Science.gov

Sample records for cancer local recurrence

  1. Re-irradiation for locally recurrent refractory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Tomas; Tran, William T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report an analysis of treatment outcomes of a cohort of patients re-irradiated for locally recurrent refractory breast cancer (LRRBC) Patients and Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 47 women (mean age = 60 years) were re-irradiated for LRRBC. Outcomes were measured using Kaplan-Meier log rank to compare curves and Cox regression for multivariate analysis. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), time to re-treatment, survival without systemic progression, and survival without local recurrence. Results Fifty-six instances of re-irradiation were completed and analyzed. The mean cumulative 2 Gy equivalent dose (EQD2) to the whole breast and tumour cavity (α/β = 3) was 99.8 Gy and 109.1 Gy, respectively. Most patients initially had significant symptoms before RT due to local recurrence. The median time to re-treatment and to systemic failure was 41 and 50 months, respectively. Median follow-up for OS was 17 months and OS was 0.73 (SE = 0.07) at 1 year and 0.67 (SE = 0.07) at 2 years. Local control was 0.62 (SE = 0.07) and 0.5 (0.08) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute radiation dermatitis was G1-2, G3 and G4 in 45, 4 and 1 cases, respectively. One patient presented with necrosis. The most common long term toxicity was G3 fibrosis (n = 4) and telangiectatic changes (n = 3). Multivariable analysis indicated that skin involvement (Hazard Ratio = 6.6 (1.4-31), p = 0.016) and time to local recurrence <2yr (HR 3.1 (1.04-9.7) p = 0.042) predicted local recurrence. Conclusion High dose re-irradiation is feasible for locally RRBC. This approach can have a significant benefit in this very high-risk group. PMID:26459388

  2. [Salvage 125I brachytherapy of locally recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gesztesi, László; Ágoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Gődény, Mária; Andi, Judit; Lengyel, Zsolt; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to report a case of salvage low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy in a patient with locally recurrent prostate cancer, four years after his first treatment with combined external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A 61-year-old man was treated with 1x10 Gy HDR brachytherapy and a total of 60 Gy EBRT for an organ confined intermediate risk carcinoma of the prostate in 2009. The patient's tumor had been in regression with the lowest PSA level of 0.09 ng/ml, till the end of 2013. After slow but continuous elevation, his PSA level had reached 1.46 ng/ml by February 2014. Pelvis MRI and whole body acetate PET/CT showed recurrent tumor in the dorsal-right region of the prostate. Bone scan was negative. After discussing the possible salvage treatment options with the patient, he chose LDR brachytherapy. In 2014, in spinal anesthesia 21 125I "seeds" were implanted with transrectal ultrasound guidance into the prostate. The prescribed dose to the whole prostate was 100 Gy, to the volume of the recurrent tumor was 140 Gy. The patient tolerated the salvage brachytherapy well. The postimplant dosimetry was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography (MR-CT) fusion and appeared satisfactory. PSA level decreased from the pre-salvage value of 1.46 ng/ml to 0.42 ng/ml by one month and 0.18 ng/ml by two months after the brachytherapy. No gastrointestinal side effects appeared, the patient's urination became slightly more frequent. In selected patients, salvage LDR brachytherapy can be a good choice for curative treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer, after primary radiation therapy. Multiparametric MRI is fundamental, acetate PET/CT can play an important role when defining the localization of the recurrent tumor. PMID:25260087

  3. Hyperthermotherapy for postoperative local recurrences of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Hizuta, A; Iwagaki, H; Makihata, E; Asaumi, J; Nishikawa, K; Gao, X S; Nakagawa, T; Togami, I; Takeda, Y

    1993-08-01

    Between November 1984 and August 1992 we used hyperthermotherapy in six cases of local recurrence of rectal cancer. Hyperthermotherapy was performed on the average 8.7 times (range: 3-18) for each patient for 60 min each. All patients underwent combined radiotherapy and received a mean radiation dose of 42.5 Gy (range: 9-60 Gy). Five patients underwent heating within 1 h after irradiation and one patient simultaneously with the irradiation. Four patients underwent combined chemotherapy and two patients immunotherapy. Before the treatment all patients had painful lesions, but pain decreased posttherapeutically in five patients. Performance status improved in two patients. High carcinoembryonic antigen levels prior to the therapy in four patients decreased in all cases after treatment. Posttherapeutical computed tomograms revealed only minor response or no changes. After the treatment, four patients died of exacerbations of recurrent tumors and one patient of distant metastases. The patient who underwent simultaneous radiohyperthermotherapy is presently alive, in August 1992, 38 months after initiation of the treatment. The 50% survival time after initiation of the treatment was 25 months (range: 10-38 months). Hyperthermotherapy combined with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy was useful for the alleviation of pain in patients who developed local recurrence after surgery, and improved survival after recurrences can be expected. PMID:8213219

  4. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

  5. Salvage of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Hoppe, Bradford S; Nichols, Romaine C; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2014-08-01

    Although a significant proportion of patients with localized prostate cancer are cured after definitive radiotherapy, solitary local recurrence is observed in a subset of patients and poses a management challenge. Curative-intent treatment options include prostatectomy, reirradiation, cryotherapy, and high-intensity-focused ultrasound. Outcomes data after any of these options are relatively limited. The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival rate is approximately 50% after salvage prostatectomy. However, the morbidity rate of the procedure is significantly higher compared with that observed in previously untreated patients. The likelihood of cure after low dose rate brachytherapy is similar to that observed after salvage prostatectomy, and the morbidity, although significant is less. Although cryotherapy and high-intensity-focused ultrasound may be less morbid than a prostatectomy, the probability of cure is probably lower. PMID:22772432

  6. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  7. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  8. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Edler, David; Syk, Erik; Hallbook, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Results Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Conclusion Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence. PMID:27104167

  9. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  10. Surgery for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: Tips, Tricks, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Satish K; Heriot, Alexander G; Lynch, Andrew Craig

    2016-06-01

    Rectal cancer can recur locally in up to 10% of the patients who undergo definitive resection for their primary cancer. Surgical salvage is considered appropriate in the curative setting as well as select cases with palliative intent. Disease-free survival following salvage resection is dependent upon achieving an R0 resection margin. A clear understanding of applied surgical anatomy, appropriate preoperative planning, and a multidisciplinary approach to aggressive soft tissue, bony, and vascular resection with appropriate reconstruction is necessary. Technical tips, tricks, and pitfalls that may assist in managing these cancers are discussed and the roles of additional boost radiation and intraoperative radiation therapy in the management of such cancers are also discussed. PMID:27247536

  11. Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  12. Techniques and Outcome of Surgery for Locally Advanced and Local Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced primary rectal cancer is variably defined, but generally refers to T3 and T4 tumours. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment for these tumours but there is a high-risk for local recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2011) guidelines recommend that patients with these tumours be considered for preoperative chemoradiotherapy and this is the starting point for any discussion, as it is standard care. However, there are many refinements of this pathway and these are the subject of this overview. In surgical terms, there are two broad settings: (i) patients with tumours contained within the mesorectal envelope, or in the lower rectum, limited to invading the sphincter muscles (namely some T2 and most T3 tumours); and (ii) patients with tumours directly invading or adherent to pelvic organs or structures, mainly T4 tumours - here referred to as primary rectal cancer beyond total mesorectal excision (PRC-bTME). Major surgical resection using the principles of TME is the mainstay of treatment for the former. Where anal sphincter sacrifice is indicated for low rectal cancers, variations of abdominoperineal resection - referred to as tailored excision - including the extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), are required. There is debate whether or not plastic reconstruction or mesh repair is required after these surgical procedures. To achieve cure in PRC-bTME tumours, most patients require extended multivisceral exenterative surgery, carried out within specialist multidisciplinary centres. The surgical principles governing the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer (RRC) parallel those for PRC-bTME, but typically only half of these patients are suitable for this type of major surgery. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality are considerable after surgery for PRC-bTME and RRC, but unacceptable levels of variation in clinical practice and outcome exist globally. To address this, there are now major efforts to standardise

  13. DOES ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND IMPROVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY RECURRENT ANAL SQUAMOUS CELL CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie Y.; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Guillem, Jose G.; Nash, Garrett M.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult due to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. Objective To compare the effectiveness of digital rectal exam and endoscopic ultrasound during routine follow-up of anal cancer patients in detecting locally recurrent disease. Design Retrospective, single-institution review Settings Oncologic tertiary referral center Patients 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous cell cancer without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy who had at least one post-treatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. Main Outcome Measures First modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Results 855 endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal exams were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital exam detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital exam. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital exam in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE 0.08, 95% CI 0.21-0.54) and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. Limitations The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and exams is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Conclusions Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for routine surveillance. PMID:25585077

  14. Trastuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  15. [Problems with topical use of Mohs paste for local recurrence of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Keiko; Kurashita, Kaname; Murai, Michiko; Miyara, Kyuichiro

    2010-09-01

    Recently, several reports have been made concerning topical use of Mohs paste for local recurrence of breast cancer tumors. Since January 2008, after the introduction of Mohs paste for palliation in patients with local recurrences of breast cancer, we have encountered some problems such as pain, draining off of the paste and ulceration of the lesion. In this study, we have reported the advantages and disadvantage of using Mohs paste, the difference in the procedure depending on the purpose, and the management of problems. When using Mohs paste for the purpose of palliative therapy, these side effects are problems we should not ignore to prevent patient pain. PMID:20841950

  16. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  17. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermal Therapy for Localized and Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, David A; Kawashima, Akira; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2015-11-01

    The advent of focal therapies theoretically offers new treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. The goal of prostate cancer treatment is effective long-term cure with minimal impact on health-related quality of life. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate is being increasingly used for diagnosis, image-guided targeted biopsy, guidance for targeted focal and regional therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of treatments for prostate cancer of all stages. In this article, the use of prostate MRI in the burgeoning domain of thermal ablative therapy for localized and recurrent prostate cancer is reviewed. PMID:26499278

  18. Risk factors for local recurrence after en bloc endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Cho, Kwang Bum; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Yoon Suk; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors related to recurrence following en bloc resection using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). METHODS: A total of 1121 patients (1215 lesions) who had undergone ESD for gastric neoplasia between April 2003 and May 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Data from 401 patients (415 lesions) were analyzed, following the exclusion of those who underwent piecemeal resection, with deep resection margin invasion or lateral margin infiltration, and diagnosed with benign lesions. RESULTS: Local recurrence after en bloc ESD was found in 36 cases (8.7%). Unclear resection margins, long procedure times, and narrow safety margins were identified as risk factors for recurrence. Lesions located in the upper third of the stomach showed a higher rate of recurrence than those located in the lower third of the stomach (OR = 2.9, P = 0.03). The probability of no recurrence for up to 24 mo was 79.9% in those with a safety resection margin ≤ 1 mm and 89.5% in those with a margin > 1 mm (log-rank test, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Even in cases in which en bloc ESD is performed for EGC, local recurrence still occurs. To reduce local recurrences, more careful assessment will be needed prior to the implementation of ESD in cases in which the tumor is located in the upper third of the stomach. In addition, clear identification of tumor boundaries as well as the securing of sufficient safety resection margins will be important. PMID:27076871

  19. Isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer following mastectomy: Radiotherapeutic management

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, K.J.; Perez, C.A.; Kuske, R.R.; Garcia, D.M.; Simpson, J.R.; Fineberg, B. )

    1990-10-01

    Two hundred twenty-four patients with their first, isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer were irradiated with curative intent. Patients who had previous chest wall or regional lymphatic irradiation were not included in the study. With a median follow-up of 46 months (range 24 to 241 months), the 5- and 10-year survival for the entire group were 43% and 26%, respectively. Overall, 57% of the patients were projected to be loco-regionally controlled at 5 years. The 5-year local-regional tumor control was best for patients with isolated chest wall recurrences (63%), intermediate for nodal recurrences (45%), and poor for concomitant chest wall and nodal recurrences (27%). In patients with solitary chest wall recurrences, large field radiotherapy encompassing the entire chest wall resulted in a 5- and 10-year freedom from chest wall re-recurrence of 75% and 63% in contrast to 36% and 18% with small field irradiation (p = 0.0001). For the group with recurrences completely excised, tumor control was adequate at all doses ranging from 4500 to 7000 cGy. For the recurrences less than 3 cm, 100% were controlled at doses greater than or equal to 6000 cGy versus 76% at lower doses. No dose response could be demonstrated for the larger lesions. The supraclavicular failure rate was 16% without elective radiotherapy versus 6% with elective radiotherapy (p = 0.0489). Prophylactic irradiation of the uninvolved chest wall decreased the subsequent re-recurrence rate (17% versus 27%), but the difference is not statistically significant (p = .32). The incidence of chest wall re-recurrence was 12% with doses greater than or equal to 5000 cGy compared to 27% with no elective radiotherapy, but again was not statistically significant (p = .20). Axillary and internal mammary failures were infrequent, regardless of prophylactic treatment.

  20. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  1. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  2. Feasibility of laparoscopic cytoreduction in patients with localized recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chel Hun; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of laparoscopic cytoreduction in patients with localized recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) by comparing its outcomes to those of laparotomy. Methods We performed retrospective analysis in 79 EOC patients who had a localized single recurrent site, as demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography/CT scan; had no ascites; were disease-free for 12 or more months prior; and who had undergone secondary cytoreduction (laparoscopy in 31 patients, laparotomy in 48 patients) at Samsung Medical Center between 2002 and 2013. By reviewing the electronic medical records, we investigated the patients’ baseline characteristics, surgical characteristics, and surgical outcomes. Results There were no statistically significant differences between laparoscopy and laparotomy patients in terms of age, body mass index, cancer antigen 125 level, tumor type, initial stage, grade, recurrence site, type of procedures used in the secondary cytoreduction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and disease-free interval from the previous treatment. With regards to surgical outcomes, reduced operating time, shorter hospital stay, and less estimated blood loss were achieved in the laparoscopy group. Complete debulking was achieved in all cases in the laparoscopy group. Conclusion The laparoscopic approach is feasible without compromising morbidity and survival in selected groups of patients with recurrent EOC. The laparoscopic approach can be a possible treatment option for recurrent EOC. PMID:27029745

  3. 6.3 MeV fast neutrons in the treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikaya, V. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Lisin, V. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 135 breast cancer patients (70 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer and 65 patients with locally advanced breast cancer with unfavorable prognostic factors) who received the neutron therapy alone or in combination with the photon therapy. The neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of patients with locally advanced and locally recurrent breast cancer. The 8-year survival rate in patients without repeated breast cancer recurrence was 87.6 ± 8.7% after the neutron and neutron-photon therapy and 54.3 ± 9.2% after the electron beam therapy.

  4. Photodynamic therapy trials with lutetium texaphyrin (Lu-Tex) in patients with locally recurrent breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Yuen, Alan R.; Panella, Timothy J.; Wieman, Thomas J.; Dougherty, Shona; Esserman, Laura; Panjehpour, Masoud; Taber, Scott W.; Fingar, Victor H.; Lowe, Elizabeth; Engel, Julie S.; Lum, Bert; Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Miller, Richard A.

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of locally recurrent breast cancer has been limited to treatment of small lesions because of non- selective necrosis of adjacent normal tissues in the treatment field. Lutetium Texaphyrin (PCI-0123, Lu-Tex) is a photosensitizer with improved tumor localization that is activated by 732 nm light, which can penetrate through larger tumors. We have evaluated Lu-Tex in a Phase I trial and in an ongoing Phase II trial in women with locally recurrent breast cancer with large tumors who have failed radiation therapy. Patients received Lu-Tex intravenously by rapid infusion 3 hours before illumination of cutaneous or subcutaneous lesions. In Phase I, Lu-Tex doses were escalated from 0.6 to 7.2 mg/kg in 7 cohorts. Sixteen patients with locally recurrent breast cancer lesions were treated. Dose limiting toxicities above 5.5 mg/kg were pain in the treatment field during therapy, and dysesthesias in light exposed areas. No necrosis of normal tissues in the treated field was noticed. Responses were observed in 60% of evaluable patients [n equals 15, 27% complete remission (CR), 33% partial remission (PR)], with 63% of lesions responding (n equals 73: 45% CR, 18% PR). In Phase II, 25 patients have been studied to date, receiving two treatments ranging from 1.0 to 3.0 mg/kg at a 21 day interval. Treatment fields up to 480 cm2 in size were treated successfully and activity has been observed. Patients have experienced pain at the treatment site but no tissue necrosis. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of Lu-Tex PDT to large chest wall areas in women who have failed radiation therapy for the treatment of locally recurrent breast cancer. Treatment conditions are currently being optimized in the ongoing Phase II trials.

  5. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  6. Loss of TIMP-1 immune expression and tumor recurrence in localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Iscaife, Alexandre; Pontes, José; Dip, Nelson; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Guimarães, Vanessa Ribeiro; Santana, Isaque; Nahas, William Carlos; Srougi, Miguel; Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Overexpression of MMPs has been related to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TIMP1 and TIMP2 are controllers of MMPs and the aim of this study is to evaluate the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray of localized prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods: Immune-expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP1, TIMP-2, MMP-14 and IL8, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy specimens of 40 patients with localized PC who underwent surgery between September 1997 and February 2000. Protein expression was considered as categorical variables, negative or positive. The results of the immune-expression were correlated to Gleason score (GS), pathological stage (TNM), pre-operatory PSA serum levels and biochemical recurrence in a mean follow up period of 92.5 months. Results: The loss of TIMP1 immune-expression was related to biochemical recurrence. When TIMP1 was negative, 56.3% patients recurred versus 22.2% of those whose TIMP1 was positive (p=0.042). MMP-9, MMP-2, IL8 and MMP-14 were positive in the majority of PC. TIMP-2 was negative in all cases. Conclusion: Negative immune-expression of TIMP1 is correlated with biochemical recurrence in patients with PC possibly by failing to control MMP-9, an important MMP related to cancer progression. PMID:26742965

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for localization of prostate cancer in the setting of biochemical recurrence.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Colarieti, Anna; Salvo, Vincenzo; Cardone, Gianpiero; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical treatment is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer has increased over recent years, mainly for detection, staging, and active surveillance. However, suspicion of recurrence in the set of biochemical failure is becoming a significant reason for clinicians to request multiparametric MRI. Radiologists should be able to recognize the normal posttreatment MRI findings. Fibrosis and atrophic remnant seminal vesicles (SV) after radical prostatectomy are often found and must be differentiated from local relapse. Moreover, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and focal therapies tend to diffusely decrease the signal intensity of the peripheral zone on T2-weighted images due to the loss of water content, consequently mimicking tumor and hemorrhage. The combination of T2-weighted images and functional studies like diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging improves the identification of local relapse. Tumor recurrence tends to restrict on diffusion images and avidly enhances after contrast administration. The authors provide a review of the normal findings and the signs of local tumor relapse after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and focal therapies. PMID:27012939

  8. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  9. Salvage HIFU for biopsy confirmed local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rittberg, Rebekah; Kroczak, Tadeusz; Fleshner, Neil; Drachenberg, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment option for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and more recently has been used as salvage therapy after failed radiation therapy. We present a case of local recurrence with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and salvage external beam radiation therapy with salvage HIFU without biochemical recurrence at 20 months. PMID:26425239

  10. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  11. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  12. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  13. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  14. Genetic variants in the Hippo pathway predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2015-01-01

    While localized prostate cancer is potentially curative, many patients still show biochemical recurrence (BCR) after curative treatments such as radical prostatectomy (RP). The Hippo pathway has recently been shown to be an evolutionarily conserved regulator of tissue growth, and its perturbation can trigger tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Hippo pathway may influence clinical outcomes in localized prostate cancer patients. We genotyped 53 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from seven core Hippo pathway genes in 246 localized prostate cancer patients treated with RP. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify significant SNPs that correlated with BCR. For replication, five associated SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 212 patients. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic factors, the association between STK3 rs7827435 and BCR (P = 0.018) was replicated in the second stage (P = 0.026; Pcombined = 0.001). Additional integrated in silico analysis provided evidence that rs7827435 affects STK3 expression, which in turn is significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. In conclusion, genetic variants of the Hippo pathway contribute to the variable outcomes of prostate cancer, and the discovery of these biomarkers provides a molecular approach for prognostic risk assessment. PMID:25707771

  15. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  16. Cicatricial Fibromatosis Diagnosis after Suspected Local Recurrence at the Bronchial Stump Following Lobectomy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wan Jin; Lee, Yeiwon; Jung, Soo Young; Yeh, Daewook; Park, Soon Hyo; Yoon, Yoo Sang

    2016-01-01

    A mass excision surrounding the bronchial stump was performed to exclude malignancy in a 42-year-old man who had undergone a right lower lobectomy for lung cancer. The mass was identified as a cicatricial fibroma. Cicatricial fibromatosis, which is desmoid fibromatosis that arises in a surgical scar, is a well-known clinical condition. It consists of histologically benign neoplasms. Their occurrence after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Biopsy or excision of suspicious lesions is very important for diagnosis. R0 resection remains the principal outcome for intra-thoracic desmoid fibromatosis. We report that a cicatricial fibromatosis in the subcarinal space was removed after suspicion of local recurrence at the bronchial stump follwing lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27064987

  17. Cicatricial Fibromatosis Diagnosis after Suspected Local Recurrence at the Bronchial Stump Following Lobectomy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wan Jin; Lee, Yeiwon; Jung, Soo Young; Yeh, Daewook; Park, Soon Hyo; Yoon, Yoo Sang

    2016-04-01

    A mass excision surrounding the bronchial stump was performed to exclude malignancy in a 42-year-old man who had undergone a right lower lobectomy for lung cancer. The mass was identified as a cicatricial fibroma. Cicatricial fibromatosis, which is desmoid fibromatosis that arises in a surgical scar, is a well-known clinical condition. It consists of histologically benign neoplasms. Their occurrence after thoracic surgery is extremely rare. Biopsy or excision of suspicious lesions is very important for diagnosis. R0 resection remains the principal outcome for intra-thoracic desmoid fibromatosis. We report that a cicatricial fibromatosis in the subcarinal space was removed after suspicion of local recurrence at the bronchial stump follwing lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27064987

  18. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy as Reirradiation for Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Kwang-Won; Jang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jung, So-Lyoung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Yoo, Eun-Jung; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Jang, Hong-Seok; Chung, Su-Mi; Kim, Yeon-Sil

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We report early preliminary experience with CyberKnife radiosurgery (RS) as salvage treatment for locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 36 patients (44 sites) were treated with CyberKnife RS as reirradiation for locally recurrent HNC. Treatment sites were as follows: nasopharynx (8), maxillary sinus (8), neck lymph nodes (8), skull base (7), nasal cavity (4), retropharyngeal lymph nodes (3), orbit (2), and others (4). Total doses administered were 18-40 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions to the 65%-85% isodose line for 3-5 consecutive days. Previous external radiation dose ranged from 39.6 to 134.4 Gy (median, 70.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 114.9 cm{sup 3} (median, 22.6 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up was 17.3 months. Results: Thirty-five of 44 sites were evaluated for response. Fifteen (42.9%) sites achieved complete response, 13 sites (37.1%) achieved a partial response, 3 (8.6%) sites maintained stable disease, and 4 sites (11.4%) showed tumor progression. Grade III acute complications were noted in 13 patients. Late complications were observed in three patients (1 bone necrosis, 2 soft tissue necrosis) during follow-up. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective treatment modality as a salvage treatment with good short-term local control. The early overall response rate is encouraging. However, more experience and a longer follow-up are necessary to determine the role of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery as a salvage treatment of locally recurrent HNC and to define long-term complications.

  19. Outcomes of pelvic exenteration for recurrent or primary locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwa Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Seo, Ho Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes of pelvic exenteration for patients with primary locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACRC) or locally recurrent colorectal cancer (LRCRC), and to identify clinically relevant prognostic factors. Methods Between January 2001 and December 2010, 40 consecutive patients with primary LACRC or LRCRC underwent pelvic exenteration at the National Cancer Center, Republic of Korea. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records. Results The median age was 59 years and the median follow-up time was 26 months (range, 1-117 months). The overall complication and in-hospital mortality rates were 70% (28/40) and 7.5% (3/40), respectively. The complication rates were similar between patients with primary LACRC (69.6%) and those with LRCRC (70.6%). The overall recurrence rate was 50% (17/34), and was lower in patients with primary LACRC than in patients with LRCRC (33.3% vs. 76.9%, P = 0.032). The 5-year overall survival was significantly different between primary LACRC and patients with LRCRC (58.7% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.022). Multivariate analysis revealed that radicality (R0 vs. R1/R2) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P = 0.020). Conclusion The complication and operative mortality rates of pelvic exenteration remained high, but pelvic exenteration might provide an opportunity for long-term survival and good local control. Complete (R0) resection was the only independent prognostic factor for overall survival. PMID:26366382

  20. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, Michael G.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  1. Erlotinib Plus Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-21

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  2. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Toi, Ants; Taback, Nathan; Evans, Andrew; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles; Menard, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  3. Chk1 phosphorylated at serine345 is a predictor of early local recurrence and radio-resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsubhi, Nouf; Middleton, Fiona; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Stephens, Peter; Doherty, Rachel; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul M; Chan, Stephen Y T; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O; Martin, Stewart G; Curtin, Nicola J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage activates the DNA damage response (DDR). DDR up-regulation may predict radio-resistance and increase the risk of early local recurrence despite radiotherapy in early stage breast cancers. In 1755 early stage breast cancers, DDR signalling [ATM, ATR, total Ckh1, Chk1 phosphorylated at serine(345) (pChk1), Chk2, p53], base excision repair [PARP1, POLβ, XRCC1, FEN1, SMUG1], non-homologous end joining (Ku70/Ku80, DNA-PKcs) and homologous recombination [RAD51, BRCA1, γH2AX, BLM, WRN, RECQL5, PTEN] protein expression was correlated to time to early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitization by inhibition of Chk1 activation by ATR inhibitor (VE-821) and inhibition of Chk1 (V158411) were investigated in MDA-MB-231 (p53 mutant) and MCF-7 (p53 wild-type) breast cancer cells. In the whole cohort, 208/1755 patients (11.9%) developed local recurrence of which 126 (61%) developed local recurrence within 5 years of initiation of primary therapy. Of the 20 markers tested, only pChk1 and p53 significantly associated with early local recurrence (p value = 0.015 and 0.010, respectively). When analysed together, high cytoplasmic pChk1-nuclear pChk1 (p = 0.039), high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.004) and high nuclear pChk1-p53 (p = 0.029) co-expression remain significantly linked to early local recurrence. In multivariate analysis, cytoplasmic pChk1 level independently predicted early local recurrence (p = 0.025). In patients who received adjuvant local radiotherapy (n = 949), p53 (p = 0.014) and high cytoplasmic pChk1-p53 (p = 0.017) remain associated with early local recurrence. Pre-clinically, radio-sensitisation by VE-821 or V158411 was observed in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and was more pronounced in MCF-7 cells. We conclude that pChk1 is a predictive biomarker of radiotherapy resistance and early local recurrence. PMID:26459098

  4. Radiosensitization of Chemotherapy-Refractory, Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer With Trastuzumab: A Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Janet K.; Halle, Jan; Ferraro, Madlyn; Carey, Lisa; Moore, Dominic T.; Ollila, David; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Trastuzumab (Herceptin), an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody, has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer in preclinical studies. The present Phase II trial evaluated trastuzumab plus radiotherapy in patients with HER2-positive, chemotherapy-refractory, locally advanced or locoregionally recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had measurable disease, normal cardiac function, and biopsy-confirmed residual HER2-positive disease. Patients received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg intravenously), concurrent with radiotherapy (50 Gy) to the breast and regional lymph nodes for 5 weeks. If feasible, surgery followed radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety, and the secondary endpoint was efficacy (pathologic response and interval to symptomatic local progression). Results: Of the 19 patients enrolled, 7 were ineligible and received radiotherapy alone and 12 received therapy per protocol. Of these 12 patients, 11 had a Stage T4 diagnosis. Grade 3 toxicities included skin (n = 2) and lymphopenia (n = 1). One patient experienced delayed wound healing after surgery. No patients developed symptomatic cardiac dysfunction. Of the 7 patients who had undergone mastectomy, 3 (43%) had a substantial pathologic response (complete response or microscopic residual disease), significantly more than a comparison cohort (2 of 38 or 5%, p = .02). The median interval to symptomatic local progression was not reached. The median overall survival was 39 months. Conclusion: This is the first prospective trial providing evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of trastuzumab in breast cancer. The combination of trastuzumab and radiotherapy was well tolerated.

