Science.gov

Sample records for cancer epidemiologic evidence

  1. Trichloroethylene and cancer: epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, D; Reyner, D; Scott, C S

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is an organic chemical that has been used in dry cleaning, for metal degreasing, and as a solvent for oils and resins. It has been shown to cause liver and kidney cancer in experimental animals. This article reviews over 80 published papers and letters on the cancer epidemiology of people exposed to trichloroethylene. Evidence of excess cancer incidence among occupational cohorts with the most rigorous exposure assessment is found for kidney cancer (relative risk [RR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.7), liver cancer (RR = 1.9, 95% CI(1.0-3.4), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.9-2.3) as well as for cervical cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and multiple myeloma. However, since few studies isolate trichloroethylene exposure, results are likely confounded by exposure to other solvents and other risk factors. Although we believe that solvent exposure causes cancer in humans and that trichloroethylene likely is one of the active agents, we recommend further study to better specify the specific agents that confer this risk and to estimate the magnitude of that risk. PMID:10807550

  2. Epidemiological evidence indicates asbestos causes laryngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.H.; Handley, M.A.; Wood, R. )

    1990-06-01

    A variety of opinions have been expressed in the literature concerning asbestos and laryngeal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of epidemiological studies based on criteria that prioritized the most heavily exposed cohorts. Emphasis was given to the six cohorts or subcohorts with lung cancer relative risk estimates of 2 or more. The two groups of workers with the highest lung cancer relative risk estimates (4.06 and 3.28) both gave strong support for a causal association of asbestos and laryngeal cancer, with relative risk estimates of 1.91 (90% confidence limits 1.00 to 3.34) and 3.75 (90% confidence limits 1.01 to 9.68), respectively. Confounding with cigarette smoking or alcohol consumption does not explain the findings. Case-control studies gave mixed results, but generally supported the hypothesis. It was concluded that asbestos is a probable cause of laryngeal cancer in view of the reasonable consistency of the studies, the strength of the association in key studies, the evidence for dose-response relationships, and the biological plausibility for asbestos being a cause of laryngeal cancer. 48 references.

  3. Insulin resistance and cancer: epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Tsugane, Shoichiro; Inoue, Manami

    2010-05-01

    Over the last 60 years, Japanese people have experienced a rapid and drastic change in lifestyle, including diet. Suspicions have been raised that so-called 'Westernization', characterized by a high-calorie diet and physical inactivity, is associated with increasing trends in the incidence of cancer of the colon, liver, pancreas, prostate, and breast, as well as type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological evidence from our prospective study, the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective (JPHC) study, and systematic literature reviews generally support the idea that factors related to diabetes or insulin resistance are associated with an increased risk of colon (mostly in men), liver, and pancreatic cancers. These cancers are inversely associated with physical activity and coffee consumption, which are known to decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. The suggested mechanism of these effects is that insulin resistance and the resulting chronic hyperinsulinemia and increase in bioavailable insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) stimulate tumor growth. In contrast, associations with diabetes are less clear for cancer of the colon in women, and breast and prostate, which are known to be related to sex hormones. The effect of insulin resistance or body fat on sex-hormone production and bioavailability may modify their carcinogenic effect differently from cancers of the colon in men, and liver and pancreas. In conclusion, there is substantial evidence to show that cancers of the colon, liver, and pancreas are associated with insulin resistance, and that these cancers can be prevented by increasing physical activity, and possibly coffee consumption. PMID:20345478

  4. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and cancer: the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, M N

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiologic evidence that low frequency electromagnetic fields generated by alternating current may be a cause of cancer. Studies examining residential exposures of children and adults and studies of electrical and electronics workers are reviewed. Using conventional epidemiologic criteria for inferring causal associations, including strength and consistency of the relationship, biological plausibility, and the possibility of bias as an explanation, it is concluded that the evidence is strongly suggestive that such radiation is carcinogenic. The evidence is strongest for brain and central nervous system cancers in electrical workers and children. Weaker evidence supports an association with leukemia in electrical workers. Some evidence also exists for an association with melanoma in electrical workers. Failure to find consistent evidence of a link between residential exposures and adult cancers may be attributable to exposure misclassification. Studies so far have used imperfect surrogates for any true biologically effective magnetic field exposure. The resulting exposure misclassification has produced relative risk estimates that understate any true risk. PMID:1821368

  5. Vitamin D and colorectal cancer: molecular, epidemiological and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Manson, JoAnn E; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol and binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D-metabolising enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating the effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies have provided evidence for anti-cancer effects of vitamin D (particularly against colorectal cancer), although clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. In addition, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In this study, we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence. PMID:27245104

  6. Epidemiologic evidence for an association between gasoline and kidney cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Enterline, P E; Viren, J

    1985-01-01

    A recent animal experiment suggests that gasoline exposure may be a cause of human kidney cancer. This is a literature review to see whether there is any epidemiologic support for these animal findings. Trends and geographic patterns in gasoline consumption and kidney cancer mortality are moderately supportive of a relationship, although this cannot be considered important evidence for a causal relationship. Most other ecological correlations are not supportive of a relationship. Eleven oil refinery populations and one population of petroleum products distribution workers have been studied. These studies taken as a group do not appear to support the notion of a relationship between gasoline exposure and kidney cancer. However, most were not designed or analyzed with this hypothesis in mind. An examination of these data which attempts to consider the ages of the populations studied provides some evidence of a small kidney cancer excess among older workers or among workers exposed for long periods. Because of the importance of gasoline and the potential for exposure by the public further study of exposed populations is needed. PMID:4085434

  7. Ionizing radiation and cancer risk: evidence from epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ron, E

    1998-11-01

    Epidemiological studies provide the primary data on the carcinogenic effects of radiation in humans. Much of what is known has come from studies of the atomic bomb survivors, and to a lesser extent from patients receiving radiotherapy. These studies demonstrate that exposure to moderate to high doses of radiation increases the risk of cancer in most organs. For all solid cancers combined, cancers of the thyroid, breast and lung, and leukemia, risk estimates are fairly precise, and associations have been found at relatively low doses (<0.2 Gy). Associations between radiation and cancers of the salivary glands, stomach, colon, bladder, ovary, central nervous system and skin have also been reported, but the relationships are not as well quantified. Associations between radiation and cancers of the liver and esophagus, and to a lesser extent multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, have been reported in a few studies, but results are inconsistent. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, and cancers of the pancreas, prostate, testis and cervix have rarely been linked to radiation exposure. A linear no-threshold model adequately describes the dose-response relationship for solid cancers, although at extremely high doses the risk appears to flatten out. Because few populations have been followed until the end of life, the temporal patterns of risk are not completely known. An increased risk, however, does continue for several decades. In contrast, radiation-related leukemias begin to occur shortly (2-3 years) after exposure and, at least in the A-bomb survivors, a linear-quadratic dose response seems to fit the data better than a pure linear model. Radiation does not act entirely in isolation. It can interact with other carcinogens, e.g. tobacco or chemotherapeutic agents, and with host factors such as age at exposure, gender or reproductive history. Interactions with medical interventions or with certain heritable mutations have also been suggested. While

  8. Green tea and the risk of gastric cancer: Epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hou, I-Chun; Amarnani, Saral; Chong, Mok T; Bishayee, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. Numerous efforts are being made to find chemoprotective agents able to reduce its risk. Amongst these, green tea has been reported to have a protective effect against stomach cancer. This article aims to critically evaluate all epidemiological studies reporting an association between green tea consumption and GC risk. MEDLINE, EBSCOHOST and Google Scholar were used to search for clinical trials of green tea and its correlation to stomach cancer. Studies include cohort and case-control studies. Outcome of interests are inverse association, no association, and positive association. Seventeen epidemiologic studies were reviewed. Eleven studies were conducted in Japan, five in China, and one with Japanese descendent in Hawaii. Ten case-control studies and seven cohort studies were included. The relative risks or odds ratio of GC for the highest level of green tea consumption was compared. Seven studies suggested no association, eight an inverse association, and one a positive association. One study had shown a significantly lowered GC risk when tea was served warm to cold. Another study also showed a significantly risk with lukewarm tea. All studies that analyzed men and women separately have suggested a reduced risk in women than in men, albeit no significant difference. This review demonstrates that there is insufficient information to support green tea consumption reduces the risk of GC. More studies on the subject matter are warranted. PMID:23840110

  9. Dietary fibre and colon cancer: epidemiologic and experimental evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B S

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified two dietary factors, a relatively high intake of fat and a relatively low intake of fibre, that are associated with colon cancer in humans. However, a recent study has shown a low risk of large bowel cancer in a rural Finnish population with a high dietary intake of fat, but also a high intake of fibre. Observations in humans and studies in animals have indicated that dietary fibre may protect against colon carcinogenesis by binding bile acids in the intestinal tract, by a direct effect on the colonic mucosa and by an indirect effect on the metabolism of carcinogens. The strength of protection varies with the type of fibre. PMID:6254626

  10. The impact of red and processed meat consumption on cancer and other health outcomes: Epidemiological evidences.

    PubMed

    Boada, Luis D; Henríquez-Hernández, L A; Luzardo, O P

    2016-06-01

    Meat is one of the staples of the human diet, which provides high-quality nutrients, but that also constitutes a relevant source of cholesterol and saturated fatty acids. Epidemiologic studies have linked consumption of red or processed meat with obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Most epidemiological studies suggest that a high intake of meat, especially processed meat, is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. Potential reasons for the association between high meat intake and colorectal cancer risk include some chemicals naturally contained in meat, or generated by the processing and cooking. From the literature it can be concluded that there is enough epidemiological evidence linking processed meat intake and colorectal cancer risk, but there is limited evidence regarding unprocessed red meat intake and the disease. On the contrary, there is only limited evidence linking meat intake with other diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes or other cancers. Nevertheless, the literature suggest that dietary intervention may be a promising approach for prevention of cancers of the colon, esophagus, liver, stomach and bladder, and type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which still need to be confirmed by further well designed prospective studies and experimental research. PMID:27106137

  11. Brassica vegetables and prostate cancer risk: a review of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kristal, Alan R; Lampe, Johanna W

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have yielded conflicting results on the associations of diet with prostate cancer. We review evidence that Brassica vegetables are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk. Brassica vegetables, which include broccoli, cabbage, mustard and collard greens, and bok choy, contain glucosinolates, the metabolic breakdown products of which are potent modulators of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that protect DNA from damage. Twelve published studies give some information about Brassica vegetables and prostate cancer risk; six of these studies can be clearly interpreted. Of these, three reported statistically significant reduced risks (P < 0.05) and one reported a borderline significant reduced risk (P = 0.06) with high Brassica vegetable consumption. The epidemiological literature provides modest support for the hypothesis that high intakes of Brassica vegetables reduce prostate cancer risk. PMID:12235639

  12. Need for epidemiological evidence from the developing world to know the cancer-related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V

    2007-01-01

    The existing evidence on cancer etiology has mostly come from epidemiological studies conducted in the developed world. Now there is an urgent need to gather information on cancer risks in developing countries. Due to recent economic, demographic and health transitions, cancers are on the rise in many developing countries. Future epidemiological studies in these countries should address changing diet, level of physical activity, various environmental and occupational exposures, smoking habits and infections, relative to cancers. In many low resource settings western and conventional lifestyles can be found side by side. Therefore, epidemiological studies in such societies should determine the wide varieties of potentially dangerous exposures, examine changing patterns of related factors and should study other contributing variables as well. Apart from the advantages of such research, there are some challenges. For example, incomplete cancer and death registration, lack of documentation, only partial computerization of medical records, cultural barriers and other technical difficulties can present problems. Some strategies to meet these challenges will be discussed in this paper. There is an immediate need for more detailed epidemiological studies before these developing societies are transformed. PMID:17998716

  13. Aspirin Use on Incidence and Mortality of Gastrointestinal Cancers: Current State of Epidemiological Evidence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kuan; Tu, Hui-Tzu; See, Lai-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the most widely used medications since its first synthesis more than 100 years ago. In addition to short-term use for pain and fever relief, regular use of aspirin has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and strokes. The issue of regular aspirin use in cancer prevention is definitely promising, which has been supported by growing evidence from a number of observational studies and post-trial follow-up data. Among all cancers, aspirin is showing to be the most effective in reducing the risk of colorectal cancer, and even at lower doses demonstrates a 30-40% effectiveness in preventing colorectal cancer. Esophagus and stomach cancers are two cancers getting increased attention from emerging evidence of meta-analyses. Given the common side effects of aspirin, such as gastrointestinal complications, whether it is ready to take aspirin regularly for general population remains controversial since more studies are needed to clarify the net balance between harm and benefit. The decision might become more complicated since recently one molecular epidemiology study showed that different genetic traits may impact the effect of aspirin on colorectal cancer. Here we summarize recent evidence from meta-analyses related to gastrointestinal cancers. We reviewed updated observational studies and post-trial follow up data from randomized controlled trials focusing on the role of aspirin in the incidence and mortality of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26369680

  14. The Association between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Women Cancer: The Epidemiological Evidences and Putative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a chronic disease increasing rapidly worldwide, is well established as an important risk factor for various types of cancer. Although many factors impact the development of T2DM and cancer including sex, age, ethnicity, obesity, diet, physical activity levels, and environmental exposure, many epidemiological and experimental studies are gradually contributing to knowledge regarding the interrelationship between DM and cancer. The insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and chronic inflammation associated with diabetes mellitus are all associated strongly with cancer. The changes in bioavailable ovarian steroid hormone that occur in diabetes mellitus (the increasing levels of estrogen and androgen and the decreasing level of progesterone) are also considered potentially carcinogenic conditions for the breast, endometrium, and ovaries in women. In addition, the interaction among insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and ovarian steroid hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone, could act synergistically during cancer development. Here, we review the cancer-related mechanisms in T2DM, the epidemiological evidence linking T2DM and cancers in women, and the role of antidiabetic medication in these cancers. PMID:25866823

  15. Bladder cancer risk in painters: a review of the epidemiological evidence, 1989-2004.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Cristina; Pira, Enrico; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2005-11-01

    Epidemiological studies on the potential association between painting and the risk of bladder cancer published after the Monograph of the International Agency for Research on Cancer N. 47 of 1989 have been systematically reviewed. These included four cohort studies on the incidence of bladder cancer among painters, with a pooled relative risk (RR) of 1.10 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.03-1.18), based on 893 cases observed. The corresponding summary RR from four cohort studies on mortality was 1.23 (95% CI 1.11-1.37), based on 370 deaths. The pooled RR from 14 case-control studies and a pooled-analysis of other 11 case-control studies was 1.35 (95% CI 1.19-1.53), based on 465 cases exposed. Overall, the RR from all epidemiological studies was 1.17 (95% 1.11-1.27). Thus, recent epidemiological evidence indicates a moderate excess risk for bladder cancer in painters. Some studies, however, suggested that any such risk would have been greater for exposures in the distant past. Open issues for interpretation include residual confounding by social class and tobacco smoking, and understanding the time-risk relation. In particular, the potential residual risk related to exposure over the last two to three decades remains to be defined. PMID:16184465

  16. Mediterranean diet and cancer: epidemiological evidence and mechanism of selected aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Populations living in the area of the Mediterranean Sea suffered by decreased incidence of cancer compared with those living in the regions of northern Europe and US countries, attributed to healthier dietary habits. Nowadays, we are assisting to a moving away from the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern, but whether this changing is influencing risk of cancers is still unclear. The aim of the study was to review recent evidence on potential relationship between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cancer. Discussion The most recent pooled analyses of epidemiological studies supported strongly the hypothesis that the Mediterranean diet may play a role in preventing several types of cancers, especially those of digestive tract, whereas contrasting results were reported for hormone-dependent cancers. Specific aspects of the Mediterranean diet such as high fruit and vegetables and low red processed meat intake may explain such protective effects. Moreover, evidence regarding olive oil and whole grains increase the beneficial effects of such dietary pattern against cancer. Conclusions Literature evidence actually demonstrates that the increased adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern is beneficial to health across populations and may translate a protective effect with certain cancers. PMID:24267672

  17. Occupational exposure to beryllium and cancer risk: a review of the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo; Fryzek, Jon P; Mandel, Jack S

    2012-02-01

    There is controversy on whether occupational exposure to beryllium causes lung cancer. We conducted a systematic review of epidemiologic studies on cancer among workers exposed to beryllium, including a study of seven U.S. production plants which has been recently updated, a study of patients with beryllium disease (largely overlapping with the former study) and several smaller studies. A small excess mortality from lung cancer was detected in the large cohort, which was partially explained by confounding by tobacco smoking and urban residence. Other potential confounders have not been addressed. The excess mortality was mainly among workers employed (often for a short duration) in the early phase of the manufacturing industry. There was no relation with duration of employment or cumulative exposure, whereas average and maximum exposure were associated with lung cancer risk. The use of lagged exposure variables resulted in associations with lung cancer risk; however, these associations were due to confounding by year of birth and year of hire. The studies of beryllium disease patients do not provide independent evidence and the results from other studies do not support the hypothesis of an increased risk of lung cancer or any other cancer. Overall, the available evidence does not support a conclusion that a causal association has been established between occupational exposure to beryllium and the risk of cancer. PMID:22276590

  18. Genetic Variants Associated with Breast Cancer Risk: Comprehensive Field Synopsis, Meta-Analysis, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Over 1,000 reports have been published during the past two decades on associations between genetic variants in candidate genes and breast cancer risk. Results have been generally inconsistent. We conducted literature searches and meta-analyses to provide a field synopsis of the current understanding of the genetic architecture of breast cancer risk. Methods Systematic literature searches for candidate gene association studies of breast cancer risk were conducted in two stages using PubMed on or before February 28, 2010. A total of 24,500 publications were identified, of which, 1,059 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses were conducted for 279 genetic variants in 128 candidate genes or chromosomal loci that had a minimum of three data sources available. Variants with significant associations by meta-analysis were assessed using the Venice criteria and scored as having strong, moderate, or weak cumulative evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Findings Fifty-one variants in 40 genes showed statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. Cumulative epidemiologic evidence for an association with breast cancer risk was graded as strong for 10 variants in six genes (ATM, CASP8, CHEK2, CTLA4, NBN, and TP53), moderate for four variants in four genes (ATM, CYP19A1, TERT, and XRCC3), and weak for 37 additional variants. Additionally, in meta-analyses that included a minimum of 10,000 cases and 10,000 controls, convincing evidence of no association with breast cancer risk was identified for 45 variants in 37 genes. Interpretation While most genetic variants evaluated in previous candidate gene studies showed no association with breast cancer risk in meta-analyses, 14 variants in 9 genes were found to have moderate to strong evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Further evaluation of these variants is warranted. PMID:21514219

  19. Iron and cancer risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Jakszyn, Paula; Agudo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Iron has been suggested as a risk factor for different types of cancers mainly due to its prooxidant activity, which can lead to oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, subjects with hemochromatosis or iron overload have been shown to have a higher risk of developing liver cancer. We have systematically reviewed 59 epidemiologic studies, published between 1995 and 2012, reporting information on total iron, dietary iron, heme iron, and biomarkers of iron status and cancer risk. Furthermore we conducted meta-analysis for colorectal [relative risk (RR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.17], colon (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22), breast (RR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09), and lung cancer (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 0.98-1.29), for an increase of 1 mg/day of heme iron intake. Globally, on the basis of the systematic review and the meta-analysis results, a higher intake of heme iron has shown a tendency toward a positive association with cancer risk. Evidence regarding high levels of biomarkers of iron stores (mostly with serum ferritin) suggests a negative effect toward cancer risk. More prospective studies combining research on dietary iron intake, iron biomarkers, genetic susceptibility, and other relevant factors need to be conducted to clarify these findings and better understand the role of iron in cancer development. PMID:24243555

  20. Occupational exposures and colorectal cancers: A quantitative overview of epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Oddone, Enrico; Modonesi, Carlo; Gatta, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    A traditional belief widespread across the biomedical community was that dietary habits and genetic predisposition were the basic factors causing colorectal cancer. In more recent times, however, a growing evidence has shown that other determinants can be very important in increasing (or reducing) incidence of this malignancy. The hypothesis that environmental and occupational risk factors are associated with colorectal cancer is gaining ground, and high risks of colorectal cancer have been reported among workers in some industrial branches. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiologic relationship between colorectal cancer and occupational exposures to several industrial activities, by means of a scientific literature review and meta-analysis. This work pointed out increased risks of colorectal cancer for labourers occupied in industries with a wide use of chemical compounds, such as leather (RR = 1.70, 95%CI: 1.24-2.34), basic metals (RR = 1.32, 95%CI: 1.07-1.65), plastic and rubber manufacturing (RR = 1.30, 95%CI: 0.98-1.71 and RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 0.92-1.76, respectively), besides workers in the sector of repair and installation of machinery exposed to asbestos (RR = 1.40, 95%CI: 1.07-1.84). Based on our results, the estimated crude excess risk fraction attributable to occupational exposure ranged from about 11% to about 15%. However, homogeneous pattern of association between colorectal cancer and industrial branches did not emerge from this review. PMID:25253943

  1. Vitamin D and Colorectal, Breast, and Prostate Cancers: A Review of the Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Kohler, Lindsay N.; Kunihiro, Andrew G.; Jurutka, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the question of whether vitamin D has a role in cancer incidence, progression, and mortality has been studied in detail. Colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers have been a particular area of focus; together, these three malignancies account for approximately 35% of cancer cases and 20% of cancer deaths in the United States, and as such are a major public health concern. Herein, we review and synthesize the epidemiological research regarding vitamin D, as measured by the biomarker 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D], and the incidence, progression, and mortality of these cancers. Overall, the results of observational studies of the relationship between 25(OH)D and colorectal cancer have revealed a consistent inverse association for incidence and mortality; while for breast cancer, results have generally demonstrated a relationship between higher 25(OH)D and lower risk for progression and mortality. In contrast, randomized, double-blind clinical trials conducted to date have generally failed to support these findings. For prostate cancer, there is no convincing evidence of an association between 25(OH)D and incidence, and inconsistent data for progression and mortality, though results of one open label clinical trial suggest that supplementation with 4000 IU/d of vitamin D3 may inhibit progression of the disease. Nonetheless, until the results of additional ongoing randomized, double-blind clinical trials are reported, it will be difficult to ascertain if vitamin D itself is related to a reduction in risk for some cancer endpoints, or whether high concentrations of the vitamin D biomarker 25(OH)D may instead serve as a marker for an overall beneficial risk factor profile. PMID:26918035

  2. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  3. Atrazine and Breast Cancer: A Framework Assessment of the Toxicological and Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, James W.; Swenberg, James A.; Weiss, Noel; Brusick, David; Eldridge, J. Charles; Stevens, James T.; Handa, Robert J.; Hovey, Russell C.; Plant, Tony M.; Pastoor, Timothy P.; Breckenridge, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    The causal relationship between atrazine exposure and the occurrence of breast cancer in women was evaluated using the framework developed by Adami et al. (2011) wherein biological plausibility and epidemiological evidence were combined to conclude that a causal relationship between atrazine exposure and breast cancer is “unlikely”. Carcinogenicity studies in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) but not Fischer-344 rats indicate that high doses of atrazine caused a decreased latency and an increased incidence of combined adenocarcinoma and fibroadenoma mammary tumors. There were no effects of atrazine on any other tumor type in male or female SD or Fischer-344 rats or in three strains of mice. Seven key events that precede tumor expression in female SD rats were identified. Atrazine induces mammary tumors in aging female SD rats by suppressing the luteinizing hormone surge, thereby supporting a state of persistent estrus and prolonged exposure to endogenous estrogen and prolactin. This endocrine mode of action has low biological plausibility for women because women who undergo reproductive senescence have low rather than elevated levels of estrogen and prolactin. Four alternative modes of action (genotoxicity, estrogenicity, upregulation of aromatase gene expression or delayed mammary gland development) were considered and none could account for the tumor response in SD rats. Epidemiological studies provide no support for a causal relationship between atrazine exposure and breast cancer. This conclusion is consistent with International Agency for Research on Cancer’s classification of atrazine as “unclassifiable as to carcinogenicity” and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's classification of atrazine as “not likely to be carcinogenic.” PMID:21768606

  4. Risk of Cancer in relation to Natural Radiation, including Radon: Evidence from Epidemiological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baysson, Helene; Tirmarche, Margot; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-08-07

    A review of recently published epidemiological studies on populations exposed to natural background ionizing radiation is proposed. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of epidemiological studies as well as the uncertainty linked to multiple exposures are discussed. As radon is the greatest source of natural radiation, particular attention is given to quantification of risk obtained through cohort studies of uranium miners and after joint analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon.

  5. Risk of Cancer in relation to Natural Radiation, including Radon: Evidence from Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysson, Hélène; Tirmarche, Margot; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-08-01

    A review of recently published epidemiological studies on populations exposed to natural background ionizing radiation is proposed. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of epidemiological studies as well as the uncertainty linked to multiple exposures are discussed. As radon is the greatest source of natural radiation, particular attention is given to quantification of risk obtained through cohort studies of uranium miners and after joint analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon.

  6. Consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces risk of pancreatic cancer: evidence from epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Wu, Lang; Zheng, Li-Qiang; Xu, Xin; Ji, Chao; Gong, Ting-Ting

    2016-05-01

    Observational studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. We carried out a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to summarize available evidence. We searched PubMed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science databases for relevant studies published until the end of January 2015. Fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A total of 15 case-control studies, eight prospective studies, and one pooled analysis fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The summary RR for the highest versus the lowest intake was 0.73 (95% CI=0.53-1.00) for fruit and vegetables, 0.73 (95% CI=0.63-0.84) for fruit, and 0.76 (95% CI=0.69-0.83) for vegetables, with significant heterogeneities (I=70.5, 55.7, and 43.0%, respectively). Inverse associations were observed in the stratified analysis by study design, although the results of prospective studies showed borderline significance, with corresponding RR=0.90 (95% CI=0.77-1.05) for fruit and vegetable intake, 0.93 (95% CI=0.83-1.03) for fruit intake, and 0.89 (95% CI=0.80-1.00) for vegetable intake. Besides, significant inverse associations were observed in the majority of other subgroup analyses by study quality, geographic location, exposure assessment method, and adjustment for potential confounders. Findings from the present meta-analysis support that fruit and vegetable intake is associated inversely with the risk of pancreatic cancer. However, study design may play a key role in the observed magnitude of the aforementioned association. Future well-designed prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:26075658

  7. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  8. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. PMID:24704294

  9. Dietary fat and fatty acid intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: evidence from epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Hou, Rui; Wu, Qi-Jun; Gong, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Luo

    2015-12-15

    The associations between dietary fat and fatty acid (FA) intakes and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk have been inconsistent in previous studies. We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to evaluate these associations. We identified relevant studies by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases. We used random-effects models to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, the search yielded 20 studies (1 pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies, 5 cohorts, and 14 case-control studies). The summary RR for EOC for the highest versus lowest categories of total dietary fat intake was 1.12 (95%CI= 0.95-1.33; I2 = 77.4%; n = 14). The RRs were not significant when fats were divided into plant-based fats (RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.77-1.13; n = 6), animal-based fats (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.95-1.39; n = 8), dairy-based fats (RR = 1.02, 95%CI = 0.88-1.18; n = 3), saturated FAs (RR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.93-1.17; n = 12), monounsaturated FAs (RR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.84-1.13; n = 10), polyunsaturated FAs (RR = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.81-1.12; n = 10), and trans-unsaturated FAs (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.98-1.36; n = 3). Similar non-significant results were also observed in most of the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The findings of this meta-analysis suggest a lack of evidence for associations between dietary fat and FA intakes and EOC risk. Further analyses should be conducted to assess the associations with other types of fat, and the results should be stratified by tumor invasiveness and EOC histology. PMID:26515595

  10. Dietary fat and fatty acid intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: evidence from epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Rui; Wu, Qi-Jun; Gong, Ting-Ting; Jiang, Luo

    2015-01-01

    The associations between dietary fat and fatty acid (FA) intakes and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk have been inconsistent in previous studies. We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to evaluate these associations. We identified relevant studies by searching PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases. We used random-effects models to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, the search yielded 20 studies (1 pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies, 5 cohorts, and 14 case-control studies). The summary RR for EOC for the highest versus lowest categories of total dietary fat intake was 1.12 (95%CI= 0.95–1.33; I2 = 77.4%; n = 14). The RRs were not significant when fats were divided into plant-based fats (RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.77–1.13; n = 6), animal-based fats (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.95–1.39; n = 8), dairy-based fats (RR = 1.02, 95%CI = 0.88–1.18; n = 3), saturated FAs (RR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.93–1.17; n = 12), monounsaturated FAs (RR = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.84–1.13; n = 10), polyunsaturated FAs (RR = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.81–1.12; n = 10), and trans-unsaturated FAs (RR = 1.15, 95%CI = 0.98–1.36; n = 3). Similar non-significant results were also observed in most of the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The findings of this meta-analysis suggest a lack of evidence for associations between dietary fat and FA intakes and EOC risk. Further analyses should be conducted to assess the associations with other types of fat, and the results should be stratified by tumor invasiveness and EOC histology. PMID:26515595

  11. Cancer Epidemiology Cohorts

    Cancer.gov

    Cohort studies are fundamental for epidemiological research by helping researchers better understand the etiology of cancer and provide insights into the key determinants of this disease and its outcomes.

  12. Lung cancer risk and talc not containing asbestiform fibres: a review of the epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wild, P

    2006-01-01

    A literature search was done and all epidemiological cancer studies mentioning talc as a risk factor were selected. The talc exposed populations were divided into three groups: (1) populations in which no other occupational carcinogen was mentioned (only talc millers satisfied this criterion); (2) populations of talc miners exposed to talc, quartz, and/or radon; and (3) other industrial populations in which talc is associated with quartz, nitrosamines, and asbestos depending on the study. No excess lung cancer mortality was found for the populations of talc millers exposed to high levels of talc but without any other potential carcinogen (SMR = 0.92, 42 cases) while the summary of mortality of talc miners exposed to quartz and/or radon was in excess (fixed effect SMR = 1.20, random effect RR = 1.85, 40 cases). Six studies in other industrial settings were identified. All reported increased lung cancer mortality among talc exposed workers but the talc exposure was confounded with other carcinogens and only one study was able to adjust on them. In conclusion, no increased lung cancer mortality was observed among talc millers despite their high exposure experience. In populations in which talc was associated with other potential carcinogens, some lung cancer excesses were observed. PMID:16361399

  13. New Exposure Biomarkers as Tools for Breast Cancer Epidemiology, Biomonitoring, and Prevention: A Systematic Approach Based on Animal Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Janet M.; Attfield, Kathleen R.; Brody, Julia Green

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to chemicals that cause rodent mammary gland tumors is common, but few studies have evaluated potential breast cancer risks of these chemicals in humans. Objective: The goal of this review was to identify and bring together the needed tools to facilitate the measurement of biomarkers of exposure to potential breast carcinogens in breast cancer studies and biomonitoring. Methods: We conducted a structured literature search to identify measurement methods for exposure biomarkers for 102 chemicals that cause rodent mammary tumors. To evaluate concordance, we compared human and animal evidence for agents identified as plausibly linked to breast cancer in major reviews. To facilitate future application of exposure biomarkers, we compiled information about relevant cohort studies. Results: Exposure biomarkers have been developed for nearly three-quarters of these rodent mammary carcinogens. Analytical methods have been published for 73 of the chemicals. Some of the remaining chemicals could be measured using modified versions of existing methods for related chemicals. In humans, biomarkers of exposure have been measured for 62 chemicals, and for 45 in a nonoccupationally exposed population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has measured 23 in the U.S. population. Seventy-five of the rodent mammary carcinogens fall into 17 groups, based on exposure potential, carcinogenicity, and structural similarity. Carcinogenicity in humans and rodents is generally consistent, although comparisons are limited because few agents have been studied in humans. We identified 44 cohort studies, with a total of > 3.5 million women enrolled, that have recorded breast cancer incidence and stored biological samples. Conclusions: Exposure measurement methods and cohort study resources are available to expand biomonitoring and epidemiology related to breast cancer etiology and prevention. Citation: Rudel RA, Ackerman JM, Attfield KR, Brody JG. 2014. New exposure

  14. Processed meat and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L.; Pierre, Fabrice; Corpet, Denis E.

    2008-01-01

    Processed meat intake may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. The epidemiologic studies published to date conclude that the excess risk in the highest category of processed meat-eaters is comprised between 20 and 50% compared with non-eaters. In addition, the excess risk per gram of intake is clearly higher than that of fresh red meat. Several hypotheses, which are mainly based on studies carried out on red meat, may explain why processed meat intake is linked to cancer risk. Those that have been tested experimentally are (i) that high-fat diets could promote carcinogenesis via insulin resistance or fecal bile acids; (ii) that cooking meat at a high temperature forms carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (iii) that carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds are formed in meat and endogenously; (iv) that heme iron in red meat can promote carcinogenesis because it increases cell proliferation in the mucosa, through lipoperoxidation and/or cytotoxicity of fecal water. Nitrosation might increase the toxicity of heme in cured products. Solving this puzzle is a challenge that would permit to reduce cancer load by changing the processes rather than by banning processed meat. PMID:18444144

  15. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  16. Risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer--the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A M

    2000-03-01

    The risk of low-dose radiation exposures has--for a variety of reasons--been highly politicised. This has led to a frequently exaggerated perception of the potential health effects, and to lasting public controversies. A balanced view requires a critical reassessment of the epidemiological basis of current assumptions. There is reliable quantitative information available on the increase of cancer rates due to moderate and high doses. This provides a firm basis for the derivation of probabilities of causation, e.g. after high radiation exposures. For small doses or dose rates, the situation is entirely different: potential increases of cancer rates remain hidden below the statistical fluctuations of normal rates, and the molecular mechanisms of cancerogenesis are not sufficiently well known to allow numerical predictions. Risk coefficients for radiation protection must, therefore, be based on the uncertain extrapolation of observations obtained at moderate or high doses. While extrapolation is arbitrary, it is, nevertheless, used and mostly with the conservative assumption of a linear dose dependence with no threshold (LNT model). All risk estimates are based on this hypothesis. They are, thus, virtual guidelines, rather than firm numbers. The observations on the A-bomb survivors are still the major source of information on the health effects of comparatively small radiation doses. A fairly direct inspection of the data shows that the solid cancer mortality data of the A-bomb survivors are equally consistent with linearity in dose and with reduced effectiveness at low doses. In the leukemia data a reduction is strongly indicated. With one notable exception -- leukemia after prenatal exposure--these observations are in line with a multitude of observations in groups of persons exposed for medical reasons. The low-dose effects of densely ionizing radiations--such as alpha-particles from radon decay products or high-energy neutrons--are a separate important issue. For

  17. Trichloroethylene and Cancer: Systematic and Quantitative Review of Epidemiologic Evidence for Identifying Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Jinot, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis focusing on studies with high potential for trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure to provide quantitative evaluations of the evidence for associations between TCE exposure and kidney, liver, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancers. A systematic review documenting essential design features, exposure assessment approaches, statistical analyses, and potential sources of confounding and bias identified twenty-four cohort and case-control studies on TCE and the three cancers of interest with high potential for exposure, including five recently published case-control studies of kidney cancer or NHL. Fixed- and random-effects models were fitted to the data on overall exposure and on the highest exposure group. Sensitivity analyses examined the influence of individual studies and of alternative risk estimate selections. For overall TCE exposure and kidney cancer, the summary relative risk (RRm) estimate from the random effects model was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.43), with a higher RRm for the highest exposure groups (1.58, 95% CI: 1.28, 1.96). The RRm estimates were not overly sensitive to alternative risk estimate selections or to removal of an individual study. There was no apparent heterogeneity or publication bias. For NHL, RRm estimates for overall exposure and for the highest exposure group, respectively, were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.42) and 1.43 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.82) and, for liver cancer, 1.29 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.56) and 1.28 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.77). Our findings provide strong support for a causal association between TCE exposure and kidney cancer. The support is strong but less robust for NHL, where issues of study heterogeneity, potential publication bias, and weaker exposure-response results contribute uncertainty, and more limited for liver cancer, where only cohort studies with small numbers of cases were available. PMID:22163205

  18. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  19. Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence in the 1900s relating smoking to lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking is a known lung cancer cause, but no detailed quantitative systematic review exists. We summarize evidence for various indices. Methods Papers published before 2000 describing epidemiological studies involving 100+ lung cancer cases were obtained from Medline and other sources. Studies were classified as principal, or subsidiary where cases overlapped with principal studies. Data were extracted on design, exposures, histological types and confounder adjustment. RRs/ORs and 95% CIs were extracted for ever, current and ex smoking of cigarettes, pipes and cigars and indices of cigarette type and dose–response. Meta-analyses and meta-regressions investigated how relationships varied by study and RR characteristics, mainly for outcomes exactly or closely equivalent to all lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma (“squamous”) and adenocarcinoma (“adeno”). Results 287 studies (20 subsidiary) were identified. Although RR estimates were markedly heterogeneous, the meta-analyses demonstrated a relationship of smoking with lung cancer risk, clearly seen for ever smoking (random-effects RR 5.50, CI 5.07-5.96) current smoking (8.43, 7.63-9.31), ex smoking (4.30, 3.93-4.71) and pipe/cigar only smoking (2.92, 2.38-3.57). It was stronger for squamous (current smoking RR 16.91, 13.14-21.76) than adeno (4.21, 3.32-5.34), and evident in both sexes (RRs somewhat higher in males), all continents (RRs highest for North America and lowest for Asia, particularly China), and both study types (RRs higher for prospective studies). Relationships were somewhat stronger in later starting and larger studies. RR estimates were similar in cigarette only and mixed smokers, and similar in smokers of pipes/cigars only, pipes only and cigars only. Exceptionally no increase in adeno risk was seen for pipe/cigar only smokers (0.93, 0.62-1.40). RRs were unrelated to mentholation, and higher for non-filter and handrolled cigarettes. RRs increased with amount smoked, duration

  20. Epidemiology of cancer in children

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.S.; Shuster, J.L. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The epidemiologic features of cancers among children have stimulated abundant descriptive and analytic investigation. The descriptive work has demonstrated consistent differences in the incidence rates of these cancers by anatomic site, age, race, and gender. It is clear that the various forms of cancer during childhood have distinctive patterns of occurrence. To a large extent, the characteristic population distributions of these diseases may represent differences in the underlying etiologic processes. Analytic studies of cancer during childhood have addressed possible genetic and environmental risk factors for these diseases. The demonstration of cancers induced by transplacental exposure to diethylstilbestrol has confirmed the speculation that the prenatal environment may influence subsequent carcinogenesis. Although possible leukemogenic effects of intrauterine diagnostic irradiation remain controversial, the issue may become unimportant clinically as prenatal irradiation is replaced by other diagnostic modalities (194). To date, studies of prenatal ultrasound have provided no evidence of an overall excess of subsequent malignancies. Postnatal exposure to high doses of irradiation is known to produce considerable excesses of leukemias and other cancers. At present, there are insufficient data available to reach a firm conclusion on the possible carcinogenic effects of exposure during childhood to low doses of irradiation, fringe magnetic fields, or chemicals.

  1. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Selikoff, I J

    1974-12-01

    Some 99,000 new cases of cancer of the colon are expected next year, an incidence rate higher than that for both cancer of the lung and cancer of the breast. Evidence from geographic pathology suggests that some environmental factors play a strong role in its etiology. Data obtained in the 1959 survey of one million people by the American Cancer Society and followed since, has failed to show correlation with any of the large number of factors listed. It is suggested that the etiology is one of multiple factors. The synergistic effect of exposure to asbestos and cigarette smoking in the production of bronchogenic carcinoma is demonstrated by data on cohorts of insulation workers. There was also a modest increase in the number of deaths from gastrointestinal cancer in asbestos workers, but smoking did not seem to act in synergistic fashion at that site, except perhaps in the esophagus. Deaths from cancer occurred almost entirely after a period of 20 years or more from initial exposure. The death rate from cancer tended to increase with duration of exposure, but a distinct rise over the expected was seen in those who had been exposed less than one year to amosite dust. PMID:4470947

  2. Epidemiologic evidence of slow growing, nonprogressive or regressive breast cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Segnan, Nereo; Minozzi, Silvia; Armaroli, Paola; Cinquini, Michela; Bellisario, Cristina; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Gianola, Silvia; Ponti, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The general aim of this systematic review is to mitigate breast cancer (BC) overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The specific aim is to summarize available data on the occurrence and features of indolent invasive or in situ (DCIS) BC, and precisely survival of untreated cases, prevalence of occult cancers found in autopsies, frequency of regressive BC. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were systematically searched up to 3/31/2014. Eligibility criteria were: cohort studies, case-control studies, uncontrolled case series assessing survival in women with a diagnosis of BC who did not receive treatment compared to treated women; case series of autopsies estimating the prevalence of undiagnosed BC; cohort studies, case-control studies, uncontrolled case series, case reports assessing the occurrence of spontaneous regression of BC in women with a confirmed histology diagnosis. Untreated BC: 8 cohort studies and 12 case series (3593 BC) were included. In three controlled cohort studies (diagnoses 1978-2006), the 5-years overall survival was 19-43%. Occult BC: 8 case series (2279 autopsies) were included. The prevalence of invasive BC undiagnosed during lifetime range was 0-1.5%, while for DCIS the range was 0.2-14.7%. Spontaneous regression: 2 cohort studies, 3 case reports, 1 case series included. In the cohort studies the relative risk of regression for screen detected compared with nonscreened BC was estimated as 1.2 and 1.1. It seems plausible that around 10% of invasive BC are not symptomatic during life, and that one fith of BC patients if untreated would be alive after 5 years. Around 1 of 10 screen-detected BC may regress according two studies. PMID:27004723

  3. Sample Cancer Epidemiology Grant Applications

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute frequently receives questions from investigators for examples of successfully funded grant applications. Several investigators agreed to let the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program post excerpts of their grant applications online.

  4. Genomic Resources for Cancer Epidemiology

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides links to research resources, complied by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, that may be of interest to genetic epidemiologists conducting cancer research, but is not exhaustive.

  5. [Epidemiologic factors in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Curie, P; Sussmann, M; Treisser, A; Renaud, R

    1985-05-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most severe gynecological cancer with an overall incidence of 12 per 1000 Americans or Europeans developing it over 40 years of age. Only 3 of the 12 cases will receive efficient care because the diagnosis will be made too late. This study reveals the principal risk factors i.e. upper socioeconomic echelon, ovarian function uninterrupted by a pregnancy or usage of oral contraceptives, anamnestic evidence of ovarian carcinoma in the family, some hereditary disorders, external insults (talcum powder). The synthesis of these various risk factors permits a comprehensive review of the hypotheses of pathogenesis concerning recurrence of tumors. But corollary epidemiologic studies are still needed to try to define better the high risk groups whose follow-up systematic detection and testing is a priority. PMID:4023542

  6. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  7. Arsenic in drinking water and urinary tract cancers: a systematic review of 30 years of epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arsenic in drinking water is a public health issue affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This review summarizes 30 years of epidemiological studies on arsenic exposure in drinking water and the risk of bladder or kidney cancer, quantifying these risks using a meta-analytical framework. Methods Forty studies met the selection criteria. Seventeen provided point estimates of arsenic concentrations in drinking water and were used in a meta-analysis of bladder cancer incidence (7 studies) and mortality (10 studies) and kidney cancer mortality (2 studies). Risk estimates for incidence and mortality were analyzed separately using Generalized Linear Models. Predicted risks for bladder cancer incidence were estimated at 10, 50 and 150 μg/L arsenic in drinking water. Bootstrap randomizations were used to assess robustness of effect size. Results Twenty-eight studies observed an association between arsenic in drinking water and bladder cancer. Ten studies showed an association with kidney cancer, although of lower magnitude than that for bladder cancer. The meta-analyses showed the predicted risks for bladder cancer incidence were 2.7 [1.2–4.1]; 4.2 [2.1–6.3] and; 5.8 [2.9–8.7] for drinking water arsenic levels of 10, 50, and 150 μg/L, respectively. Bootstrapped randomizations confirmed this increased risk, but, lowering the effect size to 1.4 [0.35–4.0], 2.3 [0.59–6.4], and 3.1 [0.80–8.9]. The latter suggests that with exposures to 50 μg/L, there was an 83% probability for elevated incidence of bladder cancer; and a 74% probability for elevated mortality. For both bladder and kidney cancers, mortality rates at 150 ug/L were about 30% greater than those at 10 μg/L. Conclusion Arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk of bladder and kidney cancers, although at lower levels (<150 μg/L), there is uncertainty due to the increased likelihood of exposure misclassification at the lower end of the exposure curve. Meta

  8. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  9. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  10. [Epidemiology of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Launoy, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer increased in France until the 2000s' then decreased. Time trends in incidence for this cancer varied according to its sublocation along the gut. Incidence increased for right and left colon cancers, whereas it remained stable for sigmoid cancers in males and decreased in females. Incidence decreased over time for rectal cancers. The proportion of colorectal cancer in the overall French cancer prevalence is 12%. In 2008, 121,000 patients had a colorectal cancer diagnosed in the 5 previous years. The cumulative risk of colorectal cancer increased from 3.9% for males born around 1900 to 4.9% for those born around 1930 and then slightly decreased, being 4.5% among those born around 1950. It remained at the same level for females and was 2.9% for those born around 1950. The prognosis of colorectal cancer improved over time. Net 5-year survival increased in males from 53% for cancers diagnosed between 1989 and 1991 to 58% for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2004. The highest improvement of 10 year survival rates concerned left colon and rectosigmoid junction (+19% in a decade). The progressive set up of national colorectal screening since the early 2000's and the introduction of recent immunological tests in 2015 should decrease the mortality for this cancer and, at term, should decrease its incidence too. PMID:26298897

  11. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2013 Archive

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  12. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2015 Archive

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  13. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2012 Archive

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  14. Cancer Epidemiology Matters Blog - 2014 Archive

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Epidemiology Matters blog helps foster a dialogue between the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), extramural researchers, and other individuals, such as clinicians, community partners, and advocates, who are interested in cancer epidemiology and genomics.

  15. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  16. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Leon, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a important public health problem: there are nearly one million new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide each year and half a million deaths. Recent reports show that, in the US, it was the most frequent form of cancer among persons aged 75 years and older. Given that the majority of cancers occur in elder people and with the ageing of the population in mind, this observation gives further impetus to investigating prevention and treatment strategies among this subgroup of the population. Screening research, recommendations and implementation is an obvious priority. While there are many questions to be resolved, it is apparent that many facets of colorectal cancer are becoming increasingly understood and prospects for prevention are becoming apparent. Achieving colorectal cancer control is the immediate challenge. PMID:12421722

  17. Some aspects of cancer epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Lilienfeld, A.M.

    1982-03-01

    Epidemiolgic studies have strongly suggested that a vast majority (80-90%) of cancers are caused by radiation, chemical and biologic agents; the remainder result from endogenous or genetic factors. Biologically, cancer is most probably the end result of a complex multistage process and therefore may be due to a sequence of exposures to different agents at each of these stages. This emphasizes the need to stress the study of interactions in epidemiologic studies to a greater extent than has been done thus far. Examples of the importance of interactions in several types of cancer are presented.

  18. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  19. Epidemiologic evidence relevant to radar (microwave) effects.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, J R

    1997-01-01

    Public and occupational exposures to microwave (RF) are of two main types. The first type of exposures are those connected with military and industrial uses and, to some extent broadcast exposures. It is this type that most of the data cited in this study draw upon. The second type, cellular telephones and their associated broadcast requirements, have raised concerns about current exposures because of their increasingly widespread use. Four types of effects were originally reported in multiple studies: increased spontaneous abortion, shifts in red and white blood cell counts, increased somatic mutation rates in lymphocytes, and increased childhood, testicular, and other cancers. In addition, there is evidence of generalized increased disability rates from a variety of causes in one study and symptoms of sensitivity reactions and lenticular opacity in at least one other. These findings suggest that RF exposures are potentially carcinogenic and have other health effects. Therefore, prudent avoidance of unneeded exposures is recommended as a precautionary measure. Epidemiologic studies of occupational groups such as military users and air traffic controllers should have high priority because their exposures can be reasonably well characterized and the effects reported are suitable for epidemiologic monitoring. Additional community studies are needed. PMID:9467086

  20. Epidemiologic evidence relevant to radar (microwave) effects.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J R

    1997-12-01

    Public and occupational exposures to microwave (RF) are of two main types. The first type of exposures are those connected with military and industrial uses and, to some extent broadcast exposures. It is this type that most of the data cited in this study draw upon. The second type, cellular telephones and their associated broadcast requirements, have raised concerns about current exposures because of their increasingly widespread use. Four types of effects were originally reported in multiple studies: increased spontaneous abortion, shifts in red and white blood cell counts, increased somatic mutation rates in lymphocytes, and increased childhood, testicular, and other cancers. In addition, there is evidence of generalized increased disability rates from a variety of causes in one study and symptoms of sensitivity reactions and lenticular opacity in at least one other. These findings suggest that RF exposures are potentially carcinogenic and have other health effects. Therefore, prudent avoidance of unneeded exposures is recommended as a precautionary measure. Epidemiologic studies of occupational groups such as military users and air traffic controllers should have high priority because their exposures can be reasonably well characterized and the effects reported are suitable for epidemiologic monitoring. Additional community studies are needed. PMID:9467086

  1. Etiology of breast cancer. II. Epidemiologic aspects *

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The epidemiology of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on its etiology. A number of studies suggest that differences in breast cancer incidence are associated with differences in marital status, number of pregnancies, age at menarche, age at menopause, height and weight, socioeconomic status, geographic location and residence. However, in no case is the evidence adequate to establish a “cause and effect” relationship. The genetic component of these associations may be of primary importance, while other conditions such as marital status are probably indirect reflections of the operation of more fundamental factors. There is a general consensus that endocrine factors play an important part in mammary cancer occurrence. At present, the association between breast cancer and the presence of the virus-like (type B) particles in human milk is not established. PMID:4353980

  2. Gene-Environment Research and Cancer Epidemiology

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program supports extramural research that investigates both genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancer and/or impact cancer outcomes.

  3. Epidemiology of oral cancer in Arab countries

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jaber, Abeer; Al-Nasser, Lubna; El-Metwally, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the oral cancer (OC) studies that were conducted in Arab countries with regard to epidemiology, risk factors, and prognosis. Methods: A computer-based PubMed literature search was performed to retrieve studies conducted in the Arab world on epidemiology of OC. After screening for exclusion criteria, cross-referencing, and searching local journals, a total of 19 articles were included. Results: Eight prevalence studies found an OC prevalence ranging from 1.8 to 2.13 per 100,000 persons. Oral cancer patients were mostly in their fifth to sixth decade of life, and the incidence in younger age was reported in some Arab countries. Yemenis have an alarming high prevalence of OC among people younger than 45 years. Eleven studies explored determinants or prognosis of OC. Behavioral determinants such as smokeless tobacco (Shamma and Qat), and cigarette smoking were strongly associated with OC. Alcohol drinking and solar radiation exposures were cited as possible risk factors. The most affected sites were tongue, floor of the mouth, and lower lip variations in the affected site were attributed to the socio-cultural behavior of the populations under study. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most frequently detected cancer, and usually patients were in late stages (III and IV) at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion: No solid evidence exists regarding the true OC prevalence/incidence in most Arab countries due to the lack of national cancer registries and population-based studies. PMID:26905345

  4. Body fatness, related biomarkers and cancer risk: an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Pischon, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Higher body fatness is not only associated with a higher risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease but also with certain types of cancer. The scope of this review is to summarize the epidemiological evidence for an association between body fatness and specific types of cancer and to outline the mediating role of obesity-related biomarkers in this context. Epidemiological studies have gathered convincing evidence that greater body fatness is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal adenocarcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and pancreatic cancer. Further, evidence for an association between higher body fatness and higher risk of ovarian cancer, advanced prostate cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma is growing. Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal cancer beyond general obesity, whereas an independent role is less clear for other obesity-related cancer types. Epidemiological biomarker studies have shown that the positive association between body fatness and risk of cancer may be partly explained by hyperinsulinemia and altered concentrations in adipokines and sex-steroid hormones. In addition, obesity-associated low-grade inflammation plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. While epidemiology has contributed substantially to the understanding of the role of higher body fatness and related metabolic alterations in the development of cancer, further epidemiological biomarker studies are necessary to elucidate the complex interrelations between mediating pathways as well as to study novel pathways. Knowledge resulting from this research may help identify an obesity phenotype that is particularly strongly associated with cancer risk and thus pave the way for targeted prevention of cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:25781710

  5. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer: epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Brody, Julia Green; Moysich, Kirsten B; Humblet, Olivier; Attfield, Kathleen R; Beehler, Gregory P; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2007-06-15

    Laboratory research has shown that numerous environmental pollutants cause mammary gland tumors in animals; are hormonally active, specifically mimicking estrogen, which is a breast cancer risk factor; or affect susceptibility of the mammary gland to carcinogenesis. An assessment of epidemiologic research on these pollutants identified in toxicologic studies can guide future research and exposure reduction aimed at prevention. The PubMed database was searched for relevant literature and systematic critical reviews were entered in a database available at URL: www.silentspring.org/sciencereview and URL: www.komen.org/environment (accessed April 10, 2007). Based on a relatively small number of studies, the evidence to date generally supports an association between breast cancer and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in conjunction with certain genetic polymorphisms involved in carcinogen activation and steroid hormone metabolism. Evidence regarding dioxins and organic solvents is sparse and methodologically limited but suggestive of an association. Methodologic problems include inadequate exposure assessment, a lack of access to highly exposed and unexposed populations, and a lack of preclinical markers to identify associations that may be obscured by disease latency. Among chemicals identified in toxicologic research as relevant to breast cancer, many have not been investigated in humans. The development of better exposure assessment methods is needed to fill this gap. In the interim, weaknesses in the epidemiologic literature argue for greater reliance on toxicologic studies to develop national policies to reduce chemical exposures that may be associated with breast cancer. Substantial research progress in the last 5 years suggests that the investigation of environmental pollutants will lead to strategies to reduce breast cancer risk. PMID:17503436

  6. Gallbladder cancer: epidemiology and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hundal, Rajveer; Shaffer, Eldon A

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer, though generally considered rare, is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80%–95% of biliary tract cancers. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis, often proving fatal. Its carcinogenesis follows a progression through a metaplasia–dysplasia–carcinoma sequence. This comprehensive review focuses on and explores the risks, management, and outcomes for primary gallbladder carcinoma. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities – inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Age, female sex, congenital biliary tract anomalies, and a genetic predisposition represent important risk factors that are immutable. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Mortality rates closely follow incidence; those countries with the highest prevalence of gallstones experience the greatest mortality from gallbladder cancer. Vague symptoms often delay the diagnosis of gallbladder cancer, contributing to its overall progression and poor outcome. Surgery represents the only potential for cure. Some individuals are fortunate to be incidentally found to have gallbladder cancer at the time of cholecystectomy being performed for cholelithiasis. Such an early diagnosis is imperative as a late presentation connotes advanced staging, nodal involvement, and possible recurrence following attempted resection. Overall mean survival is a mere 6 months, while 5-year survival rate is only 5%. The dismal prognosis, in part, relates to the gallbladder lacking a serosal layer adjacent to the liver, enabling hepatic invasion and metastatic progression. Improved imaging modalities are helping to diagnose patients at an earlier

  7. The role of diet in cancer: the epidemiologic link.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Magdalena; Chajes, Veronique; Romieu, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Diet is an important modifiable risk factor for cancer. Adequate diet modification may play a key role in reducing the incidence of some cancers. A growing body of epidemiological evidence suggested links of some nutritional exposures with individual cancers. This review updates and summarises the existing data on diet related factors for cancer prevention, evaluated in 2007 by World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research and identifies the areas where more research is needed. Mechanisms of action of nutrients are discussed. For cancer prevention, more apparent association pertains to the role of foods from plant origin, processed meat products and alcohol. There is a lack of evidence to clarify the relationship of dairy and cereal products, different types of carbohydrates, micronutrients naturally found in foods vs supplements, industrial trans-fats, food preparation and handling techniques and dietary patterns and cancer, in order to implement safe cancer prevention strategies. PMID:27557384

  8. Environmental exposure measurement in cancer epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposures, used in the broadest sense of lifestyle, infections, radiation, natural and man-made chemicals and occupation, are a major cause of human cancer. However, the precise contribution of specific risk factors and their interaction, both with each other and with genotype, continues to be difficult to elucidate. This is partially due to limitations in accurately measuring exposure with the subsequent risk of misclassification. One of the primary challenges of molecular cancer epidemiology therefore is to improve exposure assessment. Progress has been made with biomarkers such as carcinogens and their metabolites, DNA and protein adducts and mutations measured in various tissues and body fluids. Nevertheless, much remains to be accomplished in order to establish aetiology and provide the evidence base for public health decisions. This review considers some of the principles behind the application of exposure biomarkers in cancer epidemiology. It also demonstrates how the same biomarkers can contribute both to establishing the biological plausibility of associations between exposure and disease and be valuable endpoints in intervention studies. The potential of new technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabonomics to provide a step change in environmental exposure assessment is discussed. An increasing recognition of the role of epigenetic changes in carcinogenesis presents a fresh challenge as alterations in DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA in response to environmental exposures demand a new generation of exposure biomarker. The overall importance of this area of research is brought into sharp relief by the large prospective cohort studies (e.g. UK Biobank) which need accurate exposure measurement in order to shed light on the complex gene:environment interactions underlying common chronic disorders including cancer. It is suggested that a concerted effort is now required, with appropriate funding, to develop and

  9. Landmarks in the history of cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Peter; Dunn, Barbara K

    2009-03-15

    The application of epidemiology to cancer prevention is relatively new, although observations of the potential causes of cancer have been reported for more than 2,000 years. Cancer was generally considered incurable until the late 19th century. Only with a refined understanding of the nature of cancer and strategies for cancer treatment could a systematic approach to cancer prevention emerge. The 20th century saw the elucidation of clues to cancer causation from observed associations with population exposures to tobacco, diet, environmental chemicals, and other exogenous factors. With repeated confirmation of such associations, researchers entertained for the first time the possibility that cancer, like many of the infectious diseases of the time, might be prevented. By the mid-20th century, with antibiotics successfully addressing the majority of infectious diseases and high blood pressure treatment beginning to affect the prevalence of heart disease in a favorable direction, the focus of much of epidemiology shifted to cancer. The early emphasis was on exploring, in greater depth, the environmental, dietary, hormonal, and other exogenous exposures for their potential associations with increased cancer risk. The first major breakthrough in identifying a modifiable cancer risk factor was the documentation of an association between tobacco smoking and lung cancer. During the past four decades, epidemiologic studies have generated population data identifying risk factors for cancers at almost every body site, with many cancers having multiple risk factors. The development of technologies to identify biological molecules has facilitated the incorporation of these molecular manifestations of biological variation into epidemiologic studies, as markers of exposure as well as putative surrogate markers of cancer outcome. This technological trend has, during the past two decades, culminated in emphasis on the identification of genetic variants and their products as

  10. The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J. |

    1993-05-01

    Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

  11. Recent developments in the epidemiology of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kabat, G.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and also the most common tumor worldwide. Changes in the distribution of histologic types over the past two decades in the United States, as well as high rates of lung cancer in certain subpopulations, require explanation. While cigarette smoking and specific occupational exposures are firmly established as important risk factors for lung cancer, recent work provides evidence that other factors may play a role either as independent risk factors or as modifiers of the effect of smoking. This paper reviews the epidemiology of lung cancer, with an emphasis on developments in the past decade. 79 refs.

