum, whereas those in the white matter produced exclusively glia. Importantly, the grafted human cells formed synapses. Thus, the in-vitro-produced human neural precursors follow their intrinsic temporal program to produce neurons and glia and, in response to environmental signals, generate cells appropriate to their target regions and integrate into the brain. PMID:16941479

  3. Mast cell-derived interleukin 10 limits skin pathology in contact dermatitis and chronic irradiation with ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Nakae, Susumu; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis, such as in response to poison ivy or poison oak, and chronic low-dose ultraviolet B irradiation can damage the skin. Mast cells produce proinflammatory mediators that are thought to exacerbate these prevalent acquired immune or innate responses. Here we found that, unexpectedly, mast cells substantially limited the pathology associated with these responses, including infiltrates of leukocytes, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal necrosis. Production of interleukin 10 by mast cells contributed to the anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive effects of mast cells in these conditions. Our findings identify a previously unrecognized function for mast cells and mast cell-derived interleukin 10 in limiting leukocyte infiltration, inflammation and tissue damage associated with immunological or innate responses that can injure the skin. PMID:17767162

  4. Controversies in Cardiovascular Research: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes – boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed Central

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-01-01

    As part of the series on Controversies in Cardiovascular Research, the article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize anti-arrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  5. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  6. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  7. Stem cell-derived vasculature: A potent and multidimensional technology for basic research, disease modeling, and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Justin; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    Proper blood vessel networks are necessary for constructing and re-constructing tissues, promoting wound healing, and delivering metabolic necessities throughout the body. Conversely, an understanding of vascular dysfunction has provided insight into the pathogenesis and progression of diseases both common and rare. Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine - including advances in stem cell technologies and related progress in bioscaffold design and complex tissue engineering - have allowed rapid advances in the field of vascular biology, leading in turn to more advanced modeling of vascular pathophysiology and improved engineering of vascularized tissue constructs. In this review we examine recent advances in the field of stem cell-derived vasculature, providing an overview of stem cell technologies as a source for vascular cell types and then focusing on their use in three primary areas: studies of vascular development and angiogenesis, improved disease modeling, and the engineering of vascularized constructs for tissue-level modeling and cell-based therapies. PMID:26427871

  8. Monosynaptic Tracing using Modified Rabies Virus Reveals Early and Extensive Circuit Integration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Grealish, Shane; Heuer, Andreas; Cardoso, Tiago; Kirkeby, Agnete; Jönsson, Marie; Johansson, Jenny; Björklund, Anders; Jakobsson, Johan; Parmar, Malin

    2015-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived dopamine neurons are currently moving toward clinical use for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the timing and extent at which stem cell-derived neurons functionally integrate into existing host neural circuitry after transplantation remain largely unknown. In this study, we use modified rabies virus to trace afferent and efferent connectivity of transplanted hESC-derived neurons in a rat model of PD and report that grafted human neurons integrate into the host neural circuitry in an unexpectedly rapid and extensive manner. The pattern of connectivity resembled that of local endogenous neurons, while ectopic connections were not detected. Revealing circuit integration of human dopamine neurons substantiates their potential use in clinical trials. Additionally, our data present rabies-based tracing as a valuable and widely applicable tool for analyzing graft connectivity that can easily be adapted to analyze connectivity of a variety of different neuronal sources and subtypes in different disease models. PMID:26004633

  9. Unique proliferation response in odontoblastic cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells by cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Kawai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    A pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (CM: interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and IL-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 activity have been shown to increase the proliferation of rat dental pulp cells and murine stem cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. This suggests that MMP-3 may regulate wound healing and regeneration in the odontoblast-rich dental pulp. Here, we determined whether these results can be extrapolated to human dental pulp by investigating the effects of CM-induced MMP-3 up-regulation on the proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells. We used siRNA to specifically reduce MMP-3 expression. We found that CM treatment increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels as well as MMP-3 activity. Cell proliferation was also markedly increased, with no changes in apoptosis, upon treatment with CM and following the application of exogenous MMP-3. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases were constitutively expressed during all experiments and unaffected by MMP-3. Although treatment with MMP-3 siRNA suppressed cell proliferation, it also unexpectedly increased apoptosis. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed by exogenous MMP-3. These results demonstrate that cytokine-induced MMP-3 activity regulates cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis in human odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce MMP-3 activity in human odontoblast-like cells. • Increased MMP-3 activity can promote cell proliferation in odontoblasts. • Specific loss of MMP-3 increases apoptosis in odontoblasts. • MMP-3 has potential as a promising new target for pupal repair and regeneration.