  5. Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Detect Local Tumor Recurrence in Primary Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Park, Ji Eun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failures in head and neck cancer patients are mainly related to locoregional tumor recurrence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of model-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to detect local recurrence during the surveillance of head and neck cancer patients.Our retrospective study enrolled 24 patients with primary head and neck cancer who had undergone definitive treatment. Patients were grouped into local recurrence (n = 12) or posttreatment change (n = 12) groups according to the results of biopsy or clinicoradiologic follow-up. The types of time-signal intensity (TSI) curves were classified as follows: "progressive increment" as type I, "plateau" as type II, and "washout" as type III. TSI curve types and their parameters (i.e., wash-in, Emax, Tmax, area under the curve [AUC]60, AUC90, and AUC120) were compared between the 2 study groups.The distributions of TSI curve types for local recurrence versus posttreatment change were statistically significant (P < 0.001) (i.e., 0% vs 83.3% for type I, 58.3% vs 16.7% for type II, and 41.7% vs 0% for type III). There were statistically significant differences in Emax, Tmax, and all of the AUC parameters between 2 groups (P < 0.0083 [0.05/6]). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses indicated that the TSI curve type was the best predictor of local recurrence with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 73.5-100.0) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 51.6-97.9) (cutoff with type II).Model-free DCE-MRI using TSI curves and TSI curve-derived parameters detects local recurrence in head and neck cancer patients with a high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27175712

  6. Time-programmed DCA and oxaliplatin release by multilayered nanofiber mats in prevention of local cancer recurrence following surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyun; Liu, Shi; Qi, Yanxin; Zhou, Dongfang; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2016-08-10

    Local recurrence following surgery in cancer treatment remains a major clinical challenge. To increase antitumor activity but maintain toxicity in an acceptable level in prevention of local cancer recurrence, we demonstrated a dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats strategy, in which DCA and oxaliplatin were co-electrospun into the distinct layer of resultant fabrics and the oxaliplatin-loaded fibers layer was sealed between the basement film layer and other two fibers layers. The dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats exhibit time-programmed dual release behavior and synergistic effect upon cancer cells. Nontoxic DCA selectively promotes apoptosis of cancer cells through modulating cellular metabolism, and oxaliplatin subsequently kills the remained cancer cells in a low concentration. After implantation on the resection margin of cervical carcinoma on a murine model, the dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats displayed enhanced anti-recurrence efficacy and decreased side toxic effects over 30days compared with drug-loaded monolayered fiber mats. The time-programmed combination of DCA and oxaliplatin within multilayered nanofiber mats appears to be a promising strategy for local cancer treatment following resection. PMID:27221069

  7. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  8. Dosimetric analysis of isocentrically shielded volumetric modulated arc therapy for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tian; Xing, Lei; Chang, Daniel T.; Peng, Xun; Xie, Liang-Xi; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Li, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dosimetric characteristics of an isocentrically shielded RapidArc (IS-RA) technique for treatment of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer (lrNPC). In IS-RA, the isocenter was placed at the center of the pre-irradiated brainstem (BS)/spinal cord (SC) and the jaws were set to shield the BS/SC while ensuring the target coverage during the whole gantry rotation. For fifteen patients, the IS-RA plans were compared with the conventional RapidArc (C-RA) regarding target coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing and monitor units (MUs). The relationship between the dose reduction of BS/SC and some geometric parameters including the angle extended by the target with respect to the axis of BS/SC (Ang_BSSC), the minimum distance between the target and BS/SC (Dist_Min) and the target volume were evaluated. The IS-RA reduced the BS/SC doses by approximately 1–4 Gy on average over the C-RA, with more MUs. The IS-RA demonstrated similar target coverage and sparing of other OARs except for slightly improved sparing of optic structures. More dose reduction in the isocentric region was observed in the cases with larger Ang_BSSC or smaller Dist_Min. Our results indicated that the IS-RA significantly improves the sparing of BS/SC without compromising dosimetric requirements of other involved structures for lrNPC. PMID:27173670

  9. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. Sadetsky, Natalia; Chen, M.-H.; Carroll, Peter R.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  10. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  11. State-of-the-Art Treatment and Novel Agents in Local and Distant Recurrences of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tempfer, Clemens B; Beckmann, Matthias W

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the stage at initial presentation, cervical cancer will recur in 25-61% of women. Typical manifestations of recurrent cervical cancer include the central pelvis and the pelvic side walls as well as retroperitoneal lymph node basins in the pelvis and the para-aortic region, and - more rarely - supraclavicular lymph nodes. There are no typical symptoms of recurrent cervical cancer. Women with suspected recurrence after cervical cancer based on gynecological examination or organ-specific symptoms must undergo imaging studies and - if technically feasible - biopsy with histological verification, especially in cases of distant metastases, in order to rule out a second primary. Radiotherapy-naïve women should be treated with salvage radiochemotherapy with curative intention. For women with previous radiotherapy, surgery in the form of hysterectomy, local resection, or pelvic exenteration is the treatment of choice. Pelvic exenteration can lead to cure in selected patients, but at the price of a high rate of complications and significant morbidity and mortality. If complete surgical resection is not feasible or if the woman is not a candidate for surgery, chemotherapy with palliative intent should be offered. Patients with recurrent disease outside the pelvis are candidates for systemic chemotherapy. Several agents have shown to be active in this situation, either in single-agent or combination regimens. Platinum-containing regimens have a superior efficacy over non-platinum regimens and bevacizumab may be added to chemotherapy. PMID:27614445

  12. A Case Report of Local Recurrence Developing 24 Years After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer Recurrence From Breast Cancer After 24 Years

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Linlin; Hu, Xudong; Wang, Suzhen; Yong-Sheng, Gao; Yu, Qingxi; Gao, Song; Zhang, Hui; Wei, Yuchun; Zhao, Qian; Yuan, Shuang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Breast cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer, in which most patients’ metastases (about 75%) occurred in 5 years after the initial diagnosis, especially in 3 years. Recrudescence exceeding 20 years is rarely reported in the past several decades. Case information: A 68-year-old female patient presented with breast cancer in which 3 focal increased 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the right supraclavicular lymph node, the mediastinum and sternum were found on positron emission tomography and computed tomography. Then we learned that the patient had suffered from breast cancer and been given a right-sided mastectomy 24 years ago. Histopathology from the mediastinum revealed metastatic, moderately differentiated breast adenomatous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: We report this late recurrence of breast cancer 24 years following mastectomy, suggesting that possible recurrence of this disease with a 24-year latency period should be taken into consideration. PMID:27258518

  13. Chest Reirradiation With External Beam Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2011-07-15

    Lung cancer remains one of the most prevalent and deadliest malignancies worldwide. For 2008, the International Agency for the Research of Cancer (IARC) estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases of lung cancer (1.095 million in men and 0.514 million in women), with an associated 1.38 million deaths (0.95 million in men and 0.43 million in women). In the United States, lung cancer remained the number one cancer killer for both sexes in 2009, with 219,440 new cases diagnosed overall and an estimated 159,390 deaths. Recent biological and technological advances in lung cancer management notwithstanding, disease recurrence is still the dominant cause of death after initial treatment of lung cancer. This is irrespective of histology (NSCLC vs. small cell cancer), stage (early vs. locally advanced vs. metastatic), or initial treatment (surgery, RT, chemotherapy [CHT] or combinations thereof). Time to recurrence of lung cancer is not predictable, with some failures appearing early and others manifesting years later. Patterns of failure are also not easily anticipated as local (e.g., lung parenchyma, bronchial stump, or chest wall), regional (e.g., mediastinal lymph nodes), or distant (e.g., brain, liver, or bone) recurrences can appear alone or in combination. Whatever the presentation, recurrent lung cancer has historically been judged almost universally fatal as only rarely did efforts at treatment lead to control, let alone cure. More importantly, recurrence is often associated with significant distress requiring substantial supportive treatment. Recurrence leads ultimately to a significant decrease in patient quality of life, making further interventions even more limited. Because of the bleak outcome associated with recurrence, palliative retreatment has nonetheless often been attempted precisely as a means of preventing this decline in quality of life and/or reversing symptoms. However, complicating these attempts at retreatment has been the forms of initial therapy

  14. Tenascin-C expression in invasion border of early breast cancer: a predictor of local and distant recurrence.

    PubMed Central

    Jahkola, T.; Toivonen, T.; Virtanen, I.; von Smitten, K.; Nordling, S.; von Boguslawski, K.; Haglund, C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Blomqvist, C.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated an association between distant metastasis and the expression of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (Tn-C) in the invasion border of small axillary node-negative breast carcinomas. Our purpose was to assess the relationship between the expression of Tn-C in the tumour invasion border and several histopathological and biological variables and to compare their usefulness in predicting local and distant disease recurrences. The original patient group consisted of 143 women with axillary node-negative breast cancer (one bilateral) treated with breast-conserving surgery and post-operative radiotherapy, and followed for a median of 8 years. Because of the small number of recurrences an additional group of 15 similarly treated women with recurrent breast cancer was also studied. The size of the tumour, its histology, including a possible intraductal component, and grade were re-evaluated. The expression of erbB-2, p53, Ki-67 and Tn-C was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Ploidy and S-phase fraction (SPF) were assessed by flow cytometry. The only statistically significant prognostic factor for local recurrence was Tn-C expression in the invasion border. For metastasis Ki-67 positivity, tumour size and Tn-C expression in the invasion border were statistically significant, but Ki-67 positivity was the only independent prognostic factor. Tn-C expression in the invasion border was associated with a higher proliferation rate measured by Ki-67 and SPF, which is consistent with the suggested growth-promoting activity of Tn-C. Tn-C may be a useful marker in selecting patients for adjuvant therapies to reduce the rate of both local and distant cancer recurrences. Images Figure 1 PMID:9836485

  15. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  16. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  19. Telomere length variation in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor: potential biomarker for breast cancer local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Meeker, Alan K.; Makambi, Kepher H.; Kosti, Ourania; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.S.; Sidawy, Mary K.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the risk of local recurrence (LR) will facilitate therapeutic decision making in the management of early breast cancers. In the present study, we investigated whether telomere length in the normal breast epithelial cells surrounding the tumor is predictive of breast cancer LR; 152 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center were included in this nested case–control study. Cases (patients had LR) and controls (patients had no LR) were matched on year of surgery, age at diagnosis and type of surgery. Telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to determine the telomere length using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded breast tissues. Small telomere length variation (TLV), defined as the coefficient variation of telomere lengths among examined cells, in normal epithelial cells adjacent to the tumor was significantly associated with a 5-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.2–22.2) increased risk of breast cancer LR. When the subjects were categorized into quartiles, a significant inverse dose–response relationship was observed with lowest versus highest quartile odds ratio of 15.3 (Ptrend = 0.012). Patients who had large TLV had significantly better 10 year recurrence free survival rate compared with patients who had small TLV (80 versus 33%). The present study revealed that TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor is a strong predictor of breast cancer LR. If confirmed by future studies, TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor has the potential to become a promising biomarker for predicting breast cancer LR after breast conserving surgery. PMID:22072619

  20. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  1. Completion pneumonectomy and chemoradiotherapy as treatment options in local recurrence of non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sławiński, Grzegorz; Musik, Martyna; Marciniak, Łukasz; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Piwkowski, Cezary; Gałęcki, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The selection of treatment for local recurrence in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) depends on the possibility of performing a radical tumor resection, the patient's performance status, and cardiopulmonary efficiency. Compared with chemoradiotherapy, surgical treatment offers a greater chance of long-term survival, but results in completion pneumonectomy and is associated with a relatively high rate of complications. Aim of the study Aim of the study was to evaluate early and long-term results of surgery and conservative treatment (chemoradiotherapy) in patients with local NSCLC recurrence. Material and methods Between 1998 and 2011, 1697 NSCLC patients underwent lobectomy or bilobectomy at the Department of Thoracic Surgery in Poznań. Among them, 137 patients (8.1%) were diagnosed with cancer recurrence; chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy was provided to 116 patients; 21 patients (15.3%) were treated with completion pneumonectomy. The median time from primary surgery to recurrence was 13.4 months. No metastases to N2 lymph nodes were observed among the patients undergoing surgery; in 7 patients N1 lymph node metastases were confirmed. Results The rate of complications after surgery was significantly higher in comparison with conservative therapy (80.9% vs. 48.3%). Patients treated with surgery were most likely to suffer from complications associated with the circulatory system (80.9%), while hematologic complications were dominant in the group undergoing oncological treatment (41.4%). There were no perioperative deaths after completion pneumonectomy. The age of the patients was the only factor which significantly influenced the incidence of complications in both groups of patients. Analysis of the survival curves demonstrated statistically significant differences in survival between the groups treated with surgery, chemoradiotherapy, and chemotherapy (p = 0.00001). Five-year survival probability was significantly higher among patients

  2. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Bin; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen, Lili; Lang, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigates (1) local tumor control and (2) normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1) control (n = 10), (2) conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10), and (3) PLDR (n = 10). Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10) or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10). Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P < .05). The PLDR results were slightly better than conventional RT (8% difference in the mean tumor volume; P > .05). For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05), respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques. PMID:26675811

  3. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  4. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  5. Intermittent versus continuous androgen deprivation for locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in older men in the United States (USA) and Western Europe. Androgen deprivation (AD) constitutes, in most cases, the first-line of treatment for these cases. The negative impact of CAD in quality of life, secondary to the adverse events of sustained hormone deprivation, plus the costs of this therapy, motivated the intermittent treatment approach. The objective of this study is to to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials that compared the efficacy and adverse events profile of intermittent versus continuous androgen deprivation for locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Methods Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The endpoints were overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), time to progression (TTP) and adverse events. We performed a meta-analysis (MA) of the published data. The results were expressed as Hazard Ratio (HR) or Risk Ratio (RR), with their corresponding 95% Confidence Intervals (CI 95%). Results The final analysis included 13 trials comprising 6,419 patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. TTP was similar in patients who received intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) or continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) (fixed effect: HR = 1.04; CI 95% = 0.96 to 1.14; p = 0.3). OS and CSS were also similar in patients treated with IAD or CAD (OS: fixed effect: HR = 1.02; CI 95% = 0.95 to 1.09; p = 0.56 and CSS: fixed effect: HR = 1.06; CI 95% = 0.96 to 1.18; p = 0.26). Conclusion Overall survival was similar between IAD and CAD in patients with locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Data on CSS are weak and the benefits of IAD on this outcome remain uncertain. Impact in QoL was similar for both groups, however, sexual activity scores were higher and the incidence of hot flushes was lower in

  6. Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  7. Immune Adjuvant Activity of Pre-Resectional Radiofrequency Ablation Protects against Local and Systemic Recurrence in Aggressive Murine Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Fumito; Ku, Amy W.; Bucsek, Mark J.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Vardam-Kaur, Trupti; Kim, Minhyung; Fisher, Daniel T.; Camoriano, Marta; Khoury, Thaer; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While surgical resection is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, local and distant recurrences continue to adversely affect outcome in a significant proportion of patients. Evidence that an alternative debulking strategy involving radiofrequency ablation (RFA) induces antitumor immunity prompted the current investigation of the efficacy of performing RFA prior to surgical resection (pre-resectional RFA) in a preclinical mouse model. Experimental Design Therapeutic efficacy and systemic immune responses were assessed following pre-resectional RFA treatment of murine CT26 colon adenocarcinoma. Results Treatment with pre-resectional RFA significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival compared to sham surgery, RFA, or resection alone. Mice in the pre-resectional RFA group that achieved a complete response demonstrated durable antitumor immunity upon tumor re-challenge. Failure to achieve a therapeutic benefit in immunodeficient mice confirmed that tumor control by pre-resectional RFA depends on an intact adaptive immune response rather than changes in physical parameters that make ablated tumors more amenable to a complete surgical excision. RFA causes a marked increase in intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration, thus substantially enhancing the ratio of CD8+ effector T cells: FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Importantly, pre-resectional RFA significantly increases the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and tumor-draining lymph node but had no impact on infiltration by myeloid-derived suppressor cells, M1 macrophages or M2 macrophages at tumor sites or in peripheral lymphoid organs (i.e., spleen). Finally, pre-resectional RFA of primary tumors delayed growth of distant tumors through a mechanism that depends on systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Conclusion Improved survival and antitumor systemic immunity elicited by pre-resectional RFA support the translational potential of this neoadjuvant

  8. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Skye Hongiun . E-mail: skye@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Horng, C.-F.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Tsou, M.-H.; Tsai, Stella Y.; Chen, C.-M.; Jian, James J.; Liu, M.-C.; West, Mike; Huang, Andrew T.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. {>=}4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size.

  9. A case report of surgical resections with local and systemic chemotherapy for three recurrences of colon cancer occurring ten years after colectomy.

    PubMed

    Miki, Hisanori; Tsunemi, Kozo; Toyoda, Masao; Senzaki, Hideto; Yonemura, Yutaka; Tsubura, Airo

    2012-05-01

    A 56-year-old Japanese woman who underwent a curative resection of ascending colon cancer at 43 years of age was found to have a tumor in her lower left abdominal cavity by computed tomography at 53 years of age. The tumor in the omentum was resected and identified as an adenocarcinoma compatible with metastasis from the primary ascending colon cancer. Although the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur uracil and calcium folinate, liver metastasis was detected 9 months after the first recurrence. A segmentectomy and hepatectomy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. A third recurrence was detected in the right abdominal cavity 7 months after the second surgery. The patient received 5 cycles of combination chemotherapy consisting of folinic acid, fluorouracil and irinotecan before the third operation. The metastatic tumor resection together with intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed, and histopathological findings indicated metastasis from the primary colon cancer. After the third surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5 cycles of folinic acid, fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. The patient is well with no evidence of recurrence 12 months after the third recurrence. This case suggests that colon cancer can be dormant for over 10 years and that long-term follow-up is required after curative resection. Aggressive local as well as systemic chemotherapy may be required for the management of colon cancer recurrence. PMID:23525503

  10. Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  12. BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: preliminary clinical experience from a phase I/II trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Wang, S J; Chu, P Y; Ho, C Y; Jiang, S H; Liu, Y W H; Liu, Y H; Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Chou, F I; Yen, S H; Lee, Y L; Chang, C W; Liu, C S; Chen, Y W; Ono, K

    2011-12-01

    To introduce our preliminary experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent Head and Neck cancer patients at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, four patients (M/F=3/1, median age 68 Y/O) were enrolled. BNCT with BPA (400 mg/kg) injected in 2 phases and prescription dose of 12-35 Gy (Eq.)/fraction for 2 fractions at 30 day interval can be given with sustained blood boron concentration and tolerable early toxicities for recurrent H & N cancer. PMID:21478023

  13. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ho, Ching-Yin; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chou, Fong-In; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Yen, Sang-Hue

    2014-06-01

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. PMID:24369888

  14. [Diagnosis and treatment of local recurrence of prostate cancer using hystoscanning and high-intensity focused ultrasound in patients after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Glybochko, P V; Aliaev, Iu G; Krupinov, G E; Rapoport, L M; Amosov, A V; Bezrukov, E A; Novichkov, N D; Lachinov, É L; Ganzha, T M; Obukhov, A A; Lerner, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the improvement of the diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PC). The study included 46 patients with recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RPE). The examination included contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (endorectal coil 1.5T) and hystoscanning. All patients had local recurrence confirmed by the morphologically results of transrectal biopsy of the area of vesicourethral anastomosis. All patients underwent high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Before RPE, protate volume ranged from 21 to 102 cm3. The median age was 62 (46-68) years. PSA levels before a HIFU session ranged from 0.4 to 18 ng/ml. Nadir PSA level after 3 months of follow up was 0.1 ng/ml. Five-year disease-free survival in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU in the group of low cancer risk was 10 (81%), moderate risk--18 (57%), high risk--12 (42%). Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and hystoscanning are highly informative methods for diagnosis of local recurrence after radical prostatectomy, and HIFU can be categorized as highly effective treatment. PMID:25807764

  15. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  16. Fluorescence-guided surgery, but not bright-light surgery, prevents local recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC)

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CEA-positive tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS + NAC; FGS only; and FGS + NAC. An anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via tail vein of mice with a pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was clearly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. Only one out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS only group and zero out of 8 mice had local recurrence in the FGS + NAC which was significantly lower than BLS only or BLS +NAC mice, where local disease recurred in 6 out of 8 mice in each treatment group (p = 0.041 and p = 0.007, respectively). NAC did not significantly reduce recurrence rates when combined with either FGS or BLS. These results indicate that FGS can significantly reduce local recurrence compared to BLS in pancreatic cancer resistant to NAC. PMID:25800176

  17. Extracapsular tumor spread and the risk of local, axillary and supraclavicular recurrence in node-positive, premenopausal patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, G.; Cole, B. F.; Castiglione-Gertsch, M.; Holmberg, S. B.; Lindtner, J.; Golouh, R.; Collins, J.; Crivellari, D.; Thürlimann, B.; Simoncini, E.; Fey, M. F.; Gelber, R. D.; Coates, A. S.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.; Viale, G.; Gusterson, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Extracapsular tumor spread (ECS) has been identified as a possible risk factor for breast cancer recurrence, but controversy exists regarding its role in decision making for regional radiotherapy. This study evaluates ECS as a predictor of local, axillary, and supraclavicular recurrence. Patients and methods: International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial VI accrued 1475 eligible pre- and perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer who were randomly assigned to receive three to nine courses of classical combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil. ECS status was determined retrospectively in 933 patients based on review of pathology reports. Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using methods for competing risks analysis. Adjustment factors included treatment group and baseline patient and tumor characteristics. The median follow-up was 14 years. Results: In univariable analysis, ECS was significantly associated with supraclavicular recurrence (HR = 1.96; 95% confidence interval 1.23–3.13; P = 0.005). HRs for local and axillary recurrence were 1.38 (P = 0.06) and 1.81 (P = 0.11), respectively. Following adjustment for number of lymph node metastases and other baseline prognostic factors, ECS was not significantly associated with any of the three recurrence types studied. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the decision for additional regional radiotherapy should not be based solely on the presence of ECS. PMID:18385202

  18. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHIACHIEN JAKE; YING, JAMES; KAPUR, PAYAL; WOHLFELD, BRYAN; ROEHRBORN, CLAUS; KIM, DONG W. NATHAN

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients. PMID:26870272

  19. PIK3CA mutations predict recurrence in localized microsatellite stable colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Gilles; Marisa, Laetitia; Boige, Valérie; Duval, Alex; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Milano, Gérard; Selves, Janick; Olschwang, Sylviane; Jooste, Valérie; le Legrain, Michè; Lecorre, Delphine; Guenot, Dominique; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Kirzin, Sylvain; Martin, Laurent; Lepage, Come; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    PIK3CA, which encodes the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3Kα, is one of the most frequently altered oncogenes in colon cancer (CC), but its prognostic value is still a matter of debate. Few reports have addressed the association between PIK3CA mutations and survival and their results are controversial. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the prognostic impact of PIK3CA mutations in stage I–III CC according to mismatch repair status. Fresh frozen tissue samples from two independent cohorts with a total of 826 patients who underwent curative surgical resection of CC were analyzed for microsatellite instability and screened for activating point mutations in exon 9 and 20 of PIK3CA by direct sequencing. Overall, 693 tumors (84%) exhibited microsatellite stability (MSS) and 113 samples (14%) harbored PIK3CA mutation. In the retrospective training cohort (n = 433), patients with PIK3CA-mutated MSS tumors (n = 47) experienced a significant increased 5-year relapse-free interval compared with PIK3CA wild-type MSS tumors (n = 319) in univariate analysis (94% vs. 68%, Log-rank P = 0. 0003) and in multivariate analysis (HR = 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.029–0.48; P = 0.0027). In the prospective validation cohort (n = 393), the favorable prognostic impact of PIK3CA mutations in MSS tumors (n = 327) was confirmed (83% vs. 67%, Log-rank P = 0.04). Our study showed that PIK3CA mutations are associated with a good prognosis in patients with MSS stage I–III CC. PMID:25641861

  20. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  1. [A Case of Unresectable Local Recurrence of Gastric Cancer Successfully Resected after Pre-Operative Chemotherapy with Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamazaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old man was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy (tubular adenocarcinoma, tub2, pT3N0M0, stageⅡA). Eight months after the surgery, recurrence on the anastomosis was observed. Tumor invasion of the aortic artery was suspected, and the patient was considered inoperable. He was treated with S-1/CDDP plus trastuzumab therapy as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen. After 4 courses of the chemotherapy, significant tumor reduction was observed, and the patient underwent anastomosis resection. Chemotherapy with trastuzumab appears to be an effective NAC treatment for HER2-positive, advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805275

  2. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Housman, Douglas; Yang Qifeng; Toppmeyer, Deborah; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted.