  12. Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating FEV1 decline to lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reduced FEV1 is known to predict increased lung cancer risk, but previous reviews are limited. To quantify this relationship more precisely, and study heterogeneity, we derived estimates of β for the relationship RR(diff) = exp(βdiff), where diff is the reduction in FEV1 expressed as a percentage of predicted (FEV1%P) and RR(diff) the associated relative risk. We used results reported directly as β, and as grouped levels of RR in terms of FEV1%P and of associated measures (e.g. FEV1/FVC). Methods Papers describing cohort studies involving at least three years follow-up which recorded FEV1 at baseline and presented results relating lung cancer to FEV1 or associated measures were sought from Medline and other sources. Data were recorded on study design and quality and, for each data block identified, on details of the results, including population characteristics, adjustment factors, lung function measure, and analysis type. Regression estimates were converted to β estimates where appropriate. For results reported by grouped levels, we used the NHANES III dataset to estimate mean FEV1%P values for each level, regardless of the measure used, then derived β using regression analysis which accounted for non-independence of the RR estimates. Goodness-of-fit was tested by comparing observed and predicted lung cancer cases for each level. Inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis allowed derivation of overall β estimates and testing for heterogeneity by factors including sex, age, location, timing, duration, study quality, smoking adjustment, measure of FEV1 reported, and inverse-variance weight of β. Results Thirty-three publications satisfying the inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified, seven being rejected as not allowing estimation of β. The remaining 26 described 22 distinct studies, from which 32 independent β estimates were derived. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, and exp(β), the RR increase per one unit FEV1%P decrease, was estimated as 1

  13. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Cancer.gov

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  14. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  15. TCDD and cancer: A critical review of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Boffetta, Paolo; Mundt, Kenneth A; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Mandel, Jack S

    2011-01-01

    The authors reviewed the epidemiologic studies on exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and cancer risk, published since the last full-scale review made by the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs program in 1997. The update of a cohort of US herbicide producers generated negative results overall; the internal analysis provided evidence of an increased “all-cancer” risk in the highest exposure category, with a statistically significant exposure-response association in some of the many analyses performed.The update of a similar Dutch cohort did not confirm the previously observed association with TCDD exposure. The updated surveillance of the Seveso population provided evidence of increased all-cancer mortality 15-20 years after exposure among those living in the most contaminated area but might also reflect random variation, as overall excesses in the most recent follow-up were not observed. Corresponding data on cancer incidence offer little support to the mortality results. Updated results from cohort studies of Vietnam veterans potentially exposed to TCDD did not consistently suggest an increased risk of cancer. Results of additional, smaller studies of other occupational groups potentially exposed to TCDD, and of community-based case-control studies, did not provide consistent evidence of an increased cancer risk. In conclusion, recent epidemiological evidence falls far short of conclusively demonstrating a causal link between TCDD exposure and cancer risk in humans. The emphasis on results for overall cancer risk—rather than risk for specific neoplasms—is notjustified on epidemiologic grounds and is nota reason for ignoring the weaknesses of the available evidence. PMID:21718216

  16. Concurrency revisited: increasing and compelling epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Mah, Timothy L; Shelton, James D

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sexual partnerships must necessarily lie at the root of a sexually transmitted epidemic. However, that overlapping or concurrent partnerships have played a pivotal role in the generalized epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa has been challenged. Much of the original proposition that concurrent partnerships play such a role focused on modelling, self-reported sexual behaviour data and ethnographic data. While each of these has definite merit, each also has had methodological limitations. Actually, more recent cross-national sexual behaviour data and improved modelling have strengthened these lines of evidence. However, heretofore the epidemiologic evidence has not been systematically brought to bear. Though assessing the epidemiologic evidence regarding concurrency has its challenges, a careful examination, especially of those studies that have assessed HIV incidence, clearly indicates a key role for concurrency.Such evidence includes: 1) the early and dramatic rise of HIV infection in generalized epidemics that can only arise from transmission through rapid sequential acute infections and thereby concurrency; 2) clear evidence from incidence studies that a major portion of transmission in the population occurs via concurrency both for concordant negative and discordant couples; 3) elevation in risk associated with partner's multiple partnering; 4) declines in HIV associated with declines in concurrency; 5) bursts and clustering of incident infections that indicate concurrency and acute infection play a key role in the propagation of epidemics; and 6) a lack of other plausible explanations, including serial monogamy and non-sexual transmission. While other factors, such as sexually transmitted infections, other infectious diseases, biological factors and HIV sub-type, likely play a role in enhancing transmission, it appears most plausible that these would amplify the role of concurrency rather than alter it. Additionally, critics of concurrency have not proposed

  17. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  18. Beta blockers, norepinephrine, and cancer: an epidemiological viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) and its sister molecule epinephrine (EPI) (adrenaline) affect some types of cancer. Several recent epidemiological studies have shown that chronic use of beta blocking drugs (which antagonize NE/EPI receptors) results in lower recurrence, progression, or mortality of breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Preclinical studies have shown that manipulation of the levels or receptors of NE and EPI with drugs affects experimentally induced cancers. Psychological stress may play an etiological role in some cases of cancer (which has been shown epidemiologically), and this could be partly mediated by NE and EPI released by the sympathetic nervous system as part of the body's "fight or flight" response. A less well-appreciated phenomenon is that the genetic tone of NE/EPI may play a role in cancer. NE and EPI may affect cancer by interacting with molecular pathways already implicated in abnormal cellular replication, such as the P38/MAPK pathway, or via oxidative stress. NE/EPI-based drugs other than beta blockers also may prevent or treat various types of cancer, as may cholinesterase inhibitors that inhibit the sympathetic nervous system, which could be tested epidemiologically. PMID:22807646

  19. Epidemiological review of gastric cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Rajesh P; Mathur, Garima; Mhatre, Sharayu; Yeole, B B

    2011-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the one of the leading cause of cancer in southern region of India. Its incidence is decreasing worldwide yet on global scale stomach cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. Etiology of gastric cancer includes Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and lifestyle, tobacco, alcohol and genetic susceptibility. In this review, we tried to find the contribution of Indian scientist in understanding the descriptive and observational epidemiology of stomach cancer. PubMed was used as a search platform using key words such as "stomach cancer, treatment, clinical characteristics, stomach cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND". Most of the reported studies on gastric cancer from India are case report or case series and few are case-control studies. Indian studies on this topic are limited and have observed H. pylori infection, salted tea, pickled food, rice intake, spicy food, soda (additive of food), tobacco and alcohol as risk factors for gastric cancer. More research is required to understand the etiology, develop suitable screening test, to demarcate high-risk population and to develop and evaluate the effect of primary prevention programs. PMID:21731209

  20. [The epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in males and the fifth most frequent cancer in females. In developed countries only breast cancer is diagnosed more often in women. Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in males and females. In the Europe lung cancer accounts for 21% of all cancer cases in males and 29% of all cancer deaths. The rapid increase in lung cancer incidence was observed the since beginning of the XX century till 1990-1994. The incidence in males decreased recently, but still increases in females, especially in young women. The changes in frequency of various histological subtypes of lung cancer are observed too. Despite many clinical trials, modern diagnostic techniques and improved supportive care, the prognosis remains unfavourable and long-term survival almost did not change. In Poland the incidence of lung cancer in 2002 was 81.9/100 000 in males and 22.2/100 000 in females. In both genders 1-year and 5-year survivals time are one of the shortest in Europe. PMID:17541915

  1. Epidemiology of cancer of the penis.

    PubMed

    Persky, L

    1977-01-01

    World-wide incidences of penile cancer are reviewed and epidemiologic factors including ciecumcision, hygiene, phimosis, smegma, irritation, infection, veneral disease, viruses, environment, race, immune response, trauma, and age are discussed. The lowest rates appear in groups practicing infant circumcision and in areas where standards of sexual hygiene are high. PMID:325611

  2. Evaluation of endometrial cancer epidemiology in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Furtunescu, F; Dosius, M; Cîrstoiu, M; Radoi, V; Baroș, A; Bohîlțea, LC

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer represents the most frequent gynecological malignant affection in the developed countries, in which the incidence of cervical cancer has significantly decreased due to the rigorous application of screening methods and prophylaxis. According to its frequency, endometrial cancer is situated on the fourth place in the category of women’s genital-mammary malignant diseases, after breast, cervical and ovarian cancer in Romania. The incidence and mortality rates due to endometrial cancer have registered an increasing trend worldwide and also in Romania, a significant decrease of the age of appearance for the entire endometrial pathology sphere being noticed. At the national level, the maximum incidence is situated between 60 and 64 years old, the mortality rate of the women under 65 years old being high in Romania. The study evaluates endometrial cancer, from an epidemiologic point of view, at the national level compared to the international statistic data. PMID:25866582

  3. Evaluation of endometrial cancer epidemiology in Romania.

    PubMed

    Bohîlțea, R E; Furtunescu, F; Dosius, M; Cîrstoiu, M; Radoi, V; Baroș, A; Bohîlțea, L C

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer represents the most frequent gynecological malignant affection in the developed countries, in which the incidence of cervical cancer has significantly decreased due to the rigorous application of screening methods and prophylaxis. According to its frequency, endometrial cancer is situated on the fourth place in the category of women's genital-mammary malignant diseases, after breast, cervical and ovarian cancer in Romania. The incidence and mortality rates due to endometrial cancer have registered an increasing trend worldwide and also in Romania, a significant decrease of the age of appearance for the entire endometrial pathology sphere being noticed. At the national level, the maximum incidence is situated between 60 and 64 years old, the mortality rate of the women under 65 years old being high in Romania. The study evaluates endometrial cancer, from an epidemiologic point of view, at the national level compared to the international statistic data. PMID:25866582

  4. Epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors for renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; Lund, Lars; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2009-01-01

    Incidence rates of renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising in the United States and in most European countries for several decades. Family history is associated with a two- to four-fold increase in risk, but the major forms of inherited predisposition together account for less than 4% of renal cell cancers. Cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension are the most consistently established risk factors. Analgesics have not been convincingly linked with renal cell cancer risk. A reduced risk of renal cell cancer among statin users has been hypothesized but has not been adequately studied. A possible protective effect of fruit and vegetable consumption is the only moderately consistently reported dietary finding, and, with the exception of a positive association with parity, evidence for a role of hormonal or reproductive factors in the etiology of renal cell cancer in humans is limited. A recent hypothesis that moderate levels of alcohol consumption may be protective for renal cell cancer is not strongly supported by epidemiologic results, which are inconsistent with respect to the categories of alcohol consumption and the amount of alcohol intake reportedly associated with decreased risk. For occupational factors, the weight of the evidence does not provide consistent support for the hypotheses that renal cell cancer may be caused by asbestos, gasoline, or trichloroethylene exposure. The established determinants of renal cell cancer, cigarette smoking, obesity, and hypertension, account for less than half of these cancers. Novel epidemiologic approaches, including evaluation of gene–environment interactions and epigenetic mechanisms of inherited and acquired increased risk, are needed to explain the increasing incidence of renal cell cancer. PMID:20865085

  5. The Epidemiology of Cancer in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, C. Richard

    1967-01-01

    The principles of epidemiology are applicable to the study of the distribution and determinants of cancer in both human and animal populations. There are many examples of epidemiologic factors (host, environment, agent and time) related to cancer in animals. Certain host characteristics such as age, sex and breed are related to risk of developing cancer. Some environmental influences are illustrated by differences in the geographical distribution of certain types of animal cancer. Aggregations of cancer cases have been reported in herds, families and households. However, the usual distribution of cases in a population does not resemble epidemics typical of infectious diseases. Several factors (radiological, chemical, dietary, parasitic, mechanical, genetic and viral) have been identified as influences that affect the development of animal tumors. Animal species that have been domesticated live longer and consequently malignant disease develops in more of them. Cancer incidence rates now available from data compiled by an animal neoplasm registry in Alameda and Contra Costa counties, California, indicate that some of the frequent sites of cancer in man (skin, breast and the hemic and lymphatic systems) are among the most frequent sites in dogs and cats, man's closest animal associates. PMID:4865378

  6. Molecular epidemiology and cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, F.P.; Jeffrey, A.M.; Brandt-Rauf, P.W.; Brenner, D.; Mayer, J.L.; Smith, S.J.; Latriano, L.; Hemminki, K.; Santella, R.M. )

    1990-01-01

    A review of recent studies of biologic markers in populations with model exposures to carcinogens (cigarette smoke and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) illustrates their potential role in cancer prevention. Data on macromolecular adducts and oncogene activation from cross-sectional, serial sampling and case-control studies demonstrate the usefulness of biologic markers in signalling a potential carcinogenic risk and in estimating the magnitude of interindividual variation within exposed groups. Recommendations for future research include nested case-control studies to establish the relationship between markers of biologic dose and effect (e.g., adducts, gene mutation, oncogene activation) and cancer risk. 31 references.

  7. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Capote Negrin, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The basic aspects of the descriptive epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America are presented. A decrease in the incidence and mortality rates has been observed in the period from 2000 to 2012 in all countries across the region, this has not occurred at the same proportions, and in many countries, observed figures of incidence and mortality are among the highest levels in the world. In Latin America, calculating a mean measure of the numbers from the GLOBOCAN data from 2000 to 2012, we can observe a difference of up to fivefold of the incidence (Puerto Rico 9,73 Vs Bolivia 50,73) and almost seven times for mortality (Puerto Rico 3,3 Vs Nicaragua 21,67). A report of the epidemiology, risk factors, and evaluation of screening procedures regarding the possible impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine I in the prevention of cervical cancer is presented. PMID:26557875

  8. Epidemiology of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pytynia, Kristen B.; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is increasing in incidence in epidemic proportion. This site specific increase in incidence is due to an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related squamous cell carcinoma, while the incidence of tobacco related squamous cell carcinoma is decreasing. In particular, the incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increased among middle aged white men, and sexual behavior is a risk factor. HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma represents a growing etiologically distinct subset of head and neck cancers with unique epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics that differ from those of HPV-unassociated cancers. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of HPV-related OPSCC, the prevalence of oral/oropharyngeal HPV infection, and efforts aimed at reducing the incidence of HPV-related OPSCC. PMID:24461628

  9. Why does obesity promote cancer? Epidemiology, biology, and open questions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The association between obesity and/or metabolic syndrome and an elevated mortality from cancer has been confirmed by an astonishing number of studies across nations and ethnicities, such that obesity is now recognised to be among the most prominent cancer risk factors worldwide. Despite this overwhelming evidence and the societal impact of obesity, we know surprisingly little about the underlying molecular mechanisms. This knowledge gap is a major obstacle to the implementation of effective lifestyle change policies. As the scientific community is insecure on what messages it should deliver, administrators are uncertain as to what exactly to recommend, and consumers are confused about whom to believe. This leaves the field flooded with pseudo-scientific recommendations that are hard to eradicate. In this review, I will provide a summary of the existing epidemiological and mechanistic evidence on the relationship between systemic metabolism and cancer, highlighting debated issues and ongoing investigations. PMID:26284118

  10. The epidemiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wahi, P. N.

    1968-01-01

    Records of the Sarojini Naidu Medical College Hospital, Agra, India, suggested that there was a much higher endemicity of oral and oropharyngeal cancer in Mainpuri district, a rural area about 75 miles (120 km) from Agra City, than there was in Agra district itself. It was decided in 1963 to set up a complete cancer registry in Mainpuri district, based on the Sarojini Naidu Medical College and in association with the WHO International Reference Centre for the Histopathological Nomenclature and Classification of Oropharyngeal Tumours, which would, among other duties, undertake a study of the epidemiology by means of an intensive field-programme in the area. The epidemiological survey was carried out between March 1964 and September 1966. All factors considered to have any relevance to the disease were surveyed and particularly strong correlations were discovered between the prevalence of oral cancer and the use of local tobaccos (adulterated to a greater or lesser extent with various other materials), especially for chewing but also for smoking. There was also some correlation between prevalence of oral cancer and the use of certain alcoholic drinks. A number of other factors, most probably influencing or modifying the use of tobacco and alcohol, were found to be significant also. PMID:5302449

  11. Chapter 8. Tea and Cancer Prevention: Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian-Min; Sun, Canlan; Butler, Lesley M.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies have consistently shown the inhibitory activities of tea extracts on tumorigenesis in multiple model systems. Epidemiologic studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. A comprehensive review was conducted to assess the current knowledge on tea consumption and risk of cancers in humans. In general, consumption of black tea was not associated with lower risk of cancer. High intake of green tea was consistently associated with reduced risk of upper gastrointestinal tract cancers after sufficient control for confounders. Limited data support a protective effect of green tea on lung and hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Although observational studies do not support a beneficial role of tea intake on prostate cancer risk, phase II clinical trials have demonstrated an inhibitory effect of green tea extract against the progression of prostate pre-malignant lesions. Green tea may exert beneficial effects against mammary carcinogenesis in premenopausal women and recurrence of breast cancer. There is no sufficient evidence that supports a protective role of tea intake on the development of cancers of the colorectum, pancreas, urinary tract, glioma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Future prospective observational studies with biomarkers of exposure and phase III clinical trials are required to provide definitive evidence for the hypothesized beneficial effect of tea consumption on cancer formation in humans. PMID:21419224

  12. Advances in cancer epidemiology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideo

    2014-02-15

    Epidemiologists in Japan have been performing calculations to estimate nationwide cancer incidence rates as well as 5-year survival rates using population-based cancer registry data. There have been remarkable changes in cancer incidence and/or mortality in cancers of the lung, liver and stomach, which were thought to be attributed to the changing impact of exposure to cigarette smoking, chronic hepatitis C virus infection and Helicobacter pylori infection, respectively. In systematic reviews providing evidence in risk/protective factors for cancer sites using case-control and cohort studies of the Japanese population, there were associations between cancer sites (esophagus, stomach, colo-rectum, liver, pancreas, lung and breast) and various lifestyle factors. In the past 10 years, a hospital-based case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center provided valuable evidence of gene-environment interaction on the development of cancer [i.e., the effects of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) polymorphism and heavy alcohol drinking on esophageal cancer, ALDH2 polymorphism and smoking on lung cancer, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism and heavy alcohol drinking on pancreatic cancer]. The database with stored DNA was also used and identified seven loci containing significant but low-penetrance polymorphisms associated with the development of breast cancer. These findings together with established risk factors are likely to be useful to predict personalized breast cancer risk in East Asian women. In 2005, the Japan Multi-Institution Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) study was launched to elucidate gene-environment interactions as well as to confirm preclinical diagnostic biomarkers of cancer. J-MICC, which has recruited 92,000 healthy individuals by the end of 2012, will follow the individuals until 2025. PMID:24105756

  13. Alaska Native cancer epidemiology in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Cancer incidence and its possible relation to environmental contaminants, including radiation, continues to be a perceived health threat for the arctic-dwelling Alaska Native (Inupiat Eskimo) people despite the lack of a direct link to high-dose exposure. To better understand this concern, all known malignancies diagnosed in this population (n = 177) in three consecutive eight-year periods (1971-1994) were evaluated. The most recent average incidence rate (age-adjusted to world standard population) of 315 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval, CI = 248-382) represents a 33% surge (albeit non-significant) in Alaska Native cancer incidence over the initial period studied. The male rate 366 (95% CI = 266-466) for the same period exceeds the female rate 258 (95% CI = 169-347) by 42%. Two patterns of cancer incidence are seen at the village level. One, a 24 y upward trend found in the villages of Barrow, Point Hope and Kaktovik (combined rate of increase significant [P = 0.047]) associated with lung cancer; and the other, a stable trend over the past 16 y, associated with colon and rectal cancer. Lung cancer is the predominant cancer by site and is primarily a male disease. The recent male lung cancer incidence rate of 137 (95% CI = 73-201) exceeds the female rate by greater than five times. Total lung cancer cases are primarily confined to four villages where the incidence significantly (P = 0.0043) exceeds the remaining population. The major female cancers are colon/rectal and breast with cancer of the cervix virtually eliminated. Breast cancer is found primarily in two villages where its excess is significant (P = 0.025). Inupiat Eskimo cancer epidemiology is unique, differing from both the Alaska Native and other Circumpolar populations. At present, this uniqueness cannot be explained by an overt environmental contaminant exposure. Although tobacco very likely plays a central role, it by itself cannot fully explain the extremely high male lung cancer rate and why

  14. Epidemiology and etiology of ovarian cancer: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, A.P.; Hacker, N.F.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1985-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the western world. Much effort has been put into attempts to correlate differences in incidence rates with environmental, endocrinologic, and genetic factors. A review of the literature reveals that there is currently no evidence to incriminate any single etiologic factor for this group of tumors. There is growing evidence of familial predisposition in a small group of patients and of a relationship with reproductive history. If current knowledge of the epidemiology of ovarian cancer is to be translated into disease prevention, more attention should be paid to women at risk because of their family history, and more awareness should be made of the protective effect of oral contraceptives. 79 references.

  15. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N; Nyholt, Dale R; Morris, Andrew P; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursula; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Gilks, C Blake; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Gawełko, Jan; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mclaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Risch, Harvey A; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Webb, Penelope M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Montgomery, Grant W; Zondervan, Krina T; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; MacGregor, Stuart

    2015-10-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI = 0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI = 0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI = 0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI = 0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. PMID:26231222

  16. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  17. Triple-negative breast cancer: epidemiological considerations and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P

    2012-08-01

    Breast cancer is a major problem for global public health. Breast Cancer is the most common incident form of cancer in women around the world. The incidence is increasing while mortality is declining in many high-income countries. The last decade has seen a revolution in the understanding of breast cancer, with new classifications proposed that have significant prognostic value and provide guides to treatment options. Breast cancers that demonstrate the absence of oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and no overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are referred to as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). There is now evidence emerging from epidemiological studies regarding important characteristics of this group of tumours that carry a relatively poorer prognosis than the major breast cancer sub-types. From this review of available data and information, there are some consistent findings that emerge. Women with TNBC experience the peak risk of recurrence within 3 years of diagnosis, and the mortality rates appear to be increased for 5 years after diagnosis. TNBC represents 10%-20% of invasive breast cancers and has been associated with African-American race, deprivation status, younger age at diagnosis, more advanced disease stage, higher grade, high mitotic indices, family history of breast cancer and BRCA1 mutations. TNBC is regularly reported to be three times more common in women of African descent and in pre-menopausal women, and carries a poorer prognosis than other forms of breast cancer. Although prospects for prevention of non-hormone-dependent breast cancer are currently poor, it is still important to understand the aetiology of such tumours. There remains a great deal of work to be done to arrive at a comprehensive picture of the aetiology of breast cancer. Key recommendations are that there is a clear and urgent need to have more epidemiological studies of the breast cancer sub-types to integrate aetiological and

  18. The changing epidemiology of Asian digestive cancers: From etiologies and incidences to preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2015-12-01

    Digestive cancers are a major health burden in Asia. Due to the presence of similar "infection-inflammation-cancer" pathways in the carcinogenesis process, eradicating infective pathogens or attenuating relevant inflammatory signaling pathways may reduce digestive cancer incidences and improve patient outcomes. The aim of this paper is to review the recent evidence regarding the epidemiology of three major digestive cancers in Asia: stomach cancer, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer. We focused on the incidence trends, the major etiologies, and especially the potential preventive strategies. PMID:26651247

  19. Epidemiology and molecular pathology of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Ponce, E C; Miquel, J F; Muñoz, N; Herrero, R; Ferrecio, C; Wistuba, I I; Alonso de Ruiz, P; Aristi Urista, G; Nervi, F

    2001-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is usually associated with gallstone disease, late diagnosis, unsatisfactory treatment, and poor prognosis. We report here the worldwide geographical distribution of gallbladder cancer, review the main etiologic hypotheses, and provide some comments on perspectives for prevention. The highest incidence rate of gallbladder cancer is found among populations of the Andean area, North American Indians, and Mexican Americans. Gallbladder cancer is up to three times higher among women than men in all populations. The highest incidence rates in Europe are found in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia. Incidence rates in other regions of the world are relatively low. The highest mortality rates are also reported from South America, 3.5-15.5 per 100,000 among Chilean Mapuche Indians, Bolivians, and Chilean Hispanics. Intermediate rates, 3.7 to 9.1 per 100,000, are reported from Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Brazil. Mortality rates are low in North America, with the exception of high rates among American Indians in New Mexico (11.3 per 100,000) and among Mexican Americans. The main associated risk factors identified so far include cholelithiasis (especially untreated chronic symptomatic gallstones), obesity, reproductive factors, chronic infections of the gallbladder, and environmental exposure to specific chemicals. These suspected factors likely represent promoters of carcinogenesis. The main limitations of epidemiologic studies on gallbladder cancer are the small sample sizes and specific problems in quantifying exposure to putative risk factors. The natural history of gallbladder disease should be characterized to support the allocation of more resources for early treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disease in high-risk populations. Secondary prevention of gallbladder cancer could be effective if supported by cost-effective studies of prophylactic cholecystectomy among asymptomatic gallstone patients in high-risk areas. PMID:11760569

  20. The etiology of prostate cancer: what does the epidemiology suggest

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.K.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    The two most important demographic characteristics of prostate cancer in Los Angeles are the high rates among blacks, which are two times those among whites and four times those among Asians, and the rapid increase in rates with age after age 40. Despite the high rates among blacks, a birth cohort analysis indicates that mortality rates among black men born after 1900 have decreased. In this report, epidemiologic and experimental evidence supporting each of three etiologic hypotheses--industrial exposure to cadmium, sexual transmission by an infectious agent, and endocrine factors--are reviewed. Evidence from descriptive data in Los Angeles suggests that only a small portion of cases might be attributable to industrial exposures. In a cohort study of Catholic priests, we found no deficit of prostate cancer mortality, strong evidence against sexual transmission of the disease. Experimental evidence and a limited amount of human data support an endocrine hypothesis. Preliminary results of a case-control study of prostate cancer are presented, but these results are unable to distinguish among these hypotheses further. This study finds a substantial protective effect of vasectomy, an event that is accompanied by reduced prostatic function and size, but this result is thus far statistically insignificant.

  1. Gastric cancer - clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Link, Alexander; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) ranks fifth for cancer incidence and second for cancer deaths. Epidemiological data showed that survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and patients with pernicious anemia etiologically linked to autoimmune gastritis are at increased risk of GC. Screening of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease by means of pepsinogen (PG) I and PG I/II detected autoimmune gastritis with oxyntic gastric atrophy in one of four patients and may be recommended for GC prevention purposes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer reported a positive association between consumption of processed meet and increased GC risk. A new GC risk prediction model based on biological markers, age, gender, smoking status, family history of GC, and consumption of highly salted food showed good predictive performance, and might prompt individuals to modify their lifestyle habits, attend regular check-up visits or participate in screening programs. A novel GC classification based on gene expression of primary resected cancers correlated with clinicopathological features. Noncoding RNA for GC screening remains the focus of multiple studies. Patients with early GC undergoing endoscopic resection are more likely to develop metachronous lesions than patients undergoing surgery and endoscopic surveillance is warranted in this special cohort. The addition of gastrectomy to chemotherapy did not improve survival of patients with advanced GC and a single noncurable factor. Apatinib, a novel oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, improved the median overall survival of patients with advanced GC and progressive disease after two or more lines of prior chemotherapy of nearly 3 months. PMID:27531538

  2. Diet in the epidemiology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, S; Haughey, B; Marshall, J; Brasure, J; Zielezny, M; Freudenheim, J; West, D; Nolan, J; Wilkinson, G

    1990-01-01

    We examined the nutritional epidemiology of gastric cancer in 293 cases and neighborhood-, age-, and sex-matched controls in communities throughout the counties of Niagara, Monroe, and Erie in western New York. The interview was highly detailed, requiring two and one-half hours to complete; it attempted to provide an estimate of total calories ingested as well as of macro- and micronutrients and behaviors that could affect alimentary exposures, such as the use of refrigeration. We found that risk was enhanced by sodium, fat, and retinol. Substantial reductions in risk were associated with ingestion of carotene, especially raw vegetables (including celery, cucumbers, carrots, green peppers, tomatoes, and onions), as well as with increased use of low-temperature food storage. Both refrigeration and carotene could inhibit oxidation products that could act as carcinogens in the stomach. PMID:2300492

  3. Recent progress and future direction of cancer epidemiological research in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sobue, Tomotaka

    2015-06-01

    In 2006, the Cancer Control Act was approved and a Basic Plan, to Promote the Cancer Control Program at the national level, was developed in 2007. Cancer research is recognized as a fundamental component to provide evidence in cancer control program. Cancer epidemiology plays central role in connecting research and policy, since it directly deals with data from humans. Research for cancer epidemiology in Japan made substantial progress, in the field of descriptive studies, cohort studies, intervention studies and activities for summarizing evidences. In future, promoting high-quality large-scale intervention studies, individual-level linkage studies, simulation models and studies for elderly population will be of great importance, but at the same time research should be promoted in well-balanced fashion not placing too much emphasis on one particular research field. PMID:25762798

  4. Statins and breast cancer prognosis: evidence and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, Thomas P.; Lash, Timothy L.; Damkier, Per; Christiansen, Peer M.; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Much preclinical and epidemiologic evidence supports anticancer effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Epidemiologic evidence does not support an association between statin use and reduced breast cancer incidence, but does support a protective effect of statins—particularly simvastatin—on breast cancer prognosis. We argue that the current evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins. We advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence, then the indications for a safe, well-tolerated, and in expensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several design opportunities—including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy—and offer solutions to key challenges to enrolment, follow-up, and analysis of such a trial. PMID:25186049

  5. Epidemiology of Gallbladder Disease: Cholelithiasis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stinton, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases of the gallbladder are common and costly. The best epidemiological screening method to accurately determine point prevalence of gallstone disease is ultrasonography. Many risk factors for cholesterol gallstone formation are not modifiable such as ethnic background, increasing age, female gender and family history or genetics. Conversely, the modifiable risks for cholesterol gallstones are obesity, rapid weight loss and a sedentary lifestyle. The rising epidemic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome predicts an escalation of cholesterol gallstone frequency. Risk factors for biliary sludge include pregnancy, drugs like ceftiaxone, octreotide and thiazide diuretics, and total parenteral nutrition or fasting. Diseases like cirrhosis, chronic hemolysis and ileal Crohn's disease are risk factors for black pigment stones. Gallstone disease in childhood, once considered rare, has become increasingly recognized with similar risk factors as those in adults, particularly obesity. Gallbladder cancer is uncommon in developed countries. In the U.S., it accounts for only ~ 5,000 cases per year. Elsewhere, high incidence rates occur in North and South American Indians. Other than ethnicity and female gender, additional risk factors for gallbladder cancer include cholelithiasis, advancing age, chronic inflammatory conditions affecting the gallbladder, congenital biliary abnormalities, and diagnostic confusion over gallbladder polyps. PMID:22570746

  6. [Epidemiological perspectives of migration research: the example of cancer].

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Hajo; Spallek, Jacob; Razum, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic research on migration and health in Germany is increasingly focusing on chronic diseases. Migrant studies can help to identify causes of diseases. They also help to identify health inequalities and can thus contribute to improvements in health care. With regard to cancer, descriptive studies among Turkish migrants and ethnic German immigrants from the Former Soviet Union have shown overall low, but slowly increasing cancer rates as compared to autochthonous Germans. For individual cancer sites such as stomach cancer, migrants appear to experience higher risks than the comparison population. Epidemiologic approaches studying cancer care and services for migrants, as well as analytic studies that allow assessing the particular temporal dynamics of cancer risks among migrant groups, are scarce in Germany. Thus, major challenges for cancer epidemiology among migrants exist in Germany. PMID:18421652

  7. Diesel Exhaust Exposure and the Risk of Lung Cancer—A Review of the Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Bochmann, Frank; Nold, Annette; Mattenklott, Markus

    2014-01-01

    To critically evaluate the association between diesel exhaust (DE) exposure and the risk of lung cancer, we conducted a systematic review of published epidemiological evidences. To comprehensively identify original studies on the association between DE exposure and the risk of lung cancer, literature searches were performed in literature databases for the period between 1970 and 2013, including bibliographies and cross-referencing. In total, 42 cohort studies and 32 case-control studies were identified in which the association between DE exposures and lung cancer was examined. In general, previous studies suffer from a series of methodological limitations, including design, exposure assessment methods and statistical analysis used. A lack of objective exposure information appears to be the main problem in interpreting epidemiological evidence. To facilitate the interpretation and comparison of previous studies, a job-exposure matrix (JEM) of DE exposures was created based on around 4,000 historical industrial measurements. The values from the JEM were considered during interpretation and comparison of previous studies. Overall, neither cohort nor case-control studies indicate a clear exposure-response relationship between DE exposure and lung cancer. Epidemiological studies published to date do not allow a valid quantification of the association between DE and lung cancer. PMID:24473109

  8. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. PMID:27614953

  9. Epidemiology of environmental and occupational cancer.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-08-23

    Environmental carcinogens, in a strict sense, include outdoor and indoor air pollutants, as well as soil and drinking water contaminants. An increased risk of mesothelioma has consistently been detected among individuals experiencing residential exposure to asbestos, while results for lung cancer are less consistent. Several good-quality studies have investigated lung cancer risk from outdoor air pollution based on measurement of specific agents. Their results tend to show an increased risk in the categories at highest exposure, with relative risks in the range 1.5. A causal association has been established between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and lung cancer, with a relative risk in the order of 1.2. Radon is another carcinogen present in indoor air, with a relative risk in the order of 1.06 for exposure at 100 Bq/m3. In several Asian populations, an increased risk of lung cancer results among women from indoor pollution from cooking and heating. There is strong evidence of an increased risk of bladder, skin and lung cancers following consumption of water with high arsenic contamination; results for other drinking water contaminants, including chlorination by-products, are inconclusive. A total of 29 occupational agents are established human carcinogens, and another 30 agents are suspected carcinogens. In addition, at least 12 exposure circumstances entail exposure to carcinogens. Exposure is still widespread for many important occupational carcinogens, such as asbestos, coal tar, arsenic and silica, in particular in developing countries. Although estimates of the global burden of occupational and environmental cancer result in figures in the order of 2% and less than 1%, respectively, these cancers concentrate in subgroups of the population; furthermore, exposure is involuntary and can, to a large extent, be avoided. PMID:15322513

  10. Endometriosis and breast cancer: A survey of the epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    PONTIKAKI, A.; SIFAKIS, S.; SPANDIDOS, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological disease with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. Recent reviews have demonstrated the connection between endometriosis and breast cancer, which represents the most frequently diagnosed female cancer and the most common cause of cancer-related mortality among women worldwide. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of available published epidemiological studies indicating the association between endometriosis and breast cancer, and simultaneously to categorize the results based on the strength of the association, with the intention of the critical evaluation of the existing data. We performed a rigorous search of the PubMed/Medline database, using the key words ‘endometriosis’ and ‘breast cancer’ for all studies published in the English language until September 2015. We found 4 retrospective cohort studies, 4 case-control studies and 3 case-cohort studies that demonstrated a notable risk for developing breast cancer among women with endometriosis. By contrast, we also found 5 case-control studies, 1 prospective cohort study, 1 case-cohort study and 1 cross-sectional study that demonstrated a negative association between endometriosis and breast cancer. In conclusion, as regards the clarification of a ‘robust’ or ‘weak’ association between endometriosis and breast cancer, no definite conclusions could be drawn, due to the limited number of studies and the limitations of each of these studies. New well-designed, prospective cohort or randomized control trials with long-term follow-up are warranted in order to provide evidence-based clinical recommendations for proper counseling, screening and treatment strategies for patients with endometriosis, and hence to improve public health. PMID:26870162

  11. The Complexities of Epidemiology and Prevention of Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Saba; Ali, Shadan; Mohammad, Ramzi; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer epidemiology and prevention is one of the most well studied fields today. The more we can understand about the incidence and pathogenesis of this disease, the better we will be able to prevent it. Effective prevention strategies can decrease the mortality rate of cancer significantly; this is why it is important to delineate the underlying causes. It has been well recognized that genetic mutations, sporadic or hereditary, may lead to increased chance of tumorigenesis. Detecting genetic mutations can lead to the identification of high-risk individuals with hereditary cancer syndromes, which may assist in devising prevention strategies. Further, environmental factors are known to play important roles in epidemiology and suggest prevention tools that could be implemented to reduce cancer incidence and subsequent cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. Chemoprevention has been tried in colon cancer and is finding new advancements in other carcinomas as well. Out of many environmental cancer preventive agents, the most notable developments are the identification of the role of vitamins E, vitamin D and folic acid. Increased consumption of these vitamins has shown to be inversely correlated with cancer risk. This review will highlight important aspects of cancer epidemiology in the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal system focusing on colorectal adenocarcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Additionally, some of the well-known and evolving aspects of epidemiology of colorectal and pancreatic cancer along with current and new prevention strategies will also be reviewed. PMID:23202913

  12. Toxicology and epidemiology: improving the science with a framework for combining toxicological and epidemiological evidence to establish causal inference.

    PubMed

    Adami, Hans-Olov; Berry, Sir Colin L; Breckenridge, Charles B; Smith, Lewis L; Swenberg, James A; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Weiss, Noel S; Pastoor, Timothy P

    2011-08-01

    Historically, toxicology has played a significant role in verifying conclusions drawn on the basis of epidemiological findings. Agents that were suggested to have a role in human diseases have been tested in animals to firmly establish a causative link. Bacterial pathogens are perhaps the oldest examples, and tobacco smoke and lung cancer and asbestos and mesothelioma provide two more recent examples. With the advent of toxicity testing guidelines and protocols, toxicology took on a role that was intended to anticipate or predict potential adverse effects in humans, and epidemiology, in many cases, served a role in verifying or negating these toxicological predictions. The coupled role of epidemiology and toxicology in discerning human health effects by environmental agents is obvious, but there is currently no systematic and transparent way to bring the data and analysis of the two disciplines together in a way that provides a unified view on an adverse causal relationship between an agent and a disease. In working to advance the interaction between the fields of toxicology and epidemiology, we propose here a five-step "Epid-Tox" process that would focus on: (1) collection of all relevant studies, (2) assessment of their quality, (3) evaluation of the weight of evidence, (4) assignment of a scalable conclusion, and (5) placement on a causal relationship grid. The causal relationship grid provides a clear view of how epidemiological and toxicological data intersect, permits straightforward conclusions with regard to a causal relationship between agent and effect, and can show how additional data can influence conclusions of causality. PMID:21561883

  13. Toxicology and Epidemiology: Improving the Science with a Framework for Combining Toxicological and Epidemiological Evidence to Establish Causal Inference

    PubMed Central

    Adami, Hans-Olov; Berry, Sir Colin L.; Breckenridge, Charles B.; Smith, Lewis L.; Swenberg, James A.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Weiss, Noel S.; Pastoor, Timothy P.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, toxicology has played a significant role in verifying conclusions drawn on the basis of epidemiological findings. Agents that were suggested to have a role in human diseases have been tested in animals to firmly establish a causative link. Bacterial pathogens are perhaps the oldest examples, and tobacco smoke and lung cancer and asbestos and mesothelioma provide two more recent examples. With the advent of toxicity testing guidelines and protocols, toxicology took on a role that was intended to anticipate or predict potential adverse effects in humans, and epidemiology, in many cases, served a role in verifying or negating these toxicological predictions. The coupled role of epidemiology and toxicology in discerning human health effects by environmental agents is obvious, but there is currently no systematic and transparent way to bring the data and analysis of the two disciplines together in a way that provides a unified view on an adverse causal relationship between an agent and a disease. In working to advance the interaction between the fields of toxicology and epidemiology, we propose here a five-step “Epid-Tox” process that would focus on: (1) collection of all relevant studies, (2) assessment of their quality, (3) evaluation of the weight of evidence, (4) assignment of a scalable conclusion, and (5) placement on a causal relationship grid. The causal relationship grid provides a clear view of how epidemiological and toxicological data intersect, permits straightforward conclusions with regard to a causal relationship between agent and effect, and can show how additional data can influence conclusions of causality. PMID:21561883

  14. Epigenetic research in cancer epidemiology: trends, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh; Rogers, Scott; Divi, Rao L; Schully, Sheri D; Nelson, Stefanie; Joseph Su, L; Ross, Sharon A; Pilch, Susan; Winn, Deborah M; Khoury, Muin J

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetics is emerging as an important field in cancer epidemiology that promises to provide insights into gene regulation and facilitate cancer control throughout the cancer care continuum. Increasingly, investigators are incorporating epigenetic analysis into the studies of etiology and outcomes. To understand current progress and trends in the inclusion of epigenetics in cancer epidemiology, we evaluated the published literature and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported research grant awards in this field to identify trends in epigenetics research. We present a summary of the epidemiologic studies in NCI's grant portfolio (from January 2005 through December 2012) and in the scientific literature published during the same period, irrespective of support from the NCI. Blood cells and tumor tissue were the most commonly used biospecimens in these studies, although buccal cells, cervical cells, sputum, and stool samples were also used. DNA methylation profiling was the focus of the majority of studies, but several studies also measured microRNA profiles. We illustrate here the current status of epidemiologic studies that are evaluating epigenetic changes in large populations. The incorporation of epigenomic assessments in cancer epidemiology studies has and is likely to continue to provide important insights into the field of cancer research. PMID:24326628

  15. Stillbirths: epidemiology, evidence, and priorities for action.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lawn, Joy E; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2010-12-01

    The annual global burden of stillbirths amounts to an estimated 3.2 million%, 98% of which occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Of these, 1.02 million (32%) are intrapartum, ie, taking place during labor. The most important causes of stillbirths in LMICs include obstructed or prolonged labor, hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, syphilis and gram-negative infections, malaria in endemic areas, and undernutrition. Interventions that target these causes can play an important role in reducing stillbirths. There is a clear benefit of emergency obstetrical care, particularly Cesarean delivery, on intrapartum rates in LMICs when Cesarean rates are less than 8% to 10%. Provision of a skilled birth attendant is another important intervention whereby labor complications can be prevented, identified, managed, and/or referred. Among interventions for infections, syphilis screening and treatment can prevent as many as 50% of all stillbirths in areas with high syphilis prevalence, reducing the risk of stillbirths among treated women to that of untreated women. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria and insecticide-treated mosquito nets are also interventions with strong recommendation, especially in the first 2 pregnancies. Balanced energy protein supplementation is an important nutritional intervention to prevent stillbirths in undernourished women, especially in LMICs. Creation of increased demand for health services within communities and increasing their uptake also can play a role in averting stillbirths. Other potential social and behavioral interventions include birth spacing, smoking cessation and indoor air pollution control, although the evidence for these is weak. PMID:21094413

  16. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  17. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE OF CARCINOGENICITY OF CHLORINATED ORGANICS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concern has recently been voiced over possible chronic toxicity associated with chlorination of public drinking water supplies in the United States. This paper reviews the available evidence and the studies underway to further evaluate hypothesized associations between cancer ris...

  18. An epidemiologic review of marijuana and cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hui Jenny; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Tashkin, Donald P.; Feng, Bingjian; Straif, Kurt; Hashibe, Mia

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana use is legal in two states and additional states are considering legalization. Approximately 18 million Americans are current marijuana users. There is currently no consensus on whether marijuana use is associated with cancer risk. Our objective is to review the epidemiologic studies on this possible association. We identified 34 epidemiologic studies on upper aerodigestive tract cancers (n=11), lung cancer (n=6), testicular cancer (n=3), childhood cancers (n=6), all cancers (n=1), anal cancer (n=1), penile cancer (n=1), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=2), malignant primary gliomas(n=1), bladder cancer (n=1), and Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Studies on head and neck cancer reported increased and decreased risks, possibly because there is no association, or because risks differ by HPV status or geographic differences. The lung cancer studies largely appear not to support an association with marijuana use, possibly because of the smaller amounts of marijuana regularly smoked compared to tobacco. Three testicular cancer case-control studies reported increased risks with marijuana use (summary odds ratios 1.56 (95%CI=1.09-2.23) for higher frequency; 1.50 (95%=1.08-2.09) for ≥10 years). For other cancer sites, there is still insufficient data to make any conclusions. Considering that marijuana use may change due to legalization, well-designed studies on marijuana use and cancer are warranted. PMID:25587109

  19. An epidemiologic review of marijuana and cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hui Jenny; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Tashkin, Donald P; Feng, Bingjian; Straif, Kurt; Hashibe, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use is legal in two states and additional states are considering legalization. Approximately 18 million Americans are current marijuana users. There is currently no consensus on whether marijuana use is associated with cancer risk. Our objective is to review the epidemiologic studies on this possible association. We identified 34 epidemiologic studies on upper aerodigestive tract cancers (n = 11), lung cancer (n = 6), testicular cancer (n = 3), childhood cancers (n = 6), all cancers (n = 1), anal cancer (n = 1), penile cancer (n = 1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), malignant primary gliomas (n = 1), bladder cancer (n = 1), and Kaposi sarcoma (n = 1). Studies on head and neck cancer reported increased and decreased risks, possibly because there is no association, or because risks differ by human papillomavirus status or geographic differences. The lung cancer studies largely appear not to support an association with marijuana use, possibly because of the smaller amounts of marijuana regularly smoked compared with tobacco. Three testicular cancer case-control studies reported increased risks with marijuana use [summary ORs, 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-2.23 for higher frequency and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.08-2.09) for ≥10 years]. For other cancer sites, there is still insufficient data to make any conclusions. Considering that marijuana use may change due to legalization, well-designed studies on marijuana use and cancer are warranted. PMID:25587109

  20. Body fatness as a cause of cancer: epidemiologic clues to biologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Byers, Tim; Sedjo, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Carrying excess body fat is a leading cause of cancer. Epidemiologic evidence gives strong clues about the mechanisms that link excess adiposity to risk for several cancer sites. For postmenopausal breast cancer and endometrial cancer, the hyper-estrogenic state that is induced by excess body fatness is the likely cause. For esophageal cancer and gallbladder cancer, chronic local inflammation induced by acid reflux and gallstones is the likely cause, and for liver cancer, local inflammation induced by hepatic fatty infiltration is the likely cause. However, for several other cancers known to be associated with excess adiposity, including cancers of the colon, pancreas, ovary, kidney, and prostate, specific causes are not known. Possible candidates include elevated systemic or local tissue inflammation induced by adiposity and effects of the elevated levels of leptin, insulin, IGFs, and depressed immune function that are seen with excess adiposity. There is growing evidence that intentional weight loss not only reduces circulating levels of cancer-associated factors but that it also reduces cancer incidence and recurrence. Better research is needed to understand the mechanisms that link excess body fat to cancer risk as well as to understand the amount of weight loss needed for substantial cancer risk reduction. Finally, as we develop better understanding of the mediators of the effects of excess body fatness on cancer risk, we should identify pharmacologic interventions that target those mediators so that they can be used to complement weight loss in order to reduce cancer risk. PMID:25870250

  1. Proving Causation With Epidemiological Evidence in Tobacco Lawsuits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a series of lawsuits were filed in Korea claiming tort liability against tobacco companies. The Supreme Court has already issued decisions in some cases, while others are still pending. The primary issue in these cases is whether the epidemiological evidence submitted by the plaintiffs clearly proves the causal relationship between smoking and disease as required by civil law. Proving causation is difficult in tobacco lawsuits because factors other than smoking are involved in the development of a disease, and also because of the lapse of time between smoking and the manifestation of the disease. The Supreme Court (Supreme Court Decision, 2011Da22092, April 10, 2014) has imposed some limitations on using epidemiological evidence to prove causation in tobacco lawsuits filed by smokers and their family members, but these limitations should be reconsidered. First, the Court stated that a disease can be categorized as specific or non-specific, and for each disease type, causation can be proven by different types of evidence. However, the concept of specific diseases is not compatible with multifactor theory, which is generally accepted in the field of public health. Second, when the epidemiological association between the disease and the risk factor is proven to be significant, imposing additional burdens of proof on the plaintiff may considerably limit the plaintiff’s right to recovery, but the Court required the plaintiffs to provide additional information such as health condition and lifestyle. Third, the Supreme Court is not giving greater weight to the evidential value of epidemiological study results because the Court focuses on the fact that these studies were group-level, not individual-level. However, group-level studies could still offer valuable information about individual members of the group, e.g., probability of causation. PMID:27055545

  2. Proving Causation With Epidemiological Evidence in Tobacco Lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Goo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a series of lawsuits were filed in Korea claiming tort liability against tobacco companies. The Supreme Court has already issued decisions in some cases, while others are still pending. The primary issue in these cases is whether the epidemiological evidence submitted by the plaintiffs clearly proves the causal relationship between smoking and disease as required by civil law. Proving causation is difficult in tobacco lawsuits because factors other than smoking are involved in the development of a disease, and also because of the lapse of time between smoking and the manifestation of the disease. The Supreme Court (Supreme Court Decision, 2011Da22092, April 10, 2014) has imposed some limitations on using epidemiological evidence to prove causation in tobacco lawsuits filed by smokers and their family members, but these limitations should be reconsidered. First, the Court stated that a disease can be categorized as specific or non-specific, and for each disease type, causation can be proven by different types of evidence. However, the concept of specific diseases is not compatible with multifactor theory, which is generally accepted in the field of public health. Second, when the epidemiological association between the disease and the risk factor is proven to be significant, imposing additional burdens of proof on the plaintiff may considerably limit the plaintiff's right to recovery, but the Court required the plaintiffs to provide additional information such as health condition and lifestyle. Third, the Supreme Court is not giving greater weight to the evidential value of epidemiological study results because the Court focuses on the fact that these studies were group-level, not individual-level. However, group-level studies could still offer valuable information about individual members of the group, e.g., probability of causation. PMID:27055545

  3. Epidemiology of lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in China. Along with socioeconomic development, environmental problems have intensified and the burden of lung cancer continues to increase. Methods In this study, national cancer registry data was used for evaluating incidence, mortality, time trend, and prediction. Results In China in 2010, 605 900 patients were diagnosed and 486 600 patients died of lung cancer. Throughout the last three decades, the mortality of lung cancer has dramatically increased, as shown in national death surveys. From 2000 to 2010, age specific incidence of lung cancer increased in most age groups. It is estimated that in 2015, the total number of new cases of lung cancer will reach 733 300. Conclusions Lung cancer is a serious disease affecting public health and an effective control strategy is needed in China. PMID:26273360

  4. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  5. From obesity to diabetes and cancer: epidemiological links and role of therapies.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Custodia; Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martinez, Jose Manuel; Castaño, Angel; De la Vieja, Antonio

    2016-03-29

    Increasing evidence suggests a complex relationship between obesity, diabetes and cancer. Here we review the evidence for the association between obesity and diabetes and a wide range of cancer types. In many cases the evidence for a positive association is strong, but for other cancer types a more complex picture emerges with some site-specific cancers associated with obesity but not to diabetes, and some associated with type I but not type II diabetes. The evidence therefore suggests the existence of cumulative common and differential mechanisms influencing the relationship between these diseases. Importantly, we highlight the influence of antidiabetics on cancer and antineoplastic agents on diabetes and in particular that antineoplastic targeting of insulin/IGF-1 signalling induces hyperglycaemia that often evolves to overt diabetes. Overall, a coincidence of diabetes and cancer worsens outcome and increases mortality. Future epidemiology should consider dose and time of exposure to both disease and treatment, and should classify cancers by their molecular signatures. Well-controlled studies on the development of diabetes upon cancer treatment are necessary and should identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for these reciprocal interactions. Given the global epidemic of diabetes, preventing both cancer occurrence in diabetics and the onset of diabetes in cancer patients will translate into a substantial socioeconomic benefit. PMID:26908326

  6. From obesity to diabetes and cancer: epidemiological links and role of therapies

    PubMed Central

    García-Jiménez, Custodia; Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martinez, Jose Manuel; Castaño, Angel; De la Vieja, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a complex relationship between obesity, diabetes and cancer. Here we review the evidence for the association between obesity and diabetes and a wide range of cancer types. In many cases the evidence for a positive association is strong, but for other cancer types a more complex picture emerges with some site-specific cancers associated with obesity but not to diabetes, and some associated with type I but not type II diabetes. The evidence therefore suggests the existence of cumulative common and differential mechanisms influencing the relationship between these diseases. Importantly, we highlight the influence of antidiabetics on cancer and antineoplastic agents on diabetes and in particular that antineoplastic targeting of insulin/IGF-1 signalling induces hyperglycaemia that often evolves to overt diabetes. Overall, a coincidence of diabetes and cancer worsens outcome and increases mortality. Future epidemiology should consider dose and time of exposure to both disease and treatment, and should classify cancers by their molecular signatures. Well-controlled studies on the development of diabetes upon cancer treatment are necessary and should identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for these reciprocal interactions. Given the global epidemic of diabetes, preventing both cancer occurrence in diabetics and the onset of diabetes in cancer patients will translate into a substantial socioeconomic benefit. PMID:26908326

  7. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 males and 189,613 females). Meanwhile, the crude mortality of lung cancer in China was 37.00 per 100,000 population (50.04 per 100,000 men and 23.33 per 100,000 women). Consistent with the change in developed countries, adenocarcinoma has become the most predominant histological subtype of lung cancer in China. For the majority advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, especially patients with adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy became increasing important in the treatment. Chinese researcher have done a lot work in terms of lung cancer molecular epidemiology, therefore, in this review, we further summarized the epidemiology of driver genes in NSCLC, hoping to help clinicians to better screen certain driver genes in China for treatment decisions. PMID:25806311

  8. Alcohol Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: Weighing the Overall Evidence

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jasmine A.; Goyal, Abhishek; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption has been linked to an approximate 30-50% increased risk in breast cancer. Case-control and cohort studies have consistently observed this modest increase. We highlight recent evidence from molecular epidemiologic studies and studies of intermediate markers like mammographic density that provide additional evidence that this association is real and not solely explained by factors/correlates of the exposure and outcome present in non-randomized studies. We also review evidence from studies of higher risk women including BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Given the incidence of heart disease is higher than breast cancer and modest alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk of heart disease, we examine the latest evidence to evaluate if alcohol reduction should be targeted to women at high risk for breast cancer. We also review the most recent evidence on the effect of alcohol use on tumor recurrence and survival for those diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:24265860

  9. Epidemiology of cancer in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cresanta, J L

    1992-09-01

    Malignant neoplasms are responsible for more than half a million deaths annually and 22.5% of all deaths in the United States. Cancer is the second leading cause of death overall and the leading cause of death among Americans aged 35-64. Within the next decade it may become the leading cause of death. Cancers of digestive and respiratory organs are responsible for 53% of all cancer deaths. Certain subgroups are at elevated risk for various cancers. For example, sun-sensitive or excessively sun-exposed young white adults, young black women, and elderly patients are at increased risk for cutaneous melanoma, breast cancer, and colon cancer, respectively. Black men have the greatest risk for both lung cancer and cancer of the prostate. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and solid tumors of the brain and nervous system are the most frequent forms of malignancy occurring among children less than or equal to 14 years. Office screening is the traditional method for identifying cancer victims as early as possible. A suitable screening test should be rapid, simple, inexpensive, and impose minimal discomfort. There must be a window of opportunity available to identify the cancer during a detectable preclinical phase, and therapeutic modalities must be available to alter progression. An office screening test for cancer may have any one of four outcomes, and three of them are bad. False negatives are the worst adverse outcome because cancer remains undetected despite screening. An epidemic of lung cancer, caused by cigarette smoking, is occurring in all race and sex groups. If Americans stopped smoking, 87% of lung cancer deaths could be prevented. Tobacco abuse also is a major risk factor for cancer of the esophagus, larynx, and oral cavity. Cigarette smoking is a contributing factor for cancer of the bladder, kidney, and pancreas, and it has been associated with both cervical cancer and cancer of the stomach. Smoking and smokeless tobacco cessation endorsements, messages, and

  10. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer in Hehuang valley of China: A 10-year epidemiological study of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Li, Bin; Bai, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Qi; Xie, Da-Wei; Ma, Ying-Cai; Ma, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Guo, Xin-Jian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley, China, to provide a reference for treatment and prevention of regional gastric cancer. METHODS: Between February 2003 and February 2013, the records of 2419 patients with gastric cancer were included in this study. The patient’s characteristics, histological and pathological features, as well as the dietary habits of the patients, were investigated. RESULTS: The clinical data showed that adenocarcinoma was the leading histological type of gastric cancer in this area. Characteristics of gastric cancer in different ethnic groups and age showed that the 60.55-65.50 years group showed the high incidence of gastric cancer in all ethnic groups. There were more male gastric cancer patients than female. Intestinal was the most common type of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. There was no significant difference in the proportion of sex in terms of Helicobacter pylori infection. The impact of dietary habits on gastric cancer showed that regular consumption of fried or grilled food, consumption of high-salt, high-fat and spicy food and drinking strong Boiled brick-tea were three important factors associated with gastric cancer in males and females. CONCLUSION: Differences existed in race, sex, and age of patients according to the epidemiology of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. Moreover, dietary habits was also an important factor contributing to gastric cancer. PMID:25132766

  11. Epidemiology of Prostate and Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Pauline; Ferguson, James E; Nielsen, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Prostate and testicular cancers account for a large percentage of cancer morbidity in men in the United States and worldwide due to high prevalence rates that continue to grow. Patterns of incidence and mortality vary greatly in both cancers among men of different age groups, ethnicities, and geographic locations. This article summarizes the incidence, prognosis, and risk factors of both prostate and testicular cancers, globally and in the United States. PMID:27582605

  12. Epidemiologic studies of ionizing radiation and cancer: past successes and future challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M

    1997-01-01

    The health effects of radiation have been a focus for research since early in the 20th century. As the century ends, extensive experimental and epidemiologic evidence has been accumulated that addresses the adverse consequences of radiation exposure; epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed groups from the general population and specific occupational groups provide quantitative estimates of the cancer risks associated with exposure. This report provides a perspective on the extensive epidemiologic evidence on the health effects of ionizing radiation and on likely needs for further epidemiologic research on radiation and health. Epidemiologic studies have proved informative on the quantitative risks of radiation-caused cancer but we now face the challenges of more precisely characterizing risks at lower levels of exposure and also of assessing modifiers of the risks, including dose rate, genetic susceptibility, and other environmental exposures. This report considers investigative approaches, such as pooled analysis of multiple data sets, that can be used to address these complex questions and the limitations of these approaches for addressing societal concerns about the risks of radiation exposure. PMID:9255575

  13. Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Annette . E-mail: peters@gsf.de

    2005-09-01

    The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

  14. Atrazine and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Mandel, Jack S; DeSesso, John M; Scialli, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a commonly used agricultural herbicide that has been the subject of epidemiologic studies assessing its relation to reproductive health problems. This review evaluates both the consistency and the quality of epidemiologic evidence testing the hypothesis that ATR exposure, at usually encountered levels, is a risk factor for birth defects, small for gestational age birth weight, prematurity, miscarriages, and problems of fetal growth and development. We followed the current methodological guidelines for systematic reviews by using two independent researchers to identify, retrieve, and evaluate the relevant epidemiologic literature on the relation of ATR to various adverse outcomes of birth and pregnancy. Each eligible paper was summarized with respect to its methods and results with particular attention to study design and exposure assessment, which have been cited as the main areas of weakness in ATR research. As a quantitative meta-analysis was not feasible, the study results were categorized qualitatively as positive, null, or mixed. The literature on ATR and pregnancy-related health outcomes is growing rapidly, but the quality of the data is poor with most papers using aggregate rather than individual-level information. Without good quality data, the results are difficult to assess; however, it is worth noting that none of the outcome categories demonstrated consistent positive associations across studies. Considering the poor quality of the data and the lack of robust findings across studies, conclusions about a causal link between ATR and adverse pregnancy outcomes are not warranted. PMID:24797711

  15. Sleep Duration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Epidemiologic and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Covassin, Naima; Singh, Prachi

    2016-03-01

    Inadequate sleep is increasingly pervasive, and the impact on health remains to be fully understood. The cardiovascular consequences alone appear to be substantial. This review summarizes epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between extremes of sleep duration and the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The adverse effects of experimental sleep loss on physiological functions are discussed, along with cardiovascular risk factors that may underlie the association with increased morbidity and mortality. Current data support the concept that inadequate sleep duration confers heightened cardiovascular risk. Thus implementation of preventative strategies may reduce the potential disease burden associated with this high-risk behavior. PMID:26972035

  16. Gastric Cancer: Descriptive Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Screening, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Parisa; Islami, Farhad; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2014-01-01

    Less than a century ago, gastric cancer (GC) was the most common cancer in the United States and perhaps throughout the world. Despite its worldwide decline in incidence over the past century, GC remains a major killer across the globe. This article reviews the epidemiology, screening, and prevention of gastric cancer. We first discuss the descriptive epidemiology of GC, including its incidence, survival, and mortality, including trends over time. Next, we characterize the risk factors for gastric cancer, both environmental and genetic. Serological markers and histological precursor lesions of GC and early detection of GC of using these markers is reviewed. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies and provide suggestions for further research. PMID:24618998

  17. Epidemiological review of laryngeal cancer: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Jain, Aanchal; Balasubramanium, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngeal cancer is one of the 10 leading causes of cancer in Indian men. The association of laryngeal cancer and tobacco smoking is well-established, but the peculiarities such as wide variation of disease distribution and survival, role of tobacco chewing, indoor air pollution, and dietary factors in laryngeal cancer causation needs to be understood. In this study, we review the descriptive and observational epidemiology of laryngeal cancer in India. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Web of science electronic database was searched from January 1995 to December 2013, using the using keywords “laryngeal cancer, laryngeal cancer outcome, epidemiology, etiological factor and their corresponding Mesh terms were used in combination like OR, AND.” Two authors independently selected studies published in English and conducted in India. A total of 15 studies were found to be relevant and eligible for this review. Results: In India, laryngeal cancer contributes to approximately 3-6% of all cancers in men. The age-adjusted incidence rate of cancer larynx in males varies widely among registries, highest is 8.18 per 100,000 in Kamprup Urban District and the lowest is 1.26 per 100,000 in Nagaland. The 5-year survival for laryngeal cancer in India is approximately 28%. Indian studies show tobacco, alcohol, long-term exposure to indoor air pollution, spicy food, and nonvegetarian diet as risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Conclusion: There is wide regional variation in the incidence of laryngeal cancer in India. Survival rates of laryngeal carcinoma are much lower as compared to other Asian countries. Studies conducted in India to identify important risk factors of laryngeal cancer are very limited, especially on diet and indoor air pollution. Hence, more research is required for identifying the etiological factors and development of scientifically sound laryngeal cancer prevention programs. PMID:26855523

  18. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  19. Nutrition and neurodegeneration: epidemiological evidence and challenges for future research.