  10. Polyphosphate induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated proliferation of odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kawai, Rie; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate [Poly(P)] may represent a physiological source of phosphate and has the ability to induce bone differentiation in osteoblasts. We previously reported that cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates the proliferation of purified odontoblast-like cells. In this study, MMP-3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate whether MMP-3 activity is induced by Poly(P) and/or is associated with cell proliferation and differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Treatment with Poly(P) led to an increase in both cell proliferation and additional odontoblastic differentiation. Poly(P)-treated cells showed a small but significant increase in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) mRNA expression, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. The cells also acquired additional odontoblast-specific properties including adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and a calcification capacity. In addition, Poly(P) induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA and protein, and increased MMP-3 activity. MMP-3 siRNA-mediated disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of odontoblastic biomarkers ALP, DSPP, and DMP-1, and blocked calcification. Interestingly, upon siRNA-mediated silencing of MMP-3, we noted a potent and significant decrease in cell proliferation. Using specific siRNAs, we revealed that a unique signaling cascade, Poly(P)→MMP-3→DSPP and/or DMP-1, was intimately involved in the proliferation of odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Polyphosphate increases proliferation of iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. • Polyphosphate-induced MMP-3 results in an increase of cell proliferation. • Induced cell proliferation involves MMP-3, DSPP, and/or DMP-1 sequentially. • Induced MMP-3 also results in an increase of odontoblastic

  11. Functional Evaluation of Biological Neurotoxins in Networked Cultures of Stem Cell-derived Central Nervous System Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Kyle; Beske, Phillip; Lyman, Megan; McNutt, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic and mechanistic studies of the presynaptically targeted clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) have been limited by the need for a scalable, cell-based model that produces functioning synapses and undergoes physiological responses to intoxication. Here we describe a simple and robust method to efficiently differentiate murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into defined lineages of synaptically active, networked neurons. Following an 8 day differentiation protocol, mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) rapidly express and compartmentalize neurotypic proteins, form neuronal morphologies and develop intrinsic electrical responses. By 18 days after differentiation (DIV 18), ESNs exhibit active glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic synapses and emergent network behaviors characterized by an excitatory:inhibitory balance. To determine whether intoxication with CNTs functionally antagonizes synaptic neurotransmission, thereby replicating the in vivo pathophysiology that is responsible for clinical manifestations of botulism or tetanus, whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology was used to quantify spontaneous miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) in ESNs exposed to tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) or botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes /A-/G. In all cases, ESNs exhibited near-complete loss of synaptic activity within 20 hr. Intoxicated neurons remained viable, as demonstrated by unchanged resting membrane potentials and intrinsic electrical responses. To further characterize the sensitivity of this approach, dose-dependent effects of intoxication on synaptic activity were measured 20 hr after addition of BoNT/A. Intoxication with 0.005 pM BoNT/A resulted in a significant decrement in mEPSCs, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.013 pM. Comparisons of median doses indicate that functional measurements of synaptic inhibition are faster, more specific and more sensitive than SNARE cleavage assays or the mouse lethality assay

  12. Human Stem Cell-Derived Skin Progenitors Produce Alpha 2-HS Glycoprotein (Fetuin): A Revolutionary Cosmetic Ingredient.

    PubMed

    Nistor, Gabriel; Poole, Aleksandra J; Draelos, Zoe; Lupo, Mary; Tzikas, Thomas; Liu, Jerome H; Keirstead, Hans S

    2016-05-01

    These studies were designed to determine the effect of stem cell-derived skin lineage precursor secretions on the intrinsic and extrinsic symptoms of human skin aging.
    Human stem cells cultivated in balanced conditions were differentiated into skin lineage precursors, and shown to secrete large amounts of fetuin as well as multiple growth factors beneficial for human skin development and maintenance. The cell secretions were incorporated in two simple cosmetic formulations (serum and lotion) and investigated in an IRB-approved 12-week human trial that included 25 subjects in each group. Subjects were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks by a dermatologist to evaluate safety, trans-epidermal water loss, wrinkles, firmness, radiance, texture, softness, and overall appearance. A sub-group of subjects from each group consented for biopsies for histological analyses.
    Protein analyses in the cell secretions revealed a high concentration of the multifunctional alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (fetuin) along with a multitude of protein factors involved in the development and maintenance of healthy human skin. Clinical investigation demonstrated significant amelioration of the clinical signs of intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging, findings that were confirmed by significant changes in skin morphology, filaggrin, aquaporin 3, and collagen I content.
    Our data strongly support our hypothesis that cosmetic application of stem cell-derived skin lineage precursor secretions containing fetuin and growth factors beneficial for human skin development and maintenance, positively influence intrinsic and extrinsic aging.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):583-598. PMID:27168267