  3. Salvage Stereotactic Reirradiation With or Without Cetuximab for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Comet, Benedicte; Kramar, Andrew; Faivre-Pierret, Mathieu; Dewas, Sylvain; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Degardin, Marian; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lacornerie, Thomas; Lartigau, Eric F.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Normal tissues tolerance limits the use of reirradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers (HNC). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could offer precise irradiation while sparing healthy tissues. Results of a feasibility study using SBRT with or without cetuximab are reported for reirradiation of recurrent primary HNC. Methods and Materials: Patients with inoperable recurrent, or new primary tumor, in a previously irradiated area were included. Reirradiation dose was 36 Gy in six fractions of 6 Gy to the 85% isodose line covering 95% of the planning target volume. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma received concomitant cetuximab. Results: Between June 2007 and January 2010, 40 patients were prospectively treated for 43 lesions. Median age was 60 and median tumor size was 29 mm. Fifteen patients received concomitant cetuximab and 1 received concomitant cisplatin. Median follow-up was 25.6 months with 34 patients evaluable for tumor response. Median overall survival was 13.6 months and response rate was 79.4% (15 complete and 12 partial responses). Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 4 patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that short SBRT with or without cetuximab is an effective salvage treatment with good response rate in this poor prognosis population with previously irradiated HNC. Treatment is feasible and, with appropriate care to limiting critical structure, acute toxicities are acceptable. A prospective multicenter Phase II trial of SRT and concomitant cetuximab in recurrent HNC squamous cell carcinoma is ongoing.

  4. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  5. Two phase I dose-escalation/pharmacokinetics studies of low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) and mild local hyperthermia in heavily pretreated patients with local regionally recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Formenti, Silvia; Rugo, Hope; O’Connor, Brigid; Myerson, Robert; Stauffer, Paul; Hsu, I-Chow; Diederich, Chris; Straube, William; Boss, Mary-Keara; Boico, Alina; Craciunescu, Oana; Maccarini, Paolo; Needham, David; Borys, Nicholas; Blackwell, Kimberly L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Unresectable chest wall recurrences of breast cancer (CWR) in heavily pretreated patients are especially difficult to treat. We hypothesised that thermally enhanced drug delivery using low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD), given with mild local hyperthermia (MLHT), will be safe and effective in this population. Patients and methods This paper combines the results of two similarly designed phase I trials. Eligible CWR patients had progressed on the chest wall after prior hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Patients were to get six cycles of LTLD every 21–35 days, followed immediately by chest wall MLHT for 1 hour at 40–42 °C. In the first trial 18 subjects received LTLD at 20, 30, or 40 mg/m2; in the second trial, 11 subjects received LTLD at 40 or 50 mg/m2. Results The median age of all 29 patients enrolled was 57 years. Thirteen patients (45%) had distant metastases on enrolment. Patients had received a median dose of 256 mg/m2 of prior anthracyclines and a median dose of 61 Gy of prior radiation. The median number of study treatments that subjects completed was four. The maximum tolerated dose was 50 mg/m2, with seven subjects (24%) developing reversible grade 3–4 neutropenia and four (14%) reversible grade 3–4 leucopenia. The rate of overall local response was 48% (14/29, 95% CI: 30–66%), with. five patients (17%) achieving complete local responses and nine patients (31%) having partial local responses. Conclusion LTLD at 50 mg/m2 and MLHT is safe. This combined therapy produces objective responses in heavily pretreated CWR patients. Future work should test thermally enhanced LTLD delivery in a less advanced patient population. PMID:25144817

  6. Local recurrence of small cell lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation is induced by HIF-1α expression in the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JUN; WU, WEI; ZHANG, RENQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence of lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment is common. The aims of the present study were to assess how RFA treatment affects the growth of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) micrometastases in the transition zone (TZ) surrounding the ablated region and in the reference zones (RZs) of the ablated or unablated lobes and to identify the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer recurrence following RFA treatment. After lung micrometastases of human SCLCs had formed, RFA treatment was applied to the right upper lobe (RUL) of the lung in nude mice. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, proliferation and angiogenesis potential both in the TZ and RZ were evaluated over time. Separately, at day 1, 7 and 14 following RFA treatment, the growth of micrometastases showed an ~2-fold increase in the TZ compared to the RZ of the unablated lobe, as the right lower lobe (RLL) and the growth of micrometastases in the RZ of the RUL was also induced by RFA. In addition, accelerated tumor growth in the TZ was induced by HIF-1α, but was not associated with tissue angiogenesis potential. We concluded that local recurrences of SCLCs caused by overproliferation of micrometastases following RFA treatment were driven by HIF-1α, although angiogenesis was not the driving force in the TZ. PMID:26750332

  7. Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer Local Recurrence After Radiation Therapy Occurs at the Site of Primary Tumor: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Step-Section Pathology Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Pucar, Darko Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Drobnjak, Marija; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate cancer local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT) occurs at the site of primary tumor by retrospectively comparing the tumor location on pre-RT and post-RT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and using step-section pathology after salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) as the reference standard. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with intensity modulated RT (69-86.4 Gy), and had pre-RT and post-RT prostate MRI, biopsy-proven local recurrence, and SRP. The location and volume of lesions on pre-RT and post-RT MRI were correlated with step-section pathology findings. Tumor foci >0.2 cm{sup 3} and/or resulting in extraprostatic disease on pathology were considered clinically significant. Results: All nine significant tumor foci (one in each patient; volume range, 0.22-8.63 cm{sup 3}) were detected both on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and displayed strikingly similar appearances on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and step-section pathology. Two clinically insignificant tumor foci ({<=}0.06 cm{sup 3}) were not detected on imaging. The ratios between tumor volumes on pathology and on post-RT MRI ranged from 0.52 to 2.80. Conclusions: Our study provides a direct visual confirmation that clinically significant post-RT local recurrence occurs at the site of primary tumor. Our results are in agreement with reported clinical and pathologic results and support the current practice of boosting the radiation dose within the primary tumor using imaging guidance. They also suggest that monitoring of primary tumor with pre-RT and post-RT MRI could lead to early detection of local recurrence amenable to salvage treatment.

  8. Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2009-10-15

    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation. PMID:19582880

  9. Bortezomib Followed by the Addition of Doxorubicin at Disease Progression in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cancer) of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  10. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  12. Salvage concurrent radio-chemotherapy for post-operative local recurrence of squamous-cell esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the treatment outcome of salvage concurrent radio-chemotherapy for patients with loco-recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery. Methods 50 patients with loco-recurrent squamous-cell cancer after curative esophagectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were treated with radiotherapy (median 60 Gy) combined with chemotherapy consisting of either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus cisplatin (DDP) (R-FP group) or paclitaxel plus DDP (R-TP group). Results The median follow-up period was 16.0 months. The 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 56% and 14%, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) time was 9.8 and 13.3 months respectively. There was no statistical significance of the PFS of the two groups. The OS (median 16.3 months) in the R-TP group was superior to that in the R-FP group (median: 9.8 months) (p = 0.012). Among the patients who had received ≥60 Gy irradiation dose, the median PFS (10.6 months) and OS (16.3 months) were significantly superior to the PFS (8.7 months) and OS (11.3 months) among those patients did not (all p < 0.05). Grade 3 treatment-related gastritis were observed in 6 (27.3%) and 7 (25%) patients in the R-FP and R-TP group respectively. By univariate survival analysis, the age (<60 years), TP regimen and higher irradiation dose might improve the OS of such patients in present study. Conclusions For those patients with post-operative loco-recurrent squamous-cell esophageal carcinoma, radiotherapy combined with either FP or TP regimen chemotherapy was an effective salvage treatment. Younger age, treatment with the TP regimen and an irradiation dose ≥60 Gy might improve the patients’ treatment outcome. PMID:22713587

  13. Outcome following local-regional recurrence in women with early-stage breast cancer: impact of biologic subtype.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Lior Z; Niemierko, Andrzej; Shenouda, Mina N; Truong, Linh; Sadek, Betro T; Abi Raad, Rita; Wong, Julia S; Punglia, Rinaa S; Taghian, Alphonse G; Bellon, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    Local-regional recurrence (LRR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) can result in distant metastasis and decreased disease-free survival (DFS). This study examines factors associated with DFS following LRR. The initial population included 2,233 consecutive women who underwent BCT from 1998 to 2007. Biologic subtype was approximated using a combination of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and tumor grade. Cumulative incidence of DFS after LRR was calculated. The association of clinical, pathologic, and treatment parameters with DFS was evaluated using a Cox regression model. At a median follow-up of 105 months, 82 patients (3.7%) had a LRR. Of these, 66 (80%) were in-breast and 16 (20%) involved the ipsilateral lymph nodes. Twenty patients subsequently developed distant metastases. Five-year DFS after initial recurrence was 69.6% for the overall cohort. On univariate analysis, triple-negative disease (ER/PR/HER2 negative, TNBC) was associated with reduced DFS (HR = 3.8; 95% CI: 1.8-8.1; p < 0.001). Other factors associated with reduced DFS were larger tumor size (HR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.03-1.6; p = 0.02), shorter interval from initial diagnosis to LRR (HR = 0.98 per month; 95% CI: 0.97-0.99; p = 0.02), and no salvage surgery (HR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.09-0.5; p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, TNBC remained the most significant factor associated with reduced DFS (HR = 4.8; 95% CI: 2.25-10.4; p < 0.001). Compared to women with luminal A disease, those with TNBC had significantly worse DFS (37.5% versus 88.3% at 5 years; p < 0.001). Women with TNBC who developed LRR were at high risk of subsequent recurrence. Efforts should be targeted toward both preventing initial recurrence and decreasing subsequent metastasis. PMID:25559656

  14. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  15. [A long-term survival case of local recurrence of breast cancer treated with combined modality therapy].

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Eriko; Ohkubo, Takehiko; Someno, Yasunori; Saguchi, Morihito; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Takahata, Tarou; Hasegawa, Kumi; Hamada, Setsuo; Kaneko, Jun; Maejima, Shizuaki

    2010-11-01

    The case was a 70-year-old woman. In 1997, the patient underwent pectoral muscle-preserving mastectomy and axillary/subclavicular lymph node dissection for the treatment of right breast cancer. Histological diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma (T2, N2, M0, Stage IIIA). She received a combination therapy with TAM and UFT for 5 years postoperatively. Because tumor recurrence occurred in right axillary lymph nodes in the 9th postoperative year, the patient underwent resection of these lymph nodes followed by 6 cycles of AC-based chemotherapy. Multiple lung metastases occurred in the 10th postoperative year, and then, the patient received 8 cycles of DOC-based chemotherapy. In the 11th postoperative year, a mass appeared again in the right axilla, and 6 cycles of capecitabine-based chemotherapy was administered. In the 12th postoperative year, pulmonary metastasis was in progression and an increased right axillary mass were noted. Thus, the specimen extirpated in 2006 was examined again, revealing negative ER, negative PgR and positive HER2. Six cycles of combined trastuzumab+PTX therapy were administered. Lung metastasis decreased in size, allowing a judgment of partial response. Because the right axillary mass had grown to 10 cm, and the patient's QOL was reduced, it was extirpated. The patient is scheduled to receive a postoperative radiotherapy, followed by resumption of chemotherapy. PMID:21224704

  16. Salvage Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer after Definitive IMRT: A Novel Scenario of the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Wang, Lei; Shen, Chunying; Hu, Chaosu; Wang, Lei; Lu, Jiade J

    2016-01-01

    Locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (rNPC) after definitive IMRT occurs in 10% of all cases and represents a distinct clinical entity that has been selectively enriched by radio-resistant cancer cells. Therefore, we report of the outcomes of 77 patients who had repeat salvage-IMRT for rNPC after only a definitive course of IMRT. Various clinical outcomes were measured. Log-rank tests were used to detect differences in the survival outcomes between factor-defined subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. The median follow-up time was 25.7 months (range 3.0-75.7 months), measured from the time of recurrence. The median OS time and PFS time of the entire cohort was 37.0 and 20.5 months, respectively. Thirty-four patients (44.2%) died. Approximately 35% of these patients died from disease progression, but 53% were from treatment-induced severe adverse effects (SAEs) without evidence of disease progression. Higher T-classification of the recurrent tumor and the development of SAEs were found to be the only independent and significant adverse prognostic factors on multivariable analysis. These outcomes underscore the particularly virulent characteristics of rNPC after definitive IMRT. Concerning is the impact of re-irradiation toxicity on patient mortality. PMID:27616024

  17. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P < 0.01). In addition, tensile strength measurements of the surgical incisions showed that the PECE hydrogel accelerates wound healing at postoperative day 7 (P < 0.05), and days 4 and 14 (P > 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  18. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  19. [Recurrent urological cancer--diagnose and treatment].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, H; Akaza, H

    1998-02-01

    Clinical efforts to spare bladder function even in the case of muscle invasive recurrent bladder cancer is taking. Early detection of recurrence is essential for bladder sparing, and both urinary NMP22 and BTA are thought to have potency to detect recurrence of bladder cancer earlier than urinary cytology. Intravesical administration of BCG for superficial bladder cancer and intraarterial injection of chemoagents (Methotrexate and Cisplatin) with radiation for muscle invasive bladder cancer are thought to play important roles in sparing the bladder. Early detection of recurrent prostate cancer is becoming easier by ultrasensitive PSA assay. Though the value of early detection of recurrence is not proven since the benefits of early hormonal treatment have not yet been established, that should be a good indicator to evaluate new and coming treatments and play a important role to develop an effective treatment for recurrent prostate cancer. PMID:9492827

  20. Low local recurrence rate without postmastectomy radiation in node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors 5 cm and larger

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, Scott R.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Raad, Rita Abi; Oswald, Mary J.; Sullivan, Timothy; Strom, Eric A.; Powell, Simon N.; Katz, Angela; Taghian, Alphonse G. . E-mail: ataghian@partners.org

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the need for adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with node-negative breast tumors 5 cm or larger. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 2002, a total of 70 patients with node-negative breast cancer and tumors 5 cm or larger were treated with mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies but without radiotherapy at three institutions. We retrospectively assessed rates and risk factors for locoregional failure (LRF), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) in these patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 85 months, the 5-year actuarial LRF rate was 7.6% (95% confidence interval, 3%-16%). LRF was primarily in the chest wall (4/5 local failures), and lymphatic-vascular invasion (LVI) was statistically significantly associated with LRF risk by the log-rank test (p = 0.017) and in Cox proportional hazards analysis (p 0.038). The 5-year OS and DFS rates were 83% and 86% respectively. LVI was also significantly associated with OS and DFS in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: This series demonstrates a low LRF rate of 7.6% among breast cancer patients with node-negative tumors 5 cm and larger after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Our data indicate that further adjuvant radiation therapy to increase local control may not be indicated by tumor size alone in the absence of positive lymph nodes. LVI was significantly associated with LRF in our series, indicating that patients with this risk factor require careful consideration with regard to further local therapy.

  1. A Retrospective Analysis of Incidence and Its Associated Risk Factors of Upper Urinary Tract Recurrence following Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer with Transitional Cell Carcinoma: The Significance of Local Pelvic Recurrence and Positive Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Yang, Hyung-Kook; Lee, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eun-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to examine the incidence and risk factors of upper urinary tract recurrence (UUTR) following radical cystectomy (RC) in bladder cancer and to evaluate its relationship with neobladder (Neo) or ileal conduit (IC). Materials and Methods All clinicopathologic parameters and perioperative parameters of 311 patients who underwent RC with either Neo or IC by a single surgeon from 1999 to 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. Patients with a history of renal surgery, concomitant UUTR, or a histopathology of non-transitional cell carcinoma were excluded. For statistical analyses of predictive risk factors of UUTR, a multivariate analysis was performed with known risk factors of UUTR, including type of urinary diversion with significance defined as P < 0.05. Results During the median follow-up period of 53 months, 143 (46.0%) IC and 168 (54.0%) Neo were performed, resulting in 11 (3.5%) cases of UUTR (Neo 7 and IC 4) after RC and all patients then underwent nephroureterectomy. No significant differences in incidence and overall survival in UUTR were observed according different types of urinary diversion (p = 483), and the prognosis for survival of Neo was insignificantly better than that of IC (5-year overall survival 78% vs 74%, respectively, p>0.05). Higher number of positive lymph nodes (HR 9.03) and the presence of pelvic local recurrence (HR 7286.08) were significant predictive factors of UUTR (p<0.05). Conclusion This study reports a UUTR rate of 3.5%, and positive lymph nodes and presence of local recurrence at the pelvis as important risk factors. No significant differences in incidence and survival were observed between Neo and IC. PMID:24798444

  2. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  3. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  5. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, B.; Bignardi, M.; Spector, G.J.; Devineni, V.R.; Hederman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients with recurrent cancers of the head and neck region were treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. The follow-up period ranged from 18 months to 18 years. An initial overall complete response rate of 67% and a partial response rate of 7% (overall response rate-74%) were achieved. The eventual tumor control rate was 15%. Although equal initial response rates were achieved in recurrences at the primary site and the cervical nodes, the eventual local control was better for the former (21% vs. 10%). Patients receiving less than 5,000 rad radiotherapy had a 44% complete response and an 11% eventual tumor control. Patients receiving over 5,000 rad had an 80% complete response and a 25% eventual tumor control.

  6. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  7. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Mario M; Chi, Dennis S

    2009-04-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. The majority of patients with advanced ovarian cancer who experience a clinical remission after initial surgery will develop a recurrence. The optimal management for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer remains to be defined. Chemotherapy is frequently used with varying response rates. Repeat surgical cytoreduction appears to offer a survival benefit for select patients with recurrent ovarian cancer and should be considered. Surgery also plays a role in the palliation of certain patients. Continued investigations, especially randomized trials, are needed to further define the optimal treatment modalities for these patients. PMID:19332245

  8. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  9. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials. PMID:26277052

  10. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  11. Prediction of Prostate Cancer Recurrence Using Quantitative Phase Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-05-01

    The risk of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer among individuals who undergo radical prostatectomy for treatment is around 25%. Current clinical methods often fail at successfully predicting recurrence among patients at intermediate risk for recurrence. We used a label-free method, spatial light interference microscopy, to perform localized measurements of light scattering in prostatectomy tissue microarrays. We show, for the first time to our knowledge, that anisotropy of light scattering in the stroma immediately adjoining cancerous glands can be used to identify patients at higher risk for recurrence. The data show that lower value of anisotropy corresponds to a higher risk for recurrence, meaning that the stroma adjoining the glands of recurrent patients is more fractionated than in non-recurrent patients. Our method outperformed the widely accepted clinical tool CAPRA-S in the cases we interrogated irrespective of Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and pathological tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage. These results suggest that QPI shows promise in assisting pathologists to improve prediction of prostate cancer recurrence.

  12. Association of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient with Disease Recurrence in Patients with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated with Radical Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gladwish, Adam; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony; Xie, Jason; Halankar, Jaydeep; Metser, Ur; Jiang, Haiyan; Becker, Nathan; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Foltz, Warren; Han, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To investigate whether volumetrically derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from pretreatment diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is associated with disease recurrence in women with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods An ethics board-approved, retrospective study was conducted in 85 women with stage IB-IVA cervical cancer treated with chemo- and radiation therapy in 2009-2013. All patients underwent MR imaging for staging, including T2-weighted and DW MR imaging series, by using a 1.5- or 3.0-T imager. The mean, median, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentile ADCs (ADCmean, ADC50, ADC75, ADC90, and ADC95, respectively) of all voxels that comprised each tumor were extracted and normalized to the mean urine ADC (nADCmean, nADC50, nADC75, nADC90, and nADC95, respectively) to reduce variability. The primary outcome was disease-free survival (DFS). Uni- and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of ADC parameters and relevant clinical variables with DFS. Results Of the 85 women included, 62 were free of disease at last follow-up. Median follow-up was 37 months (range, 5-68 months). Significant variables at univariable analysis included T2-weighted derived tumor diameter, para-aortic nodal involvement, advanced stage, ADC90 and ADC95, nADC75, nADC90, and nADC95. Normalized parameters were more highly associated (hazard ratio per 0.01 increase in normalized ADC, 0.91-0.94; P < .04). Because nADC75, nADC90, and nADC95 were highly correlated, only nADC95 (which had the lowest P value) was included in multivariable analysis. At multivariable analysis, absolute and normalized ADC95 remained associated with DFS (hazard ratio, 0.90-0.98; P < .05). Conclusion The volumetric ADC95 may be a useful imaging metric to predict treatment failure in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemo- and radiation therapy. (©) RSNA, 2015

  13. Irradiation for locoregionally recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Chin, Christine; Riaz, Nadeem; Ho, Felix; Hu, Man; Hong, Julian C.; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Sherman, Eric; Wong, Richard J.; Morris, Luc G.; Ganly, Ian; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rao, Shyam S.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report the clinical outcomes and related prognostic factors of patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancer (recurrent OCC). Methods The records of consecutive patients with nonmetastatic recurrent OCC who presented to and were treated with RT at our institution between 1989 and 2011 were reviewed. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate overall survival (OS). The cumulative incidences of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis were calculated with death as a competing risk. Results One hundred twenty-three patients were identified. Median follow-up for living patients was 54 months and 16 months for all patients. Ninety-one patients had salvage surgery followed by adjuvant RT. Definitive RT was utilized in the remaining 32 patients. The 5-year OS was 40%. The 5-year cumulative incidence of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 55%, 34%, 22%, and 20%, respectively. Recurrent T classification and lack of salvage surgery were independently associated with worse disease-specific death and decreased OS, respectively. Subset analysis of patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated that age, recurrent T classification, and perineural invasion (PNI) were independently associated with decreased OS; recurrent T classification and thicker tumors were independently associated with worse disease-specific death; and positive/close margins and primary T classification were independently associated with increased local failure. Conclusion In this group of patients with recurrent OCC, clinical outcomes were similar or improved when compared with other recurrent OCC-specific reports. In the salvage surgery subset, tumor thickness and PNI are recurrent pathologic features associated with outcomes that were only previously demonstrated in studies of primary disease. Because of

  14. Pelvic Lymph Node Status Assessed by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Predicts Low-Risk Group for Distant Recurrence in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sokbom; Park, Jung-Yeol; Lim, Myung-Chul; Song, Yong-Joong; Park, Se-Hyun; Kim, Seok-Ki; Chung, Dae-Chul; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a prediction model to identify a low-risk group for distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Prospectively, 62 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were recruited as a training cohort. Clinical variables and parameters obtained from positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed by logistic regression. For the test set, 54 patients were recruited independently. To identify the low-risk group, negative likelihood ratio (LR) less than 0.2 was set to be a cutoff. Results: Among the training cohort, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and a high serum squamous cancer cell (SCC) antigen level were significant risk factors (p = 0.015 and 0.025, respectively). Using the two parameters, criteria to determine a low-risk subset for distant recurrence were postulated: (1) FIGO Stage IIB or less and (2) pretreatment SCC < 2.4 (Model A). Positive pelvic node on PET completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and thus was considered as another prediction model (Model B). In the test cohort, although Model A did not showed diagnostic performance, Model B completely predicted all cases with distant recurrence and showed a sensitivity of 100% with negative LR of 0. Across the training and test cohort (n = 116), the false negative rate was 0 (95% confidence interval 0%-7.6%). Conclusions: Positive pelvic node on PET is a useful marker in prediction of distant recurrence in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who are treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  15. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  16. Surgical Management of Local Recurrences of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Ömer; Şanlı, Öner

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection either in the form of radical nephrectomy or in the form of partial nephrectomy represents the mainstay options in the treatment of kidney cancer. In most instances, resecting the tumor bearing kidney or the tumor itself provides durable cancer specific survival rates. However, recurrences may rarely develop in the renal fossa or remnant kidney. Despite its rarity, locally recurrent RCC is a challenging condition in terms of the possible management options and relatively poor prognosis. If technically feasible, wide surgical excision and ensuring negative surgical margins are the most effective treatment options. Repeat surgeries (completion nephrectomy, excision of locally recurrent tumor, or repeat partial nephrectomy) may often be complicated, and perioperative morbidity is a major concern. Open approach has been extensively applied in this context and 5-year cancer specific survival rates have been reported to be around 50%. The roles of minimally invasive surgical options (laparoscopic and robotic approach) and nonsurgical alternatives (cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation) have yet to be described. In selected patients, surgical resection may have to be complemented with (neo)adjuvant radiotherapy or medical treatment. PMID:26925458

  17. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mertan, Francesca V; Greer, Matthew D; Borofsky, Sam; Kabakus, Ismail M; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2016-06-01

    There is growing consensus that multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is an effective modality in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy and radiation therapy. The emergence of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided focal therapies, such as cryoablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and laser ablation, have made the use of mpMRI even more important, as the normal anatomy is inevitably altered and the detection of recurrence is made more difficult. The aim of this article is to review the utility of mpMRI in detecting recurrent prostate cancer in patients following radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and focal therapy and to discuss expected post-treatment mpMRI findings, the varied appearance of recurrent tumors, and their mimics. PMID:27187164

  18. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  19. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

  20. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma: The role of surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival.A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008.In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271-11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281-14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846-40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028-3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906-57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352-3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586-9.153).In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  1. High Mammographic Breast Density Is Independent Predictor of Local But Not Distant Recurrence After Lumpectomy and Radiotherapy for Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C. Rembert, James; Chew, Karen; Moore, Dan; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Biologically meaningful predictors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) are lacking. Tissue components, including extracellular matrix, could confer resistance to ionizing radiation. Fibroglandular and extracellular matrix components of breast tissue relative to adipose tissue can be quantified by the mammographic breast density (MBD), the proportion of dense area relative to the total breast area on mammography. We hypothesized that the MBD might be a predictor of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of 136 women with invasive breast cancer who had undergone BCS and RT and had had the MBD ascertained before, or at, diagnosis. Women with known recurrence were matched to women without recurrence by year of diagnosis. The median follow-up was 7.7 years. The percentage of MBD was measured using a computer-based threshold method. Results: Patients with a high MBD ({>=}75% density) vs. low ({<=}25%) were at increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 4.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-021.0; p = 0.071) but not distant recurrence. In addition, we found a complete inverse correlation between high MBD and obesity (body mass index, {>=}30 kg/m{sup 2}). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, patients with MBD in the greatest quartile were at significantly greater risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-27.7; p = 0.01). Obesity without a high MBD also independently predicted for LRR (hazard ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-81.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that a high MBD and obesity are significant independent predictors of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Additional studies are warranted to validate these findings.