    PubMed

    Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Secher, Marion; Vellas, Bruno

    2013-03-01

    The prevention of dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), is a growing public health concern, due to a lack of effective curative treatment options and a rising global prevalence. Various potential risk or preventive factors have been suggested by epidemiological research, including modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet. Current epidemiological data are in favour of a protective role of certain micronutrients (B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism, the anti-oxidant vitamins C and E, flavonoids, polyunsatured omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D) and macronutrients (fish) in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia/AD. Some factors have been targeted by interventions tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but many of the results are conflicting with observational evidence. Epidemiological analysis of the relations between nutrient consumption and cognitive decline is complex and it is highly unlikely that a single component plays a major role. In addition, since multiple factors across the life course influence brain function in late life, multidomain interventions might be more promising in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia/AD. Designing such trials remains very challenging for researchers. The main objective of this paper is to review the epidemiologic data linking potential protective factors to cognitive decline or dementia/AD, focusing particularly on the roles of adiposity, caloric restriction, micro (group B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism, the anti-oxidant vitamins C and E, flavonoids, polyunsatured omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D) and macronutrients (fish). Limitations of the current data, divergence with results of interventional prevention studies and challenges for future research are discussed. PMID:23384081

  20. Nutrition and neurodegeneration: epidemiological evidence and challenges for future research

    PubMed Central

    Gillette‐Guyonnet, Sophie; Secher, Marion; Vellas, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), is a growing public health concern, due to a lack of effective curative treatment options and a rising global prevalence. Various potential risk or preventive factors have been suggested by epidemiological research, including modifiable lifestyle factors such as diet. Current epidemiological data are in favour of a protective role of certain micronutrients (B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism, the anti‐oxidant vitamins C and E, flavonoids, polyunsatured omega‐3 fatty acids, vitamin D) and macronutrients (fish) in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia/AD. Some factors have been targeted by interventions tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but many of the results are conflicting with observational evidence. Epidemiological analysis of the relations between nutrient consumption and cognitive decline is complex and it is highly unlikely that a single component plays a major role. In addition, since multiple factors across the life course influence brain function in late life, multidomain interventions might be more promising in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia/AD. Designing such trials remains very challenging for researchers. The main objective of this paper is to review the epidemiologic data linking potential protective factors to cognitive decline or dementia/AD, focusing particularly on the roles of adiposity, caloric restriction, micro (group B vitamins related to homocysteine metabolism, the anti‐oxidant vitamins C and E, flavonoids, polyunsatured omega‐3 fatty acids, vitamin D) and macronutrients (fish). Limitations of the current data, divergence with results of interventional prevention studies and challenges for future research are discussed. PMID:23384081

  1. Cancer in Canada: An Epidemiological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Gerry B.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of cancer has risen steadily over the past 20 years, with a percentage increase per year of 1.3 in males and 0.5 in females. In 1980 the incidence was 333 per 100,000 in males and 259 per 100,000 in females. Over age 45, the incidence of cancers of the larynx and lung increased in both sexes, as did that of cancer of the prostate in males. The incidence of melanoma and other skin cancer is also rising in both sexes. Although the incidence of cervical cancer among women aged 35 and over fell during the decade 1970-80, the incidence among younger women increased. The trends over time and the regional differences in incidence are generally in keeping with what is known (and what is not known) about the etiology of cancer. PMID:21274077

  2. An epidemiologic risk prediction model for ovarian cancer in Europe: the EPIC study

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Hüsing, A; Fortner, R T; Tjønneland, A; Hansen, L; Dossus, L; Chang-Claude, J; Bergmann, M; Steffen, A; Bamia, C; Trichopoulos, D; Trichopoulou, A; Palli, D; Mattiello, A; Agnoli, C; Tumino, R; Onland-Moret, N C; Peeters, P H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B(as); Gram, I T; Weiderpass, E; Sánchez-Cantalejo, E; Chirlaque, M-D; Duell, E J; Ardanaz, E; Idahl, A; Lundin, E; Khaw, K-T; Travis, R C; Merritt, M A; Gunter, M J; Riboli, E; Ferrari, P; Terry, K; Cramer, D; Kaaks, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer has a high case-fatality ratio, largely due to late diagnosis. Epidemiologic risk prediction models could help identify women at increased risk who may benefit from targeted prevention measures, such as screening or chemopreventive agents. Methods: We built an ovarian cancer risk prediction model with epidemiologic risk factors from 202 206 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Results: Older age at menopause, longer duration of hormone replacement therapy, and higher body mass index were included as increasing ovarian cancer risk, whereas unilateral ovariectomy, longer duration of oral contraceptive use, and higher number of full-term pregnancies were decreasing risk. The discriminatory power (overall concordance index) of this model, as examined with five-fold cross-validation, was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57, 0.70). The ratio of the expected to observed number of ovarian cancer cases occurring in the first 5 years of follow-up was 0.90 (293 out of 324, 95% CI: 0.81–1.01), in general there was no evidence for miscalibration. Conclusion: Our ovarian cancer risk model containing only epidemiological data showed modest discriminatory power for a Western European population. Future studies should consider adding informative biomarkers to possibly improve the predictive ability of the model. PMID:25742479

  3. Penile cancer: is there an epidemiological role for smoking and sexual behaviour?

    PubMed Central

    Hellberg, D; Valentin, J; Eklund, T; Nilsson, S

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to determine whether penile cancer, like cervical cancer, was associated with smoking and sexual behaviour. Altogether 244 men with penile cancer and 232 matched controls completed a questionnaire by post or telephone. Data on marital state, socioeconomic group, occupation, history of phimosis and balanitis, sexual behaviour, and smoking were obtained. The results of statistical analyses confirmed that phimosis and balanitis were risk factors for penile cancer, but there was no epidemiological evidence for it being a sexually transmitted disease. Smoking was a risk factor with a dose-response relation and remained associated with penile cancer even after adjustment for confounding factors. Penile cancer is associated with smoking independently of phimosis; treatment of phimosis alone does not remove the risk caused by smoking. PMID:3120988

  4. Epidemiological characteristics of ovarian cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae-Joong; Ma, Seung Hyun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae Weon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Tae Jin; Yoo, Keun-Young

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to examine recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality and secular trends in demographic factors in Korea. Methods With the data from Korea Central Cancer Registry, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Korean Death Registry, and World Health Organization's Statistical Information System, we calculated age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for ovarian cancer. Also we estimated future incidence of ovarian and cervical cancer using linear regression model. To assess the demographic trend, data from national surveys in Korea or results from published papers were searched. Results Ovarian cancer incidence rate was similar to that in women worldwide but lower than those in Western countries, and the trend has been increased steadily. Ovarian cancer-related mortality rates have been increasing in Korea, even though those in western and some Asian countries, such as China, have been decreasing. Age-specific incidence rate and mortality rate showed steep increases with advancing age. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer was estimated to surpass that of uterine cervix cancer in 2015. Korea showed rapid changes in nutritional, reproductive, and anthropometric factors. Conclusion These recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality may be partly attributed to gradual westernizing of life styles and to changes in socio-demographic behavior factors. In particular, the increasing trend in ovarian cancer mortality in Korea may be attributed to a real rise in mortality as well as, in part, a decline in misclassification bias related to an increase in the proportion of deaths confirmed by physician diagnosis. PMID:21278886

  5. Epidemiologic Evidence on the Health Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA)

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, Kyle; Fletcher, Tony; Savitz, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective and sources We reviewed the epidemiologic literature for PFOA. Data synthesis Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) does not occur naturally but is present in the serum of most residents of industrialized countries (U.S. median, 4 ng/mL). Drinking water is the primary route of exposure in some populations, but exposure sources are not well understood. PFOA has been used to manufacture such products as Gore-Tex and Teflon. PFOA does not break down in the environment; the human half-life is estimated at about 3 years. PFOA is not metabolized in the body; it is not lipophilic. PFOA is not directly genotoxic; animal data indicate that it can cause several types of tumors and neonatal death and may have toxic effects on the immune, liver, and endocrine systems. Data on the human health effects of PFOA are sparse. There is relatively consistent evidence of modest positive associations with cholesterol and uric acid, although the magnitude of the cholesterol effect is inconsistent across different exposure levels. There is some but much less consistent evidence of a modest positive correlation with liver enzymes. Most findings come from cross-sectional studies, limiting conclusions. Two occupational cohort studies do not provide consistent evidence for chronic disease; both are limited by sample size and reliance on mortality data. Reproductive data have increased recently but are inconsistent, and any observed adverse effects are modest. Conclusions Epidemiologic evidence remains limited, and to date data are insufficient to draw firm conclusions regarding the role of PFOA for any of the diseases of concern. PMID:20423814

  6. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Millikan, Robert C.; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G.; Conway, Kathleen; Smith, Lisa V.; Labbok, Miriam H.; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H. Shelton; Perou, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified “intrinsic” breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case–control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common subtype, exhibited risk factors typically reported for breast cancer in previous studies, including inverse associations for increased parity and younger age at first full-term pregnancy. Basal-like cases exhibited several associations that were opposite to those observed for luminal A, including increased risk for parity and younger age at first term full-term pregnancy. Longer duration breastfeeding, increasing number of children breastfed, and increasing number of months breastfeeding per child were each associated with reduced risk of basal-like breast cancer, but not luminal A. Women with multiple live births who did not breastfeed and women who used medications to suppress lactation were at increased risk of basal-like, but not luminal A, breast cancer. Elevated waist-hip ratio was associated with increased risk of luminal A in postmenopausal women, and increased risk of basal-like breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women. The prevalence of basal-like breast cancer was highest among premenopausal African-American women, who also showed the highest prevalence of basal-like risk factors. Among younger African-American women, we estimate that up to 68% of basal-like breast cancer could be prevented by promoting breastfeeding and reducing abdominal adiposity. PMID:17578664

  7. An epidemiologic analysis of mortality and gastric cancer in Newfoundland

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, C. J.; Fodor, J. G.; Canning, E.

    1973-01-01

    A descriptive epidemiologic study of general mortality and of deaths attributable to gastric cancer was undertaken in Newfoundland. General mortality as well as gastric cancer mortality was highest on the east coast and lowest in the northwest region. A close correspondence between general mortality and the geomorphology of the island was observed. Marked regional variations in gastric cancer mortality were observed, with consistently higher death rates being reported for the peninsula between Conception and Trinity Bays and other eastern sectors. No regular differences between rural versus urban mortality rates were observed for gastric cancer. The death rate for males was double that for females, and a slight downward trend in gastric cancer mortality from 1930 to 1971 was observed. This study reveals that gastric cancer mortality is high, by international comparisons, in Newfoundland, but is less than in the highest risk countries (Japan, Chile, Iceland). ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 4 PMID:4704906

  8. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C R; Bertesteanu, S V G; Mirea, D; Grigore, Raluca; lonescu, Diana; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century the hypopharynx and the cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in the human population with regard to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngoesophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to the latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, and nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  9. [Epidemiological situation of prostate cancer in Spain].

    PubMed

    Granado de la Orden, S; Saá Requejo, C; Quintás Viqueira, A

    2006-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most frequent neoplasms in Spanish men and the third cause of cancer death. Incidence grows up with the increase of age. 90% of cases are diagnostic in people over 65 years old. Etiology is quite unknown and has been associated with environmental exposure, life style, family sign and genetic factors. In 2002 mortality rate was 21.5/ 100.000 (situated among the lowest in Europe), with more than 5.000 deaths. Trend of mortality has grown up until 1998, from this year it has decreased due to improve on diagnostic and treatment. In order to study prostate cancer incidence we find a difficulty due to shortage of population cancer register. Estimations have found incidence rates of 45.33/100.000 which are among the lowest in Europe. Annual incidence of prostatic cancer has grown up in all Spanish registers, not only improve in register systems explains it, but also the development of diagnosis tests with a higher survival from the beginning of 90s (86% the first year after diagnosis and 65,5% five years after diagnosis), similar to other European countries. Blow up the cancer register system is necessary to know the incidence and prevalence, to assess survival and effectiveness of screening programs and to improve the knowledge of risk factors. PMID:16921834

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Epidemiology, Detection, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiubo; Zeng, Linjuan; Chen, Yinting; Lian, Guoda; Qian, Chenchen; Chen, Shaojie; Li, Jiajia; Huang, Kaihong

    2016-01-01

    PC (pancreatic cancer) is the fourth most common cause of death due to cancer worldwide. The incidence and mortality rates have been increasing year by year worldwide, and this review has analyzed the most recent incidence and mortality data for pancreatic cancer occurrence in China. Several possible risk factors have been discussed here, involving known established risk factors and novel possible risk factors. The development of this cancer is a stepwise progression through intraepithelial neoplasia to carcinoma. Though early and accurate diagnosis is promising based on a combination of recent techniques including tumor markers and imaging modalities, lacking early clinical symptoms makes the diagnosis late. Correct staging is critical because treatment is generally based on this parameter. Treatment options have improved throughout the last decades. However, surgical excision remains the primary therapy and efficacy of conventional chemoradiotherapy for PC is limited. Recently, some novel new therapies have been developed and will be applied in clinics soon. This review will provide an overview of pancreatic cancer, including an understanding of the developments and controversies. PMID:26941789

  11. Epidemiology of cancer of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sai Yi; Morrison, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the small intestine is very uncommon. There are 4 main histological subtypes: adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumors, lymphoma and sarcoma. The incidence of small intestine cancer has increased over the past several decades with a four-fold increase for carcinoid tumors, less dramatic rises for adenocarcinoma and lymphoma and stable sarcoma rates. Very little is known about its etiology. An increased risk has been noted for individuals with Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, adenoma, familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Several behavioral risk factors including consumption of red or smoked meat, saturated fat, obesity and smoking have been suggested. The prognosis for carcinomas of the small intestine cancer is poor (5 years relative survival < 30%), better for lymphomas and sarcomas, and best for carcinoid tumors. There has been no significant change in long-term survival rates for any of the 4 histological subtypes. Currently, with the possible exceptions of obesity and cigarette smoking, there are no established modifiable risk factors which might provide the foundation for a prevention program aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of cancers of the small intestine. More research with better quality and sufficient statistical power is needed to get better understanding of the etiology and biology of this cancer. In addition, more studies should be done to assess not only exposures of interest, but also host susceptibility. PMID:21461167

  12. Epidemiology of cancer of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sai Yi; Morrison, Howard

    2011-03-15

    Cancer of the small intestine is very uncommon. There are 4 main histological subtypes: adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumors, lymphoma and sarcoma. The incidence of small intestine cancer has increased over the past several decades with a four-fold increase for carcinoid tumors, less dramatic rises for adenocarcinoma and lymphoma and stable sarcoma rates. Very little is known about its etiology. An increased risk has been noted for individuals with Crohn's disease, celiac disease, adenoma, familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Several behavioral risk factors including consumption of red or smoked meat, saturated fat, obesity and smoking have been suggested. The prognosis for carcinomas of the small intestine cancer is poor (5 years relative survival < 30%), better for lymphomas and sarcomas, and best for carcinoid tumors. There has been no significant change in long-term survival rates for any of the 4 histological subtypes. Currently, with the possible exceptions of obesity and cigarette smoking, there are no established modifiable risk factors which might provide the foundation for a prevention program aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of cancers of the small intestine. More research with better quality and sufficient statistical power is needed to get better understanding of the etiology and biology of this cancer. In addition, more studies should be done to assess not only exposures of interest, but also host susceptibility. PMID:21461167

  13. Epidemiology and biology of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoell, W M; Janicek, M F; Mirhashemi, R

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide, cancer of the cervix is the second leading cause of cancer death in women: each year, an estimated 500,000 cases are newly diagnosed. Among populations, there are large differences in incidence rates of invasive cervical cancer: these reflect the influence of environmental factors, screening Papanicolaou (Pap) tests, and treatment of pre-invasive lesions. The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, and 51 have been recovered from more than 95% of cervical cancers. We have made great strides in understanding the molecular mechanism of oncogenesis of this virus, focusing on the action of the E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins. These oncoproteins function by inactivating cell cycle regulators p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb), thus providing the initial event in progression to malignancy. Cervical cancers develop from precursor lesions, which are termed squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and are graded as high or low, depending on the degree of disruption of epithelial differentiation. Viral production occurs in low-grade lesions and is restricted to basal cells. In carcinomas, viral DNA is found integrated into the host genome, but no viral production is seen. The well-defined pre-invasive stages, as well as the viral factors involved at the molecular level, make cervical carcinoma a good model for investigating immune therapeutic alternatives or adjuvants to standard treatments. PMID:10225296

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of bone cancer in greater Bombay.

    PubMed

    Yeole, B B; Jussawalla, D J

    1998-09-01

    Bone tumours are comparatively uncommon, constituting only 0.5% of the total world cancer incidence. As Bone tumors consist of several distinct clinico-pathological entities, descriptive epidemiology of tumors at this site can be based only on studies where they can be distinguished. Ewing's sarcoma Chondrosarcoma and Osteosarcoma are the principal tumors involving bones. The basic data utilized for this study was collected from the Bombay Cancer Registry which was established in 1963, and is the first population based registry to be established in India. For studying the descriptive epidemiological variables the most recent 5 year incidence rates have been used. As a group, bone cancers represent 0.9% of the total number of incident cancer are seen in Greater Bombay. Males in general are seen to have a higher incidence of bone cancers than females. Ewing's sarcoma was found to be the commonest bone cancer in Bombay. The age specific incidence curves present striking differences according to cell types of bone cancer. Time trends in the incidence of these cancers, over the past 30 years have been presented. Our data indicate that there is a decreasing trend in incidence of bone cancers in females, whilst the rates are stable in males. Ionising radiation is the only environmental agent to cause this cancer. The discovery of other risk factors is the key prevention and will depend upon the experimental work undertaken to develop sub-clinical measures of risk that can be applied in interdisciplinary studies to identify more completely the causes of bone cancers. PMID:10226399

  15. [Infantile leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields: review of epidemiologic evidence in 2000].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S; Salvan, A

    2001-01-01

    We review the epidemiological evidence on childhood leukemia and residential exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. The possibility of carcinogenic effects of power frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF), at levels below units of micro tesla (microT), was first raised in 1979 by a case-control study on childhood cancer carried out in Denver, USA. In that study, excess risks of total cancer and leukemia were observed among children living in homes with "high or very high current configuration", as categorised on the basis of proximity to electric lines and transformers. Many other epidemiological studies have been published since then, characterised by improved--although still not optimal--methods of exposure assessment. At the end of 2000, the epidemiological evidence to support the association between exposure to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields and the risk of childhood leukemia is less consistent than what was observed in the mid 90s. At the same time, a growing body of experimental evidence has accumulated against both a direct and a promoting carcinogenic effect of ELF-EMF. Such "negative" experimental evidence hampers a causal interpretation of the "positive" epidemiological studies. PMID:11758279

  16. Ambient Temperature and Morbidity: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. Data sources and data extraction: We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Data synthesis: Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature–morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature–morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. Conclusions: There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable. PMID:21824855

  17. Epidemiological evidence linking tea consumption to human health: a review.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan V

    2014-01-01

    Tea has been widely consumed around the world for thousands of years and drinking tea is a daily habit for people of all ages. Tea is a major source of flavonoids, which have become well known as antioxidants. Tea also contains caffeine and theanine, which have been found to associate with health benefits. Many animal and epidemiological studies have been conducted to investigate the link between tea consumption and human health. However, common questions that arise about tea consumption include: whether all teas are the same, why drinking tea is linked with health benefits, how do the different ways of tea preparation impact on availability of tea components, how much and how long a person should consume tea to obtain health benefits, and whether there is any negative health effect associated with drinking tea. To answer these questions, this paper outlines the tea components and their link to human health, discusses major factors affecting availability of tea components in a tea cup, and reviews the latest epidemiological evidence linking tea consumption to human health. PMID:24237002

  18. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome research, focusing on published epidemiological associations with gastric, oesophageal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and other cancers. Large, prospective studies of the microbiome that employ multidisciplinary laboratory and analysis methods, as well as rigorous validation of case status, are likely to yield translational opportunities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by improving prevention, screening, and treatment. PMID:26730578

  19. Biologically based epidemiological studies of electric power and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G

    1993-01-01

    As societies industrialize, the health profile of the population changes; in general, acute infectious disease declines and chronic disease increases. Use of electricity is a hallmark of the industrialization process, but there has been no suspicion that electricity could increase the risk of cancer. Recently, however, a number of epidemiologic studies have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) may do just that. Although few cancer experiments have been done yet, there are a number of biological effects of EMF reported in the literature that might provide bases for designing cancer experiments and epidemiologic studies. These include effects of EMF on: a) DNA transcription and translation, b) calcium balance in cells, and c) pineal production of melatonin. Alterations in DNA transcription and translation could have pleiotropic effects. Disruption of calcium homeostasis has many implications including oncogene activation, promotional activity via protein kinases and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and increasing oxidative stress. Reduction of melatonin suggests a possible increased risk of cancers of hormone-dependent tissues such as breast and prostate. The idea that a cancer-causing agent must either be an initiator or a promoter should be discarded; indeed, the phenomenologic meaning of these two terms has become confused with imputed mechanistic necessity in recent years. Agents that affect division of normal cells or of fully transformed cells can play an important role in clinical cancer development quite apart from initiation or promotion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8206047

  20. Insights from epidemiology into dichloromethane and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Bale, Ambuja S

    2011-08-01

    Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers), focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21). These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0) were seen for the rarer forms of cancers such as brain cancer and specific hematopoietic cancers. Three large population-based case-control studies of incident non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Europe and the United States observed odds ratios between 1.5 and 2.2 with dichloromethane exposure (ever exposed or highest category of exposure), with higher risk seen in specific subsets of disease. More limited indications of associations with brain cancer, breast cancer, and liver and biliary cancer were also seen in this collection of studies. Existing cohort studies, given their size and uneven exposure information, are unlikely to resolve questions of cancer risks and dichloromethane exposure. More promising approaches are population-based case-control studies of incident disease, and the combination of data from such studies, with robust exposure assessments that include detailed occupational information and exposure assignment based on industry-wide surveys or direct exposure measurements. PMID:21909313

  1. Insights from Epidemiology into Dichloromethane and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Glinda S.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Bale, Ambuja S.

    2011-01-01

    Dichloromethane (methylene chloride) is a widely used chlorinated solvent. We review the available epidemiology studies (five cohort studies, 13 case-control studies, including seven of hematopoietic cancers), focusing on specific cancer sites. There was little indication of an increased risk of lung cancer in the cohort studies (standardized mortality ratios ranging from 0.46 to 1.21). These cohorts are relatively small, and variable effects (e.g., point estimates ranging from 0.5 to 2.0) were seen for the rarer forms of cancers such as brain cancer and specific hematopoietic cancers. Three large population-based case-control studies of incident non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Europe and the United States observed odds ratios between 1.5 and 2.2 with dichloromethane exposure (ever exposed or highest category of exposure), with higher risk seen in specific subsets of disease. More limited indications of associations with brain cancer, breast cancer, and liver and biliary cancer were also seen in this collection of studies. Existing cohort studies, given their size and uneven exposure information, are unlikely to resolve questions of cancer risks and dichloromethane exposure. More promising approaches are population-based case-control studies of incident disease, and the combination of data from such studies, with robust exposure assessments that include detailed occupational information and exposure assignment based on industry-wide surveys or direct exposure measurements. PMID:21909313

  2. Epidemiology of breast cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Mohamed, Ibraham

    2006-01-01

    Data from the National Cancer Registry of Malaysia for 2004 provide an age-standardised incidence rate (ASR) of 46.2 per 100,000 women. This means that approximately 1 in 20 women in the country develop breast cancer in their lifetime. However, the rate differs between the three main races, the Malays, Chinese and Indians. The age standardized incidence in Chinese is the highest, with 59.7 per 100,000, followed by the Indians at 55.8 per 100,000. The Malays have the lowest incidence of 33.9 per 100,000. This translates into 1 in 16 Chinese, 1 in 16 Indian and 1 in 28 Malay women developing breast cancer at some stage in their lives. The commonest age at presentation is between 40-49 years, with just over 50% of the cases under the age of 50 years, 16.8% below 40, and 2% under 30. Some 55.7% of all cases were found to be ER positive. The commonest presenting symptom was a lump in the breast in over 90% of cases, generally felt by the woman herself. The mean size of the lump was 4.2 cm, and on average, the women waited 3 months before seeking medical attention. Over the 12-year period from 1993 to 2004, about 60-70% of women presented with early stage (Stages 1-2) while 30-40% presented with late breast cancer (Stages 3-4). Especially Malays present at later stages and with larger tumours. Consequently their survival is worse than with Chinese and Indian women. The challenge in Malaysia is to be able to provide a comprehensive service in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, and this requires training of a team of health professionals dedicated to breast health, such as breast surgeons, radiologists specializing in breast imaging, breast pathologists, plastic surgeons specializing in breast reconstruction, medical and radiation oncologists, psycho-oncologists, counselors, and breast nurses. Advocacy can play a role here in galvanizing the political will to meet this challenge. PMID:17059323

  3. Epidemiological review of head and neck cancers in Karachi.

    PubMed

    Bhurgri, Yasmin; Bhurgri, Asif; Usman, Ahmed; Pervez, Shahid; Kayani, Naila; Bashir, Imtiaz; Ahmed, Rashida; Hasan, Sheema H

    2006-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, categories lip, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx are placed amongst the top ten malignancies globally. The cancers have a similar epidemiology, risk factors, morphology, and control measures. The geographical variations in incidence are indicative of the global differences in the prevalence of risk factors. The present study was conducted with the objective of reviewing descriptive epidemiological characteristics, incidence and time trends of head and neck cancers in Karachi (1995-2002). Head and neck cancers accounted for approximately one-fifth (21%) of the cancers in males and about one-tenth (11%) in females in the study period. The age standardized incidence rate (ASR) was 37.1/100,000 in males and 21.7/100,000 in females. In males, oral cavity and larynx were the commonly affected sites, followed by pharynx. In females, oral cavity was the preponderant site. The mean age of the patients was 53.0 years (95% CI 48.0; 58.0). A rising incidence was observed in both genders, more apparent in males. About 30% of oral cancer cases, 28.6% of the nasopharyngeal, 6.3% of the oropharyngeal, and 2.6% of laryngeal cancers occurred in patients 40 years and younger. The age specific incidence rates (ASIR) for oral cancer in males showed a gradual rise from 10 to 64+ years of age, for pharynx from 20 to 64+ and for larynx at 25+. The ASIR for oral cancer in females showed a gradual rise from 14 to 64+ years of age, for pharynx from 20 to 64+, a decade after the oral cancer rise and cancer larynx showed a rise at 25+, a decade and a half after the oral cancer rise. The peak incidence was at 64-69 years for all three cancer sites, in both genders. Pakistan falls into a high risk head and neck cancer geographical zone Presentation is late and treatment is not optimum. Recommendations, therefore for NCCP Pakistan, for short term benefits are selected community-based screening for the high risk population, early diagnosis, better treatment, rehabilitation

  4. The Epidemiology of Skin Cancer and its Trend in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Saeid; Enayatrad, Mostafa; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid; Fathali-loy-dizaji, Mehri; Soltani, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most common cancers is skin cancer worldwide. Since incidence and cost of treatment of the cancer are increasing, it is necessary to further investigate to prevent and control this disease. This study aimed to determine skin cancer trend and epidemiology in Iran. Methods: This study was done based on existing data. Data used in this study were obtained from a national registry of cancer cases and the Disease Management Center of Ministry of Health in Iran. All cases registered in the country were included during 2004–2008. Incidence rates were reported based on the direct method and standard population of World Health Organization. Results: Based on the results of this study, the incidence of skin cancer is rising in Iran and the sex ratio was more in men than women in all provinces. The age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of skin cancer was highest in males in Semnan, Isfahan, and Hamedan provinces (34.9, 30.80, and 28.84, respectively). The highest ASRs were seen in females in Semnan, Yazd, and Isfahan provinces (26.7, 24.14, and 18.97, respectively). The lowest ASR in male was observed in Sistan and Baluchestan, and in female in Hormozgan provinces. Conclusions: The incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the country. Therefore, the plan for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers. PMID:26288708

  5. Epidemiologic evidence of relationships between reproductive and child health outcomes and environmental chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Donald T; Arbuckle, Tye E; Turner, Michelle C; Bérubé, Annie; Yang, Qiuying; Liu, Shiliang; Krewski, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    This review summarizes the level of epidemiologic evidence for relationships between prenatal and/or early life exposure to environmental chemical contaminants and fetal, child, and adult health. Discussion focuses on fetal loss, intrauterine growth restriction, preterm birth, birth defects, respiratory and other childhood diseases, neuropsychological deficits, premature or delayed sexual maturation, and certain adult cancers linked to fetal or childhood exposures. Environmental exposures considered here include chemical toxicants in air, water, soil/house dust and foods (including human breast milk), and consumer products. Reports reviewed here included original epidemiologic studies (with at least basic descriptions of methods and results), literature reviews, expert group reports, meta-analyses, and pooled analyses. Levels of evidence for causal relationships were categorized as sufficient, limited, or inadequate according to predefined criteria. There was sufficient epidemiological evidence for causal relationships between several adverse pregnancy or child health outcomes and prenatal or childhood exposure to environmental chemical contaminants. These included prenatal high-level methylmercury (CH(3)Hg) exposure (delayed developmental milestones and cognitive, motor, auditory, and visual deficits), high-level prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and related toxicants (neonatal tooth abnormalities, cognitive and motor deficits), maternal active smoking (delayed conception, preterm birth, fetal growth deficit [FGD] and sudden infant death syndrome [SIDS]) and prenatal environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure (preterm birth), low-level childhood lead exposure (cognitive deficits and renal tubular damage), high-level childhood CH(3)Hg exposure (visual deficits), high-level childhood exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (chloracne), childhood ETS exposure (SIDS, new-onset asthma, increased

  6. [Environmental epidemiology of cancer in Puerto Rico: 1987-1988].

    PubMed

    Cerame Vivas, M J

    1991-06-01

    An epidemiological analysis on cancer was run for the years 1987 and 1988 and for each municipal jurisdiction in Puerto Rico. Areas of pronounced incidence were examined on the basis of possible environmental cause-and-effect relationships. The cancer data examined were based on first diagnoses for cancer of all types, respiratory cancer and leukemia. The municipality of Cataño was salient in most incidences. Cataño lies downwind from the largest metropolitan urban center in Puerto Rico (population density 9,559 inhabitants per square mile), from the largest number of industries for the island, from past and present uncontrolled non-compliance air emissions, from the largest number of vehicles, and is surrounded by wetlands. Also salient were other municipalities of historical or current heavy industrial emission activity with lenient or non-existent environmental controls. PMID:1930477

  7. Lung cancer in never smokers Epidemiology and risk prediction models

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, William J.; Meza, Rafael; Jeon, Jihyoun; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the epidemiology of lung cancer incidence and mortality among never smokers/ nonsmokers and describe the never smoker lung cancer risk models used by CISNET modelers. Our review focuses on those influences likely to have measurable population impact on never smoker risk, such as secondhand smoke, even though the individual-level impact may be small. Occupational exposures may also contribute importantly to the population attributable risk of lung cancer. We examine the following risk factors in this chapter: age, environmental tobacco smoke, cooking fumes, ionizing radiation including radon gas, inherited genetic susceptibility, selected occupational exposures, preexisting lung disease, and oncogenic viruses. We also compare the prevalence of never smokers between the three CISNET smoking scenarios and present the corresponding lung cancer mortality estimates among never smokers as predicted by a typical CISNET model. PMID:22882894

  8. Epidemiologic evidence for time variation in HIV infectivity.

    PubMed

    Shiboski, S C; Padian, N S

    1998-12-15

    Data from three epidemiologic studies of heterosexual transmission of HIV among monogamous couples are used to assess evidence for time variation in HIV infectivity, possibly related to varying levels of infectiousness following infection in the primary infected partner. Analyses are based on statistical techniques that account for the inherent incompleteness of exposure information from such studies, and that allow direct assessment of the hypotheses that infectivity varies with time since infection and across partnerships. Data include findings from 302 couples from the California Partners' Study and 51 and 31 couples, respectively, from two U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-sponsored studies of infection in partners of transfusion recipients. Results indicate weak evidence for higher infectivity following infection of the primary partner, decreasing to relatively lower levels from 2 to 10 years after. Although these findings are consistent with biologic observations of time variation in viral levels, other explanations of the observed pattern (e.g., heterogeneity of infectivity) are equally plausible, pointing out some inherent limitations of data from such studies. PMID:9859968

  9. The epidemiology of cancers in human immunodeficiency virus infection and after organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grulich, Andrew E; Vajdic, Claire M

    2015-04-01

    The authors provide an update on the association between immune deficiency and cancer risk in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and in solid organ transplant recipients. Over the past decade, it has become clear that a wider range of about 20 mostly infection-related cancers occur at increased rates in people with immune deficiency. The human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-related cancers of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are most closely related to level of immune deficiency. Transplant recipients also have a greatly increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin, related to direct carcinogenic effects of the pharmaceuticals used for immune suppression. For those three cancer types, the increased cancer risk is largely reversed when immune deficiency is decreased by treatment of HIV or by reduction of iatrogenic immune suppression. Other infection-related cancers also occur at increased rates, but it is not clear whether reduction of immune deficiency reduces cancer risk. Prostate and breast cancer do not occur at increased rates, providing strong evidence that these cancers are unlikely to be related to infection. Epidemiological and clinical trends in these two populations have led to substantial recent changes in cancer occurrence. PMID:25843729

  10. [Epidemiologic aspects of the histologic types of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Wilde, J; Matthäi, C; Wilde, J

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological study was performed in the county of Erfurt including all lung cancer patients of the years 1963, 1968, and 1972 to 1977, together 2,585 males and 358 females. The following results were found: 1. The incidence of lung cancer increased significantly from 1963 to 1977. 2. About 60% of all lung cancer patients were younger than 70 years. 3. In male patients squamous cell carcinomas prevailed with 44.8%. Small cell cancers came up to 34.6% and adenocarcinomas to 10.1%. Large cell cancers reached 10.5%. These types in female patients had a proportion to each other like 26.9%: 30.8%: 30.4%: 11.9%. The proportion of adenocarcinomas increased significantly during 1963 to 1977. 4. We found a non significant age relation of histological types. The adenocarcinoma and the small cell cancers dropped with rising age. 5. The classification of histological types and the conditions of detection of lung cancers did not change in the study interval. Therefore the altering of patterns of histological types, especially the increase of adenocarcinomas was attached to the beginning of cigarette smoking in younger ages and the increasing proportion of filter tipped brands as well to a variation of exposition against professional cancerogens. 6. Patients with adenocarcinomas have the highest survival rate after 5 years: 8.1%. Squamous cell lung cancer patients have a 5 year survival rate of 6.8%. Patients with small cell cancers and large cell cancers ranged at 2.7% or 2.6%. 7. Peripheral tumors of each histological type will be detected earlier by fluorographic screening than central carcinomas. Therefore the 5 year survival rates of peripheral cancers always are more favourable than that of central cancers. 8. For the problems in exact typing and staging we propose an internationally adjusted definition of tumor localization as a third parameter for prognosis. PMID:2171236

  11. A critical review of epidemiologic studies of radiofrequency exposure and human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Elwood, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews studies that have assessed associations between likely exposure to radiofrequency (RF) transmissions and various types of human cancer. These studies include three cluster investigations and five studies relating to general populations; all of these studies consider place of residence at the time of cancer diagnosis in regard to proximity to radio or television transmitters. There are also five relevant occupational cohort studies and several case-control studies of particular types of cancer. These studies assessed a large number of possible associations. Several positive associations suggesting an increased risk of some types of cancer in those who may have had greater exposure to RF emissions have been reported. However, the results are inconsistent: there is no type of cancer that has been consistently associated with RF exposures. The epidemiologic evidence falls short of the strength and consistency of evidence that is required to come to a reasonable conclusion that RF emissions are a likely cause of one or more types of human cancer. The evidence is weak in regard to its inconsistency, the design of the studies, the lack of detail on actual exposures, and the limitations of the studies in their ability to deal with other likely relevant factors. In some studies there may be biases in the data used PMID:10229715

  12. Epidemiologic investigation of a cancer cluster in professional football players.

    PubMed

    Kraut, A; Chan, E; Lioy, P J; Cohen, F B; Goldstein, B D; Landrigan, P J

    1991-12-01

    In 1976, the New York Giants professional football team relocated to the newly constructed Meadowlands Sports Complex (MSC) in East Rutherford, NJ. Between 1980 and 1987 four team members developed cancer: one case each of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, glioblastoma, angiosarcoma, and Hodgkin's disease. Because the surrounding area contains three superfund sites, concern was widespread that the cancers were related to environmental contamination. To assess for a possible environmental etiology, we conducted clinical, environmental, and epidemiologic studies at the MSC. Measurements of volatile organic compounds were all below occupational exposure limits and were similar to ambient levels in nearby Lyndhurst, NJ. Outdoor AM radio broadcast field strengths were in the uppermost 0.1% of field strengths measured in urban areas of the United States. Proportionate mortality ratio and proportional cancer incidence ratio studies of the MSC workforce found no excesses of cancer deaths or of incident cancer cases either for all sites combined or for any specific site. No significant differences in cancer incidence or mortality were found between indoor and nonindoor workers. Based on examination of all available data, the four cancer cases were judged most likely to have been clustered by chance and not to have been caused by environmental conditions at the MSC. PMID:1769360

  13. Epidemiologic investigation of a cancer cluster in professional football players

    SciTech Connect

    Kraut, A. ); Chan, E.; Landrigan, P.J. ); Lioy, P.J.; Goldstein, B.D. ); Cohen, F.B. )

    1991-12-01

    In 1976, the New York Giants profession football team relocated to the newly constructed Meadowlands Sports Complex (MSC) in East Rutherford, NJ. Between 1980 and 1987 four team members developed cancer: one case each of non-hodgkin's lymphoma, glioblastoma, angiosarcoma, and Hodgkin's disease. Because the surrounding area contains three superfund sites, concern was widespread that the cancers were related to environmental contamination. To assess for a possible environmental etiology, the authors conducted clinical, environmental, and epidemiologic studies at the MSC. Measurements of volatile organic compounds were all below occupational exposure limits and were similar to ambient levels in nearby Lyndhurst, NJ. Outdoor AM radio broadcast field strengths were in the uppermost 0.1% of field strengths measured in urban areas of the US. Proportionate mortality ratio and proportional cancer incidence ratio studies of the MSC workforce found no excesses of cancer deaths or of incident cancer cases either for all sites combined or for any specific site. No significant differences in cancer incidence or mortality were found between indoor and nonindoor workers. Based on examination of all available data, the four cancer cases were judged most likely to have been clustered by chance and not to have been caused by environmental conditions at the MSC.

  14. Occupational cancer in France: epidemiology, toxicology, prevention, and compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Aubrun, J C; Binet, S; Bozec, C; Brochard, P; Dimerman, S; Fontaine, B; Guénel, P; Luce, D; Martinet, Y; Moulin, J J; Mur, J M; Pietruszynski, M; Vallayer, C

    1999-01-01

    This article is a description of the current situation in France with regard to occupational cancer: research, prevention, and occupation. Toxicologic experiments are carried out using (italic)in vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) tests, particularly using transgenic mice. Several epidemiologic studies have been conducted over the last decades: population-based case-control studies; mortality studies and cancer incidence studies carried out in historical cohorts of workers employed in the industry; and case-control studies nested in occupational cohorts. French ethical aspects of toxicologic and epidemiologic studies are described. The results thus obtained are used to establish regulations for the prevention and the compensation of cancers attributable to occupational exposure. This French regulation for prevention of occupational cancer involves several partners: (italic)a(/italic)) the states authorities, including labor inspectors, responsible for preparing and implementing the labor legislation and for supervising its application, particularly in the fields of occupational health and safety and working conditions; (italic)b(/italic)) the Social Security Organisation for the analysis of present or potential occupational risks based on tests, visits in plants, complaints or requests from various sources, and statistics. These activities are performed within the framework of the general French policy for the prevention of occupational cancer. This organization includes the National Institute for Research and Safety, particularly involved in research in the various fields of occupational risks--animal toxicology, biologic monitoring, exposure measurements epidemiology, psychology, ergonomy, electronic systems and machineries, exposure to chemicals, noise, heat, vibration, and lighting; and (italic)c(/italic)) companies where the regulation defines the role of the plant manager, the occupational physician, and the Health, Safety and Working Conditions

  15. A critical review of epidemiology studies of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene and risk of renal-cell cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J

    1997-01-01

    The epidemiology studies of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) as they relate to risk of renal-cell cancer are critically reviewed. The studies fall into two basic groups: cohort studies of workers who use TCE or PCE and community-based case-control studies. Issues of bias, confounding, and chance are examined in relation to the studies. There is little evidence of an increased risk of renal-cell cancer and exposure to TCE or PCE. The few studies with elevations in risk suffer from important methodologic shortcomings. Although it is virtually impossible using epidemiology data to rule out conclusively a small increase in risk of renal-cell cancer, the totality of epidemiologic evidence clearly does not support a causal association with TCE or PCE. Future studies of these chemicals must include quantitative evidence of exposure and proper methodologic design, be large-scale in nature to detect small increases in risk, and provide a coherent interpretation of all epidemiology data on these solvents and risk of renal-cell cancer. PMID:9342621

  16. Coffee and cancer: a review of epidemiological studies, 1990-1999.

    PubMed

    Tavani, A; La Vecchia, C

    2000-08-01

    Epidemiological studies on the relation between coffee consumption and cancer risk have been mainly focused on cancers of the urinary bladder, pancreas and colorectum. The relation between coffee and bladder cancer is controversial, despite a large number of studies published over the last three decades. In most studies, the risk tends to be higher in coffee drinkers than in those who do not drink coffee, but the excess risk is generally moderate and is neither dose- nor duration-related. Thus, a strong association between coffee drinking and bladder cancer can be excluded, although it is still unclear whether the weak association is causal or nonspecific and due to some bias or confounding. For pancreatic cancer, a possible association with coffee consumption has been postulated in a large case-control study published in 1981; since then, however, most studies have shown no substantial association, and overall evidence suggests that coffee is not materially related to pancreatic cancer risk. Overall evidence on the coffee-colorectal cancer relation suggests an inverse association, since most case-control studies found odds ratios below unity, particularly for colon cancer. The pattern of risk is less clear for cohort studies. A plausible biological explanation has been given in terms of coffee-related reduction of bile acids and neutral sterol secretion in the colon. For other cancer sites, including oral cavity, oesophagus, stomach, liver, breast, ovary, kidney and lymphoid neoplasms, the relation of coffee drinking with cancer risk has been less extensively investigated, but the evidence is largely reassuring. PMID:10958327

  17. Epidemiologic survey of head and neck cancers in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Moon; Kim, Young Mo; Shim, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chang, Hyuck Soon; Choi, Jong Ouck; Rho, Young Soo; Kim, Min-Sik; Choi, Eun Chang; Choi, Geon; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Sang-Yun; Lee, Yong-Sik; Baek, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Im, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, Sang-Hak; Kim, Jae-Hee

    2003-01-01

    Head and neck cancers have never been systematically studied for clinical purposes yet in Korea. This epidemiological survey on head and neck cancer patients was undertaken from January to December 2001 in 79 otorhinolaryngology resident-training hospitals nationwide. The number of head and neck cancer patients was 1,063 cases in the year. The largest proportion of cases arose in the larynx, as many as 488 cases, which accounted for 45.9%. It was followed by, in order of frequency, oral cavity (16.5%), oropharynx (10.0%), and hypopharynx (9.5%). The male:female ratio was 5:1, and the mean age was 60.3 yr. Surgery was the predominant treatment modality in head and neck cancers: 204 (21.5%) cases were treated with only surgery, 198 (20.8%) cases were treated with surgery and radiotherapy, 207 cases (21.8%) were treated with combined therapy of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Larynx and hypopharynx cancers had a stronger relationship with smoking and alcohol drinking than other primary site cancers. Of them, 21 cases were found to be metastasized at the time of diagnosis into the lung, gastrointestinal tract, bone, or brain. Coexisting second primary malignancies were found in 23 cases. At the time of diagnosis, a total of 354 cases had cervical lymph node metastasis accounting for 42.0%. PMID:12589092

  18. Lung cancer in central Tunisia: epidemiology and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Missaoui, Nabiha; Hmissa, Sihem; Landolsi, Hanene; Korbi, Skander; Joma, Wafa; Anjorin, Affissath; Ben Abdelkrim, Soumaya; Beizig, Nadia; Mokni, Moncef

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide but data from Tunisia are limited. The aim of this research was to describe the epidemiology, pathology and clinical features of lung cancer in Central Tunisia. All lung cancer cases diagnosed during a 15-year period were analyzed based on the data of the Cancer Registry of the Center of Tunisia. Five-year age-specific rates, world age-standardized rates (ASR), and annual percent change were calculated using annual data on population size and the estimated age structure. A total of 1,882 incident cases of lung cancer were registered (1,782 males, 100 females). The median age at diagnosis was 64 years for males and 61 years for females, with ASRs of 35.2 per 100,000 among males and 1.5 among females. Over time, there were significant decreasing trends by -6.5% (95% CI: -12.9%; -0.2%) for females and a stable incidence for males at an annual rate of +0.2% (95% CI: -1.6%; +1.8%). The predominant histological type was squamous cell carcinoma in males (36.9%) and adenocarcinoma in females (52%). During 2003-2007, adenocarcinoma became the most frequent (33.7%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (30.3%) in males. The majority of tumor cases were diagnosed at advanced stages (79.9%). In conclusion, lung cancer has remained the most common cancer diagnosed at advanced stages among Tunisian men. Our findings justify the need to plan and develop effective programs aiming at the control and prevention of the spread of lung cancer in Tunisia. PMID:22296375

  19. Vigorous physical activity and risk of breast cancer in the African American breast cancer epidemiology and risk consortium.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhihong; Hong, Chi-Chen; Bandera, Elisa V; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L; Troester, Melissa A; Park, Song-Yi; McInerney, Kathryn A; Zirpoli, Gary; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Ambrosone, Christine B; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between physical activity and breast cancer risk has been extensively studied among women of European descent, with most studies reporting inverse associations. However, data on American women of African ancestry (AA) and by tumor subtypes are sparse. Thus, we examined associations of vigorous exercise and breast cancer risk overall, and by estrogen receptor (ER) status, in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. We pooled data from four large studies on 2482 ER+ cases, 1374 ER- cases, and 16,959 controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of breast cancer overall, and polytomous logistic regression was used to model the risk of ER+ and ER- cancer. Recent vigorous exercise was associated with a statistically significant, modestly decreased risk for breast cancer overall (OR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.81-0.96) and for ER+ cancer (OR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.80-0.98), but not for ER- cancer (OR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.82-1.06). Overall, there was no strong evidence of effect modification by age, menopausal status, body mass index, and parity. However, our data were suggestive of modification by family history, such that an inverse association was present among women without a family history but not among those with a relative affected by breast cancer. Results from this large pooled analysis provide evidence that vigorous physical activity is associated with a modestly reduced risk of breast cancer in AA women, specifically ER+ cancer. PMID:27514396

  20. A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ellen T; Boffetta, Paolo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Mandel, Jack S

    2014-10-01

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively. PMID:25064616

  1. The Health Effects of Passive Smoking: An Overview of Systematic Reviews Based on Observational Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shiyi; Yang, Chen; Gan, Yong; Lu, Zuxun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aim to systematically summarize the available epidemiological evidence to identify the impact of environmental tobacco smoke on health. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus for meta-analyses was conducted through January 2015. We included systematic reviews that investigated the association between passive smoking and certain diseases. Quantitative outcomes of association between passive smoking and the risk of certain diseases were summarized. Results Sixteen meta-analyses covering 130 cohort studies, 159 case-control studies, and 161 cross-sectional studies and involving 25 diseases or health problems were reviewed. Passive smoking appears not to be significantly associated with eight diseases or health problems, but significantly elevates the risk for eleven specific diseases or health problems, including invasive meningococcal disease in children (OR 2.18; 95% CI 1.63–2.92), cervical cancer (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.35–2.21), Neisseria meningitidis carriage (OR 1.68; 95% CI 1.19–2.36), Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.33–2.07), lower respiratory infections in infancy (OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.33–1.51), food allergy (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.12–1.83), and so on. Conclusions Our overview of systematic reviews of observational epidemiological evidence suggests that passive smoking is significantly associated with an increasing risk of many diseases or health problems, especially diseases in children and cancers. PMID:26440943

  2. Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to identifying risk and protective factors for colorectal adenomas and colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications using the NHS between 1976 and 2016. Results. Existing epidemiological studies using the NHS have reported that red and processed meat, alcohol, smoking, and obesity were associated with an increased risk of CRC, whereas folate, calcium, vitamin D, aspirin, and physical activity were associated with decreased risk of CRC. Moreover, modifiable factors, such as physical activity, vitamin D, folate, insulin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, and diet quality, were identified to be associated with survival among CRC patients. In recent years, molecular pathological epidemiological studies have been actively conducted and have shown refined results by molecular subtypes of CRC. Conclusions. The NHS has provided new insights into colorectal adenomas, CRC etiology, and pathogenic mechanisms. With its unique strengths, the NHS should continue to contribute to the field of CRC epidemiology and play a major role in public health. PMID:27459444

  3. Geometrically Evident: Framing Studies Using the Graphic Appraisal Tool for Epidemiology (GATE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andres; Srihari, Vinod

    2006-01-01

    Educators in evidence-based medicine (EBM) have noted that the core set of epidemiological concepts outlined in standard sources are sometimes put to use as oversimplified checklists for the appraisal of research reports. In this article, the authors present the Graphic Appraisal Tool for Epidemiology which was designed as a way combat, by visual…

  4. Phytoestrogens: epidemiology and a possible role in cancer protection.

    PubMed Central

    Adlercreutz, H

    1995-01-01

    Because many diseases of the Western Hemisphere are hormone-dependent cancers, we have postulated that the Western diet, compared to a vegetarian or semivegetarian diet, may alter hormone production, metabolism, or action at the cellular level by some biochemical mechanisms. Recently, our interest has been mainly focused on the cancer-protective role of some hormonelike diphenolic phytoestrogens of dietary origin, the lignans and the isoflavonoids. The precursors of the biologically active compounds originate in soybean products (mainly isoflavonoids), whole grain cereal food, seeds, and probably berries and nuts (mainly lignans). The plant lignan and isoflavonoid glycosides are converted by intestinal bacteria to hormonelike compounds with weak estrogenic but also antioxidative activity; they have now been shown to influence not only sex hormone metabolism and biological activity but also intracellular enzymes, protein synthesis, growth factor action, malignant cell proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis in a way that makes them strong candidates for a role as natural cancer-protective compounds. Epidemiologic investigations strongly support this hypothesis because the highest levels of these compounds in the diet are found in countries or regions with low cancer incidence. This report is a review on recent results suggesting that the diphenolic isoflavonoids and lignans are natural cancer-protective compounds. PMID:8593855

  5. [Cancer of the uterine cervix: epidemiology and virology].