  13. Three-Dimensional Adult Cardiac Extracellular Matrix Promotes Maturation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ashley H; Romero-López, Mónica; Heylman, Christopher M; Keating, Mark; Tran, David; Sobrino, Agua; Tran, Anh Q; Pham, Hiep H; Fimbres, Cristhian; Gershon, Paul D; Botvinick, Elliot L; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W

    2016-08-01

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) have great potential in the development of new therapies for cardiovascular disease. In particular, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may prove especially advantageous due to their pluripotency, their self-renewal potential, and their ability to create patient-specific cell lines. Unfortunately, pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs are immature, with characteristics more closely resembling fetal CMs than adult CMs, and this immaturity has limited their use in drug screening and cell-based therapies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cellular behavior and maturation, as does the geometry of the environment-two-dimensional (2D) versus three-dimensional (3D). We therefore tested the hypothesis that native cardiac ECM and 3D cultures might enhance the maturation of iPSC-derived CMs in vitro. We demonstrate that maturation of iPSC-derived CMs was enhanced when cells were seeded into a 3D cardiac ECM scaffold, compared with 2D culture. 3D cardiac ECM promoted increased expression of calcium-handling genes, Junctin, CaV1.2, NCX1, HCN4, SERCA2a, Triadin, and CASQ2. Consistent with this, we find that iPSC-derived CMs in 3D adult cardiac ECM show increased calcium signaling (amplitude) and kinetics (maximum upstroke and downstroke) compared with cells in 2D. Cells in 3D culture were also more responsive to caffeine, likely reflecting an increased availability of calcium in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, these studies provide novel strategies for maturing iPSC-derived CMs that may have applications in drug screening and transplantation therapies to treat heart disease. PMID:27392582

  14. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development. PMID:26220942

  15. Subretinal transplantation of putative retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in rat retinal degeneration model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Un Chul; Cho, Myung Soo; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To differentiate the human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the defined culture condition and determine its therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Methods The embryoid bodies were formed from hESCs and attached on the matrigel coated culture dishes. The neural structures consisting neural precursors were selected and expanded to form rosette structures. The mechanically isolated neural rosettes were differentiated into pigmented cells in the media comprised of N2 and B27. Expression profiles of markers related to RPE development were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Dissociated putative RPE cells (105 cells/5 µL) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model induced by intravenous sodium iodate injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation, and immnohistochemistry study was performed to verify the survival of the transplanted cells. Results The putative RPE cells derived from hESC showed characteristics of the human RPE cells morphologically and expressed molecular markers and associated with RPE fate. Grafted RPE cells were found to survive in the subretinal space up to 4 weeks after transplantation, and the expression of RPE markers was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Transplanted RPE cells derived from hESC in the defined culture condition successfully survived and migrated within subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model. These results support the feasibility of the hESC derived RPE cells for cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative disease. PMID:22384445

  16. Isolation and Assessment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Bone Marrow: Histologic and Histomorphometric Study in a Canine Periodontal Defect.

    PubMed

    Paknejad, Mojgan; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Ghaedi, Baharak; Rokn, Amir-Reza; Khorsand, Afshin; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Moslemi, Neda; Nowzari, Hessam

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate an isolation procedure to culture mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and evaluate their potential in periodontal regeneration. Potential stem cells from bone marrow, aspirated from the iliac crest of nine mongrel canines 1 to 2 years of age, were cultivated. After the examination of surface epitopes of the isolated cells, the total RNA from osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cell cultures were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to confirm stem cell gene expressions. 2 × 10(7) mL of the stem cells were loaded on 0.2 mL of anorganic bovine bone mineral (ABBM) granules. In each animal, bilateral acute/chronic intrabony periodontal defects were created surgically and by placement of ligatures around the cervical aspect of the teeth. At week 5, after flap debridement, the bilateral defects were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: the control group received ABBM, and the test group received BMSCs-loaded ABBM. Eight weeks after transplantation, regenerative parameters were analyzed histologically and histometrically. The RNA expressions confirmed the cultivation of mesenchymal stem cell. More new cementum and periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured in the test group (cementum: 3.33 ± 0.94 vs 2.03 ± 1.30, P = 0.027; PDL: 2.69 ± 0.73 vs 1.53 ± 1.21, P = 0.026). New bone formation was similar in both groups (2.70 ± 0.86 vs 1.99 ± 1.31; P = 0.193). Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow should be considered a promising technique for use in patients with periodontal attachment loss and merits further investigations. PMID:24383495