  2. Angiokeratoma of Fordyce simulating recurrent penile cancer.

    PubMed

    Malalasekera, Ajith P; Goddard, Jonathan Charles; Terry, Timothy R

    2007-03-01

    Penile cancer requires careful clinical follow-up. Therefore, when a patient presented with a florid papillary lesion at his penectomy site, it was immediately biopsied. The histologic examination, however, revealed a benign angiokeratoma with no evidence of recurrent cancer. Angiokeratoma on the scrotum after treatment for carcinoma of the penis has only been documented once. To our knowledge, this is the first description of it causing a diagnostic dilemma with recurrence. A radiotherapy association has only been documented in vulval lesions. Symptomatic treatment is laser vaporization. This emphasizes the importance of histologic assessment before any oncologic surgery intervention. PMID:17382178

  3. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  4. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel Corey; Weinberg, Eric P; Hollenberg, Gary M; Meyers, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the prostate combines both morphological and functional MR techniques by utilizing small field of view T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and MR spectroscopy to accurately detect, localize, and stage primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Localizing the site of recurrence in patients with rising prostate-specific antigen following treatment affects decision making regarding treatment and can be accomplished with multiparametric prostate MR. Several different treatment options are available for prostate cancer including radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, brachytherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, or a number of focal therapy techniques. The findings of recurrent prostate cancer can be different depending on the treatment the patient has received, and the radiologist must be able to recognize the variety of imaging findings seen with this common disease. This review article will detail the findings of recurrent prostate cancer on multiparametric MR and describe common posttreatment changes which may create challenges to accurate interpretation. PMID:27195184

  5. Focal partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local recurrent prostate cancer after permanent prostate brachytherapy with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Nanae; Horie, Shigeo; Sasai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the treatment results for focal partial salvage re-implantation against local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods Between January 2010 and September 2015, 12 patients were treated with focal partial salvage re-implantation for local recurrence after low-dose-rate brachytherapy using 125I seeds. The focal clinical target volume (F-CTV) was delineated on positive biopsy areas in a mapping biopsy, combining the cold spots on the post-implant dosimetry for initial brachytherapy. The F-CTV was expanded by 3 mm to create the planning target volume (PTV) as a margin to compensate for uncertainties in image registration and treatment delivery. The prescribed dose to the PTV was 145 Gy. The characteristics and biochemical disease-free survival (BdFS) rates were analyzed. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Results The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at re-implantation was 4.09 ng/ml (range: 2.91-8.24 ng/ml). The median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 6-74 months). The median RD2cc and UD10 were 63 Gy and 159 Gy, respectively. The 4-year BdFS rate was 78%, which included non-responders. Biochemical recurrence occurred in two patients after 7 and 31 months, respectively. The former was treated with hormonal therapy after biochemical failure, and the latter underwent watchful waiting (PSA at the last follow-up of 53 months: 7.3 ng/ml) at the patient's request. No patients had grade 3 GU/GI toxicities or died after salvage re-implantation. Conclusions The partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy used to treat local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with high biochemical response rates. This treatment can be not only a method to delay chemical castration but also a curative treatment option in cases of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after seed implantation

  6. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases. PMID:25033684

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Reirradiation for Recurrent Pancreas Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Callery, Mark; Moser, James; Tseng, Jennifer; Kent, Tara; Bullock, Andrea; Miksad, Rebecca; Mancias, Joseph D.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After adjuvant or definitive radiation for pancreas cancer, there are limited conventional treatment options for recurrent pancreas cancer. We explored the role of (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) SBRT for reirradiation of recurrent pancreas Cancer. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients reirradiated with SBRT for recurrent pancreas cancer. All patients were deemed unresectable and treated with systemic therapy. Fiducial gold markers were used. CT simulation was performed with oral and IV contrast and patients were treated with respiratory motion tracking in the CyberknifeTM system. Results: 30 patients (17 men and 13 women) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. The median target volume was 41.29cc. The median prescription dose was 25Gy (24-36Gy) in a median of 5 fractions prescribed to a mean 78% isodose line. The median overall survival was 14 months. The 1 and 2 year local control was 78%. The worst toxicity included 3/30(10%) Grade III acute toxicity for pain, bleeding and vomiting. There was 2/30 (7%) Grade III long-term bowel obstructions. Conclusions: SBRT can be a useful and tolerable option for patients with recurrent pancreas cancer after prior radiation. PMID:26918041

  8. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hee Seung; Chang, Suk-Joon; Bristow, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer will experience a relapse of disease despite a complete response after surgical cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy. Treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer mainly comprises various combinations of systemic chemotherapy with or without targeted agents. The role of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer is not well established. Although the literature on survival benefit of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent disease has expanded steadily over the past decade, most studies were retrospective, single-institution series with small numbers of patients. Given the balance between survival benefit and surgery-related morbidity during maximum cytoreductive surgical effort, it is essential to establish the optimal selection criteria for identifying appropriate candidates who will benefit from surgery without worsening quality of life. Three phase III randomized trials for this issue are currently underway. Herein, we present contemporary evidence supporting the positive role of cytoreductive surgery and offer selection criteria for optimal candidates for surgery in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:27130407

  9. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  10. Prostate cancer post-treatment follow-up and recurrence evaluation.

    PubMed

    May, Eric J; Viers, Lyndsay D; Viers, Boyd R; Kawashima, Akira; Kwon, Eugene D; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Froemming, Adam T

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent prostate cancer following primary treatment is common, and the population of men with biochemical recurrence is complex. Conventional management of recurrent prostate cancer involves nontargeted and/or systemic therapies, without defining an individual patient's specific disease. However, recent advances in imaging enable a shift in the management of recurrent prostate cancer to targeted, patient-specific approaches. Specifically, MRI can detect and define local prostate cancer recurrence early in the course of disease, and prostate-specific PET imaging greatly improves nodal staging and can detect previously unknown distant metastases. The significant advances in the imaging of both local and distant tumor recurrences allows for specific selection of treatment options tailored to patients and their disease with less associated morbidity. PMID:27193788

  11. Recurrent thyroid cancer with changing histologic features

    PubMed Central

    Konduri, Kartik; Harshman, Leeanne K.; Welch, Brian J.; O'Brien, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old woman diagnosed with breast cancer and a thyroid mass that was suspicious for cancer. The breast cancer was estrogen and progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu borderline, with a high proliferative index. Treatment of this cancer took precedence. Nine months later, a total thyroidectomy was done for papillary thyroid cancer with metastases to 2 of 8 perithyroid lymph nodes. Postoperative radioactive iodine ablation was given. Recurrent thyroid disease was found in the right neck 1 year later and was resected; no radioactive iodine was given at that time. After 2½ years, the cancer recurred as a more highly aggressive, undifferentiated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Treatment is discussed. PMID:21240322

  12. Recurrent Gene Fusions in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of recurrent gene fusions in a majority of prostate cancers has important clinical and biological implications in the study of common epithelial tumors. Gene fusion and chromosomal rearrangements were previously thought to be the primary oncogenic mechanism of hematological malignancies and sarcomas. The prostate cancer gene fusions that have been identified thus far are characterized by 5’ genomic regulatory elements, most commonly controlled by androgen, fused to members of the ETS family of transcription factors, leading to the over-expression of oncogenic transcription factors. ETS gene fusions likely define a distinct class of prostate cancer which may have a bearing on diagnosis, prognosis and rational therapeutic targeting. PMID:18563191

  13. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  14. Feasibility of MR Imaging/MR Spectroscopy-Planned Focal Partial Salvage Permanent Prostate Implant (PPI) for Localized Recurrence After Initial PPI for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Charles C.; Hsu, Howard; Pickett, Barby; Crehange, Gilles; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Dea, Ryan; Weinberg, Vivian; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Kurhanewicz, John; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-planned partial salvage permanent prostate implant (psPPI) among patients with biopsy-proven local recurrence after initial PPI without evidence of distant disease. Methods and Materials: From 2003-2009, 15 patients underwent MRI/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) planning for salvage brachytherapy (psPPI, I-125 [n=14; 144 Gy]; Pd-103 [n=1; 125 Gy]) without hormone therapy. Full dose was prescribed to areas of recurrence and underdosage, without entire prostate implantation. Limiting urethral and rectal toxicity was prioritized. Follow-up was from salvage date to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration failure (Phoenix criteria = nadir + 2.0; ASTRO = 3 consecutive rises), recurrence, distant metastases, or last follow-up PSA level. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as no PSA failure or biopsy-proven recurrence without all-cause mortality. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results: At salvage, median age was 68 years, and PSA concentration was 3.5 ng/mL (range, 0.9-5.6 ng/mL). Abnormal MRI/MRS findings were evident in 40% of patients. Biopsy-proven recurrences consisted of a single focus (80%) or 2 foci (20%). At recurrence, Gleason score was 6 (67%) or {>=}7 (27%). Median interval between initial and salvage implantation was 69 months (range, 28-132 months). psPPI planning characteristics limited doses to the rectum (mean V100 = 0.5% [0.07 cc]) and urethra (V100 = 12% [0.3 cc]). At median follow-up (23.3 months; range, 8-88 months), treatment failure (n=2) resulted only in localized recurrence; both patients underwent second psPPI with follow-up PSA tests at 12 and 26 months, resulting in 0.6 and 0.7 ng/mL, respectively. American Society for Radiation Oncology PFS rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 86.7%, 78.4%, and 62.7%, respectively, with 5 patients for whom treatment failed (n=3 with negative transrectal ultrasound

  15. Local Recurrence of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Whitney M; Deneve, Jeremiah L

    2016-10-01

    The management of recurrent soft tissue sarcoma is a challenging problem for clinicians and has a significant physical, mental, emotional, and oncologic impact for the patient. Despite excellent limb-preservation therapies, approximately one-quarter of patients may eventually develop recurrence of disease. How to most appropriately manage these patients is a matter of debate. Several treatment options exist, including surgical resection, irradiation, systemic chemotherapy, amputation, and regional therapies. This article highlights the management of recurrent extremity soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:27542648

  16. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Dwan, Kerry; Dickson, Rumona; Proudlove, Chris; Dundar, Yenal

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pertuzumab (Roche) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) metastatic or locally recurrent unresectable breast cancer in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) initial decision. At the time of writing, final guidance had not been published by NICE. The clinical evidence was mainly derived from an ongoing phase III randomised double-blind placebo-controlled international multicentre clinical trial (CLEOPATRA), designed to evaluate efficacy and safety in 808 patients, which compared pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel (pertuzumab arm) with placebo + trastuzumab + docetaxel (control arm). Both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analysed at two data cut-off points-May 2011 (median follow-up of 18 months) and May 2012 (median follow-up of 30 months). At both time points, PFS was significantly longer in the pertuzumab arm (18.5 months compared with 12.4 months in the control arm at the first data cut-off point and 18.7 versus 12.4 months at the second data cut-off point). Assessment of OS benefit suggested an improvement for patients in the pertuzumab arm with a strong trend towards an OS benefit at the second data cut-off point; however, due to the immaturity of the OS data, the magnitude of the OS benefit was uncertain. Importantly, cardiotoxicity was not increased in patients treated with a combination of pertuzumab + trastuzumab + docetaxel. The ERG's main concern with the

  18. Involved-Field Radiation Therapy for Locoregionally Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron P.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of definitive involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) for selected patients with locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of 102 epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated with definitive IFRT (≥45 Gy). IFRT was directed to localized nodal (49%) and extranodal (51%) recurrences. Results The median time from diagnosis to IFRT was 36 months (range, 1–311), and the median follow-up after IFRT was 37 months (range, 1–123). Patients received a median of three chemotherapy courses before IFRT (range, 0–9). Five-year overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates after IFRT were 40% and 24% respectively; the 5-year in-field disease control rate was 71%. Thirty-five patients (35%) had no evidence of disease at a median of 38 months after IFRT (range, 7–122), including 25 continuously without disease for a median of 61 months (range, 17–122) and 10 with salvage treatment following disease recurrence, disease-free for a median of 39 months after salvage treatment (range, 7–92). Eight clear cell carcinoma patients had higher 5-year OS (88% versus 37%; p=0.05) and PFS (75% versus 20%; p=0.01) rates than other patients. Patients sensitive to initial platinum chemotherapy had a higher 5-year OS rate than platinum-resistant patients (43% versus 27%, p=0.03). Patients who required chemotherapy for recurrence after IFRT often benefitted from longer chemotherapy-free intervals after than before IFRT. Conclusions Definitive IFRT can yield excellent local control, protracted disease-free intervals, and even cures in carefully selected patients. RT should be considered a tool in the curative management of locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23648467

  19. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Cancer or Nasal Natural Killer T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma

  20. Locally recurrent parathyroid neoplasms as a cause for recurrent and persistent primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, D L; Travis, W D; Merendino, J J; Zimering, M B; Streeten, E A; Weinstein, L S; Marx, S J; Spiegel, A M; Aurbach, G D; Doppman, J L

    1991-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1989, 145 patients underwent operations for persistent or recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT). At re-exploration, 15 patients (10.3%) were found to have locally recurrent parathyroid tumors (11 patients with adenoma and 4 with carcinoma). These 15 patients had 28 previous operations at outside institutions for HPT. Patients with locally recurrent HPT secondary to adenoma had a longer disease-free interval than patients with locally recurrent carcinoma. At the time of evaluation at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for recurrent or persistent HPT, each patient was symptomatic and patients with carcinoma had significantly more symptoms and higher serum levels of calcium and parathyroid hormone than patients with adenoma. Locally recurrent parathyroid neoplasm was correctly localized by preoperative testing in 14 of 15 patients. These 15 patients underwent 18 reoperations at NIH for excision of locally recurrent parathyroid tumors. Following the final reoperation (two patients had more than one procedure), each patient had normal serum levels of calcium. In addition each patient remains biochemically cured (based on normal serum calcium level), with a median follow-up interval of 21 months. Local recurrence of parathyroid adenoma comprises a small but significant proportion of cases of recurrent or persistent HPT and can be indistinguishable from parathyroid carcinoma. Findings suggestive of carcinoma include shorter disease-free interval, higher serum levels of calcium and parathyroid hormone, and histologic appearance. Whether the locally recurrent parathyroid neoplasm is benign or malignant, aggressive surgery can control serum levels of calcium in these patients with acceptable rates of morbidity. PMID:1985539

  1. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  2. The 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Oprea, Gabriela M.; Yu, David S.; Godette, Karen G.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. Methods 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Results Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Conclusions Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation. PMID:25472643

  3. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  4. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shikha; Puri, Tarun; Julka, Pramod K

    2015-03-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter. PMID:25455282

  5. Efficacy of Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy for Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunmi; Park, Sung-Kwang; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Yun-Han; Oh, Won Yong; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Ki Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radiotherapy (RT) on progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Methods We reviewed the records of 22 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer treated with RT between 2008 and 2014. The median radiation dose for recurrent disease was 57.6 Gy (range, 45–75.6 Gy). Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the type of RT: patients underwent RT without previous history of irradiation (n = 14) and those treated with secondary RT (reirradiation: n = 8) at the time of recurrence. Results The median follow-up period was 24.9 months (range, 4.5–66.6 months). Progression was observed in 14 patients (including 8 with loco-regional failure and 9 with distant metastases). Distant metastases were related to the RT dose (<70 Gy, P = 0.031). The 2-year loco-regional control (LRC), PFS, and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.6%, 45.1%, and 82.0%, respectively. The LRC rate was not different between the patients treated with RT for the first time and those treated with reirradiation (P = 0.101, 2-year LRC 79.5% vs. 41.7%). However, reirradiation was related to poor PFS (P = 0.022) and OS (P = 0.002). An escalated RT dose (≥70 Gy) was associated with a higher PFS (P = 0.014, 2-year PFS 63.5% vs. 20.8%). Conclusion Salvage RT for locally recurrent colorectal cancer can be offered when surgery is impossible. Dose-escalated RT shows a possible benefit in reducing the risk of progression. PMID:27218097

  6. Fear of cancer recurrence in prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Marieke; van Oort, Inge; Schouten, Joost; Thewes, Belinda; Gielissen, Marieke; Prins, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Background High fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is an understudied topic in prostate cancer (PCa) survivors. This study aimed to detect the prevalence, consequences and characteristics associated with high FCR in PCa survivors. Material and methods This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with localized PCa and treated with curative radical prostatectomy between 1992 and 2012. We administered the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) to assess FCR severity (primary outcome measure). Secondary outcomes included distress, quality of life (QOL), post-traumatic symptoms, and multidimensional aspects of FCR. χ(2)-tests, t-tests and Pearson's correlations examined the relationship between FCR and medical/demographic characteristics. MANOVA analyses and χ2-tests identified differences between PCa survivors with high and low FCR. Results Two hundred eighty-three PCa survivors (median age of 70.0 years) completed the questionnaires a median time of 7.1 years after surgery. About a third (36%) of all PCa survivors experienced high FCR. High FCR was associated with lower QOL, more physical problems, higher distress and more post-traumatic stress symptoms. PCa survivors with high FCR reported disease-related triggers (especially medical examinations), felt helpless and experienced problems in social relationships. High FCR was associated with a younger age and having received adjuvant radiotherapy. Conclusions Results illustrate that FCR is a significant problem in PCa survivors. Younger men and those treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are especially at risk. Those with high FCR experience worse QOL and higher symptom burden. Health care providers should pay specific attention to this problem and provide appropriate psychosocial care when needed. PMID:26935517

  7. Relationship between indeterminate or positive lateral margin and local recurrence after endoscopic resection of colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Makazu, Makomo; Sakamoto, Taku; So, Eriko; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although endoscopic resection is widely used for the treatment of superficial colorectal neoplasms, the rate of local recurrence of lesions with a positive or indeterminate lateral margin on histologic evaluation is unclear. We aimed to demonstrate the relationship between lateral margin status and local recurrence after the endoscopic resection of intramucosal colorectal neoplasms. Patients and methods: We retrospectively collected the clinical and pathologic data for 844 endoscopically resected colorectal intramucosal neoplasms with a size of 10 mm or larger. We investigated the relationship between the local recurrence rate and the lateral margin status (categorized as LM0 [negative], LM1 [positive], or LMX [indeterminate]). Results: In total, 389 lesions were evaluated as LM0 and showed no local recurrence. Of the 455 lesions evaluated as LMX or LM1, 30 showed local recurrence within a median period of 6.3 months (range, 1.7 – 48.1) from the initial endoscopic resection. The local recurrence rate of the en bloc-LMX group (2.2 %) was significantly lower than that of the piecemeal-LMX group (15.2 %). Of the 30 cases of recurrence, 28 were successfully treated with a second endoscopic resection. Of the two lesions that showed further recurrence, one was treated with a third endoscopic resection, whereas the other – which was a piecemeal-LMX lesion – was eventually diagnosed as invasive cancer and treated with surgery. Conclusions: The local recurrence rate was lower in the en bloc-LMX group than in the piecemeal-LMX group. Thus, we believe that en bloc-LMX lesions that are completely and confidently resected endoscopically can be treated as en bloc-LM0 lesions. PMID:26171439

  8. Intermittent local prophylaxis against recurrent vaginal candidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bushell, T E; Evans, E G; Meaden, J D; Milne, J D; Warnock, D W

    1988-01-01

    Women with recurrent vaginal candidosis were treated until the infection cleared and were then given one clotrimazole 500 mg vaginal tablet a month or an identical placebo as prophylaxis. Of 21 women who received placebo, 16 developed symptoms or signs within three months, compared with nine of 17 women given active treatment. Women who relapsed were treated and then given active prophylaxis once a month. Of 30 women given such treatment, 13 relapsed within three months. Women who relapsed were treated and then given two clotrimazole 500 mg vaginal tablets a month. Of 17 women given prophylaxis twice a month, four developed symptoms or signs within three months, but 10 remained clear for 12 months. No appreciable difference was seen in the incidence of mycological recurrence between the different regimens; within three months over half the women in all treatment groups had become recolonised. PMID:3060424

  9. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  10. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  11. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  12. Localized Pancreatic Cancer: Multidisciplinary Management.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Herman, Joseph M; Simeone, Diane M; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer that continues to have single-digit 5-year mortality rates despite advancements in the field. Surgery remains the only curative treatment; however, most patients present with late-stage disease deemed unresectable, either due to extensive local vascular involvement or the presence of distant metastasis. Resection guidelines that include a borderline resectable group, as well as advancements in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation that improve resectability of locally advanced disease, may improve outcomes for patients with more invasive disease. Multi-agent chemotherapy regimens fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine improved response rates and survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer and are now being used in earlier stages for patients with localized potentially resectable and unresectable disease, with goals of downstaging tumors to allow margin-negative resection and reducing systemic recurrence. Chemoradiotherapy, although still controversial for both resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer, is being used in the context of contemporary chemotherapy backbone regimens, and novel radiation techniques such as stereotactic body frame radiation therapy (SBRT) are studied on the premise of maintaining or improving efficacy and reducing treatment duration. Patient selection for optimal treatment designation is currently provided by multidisciplinary tumor boards, but biomarker discovery, in blood, tumors, or through novel imaging, is an area of intense research. Results to date suggest that some patients with unresectable disease at the outset have survival rates as good as those with initially resectable disease if able to undergo surgical resection. Long-term follow-up and improved clinical trials options are needed to determine optimal treatment modalities for patients with localized pancreatic cancer. PMID:27249726

  13. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of recurrent laryngeal cancer following initial nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Agra, Ivan Marcelo Gonçalves; Ferlito, Alfio; Takes, Robert P; Silver, Carl E; Olsen, Kerry D; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Strojan, Primož; Rodrigo, Juan P; Gonçalves Filho, João; Genden, Eric M; Haigentz, Missak; Khafif, Avi; Weber, Randal S; Zbären, Peter; Suárez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kowalski, Luiz P

    2012-05-01

    Surgery is the preferred modality for curative treatment of recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of nonsurgical treatments. Patients with initial early-stage cancer experiencing recurrence following radiotherapy often have more advanced-stage tumors by the time the recurrence is recognized. About one third of such recurrent cancers are suitable for conservation surgery. Endoscopic resection with the CO(2) laser or open partial laryngectomy (partial vertical, supracricoid, or supraglottic laryngectomies) have been used. The outcomes of conservation surgery appear better than those after total laryngectomy, because of selection bias. Transoral laser surgery is currently used more frequently than open partial laryngectomy for treatment of early-stage recurrence, with outcomes equivalent to open surgery but with less associated morbidity. Laser surgery has also been employed for selective cases of advanced recurrent disease, but patient selection and expertise are required for application of this modality to rT3 tumors. In general, conservation laryngeal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for localized recurrences after radiotherapy for early-stage glottic cancer. Recurrent advanced-stage cancers should generally be treated by total laryngectomy. PMID:21484925

  15. Cancer metabolism, stemness and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Joseph M.; Tuluc, Madalina; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Ames, Julie A.; Anantharaman, Archana; Butera, Aileen; Leiby, Benjamin; Cognetti, David M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we interrogated head and neck cancer (HNSCC) specimens (n = 12) to examine if different metabolic compartments (oxidative vs. glycolytic) co-exist in human tumors. A large panel of well-established biomarkers was employed to determine the metabolic state of proliferative cancer cells. Interestingly, cell proliferation in cancer cells, as marked by Ki-67 immunostaining, was strictly correlated with oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and the uptake of mitochondrial fuels, as detected via MCT1 expression (p < 0.001). More specifically, three metabolic tumor compartments were delineated: (1) proliferative and mitochondrial-rich cancer cells (Ki-67+/TOMM20+/COX+/MCT1+); (2) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor cancer cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−); and (3) non-proliferative and mitochondrial-poor stromal cells (Ki-67−/TOMM20−/COX−/MCT1−). In addition, high oxidative stress (MCT4+) was very specific for cancer tissues. Thus, we next evaluated the prognostic value of MCT4 in a second independent patient cohort (n = 40). Most importantly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in non-proliferating epithelial cancer cells predicted poor clinical outcome (tumor recurrence; p < 0.0001; log-rank test), and was functionally associated with FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.04). Similarly, oxidative stress (MCT4+) in tumor stromal cells was specifically associated with higher tumor stage (p < 0.03), and was a highly specific marker for cancer-associated fibroblasts (p < 0.001). We propose that oxidative stress is a key hallmark of tumor tissues that drives high-energy metabolism in adjacent proliferating mitochondrial-rich cancer cells, via the paracrine transfer of mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketone bodies). New antioxidants and MCT4 inhibitors should be developed to metabolically target “three-compartment tumor metabolism” in head and neck cancers. It is remarkable that two “non-proliferating” populations of cells (Ki-67−/MCT4+) within the

  16. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  17. Durable control of locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Jillian; Breau, Rodney H; Scheida, Nicola; Malone, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is generally poorly responsive to conventional radiation doses, and patients with inoperable local recurrence have limited therapeutic options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an increasingly available technology that allows delivery of a radiation schedule providing doses far more biologically effective against cancer cells than conventional radiotherapy. We present a case where durable disease control was achieved using SBRT in a patient with inoperable locally recurrent RCC who presented 18 years from original nephrectomy. The patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of active disease 30 months following SBRT. This case highlights the need to reconsider the role of therapies with continuing advances in technology. PMID:25199199

  18. The genomic expression test EndoPredict is a prognostic tool for identifying risk of local recurrence in postmenopausal endocrine receptor-positive, her2neu-negative breast cancer patients randomised within the prospective ABCSG 8 trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitzal, F; Filipits, M; Rudas, M; Greil, R; Dietze, O; Samonigg, H; Lax, S; Herz, W; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Kronenwett, R; Gnant, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine whether EndoPredict (EP), a novel genomic expression test, is effective in predicting local recurrence (LR)-free survival (LRFS) following surgery for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. In addition, we examined whether EP may help tailor local therapy in these patients. Methods: From January 1996 to June 2004, 3714 postmenopausal patients were randomly assigned to either tamoxifen or tamoxifen followed by anastrozole within the prospective ABCSG 8 trial. Using assay scores from EP, we classified breast tumour blocks as either low or high risk for recurrence. Results: Data were gathered from 1324 patients. The median follow-up was 72.3 months and the cumulative incidence of LR was 2.6% (0.4% per year). The risk of LR over a 10-year period among patients with high-risk lesions (n=683) was significantly higher (LRFS=91%) when compared with patients with low-risk lesions (n=641) (10-year LRFS=97.5%) (HR: 1.31 (1.16–1.48) P<0.005). The groups that received breast conservation surgery (BCT) and mastectomy (MX) had similar LR rates (P=0.879). Radiotherapy (RT) after BCT significantly improved LRFS in the cohorts predicted by EP to be low-risk for LR (received RT: n=436, 10-year LRFS 99.8% did not receive RT: n=63, 10-year LRFS 83.6%, P<0.005). Conclusions: EndoPredict is an effective prognostic tool for predicting LRFS. Among postmenopausal, low-risk patients, EP does not appear to be useful for tailoring local therapy. PMID:25867274

  19. The impact of lobular carcinoma in situ in association with invasive breast cancer on the rate of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Shruti; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Goldstein, Neal S.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.