    PubMed

    Barrasso, R

    1990-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have made it possible to isolate groups of women at risk or developing an epidermoid carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Among the factors studied, age at the time of the first sexual intercourse and number of male partners were found to be statistically significant factors. No study has yet proved that smegma facilitates cancer and that circumcision may prevent its occurrence. However, the importance of the "male factor" has been enhanced by many studies suggesting the possibility of an oncogenic factor transmissible by sexual intercourse. Several data suggest that some types of human papillomavirus are the necessary, if not sufficient, factors of cervical oncogenesis. Some types of herpes virus, notably HPV 16, can be identified in the majority of invasive cancers and their direct precursors: intraepithelial neoplasias. The carcinogenic role of papillomaviruses in animals ans in laboratory experiments supports the theory that these sexually transmissible viruses are involved in the origin of epidermoid cervical carcinoma. PMID:2154029

  6. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Mortaza Jabbarpour; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs. PMID:25685149

  7. FAMILY HISTORY OF CANCER: POOLED ANALYSIS IN THE INTERNATIONAL HEAD AND NECK CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY (INHANCE) CONSORTIUM

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Eva; Boffetta, Paolo; Berthiller, Julien; Castellsague, Xavier; Curado, Maria Paula; Maso, Luigino Dal; Daudt, Alexander W.; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Franceschi, Silvia; Hayes, Richard B.; Herrero, Rolando; Koifman, Sergio; Lazarus, Philip; Lence, Juan J.; Levi, Fabio; Mates, Dana; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Muscat, Joshua; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Olshan, Andrew F.; Rudnai, Peter; Shangina, Oxana; Sturgis, Erich M.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Talamini, Renato; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M.; Zaridze, David; Lissowska, Jolanta; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Vecchia, Carlo La; Hashibe, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol and tobacco consumption are well recognized risk factors for head and neck cancer (HNC). Evidence suggests that genetic predisposition may also play a role. Only a few epidemiologic studies, however, have considered the relation between HNC risk and family history of HNC and other cancers. We pooled individual- level data across 12 case-control studies including 8,967 HNC cases and 13,627 controls. We obtained pooled odds ratios (OR) using fixed and random effect models, and adjusting for potential confounding factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. A family history of HNC in first-degree relatives increased the risk of HNC (OR=1.7, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.2-2.3). The risk was higher when the affected relative was a sibling (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.6-3.1) rather than a parent (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.1-1.8), and for more distal HNC anatomic sites (hypopharynx and larynx). The risk was also higher, or limited to, subjects exposed to tobacco. The OR rose to 7.2 (95% CI 5.5-9.5) among subjects with family history, who were alcohol and tobacco users. A weak but significant association (OR=1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2) emerged for family history of other tobacco-related neoplasms, particularly with laryngeal cancer (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5). No association was observed for family history of non-tobacco related neoplasms and the risk of HNC (OR=1.0, 95% CI 0.9-1.1). Familial factors play a role in the etiology of HNC. In both subjects with and without family history of HNC, avoidance of tobacco and alcohol exposure may be the best way to avoid HNC. PMID:18814262

  8. Nurses’ Health Study Contributions on the Epidemiology of Less Common Cancers: Endometrial, Ovarian, Pancreatic, and Hematologic

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Mollie E.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Bao, Ying; Crous-Bou, Marta; Wolpin, Brian M.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contributions of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to epidemiologic knowledge of endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. Methods. We reviewed selected NHS publications from 1976 to 2016, including publications from consortia and other pooled studies. Results. NHS studies on less common cancers have identified novel risk factors, such as a reduced risk of endometrial cancer in women of advanced age at last birth, and have clarified or prospectively confirmed previously reported associations, including an inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer. Through biomarker research, the NHS has furthered understanding of the pathogenesis of rare cancers, such as the role of altered metabolism in pancreatic cancer risk and survival. NHS investigations have also demonstrated the importance of the timing of exposure, such as the finding of a positive association of early life body fatness, but not of usual adult body mass index, with non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk. Conclusions. Evidence from the NHS has informed prevention strategies and contributed to improved survival from less common but often lethal malignancies, including endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. PMID:27459458

  9. Sequencing Strategies for Population and Cancer Epidemiology Studies (SeqSPACE) Webinar Series

    Cancer.gov

    The Sequencing Strategies for Population and Cancer Epidemiology Studies (SeqSPACE) Webinar Series provides an opportunity for our grantees and other interested individuals to share lessons learned and practical information regarding the application of next generation sequencing to cancer epidemiology studies.

  10. Research Strategies for Nutritional and Physical Activity Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    In response to a series of controversial articles about nutritional epidemiology and cancer published in 2014, staff from the Environmental Epidemiology Branch initiated a series of meetings to refine programmatic priorities for human nutrition/physical activity and cancer etiology research in the near term.

  11. Parental occupation and childhood cancer: review of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, D A; Chen, J H

    1990-01-01

    Parental occupational exposures might affect childhood cancer in the offspring through genetic changes in the ovum or sperm or through transplacental carcinogenesis. The 24 published epidemiologic studies of this association have all used case-control designs, with controls generally selected from birth certificates or from general population sampling. Occupational exposures were inferred from job titles on birth certificates or through interviews. A large number of occupation-cancer associations have been reported, many of which were not addressed or not confirmed in other studies. Several associations have been found with consistency: paternal exposures in hydrocarbon-associated occupations, the petroleum and chemical industries, and especially paint exposures have been associated with brain cancer; paint exposures have also been linked to leukemias. Maternal exposures have received much less attention, but studies have yielded strongly suggestive results linking a variety of occupational exposures to leukemia and brain cancer. The primary limitations in this literature are the inaccuracy inherent in assigning exposure based on job title alone and imprecision due to limited study size. Although no etiologic associations have been firmly established by these studies, the public health concerns and suggestive data warrant continued research. PMID:2272330

  12. Assessment of environmental and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood cancers: the Childrens Cancer Group epidemiology program.

    PubMed Central

    Robison, L L; Buckley, J D; Bunin, G

    1995-01-01

    The occurrence of cancer during childhood represents one of the leading causes of death within the pediatric and adolescent age group. It is estimated that approximately 8000 children will be diagnosed annually with cancer in the United States. Epidemiologic research addressing the etiology of childhood cancer has been limited because of the difficulties in identifying a sufficiently large study population. Moreover, the use of retrospectively ascertained childhood cancer cases in epidemiologic investigations has restricted the incorporation of biological and clinical parameters. The Childrens Cancer Group has developed an active program in epidemiologic research, with over a decade of experience demonstrating the feasibility and strengths of conducting analytic epidemiologic studies within a cooperative clinical trials network. The availability of detailed clinical and biologic data on cases diagnosed within the cooperative group facilitates the transfer of state-of-the-art technology to epidemiologic research. PMID:8549456

  13. Epidemiology and etiology of Parkinson's disease: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Wirdefeldt, Karin; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Mandel, Jack

    2011-06-01

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not well understood but likely to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Incidence and prevalence estimates vary to a large extent-at least partly due to methodological differences between studies-but are consistently higher in men than in women. Several genes that cause familial as well as sporadic PD have been identified and familial aggregation studies support a genetic component. Despite a vast literature on lifestyle and environmental possible risk or protection factors, consistent findings are few. There is compelling evidence for protective effects of smoking and coffee, but the biologic mechanisms for these possibly causal relations are poorly understood. Uric acid also seems to be associated with lower PD risk. Evidence that one or several pesticides increase PD risk is suggestive but further research is needed to identify specific compounds that may play a causal role. Evidence is limited on the role of metals, other chemicals and magnetic fields. Important methodological limitations include crude classification of exposure, low frequency and intensity of exposure, inadequate sample size, potential for confounding, retrospective study designs and lack of consistent diagnostic criteria for PD. Studies that assessed possible shared etiological components between PD and other diseases show that REM sleep behavior disorder and mental illness increase PD risk and that PD patients have lower cancer risk, but methodological concerns exist. Future epidemiologic studies of PD should be large, include detailed quantifications of exposure, and collect information on environmental exposures as well as genetic polymorphisms. PMID:21626386

  14. Extracellular vesicles: potential applications in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh; Lam, Tram Kim; Hebert, Elizabeth; Divi, Rao L

    2015-01-01

    Both normal and diseased cells continuously shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) into extracellular space, and the EVs carry molecular signatures and effectors of both health and disease. EVs reflect dynamic changes that are occurring in cells and tissue microenvironment in health and at a different stage of a disease. EVs are capable of altering the function of the recipient cells. Trafficking and reciprocal exchange of molecular information by EVs among different organs and cell types have been shown to contribute to horizontal cellular transformation, cellular reprogramming, functional alterations, and metastasis. EV contents may include tumor suppressors, phosphoproteins, proteases, growth factors, bioactive lipids, mutant oncoproteins, oncogenic transcripts, microRNAs, and DNA sequences. Therefore, the EVs present in biofluids offer unprecedented, remote, and non-invasive access to crucial molecular information about the health status of cells, including their driver mutations, classifiers, molecular subtypes, therapeutic targets, and biomarkers of drug resistance. In addition, EVs may offer a non-invasive means to assess cancer initiation, progression, risk, survival, and treatment outcomes. The goal of this review is to highlight the current status of information on the role of EVs in cancer, and to explore the utility of EVs for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and epidemiology. PMID:25883534

  15. Epidemiological research on radiation-induced cancer in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    The late effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on cancer occurrence have been evaluated by epidemiological studies on three cohorts: a cohort of atomic bomb survivors (Life Span Study; LSS), survivors exposed IN UTERO : , and children of atomic bomb survivors (F1). The risk of leukemia among the survivors increased remarkably in the early period after the bombings, especially among children. Increased risks of solid cancers have been evident since around 10 years after the bombings and are still present today. The LSS has clarified the dose-response relationships of radiation exposure and risk of various cancers, taking into account important risk modifiers such as sex, age at exposure, and attained age. Confounding by conventional risk factors including lifestyle differences is not considered substantial because people were non-selectively exposed to the atomic bomb radiation. Uncertainty in risk estimates at low-dose levels is thought to be derived from various sources, including different estimates of risk at background levels, uncertainty in dose estimates, residual confounding and interaction, strong risk factors, and exposure to residual radiation and/or medical radiation. The risk of cancer in subjects exposed IN UTERO : is similar to that in LSS subjects who were exposed in childhood. Regarding hereditary effects of radiation exposure, no increased risk of cancers associated with parental exposure to radiation have been observed in the F1 cohort to date. In addition to biological and pathogenetic interpretations of the present results, epidemiological investigations using advanced technology should be used to further analyze these cohorts. PMID:26976124

  16. Epidemiological research on radiation-induced cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ozasa, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    The late effects of exposure to atomic bomb radiation on cancer occurrence have been evaluated by epidemiological studies on three cohorts: a cohort of atomic bomb survivors (Life Span Study; LSS), survivors exposed in utero, and children of atomic bomb survivors (F1). The risk of leukemia among the survivors increased remarkably in the early period after the bombings, especially among children. Increased risks of solid cancers have been evident since around 10 years after the bombings and are still present today. The LSS has clarified the dose–response relationships of radiation exposure and risk of various cancers, taking into account important risk modifiers such as sex, age at exposure, and attained age. Confounding by conventional risk factors including lifestyle differences is not considered substantial because people were non-selectively exposed to the atomic bomb radiation. Uncertainty in risk estimates at low-dose levels is thought to be derived from various sources, including different estimates of risk at background levels, uncertainty in dose estimates, residual confounding and interaction, strong risk factors, and exposure to residual radiation and/or medical radiation. The risk of cancer in subjects exposed in utero is similar to that in LSS subjects who were exposed in childhood. Regarding hereditary effects of radiation exposure, no increased risk of cancers associated with parental exposure to radiation have been observed in the F1 cohort to date. In addition to biological and pathogenetic interpretations of the present results, epidemiological investigations using advanced technology should be used to further analyze these cohorts. PMID:26976124

  17. Divergent associations of height with cardiometabolic disease and cancer: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and global implications.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hu, Frank B; Schulze, Matthias B

    2016-05-01

    Among chronic non-communicable diseases, cardiometabolic diseases and cancer are the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although high BMI and waist circumference, as estimates of total and abdominal fat mass, are now accepted as predictors of the increasing incidence of these diseases, adult height, which also predicts mortality, has been neglected. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests that height is associated with lower cardiometabolic risk, but higher cancer risk, associations supported by mendelian randomisation studies. Understanding the complex epidemiology, biology, and pathophysiology related to height, and its association with cardiometabolic diseases and cancer, is becoming even more important because average adult height has increased substantially in many countries during recent generations. Among the mechanisms driving the increase in height and linking height with cardiometabolic diseases and cancer are insulin and insulin-like growth factor signalling pathways. These pathways are thought to be activated by overnutrition, especially increased intake of milk, dairy products, and other animal proteins during different stages of child development. Limiting overnutrition during pregnancy, early childhood, and puberty would avoid not only obesity, but also accelerated growth in children-and thus might reduce risk of cancer in adulthood. PMID:26827112

  18. Epidemiological evidence for aggravation and promotion of COPD by acid air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    The chapter discusses epidemiologic evidence for the role of acidic aerosols in the development and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The hypothesis that sulfuric acid was the most important component of the mix of pollutants responsible for classic air pollution episodes was first proposed more than 50 years ago. However, analyses of these episodes and more recent epidemiologic studies of lower level exposures are suggestive but not conclusive, primarily because of the limitations in technology available for measuring exposure.

  19. Clinical and epidemiologic variations of esophageal cancer in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Jaime V; Chamberlain, Robert M; Ngoma, Twalib; Mwaiselage, Julius; Schmid, Kendra K; Kahesa, Crispin; Soliman, Amr S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) in Kilimanjaro in comparison to other regions in Tanzania. METHODS: We also examined the clinical, epidemiologic, and geographic distribution of the 1332 EC patients diagnosed and/or treated at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) during the period 2006-2013. Medical records were used to abstract patient information on age, sex, residence, smoking status, alcohol consumption, tumor site, histopathologic type of tumor, date and place of diagnosis, and type and date of treatment at ORCI. Regional variation of EC patients was investigated at the level of the 26 administrative regions of Tanzania. Total, age- and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated. RESULTS: Male patients 55 years and older had higher incidence of EC than female and younger patients. Of histopathologically-confirmed cases, squamous-cell carcinoma represented 90.9% of histopathologic types of tumors. The administrative regions in the central and eastern parts of Tanzania had higher incidence rates than western regions, specifically administrative regions of Kilimanjaro, Dar es Salaam, and Tanga had the highest rates. CONCLUSION: Further research should focus on investigating possible etiologic factors for EC in regions with high incidence in Tanzania. PMID:26989467

  20. Overview of epidemiologic research on electric and magnetic fields and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A. )

    1993-04-01

    This overview of epidemiologic research addresses the potential role of 60 Hertz electric and magnetic fields (EMF) in the etiology of cancer. The key findings are summarized with notation of the methodological challenges with which investigators must content. Although exposure is ubiquitous, long-term average EMF is influenced primarily by the background levels in homes, use of selected electric appliances such as electric blankets, and workplace exposures to energized equipment. Studies of residential exposure have focused on childhood cancer, starting with the report of an excess of wire configurations associated with elevated magnetic fields near the homes of children who developed cancer compared to healthy children. Several subsequent studies have tended to confirm that association, although the evidence falls short of demonstrating a causal association between magnetic fields and cancer. Exposures from electric appliances have been less extensively pursued, with some suggestions of an association with childhood cancer. A more extensive literature has evaluated the association between workplace exposure to EMF, based on job titles of electrical workers and cancer. Across many different study designs and settings, certain groups of electrical workers show elevated occurrence of leukemia and brain cancer. The consistency of findings is notable, but the key question is whether the association with job title is due to EMF or some other agent in the workplace. Future research would benefit from specification of testable challenges to a causal association between EMF exposure in the home or workplace and cancer, along with continued efforts to improve our understanding and measurement of EMF exposure. 64 refs.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: Epidemiologic links and theoretical biological constructs.

    PubMed

    Gozal, David; Farré, Ramon; Nieto, F Javier

    2016-06-01

    Sleep disorders have emerged as highly prevalent conditions in the last 50-75 y. Along with improved understanding of such disorders, the realization that perturbations in sleep architecture and continuity may initiate, exacerbate or modulate the phenotypic expression of multiple diseases including cancer has gained increased attention. Furthermore, the intermittent hypoxia that is attendant to sleep disordered breathing, has recently been implicated in increased incidence and more adverse prognosis of cancer. The unifying conceptual framework linking these associations proposes that increased sympathetic activity and/or alterations in immune function, particularly affecting innate immune cellular populations, underlie the deleterious effects of sleep disorders on tumor biology. In this review, the epidemiological evidence linking disrupted sleep and intermittent hypoxia to oncological outcomes, and the potential biological underpinnings of such associations as illustrated by experimental murine models will be critically appraised. The overarching conclusion appears supportive in the formulation of an hypothetical framework, in which fragmented sleep and intermittent hypoxia may promote changes in multiple signalosomes and transcription factors that can not only initiate malignant transformation, but will also alter the tumor microenvironment, disrupt immunosurveillance, and thus hasten tumor proliferation and increase local and metastatic invasion. Future bench-based experimental studies as well as carefully conducted and controlled clinical epidemiological studies appear justified for further exploration of these hypotheses. PMID:26447849

  2. Epidemiology of lung cancer prognosis: quantity and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is very heterogeneous in its clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment response; and like other diseases, the prognosis consists of two essential facets: survival and quality of life (QOL). Lung cancer survival is mostly determined by disease stage and treatment modality, and the 5-Year survival rate has been in a plateau of 15% for three decades. QOL is focused on life aspects that are affected by health conditions and medical interventions; the balance of physical functioning and suffering from treatment side effects has long been a concern of care providers as well as patients. Obviously needed are easily measurable biologic markers to stratify patients before treatment for optimal results in survival and QOL and to monitor treatment responses and toxicities. Targeted therapies toward the mechanisms of tumor development, growth, and metastasis are promising and actively translated into clinical practice. Long-term lung cancer (LTLC) survivors are people who are alive 5 Years after the diagnosis. Knowledge about the health and QOL in LTLC survivors is limited because outcome research in lung cancer has been focused mainly on short-term survival. The independent or combined effects of lung cancer treatment, aging, smoking and drinking, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial factors likely cause late effects, including organ malfunction, chronic fatigue, pain, or premature death among lung cancer survivors. New knowledge to be gained should help lung cancer survivors, their healthcare providers, and their caregivers by providing evidence for establishing clinical recommendations to enhance their long-term survival and health-related QOL. PMID:19109795

  3. Evaluation and use of epidemiological evidence for environmental health risk assessment: WHO guideline document.

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Environmental health risk assessment is increasingly being used in the development of environmental health policies, public health decision making, the establishment of environmental regulations, and research planning. The credibility of risk assessment depends, to a large extent, on the strength of the scientific evidence on which it is based. It is, therefore, imperative that the processes and methods used to evaluate the evidence and estimate health risks are clear, explicit, and based on valid epidemiological theory and practice. Epidemiological Evidence for Environmental Health Risk Assessment is a World Health Organization (WHO) guideline document. The primary target audiences of the guidelines are expert review groups that WHO (or other organizations) might convene in the future to evaluate epidemiological evidence on the health effects of environmental factors. These guidelines identify a set of processes and general approaches to assess available epidemiological information in a clear, consistent, and explicit manner. The guidelines should also help in the evaluation of epidemiological studies with respect to their ability to support risk assessment and, consequently, risk management. Conducting expert reviews according to such explicit guidelines would make health risk assessment and subsequent risk management and risk communication processes more readily understood and likely to be accepted by policymakers and the public. It would also make the conclusions reached by reviews more readily acceptable as a basis for future WHO guidelines and other recommendations, and would provide a more rational basis for setting priorities for future research. PMID:11049823

  4. Evaluation and use of epidemiological evidence for environmental health risk assessment: WHO guideline document.

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    Environmental health risk assessment is increasingly being used in the development of environmental health policies, public health decision making, the establishment of environmental regulations, and research planning. The credibility of risk assessment depends, to a large extent, on the strength of the scientific evidence on which it is based. It is, therefore, imperative that the processes and methods used to evaluate the evidence and estimate health risks are clear, explicit, and based on valid epidemiological theory and practice. Epidemiological Evidence for Environmental Health Risk Assessment is a World Health Organization (WHO) guideline document. The primary target audiences of the guidelines are expert review groups that WHO (or other organizations) might convene in the future to evaluate epidemiological evidence on the health effects of environmental factors. These guidelines identify a set of processes and general approaches to assess available epidemiological information in a clear, consistent, and explicit manner. The guidelines should also help in the evaluation of epidemiological studies with respect to their ability to support risk assessment and, consequently, risk management. Conducting expert reviews according to such explicit guidelines would make health risk assessment and subsequent risk management and risk communication processes more readily understood and likely to be accepted by policymakers and the public. It would also make the conclusions reached by reviews more readily acceptable as a basis for future WHO guidelines and other recommendations, and would provide a more rational basis for setting priorities for future research. PMID:11049823

  5. Embolisation of cancer: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Goode, J A; Matson, M B

    2004-01-01

    Embolisation has become an accepted modality of cancer treatment in patients with a variety of clinical scenarios. It is commonly used in clinical practice in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and neuroendocrine tumours, and renal cell carcinoma. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy of embolotherapy in these clinical settings, together with the associated complications. PMID:18250022

  6. The use of epidemiological evidence in the compensation of veterans.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jonathan M; McMichael, Guy H; Wilcox, Allen J

    2010-06-01

    Men and women serving in the U.S. military are exposed to diverse agents that may affect their health, causing injury and disease while they are in the service or after discharge. This case study addresses the compensation of veterans for injury and illnesses arising from exposures received during military service and focuses on the presumptions that are made around compensation of veterans for conditions arising after their service. Presumptions are made because of evidence gaps related to exposure and causation. The current process for evidence review related to causation involves Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees that evaluate evidence relevant to association. The Veterans Administration uses the IOM reports in making presumptions. A new approach was recommended by an IOM committee: a transparent, evidence-based approach that would lead to decisions by means of an explicit process. The Committee set out six principles as a foundation for its framework: stakeholder inclusiveness, evidence-based decisions, transparent process, flexibility, consistency, and the use of causation, not just association, as the basis for decision making. The committee also called for needed tracking of exposure and associated health outcomes during and after military service. This case study covers "lessons learned" around evidence synthesis, causal inferences, and decision-making. PMID:20470968

  7. Lung cancer and diesel exhaust: an updated critical review of the occupational epidemiology literature

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, John F.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A recent review concluded that the evidence from epidemiology studies was indeterminate and that additional studies were required to support the diesel exhaust-lung cancer hypothesis. This updated review includes seven recent studies. Two population-based studies concluded that significant exposure-response (E-R) trends between cumulative diesel exhaust and lung cancer were unlikely to be entirely explained by bias or confounding. Those studies have quality data on life-style risk factors, but do not allow definitive conclusions because of inconsistent E-R trends, qualitative exposure estimates and exposure misclassification (insufficient latency based on job title), and selection bias from low participation rates. Non-definitive results are consistent with the larger body of population studies. An NCI/NIOSH cohort mortality and nested case-control study of non-metal miners have some surrogate-based quantitative diesel exposure estimates (including highest exposure measured as respirable elemental carbon (REC) in the workplace) and smoking histories. The authors concluded that diesel exhaust may cause lung cancer. Nonetheless, the results are non-definitive because the conclusions are based on E-R patterns where high exposures were deleted to achieve significant results, where a posteriori adjustments were made to augment results, and where inappropriate adjustments were made for the “negative confounding” effects of smoking even though current smoking was not associated with diesel exposure and therefore could not be a confounder. Three cohort studies of bus drivers and truck drivers are in effect air pollution studies without estimates of diesel exhaust exposure and so are not sufficient for assessing the lung cancer-diesel exhaust hypothesis. Results from all occupational cohort studies with quantitative estimates of exposure have limitations, including weak and inconsistent E-R associations that could be explained by bias, confounding or chance, exposure

  8. The changing epidemiology of smoking and lung cancer histology.

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, E L; Muscat, J E

    1995-01-01

    In 1950, the first large-scale epidemiological studies demonstrated that lung cancer is causatively associated with cigarette smoking, a finding subsequently confirmed by the Royal College of Physicians in London, the U.S. Surgeon General, and the World Health Organization. Although cigarette consumption has gradually decreased in the United States from a high of about 3800 cigarettes per adult per year in 1965 to about 2800 cigarettes in 1993, death from lung cancer has reached a high among males at the rate of 74.9/100,000/year and among females at the rate of 28.5. However, in the younger cohorts, the lung cancer death rate is decreasing in both men and women. In this overview we discuss the steeper increase during recent decades of lung adenocarcinoma incidence compared with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. In 1950, the ratio of these two major types of lung cancer in males was about 1:18; today it is about 1:1.2-1.4. This overview discusses two concepts that are regarded as contributors to this change in the histological types of lung cancer. One factor is the decrease in average nicotine and tar delivery of cigarettes from about 2.7 and 38 mg in 1955 to 1.0 and 13.5 mg in 1993, respectively. Other major factors for the reduced emission of smoke relate to changes in the composition of the cigarette tobacco blend and general acceptance of cigarettes with filter tips; the latter constitute 97% of all cigarettes currently sold. However, smokers of low-yield cigarettes compensate for the low delivery of nicotine by inhaling the smoke more deeply and by smoking more intensely; such smokers may be taking up to 5 puffs/min with puff volumes up to 55 ml. Under these conditions, the peripheral lung is exposed to increased amounts of smoke carcinogens that are suspected to lead to lung adenocarcinoma. Among the important changes in the composition of the tobacco blend of the U.S. cigarette is a significant increase in nitrate content (0.5% to 1.2-1.5%), which raises

  9. The changing epidemiology of smoking and lung cancer histology.

    PubMed

    Wynder, E L; Muscat, J E

    1995-11-01

    In 1950, the first large-scale epidemiological studies demonstrated that lung cancer is causatively associated with cigarette smoking, a finding subsequently confirmed by the Royal College of Physicians in London, the U.S. Surgeon General, and the World Health Organization. Although cigarette consumption has gradually decreased in the United States from a high of about 3800 cigarettes per adult per year in 1965 to about 2800 cigarettes in 1993, death from lung cancer has reached a high among males at the rate of 74.9/100,000/year and among females at the rate of 28.5. However, in the younger cohorts, the lung cancer death rate is decreasing in both men and women. In this overview we discuss the steeper increase during recent decades of lung adenocarcinoma incidence compared with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. In 1950, the ratio of these two major types of lung cancer in males was about 1:18; today it is about 1:1.2-1.4. This overview discusses two concepts that are regarded as contributors to this change in the histological types of lung cancer. One factor is the decrease in average nicotine and tar delivery of cigarettes from about 2.7 and 38 mg in 1955 to 1.0 and 13.5 mg in 1993, respectively. Other major factors for the reduced emission of smoke relate to changes in the composition of the cigarette tobacco blend and general acceptance of cigarettes with filter tips; the latter constitute 97% of all cigarettes currently sold. However, smokers of low-yield cigarettes compensate for the low delivery of nicotine by inhaling the smoke more deeply and by smoking more intensely; such smokers may be taking up to 5 puffs/min with puff volumes up to 55 ml. Under these conditions, the peripheral lung is exposed to increased amounts of smoke carcinogens that are suspected to lead to lung adenocarcinoma. Among the important changes in the composition of the tobacco blend of the U.S. cigarette is a significant increase in nitrate content (0.5% to 1.2-1.5%), which raises

  10. Epidemiology and early diagnosis of primary liver cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, F.S.; Shen, K.N.

    1986-01-01

    Epidemiological studies in different areas in China have revealed several outstanding risk factors of PLC, i.e., HBV infection, pollution of drinking water, contamination of food by AFB1 and/or nitrosamines, and family predisposition. Accordingly, a program of HBV vaccination, improved supply of drinking water, better preservation and storage of food, and possibly chemoprevention for high-risk populations should be effective preventive measures. Studies have shown that frequent AFP screening in high-risk populations is highly recommended to detect early cases of PLC. According to research in Qidong, careful follow-up of the dynamic changes of AFP in individuals with persistent low levels of positive AFP is important for distinguishing other conditions from true PLC. Newer means for the localization of small-size PLC (under 5 cm), such as type B ultrasonography, nuclide scanning, computerized tomography, and hepatoangiography, represent remarkable progress in improving markedly the success of surgery and hence the survival rate of PLC patients. The advances in knowledge of PLC have been encouraging. Although much work remains to be done on the etiological agents and the mechanism of oncogenesis, it is time that larger scale control measures be put into effect in high-incidence areas to discover if one of the most common cancers in the world can be controlled. 62 references.

  11. Descriptive epidemiology and geographic variation of childhood brain cancer in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Bunin, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    The descriptive epidemiology and geographic variation of childhood brain cancer by cell type was studied. For each cell type, the study indicates time trends, sex ratios, geographic variation, racial differences, urban-rural differences, and socioeconomic differences. Since, in animals, one virus or chemical often causes tumors at several sites, the sex, race, age and socio-economic status of childhood brain cancer cases was compared to the epidemiologic profile of childhood leukemias. Similar epidemiological profiles would imply similar etiologies. 116 references, 18 figures, 71 tables.

  12. Biomarkers of Dietary Polyphenols in Cancer Studies: Current Evidence and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jincheng; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols, commonly contained in fruits and vegetables, have long been associated with a protective role against multiple diseases and adverse health effects. Generally, in vitro and animal experiments have provided strong positive evidence, whereas evidence from in vivo and human epidemiological studies is not strong enough. Most epidemiological studies to date use food frequency questionnaire based dietary intake estimations, which inevitably incur imprecision. Biomarkers of polyphenol have the potential to complement and enhance current studies. This review performed a literature search of all epidemiological studies or controlled clinical/intervention trials which employed biomarkers of exposure for polyphenols to help assess their anticarcinogenic role, using studies on green tea polyphenols as a study model. Currently, studies on this topic are still limited; breast cancer and prostate cancer were the only widely studied cancer types. Isoflavone is the only widely studied polyphenol. In addition to associations between polyphenols and cancer risks, factors such as host genetic susceptibility, epigenetic modification, and gut microbiome patterns may also impact on the protective roles of polyphenols. More evidence should be collected by utilizing biomarkers of exposure for polyphenols in future epidemiological studies before a clear conclusion can be made. PMID:26180594

  13. Impact of environmental inequity on health outcome: where is the epidemiological evidence?

    PubMed Central

    René, A. A.; Daniels, D. E.; Martin, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    A significant amount of evidence reveals a presence of environmental inequity. Although there is a disproportionate distribution of waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities, and chemical and manufacturing plants in minority and low-income communities in the United States, little research has been devoted to show any associations based on analytic epidemiological methods. To date, attempts to quantify health disparities have included demographic data, race, sex, income, other socioeconomic factors, and broad symptomatic survey instruments. To study this, we examined the latest epidemiological evidence documenting the existence of adverse health impacts resulting from environmental inequity. We observed that the overwhelming majority of studies were descriptive in nature and lacked comparison populations. As a result, we believe that further research based on analytic epidemiological methods would further contribute to the determination of the cause-effect relationship between environmental exposure and health outcome. PMID:10918762

  14. Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cancer: Epidemiology and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shmuel, Sarit; Rostoker, Ran; Scheinman, Eyal J; LeRoith, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple metabolic disorders that drive cardiovascular disease, T2D and cancer. The doubling in the number of obese adults over the past 3 decades led to the recognition of obesity as a "disease". With over 42 million children obese or overweight, this epidemic is rapidly growing worldwide. Obesity and T2D are both associated together and independently with an increased risk for cancer and a worse prognosis. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies revealed potential factors that may explain the association between obesity-linked metabolic disorders and cancer risk. Studies based on the insulin resistance MKR mice, highlighted the roe of the insulin receptor and its downstream signaling proteins in mediating hyperinsulinemia's mitogenic effects. Hypercholesterolemia was also shown to promote the formation of larger tumors and enhancement in metastasis. Furthermore, the conversion of cholesterol into 27-Hydroxycholesterol was found to link high fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia with cancer pathophysiology. Alteration in circulating adipokines and cytokines are commonly found in obesity and T2D. Adipokines are involved in tumor growth through multiple mechanisms including mTOR, VEGF and cyclins. In addition, adipose tissues are known to recruit and alter macrophage phenotype; these macrophages can promote cancer progression by secreting inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. Better characterization on the above factors and their downstream effects is required in order to translate the current knowledge into the clinic, but more importantly is to understand which are the key factors that drive cancer in each patient. Until we reach this point, policies and activities toward healthy diets and physical activities remain the best medicine. PMID:25903410

  15. Analgesic use and the risk of kidney cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Choueiri, Toni K; Je, Youjin; Cho, Eunyoung

    2014-01-15

    Analgesics are the most commonly used over-the-counter drugs worldwide with certain analgesics having cancer prevention effect. The evidence for an increased risk of developing kidney cancer with analgesic use is mixed. Using a meta-analysis design of available observational epidemiologic studies, we investigated the association between analgesic use and kidney cancer risk. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify eligible case-control or cohort studies published in English until June 2012 for three categories of analgesics: acetaminophen, aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Study-specific effect estimates were pooled to compute an overall relative risk (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) using a random-effects model for each category of the analgesics. We identified 20 studies (14 with acetaminophen, 13 with aspirin and five with other NSAIDs) that were performed in six countries, including 8,420 cases of kidney cancer. Use of acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs were associated with an increased risk of kidney cancer (pooled RR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15-1.44 and 1.25; 95% CI: 1.06-1.46, respectively). For aspirin use, we found no overall increased risk (pooled RR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.95-1.28), except for non-US studies (five studies, pooled RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.04-1.33). Similar increases in risks were seen with higher analgesic intake. In this largest meta-analysis to date, we found that acetaminophen and non-aspirin NSAIDs are associated with a significant risk of developing kidney cancer. Further work is needed to elucidate biologic mechanisms behind these findings. PMID:23400756

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR AGGRAVATION AND PROMOTION OF COPD BY ACID AIR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses epidemiologic evidence for the role of acidic aerosols in the development and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The hypothesis that sulfuric acid was the most important component of the mix of pollutants responsible for classic air-poll...

  17. The genetic epidemiology of diverticulosis and diverticular disease: Emerging evidence

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Matthias C

    2015-01-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders. The pathogenesis of diverticulosis and DD is controversially discussed. Current studies call the traditional concept of a fibre-deficient diet causing the development of diverticula into question. Data from two recent twin studies have provided conclusive evidence for a strong genetic component to diverticulosis. Although genomewide association studies have provided new insights into the polygenic architecture of human diseases, genomic research in diverticulosis and DD has just been started. This is an astonishing fact given the high morbidity and mortality of the disease, as well as the substantial economic burden on health care systems. For this review, we provide an update of the molecular pathobiology and summarise recent evidence supporting the hypothesis that distinct, yet unidentified genetic variants contribute to the development of diverticulosis and DD. PMID:26535118

  18. Epidemiological Evidence of Childhood Leukaemia Around Nuclear Power Plants

    PubMed Central

    Janiak, Marek K.

    2014-01-01

    A few reports of increased numbers of leukaemia cases (clusters) in children living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants (NPP) and other nuclear installations have triggered a heated debate over the possible causes of the disease. In this review the most important cases of childhood leukaemia clusters around NPPs are described and analyzed with special emphasis on the relationship between the environmental exposure to ionizing radiation and the risk of leukaemia. Since, as indicated, a lifetime residency in the proximity of an NPP does not pose any specific health risk to people and the emitted ionizing radiation is too small to cause cancer, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the childhood leukaemia clusters. The most likely explanation for the clusters is ‘population mixing’, i.e., the influx of outside workers to rural regions where nuclear installations are being set up and where local people are not immune to pathogens brought along with the incomers. PMID:25249830

  19. Gene-Environment Interactions in Cancer Epidemiology: A National Cancer Institute Think Tank Report

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Carolyn M.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillander, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF]>0.05) and less common (0.01cancer. The marginal effects of most of these variants have been small (odds ratios: 1.1–1.4). There remain unanswered questions on how best to incorporate the joint effects of genes and environment, including gene-environment interactions, into epidemiologic studies of cancer. To help address these questions, and to better inform research priorities and allocation of resources, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a “Gene-Environment Think Tank” on January 10th–011th, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on: 1) the state of the science; 2) the goals of gene-environment interaction studies in cancer epidemiology; and 3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of gene-environment interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24123198

  20. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer: A Quantitative Update on the State of the Epidemiologic Science

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Dominik D.; Weed, Douglas L.; Miller, Paula E.; Mohamed, Muhima A.

    2015-01-01

    The potential relationship between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer (CRC) has been the subject of scientific debate. Given the high degree of resulting uncertainty, our objective was to update the state of the science by conducting a systematic quantitative assessment of the epidemiologic literature. Specifically, we updated and expanded our previous meta-analysis by integrating data from new prospective cohort studies and conducting a broader evaluation of the relative risk estimates by specific intake categories. Data from 27 independent prospective cohort studies were meta-analyzed using random-effects models, and sources of potential heterogeneity were examined through subgroup and sensitivity analyses. In addition, a comprehensive evaluation of potential dose-response patterns was conducted. In the meta-analysis of all cohorts, a weakly elevated summary relative risk was observed (1.11, 95% CI: 1.03–1.19); however, statistically significant heterogeneity was present. In general, summary associations were attenuated (closer to the null and less heterogeneous) in models that isolated fresh red meat (from processed meat), adjusted for more relevant factors, analyzed women only, and were conducted in countries outside of the United States. Furthermore, no clear patterns of dose-response were apparent. In conclusion, the state of the epidemiologic science on red meat consumption and CRC is best described in terms of weak associations, heterogeneity, an inability to disentangle effects from other dietary and lifestyle factors, lack of a clear dose-response effect, and weakening evidence over time. Key Teaching Points: •The role of red meat consumption in colorectal cancer risk has been widely contested among the scientific community.•In the current meta-analysis of red meat intake and colorectal cancer, we comprehensively examined associations by creating numerous sub-group stratifications, conducting extensive sensitivity analyses, and evaluating

  1. Venereal factors in human cervical cancer: evidence from marital clusters.

    PubMed

    Kessler, I I

    1977-04-01

    All Caucasian women in a large Eastern city who developed pathologically confirmed cervical cancer between 1950 and 1969 are being prospectively followed in an epidemiological test of the venereal hypothesis of cervical carcinogenesis. We are attempting to identify all men who were married to these probands at any time prior to the date of their cancer diagnosis. The ultimate objective is the identification of all the other wives of the proband husbands in order that their risk of cervical cancer be assessed. A random sample of control wives similar to the other wives in age, race, date and place of marriage as well as prior marital status is also being followed. To date, a total of 1,087 other wives and 659 control wives has been fully traced. Cervical cancer or carcinoma in situ was detected in 29 (2.7%) of the other wives and in seven (1.1%) of the control wives. A total of 14.0% of the other wives had either cervical cancer or a cervical cytological specimen which was other than normal. The corresponding statistic for the control wives was 8.0%. These differences in the prevalence of cervical cancer and of non-normal cervical cytology are statistically significant. In the course of this investigation so far, we have identified 29 "marital clusters" of cervical cancer in which two women married to the same man have all developed cervical neoplasms. The observed number of 29 clusters may be compared with an expected number of 11.6. This investigation, as yet incomplete, offers confirmatory evidence of the possible role of venereal factors in the pathogenesis of human cervical neoplasia. While the genital herpesvirus is the likeliest candidate, other venereal elements might also be involved. PMID:192439

  2. Cancer and OSA: Current Evidence From Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Campos-Rodriguez, Francisco; Barbé, Ferrán

    2016-08-01

    Despite the undeniable medical advances achieved in recent decades, cancer remains one of the main causes of mortality. It is thus extremely important to make every effort to discover new risk factors for this disease, particularly ones that can be treated or modified. Various pathophysiologic pathways have been postulated as possible causes of cancer or its increased aggressiveness, and also of greater resistance to antitumoral treatment, in the presence of both intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation (both inherent to sleep apnea). Thus far, these biological hypotheses have been supported by various experimental studies in animals. Meanwhile, recent human studies drawing on preexisting databases have observed an increase in cancer incidence and mortality in patients with a greater severity of sleep-disordered breathing. However, the methodologic limitations of these studies (which are mostly retrospective and lack any measurement of direct markers of intermittent hypoxia or sleep fragmentation) highlight the need for controlled, prospective studies that would provide stronger scientific evidence regarding the existence of this association and its main characteristics, as well as explore its nature and origin in greater depth. The great epidemiologic impact of both cancer and sleep apnea and the potential for clinical treatment make this field of research an exciting challenge. PMID:27164292

  3. Children’s Exposure to Diagnostic Medical Radiation and Cancer Risk: Epidemiologic and Dosimetric Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Linet, Martha S.; Kim, Kwang pyo; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2009-01-01

    While the etiology of most childhood cancers is largely unknown, epidemiologic studies have consistently found an association between exposure to medical radiation during pregnancy and risk of childhood cancer in offspring. The relation between early life diagnostic radiation exposure and occurrence of pediatric cancer risks is less clear. This review summarizes current and historical estimated doses for common diagnostic radiologic procedures as well as the epidemiologic literature on the role of maternal prenatal, children’s postnatal and parental preconception diagnostic radiologic procedures on subsequent risk of childhood malignancies Risk estimates are presented according to factors such as the year of birth of the child, trimester and medical indication for the procedure, and the number of films taken. The paper also discusses limitations of the methods employed in epidemiologic studies to assess pediatric cancer risks, the effects on clinical practice of the results reported from the epidemiologic studies, and clinical and public health policy implications of the findings. Gaps in understanding and additional research needs are identified. Important research priorities include nationwide surveys to estimate fetal and childhood radiation doses from common diagnostic procedures, and epidemiologic studies to quantify pediatric and lifetime cancer risks from prenatal and early childhood exposures to diagnostic radiography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopically-guided procedures. PMID:19083224

  4. The role of olive oil in disease prevention: a focus on the recent epidemiological evidence from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Genevieve; Gonzalez, Carlos A

    2015-04-01

    Consumption of olive oil within the Mediterranean diet has been long known to have many health benefits. However, only over the last decade has epidemiological research confirmed its protective role against developing several chronic diseases. The objective of this review was to give an overview of the state of art epidemiological evidence concerning the relationship between olive oil and key public health outcomes including mortality, CVD, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity and cancer, with a particular focus on recent results from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials. Recent epidemiological research has shown that regular consumption of olive oil is associated with increased longevity. This benefit is partly due to the olive oil's unequivocal cardio-protective role. There is converging evidence on the benefits of olive oil for preventing several CVD risk factors, including diabetes, MetS and obesity. Olive oil is also implicated in preventing certain cancers, with the most promising findings for breast and digestive tract cancers, although the data are still not entirely consistent and mainly from case-control studies. These health benefits are supported by strong mechanistic evidence from experimental studies, demonstrating that specific components of olive oil have antihypertensive, antithrombotic, antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic action. Despite the accumulating epidemiological research, there is still a lack of consistent results from high-quality studies for many health outcomes (i.e. certain cancers and metabolism-related disorders). Further research is mandatory, above all from prospective studies and randomised dietary intervention trials when feasible, to confirm some of the still potential health benefits. PMID:26148926

  5. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  6. Weight cycling and cancer: weighing the evidence of intermittent caloric restriction and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Henry J; McTiernan, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Overweight and obese individuals frequently restrict caloric intake to lose weight. The resultant weight loss, however, typically is followed by an equal or greater weight gain, a phenomenon called weight cycling. Most attention to weight cycling has focused on identifying its detrimental effects, but preclinical experiments indicating that intermittent caloric restriction or fasting can reduce cancer risk have raised interest in potential benefits of weight cycling. Although hypothesized adverse effects of weight cycling on energy metabolism remain largely unsubstantiated, there is also a lack of epidemiologic evidence that intentional weight loss followed by regain of weight affects chronic-disease risk. In the limited studies of weight cycling and cancer, no independent effect on postmenopausal breast cancer but a modest enhancement of risk for renal cell carcinoma, endometrial cancer, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma have been reported. An effect of either intermittent caloric restriction or fasting in protecting against cancer is not supported by the majority of rodent carcinogenesis experiments. Collectively, the data argue against weight cycling and indicate that the objective of energy balance-based approaches to reduce cancer risk should be to strive to prevent adult weight gain and maintain body weight within the normal range defined by body mass index. PMID:21982873

  7. Dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Hui; Qiao, Chong; Wang, Ruo-Chen; Zhou, Wen-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk has been controversial. Therefore, we carried out this meta-analysis to summarize available evidence from epidemiologic studies on this point. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases as well as by reviewing the rence lists of relevant articles. Random or fixed-effects model was used to calculate the summary risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This meta-analysis included one cohort and thirteen case-control studies which involving a total of 3287 subjects with pancreatic cancer. After summarizing the risk estimates of these studies, we yielded a significant association between dietary fiber intake and pancreatic cancer risk among case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.44–0.67; I2 = 41.4%; P = 0.043) but a non-significant result in cohort study (hazard ratio = 1.01; 95%CI = 0.59–1.74). Additionally, significant inverse associations were observed when we carried out the stratify analyses by the study characteristics and adjustment for potential confounders among case-control studies. Given only one cohort study included in the present meta-analysis, further prospective-designed studies should validate our findings and report more detail results, including those for subtypes of fiber, the risk estimates which corrected the impact of measurement errors and fully adjust for the potential confounders. PMID:26035410

  8. Environmental Chemicals and Type 2 Diabetes: An Updated Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chin-Chi; Moon, Katherine; Thayer, Kristina A.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The burden of diabetes is increasing globally. Identifying novel preventable risk factors is an urgent need. In 2011, the U.S. National Toxicological Program (NTP) conducted a workshop to evaluate the epidemiologic and experimental evidence on the relationship of environmental chemicals with obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Although the evidence was insufficient to establish causality, the NTP workshop review identified an overall positive association between some environmental chemicals and diabetes. In this systematic review, our objective was to summarize the epidemiological research published since the NTP workshop. We identified a total of 29 articles (7 on arsenic, 3 on cadmium, 2 on mercury, 11 on persistent organic pollutants, 3 on phthalates and 4 on bisphenol A) including 7 prospective studies. Considering consistency, temporality, strength, dose-response, and biological plausibility (confounding), we concluded that the evidence is suggestive but not sufficient for a relationship between arsenic and persistent organic pollutants, and insufficient for mercury, phthalates and bisphenol A. For cadmium the epidemiologic evidence does not seem to suggest an association with diabetes. Important research questions include the need of additional prospective studies and the evaluation of the dose-response relationship, the role of joint exposures, and effect modification with other comorbidities and genetic variants. PMID:24114039

  9. [Epidemiological cancer data online: an overview of information service in Germany and Europe].

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K

    2014-01-01

    Finding reliable data about cancer epidemiology on the World Wide Web is not an easy task. Information is often scattered, and sources are not always clear. This article gives a short overview of the most important websites that provide reliable data for Germany and Europe. Four internet sites are presented: The German Centre for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD), the Association of Population-Based Cancer Registries in Germany (GEKID), and two different websites created by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In combination, they provide comprehensive information about the distribution of cancer in Germany and Europe. PMID:24357168

  10. Evolution of the “Drivers” of Translational Cancer Epidemiology: Analysis of Funded Grants and the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Chang, Christine Q.; Rogers, Scott D.; Khoury, Muin J.; Schully, Sheri D.