  20. Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer after optimized surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) after optimized surgery requires a full understanding of the disease, especially as it has changed in the last 15 years, what comprises optimized surgery, and the different types and implications of disease relapse that can be encountered. PTC has evolved to tumors that are much smaller than previously seen, largely due to various high quality imaging studies obtained for different reasons, but serendipitously identifying thyroid nodules that prove to be papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC). With rare exception, these cancers are cured by conservative surgery without additional therapy, and seldom result in recurrent disease. PTC is highly curable in 85% of cases because of its rather innocent biologic behavior. Therefore, the shift in emphasis from disease survival to recurrence is appropriate. As a result of three technologic advances—high-resolution ultrasound (US), recombinant TSH, and highly sensitive thyroglobulin (Tg)—disease relapse can be discovered when it is subclinical. Endocrinologists who largely control administration of radioactive iodine have used it to ablate barely detectable or even biochemically apparent disease, hoping to reduce recurrence and perhaps improve survival. Surgeons, in response to this new intense postoperative surveillance that has uncovered very small volume disease, have responded by utilizing US preoperatively to image this disease, and incorporated varying degrees of lymphadenectomy into their initial treatment algorithm. Bilateral thyroid resection—either total or near-total thyroidectomy—remains the standard for PTC >1 cm, although recent data has re-emphasized the value of unilateral lobectomy in treating even some PTC measuring 1-4 cm. Therapeutic lymphadenectomy has universal approval, but when lymph nodes in the central neck are not worrisome to the surgeon’s intraoperative assessment, although that judgment in incorrect up to 50%, whether they should be excised

  1. Prevention of lung cancer recurrence using cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic nanofiber meshes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonah A; Liu, Rong; Freedman, Jonathan D; Padera, Robert; Schwartz, John; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-01-01

    For early stage lung cancer patients, local cancer recurrence after surgical resection is a significant concern and stems from microscopic disease left behind after surgery. Here we apply a local drug delivery strategy to combat local lung cancer recurrence after resection using non-woven, biodegradable nanofiber meshes loaded with cisplatin. The meshes are fabricated using a scalable electrospinning process from two biocompatible polymers--polycaprolactone and poly(glycerol monostearate-co-caprolactone)--to afford favorable mechanical properties for use in a dynamic tissue such as the lung. Owing to their rough nanostructure and hydrophobic polymer composition, these meshes exhibit superhydrophobicity, and it is this non-wetting nature that sustains the release of cisplatin in a linear fashion over ∼90 days, with anti-cancer efficacy demonstrated using an in vitro Lewis Lung carcinoma (LLC) cell assay. The in vivo evaluation of cisplatin-loaded superhydrophobic meshes in the prevention of local cancer recurrence in a murine model of LLC surgical resection demonstrated a statistically significant increase (p = 0.0006) in median recurrence-free survival to >23 days, compared to standard intraperitoneal cisplatin therapy of equivalent dose. These results emphasize the importance of supplementing cytoreductive surgery with local drug delivery strategies to improve prognosis for lung cancer patients undergoing tumor resection. PMID:26547283

  2. Early Local Recurrence Presents Adverse Effect on Outcomes of Primary Breast Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qun-Chao; Mei, Xin; Feng, Yan; Ma, Jin-Li; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Shao, Zhi-Min; Yu, Xiao-Li; Guo, Xiao-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary breast sarcomas (PBSs) are spectrum heterogeneous sarcomas in breast and the optimal treatment for them is still under discussion. Our study was to investigate clinical characteristics and identify potential prognostic factors for this rare malignancy. The authors retrospectively reviewed 38 patients with PBSs between October 2000 and February 2014 in FuDan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Local control rate and overall survival (OS) were determined by Kaplan–Meier actuarial method. Univariate analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were applied to identify potential prognostic factors. With median follow-up of 40.19 months, 14 patients (14/38) were found with local recurrence. Extensive operation like mastectomy was not superior to local resection (P = 0.167). Three-year recurrence-free survival and OS rate were 61.9% and 89%, respectively. Larger tumor size and local recurrence were indicated as unfavorable prognostic factors in univariate analysis. Cox model identified narrow interval of recurrence free survival as an unfavorable factor (P = 0.048). Surgery remains crucial treatment for PBSs. Mastectomy, however, is not routinely necessary if clear margin could be achieved by local excision. Early recurrence indicates a poor OS. PMID:26735546

  3. Association between transfusion of whole blood and recurrence of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, N; Heal, J M; Murphy, P; Agarwal, M M; Chuang, C

    1986-01-01

    Transfusion affects the immune response to renal transplantation and may be associated with recurrence of various human neoplasms. Data from patients with colonic, rectal, cervical, and prostate tumours showed an association between transfusion of any amount of whole blood or larger amounts of red blood cells at the time of surgery and later recurrence of cancer. Recipients of one unit of whole blood had a significantly higher incidence of recurrence (45%) than recipients of a single unit of red cells (12%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of two units of whole blood also had a higher rate of recurrence (52%) than those receiving two units of red cells (23%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of any amount of whole blood had similar recurrence rates (38-52%). Recipients of four or more units of red blood cells had a higher rate of recurrence (55%) than those receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (20%) (p = 0.005). Mortality due to cancer in patients receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (2%) was similar to that in patients who did not have transfusions (7%) and significantly lower than that observed in patients receiving three or fewer units of whole blood (20%) (p = 0.003). A proportional hazards risk analysis showed that transfusion of any whole blood or more than three units of red blood cells was significantly associated with earlier recurrence and death due to cancer. These data support an association between transfusion and recurrence of cancer. They also suggest that some factor present in greater amounts in whole blood, such as plasma, may contribute to the increased risk of recurrence in patients who have undergone transfusion. Until the questions raised by retrospective studies of cancer recurrence and transfusion can be answered by prospective interventional trials with washed red blood cells, red blood cells should be transfused to patients with cancer in preference to whole blood when clinically feasible. PMID:3092902

  4. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for locally recurrent breast carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlen, Johannes; Stern, Josef; Graschew, Georgi; Kaus, Michael R.; Herfarth, Christian

    1995-03-01

    Locally recurrent breast carcinoma and skin metastasisses on the chest wall can be difficult to treat. Conventional treatments like radiation-, chemo- and hormonal therapy have shown poor results in these patients. In comparison to this, PDT has some advantages and less side effects. We can observe a tumor accumulation of a systemic applied photosensitizer (PS). The PS can be stimulated by light of a wavelength of 630 nm and a phototoxic effect in the tumor occurs. We treated 7 patients with locally recurrent breast carcinoma 15 times with PDT. The intravenous application of the PS (Photofrin II, 1.5 mg/kg BW) was done 24 - 96 hours before local laser light radiation. The light source was an Ar-Dye laser with a wavelength of 630 nm. Due to a local tumor necrosis we observed a tumor reduction in each case. In 5 patients we saw a complete local remission with a good cosmetic result. Side effects were rare. All patients suffered from pain in the treated area. No major phototoxicity effects were seen. PDT can induce complete local tumor remissions in patients with cutaneous metastasisses after locally recurrent breast carcinoma. In absence of other metastasisses PDT is possibly a curative treatment. One of the major advantages of this treatment are the rare side effects, rare complications and the possible repetition of the PDT.

  5. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study. PMID:27217816

  6. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Taking adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years after primary treatment leads to a greater reduction in breast cancer recurrences and deaths than taking the drug for only 5 years, according to the results of a large international clinical trial.

  7. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  8. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  9. Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  10. Risk of regional recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients: a Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    van Roozendaal, Lori M; Smit, Leonie H M; Duijsens, Gaston H N M; de Vries, Bart; Siesling, Sabine; Lobbes, Marc B I; de Boer, Maaike; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Smidt, Marjolein L

    2016-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is associated with early recurrence and low survival rates. Several trials investigate the safety of a more conservative approach of axillary treatment in clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer comprises only 15 % of newly diagnosed breast cancers, which might result in insufficient power for representative results for this subgroup. We aimed to provide a nationwide overview on the occurrence of (regional) recurrences in triple-negative breast cancer patients with a clinically T1-2N0 status. For this cohort study, 2548 women diagnosed between 2005 and 2008 with clinically T1-2N0 triple-negative breast cancer were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Follow-up data until 2014 were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in 2486 patients, and (completion) axillary lymph node dissection in 562 patients. Final pathologic nodal status was pN0 in 78.5 %, pN1mi in 4.5 %, pN1 in 12.3 %, pN2-3 in 3.6 %, and pNx in 1.1 %. During a follow-up of 5 years, regional recurrence occurred in 2.9 %, local recurrence in 4.2 % and distant recurrence in 12.2 %. Five-year disease-free survival was 78.7 %, distant disease-free survival 80.5 %, and 5-year overall survival 82.3 %. Triple-negative clinically T1-2N0 breast cancer patients rarely develop a regional recurrence. Their disease-free survival is more threatened by distant recurrence, affecting their overall survival. Consequently, it seems justified to include triple-negative breast cancer patients in randomized controlled trials investigating the safety of minimizing axillary staging and treatment. PMID:27013474

  11. Details of recurrence sites after definitive radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective This is a retrospective study aimed at clarifying the details of recurrence patterns and sites in patients with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods Data were analyzed from consecutive patients, admitted to the University of Tokyo Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) between 2001 and 2013, who had received definitive RT, with or without chemotherapy, for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB–IVA cervical cancer. Results One hundred and thirty-seven patients formed the patient cohort. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 57.0 months. A complete response was achieved in 121 patients (88%). Of these, 36 (30%) developed a cancer recurrence during follow-up. The first sites of recurrence were located in intra-RT fields in nine, outside RT fields in 20, and both in seven patients. In the intra-RT field group, all patients showed a local recurrence, while no one experienced an isolated pelvic lymph node (PLN) recurrence. In the outside RT field group, the most frequent site of recurrence was lung (60%), and three-quarters of patients were free from intra-RT field recurrence until the last follow-up. Of the entire cohort, including 48 PLN-positive patients, only seven patients (5.1%) developed PLN persistence or recurrence, all in the common iliac, internal iliac, and/or obturator nodes, and all with another synchronous relapse. Conclusion Local disease was a major type of intra-RT field recurrence, while PLN control was favorable even in initially PLN-positive patients. The predominance of outside RT field recurrence alone highlights issues concerning distant control, including the intensity enhancement of systematic therapy. PMID:26463432

  12. Impact of Brachytherapy on Local Recurrence Rates After Sublobar Resection: Results From ACOSOG Z4032 (Alliance), a Phase III Randomized Trial for High-Risk Operable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Hiran C.; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Nichols, Francis C.; Hillman, Shauna L.; Heron, Dwight E.; Meyers, Bryan F.; DiPetrillo, Thomas A.; Jones, David R.; Starnes, Sandra L.; Tan, Angelina D.; Daly, Benedict D.T.; Putnam, Joe B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A major concern with sublobar resection (SR) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is high local recurrence (LR). Adjuvant brachytherapy may reduce LR This multicenter randomized trial compares SR to SR with brachytherapy (SRB). Patients and Methods High-risk operable patients with NSCLC ≤ 3 cm were randomly assigned to SR or SRB. The primary end point was time to LR, where LR included recurrence at the staple line (local progression), in the primary tumor lobe away from the staple line, and in ipsilateral hilar nodes. The trial was designed to have a 90% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.315 in favor of SRB, using a one-sided type I error rate of 0.05 with a sample size of 100 eligible patients in each arm. Results Two hundred twenty-four patients were randomly assigned; 222 patients were evaluable for intent-to-treat analysis. Median age was 71 years (range, 49 to 87 years). No differences were found in baseline characteristics. Median follow-up time was 4.38 years (range, 0.04 to 5.59 years). There was no difference in time to LR (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.98; log-rank P = .98) or in the types of LR. Local progression occurred in only 17 (7.7%) of 222 patients. In patients with potentially compromised margins (margin < 1 cm, margin-to-tumor ratio < 1, positive staple line cytology, wedge resection, nodule size > 2.0 cm), SRB did not reduce LR, although trends favored the SRB arm. This was most marked in 14 patients with positive staple line cytology (HR, 0.22; P = .24). Three-year overall survival rates were similar for patients in the SR (71%) and SRB (71%) arms (P = .97). Conclusion Brachytherapy did not reduce LR after SR. This finding may have been related to closer attention to parenchymal margins by surgeons participating in this study. PMID:24982457

  13. Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Yom, Sue S.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of regional recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 198 patients treated with definitive RT for cervical cancer between 1980 and 2000 who experienced a regional recurrence without a central or distal vaginal recurrence were reviewed. All patients received a combination of external-beam RT and intracavitary brachytherapy. In the 180 patients with a documented location of regional recurrence, the relationship between the recurrence and the radiation fields was determined. Results: The median time to regional recurrence was 13 months (range, 2-85 months). Of the 180 patients who had an evaluable regional recurrence, 119 (66%) had a component of marginal failure; 71 patients recurred above-the-field, 2 patients occurred in the inguinal nodes, and 2 patients recurred above-the-field and in the inguinal nodes. In addition, 105 patients (58%) had a component of in-field failure; 59 patients recurred in-field only, 39 patients recurred in-field and above-the-field, 2 patients recurred in-field, above-the-field, and in the inguinal nodes, and 5 patients recurred in-field and in the inguinal nodes. The median survival after regional recurrence was 8 months (range, 0-194 months). Conclusions: Most regional recurrences after definitive RT for cervical cancer include a component of marginal failure, usually immediately superior to the radiation field. These recurrences suggest a deficiency in target volume. Recurrences also occur in-field, suggesting a deficiency in dose. Developments in pretreatment staging, field delineation, dose escalation, and posttreatment surveillance may help to improve outcome in these patients.

  14. Breast cancer recurrence in relation to antidepressant use

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Jessica; Bowles, Erin J.A.; Yu, Onchee; Buist, Diana S.M.; Fujii, Monica; Boudreau, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women with breast cancer frequently use antidepressants; however, questions about the effect of these medications on breast cancer recurrence remain. Methods We identified 4216 women ≥18 years with an incident stage I or II breast cancer diagnosed between 1990–2008 in a mixed model healthcare delivery system linked to a cancer registry. Recurrences were ascertained from chart review. Medication exposures were extracted from electronic pharmacy records. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between antidepressant use and breast cancer recurrence and mortality. We also conducted analyses restricted to tamoxifen users. Results Antidepressants overall, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were not associated with risk of breast cancer recurrence or mortality. Women taking paroxetine only (adjusted HR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.71) and trazadone only (adjusted HR: 1.76; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.92), but not fluoxetine only (adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.55, 1.53), had higher recurrence risks than antidepressant non-users. There was some suggestion of an increased recurrence risk with concurrent paroxetine and tamoxifen use compared to users of tamoxifen only (adjusted HR: 1.49; 95% CI: 0.79, 2.83). Conclusions In general, antidepressants did not appear increase risk of breast cancer recurrence; though there were some suggested increases in risk that warrant further investigation in other datasets. Our results combined systematically and quantitatively with results from other studies may be useful for patients and providers making decisions about antidepressant use after breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:26518198

  15. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  16. Recurrent colorectal cancer after endoscopic resection when additional surgery was recommended

    PubMed Central

    Takatsu, Yukiko; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Hamasaki, Shunsuke; Ogura, Atsushi; Nagata, Jun; Nagasaki, Toshiya; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Ueno, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the type of recurrence after endoscopic resection in colorectal cancer patients and whether rescue was possible by salvage operation. METHODS: Among 4972 patients who underwent surgical resection at our institution for primary or recurrent colorectal cancers from January 2005 to February 2015, we experienced eight recurrent colorectal cancers after endoscopic resection when additional surgical resection was recommended. RESULTS: The recurrence patterns were: intramural local recurrence (five cases), regional lymph node recurrence (three cases), and associated with simultaneous distant metastasis (three cases). Among five cases with lymphatic invasion observed histologically in endoscopic resected specimens, four cases recurred with lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis. All cases were treated laparoscopically and curative surgery was achieved in six cases. Among four cases located in the rectum, three cases achieved preservation of the anus. Postoperative complications occurred in two cases (enteritis). CONCLUSION: For high-risk submucosal invasive colorectal cancers after endoscopic resection, additional surgical resection with lymphadenectomy is recommended, particularly in cases with lymphovascular invasion. PMID:26900295

  17. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  18. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  19. On-line learning algorithms for locally recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Campolucci, P; Uncini, A; Piazza, F; Rao, B D

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on on-line learning procedures for locally recurrent neural networks with emphasis on multilayer perceptron (MLP) with infinite impulse response (IIR) synapses and its variations which include generalized output and activation feedback multilayer networks (MLN's). We propose a new gradient-based procedure called recursive backpropagation (RBP) whose on-line version, causal recursive backpropagation (CRBP), presents some advantages with respect to the other on-line training methods. The new CRBP algorithm includes as particular cases backpropagation (BP), temporal backpropagation (TBP), backpropagation for sequences (BPS), Back-Tsoi algorithm among others, thereby providing a unifying view on gradient calculation techniques for recurrent networks with local feedback. The only learning method that has been proposed for locally recurrent networks with no architectural restriction is the one by Back and Tsoi. The proposed algorithm has better stability and higher speed of convergence with respect to the Back-Tsoi algorithm, which is supported by the theoretical development and confirmed by simulations. The computational complexity of the CRBP is comparable with that of the Back-Tsoi algorithm, e.g., less that a factor of 1.5 for usual architectures and parameter settings. The superior performance of the new algorithm, however, easily justifies this small increase in computational burden. In addition, the general paradigms of truncated BPTT and RTRL are applied to networks with local feedback and compared with the new CRBP method. The simulations show that CRBP exhibits similar performances and the detailed analysis of complexity reveals that CRBP is much simpler and easier to implement, e.g., CRBP is local in space and in time while RTRL is not local in space. PMID:18252525

  20. Prostate-specific antigen-negative prostate cancer recurrence?

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Wirth, Manfred P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a patient with bone metastases occurring shortly after radical prostatectomy for organ-confined prostate cancer. The medical history and immunohistochemical findings suggested prostate cancer recurrence to the skeleton. Undetectable serum prostate-specific antigen levels, however, raised doubts about this diagnosis. A whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was obtained and revealed a right-sided breast cancer as the primary site of metastatic spread. PMID:23374851

  1. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  2. Multimodality treatment of recurrent pancreatic cancer: Mith or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia; Merigliano, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment, but most patients present at diagnosis with unresectable or metastatic disease. Moreover, even with an R0 resection, the majority of patients will die of disease recurrence. Most recurrences occur in the first 2-year after pancreatic resection, and are commonly located in the abdomen, even if distant metastases can occur. Recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, due to the limited role of surgery and radio-chemotherapy. Surgical management of recurrence is usually unreliable because tumor relapse typically presents as a technically unresectable, or as multifocal disease with an aggressive growth. Therefore, treatment of patients with recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma has historically been limited to palliative chemotherapy or supportive care. Only few data are available in the Literature about this issue, even if in recent years more studies have been published to determine whether treatment after recurrence have any effect on patients outcome. Recent therapeutic advances have demonstrated the potential to improve survival in selected patients who had undergone resection for pancreatic cancer. Multimodality management of recurrent pancreatic carcinoma may lead to better survival and quality of life in a small but significant percentage of patients; however, more and larger studies are needed to clarify the role of the different therapeutic options and the optimal way to combine them. PMID:26689800

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers a promising opportunity for cure and/or palliation to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer whose comorbidities, performance status, and history of prior treatment may preclude many other salvage options. Stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to have a favorable response and toxicity profile compared with other nonoperative salvage options for recurrent head and neck cancer. However, the risk of severe toxicity remains, with carotid blowout syndrome a unique concern, although the incidence of this complication may be minimized with alternating-day fractionation. The short overall treatment time and low rates of acute toxicity make SBRT an optimal vehicle to integrate with novel systemic therapies, and several phase II studies have used concurrent cetuximab as a radiosensitizer with SBRT with promising results. Ongoing studies aim to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of SBRT with immune checkpoint inhibitors in recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:27441751

  4. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  5. Repeated stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the outcome of prostate cancer (PCa) patients diagnosed with oligometastatic disease at recurrence and treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods Non-castrate patients with up to 3 synchronous metastases (bone and/or lymph nodes) diagnosed on positron emission tomography - computed tomography, following biochemical recurrence after local curative treatment, were treated with (repeated) SBRT to a dose of 50 Gy in 10 fractions or 30 Gy in 3 fractions. Androgen deprivation therapy-free survival (ADT-FS) defined as the time interval between the first day of SBRT and the initiation of ADT was the primary endpoint. ADT was initiated if more than 3 metastases were detected during follow-up even when patients were still asymptomatic. Secondary endpoints were local control, progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results With a median follow-up from time of SBRT of 2 years, we treated 50 patients with 70 metastatic lesions with a local control rate of 100%. The primary involved metastatic sites were lymph nodes (54%), bone (44%), and viscera (2%). The median PFS was 19 mo (95% CI: 13–25 mo) with 75% of recurring patients having ≤3 metastases. A 2nd and 3rd course of SBRT was delivered in 19 and 6 patients respectively. This results in a median ADT-FS of 25 months (20–30 mo). On univariate analysis, only a short PSA doubling time was a significant predictor for both PFS (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82 – 0.99) and ADT-FS (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71 – 0.97). Ten patients (20%) developed toxicity following treatment, which was classified as grade I in 7 and grade II in 3 patients. Conclusion Repeated SBRT for oligometastatic prostate cancer postpones palliative androgen deprivation therapy with 2 years without grade III toxicity. PMID:24920079

  6. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  7. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  8. Determinants of recurrence after intended curative resection for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Kring, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lars N; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk; Jess, Per; Bulut, Orhan; Nielsen, Knud Thygesen; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2014-12-01

    Despite intended curative resection, colorectal cancer will recur in ∼45% of the patients. Results of meta-analyses conclude that frequent follow-up does not lead to early detection of recurrence, but improves overall survival. The present literature shows that several factors play important roles in development of recurrence. It is well established that emergency surgery is a major determinant of recurrence. Moreover, anastomotic leakages, postoperative bacterial infections, and blood transfusions increase the recurrence rates although the exact mechanisms still remain obscure. From pathology studies it has been shown that tumors behave differently depending on their location and recur more often when micrometastases are present in lymph nodes and around vessels and nerves. K-ras mutations, microsatellite instability, and mismatch repair genes have also been shown to be important in relation with recurrences, and tumors appear to have different mutations depending on their location. Patients with stage II or III disease are often treated with adjuvant chemotherapy despite the fact that the treatments are far from efficient among all patients, who are at risk of recurrence. Studies are now being presented identifying subgroups, in which the therapy is inefficient. Unfortunately, only few of these facts are implemented in the present follow-up programs. Therefore, further research is urgently needed to verify which of the well-known parameters as well as new parameters that must be added to the current follow-up programs to identify patients at risk of recurrence. PMID:25370351

  9. Exemestane Following Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences and Prolongs Survival

    Cancer.gov

    Postmenopausal women with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer had delayed disease recurrence and longer survival after taking 2-3 years of tamoxifen followed by exemestane for a total of 5 years compared to taking tamoxifen for 5 years.

  10. Breast cancer recurrence after sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    AlSaif, Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look into the pattern of breast cancer recurrence following mastectomy, breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy or chemotherapy after SLNB at our institution. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2014, all patients diagnosed with breast cancer with clinically negative axilla, underwent SLNB. We reviewed their medical records to identify pattern of cancer recurrence. Results: The median follow-up was 35.5 months. Eighty five patients (70.8%) had a negative sentinel lymph node (SLN) and subsequently had no further axillary treatment, one of them (1.2%) developed axillary recurrence 25 months postoperatively. Twenty five patients (20.8%) had a positive SLN (macrometastases) and subsequently had immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Ten patients (8.3%) had a positive SLN (micrometastases). In the positive SLN patients (macrometastases and micrometastases), there were two ipsilateral breast recurrences (5.7%), seen three and four years postoperatively. Also in this group, there was one (2.9%) distant metastasis to bone three years postoperatively. Conclusion: In this series, the clinical axillary false negative rate for SLNB was 1.2% which is in accordance with the published literature. This supports the use of SLNB as the sole axillary staging procedure in breast cancer patients with negative SLNB. Axillary lymph node dissection can be safely omitted in patients with micrometastases in their sentinel lymph node(s). PMID:26870109

  11. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  12. Cognitive Adaptation Theory and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are There Limits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomich, Patricia L.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2006-01-01

    Relations of the components of cognitive adaptation theory (self-esteem, optimism, control) to quality of life and benefit finding were examined for 70 women (91% Caucasian) diagnosed with Stage I, II, or III breast cancer over 5 years ago. Half of these women experienced a recurrence within the 5 years; the other half remained disease free. Women…

  13. Missed Radiation Therapy and Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who miss radiation therapy sessions during cancer treatment have an increased risk of their disease returning, even if they eventually complete their course of radiation treatment, according to a new study.