    2015-01-01

    Concurrently with a workshop sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, we identified key “drivers” for accelerating cancer epidemiology across the translational research continuum in the 21st century: emerging technologies, a multilevel approach, knowledge integration, and team science. To map the evolution of these “drivers” and translational phases (T0–T4) in the past decade, we analyzed cancer epidemiology grants funded by the National Cancer Institute and published literature for 2000, 2005, and 2010. For each year, we evaluated the aims of all new/competing grants and abstracts of randomly selected PubMed articles. Compared with grants based on a single institution, consortium-based grants were more likely to incorporate contemporary technologies (P = 0.012), engage in multilevel analyses (P = 0.010), and incorporate elements of knowledge integration (P = 0.036). Approximately 74% of analyzed grants and publications involved discovery (T0) or characterization (T1) research, suggesting a need for more translational (T2–T4) research. Our evaluation indicated limited research in 1) a multilevel approach that incorporates molecular, individual, social, and environmental determinants and 2) knowledge integration that evaluates the robustness of scientific evidence. Cancer epidemiology is at the cusp of a paradigm shift, and the field will need to accelerate the pace of translating scientific discoveries in order to impart population health benefits. While multi-institutional and technology-driven collaboration is happening, concerted efforts to incorporate other key elements are warranted for the discipline to meet future challenges. PMID:25767265

  11. Breastfeeding and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies1234

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Gong, Ting-Ting; Vogtmann, Emily; Wang, Yong-Lai; Lin, Bei

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies have yielded inconsistent findings between breastfeeding and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to summarize available evidence of the association between breastfeeding and breastfeeding duration and EOC risk from published cohort and case-control studies. Design: Relevant published studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE through December 2012. Two authors (T-TG and Q-JW) independently performed the eligibility evaluation and data abstraction. Study-specific RRs from individual studies were pooled by using a random-effects model, and heterogeneity and publication-bias analyses were conducted. Results: Five prospective and 30 case-control studies were included in this analysis. The pooled RR for ever compared with never breastfeeding was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.83), with moderate heterogeneity (Q = 69.4, P < 0.001, I2 = 55.3%). Risk of EOC decreased by 8% for every 5-mo increase in the duration of breastfeeding (RR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.90, 0.95). The risk reduction was similar for borderline and invasive EOC and was consistent within case-control and cohort studies. Conclusions: Results of this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that ever breastfeeding and a longer duration of breastfeeding are associated with lower risks of EOC. Additional research is warranted to focus on the association with cancer grade and histologic subtypes of EOC. PMID:23966430

  12. Molecular epidemiology in cancer risk assessment and prevention: recent progress and avenues for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Wogan, G N

    1992-01-01

    these changes are known to occur in chemically induced tumors of experimental animals, the possible role of chemical carcinogens in the induction of genetic abnormalities in human cancers has yet to be determined. Continuing investigations employing the methods of molecular epidemiology promise to provide further evidence concerning these relationships. Future investigations employing newly developed molecular biological methods, in particular those based on polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA, to identify alterations in DNA and chromosomal structure, combined with methods for characterizing exposure to carcinogens and early effects, have great potential for further elucidating the role of genotoxic agents in the etiology of human cancers and also for the development of strategies for their prevention. PMID:1486846

  13. Toxicological and epidemiological evidence for health risks from inhaled engine emissions.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1994-01-01

    Information from toxicological and epidemiological studies of the cancer and noncancer health risks from inhaled diesel engine exhaust (DE) and gasoline engine exhaust (GE) was reviewed. The toxicological database is more extensive for DE than for GE. Animal studies have shown that heavy, chronic exposures to both DE and GE can cause lung pathology and associated physiological effects. Inhaled GE has not been shown to be carcinogenic in animals. Chronically inhaled DE at high concentrations is a pulmonary carcinogen in rats, but the response is questionable in mice and negative in Syrian hamsters. The response in rats is probably not attributable to the DE soot-associated organic compounds, as previously assumed, and the usefulness of the rat data for predicting risk in humans is uncertain. Experimental human exposures to DE show that lung inflammatory and other cellular effects can occur after single exposures, and sparse data suggest that occupational exposures might affect respiratory function and symptoms. Epidemiology suggests that heavy occupational exposures to exhaust probably increase the risks for mortality from both lung cancer and noncancer pulmonary disease. The small magnitudes of the increases in these risks make the studies very sensitive to confounding factors and uncertainties of exposure; thus, it may not be possible to resolve exposure-response relationships conclusively by epidemiology. Our present knowledge suggests that heavy occupational exposures to DE and GE are hazardous but does not allow quantitative estimates of risk with a high degree of certainty. PMID:7529701

  14. Epidemiological trends of hormone-related cancers in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Zadnik, Vesna; Krajc, Mateja

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of hormone-related cancers tends to be higher in the developed world than in other countries. In Slovenia, six hormone-related cancers (breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate, testicular, and thyroid) account for a quarter of all cancers. Their incidence goes up each year, breast and prostate cancer in particular. The age at diagnosis is not decreasing for any of the analysed cancer types. The risk of breast cancer is higher in the western part of the country, but no differences in geographical distribution have been observed for other hormone-related cancers. Furthermore, areas polluted with endocrine-disrupting chemicals that affect hormone balance such as PCBs, dioxins, heavy metals, and pesticides, do not seem to involve a greater cancer risk. We know little about how many cancers can be associated with endocrine disruptors, as there are too few reliable exposure studies to support an association. PMID:27331295

  15. Recent Evidence Regarding Triclosan and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dinwiddie, Michael T.; Terry, Paul D.; Chen, Jiangang

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial commonly used in cosmetics, dentifrices, and other consumer products. The compound’s widespread use in consumer products and its detection in breast milk, urine, and serum have raised concerns regarding its potential association with various human health outcomes. Recent evidence suggests that triclosan may play a role in cancer development, perhaps through its estrogenicity or ability to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. Our aims here are to review studies of human exposure levels, to evaluate the results of studies examining the effects of triclosan on cancer development, and to suggest possible directions for future research. PMID:24566048

  16. Recommendations for Cancer Epidemiologic Research in Understudied Populations and Implications for Future Needs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Damali N; Lam, Tram Kim; Brignole, Katy; Ashing, Kimlin T; Blot, William J; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Chen, Jarvis T; Dignan, Mark; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matthews, Alicia; Palmer, Julie R; Perez-Stable, Eliseo J; Schootman, Mario; Vilchis, Hugo; Vu, Alexander; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2016-04-01

    Medically underserved populations in the United States continue to experience higher cancer burdens of incidence, mortality, and other cancer-related outcomes. It is imperative to understand how health inequities experienced by diverse population groups may contribute to our increasing unequal cancer burdens and disparate outcomes. The National Cancer Institute convened a diverse group of scientists to discuss research challenges and opportunities for cancer epidemiology in medically underserved and understudied populations. This report summarizes salient issues and discusses five recommendations from the group, including the next steps required to better examine and address cancer burden in the United States among our rapidly increasing diverse and understudied populations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 573-80. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CEBP FOCUS SECTION, "MULTILEVEL APPROACHES TO ADDRESSING CANCER HEALTH DISPARITIES". PMID:27196089

  17. Cadmium as a possible cause of bladder cancer: a review of accumulated evidence.

    PubMed

    Feki-Tounsi, Molka; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a significant disease, the rates of which have increased over the few last years. However, its etiology remains as yet undefined. Cadmium, a widespread environmental carcinogen that has received considerable interest, presents evidence as a possible cause of bladder cancer. A literature review was conducted from the years 1984-2013 to study the accumulated evidence for cadmium as a possible cause of bladder cancer, including routes of cadmium exposure, accumulation, toxicity, carcinogenicity, and evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies. Special reference is devoted to cadmium nephrotoxicity, which illustrates how cadmium exerts its effects on the transitional epithelium of the urinary tract. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis are discussed. The effects of cadmium on gene expression in urothelial cells exposed to cadmium are also addressed. Despite different methodologies, several epidemiologic and nephrotoxicity studies of cadmium indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer and provide additional evidence that cadmium is a potential toxic element in urothelial cells. In vitro studies provide further evidence that cadmium is involved in urothelial carcinogenesis. Animal studies encounter several problems such as morphology differences between species. Among the complex mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis, gene expression deregulation is the subject of recent studies on bladder cadmium-induced carcinogenesis. Further research, however, will be required to promise a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying cadmium carcinogenesis and to establish the precise role of cadmium in this important malignancy. PMID:24894749

  18. Cancer epidemiology and trends in Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mehtarpoor, Mojtaba; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid; Enayatrad, Mostafa; Khazaei, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in developing countries. In Iran, cancer is the third cause of death. The present study aimed at providing the incidence rates (crude and agestandardized) of different types of cancers in Sistan and Baluchestan province (Southeastern of Iran). Methods: Data were collected retrospectively reviewing all new cancer patients registered in Cancer Registry Center of Health Heputy for Sistan and Baluchestan province. Common cancers were defined based on the number of cases and standardized incidence rates. To compute the annual percentage change (APC), joinpoint 4.1.1.1 software was applied. Results: A total of 3535 cases of cancers registered during 2004-2009 were identified. Of these, 46.82% occurred in females and 53.18% in males. The most frequent cancer in women was breast cancer followed by esophagus, skin, colorectal and leukemia. The 5 most frequent cancers in men were stomach, skin, leukemia, esophagus and bladder. Joinpoint analyze showed a significant increasing trend for adjusted standard incidence rate (ASIR) for both sexes (p<0.05). Conclusion: According to The results of the present study and comparison to previous studies for other provinces in Iran, cancer incidence in Sistan and Baluchistan is less common but trends of cancers are increasing in Sistan and Baluchestan Province. It is necessary to have a comprehensive health policy for prevention and control of this problem. PMID:26793645

  19. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  20. The epidemiology of cancer in Angola—results from the cancer registry of the national oncology centre of Luanda, Angola

    PubMed Central

    Armando, António; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse; de Medeiros Zelmanowicz, Alice; Miguel, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiological profile of cancer is a key step in planning national cancer policy. The main objective of this study was to characterize the epidemiological profile of cancer in Angola based on cases of cancer registered at the National Oncology Centre (NOC) of Luanda, the only Angolan hospital to specialize in cancer treatment and diagnosis. The study consisted of a cross-sectional historical review of cases treated at the NOC between 2007 and 2011. The following variables were analysed: tumour location, diagnostic basis, and source of referral, as well as patient age, sex, place of residence, and the stage of the disease. The NOC registered a total of 4,791 patients throughout the study period, at an annual average of 958 cases. The most commonly diagnosed cancers were breast (20.5%), cervical (16.5%), and head and neck cancer (10.6%), followed by lymphoma (7.2%), Kaposi sarcoma (6.1%), and prostate cancer (4%). A total of 76% of patients were under 60 years old, and 10% were less than 15 years old. Of the total number of patients with cancer treated at the NOC, 77.3% lived in the Luanda province. Staging data were only available for patients with breast or cervical cancer, and an analysis of this variable showed that most of these individuals were in advanced stages of the disease. In the absence of a population-based cancer registry, this study constitutes a reasonable assessment of the epidemiological profile of cancer in Angola. PMID:25729423

  1. LUNG CANCER IN NEVER SMOKERS: CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Samet, Jonathan M.; Avila-Tang, Erika; Boffetta, Paolo; Hannan, Lindsay M.; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Thun, Michael J.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    More than 161,000 lung cancer deaths are projected to occur in the U.S. in 2008. Of these, an estimated 10–15% will be caused by factors other than active smoking, corresponding to 16,000–24,000 deaths annually. Thus lung cancer in never smokers would rank among the most common causes of cancer mortality in the U.S. if considered to be a separate category. Slightly more than half of the lung cancers caused by factors other than active smoking occur in never smokers. As summarized in the accompanying article, lung cancers that occur in never smokers differ from those that occur in smokers in their molecular profile and response to targeted therapy. These recent laboratory and clinical observations highlight the importance of defining the genetic and environmental factors responsible for the development of lung cancer in never-smokers. This article summarizes available data on the clinical epidemiology of lung cancer in never smokers, and the several environmental risk factors that population-based research has implicated in the etiology of these cancers. Primary factors closely tied to lung cancer in never smokers include exposure to known and suspected carcinogens including radon, second-hand tobacco smoke, and other indoor air pollutants. Several other exposures have been implicated. However, a large fraction of lung cancers occurring in never-smokers cannot be definitively associated with established environmental risk factors, highlighting the need for additional epidemiologic research in this area. PMID:19755391

  2. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country. PMID:24289553

  3. Discovering environmental cancer: Wilhelm Hueper, post-World War II epidemiology, and the vanishing clinician's eye.

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, C

    1997-01-01

    Today, our understanding of and approach to the exogenous causes of cancer are dominated by epidemiological practices that came into widespread use after World War II. This paper examines the forces, considerations, and controversies that shaped postwar risk factor epidemiology in the United States. It is argued that, for all of the new capabilities it brought, this risk factor epidemiology has left us with less of a clinical eye for unrecognized cancer hazards, especially from limited and localized exposures in the work-place. The focus here is on Wilhelm Hueper, author of the first textbook on occupational cancer (1942). Hueper became the foremost spokesman for earlier identification practices centering on occupational exposures. The new epidemiological methods and associated institutions that arose in the 1940s and 1950s bore an unsettled relation to earlier claims and methods that some, Hueper among them, interpreted as a challenge. Hueper's critique of the new epidemiology identified some of its limitations and potentially debilitating consequences that remain with us today. Images p1825-a p1827-a p1829-a PMID:9366640

  4. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  5. Dietary fat intake and endometrial cancer risk: dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luo; Hou, Rui; Gong, Ting-Ting; Wu, Qi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided controversial evidence of the association between dietary fat intake and endometrial cancer (EC) risk. To address this inconsistency, we conducted this dose-response meta-analysis by total dietary fat intake, based on epidemiological studies published up to the end of June 2015 identified from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Two authors (RH and Q-JW) independently performed the eligibility evaluation and data extraction. All differences were resolved by discussion with the third investigator (LJ). Random-effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, the search yielded 16 studies (6 cohort and 10 case-control studies) that involved a total of 7556 EC cases and 563,781 non-cases. The summary RR for EC for each 30g/day increment intake was 0.98 (95%CI = 0.95–1.001; I2 = 0%; n = 11) for total dietary fat. Non-significant results were observed in plant-based fat (summary RR = 1.05, 95%CI = 0.94–1.18; I2 = 0%; n = 5) and animal-based fat (summary RR = 1.17, 95%CI = 0.92–1.36; I2 = 85.0%; n = 6). Additionally, the null associations were observed in almost all the subgroup and sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, findings of the present meta-analysis suggested a lack of association between total dietary fat intake and EC risk. Further studies, especially prospective designed studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:26568366

  6. A proposal to facilitate weight-of-evidence assessments: Harmonization of Neurodevelopmental Environmental Epidemiology Studies (HONEES)

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Eric; Kenworthy, Lauren; Lipkin, Paul H.; Goodman, Michael; Squibb, Katherine; Mattison, Donald R.; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth; Makris, Susan L.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Raffaele, Kathleen C.; LaKind, Judy S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to conduct weight-of-evidence assessments to inform the assessment of potential environmental neurotoxicants is limited by lack of comparability of study methods, data analysis, and reporting. There is a need to establish consensus guidelines for conducting, analyzing, and reporting neurodevelopmental environmental epidemiologic studies, while recognizing that consistency is likewise needed for epidemiology studies examining other health outcomes. This paper proposes a set of considerations to be used by the scientific community at-large as a tool for systematically evaluating the quality of proposed and/or published studies in terms of their value for weight-of-evidence assessments. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of neurodevelopmental function tests, as these characteristics directly affect the risk of false positive and false negative decisions at the level of the individual, thus influencing the risk of incorrect conclusions at the level of study findings. The proposed considerations are the first step in what must be a larger consensus-based process and can serve to catalyze such a discussion. Achieving consensus in these types of endeavors is difficult; however, opportunities exist for further interdisciplinary discussion, collaboration, and research that will help realize this goal. Broad acceptance and application of such an approach can facilitate the expanded use of environmental epidemiology studies of potential neurodevelopmental toxicants in the protection of public health, and specifically children's health. PMID:21315817

  7. A proposal to facilitate weight-of-evidence assessments: Harmonization of Neurodevelopmental Environmental Epidemiology Studies (HONEES).

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Eric; Kenworthy, Lauren; Lipkin, Paul H; Goodman, Michael; Squibb, Katherine; Mattison, Donald R; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth; Makris, Susan L; Bale, Ambuja S; Raffaele, Kathleen C; LaKind, Judy S

    2011-01-01

    The ability to conduct weight-of-evidence assessments to inform the evaluation of potential environmental neurotoxicants is limited by lack of comparability of study methods, data analysis, and reporting. There is a need to establish consensus guidelines for conducting, analyzing, and reporting neurodevelopmental environmental epidemiologic studies, while recognizing that consistency is likewise needed for epidemiology studies examining other health outcomes. This paper proposes a set of considerations to be used by the scientific community at-large as a tool for systematically evaluating the quality of proposed and/or published studies in terms of their value for weight-of-evidence assessments. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating factors influencing the risk of incorrect conclusions at the level of study findings. The proposed considerations are the first step in what must be a larger consensus-based process and can serve to catalyze such a discussion. Achieving consensus in these types of endeavors is difficult; however, opportunities exist for further interdisciplinary discussion, collaboration, and research that will help realize this goal. Broad acceptance and application of such an approach can facilitate the expanded use of environmental epidemiology studies of potential neurodevelopmental toxicants in the protection of public health, and specifically children's health. PMID:21315817

  8. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Korea: Recent Trends

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer causes the most cancer deaths in Korea. Although the smoking rate has begun to decrease, the prevalence of lung cancer is still increasing. We reviewed the national lung cancer registry data and the data published about lung cancer in Korea. In 2012, the crude incidence rate of lung cancer was 43.9 per 100,000. The age-standardized mortality rate of lung cancer was 19.8 per 100,000. The 5-year relative survival rate for lung cancer was 11.3% from 1993 to 1995 and increased to 21.9% in the period from 2008 to 2012. Lung cancer occurring in never-smokers was estimated to increase in Korea. Adenocarcinoma is steadily increasing in both women and men and has replaced squamous cell carcinoma as the most common type of lung cancer in Korea. In patients with adenocarcinoma, the frequency of EGFR mutations was 43% (range, 20%–56%), while that of the EMK4-ALK gene was less than 5%. PMID:27064578

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Prostate Cancer: A Review of Exposure Measures and Results of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Dinwiddie, Michael T; Terry, Paul D; Whelan, Jay; Patzer, Rachel E

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies have shown that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3) may play a role in the development of prostate cancer, but the results of epidemiologic studies have been equivocal. Associations in humans may vary depending on study design, measurement methodology of fatty acid intake, intake ranges, and stage of cancer development. To address this, we identified 36 published studies through PubMed (Medline) from 1993 through 2013 on long-chain n-3s and prostate cancer. Exposure measurements included dietary assessment and biomarker levels. Associations for total, early, and late stage prostate cancer were examined by subgroup of study design and exposure measure type and by using forest plots to illustrate the relative strength of associations within each subgroup. We also tested for potential threshold effects by considering studies that included measurement cut-points that met intake levels recommended by the American Heart Association. We found no consistent evidence supporting a role of n-3s in either the causation or prevention of prostate cancer at any stage or grade. Results did not vary appreciably by study design, exposure measurement, intake level, or stage of cancer development. PMID:26595854

  10. Vitamin E intake from natural sources and head and neck cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium

    PubMed Central

    Edefonti, V; Hashibe, M; Parpinel, M; Ferraroni, M; Turati, F; Serraino, D; Matsuo, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Moysich, K; Zhang, Z-F; Morgenstern, H; Levi, F; Kelsey, K; McClean, M; Bosetti, C; Schantz, S; Yu, G-P; Boffetta, P; Chuang, S-C; A Lee, Y-C; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the possible effect of vitamin E on head and neck cancers (HNCs) is limited. Methods: We used individual-level pooled data from 10 case–control studies (5959 cases and 12 248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium to assess the association between vitamin E intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models applied to quintile categories of nonalcohol energy-adjusted vitamin E intake. Results: Intake of vitamin E was inversely related to oral/pharyngeal cancer (OR for the fifth vs the first quintile category=0.59, 95% CI: 0.49–0.71; P for trend <0.001) and to laryngeal cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.54–0.83, P for trend <0.001). There was, however, appreciable heterogeneity of the estimated effect across studies for oral/pharyngeal cancer. Inverse associations were generally observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer and within covariate strata for both sites. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that greater vitamin E intake from foods may lower HNC risk, although we were not able to explain the heterogeneity observed across studies or rule out certain sources of bias. PMID:25989276

  11. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Ze; Jin, Guang-Fu; Shen, Hong-Bing

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis. The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing, whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly, particularly in Western men. Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia, and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, hot beverage drinking, and poor nutrition. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites, and the risk factors include smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds. However, comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future. Ethnic differences should be taken into account in preventive and clinical practices. PMID:22507220

  12. Occupation, smoking, and alcohol in the epidemiology of bladder cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, R.C.; Chang, J.C.; Davis, J.R.

    1987-10-01

    We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the effects of occupation, smoking, and alcohol consumption on bladder cancer risk. A total of 823 male cases and 2,469 age-matched controls were identified through the Missouri Cancer Registry. Relative risk estimates of 2.0 or greater were observed for janitors and cleaners, mechanics, miners, and printers. Current cigarette smoking was associated with a two-fold excess risk of bladder cancer, whereas alcohol consumption showed no association with bladder cancer risk.

  13. Ovarian cancer and smoking: individual participant meta-analysis including 28 114 women with ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Smoking has been linked to mucinous ovarian cancer, but its effects on other ovarian cancer subtypes and on overall ovarian cancer risk are unclear, and the findings from most studies with relevant data are unpublished. To assess these associations, we review the published and unpublished evidence. Methods Eligible epidemiological studies were identified by electronic searches, review articles, and discussions with colleagues. Individual participant data for 28 114 women with and 94 942 without ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally, yielding adjusted relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer in smokers compared with never smokers. Findings After exclusion of studies with hospital controls, in which smoking could have affected recruitment, overall ovarian cancer incidence was only slightly increased in current smokers compared with women who had never smoked (RR 1·06, 95% CI 1·01–1·11, p=0·01). Of 17 641 epithelial cancers with specified histology, 2314 (13%) were mucinous, 2360 (13%) endometrioid, 969 (5%) clear-cell, and 9086 (52%) serous. Smoking-related risks varied substantially across these subtypes (pheterogeneity<0·0001). For mucinous cancers, incidence was increased in current versus never smokers (1·79, 95% CI 1·60–2·00, p<0·0001), but the increase was mainly in borderline malignant rather than in fully malignant tumours (2·25, 95% CI 1·91–2·65 vs 1·49, 1·28–1·73; pheterogeneity=0·01; almost half the mucinous tumours were only borderline malignant). Both endometrioid (0·81, 95% CI 0·72–0·92, p=0·001) and clear-cell ovarian cancer risks (0·80, 95% CI 0·65–0·97, p=0·03) were reduced in current smokers, and there was no significant association for serous ovarian cancers (0·99, 95% CI 0·93–1·06, p=0·8). These associations did not vary significantly by 13 sociodemographic and personal characteristics of women including their body-mass index, parity, and use of

  14. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  15. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  16. Epidemiology of skin cancer: role of some environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Triassi, Maria; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Torre, Guglielma; Annunziata, Maria Carmela; De Vita, Valerio; Pastore, Francesco; D'Arco, Vincenza; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth's surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people's behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer. PMID:24281212

  17. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Triassi, Maria; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Torre, Guglielma; Annunziata, Maria Carmela; Vita, Valerio De; Pastore, Francesco; D’Arco, Vincenza; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer. PMID:24281212

  18. Lung cancer epidemiology: contemporary and future challenges worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowska, Urszula; Mańczuk, Marta; Łobaszewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Over the last century, lung cancer from the rarest of diseases became the biggest cancer killer of men worldwide and in some parts of the world also of women (North America, East Asia, Northern Europe, Australia and New Zealand). In 2012 over 1.6 million of people died due to lung cancer. The cause-effect relationship between tobacco smoking and lung cancer occurrence has been proven in many studies, both ecological and clinical. In global perspective one can see the increasing tobacco consumption trend followed by ascending trends of lung cancer mortality, especially in developing countries. In some more developed countries, where the tobacco epidemics was on the rise since the beginning of the 20th century and peaked in its mid, in male population lung cancer incidence trend reversed or leveled off. Despite predicted further decline of incidence rates, the absolute number of deaths will continue to grow in these countries. In the remaining parts of the world the tobacco epidemics is still evolving what brings rapid increase of the number of new lung cancer cases and deaths. Number of lung cancer deaths worldwide is expected to grow up to 3 million until 2035. The figures will double both in men (from 1.1 million in 2012 to 2.1 million in 2035) and women (from 0.5 million in 2012 to 0.9 million in 2035) and the two-fold difference between sexes will persist. The most rapid increase is expected in Africa region (AFRO) and East Mediterranean region (EMRO). The increase of the absolute number of lung cancer deaths in more developed countries is caused mostly by population aging and in less developed countries predominantly by the evolving tobacco epidemic. PMID:27195268

  19. Clinical intuition versus statistics: different modes of tacit knowledge in clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Braude, Hillel D

    2009-01-01

    Despite its phenomenal success since its inception in the early nineteen-nineties, the evidence-based medicine movement has not succeeded in shaking off an epistemological critique derived from the experiential or tacit dimensions of clinical reasoning about particular individuals. This critique claims that the evidence-based medicine model does not take account of tacit knowing as developed by the philosopher Michael Polanyi. However, the epistemology of evidence-based medicine is premised on the elimination of the tacit dimension from clinical judgment. This is demonstrated through analyzing the dichotomy between clinical and statistical intuition in evidence-based medicine's epistemology of clinical reasoning. I argue that clinical epidemiology presents a more nuanced epistemological model for the application of statistical epidemiology to the clinical context. Polanyi's theory of tacit knowing is compatible with the model of clinical reasoning associated with clinical epidemiology, but not evidence-based medicine. PMID:19548116

  20. Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming aquatic food resources from chemically contaminated water.

    PubMed Central

    Ozonoff, D; Longnecker, M P

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming fish from contaminated waters must confront the problems of long latency and rarity of the end point (cancer). The latency problem makes determination of diet history more difficult, while the low frequency of cancer as an end point reduces the statistical power of the study. These factors are discussed in relation to the study designs most commonly employed in epidemiology. It is suggested that the use of biomarkers for persistent chemicals may be useful to mitigate the difficulty of determining exposure, while the use of more prevalent and timely end points, such as carcinogen-DNA adducts or oncogene proteins, may make the latency and rarity problems more tractable. PMID:2050052

  1. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. PMID:23220449

  2. Epidemiological evidence relating snus to health--an updated review based on recent publications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter N

    2013-01-01

    An earlier review summarized evidence relating use of snus (Swedish-type moist snuff) to health and to initiation and cessation of smoking. This update considers the effect recent publications on snus use and health have on the overall evidence. The additional evidence extends the list of neoplastic conditions unassociated with snus use (oropharynx, oesophagus, stomach, lung) to include colorectal cancer and acoustic neuroma, and further undermines the weakly-based argument that snus use increases the risk of pancreatic cancer, although there is a report of poorer cancer survival in users. It remains undemonstrated that "snuff-dipper's lesion" increases risk of oral cancer, and recent publications add to the evidence that snus use has no effect on periodontitis or dental caries. Although onset of acute myocardial infarction is not adversely associated with snus use, there is some evidence of an association with reduced survival. Whether this is a direct effect of snus use or a result of confounding by socioeconomic status or other factors requires further investigation, as does a report of an increased risk of heart failure in snus users. Even if some adverse health effects of snus use do exist, it remains clear that they are far less than those of smoking. PMID:24314326

  3. Diet Quality and Cancer Outcomes in Adults: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Jennifer; Brown, Leanne; Williams, Rebecca L.; Byles, Julie; Collins, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns influence cancer risk. However, systematic reviews have not evaluated relationships between a priori defined diet quality scores and adult cancer risk and mortality. The aims of this systematic review are to (1) describe diet quality scores used in cohort or cross-sectional research examining cancer outcomes; and (2) describe associations between diet quality scores and cancer risk and mortality. The protocol was registered in Prospero, and a systematic search using six electronic databases was conducted through to December 2014. Records were assessed for inclusion by two independent reviewers, and quality was evaluated using a validated tool. Sixty-four studies met inclusion criteria from which 55 different diet quality scores were identified. Of the 35 studies investigating diet quality and cancer risk, 60% (n = 21) found a positive relationship. Results suggest no relationship between diet quality scores and overall cancer risk. Inverse associations were found for diet quality scores and risk of postmenopausal breast, colorectal, head, and neck cancer. No consistent relationships between diet quality scores and cancer mortality were found. Diet quality appears to be related to site-specific adult cancer risk. The relationship with cancer mortality is less conclusive, suggesting additional factors impact overall cancer survival. Development of a cancer-specific diet quality score for application in prospective epidemiology and in public health is warranted. PMID:27399671

  4. Evidence for Field Cancerization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nonn, Larisa; Ananthanarayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Gann, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization, which is not yet well-characterized in the prostate, occurs when large areas of an organ or tissue surface are affected by a carcinogenic insult, resulting in the development of multi-focal independent premalignant foci and molecular lesions that precede histological change. METHODS Herein, we review the cumulative body of evidence concerning field effects in the prostate and critically evaluate the methods available for the identification and validation of field effect biomarkers. Validated biomarkers for field effects have an important role to play as surrogate endpoint biomarkers in Phase II prevention trials and as clinical predictors of cancer in men with negative biopsies. RESULTS Thus far, field effects have been identified involving nuclear morphometric changes, gene expression, protein expression, gene promoter methylation, DNA damage and angiogenesis. In addition to comparing cancer-adjacent benign tissue to more distant areas or to “supernormal” tissue from cancer-free organs, investigators can use a nested case–control design for negative biopsies that offers a number of unique advantages. CONCLUSIONS True carcinogenic field effects should be distinguished from secondary responses of the microenvironment to a developing tumor, although the latter may still lead to useful clinical prediction tools. PMID:19462462

  5. Epidemiologic characteristics of compensated occupational lung cancers among Korean workers.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Kyoung Sook

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of the characteristics of occupational lung cancer is important to establish policies that prevent carcinogen exposure and to compensate workers exposed to lung carcinogens. This study analyzed the characteristics of occupational lung cancers in workers who were compensated under the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Law between 1994 and 2011. A total of 179 occupational lung cancers were compensated. The main carcinogenic exposure was asbestos, followed by crystalline silica and hexavalent chromium. The mean exposure duration and latency were 19.8 and 23.2 yr. The most common industry was manufacturing, followed by construction and transportation. The most common occupation was maintenance and repair, followed by foundry work, welding, painting, and spinning or weaving. Although asbestos was predominant carcinogen, the proportion of these cases was relatively low compared to other developed countries. Proper surveillance system is needed to monitor occupational lung cancer and improve prevention measures. PMID:25408577

  6. Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

  7. [Epidemiological study of lung cancer in Portugal (2000/2002)].

    PubMed

    Parente, Bárbara; Queiroga, H; Teixeira, E; Sotto-Mayor, R; Barata, F; Sousa, A; Melo, M J; João, F; Neveda, R; Cunha, J; Fernandes, A; Manuel, M; Cardoso, T; Ferreira, L; Nogueira, F; Duarte, J; Semedo, E; Brito, U; Pimentel, F; Barros, S; Costa, F; Almodôvar, T; Araújo, A

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer death in the world. Five-year survival is about 15%, without any change to this picture envisaged. It is the 3rd most prevalent type of cancer in Portugal and the primary cause of cancer death. 85% of lung cancer cases are attributable to smoking. One study performed in Portugal for 3 years (2000/2002) by the Lung Oncology Work Committee of the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology in 22 Hospitals showed that of a total of 4396 patients with lung cancer, 81.8% were male and 18.2% were female, with a mean age of 64.49 +/- 11.28 years. About 70% of patients were smokers or former smokers, with 50.3% of patients presenting with performance status (Zubrod) 1. Histologically, 37.5% were adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous carcinoma in 30.5% of cases, and small cell lung cancer in 12.5%; neuroendocrine carcinoma presented in 1.4% of cases; non small cell lung cancer in 10.5%; mixed carcinoma in 0.7%; large cell carcinoma in 2.3%; and others/not specified in 4.6% of cases. Staging (known in 4097 patients), showed 113 patients in stage IA (2.8%)and 250 patients in stage IB (6.1%); only 0.8% in stage IIA and 4.5% in stage IIB; 9.1% in stage IIIA and 29.9% in stage IIIB; 46.9% were already in stage IV by the time of diagnosis. The first therapeutic option was known in 3855 patients. Surgery was performed in 8.2% and 21.8% of cases were treated with combined therapies (surgery and chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy); chemotherapy alone was first choice in 43.7% of patients and in 20.3% only best support therapy was chosen. PMID:17571453

  8. [Epidemiological study of risk factors for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakata, S; Sato, J; Ohtake, N; Imai, K; Yamanaka, H

    1995-12-01

    A case-control study was conducted on 303 male bladder cancer patients and controls. General population controls were chosen from 15 areas in Gunma Prefecture and were matched by age (+/- l y.o.) to the subjects. Age-adjusted and smoking-adjusted odds ratio (O.R.) and a 95% confidence interval (C.I.) were calculated for each item. Risk factors for bladder cancer in men were investigated. The O.R. tended to be significantly higher for those who had history of smoking, who smoked more per day, who had smoked longer, whose Brinkman index was higher, who began smoking younger and who inhaled deeper than it was for non-smokers. O.R.s of having a past history or complication of cystitis (age-adjusted) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (age- and smoking-adjusted) were significantly higher, but the difference was supposed to be caused by bias. There was a significantly lower age- and smoking-adjusted O.R. for bladder cancer in men who engaged in sales, whose blood type was O, who drank milk frequently, who ate grains frequently, who age vegetables frequently and who had a past history or complication of hypertension. The number of cases and controls with first degree family members who developed cancer respectively supposed to be highly related to smoking, were as follows; 16 and 8 for lung cancer, 3 and 0 for larynx cancer and 6 and 3 for bladder cancer. The following characteristics failed to show any significant difference between subjects with bladder cancer and the control group; height and weight now and 20 years ago, jobs which deal with dye, academic career, marriage, number of children, alcohol drinking and the use of hair dye or analgesics. PMID:8578986

  9. Epidemiology of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer in Europe.

    PubMed

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    To design the services for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer, we need to understand the patterns of disease and the other clinical and managerial challenges of the patient group. Cancer occurring between the ages of 15 and 39 years is 4 times less rare than cancer occurring during the first 15 years of life and consists of 2% of all invasive cancer in Europe, about 66,000 patients in Europe each year. AYAs have a unique distribution of cancer types, including the peak in incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or germ cell tumors. The relative improvement in the survival rate in AYAs has not kept pace with that achieved in younger children, especially for acute leukemia, non-HLs, Ewing tumors and rhabdomyosarcoma. Etiological factors are under-researched and remain largely hypothetical. In this unique group of illnesses, improving AYA cancer management involves bridging interfaces. Since this has begun, outcomes have also begun to improve. The local nature of these interfaces determines the age group considered as AYA. Specific skills are necessary in the clinical, biological and psychosocial domains. Services need support from policy, clinical and administrative professionals. National policy and supranational groups such as SIOPE and ESMO are in constructive collaboration to develop this further. PMID:27595352

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Metastases Harbor Evidence of Polyclonality

    PubMed Central

    Maddipati, Ravikanth; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the cancer genome have demonstrated that tumors are comprised of multiple sub-clones with varied genetic and phenotypic properties. However, little is known about how metastases arise and evolve from these sub-clones. To understand the cellular dynamics that drive metastasis, we used multi-color lineage tracing technology in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that precursor lesions exhibit significant clonal heterogeneity but that this diversity decreases during pre-malignant progression. Furthermore, we present evidence that a significant fraction of metastases are polyclonally seeded by distinct tumor sub-clones. Finally, we show that clonality during metastatic growth – leading to either monoclonal or polyclonal expansion – differs based on the site of metastatic invasion. These results provide an unprecedented window into the cellular dynamics of tumor evolution and suggest that heterotypic interactions between tumor subpopulations contribute to metastatic progression in native tumors. PMID:26209539

  11. Ionizing Radiation and Cancer Risks: What Have We Learned From Epidemiology?

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to ionizing radiation offer a wealth of information on cancer risks in humans. The Life Span Study cohort of Japanese A-bomb survivors, a large cohort that includes all ages and both sexes with a wide range of well-characterized doses, is the primary resource for estimating carcinogenic risks from low linear energy transfer external exposure. Extensive data on persons exposed for therapeutic or diagnostic medical reasons offer the opportunity to study fractionated exposure, risks at high therapeutic doses, and risks of site-specific cancers in non-Japanese populations. Studies of persons exposed for occupational and environmental reasons allow a direct evaluation of exposure at low doses and dose rates, and also provide information on different types of radiation such as radon and iodine-131. This article summarizes the findings from these studies with emphasis on studies with well-characterized doses. Conclusions Epidemiologic studies provide the necessary data for quantifying cancer risks as a function of dose and for setting radiation protection standards. Leukemia and most solid cancers have been linked with radiation. Most solid cancer data are reasonably well described by linear-dose response functions although there may be a downturn in risks at very high doses. Persons exposed early in life have especially high relative risks for many cancers, and radiation-related risk of solid cancers appears to persist throughout life. PMID:19401906

  12. The Next Generation of Large-Scale Epidemiologic Research: Implications for Training Cancer Epidemiologists

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Margaret R.; Lam, Tram Kim; Schully, Sheri D.; Khoury, Muin J.

    2014-01-01

    There is expanding consensus on the need to modernize the training of cancer epidemiologists to accommodate rapidly emerging technological advancements and the digital age, which are transforming the practice of cancer epidemiology. There is also a growing imperative to extend cancer epidemiology research that is etiological to that which is applied and has the potential to affect individual and public health. Medical schools and schools of public health are recognizing the need to develop such integrated programs; however, we lack the data to estimate how many current training programs are effectively equipping epidemiology students with the knowledge and tools to design, conduct, and analyze these increasingly complex studies. There is also a need to develop new mentoring approaches to account for the transdisciplinary team-science environment that now prevails. With increased dialogue among schools of public health, medical schools, and cancer centers, revised competencies and training programs at predoctoral, doctoral, and postdoctoral levels must be developed. Continuous collection of data on the impact and outcomes of such programs is also recommended. PMID:25234430

  13. [An epidemiological analysis on the geographic factors of esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Song, J

    1992-12-01

    The author collects the data of esophageal cancer mortality (1971-1973) of 78 counties in Hubei Province and the data of topography, climate, soil, rock formation and geochemical elements, including 40 suspected factors. The method of linear correlation and multiple stepwise regression are used for the comprehensive analysis of relation between the geographical factors and esophageal cancer. The result is that four factors metamorphic rock, zinc, copper, chromium are suspected factors. It suggests that the four factors will need future study. PMID:1303310

  14. Intrauterine devices and endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Ashley S.; Gaudet, Mia M.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Nagle, Christina M.; Ou Shu, Xiao; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Olov Adami, Hans; Beresford, Shirley; Bernstein, Leslie; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Hill, Dierdre; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Lacey, James V.; Levi, Fabio; Liang, Xiaolin; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony; McCann, Susan E.; Negri, Eva; Olson, Sara H.; Palmer, Julie R.; Patel, Alpa V.; Petruzella, Stacey; Prescott, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Sherman, Mark E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wise, Lauren A.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Wanghong; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Brinton, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs), long-acting and reversible contraceptives, induce a number of immunological and biochemical changes in the uterine environment that could affect endometrial cancer (EC) risk. We addressed this relationship through a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. We combined individual-level data from 4 cohort and 14 case-control studies, in total 8,801 EC cases and 15,357 controls. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated pooled odds ratios (pooled-ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for EC risk associated with ever use, type of device, ages at first and last use, duration of use, and time since last use, stratified by study and adjusted for confounders. Ever use of IUDs was inversely related to EC risk (pooled-OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74–0.90). Compared with never use, reduced risk of EC was observed for inert IUDs (pooled-OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.58–0.82), older age at first use (≥35 years pooled-OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.43–0.67), older age at last use (≥45 years pooled-OR=0.60, 95% CI=0.50–0.72), longer duration of use (≥10 years pooled-OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.52–0.71), and recent use (within 1 year of study entry pooled-OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.30–0.49). Future studies are needed to assess the respective roles of detection biases and biologic effects related to foreign body responses in the endometrium, heavier bleeding (and increased clearance of carcinogenic cells), and localized hormonal changes. PMID:25242594

  15. EFFECT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF LUNG CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a method for adjusting the analysis of occupational-environmental lung cancer risks for the effects of cigarette smoking in cohort and case control studies. he method uses a function that relates an individual's death rate to his age and cigarette smoking his...

  16. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications. PMID:25455844

  17. Lung Cancer Ablation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    de Baere, Thierry; Farouil, Geoffroy; Deschamps, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated to be both feasible and safe in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique for ablation, has a reported rate of complete ablation of ~90%, with best results obtained in tumors <2 to 3 cm in diameter. The best reported 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of NSCLC are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7%, respectively. It is noteworthy that in most studies, cancer-specific survival is greater than overall survival due to severe comorbidities in patients treated with RFA for NSCLC. Aside from tumor size and tumor stage, these comorbidities are predictive of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave and irreversible electroporation may in the future prove to overcome some of the limitations of RFA, namely for large tumors or tumors close to large vessels. Stereotactic body radiation therapy has also been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in treating small lung tumors and will need to be compared with percutaneous ablation. This article reviews the current evidence regarding RFA for lung cancer. PMID:24436531

  18. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    SciTech Connect

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  19. Changing Epidemiology of Common Cancers in Southern Iran, 2007-2010: A Cross Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Masoompour, Seyed Masoom; Lankarani, Kamran B; Honarvar, Behnam; Tabatabaee, Seyed Hamidreza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Khosravizadegan, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated the ever changing epidemiology of cancers in Fars province, Iran since the re-establishment of Fars cancer registry. Based on the collected data from all related sources in Fars province from 2007-2010 we calculated the cancer age-standardized rates per 100,000 person-years (ASRs). The results are presented as incidence rates of cases by site according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O), sex, age, crude rate, and ASRs. In women the total ASR was 41.70 per 100,000 from 1985-1989 which had increased to 55.50 and 95.46 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about two and four times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. The incidence of colorectal cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about three and five times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. In men the total ASR was 62.9 per 100,000 in 1985-1989 that increased to 64.50 and 101.48 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. Although stomach cancer was the most common cancer among men during 1985-1989 and 1998-2002, but in recent study bladder cancer was the most common cancer among men in Fars province. The incidence of colorectal cancer in men during 2007-2010 was about three times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. This study shows growing incidence of cancer in southern Iran. The colorectal cancer in both genders had increased and its pattern is similar to western countries. In men, bladder and prostate cancers had a growing rate and the incidences of these cancers in the present study were greater than stomach cancer. PMID:27219458

  20. Changing Epidemiology of Common Cancers in Southern Iran, 2007-2010: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Masoompour, Seyed Masoom; Lankarani, Kamran B.; Honarvar, Behnam; Tabatabaee, Seyed Hamidreza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Khosravizadegan, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated the ever changing epidemiology of cancers in Fars province, Iran since the re-establishment of Fars cancer registry. Based on the collected data from all related sources in Fars province from 2007–2010 we calculated the cancer age-standardized rates per 100,000 person-years (ASRs). The results are presented as incidence rates of cases by site according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O), sex, age, crude rate, and ASRs. In women the total ASR was 41.70 per 100,000 from 1985–1989 which had increased to 55.50 and 95.46 during 1998–2002 and 2007–2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women during 2007–2010 was about two and four times higher than 1998–2002 and 1985–1989. The incidence of colorectal cancer in women during 2007–2010 was about three and five times higher than 1998–2002 and 1985–1989. In men the total ASR was 62.9 per 100,000 in 1985–1989 that increased to 64.50 and 101.48 during 1998–2002 and 2007–2010. Although stomach cancer was the most common cancer among men during 1985–1989 and 1998–2002, but in recent study bladder cancer was the most common cancer among men in Fars province. The incidence of colorectal cancer in men during 2007–2010 was about three times higher than 1998–2002 and 1985–1989. This study shows growing incidence of cancer in southern Iran. The colorectal cancer in both genders had increased and its pattern is similar to western countries. In men, bladder and prostate cancers had a growing rate and the incidences of these cancers in the present study were greater than stomach cancer. PMID:27219458

  1. Leveraging Epidemiology and Clinical Studies of Cancer Outcomes: Recommendations and Opportunities for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors continues to grow, research investigating the factors that affect cancer outcomes, such as disease recurrence, risk of second malignant neoplasms, and the late effects of cancer treatments, becomes ever more important. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated factors that affect cancer risk, but far fewer have addressed the extent to which demographic, lifestyle, genomic, clinical, and psychosocial factors influence cancer outcomes. To identify research priorities as well as resources and infrastructure needed to advance the field of cancer outcomes and survivorship research, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a workshop titled “Utilizing Data from Cancer Survivor Cohorts: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities” on November 3, 2011, in Washington, DC. This commentary highlights recent findings presented at the workshop, opportunities to leverage existing data, and recommendations for future research, data, and infrastructure needed to address high priority clinical and research questions. Multidisciplinary teams that include epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, and bioinformaticists will be essential to facilitate future cancer outcome studies focused on improving clinical care of cancer patients, identifying those at high risk of poor outcomes, and implementing effective interventions to ultimately improve the quality and duration of survival. PMID:23197494

  2. Radiation-induced cardiovascular diseases: Is the epidemiologic evidence compatible with the radiobiologic data?

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Hector, Susanne . E-mail: susanne.schultz-hector@helmholtz.de; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger Prof.

    2007-01-01

    The Life Span Study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors demonstrates that radiation exposure significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease, in particular myocardial infarction. Similarly, epidemiologic investigations in very large populations of patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer or for peptic ulcer demonstrate that radiation exposure of the heart with an average equivalent single dose of approximately 2 Gy significantly increased the risk of developing ischemic heart disease more than 10 years after irradiation. These epidemiologic findings are compatible with radiobiologic data on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced heart disease in experimental animals. The critical target structure appears to be the endothelial lining of blood vessels, in particular arteries, leading to early functional alterations such as pro-inflammatory responses and other changes, which are slowly progressive. Research should concentrate on the interaction of these radiation-induced endothelial changes with the early stages of age-related atherosclerosis to develop criteria for optimizing treatment plans in radiotherapy and also potential interventional strategies.

  3. Low Quality Evidence of Epidemiological Observational Studies on Leishmaniasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Trentini, Bruno; Steindel, Mário; Marlow, Mariel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Brazil has implemented systematic control methods for leishmaniasis for the past 30 years, despite an increase in cases and continued spread of the disease to new regions. A lack high quality evidence from epidemiological observational studies impedes the development of novel control methods to prevent disease transmission among the population. Here, we have evaluated the quality of observational studies on leishmaniasis conducted in Brazil to highlight this issue. Methods/Principal Findings For this systematic review, all publications on leishmaniasis conducted in Brazil from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2012 were screened via Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist to select observational studies involving human subjects. The 283 included studies, representing only 14.1% of articles screened, were then further evaluated for quality of epidemiological methods and study design based on the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) checklists. Over half of these studies were descriptive or case reports (53.4%, 151), followed by cross-sectional (20.8%, n = 59), case-control (8.5%, n = 24), and cohort (6.0%, n = 17). Study design was not stated in 46.6% (n = 181) and incorrectly stated in 17.5% (n = 24). Comparison groups were utilized in just 39.6% (n = 112) of the publications, and only 13.4% (n = 38) employed healthy controls. Majority of studies were performed at the city-level (62.9%, n = 178), in contrast with two (0.7%) studies performed at the national-level. Coauthorship networks showed the number of author collaborations rapidly decreased after three collaborations, with 70.9% (n = 659/929) of coauthors publishing only one article during the study period. Conclusions/Significance A review of epidemiological research in Brazil revealed a major lack of quality and evidence. While certain indicators suggested research methods

  4. [Epidemiological study on place of death for cancer patients Autoren].

    PubMed

    Dasch, B; Blum, K; Vogelsang, H; Bausewein, C

    2016-08-01

    Background | In Germany, place of death is recorded on death certificates, but is not analyzed further. In consequence, only little is known about the place of death among cancer patients at the population level. The aim of the study was to describe the changes of places of death in cancer patients over a time period of 10 years. Material and methods | This study examined death certificates from 2001 and 2011 of selected regions of Westphalia-Lippe (Germany). Cancer patients were identified on the basis of cause of death. Description of frequencies of place of death and subgroup analyses by tumor entity (ICD-10, C00-C96) were performed. Results | A total of 24 009 death certificates were analyzed (2001: 11,585; 2011: 12,424). Cancer was the underlying or contributory cause of death in 34.0%. For the years 2001 and 2011, respectively, the following distributions of place of death were observed: home, 24.1% vs. 24.7% (p=0.553); hospital, 62.8% vs. 51.4% (p=0.001); palliative care unit, 0.0% vs. 2.2%; hospice, 5.5% vs. 12.5% (p=0.001); nursing home, 7.4% vs. 10.9% (p=0.001); other, 0.1% vs. 0.3% (p=0.063); no data, 0.1% vs. 0.3% (p=0.015). Patients with brain tumours had a higher probability of dying in a hospice (2011: female 23.5%; male 27.7%). A higher risk of death in hospital was observed among cancer patients with an underlying hematological malignancy (2011: female 63.7%; male 68.4%). Conclusion | Cancer patients mainly die in institutions, with hospitals being the most frequent location. Only one in four deaths occurs in the home setting. The trend over time shows a shift in place of death away from hospitals towards hospices, palliative care units, and nursing homes. PMID:27557075

  5. [Epidemiology and risk factors of the prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Stasiewicz, Dominika; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Brzozowska, Anna; Mocarska, Agnieszka; Losicki, Marek; Szumiło, Justyna; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy of male genital organs. The etiology of the disease is complex and remains mainly unclear. The only established risk factors are advancing age, ethnicity and genetics, including changing in expression of ELAC2, RNASEL, MSR1 and HOXB13 genes as well as low number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene. There are number of coexisting environmental risk factors, such as eating habits mostly diet reach in animal fats. An early sexual initiation and sexually transmitted infections, both viral (HSV-2, HPV-18 and -16, CMV) and bacterial (Neisseria gonorrhoea, Treponema pallidum, Chlamydia trachomatis) were also included. The etiology of prostate cancer also involves the influence of hormones - androgens and estrogens, as well as chronic inflammation of the prostate. In contrast to the incidence rate, which varies significantly depending on the geographic region, the incidence of the malignancy at autopsy is similar. PMID:23157136

  6. Do cervical cancer data justify HPV vaccination in India? Epidemiological data sources and comprehensiveness

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, I; Pollock, AM; Brhlikova, P

    2012-01-01

    The Indian government suspended research in April 2010 on the feasibility and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in two Indian states (Andhra Pradesh and Gujarat) amid public concerns about its safety. This paper describes cervical cancer and cancer surveillance in India and reviews the epidemiological claims made by the Programme for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) in support of the vaccine in these two states. National cancer data published by the Indian National Cancer Registry Programme of state registry returns and the International Agency for Research on Cancer cover around seven percent of the population with underrepresentation of rural, northern, eastern and north-eastern areas. There is no cancer registry in the state of Andhra Pradesh and PATH does not cite data from the Gujarat cancer registries. Age-adjusted cervical cancer mortality and incidence rates vary widely across and within states. National trends in age standardized cervical cancer incidence fell from 42.3 to 22.3 per 100,000 between 1982/1983 and 2004/2005 respectively. Incidence studies report low incidence and mortality rates in Gujarat and Andhra Pradesh. Although HPV prevalence is higher in cancer patients (93.3%) than healthy patients (7.0%) and HPV types 16 and 18 are most prevalent in cancer patients, population prevelance data are poor and studies highly variable in their findings. Current data on HPV type and cervical cancer incidence do not support PATH's claim that India has a large burden of cervical cancer or its decision to roll out the vaccine programme. In the absence of comprehensive cancer surveillance, World Health Organization criteria with respect to monitoring effectiveness of the vaccine and knowledge of disease trends cannot be fulfilled. PMID:22722970

  7. Computational Discrimination of Breast Cancer for Korean Women Based on Epidemiologic Data Only.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiwon; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Boyoung; Bae, Jonghee; Lim, Min Hyuk; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K; Kim, Youdan; Kim, Sungwan

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cancer for Korean women and its incidence rate has been increasing annually. If early diagnosis were implemented with epidemiologic data, the women could easily assess breast cancer risk using internet. National Cancer Institute in the United States has released a Web-based Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool based on Gail model. However, it is inapplicable directly to Korean women since breast cancer risk is dependent on race. Also, it shows low accuracy (58%-59%). In this study, breast cancer discrimination models for Korean women are developed using only epidemiological case-control data (n = 4,574). The models are configured by different classification techniques: support vector machine, artificial neural network, and Bayesian network. A 1,000-time repeated random sub-sampling validation is performed for diverse parameter conditions, respectively. The performance is evaluated and compared as an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). According to age group and classification techniques, AUC, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and calculation time of all models were calculated and compared. Although the support vector machine took the longest calculation time, the highest classification performance has been achieved in the case of women older than 50 yr (AUC = 64%). The proposed model is dependent on demographic characteristics, reproductive factors, and lifestyle habits without using any clinical or genetic test. It is expected that the model could be implemented as a web-based discrimination tool for breast cancer. This tool can encourage potential breast cancer prone women to go the hospital for diagnostic tests. PMID:26240478

  8. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. -- Highlights: ► The potential for organic solvents to cause Parkinson's disease has been reviewed. ► Twins study suggests etiologic relations with chlorinated solvents and Parkinson's. ► Animal studies with TCE showed potential to cause damage to dopaminergic neurons. ► Need to determine if effects in animals are relevant to human exposure

  9. Exposure, epidemiology and human cancer incidence of naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Griego, Fumie Y; Bogen, Kenneth T; Price, Paul S; Weed, Douglas L

    2008-07-01

    This report provides a summary of deliberations conducted under the charge for members of Module B participating in the Naphthalene State-of-the-Science Symposium (NS(3)), Monterey, CA, October 9-12, 2006. The panel's charge was to derive consensus estimates of human exposure to naphthalene under various conditions, cancer incidence plausibly associated with these exposures, and identify quintessential research that could significantly reduce or eliminate material uncertainties to inform human cancer risk assessment. Relying in large part on a commissioned paper [Price, P.S., Jayjock, M.A., 2008. Available data on naphthalene exposures: strengths and limitations, in this issue], exposure levels were estimated for background (0.0001-0.003 microg/m(3)), ambient air (0.001-1.0 microg/m(3)), vehicles (0.003-3.0 microg/m(3)), residences (0.1-10 microg/m(3)), mothball use (on-label: 1-100 microg/m(3); off-label: 10-100 microg/m(3)), and occupational (low: 3-100 microg/m(3); high: 30-1,000 microg/m(3)). There have been few published reports of human cancer associated with naphthalene exposure. Several research projects are suggested that could reduce uncertainty in our understanding of human exposure. Using best scientific judgment, it is reasonably certain that the largest non-occupational exposures to naphthalene are indoor/residential exposures, particularly in households that use naphthalene-based products such as mothballs. However, even the highest of these exposures is likely to fall one or more orders of magnitude below moderate or high-level occupational exposure levels experienced by the few known cohorts exposed occupationally to naphthalene alone or as part of chemical mixtures such as jet fuel. PMID:18423820

  10. A review of the application of inflammatory biomarkers in epidemiologic cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Darren R.; Scherer, Dominique; Muir, Kenneth; Schildkraut, Joellen; Boffetta, Paolo; Spitz, Margaret R.; LeMarchand, Loic; Chan, Andrew T.; Goode, Ellen L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a facilitating process for multiple cancer types. It is believed to affect cancer development and progression through several etiologic pathways including increased levels of DNA adduct formation, increased angiogenesis and altered anti-apoptotic signaling. This review highlights the application of inflammatory biomarkers in epidemiologic studies and discusses the various cellular mediators of inflammation characterizing the innate immune system response to infection and chronic insult from environmental factors. Included is a review of six classes of inflammation-related biomarkers: cytokines/chemokines, immune-related effectors, acute phase proteins, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, prostaglandins and cyclooxygenase-related factors, and mediators such as transcription factors and growth factors. For each of these biomarkers we provide a brief overview of the etiologic role in the inflammation response and how they have been related to cancer etiology and progression within the literature. We provide a discussion of the common techniques available for quantification of each marker including strengths, weaknesses and potential pitfalls. Subsequently, we highlight a few under-studied measures to characterize the inflammatory response and their potential utility in epidemiologic studies of cancer. Finally, we suggest integrative methods for future studies to apply multi-faceted approaches to examine the relationship between inflammatory markers and their roles in cancer development. PMID:24962838

  11. Epidemiology and molecular genetics of colorectal cancer in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Reza; Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Ansari, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer in Iranian older age subjects is currently very low compared to Western population, the younger generation is experiencing an accelerated rate approaching the Western rates and the burden of disease will increase dramatically in near future. The high frequency of positive family history of colorectal cancer in Iranian patients indicates that a significant number of colorectal cancers in Iran arise in family members and relatives of colorectal cancer patients. It is clear that the familial clustering of colorectal cancer is more often seen in younger probands and cancer located in the right side of the colon. These epidemiologic findings call for a broader attempt to promote public awareness and screening strategies in those families with a member affected by colorectal cancer, especially at younger age or with proximal tumors. Based on our present understanding, the possibility of preventing or curing most colon and rectal cancers is now plausible. The molecular biology of colon cancer has been the subject of many researches and is better understood than those for any other solid cancer and have established an important example for cancer research. It is now clear that colorectal cancer develops as the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to malignant transformation of normal mucosa. In spite of these scientific progresses and the fact that screening can reduce the rate of death by detecting early cancer or premalignant polyps, the rate of screening is very low globally and negligible in Iran and many other developing countries which is due to cost, resistance by physicians, patients, and the healthcare system. In Iran screening should at least be started in family members at earlier age with colonoscopy as the preferred modality of screening method. PMID:19249887

  12. Essential evidence for guiding health system priorities and policies: anticipating epidemiological transition in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Byass, Peter; de Savigny, Don; Lopez, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite indications that infection-related mortality in sub-Saharan Africa may be decreasing and the burden of non-communicable diseases increasing, the overwhelming reality is that health information systems across most of sub-Saharan Africa remain too weak to track epidemiological transition in a meaningful and effective way. Proposals We propose a minimum dataset as the basis of a functional health information system in countries where health information is lacking. This would involve continuous monitoring of cause-specific mortality through routine civil registration, regular documentation of exposure to leading risk factors, and monitoring effective coverage of key preventive and curative interventions in the health sector. Consideration must be given as to how these minimum data requirements can be effectively integrated within national health information systems, what methods and tools are needed, and ensuring that ethical and political issues are addressed. A more strategic approach to health information systems in sub-Saharan African countries, along these lines, is essential if epidemiological changes are to be tracked effectively for the benefit of local health planners and policy makers. Conclusion African countries have a unique opportunity to capitalize on modern information and communications technology in order to achieve this. Methodological standards need to be established and political momentum fostered so that the African continent's health status can be reliably tracked. This will greatly strengthen the evidence base for health policies and facilitate the effective delivery of services. PMID:24848653

  13. Dyslipidemia and dementia: current epidemiology, genetic evidence and mechanisms behind the associations

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The role of cholesterol in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is still controversial. Some studies aiming to explore the association between lipids and/or lipid lowering treatment and AD indicate a harmful effect of dyslipidemia and a beneficial effect of statin therapy on AD risk. The findings are supported by genetic linkage and association studies that have clearly identified several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism or transport as AD susceptibility genes, including Apolipoprotein E (APOE), Apolipoprotein J (APOJ, CLU) and the sortilin-related receptor (SORL1). Functional cell biology studies support a critical involvement of lipid raft cholesterol in the modulation of AbetaPP processing by β- and γ-secretase resulting in altered Aβ production. Contradictory evidence comes from epidemiological studies showing no or controversial association between dyslipidemia and AD risk, cell biology studies suggesting that there is little exchange between circulating and brain cholesterol, that increased membrane cholesterol is protective by inhibiting loss of membrane integrity through amyloid cytotoxicity, and that cellular cholesterol inhibits co-localization of BACE1 and AbetaPP in non-raft membrane domains and thereby increasing generation of plasmin, an Aβ-degrading enzyme. The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of epidemiologic and cell biologic studies aiming to elucidate the role of cholesterol in AD etiology. PMID:21965313

  14. Fever in Cancer Treatment: Coley's Therapy and Epidemiologic Observations.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Gunver S

    2012-03-01

    In the fall of 1890, an athletic, self-possessed, and thoughtful 17-year-old girl, who had just returned from an adventurous trip to Alaska where she had hurt her hand in a trivial accident, went to see a young, innovative surgeon in his new practice in New York City. Barely out of Harvard Medical School, he was a rising star in New York surgical circles, and the young woman asked him for help with her poorly healing, swollen, and naggingly painful injury. This visit had a far-reaching effect on cancer research, American philanthropy, and the career of the young man, William Coley, MD (1862-1936, Figure 1). The patient, Elisabeth Dashiell, confidant and close friend of John D. Rockefeller, Jr, was diagnosed by Coley with a highly aggressive round cell sarcoma, and despite radical surgery and in spite of Coley's undoubtedly fine surgical skills and intensive care, a rapid progression of the cancer, immense suffering, and Elisabeth's death a few months later could not be prevented. PMID:24278806

  15. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  16. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  17. Epidemiologic, Racial and Healthographic Mapping of Delaware Pediatric Cancer: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Laurens; Vandenberg, Jonathan; McClarin, Lavisha; Dabney, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Childhood cancer remains the leading cause of disease-related death among children 0 to 14 years and incidence varies by race, ethnicity, sex, geographic locale, and age at onset. However, data are unavailable in some regions, indicative of a need for such information for cancer awareness, education and prevention program. We utilized retrospective epidemiologic design to assess and characterize pediatric tumors in the Nemours Electronic Medical Records, between 2004 and 2014. Tumor frequency and children population size were used to determine the period prevalence as cumulative incidence (CI) proportion, as well as chi-square and Poisson Regression. The CI for overall childhood cancer in Delaware was 234 per 100,000 children, and varied by race, black (273 per 100,000), white (189 per 100,000). Similarly, sex variability was observed in CI, boys (237 per 100,000) and girls (230 per 100,000). The most commonly diagnosed malignancies were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS)/brain and renal cancer. The geographic locales with relatively higher cancer CI in the state of DE were zip codes 19804 and 19960, but this does not imply cancer clustering. Differences in overall childhood cancer distribution occurred by race, sex, geography, and age. These findings are indicative of the need for cancer-specific health education, awareness and prevention programs in reducing the observed disparities in Delaware. PMID:26703649

  18. Epidemiologic, Racial and Healthographic Mapping of Delaware Pediatric Cancer: 2004–2014

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Laurens; Vandenberg, Jonathan; McClarin, Lavisha; Dabney, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer remains the leading cause of disease-related death among children 0 to 14 years and incidence varies by race, ethnicity, sex, geographic locale, and age at onset. However, data are unavailable in some regions, indicative of a need for such information for cancer awareness, education and prevention program. We utilized retrospective epidemiologic design to assess and characterize pediatric tumors in the Nemours Electronic Medical Records, between 2004 and 2014. Tumor frequency and children population size were used to determine the period prevalence as cumulative incidence (CI) proportion, as well as chi-square and Poisson Regression. The CI for overall childhood cancer in Delaware was 234 per 100,000 children, and varied by race, black (273 per 100,000), white (189 per 100,000). Similarly, sex variability was observed in CI, boys (237 per 100,000) and girls (230 per 100,000). The most commonly diagnosed malignancies were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS)/brain and renal cancer. The geographic locales with relatively higher cancer CI in the state of DE were zip codes 19804 and 19960, but this does not imply cancer clustering. Differences in overall childhood cancer distribution occurred by race, sex, geography, and age. These findings are indicative of the need for cancer-specific health education, awareness and prevention programs in reducing the observed disparities in Delaware. PMID:26703649

  19. Molecular epidemiology of lung cancer and geographic variations with special reference to EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in many countries. Although recent advances in targeted therapy against driver oncogenes have significantly improved patient outcome, cure of this disease is still exceptional. Although tobacco is a known cause of lung cancer, not all smokers develop lung cancer, and conversely many patients, especially Asian female patients with lung cancer, are lifetime never-smokers. Therefore, efforts to understand the basis for different susceptibilities to lung cancer among individuals with different genetic, biologic, ethnic, and social backgrounds are important to help develop effective preventive measures. Lung cancer in never-smokers has many different characteristics to lung cancer in smokers, such as adenocarcinoma predominance and high frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation yet low number of genetic changes. Epidemiologic studies suggest that East Asians are more susceptible to smoking-unrelated lung cancer but less susceptible to smoking-related lung cancer compared with Caucasians. Mutations in the EGFR gene are more common in Asian females and never-smokers. Our case-control study suggests that EGFR mutation occurs independent of smoking, and that the apparent low frequency of EGFR mutations in smokers may be the result of dilution by smoking-related lung cancer. The frequencies of three EGFR gene polymorphisms associated with increased protein expression are significantly different between East Asians and Caucasians, favoring lower protein expression in East Asians. Although these may be associated with preferred expression of the EGFR mutant allele, it is difficult to explain the frequent EGFR mutation in Asian patients. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) revealed several loci related to lung cancer susceptibility. In the future, GWAS may identify loci that are specifically related to EGFR-targeted carcinogenesis, leading to identification of carcinogens that induce EGFR

  20. Molecular epidemiology of lung cancer and geographic variations with special reference to EGFR mutations.

    PubMed

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in many countries. Although recent advances in targeted therapy against driver oncogenes have significantly improved patient outcome, cure of this disease is still exceptional. Although tobacco is a known cause of lung cancer, not all smokers develop lung cancer, and conversely many patients, especially Asian female patients with lung cancer, are lifetime never-smokers. Therefore, efforts to understand the basis for different susceptibilities to lung cancer among individuals with different genetic, biologic, ethnic, and social backgrounds are important to help develop effective preventive measures. Lung cancer in never-smokers has many different characteristics to lung cancer in smokers, such as adenocarcinoma predominance and high frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation yet low number of genetic changes. Epidemiologic studies suggest that East Asians are more susceptible to smoking-unrelated lung cancer but less susceptible to smoking-related lung cancer compared with Caucasians. Mutations in the EGFR gene are more common in Asian females and never-smokers. Our case-control study suggests that EGFR mutation occurs independent of smoking, and that the apparent low frequency of EGFR mutations in smokers may be the result of dilution by smoking-related lung cancer. The frequencies of three EGFR gene polymorphisms associated with increased protein expression are significantly different between East Asians and Caucasians, favoring lower protein expression in East Asians. Although these may be associated with preferred expression of the EGFR mutant allele, it is difficult to explain the frequent EGFR mutation in Asian patients. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) revealed several loci related to lung cancer susceptibility. In the future, GWAS may identify loci that are specifically related to EGFR-targeted carcinogenesis, leading to identification of carcinogens that induce EGFR

  1. Pioglitazone (Actos) and bladder cancer: Legal system triumphs over the evidence.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Mayer B

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical studies, pioglitazone was associated with bladder cancer in male rats (but not in female rats, mice dogs or monkeys). Because of this association, the Federal Drug Administration requested a large 10year epidemiological study to evaluate whether there was an association between bladder cancer and exposure to pioglitazone in patients. A 5-year interim report published in 2011 showed no significant association between ever vs never exposure to the drug but a significant association in patients exposed to pioglitazone for >2years. Importantly, the final 10year report did not confirm the 5year interim report finding no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone, even after >4years of exposure to the drug. However, as would be expected, following the 5-year interim report, many epidemiological studies were carried out and civil litigation lawsuits began to be filed. Of the 23 epidemiological studies that have been published to date, 18 showed no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone (5 with a combination of rosiglitazone and pioglitazone). Of the five that did show a significant association with pioglitazone, three could not be confirmed in the same population and in one of them there were significantly more risk factors for bladder cancer in the patients exposed to pioglitazone. In the fourth one, a significant association became non-significant when patients >79years were included. In the fifth one, detection bias was a major flaw. Currently, >11,000 legal cases have been filed, many of which claim emotional distress due to the fear of bladder cancer. To limit their legal costs, the pharmaceutical company has established a 2.4 billion dollar settlement pool. So much for evidence-based medicine. PMID:27133452

  2. Natural vitamin C intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: A pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    PubMed

    Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Turati, Federica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Amy Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chuang, Shu-Chun; La Vecchia, Carlo; Decarli, Adriano

    2015-07-15

    Evidence of associations between single nutrients and head and neck cancer (HNC) is still more limited and less consistent than that for fruit and vegetables. However, clarification of the protective mechanisms of fruit and vegetables is important to our understanding of HNC etiology. We investigated the association between vitamin C intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx using individual-level pooled data from ten case-control studies (5,959 cases and 12,248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. After harmonization of study-specific exposure information via the residual method, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models on quintile categories of 'non-alcohol energy-adjusted' vitamin C intake. In the presence of heterogeneity of the estimated ORs among studies, we derived those estimates from generalized linear mixed models. Higher intakes of vitamin C were inversely related to oral and pharyngeal (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.45-0.65, for the fifth quintile category versus the first one, p for trend<0.001) and laryngeal cancers (OR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.40-0.68, p for trend = 0.006), although in the presence of heterogeneity among studies for both sites. Inverse associations were consistently observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer, and across strata of age, sex, education, body mass index, tobacco, and alcohol, for both cancer sites. The inverse association of vitamin C intake from foods with HNC may reflect a protective effect on these cancers; however, we cannot rule out other explanations. PMID:25627906

  3. Natural vitamin C intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortiuma,b

    PubMed Central

    Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Turati, Federica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F.; Zevallos, Jose P.; Winn, Deborah M.; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Chuang, Shu-Chun; La Vecchia, Carlo; Decarli, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of associations between single nutrients and head and neck cancer (HNC) is still more limited and less consistent than that for fruit and vegetables. However, clarification of the protective mechanisms of fruit and vegetables is important to our understanding of HNC etiology. We investigated the association between vitamin C intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx using individual-level pooled data from ten case-control studies (5959 cases and 12248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. After harmonization of study-specific exposure information via the residual method, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models on quintile categories of ’non-alcohol energy-adjusted’ vitamin C intake. In the presence of heterogeneity of the estimated ORs among studies, we derived those estimates from generalized linear mixed models. Higher intakes of vitamin C were inversely related to oral and pharyngeal (OR=0.54, 95% CI: 0.45–0.65, for the fifth quintile category versus the first one, p for trend<0.001) and laryngeal cancers (OR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.40–0.68, p for trend=0.006), although in the presence of heterogeneity among studies for both sites. Inverse associations were consistently observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer, and across strata of age, sex, education, body mass index, tobacco, and alcohol, for both cancer sites. The inverse association of vitamin C intake from foods with HNC may reflect a protective effect on these cancers; however, we cannot rule out other explanations. PMID:25627906

  4. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratiosmore » (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.« less

  5. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.