  14. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Kidney Developing Local Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Usuba, Wataru; Sasaki, Hideo; Yoshie, Hidekazu; Kitajima, Kazuki; Kudo, Hiroya; Nakazawa, Ryuto; Sato, Yuichi; Takagi, Masayuki; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the kidney is a rare entity and usually displays a favorable prognosis. We herein report a second case of renal SFT developing local recurrence. A 50-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a left renal mass. An abdominal CT detected a large renal tumor and radical nephrectomy was performed with a possible diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The resected tumor size was measured at 17 × 11 × 8 cm. Grossly, necrosis was observed in central lesion of the tumor but hemorrhage was not observed. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of spindle-shaped cells with scant cytoplasm accompanied by hyalinized collagenous tissue, which displayed hemangiopericytomatous patterns. The cellularity was normal and nuclear pleomorphism was not observed. Ki-67 labeling index was less than 3%. The pathological diagnosis of SFT was made without obvious malignant findings. Three years after the surgery, a follow-up CT scan detected a mass lesion in the tumor bed. Surgical resection was performed and the resected tumor was compatible with local recurrence of the SFT without obvious malignant findings. Renal SFT should be carefully monitored even in the absence of obvious malignant findings. PMID:27239363

  15. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Kidney Developing Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Usuba, Wataru; Sasaki, Hideo; Yoshie, Hidekazu; Kitajima, Kazuki; Kudo, Hiroya; Nakazawa, Ryuto; Sato, Yuichi; Takagi, Masayuki; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the kidney is a rare entity and usually displays a favorable prognosis. We herein report a second case of renal SFT developing local recurrence. A 50-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a left renal mass. An abdominal CT detected a large renal tumor and radical nephrectomy was performed with a possible diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. The resected tumor size was measured at 17 × 11 × 8 cm. Grossly, necrosis was observed in central lesion of the tumor but hemorrhage was not observed. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of spindle-shaped cells with scant cytoplasm accompanied by hyalinized collagenous tissue, which displayed hemangiopericytomatous patterns. The cellularity was normal and nuclear pleomorphism was not observed. Ki-67 labeling index was less than 3%. The pathological diagnosis of SFT was made without obvious malignant findings. Three years after the surgery, a follow-up CT scan detected a mass lesion in the tumor bed. Surgical resection was performed and the resected tumor was compatible with local recurrence of the SFT without obvious malignant findings. Renal SFT should be carefully monitored even in the absence of obvious malignant findings. PMID:27239363

  16. Robust local stability of multilayer recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Suykens, J K; De Moor, B; Vandewalle, J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we derive a condition for robust local stability of multilayer recurrent neural networks with two hidden layers. The stability condition follows from linking theory about linearization, robustness analysis of linear systems under nonlinear perturbation and matrix inequalities. A characterization of the basin of attraction of the origin is given in terms of the level set of a quadratic Lyapunov function. In a similar way like for NL theory, local stability is imposed around the origin and the apparent basin of attraction is made large by applying the criterion, while the proven basin of attraction is relatively small due to conservatism of the criterion. Modifying dynamic backpropagation by the new stability condition is discussed and illustrated by simulation examples. PMID:18249754

  17. Lymph Node Ratio Predicts Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazeh, Haggi; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lymph node metastasis occurs in 20%–50% of patients presenting for initial treatment of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The significance of lymph node metastases remains controversial, and the aim of this study is to determine how the lymph node ratio (LNR) may predict the likelihood of disease recurrence. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for PTC at our institution from 2005 to 2010. A total LNR (positive nodes to total nodes) and central lymph node ratio (cLNR) was calculated. Regression was used to determine a threshold LNR that best predicted recurrence. Multivariate logistic regression then determined the influence of LNR on recurrence while accounting for other known predictors of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test were used to compare differences in disease-free survival. Results. Of the 217 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for PTC, 69 patients had concomitant neck dissections. Sixteen (23.2%) patients developed disease recurrence. When disease-free survival functions were compared, we found that patients with a total LNR ≥0.7 (p < .01) or a cLNR ≥0.86 (p = .04) had significantly worse disease-free survival rates than patients with ratios below these threshold values. Considering other known predictors of recurrence, we found that LNR was significantly associated with recurrence (odds ratio: 19.5, 95% confidence interval: 4.1–22.9; p < .01). Conclusions. Elevated total LNR and cLNR are strongly associated with recurrence of PTC after initial operation. LNR in PTC is a tool that can be used to determine the likelihood of the patient developing recurrent disease and inform postoperative follow-up. PMID:23345543

  18. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  19. The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Blair, Cindy K.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Wadden, Thomas; Philip, Errol J.; Wolfe, Bruce; Gapstur, Susan M.; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; McTiernan, Anne; Minasian, Lori; Nebeling, Linda; Goodwin, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and components of energy imbalance, i.e., excessive energy intake and suboptimal levels of physical activity, are established risk factors for cancer incidence. Accumulating evidence suggests that these factors also may be important after the diagnosis of cancer and influence the course of disease, as well as overall health, well-being, and survival. Lifestyle and medical interventions that effectively modify these factors could potentially be harnessed as a means of cancer control. However, for such interventions to be maximally effective and sustainable, broad sweeping scientific discoveries ranging from molecular and cellular advances, to developments in delivering interventions on both individual and societal levels are needed. This review summarizes key discussion topics that were addressed in a recent Institute of Medicine Workshop entitled, “The Role of Obesity in Cancer Survival and Recurrence”; discussions included: 1) mechanisms associated with obesity and energy balance that influence cancer progression; 2) complexities of studying and interpreting energy balance in relation to cancer recurrence and survival; 3) associations between obesity and cancer risk, recurrence, and mortality; 4) interventions that promote weight loss, increased physical activity, and negative energy balance as a means of cancer control; and 5) future directions. PMID:22695735

  20. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  1. Validation study of genes with hypermethylated promoter regions associated with prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Stott-Miller, Marni; Zhao, Shanshan; Wright, Jonathan L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Background One challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) is distinguishing indolent from aggressive disease at diagnosis. DNA promoter hypermethylation is a frequent epigenetic event in PCa, but few studies of DNA methylation in relation to features of more aggressive tumors or PCa recurrence have been completed. Methods We used the Infinium® HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to assess DNA methylation in tumor tissue from 407 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy. Recurrence status was determined by follow-up patient surveys, medical record review, and linkage with the SEER registry. The methylation status of 14 genes for which promoter hypermethylation was previously correlated with advanced disease or biochemical recurrence was evaluated. Average methylation level for promoter region CpGs in patients who recurred compared to those with no evidence of recurrence was analyzed. For two genes with differential methylation, time to recurrence was examined. Results During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, 104 (26%) patients recurred. Significant promoter hypermethylation in at least 50% of CpG sites in two genes, ABHD9 and HOXD3, was found in tumors from patients who recurred compared to those without recurrence. Evidence was strongest for HOXD3 (lowest P = 9.46x10−6), with higher average methylation across promoter region CpGs associated with reduced recurrence-free survival (P = 2×10−4). DNA methylation profiles did not differ by recurrence status for the other genes. Conclusions These results validate the association between promoter hypermethylation of ADHB9 and HOXD3 and PCa recurrence. Impact Tumor DNA methylation profiling may help distinguish PCa patients at higher risk for disease recurrence. PMID:24718283

  2. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  3. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  4. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Corpus Carcinosarcoma

  5. Fluorescence-guided surgical resection of oral cancer reduces recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre; Poh, Catherine F.; Durham, J. Scott; Zhang, Lewei; Lam, Sylvia F.; Rosin, Miriam; MacAulay, Calum

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 36,000 people in the US will be newly diagnosed with oral cancer in 2010 and it will cause 8,000 new deaths. The death rate is unacceptably high because oral cancer is usually discovered late in its development and is often difficult to treat or remove completely. Data collected over the last 5 years at the BC Cancer Agency suggest that the surgical resection of oral lesions guided by the visualization of the alteration of endogenous tissue fluorescence can dramatically reduce the rate of cancer recurrence. Four years into a study which compares conventional versus fluorescence-guided surgical resection, we reported a recurrence rate of 25% (7 of 28 patients) for the control group compared to a recurrence rate of 0% (none of the 32 patients) for the fluorescence-guided group. Here we present resent results from this ongoing study in which patients undergo either conventional surgical resection of oral cancer under white light illumination or using tools that enable the visualization of naturally occurring tissue fluorescence.

  6. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ansa, Benjamin; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary; Coughlin, Steven; Smith, Selina

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs). Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%), lack of physical activity (48.7%), and a high fat diet (63.2%) are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5%) agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9%) believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M² reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M² (p = 0.06); nearly all of the women (99.2%) answered "yes" to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05). These results provide information about AA BCSs' beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity. PMID:26703650

  7. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ansa, Benjamin; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary; Coughlin, Steven; Smith, Selina

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs). Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%), lack of physical activity (48.7%), and a high fat diet (63.2%) are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5%) agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9%) believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06); nearly all of the women (99.2%) answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05). These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity. PMID:26703650

  8. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer

  9. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-06-15

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease.

  10. Reducing Breast Cancer Recurrence: The Role of Dietary Polyphenolics.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Andrea J; Campion, Peta; Bishop, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from numerous observational and clinical studies suggest that polyphenolic phytochemicals such as phenolic acids in olive oil, flavonols in tea, chocolate and grapes, and isoflavones in soy products reduce the risk of breast cancer. A dietary food pattern naturally rich in polyphenols is the Mediterranean diet and evidence suggests those of Mediterranean descent have a lower breast cancer incidence. Whilst dietary polyphenols have been the subject of breast cancer risk-reduction, this review will focus on the clinical effects of polyphenols on reducing recurrence. Overall, we recommend breast cancer patients consume a diet naturally high in flavonol polyphenols including tea, vegetables (onion, broccoli), and fruit (apples, citrus). At least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily appear protective. Moderate soy protein consumption (5-10 g daily) and the Mediterranean dietary pattern show the most promise for breast cancer patients. In this review, we present an overview of clinical trials on supplementary polyphenols of dietary patterns rich in polyphenols on breast cancer recurrence, mechanistic data, and novel delivery systems currently being researched. PMID:27608040

  11. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer. PMID:26811619

  12. Estrogen Receptor Status Predicts Late-Onset Skeletal Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Baek Gil; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kang, Suki; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BCa) often recurs after long latency, and is known to favor bone as a metastatic site. We hypothesized that skeletal recurrence of ER+ BCa follows a different chronological pattern from that of nonskeletal recurrence. We retrospectively evaluated 434 matched pairs of ER+ and ER− female patients who underwent surgery for clinically localized BCa between 2005 and 2009. Patient age, tumor size, lymph node involvement, and adjuvant treatment biases were adjusted by the propensity score method. We conducted competing risk analysis to determine the prognostic significance of ER expression status on the risk of overall recurrence and late recurrence (after 3 years). We also compared chronological patterns of ER+ and ER− tumor recurrence, stratified by the first metastatic site (skeletal vs nonskeletal). After 3 postoperative years, ER+ tumor had a significantly higher risk of overall distant recurrence than ER− tumor (P = 0.02). When further stratified by first site of metastasis, only late skeletal recurrence was significantly associated with ER status (P = 0.029). In multivariate analysis, ER and lymph node involvement status were significant prognostic factors for late skeletal recurrence, with adjusted hazard ratios of 5.2 (95% CI = 1.2–22.4, P = 0.025) and 5.2 (1.7–16.3, P = 0.005), respectively. For nonskeletal distant recurrence, tumor size (>2 cm) was the only significant risk factor with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.8 (1.4–5.7, P = 0.005). Annual hazard of skeletal recurrence events of ER+ tumors continued to exist up to 10 years, while annual hazard of nonskeletal recurrences decreased after peaking at 5 years. ER− tumor recurrences exhibited similar annual hazard patterns across skeletal and nonskeletal sites. ER expression and lymph node involvement status were strong predictors of BCa late-onset (>3 years) recurrences, especially in skeletal sites. Therefore

  13. Estrogen Receptor Status Predicts Late-Onset Skeletal Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Baek Gil; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kang, Suki; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BCa) often recurs after long latency, and is known to favor bone as a metastatic site. We hypothesized that skeletal recurrence of ER+ BCa follows a different chronological pattern from that of nonskeletal recurrence.We retrospectively evaluated 434 matched pairs of ER+ and ER- female patients who underwent surgery for clinically localized BCa between 2005 and 2009. Patient age, tumor size, lymph node involvement, and adjuvant treatment biases were adjusted by the propensity score method. We conducted competing risk analysis to determine the prognostic significance of ER expression status on the risk of overall recurrence and late recurrence (after 3 years). We also compared chronological patterns of ER+ and ER- tumor recurrence, stratified by the first metastatic site (skeletal vs nonskeletal).After 3 postoperative years, ER+ tumor had a significantly higher risk of overall distant recurrence than ER- tumor (P = 0.02). When further stratified by first site of metastasis, only late skeletal recurrence was significantly associated with ER status (P = 0.029). In multivariate analysis, ER and lymph node involvement status were significant prognostic factors for late skeletal recurrence, with adjusted hazard ratios of 5.2 (95% CI = 1.2-22.4, P = 0.025) and 5.2 (1.7-16.3, P = 0.005), respectively. For nonskeletal distant recurrence, tumor size (>2 cm) was the only significant risk factor with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.8 (1.4-5.7, P = 0.005). Annual hazard of skeletal recurrence events of ER+ tumors continued to exist up to 10 years, while annual hazard of nonskeletal recurrences decreased after peaking at 5 years. ER- tumor recurrences exhibited similar annual hazard patterns across skeletal and nonskeletal sites.ER expression and lymph node involvement status were strong predictors of BCa late-onset (>3 years) recurrences, especially in skeletal sites. Therefore, skeletal system surveillance is

  14. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  15. Significance of microvascular density (MVD) in cervical cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cantu De León, D; Lopez-Graniel, C; Frias Mendivil, M; Chanona Vilchis, G; Gomez, C; De La Garza Salazar, J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study of 118 patients with squamous cell cervical cancer from January 1990 to December 1993 was to evaluate angiogenesis as predictive factor of recurrence in cervical cancer stages II-III treated with standard radiotherapy. Microvessel density (MVD) was evaluated and correlated with other prognostic factors. MVD was greater than 20 in 67.8% of patients with recurrence (P = 0.002) in comparison to 39% of patients without. Disease-free survival was shorter in stage IIA and MVD >20 (P = 0.0193) as well as for stage IIB (P < 0.05 ), but not for IIIB (P = 0.1613 ). Global survival was significantly shorter when MVD was >20 (P = 0.0316). For stage IIA and MVD >20 survival was shorter (P = 0.0008) for stage IIB (P < 0.05) but not for IIIB (P = 0.14). Patients younger than 40 years and MVD >20 had poorer disease-free interval and survival (P = 0.0029). MVD in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer stage II and age younger than 40 may play a role in predicting recurrence and survival. PMID:14675324

  16. Improving Prediction of Prostate Cancer Recurrence using Chemical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Macias, Virgilia; Walsh, Michael; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Precise Outcome prediction is crucial to providing optimal cancer care across the spectrum of solid cancers. Clinically-useful tools to predict risk of adverse events (metastases, recurrence), however, remain deficient. Here, we report an approach to predict the risk of prostate cancer recurrence, at the time of initial diagnosis, using a combination of emerging chemical imaging, a diagnostic protocol that focuses simultaneously on the tumor and its microenvironment, and data analysis of frequent patterns in molecular expression. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging was employed to record the structure and molecular content from tumors prostatectomy. We analyzed data from a patient cohort that is mid-grade dominant - which is the largest cohort of patients in the modern era and in whom prognostic methods are largely ineffective. Our approach outperforms the two widely used tools, Kattan nomogram and CAPRA-S score in a head-to-head comparison for predicting risk of recurrence. Importantly, the approach provides a histologic basis to the prediction that identifies chemical and morphologic features in the tumor microenvironment that is independent of conventional clinical information, opening the door to similar advances in other solid tumors.

  17. Gefitinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  18. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  19. Definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer: correlation between treatment patterns and recurrence rate

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Naoyuki; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Baek, Sungjae; Chatani, Masashi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Mabuchi, Seiji; Shiki, Yasuhiko; Tatsumi, Keiji; Kimura, Tadashi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes and optimal practice patterns of definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer. Between 1993 and 2012, 49 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy for primary vaginal cancer in three hospitals. Of these, 15 patients (31%) had clinically positive regional lymph node metastasis. A total of 34 patients (70%) received external beam radiotherapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary), and 8 (16%) (with small superficial Stage I tumors) were treated with local radiotherapy. The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 1–169 months). The 3-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and loco-regional control (LRC) rates were 83%, 59% and 71%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the histological type (P = 0.044) was significant risk factors for LRC. In Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I cases, 3 of 8 patients (38%) who did not undergo prophylactic lymph node irradiation had lymph node recurrence, compared with 2 of 12 patients (17%) who underwent prophylactic pelvic irradiation. For Stage III–IV tumors, the local recurrence rate was 50% and the lymph node recurrence rate was 40%. Patients with FIGO Stage I/II or clinical Stage N1 had a higher recurrence rate with treatment using a single modality compared with the recurrence rate using combined modalities. In conclusion, our treatment outcomes for vaginal cancer were acceptable, but external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy (interstitial or intracavitary) was needed regardless of FIGO stage. Improvement of treatment outcomes in cases of FIGO Stage III or IV remains a significant challenge. PMID:25614068

  20. Efficacy and safety of adding an agent to bevacizumab/taxane regimens for the first-line treatment of Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from seven randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The combined therapy of bevacizumab (BEV) with taxane (paclitaxel or docetaxel) has shown an improvement on progression-free survival (PFS) and objective remission in Her2-negative patients with locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer (LR/MBC). However, there was no benefit in overall survival (OS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding an agent to the BEV/taxane regimens for the treatment of Her2-negative patients with LR/MBC in a first-line setting. Materials and methods We searched PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases for eligible trials. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0 freeware package. We calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS and OS. The odds ratio (OR) was used to calculate objective response rate (ORR) and grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events. The heterogeneity of study outcomes was calculated by the χ2 test or I2 statistics. Results A total of 1,124 patients from seven randomized controlled trials were analyzed. Our meta-analysis showed that the ORR was significantly improved in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group when compared with the BEV/taxane-based doublet group (OR =1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.67, P=0.03). A subset analysis showed that a similar result was achieved in the triplet group in which a cytotoxic agent was added (OR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.09–1.95, P=0.01). However, the PFS and OS had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (HR =0.87, 95% CI: 0.68–1.13, P=0.31; HR =0.98, 95% CI: 0.82–1.16, P=0.78, respectively). Regarding safety, thromboembolic events, fatigue, and diarrhea (all $grade 3) were more frequently observed in the BEV/taxane-based triplet group (OR =3.8, 95% CI: 1.86–7.79, P=0.0003; OR =1.55, 95% CI: 1.05–2.27, P=0.03; OR =2.1, 95% CI: 1.29–3.41, P=0.003, respectively). Other toxic effects had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion Our

  1. Hepatopancreatoduodenectomy for local recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma after excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mihoko; Ebata, Tomoki; Sugawara, Gen; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Takashi; Shingu, Yuji; Nagino, Masato

    2016-12-01

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment for biliary tract cancer (BTC); however, the recurrence rate remains high even after curative resection. There are limited data regarding the effectiveness of surgical resection for recurrent BTC. We report the favorable survival outcome of a patient who underwent a hepatopancreatoduodenectomy for local recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma after excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst. The patient, a 25-year-old woman, had undergone excision of a type IV-A congenital choledochal cyst with hepaticojejunostomy. The resected specimen revealed an early cholangiocarcinoma. The local recurrence at the site of anastomosis was detected 4 years and 4 months after surgery. We performed a left trisectionectomy with caudate lobectomy combined with hepatic artery and portal vein resections and a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histological examination revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the final diagnosis was recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma. There are a few reports of extensive resection for recurrence of BTC; however, aggressive surgery is possible and may offer favorable survival in selected patients. PMID:26943695

  2. A scoring system for predicting recurrence of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, H.T.; Shyu, S.K.; Chen, Y.K.; Yuan, C.C.; Chao, K.C.; Kan, Y.Y.

    1992-03-01

    An evaluation was made of factors that affect the recurrence of cervical cancer after primary surgery, these including age, clinical stage, histology, grade, involvement of uterine body, parametrium or vagina and lymph node metastases. During a period of at least 3 years, 702 of 1508 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection were studied by using a scoring system. A comparison between the group of women scored at or greater than 13 that scored less than 13 revealed that the risk of recurrence was higher in the former group. One hundred and twenty five of 702 patients found to have positive pelvic node involvement scored greater than 13, which rendered them eligible for further mangement as follows: the recurrence rate in 99 patients receiving multi-agent chemotherapy was 34.4%, compared with 65.4% in 26 patients receiving no treatment (P < 0.01). Applying this score to other patients in planning adjuvant therapy, the recurrence rate may be reduced further. The number of patients needlessly exposed to the toxic effects of multi-agent chemotherapy may be reduced also. PMID:11576239

  3. Risk factors and therapeutic results of early local recurrence after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Rou, Woo Sun; Lee, Byung Seok; Moon, Hee Seok; Lee, Eaum Seok; Kim, Seok Hyun; Lee, Heon Young

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify factors affecting early local recurrence after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and investigate treatments and outcomes for local recurrence. METHODS: Early local recurrence and no early local recurrence groups drawn from 134 patients who were initially diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and showed a complete response (CR) to TACE treatment between January 1, 2006, and January 31, 2012, were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Additionally, the subsequent treatment for patients with recurrence was analyzed, and in cases in which TACE had been performed, the cumulative recurrence rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with those of the primary lesion. RESULTS: The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 92.3%, 60.2%, and 39.8%, respectively, in the early local recurrence group, which were significantly lower than those in both the late local and no local recurrence groups (P < 0.001). On multivariate analyses, non-compact lipiodol uptake, large tumor size, and an alpha-fetoprotein > 20 ng/mL after achieving a CR were significant predictors. When TACE was performed for early and late locally recurrent lesions, a CR was observed in 15 patients (41.7%) and 11 patients (78.6%), and the cumulative recurrence rates at 6, 12, and 24 mo were 17.9%, 43.3%, and 71.2%, respectively, which did not differ significantly from those after the first CR of 20.5%, 44.0%, and 58.6%, respectively (P = 0.639). CONCLUSION: Closer monitoring and active treatments must be provided to patients with risk factors for early local recurrence of HCC. PMID:24944494

  4. Prostatic Fatty Acids and Cancer Recurrence Following Radical Prostatectomy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Results from some observational studies suggest that diet and energy balance influence the clinical course of early-stage prostate cancer. To evaluate possible mechanisms, we prospectively examined the relation between prostatic concentrations of fatty acids at diagnosis and cancer recurr...

  5. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkler, Ian H.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Jack, Wilma J.L.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Pedersen, Hans C.; Cameron, David A.; Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981-1989, 1990-1992, and 1993-1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35-5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0-16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5-20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  6. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  7. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  8. Improved outcome in asymptomatic recurrence following curative surgery for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Rojas-Flores, Miriam; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Villa, Antonio R; García-Aceituno, Luis; León-Rodríguez, Eucario

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome and resectability of patients with gastric cancer recurrence after curative surgery detected by follow-up endoscopy, according to the presence or absence of symptoms. All patients with gastric carcinoma, who underwent a curative gastrectomy, were retrospectively identified. We analyzed outcome and survival in patients compliant with routine follow-up who presented symptomatic and asymptomatic recurrence. Of the 119 resected patients, 63.0% had a recurrence, with an overall survival of 20.0 months. Fourteen patients were asymptomatic when recurrence was detected, whereas 61 patients were symptomatic. Median time to recurrence was 16.0 m for both groups. A local curative re-resection was possible in 2/14 (asymptomatic) and 1/61 (symptomatic). Asymptomatic patients had a longer median postrecurrence survival time of 9.0 months, compared with 2.0 months in the symptomatic patients (p=0.034). The median overall survival was greater in the asymptomatic vs symptomatic group (25.0 vs 20.0 months), although this did not reach statistical significance. The results from this study advocate that the presence or absence of symptoms is a good surrogate marker to assess biologic aggressiveness. The value of routine follow-up endoscopy to permit a higher rate of re-resection in asymptomatic patients remains to be established. PMID:20517658

  9. Predicting Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Self-Efficacy in Survivors by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D.; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. Sample 1,128 long-term survivors. Methods Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18–45 years (younger group) or 55–70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables’ prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Main Research Variables Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Findings Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. Conclusions The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of

  10. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  11. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  12. Recurrent R-spondin fusions in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Somasekar; Stawiski, Eric W; Durinck, Steffen; Modrusan, Zora; Storm, Elaine E; Conboy, Caitlin B; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Guan, Yinghui; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Guillory, Joseph; Ha, Connie; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J P; Stinson, Jeremy; Gnad, Florian; Huntley, Melanie A; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Haverty, Peter M; Bourgon, Richard; Wang, Weiru; Koeppen, Hartmut; Gentleman, Robert; Starr, Timothy K; Zhang, Zemin; Largaespada, David A; Wu, Thomas D; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2012-08-30

    Identifying and understanding changes in cancer genomes is essential for the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we analyse systematically more than 70 pairs of primary human colon tumours by applying next-generation sequencing to characterize their exomes, transcriptomes and copy-number alterations. We have identified 36,303 protein-altering somatic changes that include several new recurrent mutations in the Wnt pathway gene TCF7L2, chromatin-remodelling genes such as TET2 and TET3 and receptor tyrosine kinases including ERBB3. Our analysis for significantly mutated cancer genes identified 23 candidates, including the cell cycle checkpoint kinase ATM. Copy-number and RNA-seq data analysis identified amplifications and corresponding overexpression of IGF2 in a subset of colon tumours. Furthermore, using RNA-seq data we identified multiple fusion transcripts including recurrent gene fusions involving R-spondin family members RSPO2 and RSPO3 that together occur in 10% of colon tumours. The RSPO fusions were mutually exclusive with APC mutations, indicating that they probably have a role in the activation of Wnt signalling and tumorigenesis. Consistent with this we show that the RSPO fusion proteins were capable of potentiating Wnt signalling. The R-spondin gene fusions and several other gene mutations identified in this study provide new potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. PMID:22895193

  13. Cancer recurrence worry, risk perception, and informational-coping styles among Appalachian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; Desimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, Appalachian and non-Appalachian cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perceived risk data were generally older, less educated, and lower in monitoring, blunting, and health literacy. Additional resources are needed to assist Appalachians and those with cancers with poor prognoses (e.g., liver cancer, pancreatic cancer) to cope with worry associated with developing cancer again. More attention for cancer prevention is critical to improve quality of life in underserved populations where risk of cancer is greater. PMID:21240722

  14. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  15. Predictive Factor of Local Recurrence after Balloon-Occluded TACE with Miriplatin (MPT) in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Abe, Satoshi; Inoue, Ryousuke; Sugano, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Yuhsuke; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Nemoto, Takeo; Takeda, Keiko; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Miriplatin (MPT) is a novel platinum complex used in TACE that shows promise for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, rapid washout has been reported in some cases. Therefore, various methods of administration with MPT have been attempted to increase its therapeutic efficacy. One hopeful method is balloon-occluded TACE (B-TACE), but the therapeutic efficacy of B-TACE with MPT has not been evaluated. Aim To investigate the treatment outcomes and factors involved in local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT in HCC. Methods This study included 51 patients (55 nodules) with HCC lesions equal or less than 5 cm in diameter who underwent B-TACE with MPT between January 2012 and June 2013. Local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT and factors associated with local recurrence were evaluated. Results The overall local recurrence rate was 11.1% at 6 months and 26.2% at 12 months. The local recurrence rate did differ significantly depending on CT values immediately after B-TACE with MPT. Multivariate analysis also showed that the CT value after B-TACE with MPT was the only factor related to local recurrence after B-TACE. Conclusions B-TACE with MPT achieves relatively good local control of HCC. The plain CT value immediately after B-TACE with MPT is a predictive factor for local recurrence. In patients with unsatisfactory CT values, locoregional therapy or additional treatment is required. PMID:25047920