  6. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Humpage, Andrew R.; Krasner, Stuart W.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Moore, Lee E.; Singer, Philip C.; Stanford, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  7. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products.

    PubMed

    Hrudey, Steve E; Backer, Lorraine C; Humpage, Andrew R; Krasner, Stuart W; Michaud, Dominique S; Moore, Lee E; Singer, Philip C; Stanford, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  8. Measurement of spices and seasonings in India: Opportunities for cancer epidemiology and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Leah M.; Daniel, Carrie R.; Kapur, Kavita; Chadha, Puneet; Shetty, Hemali; Graubard, Barry I.; George, Preethi S.; Osborne, Whitney; Yurgalevitch, Susan; Devasenapathy, Niveditha; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gupta, Prakash C.; Mathew, Aleyamma; Sinha, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive components of many foods added during cooking have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antibacterial and chemopreventive properties. However, epidemiologic studies generally do not collect detailed information on these items which include spices, chilies, coconuts, garlic, onions, and oils. Since India has some of the highest spice consumption in the world, we developed a computer-based food preparer questionnaire to estimate per capita consumption of 19 spices, chilies, coconuts, garlic, onions, and 13 cooking oils among 3,625 participants in the India Health Study, a multicenter pilot study in three regions of India. We observed notable regional differences in consumption of spices, chilies, coconut, garlic, and onions. In Trivandrum, over 95 percent of the participants consumed 12 different spices, while in New Delhi and Mumbai, 95 percent of participants consumed only four and five spices, respectively. Cooking oil use also varied, as ghee was most common in New Delhi (96.8%) followed by mustard seed oil (78.0%), while in Trivandrum the primary oil was coconut (88.5%) and in Mumbai it was peanut (68.5%). There was some variation in consumption by education, income, and religion. Using a novel method for assessing food items primarily added during cooking, we successfully estimated per capita consumption within an epidemiologic study. Based on basic science research and suggestive ecologic level data on cancer incidence and spice consumption, improving epidemiologic assessment of these potentially chemopreventive food items may enhance our understanding of diet and cancer risk. PMID:21338207

  9. Lung cancer incidence decreases with elevation: evidence for oxygen as an inhaled carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Kamen P; Himmelstein, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    The level of atmospheric oxygen, a driver of free radical damage and tumorigenesis, decreases sharply with rising elevation. To understand whether ambient oxygen plays a role in human carcinogenesis, we characterized age-adjusted cancer incidence (compiled by the National Cancer Institute from 2005 to 2009) across counties of the elevation-varying Western United States and compared trends displayed by respiratory cancer (lung) and non-respiratory cancers (breast, colorectal, and prostate). To adjust for important demographic and cancer-risk factors, 8-12 covariates were considered for each cancer. We produced regression models that captured known risks. Models demonstrated that elevation is strongly, negatively associated with lung cancer incidence (p < 10(-16)), but not with the incidence of non-respiratory cancers. For every 1,000 m rise in elevation, lung cancer incidence decreased by 7.23 99% CI [5.18-9.29] cases per 100,000 individuals, equivalent to 12.7% of the mean incidence, 56.8. As a predictor of lung cancer incidence, elevation was second only to smoking prevalence in terms of significance and effect size. Furthermore, no evidence of ecological fallacy or of confounding arising from evaluated factors was detected: the lung cancer association was robust to varying regression models, county stratification, and population subgrouping; additionally seven environmental correlates of elevation, such as exposure to sunlight and fine particulate matter, could not capture the association. Overall, our findings suggest the presence of an inhaled carcinogen inherently and inversely tied to elevation, offering epidemiological support for oxygen-driven tumorigenesis. Finally, highlighting the need to consider elevation in studies of lung cancer, we demonstrated that previously reported inverse lung cancer associations with radon and UVB became insignificant after accounting for elevation. PMID:25648772

  10. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    PubMed

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields. PMID:26344172

  11. Cancer epidemiology in mainland South-East Asia - past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Moore, Malcolm A; Attasara, Pattarawin; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Le, Tran Ngoan; Nguyen, Thi Hoai Nga; Raingsey, Prak Piseth; Sriamporn, Supannee; Sriplung, Hutcha; Srivanatanakul, Petcharin; Bui, Duc Tung; Wiangnon, Surapon; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2010-01-01

    The countries of mainland South-East Asia, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Viet Nam, share a long history of interactions and many cultural similarities, as well as geographical contiguity. They therefore can be usefully examined as a group when considering measures for control of cancer and other non-communicable diseases. Liver cancer is consistently found at higher incidence than most other parts of Asia, with lung cancer as the other most important neoplasm in males. In females cervical and breast cancer about equally predominate, throughout. However, there are also major differences, particularly with regard to stomach and nasopharyngeal cancer, only found at relatively high incidence in Viet Nam. The present review was conducted to gather together registry data on cancer prevalence and epidemiological findings cited in PubMed in order to obtain as comprehensive picture as possible of the present status. It is hoped that future cooperation across the region will facilitate development of coordinated cancer control programs to reduce the burden. PMID:20553069

  12. Retinoblastoma and the Genetic Theory of Cancer: An Old Paradigm Trying to Survive to the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, Domenico; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Loré, Cosimo

    2009-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is considered to represent the prototype of cancer linked to the sequential loss or inactivation of both alleles of a so-called “tumor suppressor gene”, the Rb1 gene. The pathogenetic mechanism behind this tumor was first hypothesized by Knudson in 1971 and further confirmed by others who identified the Rb1 gene whose loss or inactivation was claimed to be responsible for the disease. However, after about four decades of continuous research in the field of molecular biology, the evidence behind the role of the Rb1 gene in Rb appears to be seriously flawed in the light of epidemiological, biological, and clinical evidences. This editorial summarizes the inconsistencies on this subject. Nevertheless, the molecular biology establishment still adheres to the biased view of the genetic origin of Rb and other cancers, and hardly any alternative explanations are taken into account. PMID:20445799

  13. Epidemiological transition of colorectal cancer in developing countries: Environmental factors, molecular pathways, and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Vacca, Michele; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related mortality worldwide. The disease has been traditionally a major health problem in industrial countries, however the CRC rates are increasing in the developing countries that are undergoing economic growth. Several environmental risk factors, mainly changes in diet and life style, have been suggested to underlie the rise of CRC in these populations. Diet and lifestyle impinge on nuclear receptors, on the intestinal microbiota and on crucial molecular pathways that are implicated in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this respect, the epidemiological transition in several regions of the world offers a unique opportunity to better understand CRC carcinogenesis by studying the disease phenotypes and their environmental and molecular associations in different populations. The data from these studies may have important implications for the global prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24876728

  14. Epidemiological overview, advances in diagnosis, prevention, treatment and management of epithelial ovarian cancer in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores; Espinosa-Romero, Raquel; Muñoz, Wendy Rosemary; Mendoza-Martínez, Roberto; Villar-Álvarez, Susana Del; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis; Isla-Ortiz, David; Márquez-Manríquez, Juan Pablo; Apodaca-Cruz, Ángel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has been underdiagnosed because it does not have a specific clinical presentation, and the signs and symptoms are similar to the irritable bowel syndrome and pelvic inflammatory disease. EOC is less common than breast and cervical cancer, but it is more lethal. On the whole, EOC has an early dissemination to peritoneal cavity, which delays a timely diagnosis and increases the rate of advanced diagnosed disease. The diagnosis usually surprises the women and the primary care physician. Therefore, it is necessary to count on prevention and early diagnosis programs. EOC has 80% response to surgical treatment, but nearly 70% of the patients may relapse in five years. The objectives of this document are presenting a summary of the EOC epidemiology and comment about advancements in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this cancer. That will raise awareness about the importance of this disease. PMID:27557390

  15. Environmental and Occupational Causes of Cancer New Evidence, 2005–2007

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Richard W.; Jacobs, Molly M.; Loechler, Edward L

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary What do we currently know about the occupational and environmental causes of cancer? As of 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has identified 415 known or suspected carcinogens. Cancer arises through an extremely complicated web of multiple causes. We will likely never know the full range of agents or combinations of agents that cause cancer. However, we do know that preventing exposure to individual carcinogens prevents the disease. Declines in cancer rates – such as the drop in male lung cancer cases from the reduction in tobacco smoking or the drop in bladder cancer among cohorts of dye workers from the elimination of exposure to specific aromatic amines – provides evidence that preventing cancer is possible when we act on what we know. Although the overall age-adjusted cancer incidence rates in the U.S. among both men and women have declined in the last decade, rates of several types of cancers are on the rise; some of these cancers are linked to environmental and occupational exposures. This report chronicles the most recent epidemiological evidence linking occupational and environmental exposures with cancer. Peer-reviewed scientific studies published from January 2005-June 2007 were reviewed, supplementing our state-of-the-evidence report published in September 2005. Despite weaknesses in some individual studies, we consider the evidence linking the increased risk of several types of cancer with specific exposures somewhat strengthened by recent publications, among them: brain cancer from exposure to non-ionizing radiation, particularly radiofrequency fields emitted by mobile telephones;breast cancer from exposure to the pesticide dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) prior to puberty;leukemia from exposure to 1,3-butadiene;lung cancer from exposure to air pollution;non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) from exposure to pesticides and solvents; andprostate cancer from exposure to pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs

  16. Assessing the evidence for organised cancer screening programmes.

    PubMed

    Madlensky, L; Goel, V; Polzer, J; Ashbury, F D

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the evidence in the literature for organised cancer screening programmes. A Medline search for publications related to organised cancer screening programmes and their components was done. While there is a broad descriptive literature on various cancer screening programmes, there are few published studies that evaluate the impact of organised cancer screening. Most of the evidence to date is from Scandinavian cervical and breast cancer screening programmes. There is a moderate amount of literature that evaluates specific components of cancer screening programmes (such as quality control and recruitment). There is a substantial body of literature on organised cancer screening programmes. However, the studies tend to describe organised screening programmes rather than evaluate their effectiveness relative to opportunistic screening. Furthermore, most studies focus on individual components of organised screening programmes, rather than on the programmes as a whole. More research is needed that directly compares organised with opportunistic cancer screening. PMID:12888358

  17. Progress in the epidemiological understanding of gene-environment interactions in major diseases: cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung, larynx and bladder cancer. Major chemical, physical and biological carcinogenic agents have been identified in the working environment and in the overall environment. The chain of events from environmental exposures to cancer requires hundreds of polymorphic genes coding for proteins involved in the transport and metabolism of xenobiotics, or in repair, or in an immune or inflammatory response. The multifactorial and multistage characteristics of cancer create the theoretical conditions for statistical interactions which have been exceptionnally detected. Over the last two decades, a considerable mass of data has been generated, mostly addressing the interactions between smoking and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in smoking-related cancers. They are sometimes considered disappointing but they actually brought a lot of information and raised many methodological issues. In parallel, the number of polymorphisms which can be considered candidate per function increased so much that multiple testing has become a major issue, and genome wide screening approaches have more and more gained in interest. Facing the resulting complexity, some instruments are being set up: our studies are now equipped with carefully sampled biological collections, high-throughput genotyping systems are becoming available, work on statistical methodologies is ongoing, bioinformatics databases are growing larger and access to them is becoming simpler; international consortiums are being organized. The roles of environmental and genetic factors are being jointly elucidated. The basic rules of epidemiology, which are demanding with respect to sampling, with respect to the histological and molecular criteria for cancer classification, with respect to the evaluation of environmental

  18. Bisphenol A, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Epidemiological, Laboratory, and Clinical Trial Evidence.

    PubMed

    Han, Changwoo; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has become one of the most common environmental chemical exposures in humans. There is growing evidence regarding an association between BPA exposure, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). If BPA exposure is indeed associated with raised blood pressure and CVD, it would be a major public health problem. Therefore, we reviewed the epidemiological, laboratory, and clinical trial evidence for an association between BPA exposure, CVD, and hypertension, and discussed the possible mechanisms in this article. Cross-sectional studies in various ethnicities suggested a possible association between BPA exposure and hypertension; this association was supported by a panel study and a randomized clinical trial. Despite the discordance among cross-sectional studies about an association between BPA exposure and CVD, a longitudinal study shows that BPA exposure is a risk factor for CVD. The effects of BPA exposure such as endocrinal disturbance, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation, epigenetic change, and links with other chronic diseases may highlight a possible mechanism between BPA exposure, CVD, and hypertension. To clarify the causal relationship, well-designed studies are needed in the future. PMID:26781251

  19. [Physical activity, physical fitness, and overweight in children and adolescents: evidence from epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco B; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Castillo, Manuel J

    2013-10-01

    Physical activity and fitness play a significant role in prevention of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Current understanding and evidence from epidemiologic studies provide useful insights to better understand how they relate to each other and how to develop future intervention strategies. This paper summarizes the most relevant information from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and overweight in early life. According to current scientific evidence: (i) High levels of physical activity during childhood and adolescence, particularly vigorous physical activity, are associated to lower total and central adiposity at this age and later in life; (ii) the level of physical fitness, especially aerobic fitness, is inversely related to current and future adiposity levels; (iii) overweight children and adolescents with a high fitness level have a healthier cardiovascular profile than their overweight, low fit peers and a similar profile to their normal weight, low fit peers. This suggests that high fitness levels may counteract the negative consequences attributed to body fat. These findings suggest that increasing physical fitness in overweight children and adolescents may have many positive effects on health, including lower body fat levels. PMID:23419502

  20. Bisphenol a and the female reproductive tract: an overview of recent laboratory evidence and epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume monomer used for making a wide variety of polycarbonate plastics and resins. A large body of evidence links BPA to endocrine disruption in laboratory animals, and a growing number of epidemiological studies support a link with health disorders in humans. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent experimental studies describing the effects and mechanisms of BPA on the female genital tract and to compare them to the current knowledge regarding the impact of BPA impact on female reproductive health. In particular, BPA has been correlated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary hormonal production, reduced oocyte quality due to perinatal and adulthood exposure, defective uterine receptivity and the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. Researchers have reported conflicting results regarding the effect of BPA on premature puberty and endometriosis development. Experimental studies suggest that BPA’s mechanism of action is related to life stage and that its effect on the female reproductive system may involve agonism with estrogen nuclear receptors as well as other mechanisms (steroid biosynthesis inhibition). Notwithstanding uncertainties and knowledge gaps, the available evidence should be seen as a sufficient grounds to take precautionary actions against excess exposure to BPA. PMID:24886252

  1. Environmental chemicals and DNA methylation in adults: a systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Adrian; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Rentero-Garrido, Pilar; Tang, Wan-Yee; Redon, Josep; Ordovas, Jose M; Navas-Acien, Ana; Tellez-Plaza, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Current evidence supports the notion that environmental exposures are associated with DNA-methylation and expression changes that can impact human health. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of epidemiologic studies evaluating the association between environmental chemicals with DNA methylation levels in adults. After excluding arsenic, recently evaluated in a systematic review, we identified a total of 17 articles (6 on cadmium, 4 on lead, 2 on mercury, 1 on nickel, 1 on antimony, 1 on tungsten, 5 on persistent organic pollutants and perfluorinated compounds, 1 on bisphenol A, and 3 on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). The selected articles reported quantitative methods to determine DNA methylation including immunocolorimetric assays for total content of genomic DNA methylation, and microarray technologies, methylation-specific quantitative PCR, Luminometric Methylation Assay (LUMA), and bisulfite pyrosequencing for DNA methylation content of genomic sites such as gene promoters, LINE-1, Alu elements, and others. Considering consistency, temporality, strength, dose-response relationship, and biological plausibility, we concluded that the current evidence is not sufficient to provide inference because differences across studies and limited samples sizes make it difficult to compare across studies and to evaluate sources of heterogeneity. Important questions for future research include the need for larger and longitudinal studies, the validation of findings, and the systematic evaluation of the dose-response relationships. Future studies should also consider the evaluation of epigenetic marks recently in the research spotlight such as DNA hydroxymethylation and the role of underlying genetic variants. PMID:25984247

  2. Exposure to non-persistent pesticides and thyroid function: A systematic review of epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Campos, Élida; Freire, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous pesticides are recognized for their endocrine-disrupting properties. Non-persistent pesticides such as organophosphates, dithiocarbamates and pyrethroids may interfere with thyroid function as suggested by animal studies. However, the influence of chronic exposure to these compounds on thyroidal functions in humans remains to be determined. The present study aimed to review epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to non-persistent pesticides and circulating levels of thyroid hormones (thyroxin [T4] and triiodothyronine [T3]) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Virtual Health Library (BVS) databases. Articles were limited to original studies and reports published in English, Portuguese or Spanish. Nineteen epidemiological studies were identified, 17 of which were cross-sectional, 14 were of occupationally exposed workers and 11 used exposure biomarkers. Fungicides and organophosphates (OP) insecticides were the most studied pesticides. Although methodological heterogeneity between studies was noted, particularly regarding study design, exposure assessment, and control of confounding, most of them showed associations with changes in T3 and T4, and/or TSH levels, while results from a few of these are consistent with experimental data supporting the findings that non-persistent pesticide exposure exerts hypothyroid-like effects. However, reporting quality was moderate to poor in 50% of the studies, particularly regarding method of selection of participants and discussion of external validity. Overall, current knowledge regarding the impact of non-persistent pesticides on human thyroid function is still limited. Given the widespread use of pesticides, future research should assess effects of exposure to currently-used pesticides in cohort studies combining comprehensive questionnaire-based assessment and biomarkers. Investigators need to pay particular attention to exposure

  3. Coffee consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer: Evidence from a case-control study of female hormone-related cancers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Kaoru; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Wakai, Kenji; Matsuo, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Toru; Tajima, Kazuo

    2007-03-01

    Coffee has become a popular beverage worldwide. Caffeine, a major ingredient of coffee, has been proposed to have a favorable affect on the modulation of circulating estrogen levels and therefore may be of importance in developments on hormone-related cancers. However, epidemiological evidence is limited and inconsistent. We examined the relationship between intake of coffee and hormone-related cancer risk among Japanese women using data from the hospital-based epidemiological research program at Aichi Cancer Center (HERPACC). In total, 2122 breast, 229 endometrial and 166 ovarian cancer cases were included, and 12 425 women, confirmed as free of cancer, were recruited as the control group. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were determined by multiple logistic regression analysis. A statistically significant inverse association between risk of endometrial cancer and coffee consumption was noted in Japanese women, with no clear association evident for breast and ovarian cancer risk. Compared to non-drinker, the OR of daily drinking of 1-2 cups and 3 or more cups per day for endometrial cancer were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.43-0.94) and 0.41 (95% CI: 0.19-0.87), respectively, and the linear trend was also statistically significant (P < 0.01). However, there was no statistically significant association between caffeine intake and endometrial cancer. In summary, the results of the present study suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of endometrial cancer in Japanese subjects. Given the scarcity of studies of coffee intake and endometrial cancer and other hormone-dependent cancer risk, additional investigations are warranted. PMID:17270030

  4. Point: Clarifying Policy Evidence With Potential-Outcomes Thinking—Beyond Exposure-Response Estimation in Air Pollution Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Corwin Matthew; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory environment surrounding policies to control air pollution warrants a new type of epidemiologic evidence. Whereas air pollution epidemiology has typically informed policies with estimates of exposure-response relationships between pollution and health outcomes, these estimates alone cannot support current debates surrounding the actual health effects of air quality regulations. We argue that directly evaluating specific control strategies is distinct from estimating exposure-response relationships and that increased emphasis on estimating effects of well-defined regulatory interventions would enhance the evidence that supports policy decisions. Appealing to similar calls for accountability assessment of whether regulatory actions impact health outcomes, we aim to sharpen the analytic distinctions between studies that directly evaluate policies and those that estimate exposure-response relationships, with particular focus on perspectives for causal inference. Our goal is not to review specific methodologies or studies, nor is it to extoll the advantages of “causal” versus “associational” evidence. Rather, we argue that potential-outcomes perspectives can elevate current policy debates with more direct evidence of the extent to which complex regulatory interventions affect health. Augmenting the existing body of exposure-response estimates with rigorous evidence of the causal effects of well-defined actions will ensure that the highest-level epidemiologic evidence continues to support regulatory policies. PMID:25399414

  5. Point: clarifying policy evidence with potential-outcomes thinking--beyond exposure-response estimation in air pollution epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zigler, Corwin Matthew; Dominici, Francesca

    2014-12-15

    The regulatory environment surrounding policies to control air pollution warrants a new type of epidemiologic evidence. Whereas air pollution epidemiology has typically informed policies with estimates of exposure-response relationships between pollution and health outcomes, these estimates alone cannot support current debates surrounding the actual health effects of air quality regulations. We argue that directly evaluating specific control strategies is distinct from estimating exposure-response relationships and that increased emphasis on estimating effects of well-defined regulatory interventions would enhance the evidence that supports policy decisions. Appealing to similar calls for accountability assessment of whether regulatory actions impact health outcomes, we aim to sharpen the analytic distinctions between studies that directly evaluate policies and those that estimate exposure-response relationships, with particular focus on perspectives for causal inference. Our goal is not to review specific methodologies or studies, nor is it to extoll the advantages of "causal" versus "associational" evidence. Rather, we argue that potential-outcomes perspectives can elevate current policy debates with more direct evidence of the extent to which complex regulatory interventions affect health. Augmenting the existing body of exposure-response estimates with rigorous evidence of the causal effects of well-defined actions will ensure that the highest-level epidemiologic evidence continues to support regulatory policies. PMID:25399414

  6. Radiation and breast cancer: a review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ronckers, Cécile M; Erdmann, Christine A; Land, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes current knowledge on ionizing radiation-associated breast cancer in the context of established breast cancer risk factors, the radiation dose–response relationship, and modifiers of dose response, taking into account epidemiological studies and animal experiments. Available epidemiological data support a linear dose–response relationship down to doses as low as about 100 mSv. However, the magnitude of risk per unit dose depends strongly on when radiation exposure occurs: exposure before the age of 20 years carries the greatest risk. Other characteristics that may influence the magnitude of dose-specific risk include attained age (that is, age at observation for risk), age at first full-term birth, parity, and possibly a history of benign breast disease, exposure to radiation while pregnant, and genetic factors. PMID:15642178

  7. Invited Commentary: Circulating Inflammation Markers and Cancer Risk—Implications for Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Moore, Steven C.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation, an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is increasingly being recognized as an etiologic factor in several cancers. In this issue of the Journal, Touvier et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(1):3–13) report on the association of 7 markers of inflammation, adiposity, and endothelial function with risk of overall cancer and breast and prostate cancers in a nested case-control study carried out within the SU.VI.MAX cohort (France, 1994–2007). Consistent with previous reports on this topic, Touvier et al. focused on a limited number of markers. Future studies of inflammation and cancer should be able to capitalize on emerging multiplexed methods for the simultaneous detection of larger numbers of inflammatory markers in low-volume specimens. This should allow a more comprehensive evaluation of the role of inflammation in cancer development. In this commentary, the authors review emerging methods for measurement of multiplexed inflammation markers, the design and analytic implications of the use of these methods in epidemiologic studies, and potential public health implications of such studies. Given that many large prospective cohort studies have already collected and banked serum/plasma samples, rapid gains in our understanding of chronic inflammation and its role in cancer etiology are possible. PMID:23171878

  8. Cancer epidemiology and control in peninsular and island South-East Asia - past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Moore, Malcolm A; Manan, Azizah Ab; Chow, Khuan Yew; Cornain, Santoso F; Devi, C R Beena; Triningsih, F X Ediati; Laudico, Adriano; Mapua, Cynthia A; Mirasol-Lumague, Maria Rica; Noorwati, S; Nyunt, Kan; Othman, Nor Hayati; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Sinuraya, Evlina Suzanna; Yip, Cheng Har; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2010-01-01

    Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, East Timor and the Philippines constitute peninsular and island South-East Asia. For reasons of largely shared ethnicity, with Chinese elements added to the basic Austromalaysian populations, as well as geographical contiguity, they can be usefully grouped together for studies of chronic disease prevalence and underlying risk factors. The fact of problems are shared in common, particularly regarding increasing cancer rates, underlines the necessity for a coordinated approach to research and development of control measures. To provide a knowledge base, the present review of available data for cancer registration, epidemiology and control was conducted. The most prevalent cancer site in males is the lung, followed by the liver, colon or the prostate in the majority of cases, while breast and cervical cancers predominate in most female populations. However, there are interesting differences among the racial groups, particularly regarding the stomach. General tendencies for increase in adenocarcinomas but decrease in squamous cell carcinomas and gastric cancer, point to change in environmental influence over time. Variation in risk factors depends to some extent on the level of economic development but overall the countries of the region face similar challenges in achieving effective cancer control. A major task is persuading the general populace of the efficacy of early detection and clinical treatment. PMID:20553070

  9. TP53 mutations as biomarkers for cancer epidemiology in Latin America: current knowledge and perspectives.

    PubMed

    de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitória; Azevedo E Silva Mendonça, Gulnar; de Moraes, Emanuela; Olivier, Magali; Hainaut, Pierre

    2005-05-01

    Due to particular social and economical development, and to the impact of globalization of lifestyles, Latin America shows a superposition of cancers that are frequent in low resource countries (gastric, oesophageal squamous cell and cervical cancers) and high resource countries (cancers of breast, colon and rectum, lung and prostate). Latin America thus offers opportunities for investigating the impact on changing lifestyle patterns on the occurrence of cancer. At the molecular level, mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 are common in many cancers and their distribution can be informative of the nature of the mutagenic mechanisms, thus giving clues to cancer etiology and molecular pathogenesis. However most of the data available are derived from studies in industrialized countries. In this review, we discuss current trends on cancer occurrence in Latin American countries, and we review the literature available on TP53 mutations and polymorphisms in patients from Latin America. Overall, a total of 285 mutations have been described in 1213 patients in 20 publications, representing 1.5% of the total number of mutations reported world-wide. Except for hematological cancers, TP53 mutation frequencies are similar to those reported in other regions of the world. The only tumor site presenting significant differences in mutation pattern as compared to other parts of the world is colon and rectum. However, this difference is based on a single study with 35 patients. Recently, a characteristic TP53 mutation at codon 337 (R337H) has been identified in the germline of children with adrenocortical carcinoma in Southern Brazil. Further and better focused analyses of TP53 mutation patterns in the context of epidemiological studies, should help to improve our understanding of cancer etiology in order to develop appropriate health policies and public health programs in Latin America. PMID:15878142

  10. Ovarian Cancer and Body Size: Individual Participant Meta-Analysis Including 25,157 Women with Ovarian Cancer from 47 Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Only about half the studies that have collected information on the relevance of women's height and body mass index to their risk of developing ovarian cancer have published their results, and findings are inconsistent. Here, we bring together the worldwide evidence, published and unpublished, and describe these relationships. Methods and Findings Individual data on 25,157 women with ovarian cancer and 81,311 women without ovarian cancer from 47 epidemiological studies were collected, checked, and analysed centrally. Adjusted relative risks of ovarian cancer were calculated, by height and by body mass index. Ovarian cancer risk increased significantly with height and with body mass index, except in studies using hospital controls. For other study designs, the relative risk of ovarian cancer per 5 cm increase in height was 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.09; p<0.001); this relationship did not vary significantly by women's age, year of birth, education, age at menarche, parity, menopausal status, smoking, alcohol consumption, having had a hysterectomy, having first degree relatives with ovarian or breast cancer, use of oral contraceptives, or use of menopausal hormone therapy. For body mass index, there was significant heterogeneity (p<0.001) in the findings between ever-users and never-users of menopausal hormone therapy, but not by the 11 other factors listed above. The relative risk for ovarian cancer per 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.07–1.13; p<0.001) in never-users and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92–0.99; p = 0.02) in ever-users of hormone therapy. Conclusions Ovarian cancer is associated with height and, among never-users of hormone therapy, with body mass index. In high-income countries, both height and body mass index have been increasing in birth cohorts now developing the disease. If all other relevant factors had remained constant, then these increases in height and weight would be associated with a 3% increase

  11. Risk factors and other epidemiologic considerations for cervical cancer screening: a narrative review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    PubMed

    Vesco, Kimberly K; Whitlock, Evelyn P; Eder, Michelle; Burda, Brittany U; Senger, Caitlyn A; Lutz, Kevin

    2011-11-15

    Despite the success of cervical cancer screening programs, questions remain about the appropriate time to begin and end screening. This review explores epidemiologic and contextual data on cervical cancer screening to inform decisions about when screening should begin and end. Cervical cancer is rare among women younger than 20 years. Screening for cervical cancer in this age group is complicated by lower rates of detection and higher rates of false-positive results than in older women. Methods used to diagnose and treat cervical intraepithelial neoplasia have important potential adverse effects. High-risk human papillomavirus infections and abnormalities on cytologic and histologic examination have relatively high rates of regression. Accordingly, cervical cancer screening in women younger than 20 years may be harmful. The incidence of, and mortality rates from, cervical cancer and the proportion of U.S. women aged 65 years or older who have had a Papanicolaou smear within 3 years have decreased since 2000. Available evidence supports discontinuation of cervical cancer screening among women aged 65 years or older who have had adequate screening and are not otherwise at high risk. Further reductions in the burden of cervical cancer in older women are probably best achieved by focusing on screening those who have not been adequately screened. PMID:22006929

  12. Current Status of the Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and the Role of Immune Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Hikel, Stephanie Moller; Adams, Kristen; Hinds, David; Moon, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although case–control studies conducted to date have largely affirmed the relationship between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), occupational cohort studies of PCB-exposed workers have been generally interpreted as negative, thereby raising doubts about a potential causal association. A common theme of immune dysregulation unifies many of NHL’s strongest risk factors, and several authors have posited that subclinical immune dysregulation may increase NHL risk by decreasing host resistance, reducing control of cellular proliferation and differentiation, and diminishing tumor surveillance mechanisms. Objectives: The goals of this review were a) to evaluate the epidemiological research examining the association between PCB exposure and NHL and discuss the contribution to the weight of evidence of case–control studies and occupational cohort studies; and b) to summarize the evidence for immune dysregulation as a means by which PCBs may cause NHL. Methods: We performed a literature search using PubMed and seven additional online biomedical and toxicological referencing libraries to identify literature published through August 2011. Discussion and Conclusions: Overall, we conclude that the weight of evidence supports a causal role of PCBs in lymphomagenesis. The strongest epidemiological evidence for the relationship between PCBs and NHL comes from case–control studies conducted among the general population. Epidemiological and toxicological data demonstrating immunosuppressive and inflammatory effects of PCBs further contribute to the weight of evidence by providing a plausible explanation for how PCBs can cause NHL through immune dysregulation. PMID:22552995

  13. Potential for Adult-Based Epidemiological Studies to Characterize Overall Cancer Risks Associated with a Lifetime of CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Lubin, Jay H.; Brenner, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that radiation exposure from pediatric CT scanning is associated with small excess cancer risks. However, the majority of CT scans are performed on adults, and most radiation-induced cancers appear during middle or old age, in the same age range as background cancers. Consequently, a logical next step is to investigate the effects of CT scanning in adulthood on lifetime cancer risks by conducting adult-based, appropriately designed epidemiological studies. Here we estimate the sample size required for such studies to detect CT-associated risks. This was achieved by incorporating different age-, sex-, time- and cancer type-dependent models of radiation carcinogenesis into an in silico simulation of a population-based cohort study. This approach simulated individual histories of chest and abdominal CT exposures, deaths and cancer diagnoses. The resultant sample sizes suggest that epidemiological studies of realistically sized cohorts can detect excess lifetime cancer risks from adult CT exposures. For example, retrospective analysis of CT exposure and cancer incidence data from a population-based cohort of 0.4 to 1.3 million (depending on the carcinogenic model) CT-exposed UK adults, aged 25–65 in 1980 and followed until 2015, provides 80% power for detecting cancer risks from chest and abdominal CT scans. PMID:24828111

  14. Epidemiology of lung cancer in Xuan Wei, China: current progress, issues, and research strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.S.; Mumford, J.L.; Harris, D.B.; He, Z.Z.; Jiang, W.Z.; Yang, R.D.

    1988-03-01

    In Xuan Wei, a rural Chinese county of about one million people, females' annual lung cancer mortality is China's highest, and males' is among China's highest. Xuan Wei's very high indoor air pollution levels (sometimes exceeding 20 mg/m3), residentially stable population, relatively uncomplicated lifestyle, and wide geographic variation in lung cancer mortality render it highly amenable to quantitative, interdisciplinary investigation of chemical carcinogens due to indoor air pollution. To date, epidemiologic findings reveal a closer association of lung cancer with the indoor burning of smoky coal (as opposed to smokeless coal or wood) than with tobacco use or occupation. Current aerometric, chemical, and toxicologic findings tend to confirm this association, though the specific carcinogenic constituents of Xuan Wei indoor air pollution have not yet been determined. Chinese and American investigators are conducting interdisciplinary field and laboratory investigations to quantify the lung cancer risk attendant on indoor air pollution relative to other factors, to measure and compare the characteristics of pollution from different Xuan Wei fuels, to determine the relative etiologic importance of pollution composition and concentration, and to develop quantitative relationships between air pollution dose and lung cancer risk.

  15. Flavonoids, Flavonoid Subclasses, and Esophageal Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lingling; Liu, Xinxin; Tian, Yalan; Xie, Chen; Li, Qianwen; Cui, Han; Sun, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have been suggested to play a chemopreventive role in carcinogenesis. However, the epidemiologic studies assessing dietary intake of flavonoids and esophageal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. This study was designed to examine the association between flavonoids, each flavonoid subclass, and the risk of esophageal cancer with a meta-analysis approach. We searched for all relevant studies with a prospective cohort or case-control study design published from January 1990 to April 2016, using PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using fixed or random-effect models. In total, seven articles including 2629 cases and 481,193 non-cases were selected for the meta-analysis. Comparing the highest-intake patients with the lowest-intake patients for total flavonoids and for each flavonoid subclass, we found that anthocyanidins (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49–0.74), flavanones (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.49–0.86), and flavones (OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.64–0.95) were inversely associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, total flavonoids showed marginal association with esophageal cancer risk (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.59–1.04). In conclusion, our study suggested that dietary intake of total flavonoids, anthocyanidins, flavanones, and flavones might reduce the risk of esophageal cancer. PMID:27338463

  16. [Current epidemiological overview of the most frequent cancers in Spain. Implications for nursing care].

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Teresa de Jesús; Prada-Morales, Sara; Díaz-Espinos, María Isabel; Bouza-Nebrera, Irene; Lázaro-Escobar, Verónica; Serrano-Gallardo, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    This article is to describe the epidemiological situation of cancer and prevention strategies, particularly related to the work of nurses (primary prevention and early detection), focusing primarily on lung cancer (LC), breast (BC) and colorectal (CRC). 98,046 cancer deaths occurred in Spain in 2006, which is the leading cause of death in our country. The main action of prevention for the LC is based on smoking cessation, the main risk factor (relative risk (RR) from 10 to 30) beside radon and asbestos exposures. Basically the prevention for the BC is based on early detection, mammography remains the ultimate test because it reduces mortality, and must be done along period between 50 and 70 years old with a two-year interval. CRC mortality is reduced by 16% due to early detection test based on fecal occult blood (TsOH), but it's necessary to insist on changes in lifestyle (diet and exercise) as primary prevention strategies, and in breast cancer too. One of the most effective ways to reduce the impact of cancer today is the prevention, which is carried out mainly by the nurses. PMID:22558714

  17. Assessment of the epidemiological data relating lung cancer to air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Speizer, F E

    1983-01-01

    The epidemiological data linking air pollution and lung cancer are derived from statistical associations concerning rates of cancer among urban and rural residents, migrant studies and studies of occupational groups exposed to effluents from fossil fuel combinations. Few, if any of these studies, are adequately adjusted for both relatively simple measures of cigarette smoking or the potentially more subtle effects of the duration of smoking. Because urbanization and industrial sources of air pollution correspond chronologically with the major increases in cigarette smoking, it is not likely that the specific attributable risk to each component can be adequately assessed. Interactions between cigarette smoking and specific air pollutants, similar to those seen between cigarette smoking and asbestos and or radiation, may be occurring. Considering the various estimates made over the last 25 years, it is likely that the effect of air pollution on lung cancer is something greater than zero; however, it is unlikely that the estimate exceeds 2% of all lung cancers or 5/100,000 cases in urban males. Thus, the effect on all cancers is likely to be less than 1% of all cases. PMID:6337830

  18. Cancer epidemiology and control in north-East Asia - past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Long, Ne; Moore, Malcolm A; Chen, Wanqing; Gao, Chao-Ming; Lai, Mei-Shu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Park, Sohee; Shin, Hai-Rim; Tajima, Kazuo; Yoo, Keun-Young; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2010-01-01

    China, Mongolia, Korea and Japan constitute North-East Asia. For reasons of largely shared ethnicity and culture, with various degress of mixed Chinese and Altaic elements, as well as geographical contiguity, they can be usefully grouped together for studies of chronic disease prevalence and particularly cancer. The fact of problems shared in common, with increasing disease rates, underlines the necessity for a coordinated approach to research and development of control measures. To provide a knowledge base, the present review of cancer registration and epidemiology data was conducted. The most frequent cancers in males of North-East Asia are in the lung, liver and stomach, with considerable geographical and temporal variation in their respective prevalences. However, colorectal cancer is also of increasing importance. In females the breast, together with the lung in China, the liver in Mongolia and the stomach in Korea and Japan, are most frequent. Variation in risk factors depends to a large extent on the local level of economic development but overall the countries of the region face similar challenges in achieving effective cancer control. PMID:20553072

  19. Cancer risk in asphalt workers and roofers: review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Partanen, T; Boffetta, P

    1994-12-01

    Twenty epidemiologic studies have described cancer risk in asphalt workers and roofers in various countries. A current concern for these workers is the potential carcinogenicity posed by inhalation of bitumen fumes or dermal exposure to bitumens. Bitumens are chemically different from many carcinogenic coal-tar based materials. Both have been employed in road paving and waterproofing. We examined and combined the results of the epidemiologic studies conducted on asphalt workers and roofers. We examined the cancer risk separately in three broad job categories: 1) roofers (exposed to bitumen fumes and previously often to coal-tar fumes); 2) highway maintenance workers (HMWs) and road pavers (exposed to bitumen fumes as well as possibly coal-tar fumes previously); and 3) miscellaneous and unspecified bitumen/asphalt workers. In roofers, an increased risk was suggested for cancers of the lung (aggregated relative risk 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.5-2.1), stomach (1.7, 1.1-2.5), nonmelanoma skin (4.0, 0.8-12), and leukemia (1.7, 0.9-2.9). Some of the excesses may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from coal-tar products. The aggregated relative risks in road pavers and HMWs were consistently lower than in roofers for cancers of the lung (0.9, 0.8-1.0), stomach (1.1, 0.8-1.5), bladder (1.2, 0.7-1.8), skin (2.2, 1.2-3.7), and leukemias (1.3, 0.9-1.8). Their risk of skin cancer was significantly increased, based on one study. Miscellaneous and unspecified workers had a significant excess (1.5, 1.2-1.8) of lung cancer. The data were poorly focused to address the carcinogenicity of bitumen fumes, as contrasted with tar-derived exposures. For the prospect of shedding more light on the bitumen-cancer controversy, the feasibility of a powerful multicenter cohort is currently being studied by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). PMID:7892824

  20. Carotenoid intake and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuele; Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Cadoni, Gabriella; Ferraroni, Monica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F; Zevallos, Jose P; Winn, Deborah M; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Decarli, Adriano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Food and nutrition play an important role in head and neck cancer (HNC) etiology; however, the role of carotenoids remains largely undefined. We explored the relation of HNC risk with the intake of carotenoids within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. We pooled individual-level data from 10 case-control studies conducted in Europe, North America, and Japan. The analysis included 18,207 subjects (4414 with oral and pharyngeal cancer, 1545 with laryngeal cancer, and 12,248 controls), categorized by quintiles of carotenoid intake from natural sources. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile, the risk reduction associated with total carotenoid intake was 39 % (95 % CI 29-47 %) for oral/pharyngeal cancer and 39 % (95 % CI 24-50 %) for laryngeal cancer. Intakes of β-carotene equivalents, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin were associated with at least 18 % reduction in the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer (95 % CI 6-29 %) and 17 % reduction in the rate of laryngeal cancer (95 % CI 0-32 %). The overall protective effect of carotenoids on HNC was stronger for subjects reporting greater alcohol consumption (p < 0.05). The odds ratio for the combined effect of low carotenoid intake and high alcohol or tobacco consumption versus high carotenoid intake and low alcohol or tobacco consumption ranged from 7 (95 % CI 5-9) to 33 (95 % CI 23-49). A diet rich in carotenoids may protect against HNC. Persons with both low carotenoid intake and high tobacco or alcohol are at substantially higher risk of HNC. PMID:25930054

  1. Limiting the Spread of Resistant Pneumococci: Biological and Epidemiologic Evidence for the Effectiveness of Alternative Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Beall, Bernard; Dowell, Scott F.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are a leading cause of respiratory illness in young children, the elderly, and persons with chronic medical conditions. The emergence of multidrug-resistant pneumococci has compromised the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy for pneumococcal infections. As antibiotic-resistant strains increase in prevalence, there is a need for interventions that minimize the spread of resistant pneumococci. In this review we provide a framework for understanding the spread of pneumococcal resistance and evaluate proposed interventions to reduce this spread. Pneumococci differ from many drug-resistant pathogens because asymptomatic carriers play a key role in transmission of resistant strains and the genes encoding resistance are spread primarily by transformation and conjugative transposons. Evidence suggests that modifications of treatment regimens that have proved effective at limiting resistance in other pathogens may not prevent the spread of pneumococcal resistance. In contrast, programs encouraging more judicious antibiotic use have been shown to be effective. Additionally, a newly developed conjugate pneumococcal vaccine holds great potential as an “antiresistance vaccine” that simultaneously reduces the burden of invasive disease and the prevalence of resistant strains. Several areas of future epidemiologic and laboratory research hold promise to contribute to the reduced spread of pneumococcal resistance. PMID:11023959

  2. Environmental and Genetic Contributors to Hypospadias: A Review of the Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Lammer, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    This review evaluates current knowledge related to trends in the prevalence of hypospadias, the association of hypospadias with endocrine-disrupting exposures, and the potential contribution of genetic susceptibility to its etiology. The review focuses on epidemiologic evidence. Increasing prevalence of hypospadias has been observed, but such increases tend to be localized to specific regions or time periods. Thus, generalized statements that hypospadias is increasing are unsupported. Due to limitations of study designs and inconsistent results, firm conclusions cannot be made regarding the association of endocrine-disrupting exposures with hypospadias. Studies with more rigorous study designs (e.g., larger and more detailed phenotypes) and exposure assessment that encompasses more breadth as well as depth (e.g., specific endocrine-related chemicals) will be critical to make better inferences about these important environmental exposures. Many candidate genes for hypospadias have been identified, but few of them have been examined to an extent that enables solid conclusions. Further studies are needed that include larger sample sizes, comparison groups that are more representative of the populations from which the cases were derived, phenotype-specific analyses, and more extensive exploration of variants. In conclusion, examining the associations of environmental and genetic factors with hypospadias remain important areas of inquiry, although our actual understanding of their contribution to hypospadias risk in humans is currently limited. PMID:22678668

  3. Adverse health effects of fluoro-edenitic fibers: epidemiological evidence and public health priorities.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Caterina; Comba, Pietro; Zona, Amerigo

    2006-09-01

    Subsequent to the detection of a cluster of mesothelioma cases in the Sicilian town of Biancavilla, located at the slopes of Etna volcano, ad hoc epidemiological studies and environmental monitoring suggested an etiological role of an asbestiform fiber present in a stone quarry. The fiber was shown to constitute a new mineral species named fluoro-edenite. Fluoro-edenitic fibers were found in the materials extracted from the quarry and used in the local building industry, as well as in soils. Besides the risk of mesothelioma, residents in Biancavilla showed a significantly increased mortality from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which was particularly evident among women. In the light of these findings, Biancavilla was defined a site of national interest for environmental reclamation. The first preventive action involved termination of quarrying activity, covering with asphalt of roads previously paved with local soil materials, and removal of sources of dust in the urban area. Concurrent to the implementation of environmental cleanup, some specific "second generation" studies are now being designed and performed, namely morbidity surveys based on hospital discharge cards, monitoring of fibers in sputum and health surveillance in selected population groups. In this frame, special emphasis is given to the issue of communication, both to the general public and to target groups like family doctors, teachers, and media professionals. This experience could represent a useful basis for the elaboration of a strategy to approach similar environmental issues. PMID:17119254

  4. [Epidemiologic factors in cervical cancer--investigation on 306 pairs of partners. Jiangxi Co-operative Group of Cervical Cancer].

    PubMed

    1986-11-01

    To investigate the epidemiologic factors in Jingan and Tonggu counties, high incidence areas of cervical cancer, the 306 patient-control pairs were studied in 1980. These patients with various stages of cervical cancer were pathologically diagnosed in mass screening. The controls were healthy women of the same tribe and occupation, living in the same village as the patients. The age difference between the patients and the controls were not over 2-3 years. The ratio of the patients to the controls was 1:1. 36 doubtful factors were investigated by direct inquiry with uniform tables. After statistical analysis, it was found that sexual activity, smegma and cervical erosion are the high risk factors in causing cervical cancer. These three factors coexist, the relative risk was 11.2. It suggests that these factors have a comprehensive effect in causing cervical cancer. In view of the above, we suggested a preliminary plan for preventing and blocking of the development of cervical cancer and experiments in Jingan county are being carried out. PMID:3582114

  5. Age at last birth in relation to risk of endometrial cancer: pooled analysis in the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pike, Malcolm C; Karageorgi, Stalo; Deming, Sandra L; Anderson, Kristin; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Cai, Hui; Cerhan, James R; Cozen, Wendy; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer; Freudenheim, Jo L; Goodman, Marc T; Hankinson, Susan E; Lacey, James V; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Lurie, Galina; Mack, Thomas; Matsuno, Rayna K; McCann, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B; Olson, Sara H; Rastogi, Radhai; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Risch, Harvey; Robien, Kim; Schairer, Catherine; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Spurdle, Amanda B; Strom, Brian L; Thompson, Pamela J; Ursin, Giske; Webb, Penelope M; Weiss, Noel S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Hannah P; Yu, Herbert; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2012-08-15

    Childbearing at an older age has been associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer, but whether the association is independent of the number of births or other factors remains unclear. Individual-level data from 4 cohort and 13 case-control studies in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium were pooled. A total of 8,671 cases of endometrial cancer and 16,562 controls were included in the analysis. After adjustment for known risk factors, endometrial cancer risk declined with increasing age at last birth (P(trend) < 0.0001). The pooled odds ratio per 5-year increase in age at last birth was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.90). Women who last gave birth at 40 years of age or older had a 44% decreased risk compared with women who had their last birth under the age of 25 years (95% confidence interval: 47, 66). The protective association was similar across the different age-at-diagnosis groups and for the 2 major tumor histologic subtypes (type I and type II). No effect modification was observed by body mass index, parity, or exogenous hormone use. In this large pooled analysis, late age at last birth was independently associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, and the reduced risk persisted for many years. PMID:22831825

  6. Dementia in western Europe: epidemiological evidence and implications for policy making.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Tzu; Fratiglioni, Laura; Matthews, Fiona E; Lobo, Antonio; Breteler, Monique M B; Skoog, Ingmar; Brayne, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is receiving increasing attention from governments and politicians. Epidemiological research based on western European populations done 20 years ago provided key initial evidence for dementia policy making, but these estimates are now out of date because of changes in life expectancy, living conditions, and health profiles. To assess whether dementia occurrence has changed during the past 20-30 years, investigators of five different studies done in western Europe (Sweden [Stockholm and Gothenburg], the Netherlands [Rotterdam], the UK [England], and Spain [Zaragoza]) have compared dementia occurrence using consistent research methods between two timepoints in well-defined geographical areas. Findings from four of the five studies showed non-significant changes in overall dementia occurrence. The only significant reduction in overall prevalence was found in the study done in the UK, powered and designed explicitly from its outset to detect change across generations (decrease in prevalence of 22%; p=0.003). Findings from the study done in Zaragoza (Spain) showed a significant reduction in dementia prevalence in men (43%; p=0.0002). The studies estimating incidence done in Stockholm and Rotterdam reported non-significant reductions. Such reductions could be the outcomes from earlier population-level investments such as improved education and living conditions, and better prevention and treatment of vascular and chronic conditions. This evidence suggests that attention to optimum health early in life might benefit cognitive health late in life. Policy planning and future research should be balanced across primary (policies reducing risk and increasing cognitive reserve), secondary (early detection and screening), and tertiary (once dementia is present) prevention. Each has their place, but upstream primary prevention has the largest effect on reduction of later dementia occurrence and disability. PMID:26300044

  7. Epidemiologic studies of electric and magnetic fields and cancer: Strategies for extending knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    Epidemiologic research concerning electric and magnetic fields in relation to cancer has focused on the potential etiologic roles of residential exposure on childhood cancer and occupational exposure on adult leukemia and brain cancer. Future residential studies must concentrate on exposure assessment that is enhanced by developing models of historical exposure, assessment of the relation between magnetic fields and wire codes, and consideration of alternate exposure indices. Study design issues deserving attention include possible biases in random digit dialing control selection, consideration of the temporal course of exposure and disease, and acquisition of the necessary information to assess the potential value of ecologic studies. Highest priorities are comprehensive evaluation of exposure patterns and sources and examination of the sociology and geography of residential wire codes. Future occupational studies should also concentrate on improved exposure assessment with increased attention to nonutility worker populations and development of historical exposure indicators that are superior to job titles alone. Potential carcinogens in the workplace that could act as confounders need to be more carefully examined. The temporal relation between exposure and disease and possible effect modification by other workplace agents should be incorporated into future studies. The most pressing need is for measurement of exposure patterns in a variety of worker populations and performance of traditional epidemiologic evaluations of cancer occurrence. The principal source of bias toward the null is nondifferential misclassification of exposure with improvements expected to enhance any true etiologic association that is present. Biases away from the null might include biased control selection in residential studies and chemical carcinogens acting as confounders in occupational studies. 51 refs., 1 tab.