  16. Salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Syed, A.M. Nisar . E-mail: bvigil@memnet.org; Puthawala, Ajmel; Sharma, Anil; Frankel, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Background: A significant portion of head-and-neck cancer patients will develop persistent or recurrent disease after definitive treatment. Radiation therapy is often used as definitive therapy or as an adjunct to surgery. Recurrent cancer of the head and neck in the previously irradiated field is, thus, a common occurrence and poses a therapeutic challenge. Some studies have evaluated low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy as a therapeutic option, including a large case series with long-term follow-up by our own institution. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy offers therapeutic advantages over LDR brachytherapy. This study evaluates the local control and outcomes of patients with previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2002, 30 patients who received prior radiation therapy for primary tumors of the head and neck were treated for biopsy-proven recurrent disease. All patients received previous radiation as definitive therapy alone or as adjunct to surgery. All patients were inoperable, refused surgery, or had gross residual disease after salvage surgery for their recurrent disease. Thirty-six sites on the 30 patients were implanted by application of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy techniques with mean tumor dose of 34 Gy (18-48 Gy) in twice daily fractions of 300 to 400cGy per fraction. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 12 months, local tumor control was achieved in 69% of implanted sites. Disease-specific survival at 1 and 2 years was 54% and 45%, respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 56% and 37%, respectively. Grade 3/4 late complications occurred in 16% of the patients. No fatal complications occurred. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer. This study shows that comparable results are obtained by HDR brachytherapy with fewer late complications than

  17. Challenges and opportunities in measuring cancer recurrence in the United States.

    PubMed

    Warren, Joan L; Yabroff, K Robin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer recurrence and disease-free survival are key outcomes for measuring the burden of illness, assessing the quality of cancer care, and informing decisions about increasingly costly cancer therapies. Yet information about recurrence is not collected in cancer registries or other population-based data sources. To address the lack of population-based recurrence information, researchers are increasingly using algorithms applied to health claims to infer recurrence. However, the validity of these approaches has not been comprehensively evaluated. In this commentary, we review existing studies and discuss options for improving the availability of recurrence data. We found that the validity of claims-based approaches appears promising in small, single institution studies, but larger population-based studies have identified substantial limitations with using claims to identify recurrence. With the increasing availability of health data, there are potential options that can be implemented to enhance information about recurrence. These options include design of software for the electronic medical record that enables rapid and standardized reporting of recurrence, use of electronic pathology reports to facilitate streamlined collection of recurrence by cancer registries, and mandates by insurers to require reporting of recurrence on health claims submitted by physicians. All of these options will require that governmental agencies, health insurers, professional societies, and other groups recognize the importance of population-based recurrence data and determine that this information is a priority for assessing cancer outcomes and costs. PMID:25971299

  18. Safety of topotecan in the treatment of recurrent small-cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Garst, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, topotecan, is approved for the treatment of recurrent small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and ovarian cancer (OC). Patients with recurrent SCLC and OC typically experience multiple relapses and receive multiple rounds of chemotherapy. In these settings, disease stabilisation is considered a treatment benefit, and quality-of-life effects and cumulative toxicities of treatments should be considered. Many patients with recurrent cancer may be predisposed to treatment-related adverse events because of advanced age, renal impairment or extensive prior therapy. The standard regimen of topotecan, 1.5 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 of a 21-day cycle, has generally mild nonhaematological toxicity and a well-defined haematological toxicity profile characterised by reversible and noncumulative neutropenia. Alternative regimens may lower the incidence of haematological toxicities and maintain antitumour efficacy. Topotecan may provide physicians with a versatile therapeutic option for the treatment of patients with relapsed SCLC or OC. PMID:17181452

  19. Salvage HDR Brachytherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Previous Definitive Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chien Peter; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Nash, Marc; Gottschalk, Alexander; Chang, Albert J.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate efficacy and toxicity of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 52 consecutively accrued patients undergoing salvage HDRB between 1998 and 2009 for locally recurrent prostate cancer after previous definitive RT. After pathologic confirmation of locally recurrent disease, patients received 36 Gy in 6 fractions. Twenty-four patients received neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before salvage, and no patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Determination of biochemical failure after salvage HDRB was based on the Phoenix definition. Overall survival (OS) and bF distributions were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4), were documented. Results: Median follow-up after salvage HDRB was 59.6 months. The 5-year OS estimate was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80%-97%) with median survival not yet reached. Five-year biochemical control after salvage was 51% (95% CI: 34%-66%). Median PSA nadir postsalvage was 0.1 (range: 0-7.2) reached at a median of 10.2 months after completing HDRB. As for complications, acute and late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in only 2% and 2%, respectively. No grade 2 or higher acute GI events and 4% grade 2 GI late events were observed. On univariate analysis, disease-free interval after initial definitive RT (P=.07), percent of positive cores at the time of diagnosis (P=.08), interval from first recurrence to salvage HDRB (P=.09), and pre-HDRB prostate-specific antigen (P=.07) were each of borderline significance in predicting biochemical control after salvage HDRB. Conclusions: Prostate HDRB is an effective salvage modality with relatively few long-term toxicities. We

  20. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

  1. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using {sup 11}C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Leliveld, Anna M.; Nijman, Rien J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Jong, Igle J. de

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq {sup 11}C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for {sup 11}C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: {sup 11}C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  2. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  3. Target Definition in Salvage Radiotherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Advanced Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Amzalag, Gaël; Rager, Olivier; Tabouret-Viaud, Claire; Wissmeyer, Michael; Sfakianaki, Electra; de Perrot, Thomas; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Garibotto, Valentina; Zilli, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) represents the main treatment option for relapsing prostate cancer in patients after radical prostatectomy. Several open questions remain unanswered in terms of target volumes definition and delivered doses for SRT: the effective dose necessary to achieve biochemical control in the SRT setting may be different if the tumor recurrence is micro- or macroscopic. At the same time, irradiation of only the prostatic bed or of the whole pelvis will depend on the localization of the recurrence, local or locoregional. In the “theragnostic imaging” era, molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) constitutes a useful tool for clinicians to define the site of the recurrence, the extent of disease, and individualize salvage treatments. The best option currently available in clinical routine is the combination of radiolabeled choline PET imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), associating the nodal and distant metastases identification based on PET with the local assessment by MRI. A new generation of targeted tracers, namely, prostate-specific membrane antigen, show promising results, with a contrast superior to choline imaging and a higher detection rate even for low prostate-specific antigen levels; validation studies are ongoing. Finally, imaging targeting bone remodeling, using whole-body SPECT–CT, is a relevant complement to molecular/metabolic PET imaging when bone involvement is suspected. PMID:27065024

  4. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-16

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  5. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  6. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  7. Cetuximab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  9. Outcome in recurrent head neck cancer treated with salvage-IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Gabriela; Graetz, Klaus W; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent head neck cancer (rHNC) is a known unfavourable prognostic condition. The purpose of this work was to analyse our rHNC subgroup treated with salvage-intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for curable recurrence after initial surgery alone. Patients Between 4/2003–9/2008, 44 patients with squamous cell rHNC were referred for IMRT, mean/median 33/21 (3–144) months after initial surgery. None had prior head neck radiation. 41% underwent definitive, 59% postoperative IMRT (66–72.6 Gy). 70% had simultaneous chemotherapy. Methods Retrospective analysis of the outcome following salvage IMRT in rHNC patients was performed. Results After mean/median 25/21 months (3–67), 22/44 (50%) patients were alive with no disease; 4 (9%) were alive with disease. 18 patients (41%) died of disease. Kaplan Meier 2-year disease specific survival (DSS), disease free survival (DFS), local and nodal control rates of the cohort were 59/49/56 and 68%, respectively. Known risk factors (advanced initial pTN, marginal initial resection, multiple recurrences) showed no significant outcome differences. Risk factors and the presence of macroscopic recurrence gross tumor volume (rGTV) in oral cavity patients vs others resulted in statistically significantly lower DSS (30 vs 70% at 2 years, p = 0.03). With respect to the assessed unfavourable outcome following salvage treatment, numbers needed to treat to avoid one recurrence with initial postoperative IMRT have, in addition, been calculated. Conclusion A low salvage rate of only ~50% at 2 years was found. Calculated numbers of patients needed to treat with postoperative radiation after initial surgery, in order to avoid recurrence and tumor-specific death, suggest a rather generous use of adjuvant irradiation, usually with simultaneous chemotherapy. PMID:19091097

  10. Posterior high sacral segmental disconnection prior to anterior en bloc exenteration for recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, K G M; Solomon, M J; Austin, K K S; Lee, P J; Stalley, P

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a novel technique for en bloc resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer that invades the high sacral bone (above S3). The involved segment of the sacrum is mobilised with osteotomes during an initial posterior approach before an anterior abdominal phase where the segment of sacral bone is delivered with the specimen. This allows en bloc resection of the involved sacrum while preserving uninvolved distal and contralateral sacral bone and nerve roots. The goal is to obtain a clear bony margin and offer a chance of cure while improving functional outcomes by maintaining pelvic stability and minimising neurological deficit. PMID:27000857

  11. Pak1, adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, and breast cancer recurrence risk in a Danish population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Thomas P; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Lash, Timothy L; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Ording, Anne Gulbech; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Hellberg, Ylva

    2016-06-01

    Background Adjuvant tamoxifen therapy approximately halves the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer recurrence, but many women do not respond to therapy. Observational studies nested in clinical trial populations suggest that overexpression or nuclear localization of p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) in primary tumors predicts tamoxifen failure. Material and methods We measured the association between Pak1 expression and breast cancer recurrence in a Danish population-based case-control study. Pak1 cytoplasmic expression level and nuclear positivity were determined by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tumors from recurrence cases and matched controls from two breast cancer populations; women diagnosed with ER-positive tumors who received at least one year of tamoxifen therapy (ER+/TAM+), and women diagnosed with ER-negative tumors who survived for at least one year (ER-/TAM-). Pak1 staining was assessed by a single, blinded pathologist, and associations were estimated with conditional logistic regression models. Results We included 541 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER+/TAM + group and 300 recurrence cases and 1:1 matched controls from the ER-/TAM - group. Pak1 cytoplasmic intensity was not associated with breast cancer recurrence in either group (ER+/TAM + ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.91, 95% CI 0.57, 1.5; ER-/TAM - ORadj for strong vs. no cytoplasmic staining = 0.74, 95% CI 0.39, 1.4). Associations between Pak1 nuclear positivity and breast cancer recurrence were similarly near null in both groups. Conclusion Pak1 positivity in primary breast tumors was neither predictive nor prognostic in this prospective, population-based study. PMID:27056567

  12. Soy isoflavones and risk of cancer recurrence in a cohort of breast cancer survivors: the Life After Cancer Epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Guha, Neela; Kwan, Marilyn L; Quesenberry, Charles P; Weltzien, Erin K; Castillo, Adrienne L; Caan, Bette J

    2009-11-01

    Soy isoflavones, structurally similar to endogenous estrogens, may affect breast cancer through both hormonally mediated and non-hormonally related mechanisms. Although the effects of soy are not well understood, some breast cancer survivors increase their soy intake post-diagnosis in attempt to improve their prognosis. Therefore, we examined the role of soy isoflavone intake and the risk of breast cancer recurrence by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, and tamoxifen therapy. A cohort of 1,954 female breast cancer survivors, diagnosed during 1997-2000, was prospectively followed for 6.31 years and 282 breast cancer recurrences were ascertained. Isoflavone intake was assessed by mailing modified Block and supplemental soy food frequency questionnaires to participants, on average 23 months post-diagnosis. Risk of breast cancer recurrence, measured by hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), was estimated using multivariable delayed entry Cox proportional hazards models. Suggestive trends for a reduced risk of cancer recurrence were observed with increasing quintiles of daidzein and glycetin intake compared to no intake among postmenopausal women (P for trend: P = 0.08 for daidzein, P = 0.06 for glycetin) and among tamoxifen users (P = 0.10 for daidzein, P = 0.05 for glycetin). Among postmenopausal women treated with tamoxifen, there was an approximately 60% reduction in breast cancer recurrence comparing the highest to the lowest daidzein intakes (>1,453 vs. <7.7 microg/day; HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-0.79, P = 0.008). Soy isoflavones consumed at levels comparable to those in Asian populations may reduce the risk of cancer recurrence in women receiving tamoxifen therapy and moreover, appears not to interfere with tamoxifen efficacy. Further confirmation is required in other large prospective studies before recommendations regarding soy intake can be issued to breast cancer survivors. PMID:19221874

  13. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate registered 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and September 1, 2009, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 8 patients, brachytherapy in 7 patients or proton therapy in 5 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 16.0 (3-80) months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-intermediate and high risk groups were 86% and 50%, respectively. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 2 of the 16 patients (13%), urinary tract infection or dysuria syndrome in eight (26%), and urinary incontinence in one (6%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (6%). Transrectal HIFU is an effective treatment for recurrence after radiotherapy especially in patients with low- and intermediate risk groups.

  14. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.; Uchida, T.

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and September 1, 2009, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 8 patients, brachytherapy in 7 patients or proton therapy in 5 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 16.0 (3-80) months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-intermediate and high risk groups were 86% and 50%, respectively. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 2 of the 16 patients (13%), urinary tract infection or dysuria syndrome in eight (26%), and urinary incontinence in one (6%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (6%). Transrectal HIFU is an effective treatment for recurrence after radiotherapy especially in patients with low- and intermediate risk groups.

  15. Pertuzumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  16. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  17. Cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuyo; Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tomita, Eri; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-03-01

    Although local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy is sometimes reported, cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with hemodialysis who developed cystic local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma accompanied by acquired cystic disease of the kidney in the retroperitoneal space after laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. A cystic tumor of 5.1 cm in diameter occurred in the left retroperitoneal space 15 months after left laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, and enlarged to 7.2 cm in diameter with enhanced mass along the wall of the cyst 36 months after surgery. The cystic tumor was removed and showed local recurrence of renal cell carcinoma on pathological examination. PMID:23909823

  18. Soft tissue metastases and lung cancer recurrence detected by Tc-99m depreotide scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Miliziano, John S; Bradley, Yong C

    2002-06-01

    A 63-year-old woman with previously treated stage I lung cancer was reexamined 5 years later for recurrence. A conventional work-up using computed tomographic scanning and transbronchial biopsy showed nothing abnormal. A Tc-99m depreotide scan, however, led to a noninvasive diagnosis of lung cancer recurrence with metastases, and it directed a noninvasive tissue diagnosis. PMID:12045431

  19. Phase I/II Trial Evaluating Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Salvaging Treatment of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lin; Hu, Jiyi; Guan, Xiyin; Gao, Jing; Lu, Rong; Lu, Jiade J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy is the mainstay strategy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMXT) alone is the current standard for stage I and II NPC. For stage III and IV A/B diseases, concurrent chemotherapy should be provided in addition to IMXT. However, optimal treatment for locally recurrent NPC after previous definitive dose of radiotherapy is lacking. Various techniques including brachytherapy, IMXT, stereotactic radiosurgery or radiotherapy (SRS or SBRT) have been used in the management of locally recurrent NPC. Due to the inherent limitation of these techniques, i.e., limited range of irradiation or over-irradiation to surrounding normal tissues, moderate efficacy has been observed at the cost of severe toxicities. Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) offers potential physical and biological advantages over photon and proton radiotherapy. Due to the inverted dose profile of particle beams and their greater energy deposition within the Bragg peak, precise dose delivery to the target volume(s) without exposing the surrounding organs at risk to extra doses is possible. In addition, CIRT provides an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to photon and proton radiotherapy. Such advantages may translate to improved outcomes after irradiation in terms of disease control in radio-resistant and previously treated, recurrent malignancies. It is therefore reasonable to postulate that recurrent NPC after high-dose radiotherapy could be more resistant to re-irradiation using photons. Reports on the treatment of radio-resistant malignancies in the head and neck region such as melanoma, sarcoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) have demonstrated superior local control rates from CIRT as compared to photon irradiation. Thus patients with recurrent NPC are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological effectiveness of carbon ions. As effective retreatment strategy is lacking for locally recurrent NPC

  20. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  1. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  2. Pharmacotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koji; Onda, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-05-01

    Several 'lines of therapy' that utilize cytotoxic agents and are driven by platinum-free intervals are the current standard of care for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. For patients with platinum-resistant disease, single agent chemotherapy (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, topotecan, gemcitabine or weekly paclitaxel) is the standard of care. For patients with platinum-sensitive disease, combination chemotherapy (carboplatin plus paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or gemcitabine) is the standard of care. In addition, antiangiogenic therapy using bevacizumab is an established option. Future directions could include 'lines of therapy' with biologic agents driven by specific biologic targets. Data from antiangiogenic agents (trebananib, pazopanib and cediranib), antifolate drugs (farletuzumab and vintafolide), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (olaparib and veliparib), mTOR inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and immune editing agents (nivolumab) have been summarized in this review. PMID:25765457

  3. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rudzianskas, V; Inciura, A; Juozaityte, E; Rudzianskiene, M; Kubilius, R; Vaitkus, S; Kaseta, M; Adliene, D

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results of hypofractionated accelerated CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT using 2.5 Gy per fraction. From December 2008 to March 2010, 30 patients were treated for recurrence of previously-irradiated head and neck cancer. Thirteen patients underwent surgical resection followed by HDR-BRT to the tumour bed. Seventeen patients were treated with HDR-BRT only. All patients received 2.5 Gy twice per day for a total dosage of 30 Gy. The overall survival rate (OS) for the entire group at 1 and 2-years was 63% and 47%, while local control (LC) was 73% and 67%, and disease-free survival (DFS) was 60% and 53%, respectively. Patients treated with surgical resection and HDR-BRT showed an improvement in both 2-year LC (77% vs. 47%, p = 0.013) and 2-year OS (62% vs. 35%, p = 0.035) compared to patients treated with HDR-BRT only. Median OS for pre-treatment tumour volumes ≤ 36 cm3 was 22 months and 9.2 months for those > 36 cm3 (p = 0.038). Grade III and IV late complications occurred in 3% of patients. There were no grade V complications. The interstitial HDR brachytherapy regimen using 2.5 Gy twice daily fractions at a total dose of 30 Gy offers an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent previously-irradiated head and neck cancer with a low rate of late high grade toxicity. Surgical resection had a positive effect on survival and local control in management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:23326008

  4. Neuroendocrine immunophenotype as predictor of clinical recurrence in 110 patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Autorino, R; Lamendola, M G; De Luca, G; De Sio, M; Giuliano, F; D' Armiento, M; De Placido, S; Conti, P; Di Lorenzo, G

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between NE expression and well-known prognostic factors and assessed whether tumor relapse after radical surgery correlates with the extent of NE differentiation. Radical prostatectomy specimens from 110 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were assessed. Patients were followed up every three months for the first two years after surgery and six monthly for 5 additional years until failure, or for a mean of 48 months from the time of surgery for those who did not experience failure. The percentage of cells showing CgA immunoreactivity was evaluated using a visual quantitative method. Tumor staining was categorized as positive if greater than 10 percent and negative if less than 10 percent of tumor cells were stained, to ensure that only cases with significant positivity were included in the positive group. The median follow-up was 5.4 years (range 1.8 to 7.2). The median time to clinical recurrence was 7.5 years and the median time to biochemical recurrence was 2.8 years. Of 31 patients (28 percent) who experienced a PSA recurrence, 15 developed a clinical recurrence. The mean preoperative PSA level was 9 ng/ml (range 2.7 to 25). Most cases were well differentiated (Gleason score less than 7), intraprostatic (less than pT2) tumors. Immunoreactivity in >or= 10 percent of the cells was seen in 17.2 percent (n=19) of the tumor specimens. The preoperative PSA level, Gleason score, use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, lymphnode positivity were not statistically associated with NE expression. Only the primary pathologic stage appeared to be associated with CgA staining in the primary tumor (p=0.001). On the univariate analysis NE expression did not predict biochemical recurrence free survival, whereas it was associated with clinical recurrence. NE differentiation in clinically localized prostate cancer can be associated with failure after definitive surgical treatment, even if no conclusions can be drawn regarding its value

  5. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  6. pN0(i+) Breast Cancer: Treatment Patterns, Locoregional Recurrence, and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Lesperance, Maria F.; Berrang, Tanya; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Truong, Pauline T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To examine treatment patterns, recurrence, and survival outcomes in patients with pN0(i+) breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5999 women with AJCC (6th edition) pT1-3, pN0-N1a, M0 breast cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 4342 (72%) had pN0, 96 (2%) had pN0(i+), 349 (6%) had pNmic (micrometastases >0.2 mm to ≤2 mm), and 1212 (20%) had pN1a (1-3 positive macroscopic nodes) disease. Treatment characteristics and 5-year Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence (RR), locoregional recurrence (LRR), and overall survival were compared between nodal subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. A 1:3 case-match analysis examined outcomes in pN0(i+) cases compared with pN0 controls matched for similar tumor and treatment characteristics. Results: Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Adjuvant systemic therapy use increased with nodal stage: 81%, 92%, 95%, and 94% in pN0, pN0(i+), pNmic, and pN1a disease, respectively (P<.001). Nodal radiation therapy (RT) use also increased with nodal stage: 1.7% in pN0, 27% in pN0(i+), 33% in pNmic, and 63% in pN1a cohorts (P<.001). Five-year Kaplan-Meier outcomes in pN0 versus pN0(i+) cases were as follows: local recurrence 1.7% versus 3.7% (P=.20), RR 0.5% versus 2.2% (P=.02), and LRR 2.1% versus 5.8% (P=.02). There were no RR events in 26 patients with pN0(i+) disease who received nodal RT and 2 RR events in 70 patients who did not receive nodal RT. On multivariable analysis, pN0(i+) was not associated with worse locoregional control or survival. On case-match analysis, LRR and overall survival were similar between pN0(i+) and matched pN0 counterparts. Conclusions: Nodal involvement with isolated tumor cells is not a significant prognostic factor for LRR or survival in this study's multivariable and case-match analyses. These data do not support the routine use of nodal RT in the setting of pN0(i+) disease. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal

  7. Quantum recurrence and fractional dynamic localization in ac-driven perfect state transfer Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-06-15

    Quantum recurrence and dynamic localization are investigated in a class of ac-driven tight-binding Hamiltonians, the Krawtchouk quantum chain, which in the undriven case provides a paradigmatic Hamiltonian model that realizes perfect quantum state transfer and mirror inversion. The equivalence between the ac-driven single-particle Krawtchouk Hamiltonian H{sup -hat} (t) and the non-interacting ac-driven bosonic junction Hamiltonian enables to determine in a closed form the quasi energy spectrum of H{sup -hat} (t) and the conditions for exact wave packet reconstruction (dynamic localization). In particular, we show that quantum recurrence, which is predicted by the general quantum recurrence theorem, is exact for the Krawtchouk quantum chain in a dense range of the driving amplitude. Exact quantum recurrence provides perfect wave packet reconstruction at a frequency which is fractional than the driving frequency, a phenomenon that can be referred to as fractional dynamic localization.

  8. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  10. Patterns of failure after primary local therapy for prostate cancer and rationale for secondary therapy.

    PubMed

    Grossfeld, Gary D; Li, Yu-ping; P Lubeck, Deborah P; Carroll, Peter R

    2002-09-01

    The timing and type of treatment for patients with biochemical disease recurrence after local therapy for prostate cancer remains controversial. This is because of many unresolved issues surrounding the natural history of disease progression in such patients, including the limited ability of clinical measures to accurately define local versus distant disease recurrence. Clinicians generally rely on clinical tumor characteristics, such as tumor stage, grade, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after local therapy, to distinguish local from distant recurrence. This determination is important, because patients with local recurrence may be candidates for a second, potentially curative treatment, whereas those with distant recurrence are generally treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Data from a national disease registry of patients with prostate cancer, the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE), suggest that the use of secondary cancer treatment after local therapy for prostate cancer is common. For patients initially treated with radical prostatectomy, secondary treatment appears to be nearly equally divided between postoperative radiation and ADT, whereas >90% of patients receiving a secondary treatment after radiation are treated with ADT. Serum PSA at diagnosis, Gleason score, and type of initial treatment appear to be predictors of secondary treatment use in this setting. Patient age, lymph node status, and margin status appear to be predictors of secondary treatment with ADT or radiation for patients initially treated with radical prostatectomy. PMID:12231051

  11. RECURRENCE OF HIGH-RISK BLADDER CANCER: A POPULATION-BASED ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Chamie, Karim; Litwin, Mark S.; Bassett, Jeffrey C.; Daskivich, Timothy J.; Lai, Julie; Hanley, Jan M.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Saigal, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with bladder cancer are apt to develop multiple recurrences that require intervention. We examined the recurrence, progression and bladder cancer-related mortality rates in a cohort of individuals with high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods Using linked SEER-Medicare data, we identified subjects with a diagnosis of high-grade, non-muscle-invasive disease in 1992–2002 and were followed until 2007. We then used multivariate competing-risks regression analyses to examine recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates. Results Of 7,410 subjects, 2,897 (39.1%) experienced a recurrence without progression, 2,449 (33.0%) experienced disease progression, of whom 981 succumbed to bladder cancer. Using competing-risks regression analysis, we found the 10-year recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates to be 74.3%, 33.3%, and 12.3%, respectively. Stage T1 was the only variable associated with a higher rate of recurrence. Women, black race, undifferentiated grade, stage Tis and T1 were associated with a higher risk of progression and mortality. Advanced age (≥70) was associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer-related mortality. Conclusions Nearly three-fourths of patients diagnosed with high-risk bladder cancer will recur, progress, or die within ten years of their diagnosis. Even though most patients do not die of bladder cancer, the vast majority endures the morbidity of recurrence and progression of their cancer. Increasing efforts should be made to offer patients intravesical therapy with the goal of minimizing the incidence of recurrences. Furthermore, the high recurrence rate seen during the first two years of diagnosis warrants an intense surveillance schedule. PMID:23737352

  12. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. High-Dose-Rate Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, David J.; Chan, Kelvin; Wolden, Suzanne; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Chiu, Johnny; Cohen, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To report the use of high-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) for recurrent head-and-neck cancer (HNC) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and February 2007, 34 patients with recurrent HNC received 38 HDR-IORT treatments using a Harrison-Anderson-Mick applicator with Iridium-192. A single fraction (median, 15 Gy; range, 10-20 Gy) was delivered intraoperatively after surgical resection to the region considered at risk for close or positive margins. In all patients, the target region was previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (median dose, 63 Gy; range, 24-74 Gy). The 1- and 2-year estimates for in-field local progression-free survival (LPFS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 23 months (range, 6-54 months), 8 patients (24%) are alive and without evidence of disease. The 1- and 2-year LPFS rates are 66% and 56%, respectively, with 13 (34%) in-field recurrences. The 1- and 2-year DMFS rates are 81% and 62%, respectively, with 10 patients (29%) developing distant failure. The 1- and 2-year OS rates are 73% and 55%, respectively, with a median time to OS of 24 months. Severe complications included cellulitis (5 patients), fistula or wound complications (3 patients), osteoradionecrosis (1 patient), and radiation-induced trigeminal neuralgia (1 patient). Conclusions: HDR-IORT has shown encouraging local control outcomes in patients with recurrent HNC with acceptable rates of treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up with a larger cohort of patients is needed to fully assess the benefit of this procedure.