  8. HESI/FDA workshop on immunomodulators and cancer risk assessment: Building blocks for a weight-of-evidence approach.

    PubMed

    Lebrec, H; Brennan, F R; Haggerty, H; Herzyk, D; Kamperschroer, C; Maier, C C; Ponce, R; Preston, B D; Weinstock, D; Mellon, R D

    2016-03-01

    Profound immunosuppression (e.g., AIDS, transplant therapy) is epidemiologically associated with an increased cancer risk, and often with oncogenic viruses. It is currently unclear how broadly this association translates to therapeutics that modulate immunity. A workshop co-sponsored by the FDA and HESI examined how perturbing the immune system may contribute to carcinogenesis, and highlighted priorities for improving non-clinical risk assessment of targeted immunomodulatory therapies. Conclusions from the workshop were as follows. 1) While profound altered immunity can promote tumorigenesis, not all components of the immune system are equally important in defense against or promotion of cancer and a similar cancer risk for all immunomodulatory molecules should not be assumed. 2) Rodent carcinogenicity studies have limitations and are generally not reliable predictors of cancer risk associated with immunosuppression. 3) Cancer risk needs to be evaluated based on mechanism-based weight-of-evidence, including data from immune function tests most relevant to tumor immunosurveillance or promotion. 4) Information from nonclinical experiments, clinical epidemiology and immunomodulatory therapeutics show that immunosurveillance involves a complex network of cells and mediators. To support a weight-of-evidence approach, an increased focus on understanding the quantitative relationship between changes in relevant immune function tests and cancer risk is needed. PMID:26743742

  9. Coordinating Centers in Cancer-Epidemiology Research: The Asia Cohort Consortium Coordinating Center

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Betsy; Smith, Briana R; Potter, John D

    2011-01-01

    Although it is tacitly recognized that a good Coordinating Center (CC) is essential to the success of any multi-site collaborative project, very little study has been done on what makes a CC successful, why some CCs fail, or how to build a CC that meets the needs of a given project. Moreover, very little published guidance is available, as few CCs outside the clinical-trial realm write about their work. The Asia Cohort Consortium (ACC) is a collaborative cancer-epidemiology research project that has made strong scientific and organizational progress over the past three years by focusing its CC on the following activities: collaboration development; operations management; statistical and data management; and communications infrastructure and tool development. Our hope is that, by sharing our experience building the ACC CC, we can begin a conversation about what it means to run a coordinating center for multi-institutional collaboration in cancer epidemiology, help other collaborative projects solve some of the issues associated with collaborative research, and learn from others. PMID:21803842

  10. Coordinating centers in cancer epidemiology research: the Asia Cohort Consortium coordinating center.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Betsy; Smith, Briana R; Potter, John D

    2011-10-01

    Although it is tacitly recognized that a good coordinating center (CC) is essential to the success of any multisite collaborative project, very little study has been done on what makes a CC successful, why some CCs fail, or how to build a CC that meets the needs of a given project. Moreover, very little published guidance is available, as few CCs outside the clinical trial realm write about their work. The Asia Cohort Consortium (ACC) is a collaborative cancer epidemiology research project that has made strong scientific and organizational progress over the past 3 years by focusing its CC on the following activities: collaboration development; operations management; statistical and data management; and communications infrastructure and tool development. Our hope is that, by sharing our experience building the ACC CC, we can begin a conversation about what it means to run a CC for multi-institutional collaboration in cancer epidemiology, help other collaborative projects solve some of the issues associated with collaborative research, and learn from others. PMID:21803842

  11. Chernobyl-related thyroid cancer: what evidence for role of short-lived iodines?

    PubMed Central

    Bleuer, J P; Averkin, Y I; Abelin, T

    1997-01-01

    Over 500 cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed in Belarus between 1986 and 1995 among persons exposed as children (under 15 years of age) to radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There is little doubt that radioactive iodine isotopes emitted during the nuclear explosion and subsequent fire were instrumental in causing malignancy in this particular organ. Comparison of the observed geographic distribution of Chernobyl-associated thyroid cancer incidence rates by districts with contamination maps of radioactive fallout shows a better fit for estimated 131I contamination than for 137Cs. Because 131I used for medical purposes had not been considered carcinogenic in humans in the past, and in view of the unusually short latency period between exposure and clinical manifestation of cancer, it is suspected that not only 131I but also energy-rich shorter-lived radioiodines may have played a role in post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinogenesis. Measurements of iodine isotopes are not available, but reconstruction of geographic distributions and estimations of radioactive fallout based on meteorological observations immediately following the accident could provide a basis for comparison with the distribution of thyroid cancer cases. In this paper, data from the Epidemiological Cancer Register for Belarus will be used to show geographic and time trends of thyroid cancer incidence rates in the period from 1986 to 1995 among persons who were exposed as children, and these will be compared with the estimated contamination by radioiodines. Tentative conclusions are drawn from the available evidence and further research requirements discussed. PMID:9467068

  12. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case–control study in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case–control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. Methods/Design EPICAP is a population-based case–control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population. The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014). The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. Discussion The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic

  13. Recent incidence and descriptive epidemiological survey of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Shalini; Rehman, Hasibur; Abbas, Zahid K.; Ansari, Abid A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To review and analyze the pattern of breast cancer (BC) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological review of BC of all diagnosed Saudi female cases from January 1990 to December 2014 was conducted at the Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA. This report contains information obtained from the Saudi Cancer Registry and from King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Results: The number of women with BC increased steadily from 1990-2010. On the basis of the number of cases, the percentage distribution of BC appears to be increasing. There were 1152 female BC cases in 2008 in comparison with 1308 in 2009, and 1473 in 2010. Breast cancer ranked first among females accounting for 27.4% of all newly diagnosed female cancers (5378) in the year 2010. The average age at the diagnosis of BC was 48; weighted average was 49.8, and range 43-52. Conclusion: Among Saudi patients, there was a significant increase in the number of cases of BC, which occurs at an earlier age than in Western countries. Continued vigilance, mammographic screening, and patient education are needed to establish early diagnosis and perform optimal treatment. PMID:26446327

  14. Combining Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Genetic Variant rs2736100 with Epidemiologic Factors in the Prediction of Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Kewei; Chi, Lumei; Cui, Jiuwei; Jin, Lina; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants from a considerable number of susceptibility loci have been identified in association with cancer risk, but their interaction with epidemiologic factors in lung cancer remains to be defined. We sought to establish a forecasting model for identifying individuals with high-risk of lung cancer by combing gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms with epidemiologic factors. Genotyping and clinical data from 500 lung cancer cases and 500 controls were used for developing the logistic regression model. We found that lung cancer was associated with telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) rs2736100 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The TERT rs2736100 model was still significantly associated with lung cancer risk when combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, including lower education, lower BMI, COPD history, heavy cigarettes smoking, heavy cooking emission, and dietary factors (over-consumption of meat and deficiency in fish/shrimp, vegetables, dairy products, and soybean products). These data suggest that combining TERT SNP and epidemiologic factors may be a useful approach to discriminate high and low-risk individuals for lung cancer. PMID:27162544

  15. Menopausal hormone use and ovarian cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis of 52 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Collaborative Group on Epidemiological Studies of Ovarian Cancer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy on ovarian cancer risk. Methods Individual participant datasets from 52 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally. The principal analyses involved the prospective studies (with last hormone therapy use extrapolated forwards for up to 4 years). Sensitivity analyses included the retrospective studies. Adjusted Poisson regressions yielded relative risks (RRs) versus never-use. Findings During prospective follow-up, 12 110 postmenopausal women, 55% (6601) of whom had used hormone therapy, developed ovarian cancer. Among women last recorded as current users, risk was increased even with <5 years of use (RR 1·43, 95% CI 1·31–1·56; p<0·0001). Combining current-or-recent use (any duration, but stopped <5 years before diagnosis) resulted in an RR of 1·37 (95% CI 1·29–1·46; p<0·0001); this risk was similar in European and American prospective studies and for oestrogen-only and oestrogen-progestagen preparations, but differed across the four main tumour types (heterogeneity p<0·0001), being definitely increased only for the two most common types, serous (RR 1·53, 95% CI 1·40–1·66; p<0·0001) and endometrioid (1·42, 1·20–1·67; p<0·0001). Risk declined the longer ago use had ceased, although about 10 years after stopping long-duration hormone therapy use there was still an excess of serous or endometrioid tumours (RR 1·25, 95% CI 1·07–1·46, p=0·005). Interpretation The increased risk may well be largely or wholly causal; if it is, women who use hormone therapy for 5 years from around age 50 years have about one extra ovarian cancer per 1000 users and, if its prognosis is typical, about one extra ovarian cancer death per 1700 users. Funding

  16. Soy intake and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrom, Suhaila; Idris, Nik Ruzni Nik

    2016-06-01

    The impact of soy intake on breast cancer risk has been investigated extensively. However, these studies reported conflicting results. The objective of this study is to perform comprehensive review and updated meta-analysis on the association between soy intake and breast cancer risk and to identify significant factors which may contribute to the inconsistencies of results of the individual studies. Based on reviews of existing meta-analysis, we identified four main factors which contributed to the inconsistencies of results of individual studies on the association of soy intake and breast cancer risk namely; region, menopausal status of the patients, soy type and study design. Accordingly, we performed an updated meta-analysis of 57 studies grouped by the identified factors. Pooled ORs of studies carried out in Asian countries suggested that soy isoflavones consumption was inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer among both pre and postmenopausal women (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.54-0.74 for premenopausal women; OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.52-0.75 for postmenopausal women). However, pooled OR of studies carried out in Western countries shows that there is no statistically significant association between soy intake and breast cancer risk (OR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.03). Our study suggests that soy food intake is associated with significantly reduced risk of breast cancer for women in Asian but not in Western countries. Further epidemiological studies need to be conducted with more comprehensive information about the dietary intake and relative exposure among the women in these two different regions.

  17. Epidemiological evidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia without the presence of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, M. P.; Hollema, H.; Pieters, W. J.; Schröder, F. P.; Quint, W. G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide epidemiological evidence to support the notion that cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) without human papillomavirus (HPV) is a true entity. If a diagnosis of HPV-negative cervical neoplasia is erroneous, one would not expect there to be any differences in risk factors between HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients. Patients at a gynaecological outpatient clinic of a university hospital [a total of 265 consecutive women with dyskaryotic cervical smears who were subsequently diagnosed with CIN I (n=37), CIN II (n=48) or CIN III (n=180)] completed a structured questionnaire regarding smoking habits and sexual history. Analysis of an endocervical swab for Chlamydia trachomatis, analysis of a cervical scrape for HPV, and morphological examination of cervical biopsy specimens were also performed. HPV was found in 205 (77.4%) out of the 265 women. Univariate analysis showed that current age (P=0.02), current smoking behaviour (P=0.002) and the number of sexual partners (P=0.02) were significantly associated with the presence of HPV. Age at first sexual intercourse, a past history of venereal disease or genital warts, and current infection with Chlamydia trachomatis were not associated with the presence of HPV. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, the number of sexual partners and current smoking behaviour showed an independent significant association with HPV. HPV-negative and HPV-positive CIN patients differ with respect to the risk factors for HPV. These findings suggest that HPV-negative CIN is a separate true entity. PMID:8611390

  18. Screening for Cervical, Prostate, and Breast Cancer: Interpreting the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stacy M; Williams, Jane; Parker, Lisa; Pickles, Kristen; Jacklyn, Gemma; Rychetnik, Lucie; Barratt, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    Cancer screening is an important component of prevention and early detection in public health and clinical medicine. The evidence for cancer screening, however, is often contentious. A description and explanation of disagreements over the evidence for cervical, breast, and prostate screening may assist physicians, policymakers, and citizens faced with screening decisions and suggest directions for future screening research. There are particular issues to be aware of in the evidence base for each form of screening, which are summarized in this paper. Five tensions explain existing conflicts over the evidence: (1) data from differing contexts may not be comparable; (2) screening technologies affect evidence quality, and thus evidence must evolve with changing technologies; (3) the quality of evidence of benefit varies, and the implications are contested; (4) evidence about harm is relatively new, there are gaps in that evidence, and there is disagreement over what it means; and (5) evidence about outcomes is often poorly communicated. The following principles will assist people to evaluate and use the evidence: (1) attend closely to transferability; (2) consider the influence of technologies on the evidence base; (3) query the design of meta-analyses; (4) ensure harms are defined and measured; and (5) improve risk communication practices. More fundamentally, there is a need to question the purpose of cancer screening and the values that inform that purpose, recognizing that different stakeholders may value different things. If implemented, these strategies will improve the production and interpretation of the methodologically challenging and always-growing evidence for and against cancer screening. PMID:26091929

  19. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  20. Epidemiology of breast cancer in older women: implications for future healthcare.

    PubMed

    Alberg, A J; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer in elderly women is already a significant public health problem. Elderly women have a 6-fold higher breast cancer incidence rate and 8-fold higher mortality rate compared with non-elderly women. Because of demographic trends, the number of elderly women diagnosed with breast cancer is likely to increase substantially in the coming decades. Specifically, if incidence rates remain constant, we project a 72% increase in the number of elderly women in the US diagnosed with breast cancer by 2025, an increase from approximately 89,500 in 1998 to almost 154,000 in 2025. If this projection holds true, the sheer magnitude of the increase in patients has profound implications for the delivery of medical care. Considerable planning is needed to ensure that the infrastructure is in place to effectively treat these patients. The burgeoning number of elderly patients with breast cancer accentuates the need for more definitive evidence concerning preventing and treating breast cancer in the elderly. Treatment patterns for elderly patients with breast cancer have been shown to differ from those for non-elderly patients, but the evidence base for differentiating treatment plans by age is deficient. For example, information is needed to tease apart the relative importance of age per se compared with important age-related factors, such as comorbidity. Patient care will benefit from an interdisciplinary team approach that includes oncologists, geriatricians, surgeons, radiation oncologists, nurses and social workers. The continued increase in life expectancy necessitates well-crafted strategies for the primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer. Carefully addressing the priorities for breast cancer prevention and control in the elderly during the first portion of the century may reap substantial dividends by the end of the century. PMID:11735623

  1. Putting evidence into practice: cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei R; Deng, Jie; Armer, Jane M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related lymphedema is a progressive and chronic syndrome of abnormal swelling and multiple symptoms resulting from cancer treatment. Even with modern medical advances, lymphedema remains a major health problem affecting thousands of cancer survivors. To provide healthcare professionals with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for lymphedema treatment and management, a systematic review was conducted to evaluate 75 selected articles from 2009-2014 by the Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence Into Practice lymphedema team. Findings of the systematic review support complete decongestive therapy, compression bandages, and compression garments with highest evidence for best clinical practice. Weight management, full-body exercise, information provision, prevention, and early intervention protocols are likely to be effective for clinical practice. Historic recommendations for activity restriction and avoidance of aerobic and resistive exercises that limit cancer survivors' daily lives have been challenged with more evidence. Cancer survivors may not need to restrict activities such as resistive or aerobic exercises and weightlifting with gradual exercise progression. Future research should focus on providing high-level evidence using randomized clinical trials with larger samples and studying lymphedema beyond breast cancer. PMID:25427610

  2. Empirical Evidence of Study Design Biases in Randomized Trials: Systematic Review of Meta-Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Page, Matthew J.; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Clayton, Gemma; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Savović, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesise evidence on the average bias and heterogeneity associated with reported methodological features of randomized trials. Design Systematic review of meta-epidemiological studies. Methods We retrieved eligible studies included in a recent AHRQ-EPC review on this topic (latest search September 2012), and searched Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBASE for studies indexed from Jan 2012-May 2015. Data were extracted by one author and verified by another. We combined estimates of average bias (e.g. ratio of odds ratios (ROR) or difference in standardised mean differences (dSMD)) in meta-analyses using the random-effects model. Analyses were stratified by type of outcome (“mortality” versus “other objective” versus “subjective”). Direction of effect was standardised so that ROR < 1 and dSMD < 0 denotes a larger intervention effect estimate in trials with an inadequate or unclear (versus adequate) characteristic. Results We included 24 studies. The available evidence suggests that intervention effect estimates may be exaggerated in trials with inadequate/unclear (versus adequate) sequence generation (ROR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99; 7 studies) and allocation concealment (ROR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97; 7 studies). For these characteristics, the average bias appeared to be larger in trials of subjective outcomes compared with other objective outcomes. Also, intervention effects for subjective outcomes appear to be exaggerated in trials with lack of/unclear blinding of participants (versus blinding) (dSMD -0.37, 95% CI -0.77 to 0.04; 2 studies), lack of/unclear blinding of outcome assessors (ROR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.96; 1 study) and lack of/unclear double blinding (ROR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93; 1 study). The influence of other characteristics (e.g. unblinded trial personnel, attrition) is unclear. Conclusions Certain characteristics of randomized trials may exaggerate intervention effect estimates. The average bias appears to be greatest in trials of

  3. Genetic epidemiology of bilateral breast cancer: a linkage analysis using the affected-pedigree-member method.

    PubMed

    Haile, R W; Goldstein, A M; Weeks, D E; Sparkes, R S; Paganini-Hill, A

    1990-01-01

    We used the affected-pedigree-member (APM) method to conduct linkage analyses on 19 pedigrees in which the probands had premenopausal bilateral breast cancer. This method analyzes all affected pairs of relatives, as opposed to siblings only, and incorporates into the analyses information on the frequency of marker alleles. Fourteen codominant marker systems were evaluated in two separate analyses. In the first, only premenopausal cases of breast cancer were coded as affected because we assumed that postmenopausal cases were due to a different etiology. In the second analysis, all cases of breast cancer were coded as affected, irrespective of menopausal status. In the premenopausal-cases-only analysis, we observed evidence suggestive of nonindependent segregation for C3 and ESD. In the all-cases analysis, we observed much weaker evidence for C3 and ESD and noted a suggestion of nonindependent segregation for AMY2 and PGM1. PMID:2328913

  4. Alzheimer’s Disease and Environmental Exposure to Lead: The Epidemiologic Evidence and Potential Role of Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Bakulski, Kelly M.; Rozek, Laura S.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Paulson, Henry L.; Hu, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the etiology of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is complex, with significant contributions from both genes and environmental factors. Recent research suggests the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in defining the relationship between environmental exposures and LOAD. In epidemiologic studies of adults, cumulative lifetime lead (Pb) exposure has been associated with accelerated declines in cognition. In addition, research in animal models suggests a causal association between Pb exposure during early life, epigenetics, and LOAD. There are multiple challenges to human epidemiologic research evaluating the relationship between epigenetics, LOAD, and Pb exposure. Epidemiologic studies are not well-suited to accommodate the long latency period between exposures during early life and onset of Alzheimer’s disease. There is also a lack of validated circulating epigenetics biomarkers and retrospective biomarkers of Pb exposure. Members of our research group have shown bone Pb is an accurate measurement of historical Pb exposure in adults, offering an avenue for future epidemiologic studies. However, this would not address the risk of LOAD attributable to early-life Pb exposures. Future studies that use a cohort design to measure both Pb exposure and validated epigenetic biomarkers of LOAD will be useful to clarify this important relationship. PMID:22272628

  5. Making epidemiologic studies responsive to the needs of participants and communities: the Carolina Breast Cancer Study experience.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Konarski, Jamie; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Dunmore, Carolyn; Regan, Georgette; Mattingly, Dianne; Parker, Barbara; Williams, Sara; Andrews, Catherine; Vannapppagari, Vani; Hall, Susan; Deming, Sandra; Hodgson, Elizabeth; Moorman, Patricia; Newman, Beth; Millikan, Robert

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we present the results of surveys administered to participants and nonparticipants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS). Surveys and structured interviews were administered to determine women's concerns regarding participation in research studies, access to health care, and beliefs regarding causes of breast cancer. Survey results showed the highest concern for the growing number of women diagnosed with breast cancer in North Carolina and potential environmental agents that may cause breast cancer. Negative responses were noted for time constraints related to participation and lack of familiarity with epidemiologic research; another concern noted was the lack of centralized information regarding breast cancer treatment. These issues were addressed by (1) developing a web site that provided background information about the CBCS, summaries of published study results, and information about the etiology of breast cancer; and (2) creating a statewide, comprehensive breast cancer resource directory for women who need information about breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and support. These two projects were carried out in collaboration with breast cancer advocates, and demonstrate the important role that advocates can play in making epidemiologic research more responsive to the needs of communities. PMID:11921175

  6. Squamous cell cancer – 31-year epidemiological study in a city of south Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Nilton; Nasser Filho, Nilton; Lehmkuhl, Rafaela Ludvig

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence and morbidity of squamous cell cancers are increasing worldwide. Epidemiological studies with morbidity coefficients about this type of cancer are scarce in Brazil. OBJECTIVES To determine morbidity coefficients, analyze and classify the squamous cell cancers diagnosed in the city of Blumenau - SC from 1980 to 2011, according to clinical and histological features. METHODS The authors revised 4000 histopathological exams with respect to sex, age, anatomic site and histological type. The morbidity coefficients were calculated using the number of squamous cell cancers found and the annual population estimated by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics between 1980 and 2011. RESULTS A total of 4000 tumors were identified, 2249 (56.2%) in male and 1751 (43.8%) in female patients. The standard incidence rates varied from 40 cases in 1980 to 120 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 2011. The morbidity above 70 years of age reached 1484 cases/100,000 inhabitants in male and 975 in female patients. As to primary anatomic site, we found more tumors on the lips and ears in male and on the face and legs in female patients. As to the degree of involvement, the more frequent were Well Differentiated Squamous cell carcinomas (70%) and Moderate Squamous cell carcinomas (19,1%). The Low Differentiated Squamous cell carcinomas, which represented those with the worst prognosis, were found in 4.5% of the tumors. CONCLUSION Squamous cell cancers in Blumenau - SC have similar patterns of distribution regarding age, primary anatomic site and histological types as found in the international literature. The morbidity increased by 300% in the last 31 years, which indicates that we need to dedicate special attention to the older population. PMID:25672295

  7. Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Trends of Breast Cancer in Chinese Patients During 1993 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Si, Wen; Li, Ying; Han, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yingzhe; Li, Ying; Linghu, Rui Xia; Zhang, Xingyang; Yang, Junlan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to summarize the epidemiological and pathological trends of breast cancer in Chinese women. The clinical data of 4968 breast cancer patients treated at the Chinese PLA General Hospital from 1993 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 47.4 ± 11.3 years before the year 2001, 49.2 ± 11.2 years during 2001 to 2010, and 50.6 ± 11.4 years after the year 2010, respectively (P < 0.001). The ratio of premenopausal women to postmenopausal women was 1.6 and no significant changes were found during the period (P = 0.121). The proportion of patients with Scarff Bloom Richardson III breast cancer showed significant increase along with time (P = 0.015). The breast cancer was accounting for 31.7% at stage I and DCIS/LCIS and tend to be diagnosed with early stage around time (P < 0.001). The proportion of DCIS/LCIS and stage I increased with time during the 20 years from 14.6% to 33.2%, whereas the proportion of stage III to IV decreased. The proportion of Luminal A-like subtype gradually reduced and Luminal B-like (HER2-negative) increased and developed to the predominant type. Older age and earlier stage at diagnosis, as well as the alternation of predominant molecular subtypes, have become the developed trends of breast cancer. PMID:26131834

  8. The descriptive epidemiology of gastric cancer in Central America and comparison with United States Hispanic populations

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Delgado Hurtado, Juan J.; Domínguez, Ricardo L.; de Cuéllar, Marisabel Valdez; Cruz, Carlos Balmore; Morgan, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Delineate the epidemiology of gastric adenocarcinoma in Central America and contrast it with Hispanic-Latino populations in the U.S. Methods Published literature and Central America Ministry of Health databases were used as primary data sources, including national, population-based and hospital-based registries. U.S. data was obtained from the NCI-SEER registry. Incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases were analyzed for available data between 1985–2011, including demographic variables and pathology information. Results In Central America, 19,741 incident gastric adenocarcinomas were identified. Two-thirds of cases were male, 20.5% were under age 55, and 58.5% were from rural areas. In the SEER database (n=7,871), 57.8% were male, and 28.9% were under age 55. Among the U.S. Hispanics born in Central America with gastric cancer (n=1,210), 50.3% of cases were male, and 38.1% were under age 55. Noncardia gastric cancer was more common in Central America (83.3%), among U.S. Hispanics (80.2%), and Hispanics born in Central America (86.3%). Cancers of the antrum were more common in Central America (73.6%), whereas cancers of the corpus were slightly more common among U.S. Hispanics (54.0%). Adenocarcinoma of the diffuse subtype was relatively common, both in Central America (35.7%), and U.S. Hispanics (69.5%), although Lauren classification was reported in only 50% of cases. Conclusions A significant burden of gastric adenocarcinoma is observed in Central America based upon limited available data. Differences are noted between Central America and U.S. Hispanics. Strengthening population-based registries is needed for improved cancer control in Central America, which may have implications for the growing U.S. Hispanic population. PMID:25412859

  9. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer risk: a case study of scientific standards in environmental epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Huncharek, Michael; Muscat, Joshua

    2011-11-01

    A number of observational studies (largely case-control) conducted over the last two decades suggest an association between use of talc powders on the female perineum and increased risk of ovarian cancer. A subset of these reports shows a roughly 30-60% increased risk of ovarian cancer associated with perineal talc exposure. A number of researchers partly base their conclusions of an association on the '…chemical relationship between talc and asbestos', the latter substance being a known human carcinogen. Although separating causal from noncausal explanations for an observed statistical association is a difficult process, there currently exist commonly accepted guidelines by which such inferences can be made. These scientific approaches include consideration of the strength of the association, the consistency of the finding across studies, and existence of a biological explanation of the observed phenomenon, among others. When applied to the context of a proposed talc/ovarian cancer association, we conclude that the weak statistical associations observed in a number of epidemiological studies do not support a causal association. PMID:21712717

  10. Clinical profile and epidemiological factors of oral cancer patients from North India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Misra, Sanjeev; Rathanaswamy, Siva Prakash; Gupta, Sameer; Tewari, Brij Nath; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption are major contributing factors in the development of oral carcinoma. India has world's highest number of oral cancers (almost 20%) and approximately 1% of the Indian population has oral premalignant lesions. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the epidemiological factors and clinical profile of oral cancer cases in our hospital. Settings: Department of Surgical Oncology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted from January 2010 to December 2012 on 479 cases with histopathologically confirmed oral carcinoma. Subjects’ details of age, sex, occupation, tobacco consumption, site of carcinoma, and stage at presentation were recorded. Results: Mean age in this study was 47.84 years with male to female ratio of 3.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa and alveolus were the most affected sites. The majority of cases were from socially and economically weaker section, with 93.72% cases being tobacco users. The majority of cases were advance stage (Stage III and IV) with Stage IV being the predominant stage at presentation followed by Stage III. Conclusion: The findings of the study reveal that tobacco consumption is one of the major contributors in the development of cancer of oral cavity with the majority of cases presenting in advance stages posing a big therapeutic challenge. PMID:26668448

  11. A geographical profile of the South African population as a basis for epidemiological cancer research.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, I J

    1988-11-19

    Because people do not necessarily become ill proportionally, particular subgroups of the population are more susceptible to certain types of diseases than others. It is also essential to take spatial distribution and accessibility of the population into account when considering the optimal location of medical facilities. A geographical profile of the heterogeneous population of South Africa with regard to demographic and socioeconomic composition and urbanisation patterns is therefore presented. Analysis of the composition of the population by tabulating and mapping population census results reveals a complexity which arises from the diversity between the developed white profile and the developing black and coloured communities with their escalating numbers, relative youth and socio-economic backlog. Examination of the maps shows up an unbalanced spatial urbanisation profile with overconcentration in the five metropolitan core areas. Although such a population framework usually fits best to cancer epidemiology, most other diseases could benefit from such an approach. PMID:3187804

  12. Radiation Exposure, the ATM Gene, and Contralateral Breast Cancer in the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Langholz, Bryan; Thomas, Duncan C.; Lynch, Charles F.; Olsen, Jorgen H.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Diep, Anh T.; Smith, Susan A.; Capanu, Marinela; Reiner, Anne S.; Liang, Xiaolin; Gatti, Richard A.; Concannon, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation is a known mutagen and an established breast carcinogen. The ATM gene is a key regulator of cellular responses to the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. We investigated whether genetic variants in ATM play a clinically significant role in radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in women. Methods The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study is an international population-based case–control study nested within a cohort of 52 536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2000. The 708 case subjects were women with contralateral breast cancer, and the 1397 control subjects were women with unilateral breast cancer matched to the case subjects on age, follow-up time, registry reporting region, and race and/or ethnicity. All women were interviewed and underwent full mutation screening of the entire ATM gene. Complete medical treatment history information was collected, and for all women who received radiotherapy, the radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed using radiotherapy records and radiation measurements. Rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. All P values are two-sided. Results Among women who carried a rare ATM missense variant (ie, one carried by <1% of the study participants) that was predicted to be deleterious, those who were exposed to radiation (mean radiation exposure = 1.2 Gy, SD = 0.7) had a statistically significantly higher risk of contralateral breast cancer compared with unexposed women who carried the wild-type genotype (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 6.5; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4 to 8.0) or compared with unexposed women who carried the same predicted deleterious missense variant (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 17.3; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.8 to 19.0; Ptrend = .044). Conclusions Women who carry rare

  13. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  14. Rottlerin and Cancer: Novel Evidence and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, E.; Torricelli, C.; Valacchi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Because cancers are caused by deregulation of hundreds of genes, an ideal anticancer agent should target multiple gene products or signaling pathways simultaneously. Recently, extensive research has addressed the chemotherapeutic potential of plant-derived compounds. Among the ever-increasing list of naturally occurring anticancer agents, Rottlerin appears to have great potentiality for being used in chemotherapy because it affects several cell machineries involved in survival, apoptosis, autophagy, and invasion. The underlying mechanisms that have been described are diverse, and the final, cell-specific, Rottlerin outcome appears to result from a combination of signaling pathways at multiple levels. This paper seeks to summarize the multifocal signal modulatory properties of Rottlerin, which merit to be further exploited for successful prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:22272173

  15. Assessment of Automated Image Analysis of Breast Cancer Tissue Microarrays for Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Kelly L.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Duggan, Máire A.; Howat, William J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Cornelison, Robert; Anzick, Sarah L.; Meltzer, Paul; Davis, Sean; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in studies of etiologic heterogeneity in breast cancer has been the limited throughput, accuracy and reproducibility of measuring tissue markers. Computerized image analysis systems may help address these concerns but published reports of their use are limited. We assessed agreement between automated and pathologist scores of a diverse set of immunohistochemical (IHC) assays performed on breast cancer TMAs. TMAs of 440 breast cancers previously stained for ER-α, PR, HER-2, ER-β and aromatase were independently scored by two pathologists and three automated systems (TMALabII, TMAx, Ariol). Agreement between automated and pathologist scores of negative/positive was measured using the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) and weighted kappa statistics (κ) for categorical scores. We also investigated the correlation between IHC scores and mRNA expression levels. Agreement between pathologist and automated negative/positive and categorical scores was excellent for ER-α and PR (AUC range =0.98-0.99; κ range =0.86-0.91). Lower levels of agreement were seen for ER-β categorical scores (AUC=0.99-1.0; κ=0.80-0.86) and both negative/positive and categorical scores for aromatase (AUC=0.85-0.96; κ=0.41-0.67) and HER2 (AUC=0.94-0.97; κ=0.53-0.72). For ER-α and PR, there was strong correlation between mRNA levels and automated (ρ=0.67-0.74) and pathologist IHC scores (ρ=0.67-0.77). HER2 mRNA levels were more strongly correlated with pathologist (ρ=0.63) than automated IHC scores (ρ=0.41-0.49). Automated analysis of IHC markers is a promising approach for scoring large numbers of breast cancer tissues in epidemiologic investigations. This would facilitate studies of etiologic heterogeneity which ultimately may allow improved risk prediction and better prevention approaches. PMID:20332278

  16. An assessment of the possible extent of confounding in epidemiological studies of lung cancer risk among roofers

    SciTech Connect

    Mundt, D.J.; van Wijngaarden, E.; Mundt, K.A.

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated the likelihood and extent to which the observed increased risk of lung cancer may be due to confounding (a mixing of effects of multiple exposures) by co-exposure to other potential carcinogens present in roofing or to lifestyle variables. We conducted a review of the epidemiological and industrial hygiene literature of asphalt-exposed workers. Peer-reviewed epidemiological studies of asphalt fumes, related occupational exposures, and confounding factors were identified from MEDLINE (1966 early 2004). Industrial hygiene studies of asphalt workers were identified through MEDLINE, publicly available government documents, and asphalt industry documents. Using well established statistical methods, we quantified the extent to which lung cancer relative risk estimates among roofers reflect confounding from other exposures, using different prevalence and risk scenarios. The relative risk of lung cancer varied from 1.2 to 5.0 in 13 epidemiological studies of roofers; most studies reported a relative risk between 1.2 and 1.4. Smoking, asbestos and coal tar were the most likely confounders, but the prevalence of these factors varied over time. The results of the study indicate that much of the observed risk reported in epidemiological studies of cancer among roofers is well within the range of what may have resulted from confounding by reasonable and expected levels of smoking, asbestos or coal tar. This may be particularly true for those studies that did not adjust for these confounders and where the exposure was defined as employment in the roofing industry. In addition to poorly defined asphalt exposure, uncontrolled confounding cannot reliably be ruled out in studies of lung cancer among asphalt-exposed roofers. Therefore, it is not possible to conclude whether roofers are at increased risk of lung cancer due to asphalt exposure.

  17. Gastric cancer stem cells: evidence, potential markers, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brungs, Daniel; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Vine, Kara L; Becker, Therese M; Carolan, Martin G; Ranson, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant global health problem. It is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide (Torre et al. in CA Cancer J Clin 65(2):87-108, 2015). Despite advances in treatment, overall prognosis remains poor, due to tumour relapse and metastasis. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches to improve clinical outcomes in gastric cancer. The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been proposed to explain the high rate of relapse and subsequent resistance of cancer to current systemic treatments (Vermeulen et al. in Lancet Oncol 13(2):e83-e89, 2012). CSCs have been identified in many solid malignancies, including gastric cancer, and have significant clinical implications, as targeting the CSC population may be essential in preventing the recurrence and spread of a tumour (Dewi et al. in J Gastroenterol 46(10):1145-1157, 2011). This review seeks to summarise the current evidence for CSC in gastric cancer, with an emphasis on candidate CSC markers, clinical implications, and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:26428661

  18. Short sleep duration and dietary intake: epidemiological evidence, mechanisms, and health implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Links between short sleep duration and obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease may be mechanistically mediated through changes in dietary intake. This review aims to provide an overview of recent epidemiologic studies on the relationships between habitual short sleep durat...

  19. Clinical Epidemiology (CE) and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) in the Asia Pacific region (Round Table Forum).

    PubMed

    Su, Tin Tin; Bulgiba, Awang M; Sampatanukul, Pichet; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Chang, Peter; Tharyan, Prathap; Lin, Vivian; Wong, Yut Lin

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Epidemiology (CE) and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) have become increasingly important in an era of rising costs, patient safety concerns and evidence-based health care. CE and EBM research in the Asia Pacific region have grown significantly. However, there are three main challenges such as linking evidence to practice and policy; developing a strong collaborative network; and a need for resources and technical expertise to produce evidence. The Cochrane Collaboration is a possible solution to resolve above challenges identified, particularly the challenge of transforming evidence to practice. In addition, training can be carried out to enhance technical expertise in the region and there is also the promising potential that collaborations could extend beyond systematic reviews. To improve the adoption of evidence-based health policy, selection of the best evidence for the right audience and focusing on the relevant issues through appropriate methodology are essential. Information on effectiveness and cost effectiveness needs to be highlighted for policy makers. The way forward to strengthen research and capacity building is to establish the Asia Pacific Consortium for CE and EBM. The consortium would help to create mutually rewarding scientific research and collaborations that will augur well for advances in CE and EBM. PMID:23624253

  20. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence: formulating a narrative of HIV transmission in Acholiland of northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Westerhaus, M

    2007-08-01

    For twenty years, a region of northern Uganda known as Acholiland has been heavily affected by war, leading to the formation of internally displaced people's camps, rape, transactional sex and child abductions. While it is clear that the war has had onerous consequences for the health of the Acholi people, the specific impact of the war on HIV transmission remains unclear, as the epidemiological evidence presents an ambiguous picture of HIV prevalence patterns. Other than a few non-governmental organization reports, very little qualitative data exists about the impact of HIV on the Acholi population. Attempting to formulate a clearer narrative of HIV transmission in Acholiland, this paper jointly analyses the historical and political context of the Acholi people and the war, the epidemiologic evidence of HIV prevalence patterns, and the ethnographic perspectives of Acholi healthcare workers and patients living with HIV/AIDS. Juxtaposing these sources of information allows for the emergence of a rich understanding of HIV in Acholiland. It is argued that three specific forms of violence--physical, symbolic and structural--create vulnerability to HIV infection in Acholiland, although to variable degrees dependent on location. The ethnographic evidence presented regarding HIV's impact on Acholiland suggests that an incorporation of historical, political, cultural and social factors must form the backbone of efforts both to understand HIV transmission and design strategies for curbing the epidemic in war settings. PMID:18071611

  1. Post-sampling mortality and non-response patterns in the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey: Implications for epidemiological studies based on surveys of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Gary A.; Saunders, Catherine L.; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveys of the experience of cancer patients are increasingly being introduced in different countries and used in cancer epidemiology research. Sampling processes, post-sampling mortality and survey non-response can influence the representativeness of cancer patient surveys. Methods We examined predictors of post-sampling mortality and non-response among patients initially included in the sampling frame of the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey. We also compared the respondents’ diagnostic case-mix to other relevant populations of cancer patients, including incident and prevalent cases. Results Of 109,477 initially sampled cancer patients, 6273 (5.7%) died between sampling and survey mail-out. Older age and diagnosis of brain, lung and pancreatic cancer were associated with higher risk of post-sampling mortality. The overall response rate was 67% (67,713 respondents), being >70% for the most affluent patients and those diagnosed with colon or breast cancer and <50% for Asian or Black patients, those under 35 and those diagnosed with brain cancer. The diagnostic case-mix of respondents varied substantially from incident or prevalent cancer cases. Conclusions Respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey represent a population of recently treated cancer survivors. Although patient survey data can provide unique insights for improving cancer care quality, features of survey populations need to be acknowledged when analysing and interpreting findings from studies using such data. PMID:26797675

  2. Molecular mistletoe therapy: friend or foe in established anti-tumor protocols? A multicenter, controlled, retrospective pharmaco-epidemiological study in pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthes, H; Friedel, W E; Bock, P R; Zänker, K S

    2010-06-01

    Mistletoe is often used as complementary therapy in oncology. The anti-tumor effects of mistletoe (Iscador) are well documented in-vitro in respect to inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, segmental activation of immune competent cells and trapping of chemotherapeutic drugs within cancer cells by modulating the inhibitory potential of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated transport of cell toxifying substances (cytotoxic drugs). However, the clinical activity of mistletoe treatment remains still controversial. Implementation of mistletoe therapy as supportive care into anti-cancer programs should be based on the best evidence and must continually be evaluated to ensure safety, efficacy, collection of new data, and cost-effectiveness. Useful domains that can be evaluated include symptom control, adherence to conventional treatment protocols, quality of life, individual outcome and potential advantages of a whole-system health approach. Here we report the results of a multicenter, controlled, retrospective and observational pharmaco-epidemiological study in patients suffering from a pancreatic carcinoma. After surgery the patients were treated by adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine supported by Iscador, or with gemcitabine alone, or any other best of care, but not including Iscador. Using a novel methodological pharmaco-epidemiological design and statistical approach it could be shown that Iscador offers benefits--symptom control, overall survival--as supportive care within gemcitabine protocols of patients with surgically resected pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:20455850

  3. Contrary to Evidence, Some Doctors Recommend Ovarian Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    One in three doctors believes that screening for ovarian cancer is effective, according to a recently published survey of practicing physicians, even though substantial evidence to the contrary exists. |

  4. An epidemiological model for prediction of endometrial cancer risk in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hüsing, Anika; Dossus, Laure; Ferrari, Pietro; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Baglietto, Laura; Schock, Helena; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Boeing, Heiner; Steffen, Annika; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Katsoulis, Michalis; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Ardanaz, Eva; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Navarro, Carmen; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Etxezarreta, Nerea; Allen, Naomi E; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nick; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merritt, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the fourth most frequent cancer in women in Europe, and as its incidence is increasing, prevention strategies gain further pertinence. Risk prediction models can be a useful tool for identifying women likely to benefit from targeted prevention measures. On the basis of data from 201,811 women (mostly aged 30-65 years) including 855 incident EC cases from eight countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, a model to predict EC was developed. A step-wise model selection process was used to select confirmed predictive epidemiologic risk factors. Piece-wise constant hazard rates in 5-year age-intervals were estimated in a cause-specific competing risks model, five-fold-cross-validation was applied for internal validation. Risk factors included in the risk prediction model were body-mass index (BMI), menopausal status, age at menarche and at menopause, oral contraceptive use, overall and by different BMI categories and overall duration of use, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, duration of menopausal hormone therapy and smoking status (specific for pre, peri- and post-menopausal women). These variables improved the discriminating capacity to predict risk over 5 years from 71% for a model based on age alone to 77% (overall C statistic), and the model was well-calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cases = 0.99). Our model could be used for the identification of women at increased risk of EC in Western Europe. To achieve an EC-risk model with general validity, a large-scale cohort-consortium approach would be needed to assess and adjust for population variation. PMID:25968175

  5. Epidemiology of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer--the role of sunlight.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased sun exposure or exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. A dose-dependent increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin was found associated with exposure to Psoralen and UVA irradiation. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the aetiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive colour of the skin and depends on the geographical zone. The highest incidence rates have been reported from Queensland, Australia with 56 new cases per year per 100,000 for men and 43 for women. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilisation in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. The tumor thickness is the most important prognostic factor in primary melanoma. There is an ongoing trend towards thin melanoma since the last two decades. Epidemiological studies have confirmed the hypothesis that the majority of all melanoma cases are caused, at least in part, by excessive exposure to sunlight. In contrast to squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma risk seems not to be associated with cumulative, but intermittent exposure to sunlight. Therefore campaigns for prevention and early detection are necessary. PMID:18348450

  6. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11·3%, melanoma 4·4% and NMSC 6·9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1·2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1·3, 95% CI 0·78-2·03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  7. Endodontic Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Shahravan, Arash; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of disease distribution and factors determining or affecting it. Likewise, endodontic epidemiology can be defined as the science of studying the distribution pattern and determinants of pulp and periapical diseases; specially apical periodontitis. Although different study designs have been used in endodontics, researchers must pay more attention to study designs with higher level of evidence such as randomized clinical trials. PMID:24688577

  8. Citrus Fruit Intake Substantially Reduces the Risk of Esophageal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anqiang; Zhu, Chengpei; Fu, Lilan; Wan, Xueshuai; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haohai; Miao, Ruoyu; He, Lian; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    Many epidemiologic studies indicate a potential association between fruit and vegetable intake and various cancers. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to investigate the association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The authors conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library from inception until July 2014. Studies presenting information about citrus intake and esophageal cancer were analyzed. The authors extracted the categories of citrus intake, study-specific odds ratio or relative risk, and the P value and associated 95% confidence intervals for the highest versus lowest dietary intake of citrus fruit level. The association was quantified using meta-analysis of standard errors with a random-effects model. Thirteen case-control studies and 6 cohort studies were eligible for inclusion. Citrus intake may significantly reduce risk of esophageal cancer (summary odds ratio = 0.63; 95% confidence interval = 0.52-0.75; P = 0), without notable publication bias (intercept = -0.79, P = 0.288) and with significant heterogeneity across studies (I = 52%). The results from epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse association between citrus fruit intake and esophageal cancer risk. The significant effect is consistent between case-control and cohort studies. Larger prospective studies with rigorous methodology should be considered to validate the association between citrus fruits and esophageal cancer. PMID:26426606

  9. Epidemiologic evidence for asthma and exposure to air toxics: linkages between occupational, indoor, and community air pollution research.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Ralph J

    2002-01-01

    Outdoor ambient air pollutant exposures in communities are relevant to the acute exacerbation and possibly the onset of asthma. However, the complexity of pollutant mixtures and etiologic heterogeneity of asthma has made it difficult to identify causal components in those mixtures. Occupational exposures associated with asthma may yield clues to causal components in ambient air pollution because such exposures are often identifiable as single-chemical agents (e.g., metal compounds). However, translating occupational to community exposure-response relationships is limited. Of the air toxics found to cause occupational asthma, only formaldehyde has been frequently investigated in epidemiologic studies of allergic respiratory responses to indoor air, where general consistency can be shown despite lower ambient exposures. The specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) identified in association with occupational asthma are generally not the same as those in studies showing respiratory effects of VOC mixtures on nonoccupational adult and pediatric asthma. In addition, experimental evidence indicates that airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures linked to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) have proinflammatory effects on airways, but there is insufficient supporting evidence from the occupational literature of effects of DEPs on asthma or lung function. In contrast, nonoccupational epidemiologic studies have frequently shown associations between allergic responses or asthma with exposures to ambient air pollutant mixtures with PAH components, including black smoke, high home or school traffic density (particularly truck traffic), and environmental tobacco smoke. Other particle-phase and gaseous co-pollutants are likely causal in these associations as well. Epidemiologic research on the relationship of both asthma onset and exacerbation to air pollution is needed to disentangle effects of air toxics from monitored criteria air pollutants such as particle mass

  10. [Several yellow fever cases in an endemic area in Ivory Coast: serological and epidemiological evidence (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, A; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C l; Monteny-Vandervorst, N; Souloumiac-Deprez, D

    1981-01-01

    1 - More than hundred febrile haemorrhagic jaundice cases with an unexpectedly high number of death happened in the north-west of the Ivory Coast between October 1977 and December 1977. It was the end of the rainy season and in this area, yellow fever is a dreadful eventuality. 2 - Epidemiological and serological survey was immediately carried out. Presence of numerous yellow fever potential vectors was well known and has been noticed in September 1977; there were some left in December 1977. Therefore no virus was isolated either in September or further. 3 - Haemagglutination-inhibition, complement-fixation and neutralization tests were performed with six flavivirus antigens, i.e. yellow fever, Wesselsbron, West Nile, Ntaya, Uganda S and Zika. 2 or 3 sera from 29 patients and 49 school children who have recent jaundice history, sometimes with haemorrhagic symptoms, were available. Single sera from 52 young rural workers and 402 inhabitants of surrounding villages were examined too. 4 - By the way of clinical, epidemiological, serological evidence, authors concluded 21 cases were certainly yellow fever. Evidence of 2 other cases was demonstrated by specific micropathological features. Furthermore, by serological results, 20 were probably yellow fever, 15 were inconclusive and 476 certainly not. 5 - Authors discussed some specific difficulties of yellow fever retrospective diagnosis in flavivirus endemic area. PMID:6268925

  11. Soy isoflavones and risk of cancer recurrence in a cohort of breast cancer survivors: the Life After Cancer Epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Guha, Neela; Kwan, Marilyn L; Quesenberry, Charles P; Weltzien, Erin K; Castillo, Adrienne L; Caan, Bette J

    2009-11-01

    Soy isoflavones, structurally similar to endogenous estrogens, may affect breast cancer through both hormonally mediated and non-hormonally related mechanisms. Although the effects of soy are not well understood, some breast cancer survivors increase their soy intake post-diagnosis in attempt to improve their prognosis. Therefore, we examined the role of soy isoflavone intake and the risk of breast cancer recurrence by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, and tamoxifen therapy. A cohort of 1,954 female breast cancer survivors, diagnosed during 1997-2000, was prospectively followed for 6.31 years and 282 breast cancer recurrences were ascertained. Isoflavone intake was assessed by mailing modified Block and supplemental soy food frequency questionnaires to participants, on average 23 months post-diagnosis. Risk of breast cancer recurrence, measured by hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), was estimated using multivariable delayed entry Cox proportional hazards models. Suggestive trends for a reduced risk of cancer recurrence were observed with increasing quintiles of daidzein and glycetin intake compared to no intake among postmenopausal women (P for trend: P = 0.08 for daidzein, P = 0.06 for glycetin) and among tamoxifen users (P = 0.10 for daidzein, P = 0.05 for glycetin). Among postmenopausal women treated with tamoxifen, there was an approximately 60% reduction in breast cancer recurrence comparing the highest to the lowest daidzein intakes (>1,453 vs. <7.7 microg/day; HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-0.79, P = 0.008). Soy isoflavones consumed at levels comparable to those in Asian populations may reduce the risk of cancer recurrence in women receiving tamoxifen therapy and moreover, appears not to interfere with tamoxifen efficacy. Further confirmation is required in other large prospective studies before recommendations regarding soy intake can be issued to breast cancer survivors. PMID:19221874

  12. Management of Male Breast Cancer in the United States: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Emma C.; DeWitt, Peter; Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stage-specific management of male breast cancer (MBC) with surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and relate them to outcomes and to female breast cancer (FBC). Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all primary invasive MBC and FBC diagnosed from 1973 to 2008. Analyzable data included age, race, registry, grade, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, type of surgery, and use of RT. Stage was defined as localized (LocD): confined to the breast; regional (RegD): involving skin, chest wall, and/or regional lymph nodes; and distant: M1. The primary endpoint was cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 4276 cases of MBC and 718,587 cases of FBC were identified. Male breast cancer constituted 0.6% of all breast cancer. Comparing MBC with FBC, mastectomy (M) was used in 87.4% versus 38.3%, and breast-conserving surgery in 12.6% versus 52.6% (P<10{sup −4}). For males with LocD, CSS was not significantly different for the 4.6% treated with lumpectomy/RT versus the 70% treated with M alone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.49-3.61; P=.57). Postmastectomy RT was delivered in 33% of males with RegD and was not associated with an improvement in CSS (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.88-1.41; P=.37). There was a significant increase in the use of postmastectomy RT in MBC over time: 24.3%, 27.2%, and 36.8% for 1973-1987, 1988-1997, and 1998-2008, respectively (P<.0001). Cause-specific survival for MBC has improved: the largest significant change was identified for men diagnosed in 1998-2008 compared with 1973-1987 (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60-0.88; P=.0004). Conclusions: Surgical management of MBC is dramatically different than for FBC. The majority of males with LocD receive M despite equivalent CSS with lumpectomy/RT. Postmastectomy RT is greatly underutilized in MBC with RegD, although a CSS benefit was not demonstrated. Outcomes for MBC are improving, attributable to improved

  13. The epidemiology of bone cancer in 0 - 39 year olds in northern England, 1981 - 2002

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of recent epidemiological data on bone cancers. The aim of this study was to describe incidence and survival patterns for bone cancers diagnosed during 1981 - 2002. Methods Cases aged 0 - 39 years (236 osteosarcomas, 166 Ewing sarcomas and 73 chondrosarcomas) were analysed using Poisson and Cox regressions. Results Incidence rates (per million persons per year) for osteosarcoma were 2.5 at age 0 - 14 years; 4.5 at age 15 - 29 years and 1.0 at age 30 - 39 years. Similarly, for Ewing sarcoma the incidence rates were 2.2; 2.9; 0.4 and for chondrosarcoma rates were 0.1; 1.2; 1.8 respectively. Incidence of osteosarcoma increased at an average annual rate of 2.5% (95% CI 0.4 - 4.7; P = 0.02), but there was no change in incidence of Ewing sarcoma or chondrosarcoma. There was a marginally statistically significant improvement in survival for Ewing sarcoma (hazard ratio (HR) per annum = 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 - 1.00; P = 0.06), although patients aged 15 - 39 years (n = 93) had worse overall survival than those aged 0 - 14 (n = 73; HR = 1.46; 95% CI 0.98 - 2.17; P = 0.06). There was no significant improvement in osteosarcoma survival (HR per annum = 0.98; 95% CI 0.95 - 1.01; P = 0.18). Conclusions Reasons for poorer survival in Ewing sarcoma patients aged 15 - 39 years and failure to significantly improve survival for osteosarcoma patients requires further investigation. PMID:20604931

  14. Are Breast Cancer Navigation Programs Cost-Effective? Evidence from the Chicago Cancer Navigation Project

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Talar W.; Calhoun, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives One of the aims of the Chicago Cancer Navigation Project (CCNP) is to reduce the interval of time between abnormal breast cancer screening and definitive diagnosis in patients who are navigated as compared to usual care. In this article, we investigate the extent to which total costs of breast cancer navigation can be off-set by survival benefits and savings in lifetime breast cancer-attributable costs. Methods Data sources for the cost-effectiveness analysis include data from published literature, secondary data from the NCI’s Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results program, and primary data from the CCNP. Results If women enrolled in CCNP receive breast cancer diagnosis earlier by 6-months as compared to usual care, then navigation is borderline cost-effective for $95,625 per life-year saved. Results from sensitivity analyses suggest that the cost-effectiveness of navigation is sensitive to: the interval of time between screening and diagnosis, percent increase in number of women who receive cancer diagnosis and treatment, women’s age, and the positive predictive value of a mammogram. Conclusions In planning cost-effective navigation programs, special considerations should be made regarding the characteristics of the disease, program participants, and the initial screening test that determines program eligibility. PMID:20685001

  15. BioCAST/IFCT-1002: epidemiological and molecular features of lung cancer in never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Couraud, Sébastien; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Paris, Christophe; Dô, Pascal; Doubre, Hélène; Pichon, Eric; Dixmier, Adrien; Monnet, Isabelle; Etienne-Mastroianni, Bénédicte; Vincent, Michel; Trédaniel, Jean; Perrichon, Marielle; Foucher, Pascal; Coudert, Bruno; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Dansin, Eric; Labonne, Stéphanie; Missy, Pascale; Morin, Franck; Blanché, Hélène; Zalcman, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers (LCINS) (fewer than 100 cigarettes in lifetime) is considered as a distinct entity and harbours an original molecular profile. However, the epidemiological and molecular features of LCINS in Europe remain poorly understood. All consecutive newly diagnosed LCINS patients were included in this prospective observational study by 75 participating centres during a 14-month period. Each patient completed a detailed questionnaire about risk factor exposure. Biomarker and pathological analyses were also collected. We report the main descriptive overall results with a focus on sex differences. 384 patients were included: 65 men and 319 women. 66% had been exposed to passive smoking (significantly higher among women). Definite exposure to main occupational carcinogens was significantly higher in men (35% versus 8% in women). A targetable molecular alteration was found in 73% of patients (without any significant sex difference): EGFR in 51%, ALK in 8%, KRAS in 6%, HER2 in 3%, BRAF in 3%, PI3KCA in less than 1%, and multiple in 2%. We present the largest and most comprehensive LCINS analysis in a European population. Physicians should track occupational exposure in men (35%), and a somatic molecular alteration in both sexes (73%). PMID:25657019

  16. Air particulate matter and cardiovascular disease: the epidemiological, biomedical and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yixing; Xu, Xiaohan; Chu, Ming; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is now becoming an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Numerous epidemiological, biomedical and clinical studies indicate that ambient particulate matter (PM) in air pollution is strongly associated with increased cardiovascular disease such as myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrhythmias, ischemic stroke, vascular dysfunction, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanisms for PM-caused cardiovascular disease include directly toxicity to cardiovascular system or indirectly injury by inducing systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in peripheral circulation. Here, we review the linking between PM exposure and the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and discussed the possible underlying mechanisms for the observed PM induced increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26904258

  17. Diagnosis of bovine-associated parapoxvirus infections in humans: molecular and epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, A; Lederman, E; Reynolds, M G; Ragade, N J; Talken, R; Friedman, D; Hall, W; Shwe, T; Li, Y; Zhao, H; Smith, S; Davidson, W; Hughes, C; Damon, I K

    2010-12-01

    Orf virus, pseudocowpox virus and bovine papular stomatitis virus, are parapoxviruses, associated with domestic ruminants, which are capable of causing cutaneous infections in humans. Owing to virtually identical appearances in humans, clinical differentiation of these viruses is difficult. We discuss three recent occurrences of parapoxvirus infection, involving contact with domestic bovine and use a combination of molecular and epidemiological data in the diagnosis. These cases underscore the utility of modern diagnostic tools, along with species-specific contact information in acquiring a definitive diagnosis, in the case of suspected parapoxvirus infection. PMID:20163577

  18. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Deodutta; Morgan, Marisa; Yoo, Changwon; Deoraj, Alok; Roy, Sandhya; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Garoub, Mohannad; Assaggaf, Hamza; Doke, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenols (BPs), and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs–PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes—CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1—in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors. PMID:26512648

  19. Evidence-based nutritional support of the elderly cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    The papers included in this section represent the effort of the Task Force on Nutrition of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology to synthetize the evidence-based concepts on nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. In the attempt of presenting a comprehensive overview of the topic, the panel included experts from different specialties: basic researchers, nutritionists, geriatricians, nurses, dieticians, gastroenterologists, oncologists. Cancer in elderly people is a growing problem. Not only in almost every country, the proportion of people aged over 60 years is growing faster than any other age group, but cancer per se is also a disease of old adult-elderly people, hence the oncologists face an increasing number of these patients both now and in the next years. The are several studies on nutrition of elderly subjects and many other on nutrition of cancer patients but relatively few specifically devoted to the nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. However, the awareness that elderly subjects account for a high proportion of the mixed cancer patients population, in some way legitimates us to extend some conclusions of the literature also to the elderly cancer patients. Although the topics of this Experts' Consensus have been written by specialists in different areas of nutrition, the final message is addressed to the oncologists. Not only they should be more directly involved in the simplest steps of the nutritional care (recognition of the potential existence of a "nutritional risk" which can compromise the planned oncologic program, use of some oral supplements, etc.) but, as the true experts of the natural history of their cancer patient, they should also coordinate the process of the nutritional support, integrating this approach in the overall multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:25770321

  20. [Surgery for pancreatic cancer: Evidence-based surgical strategies].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Cabús, Santiago; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer surgery represents a challenge for surgeons due to its technical complexity, the potential complications that may appear, and ultimately because of its poor survival. The aim of this article is to summarize the scientific evidence regarding the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer in order to help surgeons in the decision making process in the management of these patients .Here we will review such fundamental issues as the need for a biopsy before surgery, the type of pancreatic anastomosis leading to better results, and the need for placement of drains after pancreatic surgery will be discussed. PMID:25957457

  1. Evolving epidemiology of Nipah virus infection in Bangladesh: evidence from outbreaks during 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A; Sazzad, H M S; Hossain, M J; Islam, M S; Parveen, S; Husain, M; Banu, S S; Podder, G; Afroj, S; Rollin, P E; Daszak, P; Luby, S P; Rahman, M; Gurley, E S

    2016-01-01

    Drinking raw date palm sap is the primary route of Nipah virus (NiV) transmission from bats to people in Bangladesh; subsequent person-to-person transmission is common. During December 2010 to March 2011, we investigated NiV epidemiology by interviewing cases using structured questionnaires, in-depth interviews, and group discussions to collect clinical and exposure histories. We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for transmission. We identified 43 cases; 23 were laboratory-confirmed and 20 probable. Thirty-eight (88%) cases died. Drinking raw date palm sap and contact with an infected person were major risk factors; one healthcare worker was infected and for another case transmission apparently occurred through contact with a corpse. In absence of these risk factors, apparent routes of transmission included drinking fermented date palm sap. For the first time, a case was detected in eastern Bangladesh. Identification of new epidemiological characteristics emphasizes the importance of continued NiV surveillance and case investigation. PMID:26122675

  2. Toxicity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. An overview of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Carson, J L; Willett, L R

    1993-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used throughout the world. This paper reviews the epidemiological data linking NSAID administration with gastrointestinal, hepatic, renal, haematological, and hypersensitivity reactions. Meta-analysis has demonstrated that NSAIDs are associated with serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, with a relative risk of 2.7 in patients receiving NSAIDs compared with subjects not receiving NSAIDs. An increase in the dose and duration of NSAIDs and age > 60 are associated with an increase in the risk of upper gastrointestinal toxicity. The current data strongly support a causal relationship between NSAIDs and gastrointestinal disorders. Case-control studies have demonstrated an association between some NSAIDs and neutropenia, with a relative risk of between 3 and 9 in patients treated with NSAIDs compared with nonusers of these drugs. NSAIDs have also been linked with hypersensitivity reactions, although the incidence of such reactions is very low. However, there are inconsistent data on the potential associations between NSAIDs and renal disease, and there are no epidemiological studies linking NSAIDs with acute liver disease. Overall, the incidence of serious adverse reactions associated with NSAIDs is low, and this class of drugs can be regarded as being reasonably safe. PMID:7506183

  3. Molecular Evidence for the Inverse Comorbidity between Central Nervous System Disorders and Cancers Detected by Transcriptomic Meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Baudot, Anaïs; Valencia, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence that patients with certain Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders have a lower than expected probability of developing some types of Cancer. We tested here the hypothesis that this inverse comorbidity is driven by molecular processes common to CNS disorders and Cancers, and that are deregulated in opposite directions. We conducted transcriptomic meta-analyses of three CNS disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia) and three Cancer types (Lung, Prostate, Colorectal) previously described with inverse comorbidities. A significant overlap was observed between the genes upregulated in CNS disorders and downregulated in Cancers, as well as between the genes downregulated in CNS disorders and upregulated in Cancers. We also observed expression deregulations in opposite directions at the level of pathways. Our analysis points to specific genes and pathways, the upregulation of which could increase the incidence of CNS disorders and simultaneously lower the risk of developing Cancer, while the downregulation of another set of genes and pathways could contribute to a decrease in the incidence of CNS disorders while increasing the Cancer risk. These results reinforce the previously proposed involvement of the PIN1 gene, Wnt and P53 pathways, and reveal potential new candidates, in particular related with protein degradation processes. PMID:24586201

  4. Nutritional epidemiology--there's life in the old dog yet!

    PubMed

    Potter, John D

    2015-02-01

    Consideration is given to the idea that the nutritional epidemiology of cancer is dead, as some in the media have claimed. The basis for the claim does not lie in science nor has anyone with relevant knowledge made such a statement-although that, too, has been claimed. Evidence is adduced for the importance of past achievements of nutritional epidemiology. Attention is similarly drawn to recent contributions. In particular, I note the state of play of cancer and plant foods, fat and breast cancer, meat and cancer, vegetarians, intervention studies, migrant studies, and westernization of diet and lifestyle. Some next steps and some currently important questions are outlined. PMID:25515549

  5. Properly Interpreting the Epidemiologic Evidence about the Health Effects of Industrial Wind Turbines on Nearby Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that wind turbines cause serious health problems in nearby residents, usually stress-disorder-type diseases, at a nontrivial rate. The bulk of the evidence takes the form of thousands of adverse event reports. There is also a small amount of systematically gathered data. The adverse event reports provide compelling…

  6. Essential problems in the interpretation of epidemiologic evidence for an association between mobile phone use and brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundi, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Due to the close proximity of a mobile phone to the head when placing a call, concerns have been raised that exposure from microwaves during mobile phone use may exert adverse health effects and, in particular, may increase the risk of brain tumours. In response to these concerns epidemiological studies have been conducted, most applying the case-control design. While epidemiology can provide decisive evidence for an association between an exposure and a disease fundamental problems arise if exposure is short compared to the natural history of the disease. For brain tumours latencies of decades have been implicated making special considerations about potential effects of exposures necessary that commence during an already growing tumour. It is shown that measures of disease risk like odds ratios and relative risks can under such circumstances not be interpreted as indicators of a long term effect on incidences in the exposed population. Besides this problem, the issues of a suitable exposure metric and the selection of endpoints are unresolved. It is shown that the solution of these problems affords knowledge about the mechanism of action by which exposure increases the risk of manifest disease.

  7. Viral Hepatitis Induces Hepatocellular Cancer: What Can We Learn from Epidemiology Comparing Iran and Worldwide Findings?

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Elisabeth; Zöhrer, Evelyn; Bettermann, Kira; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Context Several risk factors play the role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from which chronic hepatitis B and C infections are the most important ones. DNA integration of hepatitis viruses alters the function of critical genes promoting malignant transformation of virus-infected liver cells. Evidence Acquisition There are remarkable geographic differences in prevalence of chronic viral hepatitis and incidence of HCC. Middle Eastern countries are characterized by a moderate to high prevalence rate of chronic viral hepatitis in the population. This review discusses about epidemiologic findings of hepatitis B and C infections, and HCC, as well as focuses on Middle East countries, particularly Iran. We provide an overview about risk factors, prevention and treatment, and bring up the role of HCC induced by chronic viral hepatitis. Results Vaccination against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the early childhood is highly effective to lower infection rates, substantially. For hepatitis C, adequate hygiene when dealing with human blood and screening programs for blood donors can mainly reduce infection rates. As HCC is strongly associated with chronic viral hepatitis, prevention against the infection is crucial for preventing against HCC too. Conclusions Although prevention and treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C have improved within the last decades even in high-risk countries, effective and sustainable reduction of these infections still needs more actions. PMID:23233866

  8. Dietary Nitrate Lowers Blood Pressure: Epidemiological, Pre-clinical Experimental and Clinical Trial Evidence.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lorna C; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator critical in maintaining vascular homeostasis, can reduce blood pressure in vivo. Loss of constitutive NO generation, for example as a result of endothelial dysfunction, occurs in many pathological conditions, including hypertension, and contributes to disease pathology. Attempts to therapeutically deliver NO via organic nitrates (e.g. glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) to reduce blood pressure in hypertensives have been largely unsuccessful. However, in recent years inorganic (or 'dietary') nitrate has been identified as a potential solution for NO delivery through its sequential chemical reduction via the enterosalivary circuit. With dietary nitrate found in abundance in vegetables this review discusses epidemiological, pre-clinical and clinical data supporting the idea that dietary nitrate could represent a cheap and effective dietary intervention capable of reducing blood pressure and thereby improving cardiovascular health. PMID:26815004

  9. Chronic Hepatitis C: An Overview of Evidence on Epidemiology and Management from a Brazilian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rodolfo; Perazzo, Hugo; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Hyde, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C remains one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide and presents a variable natural history ranging from minimal changes to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis and its complications, such as development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately, 1.45 million people are estimated to be infected by HCV in Brazil representing a major public health issue. The aim of this paper was to review the epidemiology and management of chronic hepatitis C from a Brazilian perspective. The management of chronic hepatitis C has been challenged by the use of noninvasive methods to stage liver fibrosis as an alternative to liver biopsy and the high cost of new interferon-free antiviral treatments. Moreover, the need of cost-effectiveness analysis in hepatitis C and the recent changes in treatment protocols were discussed. PMID:26693356

  10. Cancer therapy with phytochemicals: evidence from clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Azar; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the major causes of mortality in both developing and developed countries. At present, in spite of intensive interventions, a large number of patients suffer from poor prognosis. Therefore, the effort for finding new anticancer agents with better efficacy and lesser side effects has been continued. According to the traditional recommendations and experimental studies, numerous medicinal plants have been reported to have anticancer effect. Also antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of several phytochemicals have been shown in in vitro experiments or animal studies. However, only a small number have been tested in cancerous patients and limited evidence exists for their clinical effectiveness. Also, regarding some phytochemicals, only beneficial effects on cancer-related symptoms or on quality of life have been reported and no positive results exist for their antitumor actions. This review was focused on the phytochemicals whole beneficial effects on various types of cancer have been supported by clinical trials. Based on the literature review, curcumin, green tea, resveratrol and Viscum album were the satisfactory instances of clinical evidence for supporting their anticancer effects. The main findings of these phytochemicals were also summarized and discussed. PMID:25949949

  11. The high prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer at autopsy: implications for epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer in the Prostate-specific Antigen-era.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J

    2015-12-15

    Widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening detects many cancers that would have otherwise gone undiagnosed. To estimate the prevalence of unsuspected prostate cancer, we reviewed 19 studies of prostate cancer discovered at autopsy among 6,024 men. Among men aged 70-79, tumor was found in 36% of Caucasians and 51% of African-Americans. This enormous prevalence, coupled with the high sensitivity of PSA screening, has led to the marked increase in the apparent incidence of prostate cancer. The impact of PSA screening on clinical practice is well-recognized, but its effect on epidemiologic research is less appreciated. Before screening, a larger proportion of incident prostate cancers had lethal potential and were diagnosed at advanced stage. However, in the PSA era, overall incident prostate cancer mainly is indolent disease, and often reflects the propensity to be screened and biopsied. Studies must therefore focus on cancers with lethal potential, and include long follow-up to accommodate the lead time induced by screening. Moreover, risk factor patterns differ markedly for potentially lethal and indolent disease, suggesting separate etiologies and distinct disease entities. Studies of total incident or indolent prostate cancer are of limited clinical utility, and the main focus of research should be on prostate cancers of lethal potential. PMID:25557753

  12. Epidemiologic study of residential proximity to transmission lines and childhood cancer in California: description of design, epidemiologic methods and study population.

    PubMed

    Kheifets, Leeka; Crespi, Catherine M; Hooper, Chris; Oksuzyan, Sona; Cockburn, Myles; Ly, Thomas; Mezei, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large epidemiologic case-control study in California to examine the association between childhood cancer risk and distance from the home address at birth to the nearest high-voltage overhead transmission line as a replication of the study of Draper et al. in the United Kingdom. We present a detailed description of the study design, methods of case ascertainment, control selection, exposure assessment and data analysis plan. A total of 5788 childhood leukemia cases and 3308 childhood central nervous system cancer cases (included for comparison) and matched controls were available for analysis. Birth and diagnosis addresses of cases and birth addresses of controls were geocoded. Distance from the home to nearby overhead transmission lines was ascertained on the basis of the electric power companies' geographic information system (GIS) databases, additional Google Earth aerial evaluation and site visits to selected residences. We evaluated distances to power lines up to 2000 m and included consideration of lower voltages (60-69 kV). Distance measures based on GIS and Google Earth evaluation showed close agreement (Pearson correlation >0.99). Our three-tiered approach to exposure assessment allowed us to achieve high specificity, which is crucial for studies of rare diseases with low exposure prevalence. PMID:24045429

  13. Association of Dioxin and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) with Diabetes: Epidemiological Evidence and New Mechanisms of Beta Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide explosion of the rates of diabetes and other metabolic diseases in the last few decades cannot be fully explained only by changes in the prevalence of classical lifestyle-related risk factors, such as physical inactivity and poor diet. For this reason, it has been recently proposed that other “nontraditional” risk factors could contribute to the diabetes epidemics. In particular, an increasing number of reports indicate that chronic exposure to and accumulation of a low concentration of environmental pollutants (especially the so-called persistent organic pollutants (POPs)) within the body might be associated with diabetogenesis. In this review, the epidemiological evidence suggesting a relationship between dioxin and other POPs exposure and diabetes incidence will be summarized, and some recent developments on the possible underlying mechanisms, with particular reference to dioxin, will be presented and discussed. PMID:24802877

  14. [Evidence-Based Review of Laryngeal Cancer Surgery].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S

    2016-04-01

    Surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer has been established for decades. In addition to total laryngectomy, which was first performed in 1873, a large number of organ preservation surgical techniques, like open partial laryngectomy, transoral laser microsurgery and transoral robotic surgery, have been developed. Studies on laryngeal cancer surgery are mainly retrospective case series and cohort studies. The evolution of chemoradiation protocols and their analysis in prospective randomized trials have led to an increasing acceptance of non-surgical treatment procedures. In addition to an improvement of prognosis, in recent years the preservation of function and maintenance of life quality after primary therapy of laryngeal cancer has increasingly become the focus of therapy planning. Significant late toxicity after chemoradiation has been identified as an important issue. This leads to a reassessment of surgical concepts and initiation of studies on laryngeal cancer surgery which was additionally stimulated by the advent of transoral robotic surgery in the U.S.. Improving the evidence base in laryngeal cancer surgery by successful establishment of surgical trials should be the future goal. PMID:27128401

  15. Stressful life experiences, alcohol consumption, and alcohol use disorders: the epidemiologic evidence for four main types of stressors

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Katherine M.; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to stress is potentially important in the pathway to alcohol use and alcohol use disorders. Stressors occur at multiple time points across the life course, with varying degrees of chronicity and severity. Method We review evidence from epidemiologic studies on the relationship between four different stressors (fateful/catastrophic events, child maltreatment, common adult stressful life events in interpersonal, occupational, financial, and legal domains, and minority stress) and alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders. Results Studies generally demonstrate an increase in alcohol consumption in response to exposure to terrorism or other disasters. Research has demonstrated little increase in incident alcohol use disorders, but individuals with a history of alcohol use disorders are more likely to report drinking to cope with the traumatic event. Childhood maltreatment is a consistent risk factor for early onset of drinking in adolescence and adult alcohol use disorders, and accumulating evidence suggests that specific polymorphisms may interact with child maltreatment to increase risk for alcohol consumption and disorder. Stressful life events such as divorce and job loss increase the risk of alcohol disorders, but epidemiologic consensus on the specificity of these associations across gender has not been reached. Finally, both perceptions of discrimination and objective indicators of discrimination are associated with alcohol use and alcohol use disorders among racial/ethnic and sexual minorities. Conclusion Taken together, these literatures demonstrate that exposure to stress is an important component in individual differences in risk for alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorders. However, many areas of this research remain to be studied, including greater attention to the role of various stressors in the course of alcohol use disorders and potential risk moderators when individuals are exposed to stressors. PMID:21373787

  16. Epidemiological factors in gall bladder cancer in eastern India-a single centre study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Panda, Nilanjan; Banerjee, Manju; Das, Ruchira

    2013-03-01

    India has high incidence of Gallbladder carcinoma with regional variation in incidence possibly due to environmental factors. Prospective study of all the gall bladder cancer in our hospital over 18 months analysing how the epidemiological factors are influencing the disease. Incidence-Four cases per 100,000 populations per year. The peak incidence was in 41 to 50 years group (49.20 %). Male to female ratio was 1:3.8. Majority (69.84 %) were in lower socio-economic group. 61 out of 63 patients (96.62 %) were non-vegetarians. 60.34 % and 19.04 % patients weighed between 50 and 55 kg and 55and 60 kg respectively (p = 0.003). Male smokers had significantly higher risk (p = 0.000 1). Gall stones were present in 45 out of 63 cases(71.42 %).45 out of 63 patients were typhoid carriers (p < 0.05). Pain abdomen was the commonest complaint (87.30 %), followed by pallor, lump in right upper quadrant, nausea & vomiting and jaundice in 71.42 %, 69.84 %, 66.66 %, 31.74 % patients respectively. This data highlights high prevalence of gall bladder carcinoma in Eastern India. Better hygiene and water supply to prevent typhoid carriers, prevention of malnutrition, early intervention for cholelithiasis, importance of balanced diet, increase in awareness about risk of tobacco and alcohol consumption-all are highlighted as significant modifiable factors. PMID:24426702

  17. Impact of Bisphenol A on the Cardiovascular System — Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA’s toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV) system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area. PMID:25153468

  18. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S. M. Salim; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%), followed by colorectal cancer (16.4%) and lung cancer (13.2%) among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%), breast cancer (16.1%), and stomach cancer (10.4%) were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region. PMID:27478644

  19. Epidemiology of Cancers in Kashmir, India: An Analysis of Hospital Data.

    PubMed

    Qurieshi, Mariya A; Khan, S M Salim; Masoodi, Muneer A; Qurieshi, Uruj; Ain, Quratul; Jan, Yasmeen; Haq, Inaamul; Ahmad, Sheikh Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. The aim of the present study was to measure the pattern of different cancers in Kashmir, India, a cancer belt with peculiar cancer profile. A hospital based cancer registry was started by the Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Srinagar, in January 2006, wherein information was collected from cancer patients who were diagnosed and treated in the hospital. Data has been analysed for a period extending from January 2006 to December 2012. Descriptive analysis has been done by using statistical software. A total of 1598 cancer patients were admitted during this period. Overall male to female ratio was 1.33 : 1. Stomach cancer was the most commonly reported cancer (25.2%), followed by colorectal cancer (16.4%) and lung cancer (13.2%) among males. For females, colorectal cancer (16.8%), breast cancer (16.1%), and stomach cancer (10.4%) were the most frequently reported cancers in order of frequency. Tobacco related cancers contributed to more than three-fourths of cancers among men and more than half of cancers for women. There is an urgent need to set up a population based cancer registration system to understand the profile of cancers specific to this geographic region. PMID:27478644

  20. Chemicals and cancer in humans: first evidence in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    Certain human diseases have been traced to exposure to environmental and occupational chemicals. In many instances the first evidence of potential adverse effects came from experimental studies and were subsequently discovered in humans. Associations of human cancers, as a diverse group of diseases, and chemicals have been made since the middle 1700s. Since then, nearly 100 chemicals, mixtures of chemicals, or exposure circumstances are now recognized as being or strongly implicated as being carcinogenic to humans. Of the less than 1000 agents evaluated adequately for carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, a varying spectrum of data from studies on humans are available for only about 20-25%. So far, more than 60 agents are linked unequivocally as causing cancer in humans, and another 50 or so are strongly suspected of being carcinogenic to humans. Not all of these have been or can be evaluated in animals because some are industrial processes or "occupations," some are environmental and cultural risk factors, and some are mixtures of agents. For those that can be studied experimentally, the qualitative concordance between humans and animals approaches unity, and in every case there is at least one common organ site of cancer in both species. The evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals preceded that observed in humans for nearly 30 agents and is the subject of this paper. PMID:8354167

  1. Diet, H pylori infection and gastric cancer: Evidence and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Alba; Nardone, Gerardo

    2007-01-01

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality rates, gastric cancer (GC) still remains the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Due to the limited treatment options, at present, prevention is likely to be the only effective means of controlling this disease. The success of a prevention strategy depends upon the understanding of etiological and pathogenic mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis. The etiology of GC is multi-factorial, however, in the recent years, mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors play a key role. The most important environmental factors implicated in the pathogenesis of GC are diet and H pylori infection. Thus, modifications in lifestyle and dietary habit associated with eradication of H pylori infection could hypothetically represent the most promising potential targets for GC prevention. In this review we will address the evidence and the controversies on the role of these agents in non-cardia GC by focusing on retrospective and prospective observational studies and interventional trials. PMID:17589938

  2. Carotenoid Intake from Natural Sources and Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuele; Nedovic, Darko; Panic, Nikola; Pastorino, Roberta; Edefonti, Valeria; Boccia, Stefania

    2015-07-01

    Because of their role as antioxidants, the intake of carotenoids has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiological studies to investigate whether the intake of specific carotenoids from dietary sources, as well as combined carotenoids, is associated with the risk of HNC according to cancer subsites. A comprehensive literature search of the Medline and Scopus databases was conducted. Sixteen articles were identified from the literature search, of which 15 were case-control studies and one prospective cohort study. The risk reduction associated with β-carotene equivalents intake was 46% (95% CI, 20%-63%) for cancer of oral cavity and 57% (95% CI, 23%-76%) for laryngeal cancer. Lycopene and β-cryptoxanthin also reduced the risk for laryngeal cancer; the ORs for the highest category compared with the lowest one of carotenoid intake were 50% (95% CI, 11%-72%) and 59% (95% CI, 49%-67%), respectively. Lycopene, α-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin were associated with at least 26% reduction in the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer (95% CI, 2%-44%). Our systematic review and meta-analysis on dietary carotenoids intake and HNC showed carotenoids to act protectively against HNC, in relation to most of single nutrients and subsites. PMID:25873578

  3. Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimoto, Y. )

    1990-08-01

    This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered.

  4. [Exposure to CT scans in childhood and long-term cancer risk: A review of epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Baysson, Hélène; Journy, Neige; Roué, Tristan; Ducou-Lepointe, Hubert; Etard, Cécile; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2016-02-01

    Amongst medical exams requiring ionizing radiation, computed tomography (CT) scans are used more frequently, including in children. These CT examinations are associated with absorbed doses that are much higher than those associated with conventional radiology. In comparison to adults, children have a greater sensitivity to radiation and a longer life span with more years at cancer risks. Five epidemiological studies on cancer risks after CT scan exposure during childhood were published between 2012 and 2015. The results of these studies are consistent and show an increase of cancer risks in children who have been exposed to several CT scans. However, methodological limits due to indication bias, retrospective assessment of radiation exposure from CT scans and lack of statistical power are to be taken into consideration. International projects such as EPI-CT (Epidemiological study to quantify risks for pediatric computerized tomography and to optimize dose), with a focus on dosimetric reconstruction and minimization of bias will provide more precise results. In the meantime, available results reinforce the necessity of justification and optimization of doses. PMID:26782078

  5. Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes: Epidemiologic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Frank B.; Malik, Vasanti S.

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, temporal patterns in SSB intake have shown a close parallel between the upsurge in obesity and rising levels of SSB consumption. SSBs are beverages that contain added caloric sweeteners such as sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup or fruit-juice concentrates, all of which result in similar metabolic effects. They include the full spectrum of soft drinks, carbonated soft drinks, fruitades, fruit drinks, sports drinks, energy and vitamin water drinks, sweetened iced tea, cordial, squashes, and lemonade, which collectively are the largest contributor to added sugar intake in the US. It has long been suspected that SSBs have an etiologic role in the obesity epidemic, however only recently have large epidemiological studies been able to quantify the relationship between SSB consumption and long-term weight-gain, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Experimental studies have provided important insight into potential underlying biological mechanisms. It is thought that SSBs contribute to weight gain in part by incomplete compensation for energy at subsequent meals following intake of liquid calories. They may also increase risk of T2DM and CVD as a contributor to a high dietary glycemic load leading to inflammation, insulin resistance and impaired β-cell function. Additional metabolic effects from the fructose fraction of these beverages may also promote accumulation of visceral adiposity, and increased hepatic de novo lipogenesis, and hypertension due to hyperuricemia. Consumption of SSBs should therefore be replaced by healthy alternatives such as water, to reduce risk of obesity and chronic diseases. PMID:20138901

  6. Environmental Chemical Exposures and Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of the Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kalkbrenner, Amy E.; Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Penlesky, Annie C.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the number of epidemiological publications addressing environmental chemical exposures and autism has grown tremendously. These studies are important because it is now understood that environmental factors play a larger role in causing autism than previously thought and because they address modifiable risk factors that may open up avenues for the primary prevention of the disability associated with autism. In this review, we covered studies of autism and estimates of exposure to tobacco, air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and solvents, metals (from air, occupation, diet, dental amalgams, and thimerosal-containing vaccines), pesticides, and organic endocrine-disrupting compounds such as flame retardants, non-stick chemicals, phthalates, and bisphenol A. We included studies that had individual-level data on autism, exposure measures pertaining to pregnancy or the 1st year of life, valid comparison groups, control for confounders, and adequate sample sizes. Despite the inherent error in the measurement of many of these environmental exposures, which is likely to attenuate observed associations, some environmental exposures showed associations with autism, especially traffic-related air pollutants, some metals, and several pesticides, with suggestive trends for some volatile organic compounds (e.g., methylene chloride, trichloroethylene, and styrene) and phthalates. Whether any of these play a causal role requires further study. Given the limited scope of these publications, other environmental chemicals cannot be ruled out, but have not yet been adequately studied. Future research that addresses these and additional environmental chemicals, including their most common routes of exposures, with accurate exposure measurement pertaining to several developmental windows, is essential to guide efforts for the prevention of the neurodevelopmental damage that manifests in autism symptoms. PMID:25199954

  7. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  8. Epidemiological evidence on count processes in the formation of tobacco dependence

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Emily M.; Boinapally, Prashanthi M.; Fairman, Brian; Anthony, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Large-sample epidemiological studies of tobacco cigarette smoking routinely assess so-called “lifetime prevalence” of tobacco dependence. This work delves into the earliest stages of smoking involvement, focusing on newly incident tobacco cigarette smokers in the very recent past, and examines hypothesized subgroup variation in count processes that become engaged once smoking starts. Here, the term “count process” has two components: (a) whether smoking will be persistent and (b) the rate of smoking, conditional upon membership in a latent class of smokers who will persist, as estimated under the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model for complex survey data. Methods: We estimate these ZIP parameters for nationally representative samples of newly incident smokers in the United States (all with smoking initiation within 24 months of assessment). Data are from the 2004–2007 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Results: Once cigarette smoking started, roughly 40%–45% persisted, and the estimated median rate was five smoking days/30 days, conditional on membership in the latent class of persistent smokers. Among non-Hispanic recent-onset cigarette smokers, Whites, Black/African Americans, Asians, and Native American/Alaskan Natives did not differ, but recent-onset smokers of Hispanic origin and those of Pacific Islander background had comparatively less cigarette involvement. Discussion: Tobacco prevention and control initiatives may require elaboration in the form of brief interventions, including interpersonal and social transactions that might constrain a mounting frequency of days of smoking before daily smoking starts, and until conventional smoking cessation medication aids become indicated. These very–early stage interventions (VESI) might be mounted within family or peer groups or in the primary care or school settings, but randomized trials to evaluate VESI interventions will be required. PMID:20507897

  9. Environmental chemical exposures and autism spectrum disorders: a review of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kalkbrenner, Amy E; Schmidt, Rebecca J; Penlesky, Annie C

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade, the number of epidemiological publications addressing environmental chemical exposures and autism has grown tremendously. These studies are important because it is now understood that environmental factors play a larger role in causing autism than previously thought and because they address modifiable risk factors that may open up avenues for the primary prevention of the disability associated with autism. In this review, we covered studies of autism and estimates of exposure to tobacco, air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and solvents, metals (from air, occupation, diet, dental amalgams, and thimerosal-containing vaccines), pesticides, and organic endocrine-disrupting compounds such as flame retardants, non-stick chemicals, phthalates, and bisphenol A. We included studies that had individual-level data on autism, exposure measures pertaining to pregnancy or the 1st year of life, valid comparison groups, control for confounders, and adequate sample sizes. Despite the inherent error in the measurement of many of these environmental exposures, which is likely to attenuate observed associations, some environmental exposures showed associations with autism, especially traffic-related air pollutants, some metals, and several pesticides, with suggestive trends for some volatile organic compounds (e.g., methylene chloride, trichloroethylene, and styrene) and phthalates. Whether any of these play a causal role requires further study. Given the limited scope of these publications, other environmental chemicals cannot be ruled out, but have not yet been adequately studied. Future research that addresses these and additional environmental chemicals, including their most common routes of exposures, with accurate exposure measurement pertaining to several developmental windows, is essential to guide efforts for the prevention of the neurodevelopmental damage that manifests in autism symptoms. PMID:25199954

  10. Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provides lack of evidence for epidemiological peak of infection.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Wasley, Jeff; Esler, Daniel N.; Stalknecht, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling of sea ducks for influenza A viruses in Alaska during winter provided no evidence for an epidemiologic peak of infection. Isolates were recovered, however, that provide information on viral diversity and dispersal that may not be realized through sampling efforts focused on other avian taxa.

  11. Intensive Care Unit Outcomes Among Patients With Lung Cancer in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare Registry

    PubMed Central

    Slatore, Christopher G.; Cecere, Laura M.; LeTourneau, Jennifer L.; O'Neil, Maya E.; Duckart, Jonathan P.; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Farjah, Farhood; Cooke, Colin R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Intensive care unit (ICU) use among patients with cancer is increasing, but data regarding ICU outcomes for patients with lung cancer are limited. Patients and Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) –Medicare registry (1992 to 2007) to conduct a retrospective cohort study of patients with lung cancer who were admitted to an ICU for reasons other than surgical resection of their tumor. We used logistic and Cox regression to evaluate associations of patient characteristics and hospital mortality and 6-month mortality, respectively. We calculated adjusted associations for mechanical ventilation receipt with hospital and 6-month mortality. Results Of the 49,373 patients with lung cancer admitted to an ICU for reasons other than surgical resection, 76% of patients survived the hospitalization, and 35% of patients were alive 6 months after discharge. Receipt of mechanical ventilation was associated with increased hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 6.95; 95% CI, 6.89 to 7.01; P < .001), and only 15% of these patients were alive 6 months after discharge. Of all ICU patients with lung cancer, the percentage of patients who survived 6 months from discharge was 36% for patients diagnosed in 1992 and 32% for patients diagnosed in 2005, whereas it was 16% and 11% for patients who received mechanical ventilation, respectively. Conclusion Most patients with lung cancer enrolled in Medicare who are admitted to an ICU die within 6 months of admission. To improve patient-centered care, these results should guide shared decision making between patients with lung cancer and their clinicians before an ICU admission. PMID:22473159

  12. Molecular understanding of lung cancers-A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chinnappan Ravinder; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence, particularly epidemiologic evidence of overall lung cancer burden in the world. And molecular understanding of lung cancer at various levels by dominant and suppressor oncogenes. PMID:25183110

  13. The epidemiology of bovine respiratory disease: What is the evidence for preventive measures?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jared D.; Fulton, Robert W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Step, Douglas L.; Confer, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most common and costly disease of beef cattle in North America. Despite extensive research, industry practices are often more informed by dogma than by fact. Frequently advocated interventions, including vaccination, various processing procedures, and nutritional manipulation, have limited impact on morbidity and mortality. Evidence for use of oral antimicrobials, either in feed or water, appears to be equivocal. In contrast, preconditioning and metaphylaxis have significant scientific evidence of efficacy, with weaning prior to sale potentially being the most important component of preconditioning. The inability to reach more definitive conclusions in preventing BRD may be attributable to difficulties in investigating the disease. Study challenges include potential for extensive confounding, tremendous variability, the multi-factorial nature of the disease, and inadequate methods for diagnosis. PMID:21358927

  14. European Working Time Directive and doctors’ health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Škerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Setting Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. Participants The total number of participants was 14 338. Primary and secondary outcome measures Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. Conclusions LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or ‘dose–response’ relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy

  15. Nutrition, dietary interventions and prostate cancer: the latest evidence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hwa; Aronson, William; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains a leading cause of mortality in US men and the prevalence continues to rise world-wide especially in countries where men consume a 'Western-style' diet. Epidemiologic, preclinical and clinical studies suggest a potential role for dietary intake on the incidence and progression of PCa. 'This minireview provides an overview of recent published literature with regard to nutrients, dietary factors, dietary patterns and PCa incidence and progression. Low carbohydrates intake, soy protein, omega-3 (w-3) fat, green teas, tomatoes and tomato products and zyflamend showed promise in reducing PCa risk or progression. A higher saturated fat intake and a higher β-carotene status may increase risk. A 'U' shape relationship may exist between folate, vitamin C, vitamin D and calcium with PCa risk. Despite the inconsistent and inconclusive findings, the potential for a role of dietary intake for the prevention and treatment of PCa is promising. The combination of all the beneficial factors for PCa risk reduction in a healthy dietary pattern may be the best dietary advice. This pattern includes rich fruits and vegetables, reduced refined carbohydrates, total and saturated fats, and reduced cooked meats. Further carefully designed prospective trials are warranted. PMID:25573005

  16. Bisphosphonates and evidence for association with esophageal and gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Ellen; Schofield, Peter T; Molokhia, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Concerns have been raised about a possible link between bisphosphonate use, and in particular alendronate, and upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer. A number of epidemiological studies have been published with conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies, to determine the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in users of bisphosphonates compared with non-users. Design We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for studies investigating bisphosphonates and esophageal or gastric cancer. We calculated pooled ORs and 95% CIs for the risk of esophageal or gastric cancer in bisphosphonate users compared with non-users. We performed a sensitivity analysis of alendronate as this was the most common single drug studied and is also the most widely used in clinical practice. Results 11 studies (from 10 papers) examining bisphosphonate exposure and UGI cancer (gastric and esophageal), met our inclusion criteria. All studies were retrospective, 6/11 (55%) case–control and 5/11(45%) cohort, and carried out using data from 5 longitudinal clinical databases. Combining 5 studies (1 from each database), we found no increased risk, OR 1.11 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.27) of esophageal cancer in bisphosphonate users compared with non-users and no increased risk of gastric cancer in bisphosphonate users, OR 0.96 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.12). Conclusion This is the fourth and most detailed meta-analysis on this topic. We have not identified any compelling evidence for a significantly raised risk of esophageal cancer or gastric cancer in male and female patients prescribed bisphosphonates. PMID:26644118

  17. Epidemiology of road traffic accidents during pleasure travelling: the evidence from the Island of Crete.

    PubMed

    Petridou, E; Askitopoulou, H; Vourvahakis, D; Skalkidis, Y; Trichopoulos, D

    1997-09-01

    score there was no difference in the probability of death or the likelihood for admission to intensive care unit between Greek and foreign nationals. Road traffic accidents are a major hazard during pleasure travelling and victims of such accidents among travellers have a distinct epidemiologic profile compared with accidents of a similar nature among locals. PMID:9316716

  18. Human Rhinovirus Infections in Rural Thailand: Epidemiological Evidence for Rhinovirus as Both Pathogen and Bystander

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Alicia M.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Olsen, Sonja J.; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Chantra, Somrak; Baggett, Henry C.; Erdman, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe human rhinovirus (HRV) detections in SaKaeo province, Thailand. Methods From September 1, 2003–August 31, 2005, we tested hospitalized patients with acute lower respiratory illness and outpatient controls without fever or respiratory symptoms for HRVs with polymerase chain reaction and molecularly-typed select HRVs. We compared HRV detection among hospitalized patients and controls and estimated enrollment adjusted incidence. Results HRVs were detected in 315 (16%) of 1919 hospitalized patients and 27 (9.6%) of 280 controls. Children had the highest frequency of HRV detections (hospitalized: <1 year: 29%, 1–4 year: 29%, ≥65 years: 9%; controls: <1 year: 24%, 1–4 year: 14%, ≥65 years: 2.8%). Enrollment adjusted hospitalized HRV detection rates were highest among persons aged <1 year (1038/100,000 persons/year), 1–4 years (457), and ≥65 years (71). All three HRV species were identified, HRV-A was the most common species in most age groups including children aged <1 year (61%) and all adult age groups. HRV-C was the most common species in the 1–4 year (51%) and 5–19 year age groups (54%). Compared to controls, hospitalized adults (≥19 years) and children were more likely to have HRV detections (odds ratio [OR]: 4.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5, 15.8; OR: 2.0, CI: 1.2, 3.3, respectively) and hospitalized children were more likely to have HRV-A (OR 1.7, CI: 0.8, 3.5) or HVR-C (OR 2.7, CI: 1.2, 5.9) detection. Conclusions HRV rates were high among hospitalized children and the elderly but asymptomatic children also had substantial HRV detection. HRV (all species), and HRV-A and HRV-C detections were epidemiologically-associated with hospitalized illness. Treatment or prevention modalities effective against HRV could reduce hospitalizations due to HRV in Thailand. PMID:21479259

  19. Epidemiology, incidence and mortality of lung cancer and their relationship with the development index in the world

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mehtarpour, Mojtaba; Khani, Farah; Hesami, Sayed Mohammadali; Shamlou, Reza; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Moini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of lung cancer is seen in North America and the lowest incidence in central Africa. Socioeconomic factors of inequality reflect regional disparities in human development. Due to the importance of awareness about incidence and mortality of lung cancer in health programming and the possible role of the human development index (HDI), this study was done with the aim to investigate the epidemiology of lung cancer in the world and its relationship with HDI. Methods The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components). Data about the age-specific incidence and mortality rate (ASR) for every country in 2012 were getting from the global cancer project. To analyze data, correlation tests between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components were employed with a significance level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Lung cancer with standardized incidence rate (ASIR) and standardized mortality rate (ASMR), equal to 23.1 and 19.7 (in 100,000 people), respectively. The highest and lowest values of mortality incidence ratio (MIR) for lung cancer due to continents division were 0.93 and 0.71 for Eastern Africa and Australia/New Zealand, respectively. Univariate analysis showed significant relationship (P<0.0001) between ASIR and ASMR with life expectancy at birth and mean years of schooling. Conclusions The highest MIR for lung cancer was for medium human development countries. Linear regression analysis showed a reverse significant relationship between MIR and HDI. PMID:27293825

  20. Weight Fluctuation and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Komaroff, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate if weight fluctuation is an independent risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (PBC) among women who gained weight in adult years. Methods. NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study (NHEFS) database was used in the study. Women that were cancers-free at enrollment and diagnosed for the first time with breast cancer at age 50 or greater were considered cases. Controls were chosen from the subset of cancers-free women and matched to cases by years of follow-up and status of body mass index (BMI) at 25 years of age. Weight fluctuation was measured by the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) from a simple linear regression model for each woman with their body mass index (BMI) regressed on age (started at 25 years) while women with the positive slope from this regression were defined as weight gainers. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. Results. A total of 158 women were included into the study. The conditional logistic regression adjusted for weight gain demonstrated positive association between weight fluctuation in adult years and postmenopausal breast cancers (odds ratio/OR = 1.67; 95% confidence interval/CI: 1.06–2.66). Conclusions. The data suggested that long-term weight fluctuation was significant risk factor for PBC among women who gained weight in adult years. This finding underscores the importance of maintaining lost weight and avoiding weight fluctuation. PMID:26953120

  1. Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Trends of Breast Cancer in Chinese Patients During 1993 to 2013: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Si, Wen; Li, Ying; Han, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yingzhe; Li, Ying; Linghu, Rui Xia; Zhang, Xingyang; Yang, Junlan

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to summarize the epidemiological and pathological trends of breast cancer in Chinese women.The clinical data of 4968 breast cancer patients treated at the Chinese PLA General Hospital from 1993 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed.The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 47.4 ± 11.3 years before the year 2001, 49.2 ± 11.2 years during 2001 to 2010, and 50.6 ± 11.4 years after the year 2010, respectively (P < 0.001). The ratio of premenopausal women to postmenopausal women was 1.6 and no significant changes were found during the period (P = 0.121). The proportion of patients with Scarff Bloom Richardson III breast cancer showed significant increase along with time (P = 0.015). The breast cancer was accounting for 31.7% at stage I and DCIS/LCIS and tend to be diagnosed with early stage around time (P < 0.001). The proportion of DCIS/LCIS and stage I increased with time during the 20 years from 14.6% to 33.2%, whereas the proportion of stage III to IV decreased.The proportion of Luminal A-like subtype gradually reduced and Luminal B-like (HER2-negative) increased and developed to the predominant type. Older age and earlier stage at diagnosis, as well as the alternation of predominant molecular subtypes, have become the developed trends of breast cancer. PMID:26131834

  2. Tumor-based case-control studies of infection and cancer: muddling the when and where of molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Wacholder, Sholom; Katki, Hormuzd A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    We describe the "tumor-based case-control" study as a type of epidemiologic study used to evaluate associations between infectious agents and cancer. These studies assess exposure using diseased tissues from affected individuals (i.e., evaluating tumor tissue for cancer cases), but they must utilize nondiseased tissues to assess control subjects, who do not have the disease of interest. This approach can lead to exposure misclassification in two ways. First, concerning the "when" of exposure assessment, retrospective assessment of tissues may not accurately measure exposure at the key earlier time point (i.e., during the etiologic window). Second, concerning the "where" of exposure assessment, use of different tissues in cases and controls can have different accuracy for detecting the exposure (i.e., differential exposure misclassification). We present an example concerning the association of human papillomavirus with various cancers, where tumor-based case-control studies likely overestimate risk associated with infection. In another example, we illustrate how tumor-based case-control studies of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer underestimate risk. Tumor-based case-control studies can demonstrate infection within tumor cells, providing qualitative information about disease etiology. However, measures of association calculated in tumor-based case-control studies are prone to over- or underestimating the relationship between infections and subsequent cancer risk. PMID:25063520

  3. Solitary pulmonary nodule and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Part 1: epidemiology, morphological evaluation and cancer probability*

    PubMed Central

    Mosmann, Marcos Pretto; Borba, Marcelle Alves; de Macedo, Francisco Pires Negromonte; Liguori, Adriano de Araujo Lima; Villarim Neto, Arthur; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2016-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule corresponds to a common radiographic finding, which is frequently detected incidentally. The investigation of this entity remains complex, since characteristics of benign and malignant processes overlap in the differential diagnosis. Currently, many strategies are available to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodules with the main objective of characterizing benign lesions as best as possible, while avoiding to expose patients to the risks inherent to invasive methods, besides correctly detecting cases of lung cancer so as the potential curative treatment is not delayed. This first part of the study focuses on the epidemiology, the morfological evaluation and the methods to determine the likelihood of cancer in cases of indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodule. PMID:26929459

  4. Childhood exposure to ultraviolet radiation and harmful skin effects: Epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Green, Adèle C.; Wallingford, Sarah C.; McBride, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    We review the general amount and patterns of exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation that children and teenagers experience and the spectrum of UV-related skin damage that can occur as a result. Data about the amount of solar UV received by children and teenagers are relatively few but suggest that around 40–50% of total UV to age 60 occurs before age 20. Among white children, those with the palest complexions suffer the most damage. Comparisons of prevalence and incidence of outcomes in children and teenagers sharing common ancestry, but living at different latitudes, show that prevalence rates of photoaging and melanocytic naevi are higher in Australian compared with British children, and similarly for melanoma. Genetic risk for the majority of the melanomas in teens is a function of genes controlling naevus propensity and pigmentation in the skin. High numbers of naevi and freckles, red hair, blue eyes, inability to tan, as well as a family history are the primary determinants of melanoma among adolescents. Beyond the signs of skin damage seen in children are the latent effects observed later in adulthood. Childhood is believed to be a susceptible window for long-term harmful effects of UV, as evidenced by clear differences in skin cancer risk between child and adult migrants from high to low latitudes. Effective UV radiation protection from childhood is necessary to control both immediate and long-term harmful effects on children’s skin. PMID:21907230

  5. Role of Inflammation and Immunity in Hypertension: Recent Epidemiological, Laboratory, and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Caillon, Antoine; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation has been shown to play an important role in the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Accordingly, innate and adaptive immune responses participate in blood pressure elevation. Here, we describe recent immunity studies focusing on novel inflammatory mechanisms during the hypertensive process. Different subpopulations of cells involved in innate and adaptive immune responses, such as monocyte/macrophages and dendritic cells on the one hand and B and T lymphocytes on the other hand, play roles leading to vascular injury in hypertension. Innate lymphoid cells, including natural killer cells and γ/δ T cells, have recently been demonstrated to participate in hypertensive mechanisms triggering vascular inflammation. In summary, we discuss the evidence of interaction of these different inflammatory and immune components in both experimental models and in humans during the development of hypertension. PMID:26846785

  6. Identical twins in forensic genetics - Epidemiology and risk based estimation of weight of evidence.

    PubMed

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Morling, Niels

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the number of forensic genetic loci used for identification purposes results in infinitesimal random match probabilities. These probabilities are computed under assumptions made for rather simple population genetic models. Often, the forensic expert reports likelihood ratios, where the alternative hypothesis is assumed not to encompass close relatives. However, this approach implies that important factors present in real human populations are discarded. This approach may be very unfavourable to the defendant. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects concerning the closest familial relationship, i.e., identical (monozygotic) twins, when reporting the weight of evidence. This can be done even when the suspect has no knowledge of an identical twin or when official records hold no twin information about the suspect. The derived expressions are not original as several authors previously have published results accounting for close familial relationships. However, we revisit the discussion to increase the awareness among forensic genetic practitioners and include new information on medical and societal factors to assess the risk of not considering a monozygotic twin as the true perpetrator. If accounting for a monozygotic twin in the weight of evidence, it implies that the likelihood ratio is truncated at a maximal value depending on the prevalence of monozygotic twins and the societal efficiency of recognising a monozygotic twin. If a monozygotic twin is considered as an alternative proposition, then data relevant for the Danish society suggests that the threshold of likelihood ratios should approximately be between 150,000 and 2,000,000 in order to take the risk of an unrecognised identical, monozygotic twin into consideration. In other societies, the threshold of the likelihood ratio in crime cases may reach other, often lower, values depending on the recognition of monozygotic twins and the age of the suspect. In general, more strictly kept

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  8. Laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery: Current evidence and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy has been widely accepted as a standard alternative for the treatment of early-stage gastric adenocarcinoma because of its favorable short-term outcomes. Although controversies exist, such as establishing clear indications, proper preoperative staging, and oncologic safety, experienced surgeons and institutions have applied this approach, along with various types of function-preserving surgery, for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. With technical advancement and the advent of state-of-the-art instruments, indications for laparoscopic gastrectomy are expected to expand as far as locally advanced gastric cancer. Laparoscopic gastrectomy appears to be promising; however, scientific evidence necessary to generalize this approach to a standard treatment for all relevant patients and care providers remains to be gathered. Several multicenter, prospective randomized trials in high-incidence countries are ongoing, and results from these trials will highlight the short- and long-term outcomes of the approach. In this review, we describe up-to-date findings and critical issues regarding laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer. PMID:26811620

  9. Protocol of a Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS): a prospective, clinical and epidemiological study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Cho, Belong; Hwang, Yunji; Choi, June Young; Kim, Su-jin; Choi, Hoonsung; Choi, Ho-Chun; An, Ah Reum; Park, Do Joon; Park, Sue K; Youn, Yeo-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroid cancer incidence in Korea is the highest in the world and has recently increased steeply. However, factors contributing to this sudden increase have not been fully elucidated, and few studies have explored the postoperative prognosis. The Thyroid Cancer Longitudinal Study (T-CALOS) was initiated with three aims: (1) to identify factors predicting quality of life, recurrence, and incidence of other diseases after thyroid cancer treatments; (2) to investigate environmental exposure to radiation, toxicants and molecular factors in relation to tumour aggressiveness; and (3) to evaluate gene–environment interactions that increase thyroid cancer in comparison with healthy participants from a pool of nationwide population-based healthy examinees. Methods and analysis T-CALOS enrols patients with incident thyroid cancer from three general hospitals, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and National Medical Center, Korea. The study is an ongoing project expecting to investigate 5000 patients with thyroid cancer up until 2017. Healthy examinees with a normal thyroid confirmed by sonography have been enrolled at the Healthy Examination Center at Seoul National University Hospital. We are also performing individual matching using two nationwide databases that are open to the public. Follow-up information is obtained at patients’ clinical visits and by linkage to the national database. For statistical analysis, we will use conditional logistic regression models and a Cox proportional hazard regression model. A number of stratifications and sensitivity analyses will be performed to confirm the results. Ethics and dissemination Based on a large sample size, a prospective study design, comprehensive data collection and biobank, T-CALOS has been independently peer-reviewed and approved by the three hospitals and two funding sources (National Research Foundation of Korea and Korean Foundation for Cancer Research

  10. Mouthwash use and cancer of the head and neck: a pooled analysis from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo; Hayes, Richard B; Sartori, Samantha; Lee, Yuan-Chin A; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew; Winn, Deborah M; Castellsagué, Xavier; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Chen, Chu; Schwartz, Stephen M; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Purdue, Mark; Koifman, Sergio; Curado, Maria P; Vilensky, Marta; Gillison, Maura; Fernandez, Leticia; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guopei; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Haddad, Robert I; La Vecchia, Carlo; Hashibe, Mia

    2016-07-01

    Most mouthwashes contain alcohol, a known cause of head and neck cancer (oral cavity, pharynx, larynx), likely through the carcinogenic activity of acetaldehyde, formed in the oral cavity from alcohol. We carried out a pooled analysis of 8981 cases of head and neck cancer and 10 090 controls from 12 case-control studies with comparable information on mouthwash use in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of mouthwash use with cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx, adjusting for study, age, sex, pack-years of tobacco smoking, number of alcoholic drinks/day, and education. Compared with never users of mouthwash, the odds ratio (OR) of all head and neck cancers was 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94-1.08] for ever users, based on 12 studies. The corresponding ORs of cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx were 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.23) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.06-1.56), respectively. OR for all head and neck cancer was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.01-1.30) for use for more than 35 years, based on seven studies (P for linear trend=0.01), and OR 1.31 (95% CI: 1.09-1.58) for use more than one per day, based on five studies (P for linear trend <0.001). Although limited by the retrospective nature of the study and the limited ability to assess risks of mouthwash use in nonusers of tobacco and alcohol, this large investigation shows potential risks for head and neck cancer subsites and in long-term and frequent users of mouthwash. This pooled analysis provides the most precise estimate of the association between mouthwash use and head and neck cancer. PMID:26275006

  11. Epidemiologic contributions to recent cancer trends among HIV-infected people in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A.; Shiels, Meredith S.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Engels, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected people have elevated risk for some cancers. Changing incidence of these cancers over time may reflect changes in three factors: HIV population demographic structure (e.g. age distribution), general population (background) cancer rates, and HIV-associated relative risks. We assessed the contributions of these factors to time trends for 10 cancers during 1996–2010. Design Population-based registry linkage study. Methods We applied Poisson models to data from the U.S. HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study to estimate annual percent changes (APCs) in incidence rates of AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs: Kaposi sarcoma (KS), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and cervical cancer) and 7 non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs). We evaluated HIV-infected cancer trends with and without adjustment for demographics, trends in background rates, and trends in standardized incidence ratios (SIRs, to capture relative risk). Results Cancer rates among HIV-infected people rose over time for anal (APC 3.8%), liver (8.5%), and prostate (9.8%) cancers, but declined for KS (1996–2000: −29.3%; 2000–2010: −7.8%), NHL (1996–2003: −15.7%; 2003–2010: −5.5%), cervical cancer (−11.1%), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, −4.0%), and lung cancer (−2.8%). Breast and colorectal cancer incidence did not change over time. Based on comparison to adjusted models, changing demographics contributed to trends for KS and breast, colorectal, liver, lung, and prostate cancers (all p<0.01). Trends in background rates were notable for liver (APC 5.6%) and lung (−3.2%) cancers. SIRs declined for ADCs, HL (APC −3.2%), and lung cancer (−4.4%). Conclusions Demographic shifts influenced several cancer trends among HIV-infected individuals. Falling relative risks largely explained ADC declines, while background incidence contributed to some NADC trends. PMID:24300545

  12. Evidence-based planning and costing palliative care services for children: novel multi-method epidemiological and economic exemplar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Children’s palliative care is a relatively new clinical specialty. Its nature is multi-dimensional and its delivery necessarily multi-professional. Numerous diverse public and not-for-profit organisations typically provide services and support. Because services are not centrally coordinated, they are provided in a manner that is inconsistent and incoherent. Since the first children’s hospice opened in 1982, the epidemiology of life-limiting conditions has changed with more children living longer, and many requiring transfer to adult services. Very little is known about the number of children living within any given geographical locality, costs of care, or experiences of children with ongoing palliative care needs and their families. We integrated evidence, and undertook and used novel methodological epidemiological work to develop the first evidence-based and costed commissioning exemplar. Methods Multi-method epidemiological and economic exemplar from a health and not-for-profit organisation perspective, to estimate numbers of children under 19 years with life-limiting conditions, cost current services, determine child/parent care preferences, and cost choice of end-of-life care at home. Results The exemplar locality (North Wales) had important gaps in service provision and the clinical network. The estimated annual total cost of current children’s palliative care was about £5.5 million; average annual care cost per child was £22,771 using 2007 prevalence estimates and £2,437- £11,045 using new 2012/13 population-based prevalence estimates. Using population-based prevalence, we estimate 2271 children with a life-limiting condition in the general exemplar population and around 501 children per year with ongoing palliative care needs in contact with hospital services. Around 24 children with a wide range of life-limiting conditions require end-of-life care per year. Choice of end-of-life care at home was requested, which is not currently

  13. Child-rearing and adult leukemia: Epidemiologic evidence in support of competing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.G. ); Severson, R.K. . Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study); Heuser, L. )

    1988-05-01

    The hypothesis that lack of child-rearing increases the risk of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) in adults was examined in a case-control study in western Washington State. Among 159 study subjects over age 50 in 1985, there were 76 cases of ANLL and 83 controls. The crude odds ratio associated with lack of child-rearing was 1.8, with a 95% confidence range of 0.7 to 5.0. The average total number of children ever living with cases was 2.6 and with controls was 3.1 (p = 0.06). The mean total number of years living with a child, or children, under age 18 was 17.6 in cases and 20.2 in controls (p = 0.05). These results were not materially altered after adjustment for age, smoking, race, income, and sex. The data provide evidence that cases of ANLL were less likely to ever have had children and that fewer years were spent rearing children than were spent by controls. The hypothesis was based on the competing stem cell'' theory of hematopoietic ontogeny. If valid, then exposure to children would increase exposure to infection, leading to increased lymphocytic stem cell turnover, and decreased non-lymphocytic stem cell turnover. This, in turn, may reduce risk of ANLL in adults. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms and psychosis: Epidemiological evidence from a population survey in England.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Steven; Thompson, Andrew; Bebbington, Paul; Singh, Swaran P; Freeman, Daniel; Winsper, Catherine; Broome, Matthew R

    2015-09-30

    Despite both having some shared features, evidence linking psychosis and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is sparse and inconsistent. Hypotheses tested were (1) adult ADHD symptoms are associated with auditory hallucinations, paranoid ideation and psychosis (2) links between ADHD symptoms and psychosis are m