  14. A Trial for Patients With Advanced/Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-11-13

    Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Urogenital Neoplasms; Genital Neoplasms, Female; Uterine Neoplasms; Endometrial Neoplasms; Cancer of Endometrium; Endometrial Cancer; Cancer of the Endometrium; Endometrium Cancer; Neoplasms, Endometrial

  15. Impact of Margin Status on Local Recurrence After Mastectomy for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. Results: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.

  16. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  17. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  18. Risk of cancer-specific mortality following recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Michael; Sjoberg, Daniel; Comploj, Evi; Margulis, Vitaly; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Lee, Richard K.; Hansen, Jens; Cha, Eugene K.; Raman, Jay D.; Remzi, Mesut; Bensalah, Karim; Novara, Giacomo; Matin, Surena F.; Chun, Felix K.; Kikuchi, Eiji; Kassouf, Wassim; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan I.; Lotan, Yair; Seitz, Christian; Pycha, Armin; Zigeuner, Richard; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Scherr, Douglas S.; Vickers, Andrew; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the natural history and identify predictors of cancer-specific survival in patients who experience disease recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Methods Of 2,494 UTUC patients treated with RNU without neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 597 patients experienced disease recurrence. 148 patients (25%) received adjuvant chemotherapy before disease recurrence. Multivariable Cox regression model addressed time to cancer-specific mortality after disease recurrence. Results The median time from RNU to disease recurrence was 12 months (IQR 5–22). 491 of 597 (82%) patients died from UTUC and 8 patients (1.3%) died from other causes. The median time from disease recurrence to death of UTUC was 10 months. Actuarial cancer-specific survival estimate at 12 months after disease recurrence was 35%. On multivariable analysis that adjusted for the effects of standard clinico-pathologic characteristics, higher tumor stages (HR pT3 vs. pT0-T1: 1.66, p=0.001; HR pT4 vs. pT0-T1: 1.90, p=0.002), absence of lymph node dissection (HR 1.28, p=0.041), ureteral tumor location (HR 1.44, p<0.0005) and a shorter interval from surgery to disease recurrence (p<0.0005) were significantly associated with cancer-specific mortality. The adjusted 6, 12 and 24 months post-recurrence cancer-specific mortality was 73%, 60% and 57%, respectively. Conclusion Approximately 80% of patients who experience disease recurrence after RNU die within two years post-recurrence. Patients with non-organ-confined stage, absence of lymph node dissection, ureteral tumor location and/or shorter time to disease recurrence died of their tumor faster than their counterparts. These factors should be considered in patient counseling and risk-stratification for salvage treatment decision-making. PMID:22805867

  19. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  20. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  1. GTI-2040, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-26

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Risk Factors for Recurrence in Filipinos with Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Canto, Abigail Uy; Maningat, Patricia Deanna D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) has increased in recent years. Despite its excellent prognosis, increasing morbidity from recurrent diseases continues to affect long-term outcomes. Among at-risk populations, Filipinos have the highest incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide, characterized by a highly aggressive and recurrent form of disease. Here, we sought to identify risk factors associated with disease recurrence among Filipinos with WDTC. Methods This retrospective cohort study examined 723 patients diagnosed with WDTC seen at Philippine General Hospital. Affected individuals were classified based on the presence or absence of disease recurrence. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine significant predictors of recurrence. Results Multiple risk factors, including age >45 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.44), multifocality of cancer (OR, 1.43), nodal involvement (OR, 4.0), and distant metastases at presentation (OR, 2.78), were significantly associated with a recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In contrast, follicular variant histology (OR, 0.60) and postsurgical radioactive iodine therapy (OR, 0.31) were protective for PTC recurrence. Distant metastases at presentation (OR, 19.4) and postsurgical radioactive iodine therapy (OR, 0.41) were associated with follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) recurrence. Conclusion Lymph node metastases at presentation was the strongest predictor of recurrence in PTC, whereas distant metastases at presentation was the strongest for FTC recurrence. Among Filipinos, stratification of WDTC patients based on recurrence risk factors identified in this study will be helpful in guiding the intensity of treatment strategies and long-term thyroid cancer surveillance. PMID:26485470

  3. Three Different Locations of a Sentinel Node Highlight the Importance of Performing a Sentinel Node Biopsy in Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Adrien; Huyghe, Ivan; Stroobants, Sigrid; Tjalma, Wiebren A.A.

    2016-01-01

    A local breast cancer recurrence or a new breast cancer in the previously treated breast is a staging challenge. Staging is important to tailor the local and the systemic treatment. Earlier treatment(s) can disrupt the primary lymphatic drainage. After the disruption, new lymphatic drainage pathways are often created. The identification of these new pathways together with their sentinel node(s) (SN) is important for retreatment. A fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computerized tomography could be useful to identify the involved node(s), but, unfortunately, there is no evidence to support this. Ideally, in the case of a recurrence, an SN biopsy should be performed in order to identify the “new” draining lymph node(s). This new draining SN(s) can be located in unexpected places, and tumor invasion will lead to a change in the management. PMID:26792995

  4. Rapid Extensive Recurrence of Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Are Both Therapy and Cancer Biology the Culprit?

    PubMed

    Vyas, Dinesh; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Chaturvedi, Lakshmishankar; Gieric, Laput; Ching, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) comprises 17-20% of all breast cancers and is one of the most common breast cancers. The lack of therapy and failure of existing therapy has been a challenge for clinicians. Doxorubicin (DOX) is the first-line therapy, however, it has significant limitations. Rapid extensive recurrence with metastasis in any cancer has been a challenge for surgeons and medical oncologists. The challenge can be due to failure of therapy, drug resistance, or epigenetic changes. Here, we are discussing a stage I breast cancer patient, operated and treated with appropriate chemotherapy with complete response, which recurred in less than 8 months and metastasized to bone, liver and other organs. We are also presenting lab data of the IL-6 secretions on exposure to DOX in one of the most commonly used TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 upon exposure to DOX shows an increase in IL-6 levels more than the already elevated IL-6 levels. This might be a reason for early recurrence. We concluded that patients with TNBC might benefit from a standard DOX treatment regimen with an inflammation-blocking agent. PMID:26767086

  5. Rapid Extensive Recurrence of Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Are Both Therapy and Cancer Biology the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Dinesh; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Chaturvedi, Lakshmishankar; Gieric, Laput; Ching, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) comprises 17-20% of all breast cancers and is one of the most common breast cancers. The lack of therapy and failure of existing therapy has been a challenge for clinicians. Doxorubicin (DOX) is the first-line therapy, however, it has significant limitations. Rapid extensive recurrence with metastasis in any cancer has been a challenge for surgeons and medical oncologists. The challenge can be due to failure of therapy, drug resistance, or epigenetic changes. Here, we are discussing a stage I breast cancer patient, operated and treated with appropriate chemotherapy with complete response, which recurred in less than 8 months and metastasized to bone, liver and other organs. We are also presenting lab data of the IL-6 secretions on exposure to DOX in one of the most commonly used TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231. Breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 upon exposure to DOX shows an increase in IL-6 levels more than the already elevated IL-6 levels. This might be a reason for early recurrence. We concluded that patients with TNBC might benefit from a standard DOX treatment regimen with an inflammation-blocking agent. PMID:26767086

  6. Rectal cancer. Treatment advances that reduce recurrence rates and lengthen survival.

    PubMed

    Sexe, R; Miedema, B W

    1993-07-01

    The risk of malignant disease arising in rectal mucosa is high. Surgery is the most effective form of treatment but results in cure in only 50% of patients. Adjuvant preoperative radiation therapy reduces the likelihood of local recurrence but does not improve survival rates. Fluorouracil is the most effective agent for adjuvant chemotherapy and slightly improves survival when given after surgery. Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy appears to have a synergistic effect, and recent studies show that providing this combination after surgery improves survival. Future trends in the treatment of rectal cancer are expected to include expanded use of local excision to preserve anal sphincter function, preoperative use of a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, perioperative use of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulating therapy, and use of tumor antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:8321771

  7. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. Washout after lobectomy: is water more effective than normal saline in preventing local recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Tsakok, Teresa; Tsakok, Maria; Damji, Charlene; Watson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: ‘is water washout more effective than normal saline washout after lobectomy in preventing local recurrence?’ Altogether more than 48 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Tumour cell ‘spillage’ after cancer resection is linked to a worse prognosis, so washout to minimize contamination is an established surgical technique. While the mechanical effects of lavage are well validated, the differential cytocidal effects of water versus saline as irrigation fluids are not. There are currently no studies addressing this issue in the thoracic surgery setting, after lung cancer lobectomy. However, the majority of relevant papers describe the use of basic in vitro methods and animal models to produce data that can conceivably be extrapolated to the clinical question in hand. The number of studies is small, and some have technical limitations. While two of the better-designed experiments suggest that water exerts a superior cytocidal effect on tumour cells, data from other studies are somewhat unimpressive, with two studies reporting that water washout controls tumour growth to a lesser extent than saline. This, together with the complete paucity of clinical trials on the subject, leads us to conclude that water is unlikely to represent a superior irrigation fluid in lung cancer patients after lobectomy. PMID:22159256

  9. DNA Methylation profiles as predictors of recurrence in non muscle invasive bladder cancer: an MS-MLPA approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) generally has a good long-term prognosis, up to 80% of patients will nevertheless experience local recurrence after the primary tumor resection. The search for markers capable of accurately identifying patients at high risk of recurrence is ongoing. We retrospectively evaluated the methylation status of a panel of 24 tumor suppressor genes (TIMP3, APC, CDKN2A, MLH1, ATM, RARB, CDKN2B, HIC1, CHFR, BRCA1, CASP8, CDKN1B, PTEN, BRCA2, CD44, RASSF1, DAPK1, FHIT, VHL, ESR1, TP73, IGSF4, GSTP1 and CDH13) in primary lesions to obtain information about their role in predicting local recurrence in NMIBC. Methods Formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples from 74 patients operated on for bladder cancer were analyzed by methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA): 36 patients had relapsed and 38 were disease-free at the 5-year follow up. Methylation status was considered as a dichotomous variable and genes showing methylation ≥20% were defined as “positive”. Results Methylation frequencies were higher in non recurring than recurring tumors. A statistically significant difference was observed for HIC1 (P = 0.03), GSTP1 (P = 0.02) and RASSF1 (P = 0.03). The combination of the three genes showed 78% sensitivity and 66% specificity in identifying recurrent patients, with an overall accuracy of 72%. Conclusions Our preliminary data suggest a potential role of HIC1, GSTP1 and RASSF1 in predicting local recurrence in NMIBC. Such information could help clinicians to identify patients at high risk of recurrence who require close monitoring during follow up. PMID:24252461

  10. Osteosarcoma of the spine: prognostic variables for local recurrence and overall survival, a multicenter ambispective study.

    PubMed

    Dekutoski, Mark B; Clarke, Michelle J; Rose, Peter; Luzzati, Alessandro; Rhines, Laurence D; Varga, Peter P; Fisher, Charles G; Chou, Dean; Fehlings, Michael G; Reynolds, Jeremy J; Williams, Richard; Quraishi, Nasir A; Germscheid, Niccole M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Boriani, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Primary spinal osteosarcomas are rare and aggressive neoplasms. Poor outcomes can occur, as obtaining marginal margins is technically demanding; further Enneking-appropriate en bloc resection can have significant morbidity. The goal of this study is to identify prognostic variables for local recurrence and mortality in surgically treated patients diagnosed with a primary osteosarcoma of the spine. METHODS A multicenter ambispective database of surgically treated patients with primary spine osteosarcomas was developed by AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor. Patient demographic, diagnosis, treatment, perioperative morbidity, local recurrence, and cross-sectional survival data were collected. Tumors were classified in 2 cohorts: Enneking appropriate (EA) and Enneking inappropriate (EI), as defined by pathology margin matching Enneking-recommended surgical margins. Prognostic variables were analyzed in reference to local recurrence and survival. RESULTS Between 1987 and 2012, 58 patients (32 female patients) underwent surgical treatment for primary spinal osteosarcoma. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3.5 ± 3.5 years (range 0.5 days to 14.3 years). The median survival for the entire cohort was 6.7 years postoperative. Twenty-four (41%) patients died, and 17 (30%) patients suffered a local recurrence, 10 (59%) of whom died. Twenty-nine (53%) patients underwent EA resection while 26 (47%) patients underwent EI resection with a postoperative median survival of 6.8 and 3.7 years, respectively (p = 0.048). EI patients had a higher rate of local recurrence than EA patients (p = 0.001). Patient age, previous surgery, biopsy type, tumor size, spine level, and chemotherapy timing did not significantly influence recurrence and survival. CONCLUSIONS Osteosarcoma of the spine presents a significant challenge, and most patients die in spite of aggressive surgery. There is a significant decrease in recurrence and an increase in survival with en bloc resection (EA

  11. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27171907

  12. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Recurrently Deregulated Genes across Multiple Cancers Identifies New Pan-Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Tanaka, Yuji; Kawaji, Hideya; Sandelin, Albin; Andersson, Robin; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2016-01-15

    Genes that are commonly deregulated in cancer are clinically attractive as candidate pan-diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. To globally identify such targets, we compared Cap Analysis of Gene Expression profiles from 225 different cancer cell lines and 339 corresponding primary cell samples to identify transcripts that are deregulated recurrently in a broad range of cancer types. Comparing RNA-seq data from 4,055 tumors and 563 normal tissues profiled in the The Cancer Genome Atlas and FANTOM5 datasets, we identified a core transcript set with theranostic potential. Our analyses also revealed enhancer RNAs, which are upregulated in cancer, defining promoters that overlap with repetitive elements (especially SINE/Alu and LTR/ERV1 elements) that are often upregulated in cancer. Lastly, we documented for the first time upregulation of multiple copies of the REP522 interspersed repeat in cancer. Overall, our genome-wide expression profiling approach identified a comprehensive set of candidate biomarkers with pan-cancer potential, and extended the perspective and pathogenic significance of repetitive elements that are frequently activated during cancer progression. PMID:26552699

  14. Prospective Analysis of Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Recurrence in Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schutz, Fabio A. B.; Pomerantz, Mark M.; Gray, Kathryn P.; Atkins, Prof Michael B.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Hirsch, Michelle S.; McDermott, David F.; Lampron, Megan E.; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Signoretti, Sabina; Kantoff, Prof Philip W.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Germline genetic polymorphisms may affect the risk of recurrence in patients with localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Our aim was to investigate the association of genetic polymorphisms with RCC recurrence. Patients and Methods We analyzed germline DNA samples extracted from 554 (discovery cohort of 403 and an independent validation cohort of 151) patients with localized RCC treated at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC) and of European-American ancestry (Caucasians). The discovery cohort was selected from a prospective database at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the validation cohort was identified from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital surgery and pathology department records. Single nucleotide polymorphims (SNPs) residing in 70 genes involved in RCC pathogenesis including the VHL/HIF/VEGF, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, and genes involved in immune regulation and metabolism were genotyped for the discovery cohort (total 285 SNPs successfully genotyped and assessable for analysis). The analyses of genotype associations with recurrence free survival (RFS) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards model, Kaplan-Meier method and logrank test. False discovery rate (FDR) q-value was used to adjust for multiple comparisons in selecting potential SNPs with RFS association. The finding from the discovery cohort was validated in an external independent cohort. Findings We report the significant association between genotype variants of SNP rs11762213 (c.144G>A; p.Ala48Ala, located in exon two c-MET) and primary analysis endpoint of RFS using both univariate and multivariable analysis. Specifically, patients carrying one or two copies of the minor (risk) allele had an increased risk of recurrence or death (hazard ratio (HR) =1·86, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1·17,2·95; p=0·0084) in the multivariate analysis adjusted for clinical and pathological factors. The median RFS for carriers of the risk allele was 19 months (95%CI: 9,*) compared

  15. [Outcomes of Tertiary Debulking Surgery(TDS)for Re-Recurrent Ovarian Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shinya; Konishi, Haruhisa; Okame, Shinichi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Shiroyama, Yuko; Yokoyama, Takashi; Takehara, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    The survival of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who have completed secondary debulking surgery (SDS) has been shown to increase. However, whether tertiary debulking surgery (TDS) aimed at complete surgery is useful in patients with a second recurrence is unclear. Eight patients who had undergone SDS were treated after a second recurrence in our hospital. Their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Consequently, TDS was performed in 4 of the patients (TDSgr). All 4 patients underwent complete debulking surgery, 2 patients received blood transfusions, and none had serious postoperative complications. The median treatment free interval (TFI) from recurrence surgery to the second recurrence was 16 months (range, 9-23 months), and the median TFI after the second recurrence was 30.5 months (range, 15-69 months). Meanwhile, the median TFI after the second recurrence was 7.5 months (range, 1-31 months) in the 4 patients who did not undergo TDS (non-TDSgr). The median survival times after the second recurrence in TDSgr and non-TDSgr were 53 months (range, 41-69 months) and 12 months (range, 2-30 months), respectively. When complete surgery is indicated in patients with a second recurrent ovarian cancer after SDS, in case of good physical condition with single or multiple recurrent lesions, TDS may increase survival and TFI. PMID:27067855

  16. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  17. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  18. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  20. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  1. Influence of margin status and radiation on recurrence after radical hysterectomy in Stage IB cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N. . E-mail: aviswanathan@partners.org; Lee, Hang; Hanson, Emily; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Crum, Christopher P.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between margin status and local recurrence (LR) or any recurrence after radical hysterectomy (RH) in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT) for Stage IB cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This study included 284 patients after RH with assessable margins between 1980 and 2000. Each margin was scored as negative ({>=}1 cm), close (>0 and <1 cm), or positive. The outcomes measured were any recurrence, LR, and relapse-free survival. Results: The crude rate for any recurrence was 11%, 20%, and 38% for patients with negative, close, and positive margins, respectively. The crude rate for LR was 10%, 11%, and 38%, respectively. Postoperative RT decreased the rate of LR from 10% to 0% for negative, 17% to 0% for close, and 50% to 25% for positive margins. The significant predictors of decreased relapse-free survival on univariate analysis were the depth of tumor invasion (hazard ratio [HR] 2.14/cm increase, p = 0.007), positive margins (HR 3.92, p = 0.02), tumor size (HR 1.3/cm increase, p = 0.02), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.19, p = 0.03), and margin status (HR 0.002/increasing millimeter from cancer for those with close margins, p = 0.03). Long-term side effects occurred in 8% after RH and 19% after RH and RT. Conclusion: The use of postoperative RT may decrease the risk of LR in patients with close paracervical margins. Patients with other adverse prognostic factors and close margins may also benefit from the use of postoperative RT. However, RT after RH may increase the risk of long-term side effects.

  2. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  3. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA {<=}0.3 ng/mL (P<.01). The median volume of recurrence was 0.26 cm{sup 3} and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA

  4. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  5. Trebananib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  6. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  7. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Interstitial Implants: Risk Factors Associated With Increased Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Oliver J.; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Schrauder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze patient, disease, and treatment-related factors regarding their impact on local control after interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Between November 2000 and April 2005, 274 patients with early breast cancer were recruited for the German-Austrian APBI Phase II trial ( (ClinicalTrials.gov) identifier: NCT00392184). In all, 64% (175/274) of the patients received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy and 36% (99/274) received high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy each hour. Total treatment time was 3 to 4 days. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 9-110). The actuarial 5-year local recurrence free survival rate (5-year LRFS) was 97.7%. Comparing patients with an age <50 years (49/274) vs. {>=}50 years (225/274), the 5-year LRFS resulted in 92.5% and 98.9% (exact p = 0.030; 99% confidence interval, 0.029-0.032), respectively. Antihormonal treatment (AHT) was not applied in 9% (24/274) of the study population. The 5-year LRFS was 99% and 84.9% (exact p = 0.0087; 99% confidence interval, 0.0079-0.0094) in favor of the patients who received AHT. Lobular histology (45/274) was not associated with worse local control compared with all other histologies (229/274). The 5-year LRFS rates were 97.6% and 97.8%, respectively. Conclusions: Local control at 5 years is excellent and comparable to therapeutic successes reported from corresponding whole-breast irradiation trials. Our data indicate that patients <50 years of age ought to be excluded from APBI protocols, and that patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer should definitely receive adjuvant AHT when interstitial multicatheter APBI is performed. Lobular histology need not be an exclusion criterion for future APBI trials.

  8. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  9. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  10. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Other Salivary Gland Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-10

    High-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor

  11. Expression profiling of prostate cancer tissue delineates genes associated with recurrence after prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin Mørck; Høyer, Søren; Lynnerup, Anne-Sophie; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Borre, Michael; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death amongst males. The main clinical dilemma in treating prostate cancer is the high number of indolent cases that confer a significant risk of overtreatment. In this study, we have performed gene expression profiling of tumor tissue specimens from 36 patients with prostate cancer to identify transcripts that delineate aggressive and indolent cancer. Key genes were validated using previously published data and by tissue microarray analysis. Two molecular subgroups were identified with a significant overrepresentation of tumors from patients with biochemical recurrence in one of the groups. We successfully validated key transcripts association with recurrence using two publically available datasets totaling 669 patients. Twelve genes were found to be independent predictors of recurrence in multivariate logistical regression analysis. SFRP4 gene expression was consistently up regulated in patients with recurrence in all three datasets. Using an independent cohort of 536 prostate cancer patients we showed SFRP4 expression to be an independent predictor of recurrence after prostatectomy (HR = 1.35; p = 0.009). We identified SFRP4 to be associated with disease recurrence. Prospective studies are needed in order to assess the clinical usefulness of the identified key markers in this study. PMID:26522007

  12. Predictors of recurrence free survival for patients with stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate clinico-pathologic specific predictors of recurrence for stage II/III disease. Improving recurrence prediction for resected stage II/III colon cancer patients could alter surveillance strategies, providing opportunities for more informed use of chemotherapy for high risk individuals. Methods 871 stage II and 265 stage III patients with colon cancers were included. Features studied included surgery date, age, gender, chemotherapy, tumor location, number of positive lymph nodes, tumor differentiation, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion. Time to recurrence was evaluated, using Cox’s proportional hazards models. The predictive ability of the multivariable models was evaluated using the concordance (c) index. Results For stage II cancer patients, estimated recurrence-free survival rates at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 98%, 92%, 90%, and 89%. Only T stage was significantly associated with recurrence. Estimated recurrence-free survival rates for stage III patients at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 94%, 78%, 70%, and 66%. Higher recurrence rates were seen in patients who didn’t receive chemotherapy (p = 0.023), with a higher number of positive nodes (p < 0.001). The c-index for the stage II model was 0.55 and 0.68 for stage III. Conclusions Current clinic-pathologic information is inadequate for prediction of colon cancer recurrence after resection for stage II and IIII patients. Identification and clinical use of molecular markers to identify the earlier stage II and III colon cancer patients at elevated risk of recurrence are needed to improve prognostication of early stage colon cancers. PMID:24886281

  13. Current Approaches and Challenges in Early Detection of Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Schneble, Erika J.; Graham, Lindsey J.; Shupe, Matthew P.; Flynt, Frederick L.; Banks, Kevin P.; Kirkpatrick, Aaron D.; Nissan, Aviram; Henry, Leonard; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Shumway, Nathan M.; Avital, Itzhak; Peoples, George E.; Setlik, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer recurrence is a key element of follow-up care and surveillance after completion of primary treatment. The goal is to improve survival by detecting and treating recurrent disease while potentially still curable assuming a more effective salvage surgery and treatment. In this review, we present the current guidelines for early detection of recurrent breast cancer in the adjuvant setting. Emphasis is placed on the multidisciplinary approach from surgery, medical oncology, and radiology with a discussion of the challenges faced within each setting. PMID:24790656

  14. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  15. Solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence after curative resection of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Yano, Masahiko; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Noura, Shingo; Ohue, Masayuki; Sugimura, Keijiro; Motoori, Masaaki; Kishi, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Gotoh, Kunihito; Marubashi, Shigeru; Akita, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Hidenori; Sakon, Masato

    2014-08-27

    We report two cases of solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence after colon cancer resection. Both cases had para-aortic lymph node metastasis at the time of initial surgery and received adjuvant chemotherapy for 4 years in case 1 and 18 mo in case 2. The time to recurrence was more than 8 years in both cases. After resection of the recurrent tumor, the patient is doing well with no recurrence for 6 years in case 1 and 4 mo in case 2. Patients should be followed up after colon cancer surgery considering the possibility of solitary mediastinal lymph node recurrence if they had para-aortic node metastasis at the time of initial surgery. PMID:25161766

  16. [A case of recurrent breast cancer that responded to bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Hagino, Shigeta; Iwata, Keiko; Nakura, Makoto; Yoshizumi, Tetsuya; Tsuneda, Atsushi; Kiriyama, Masato

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who was forced to undergo mastectomy of the right breast (Rt Bt) plus axillary lymph node (Ax) dissection for right breast cancer at another hospital. The pathological diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma( scirrhou[s sci], pT2N2M0, Stage IIIA, estrogen recepto[r ER[]+], progesterone recepto[r PgR[]+], human epidermal growth factor receptor-2[HER2][2+]). Although no recurrence was observed after postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, skin metastasis on the left back and pleuritis carcinomatosa were detected at our hospital 9 years and 6 months after the operation. Thereafter, bone metastasis, contralateral lymph node metastasis, and frequent occurrence of hepatic metastasis were sequentially detected. The patient was treated with chemotherapy (a total of 4 regimens) and endocrine therapy in addition to radiation therapy for lymph node metastasis over a period of approximately 2 years and 3 months; however, disease control was poor. Therefore, combined chemotherapy with paclitaxel and bevacizumab was initiated from February 2012. Soon after the initiation of combination therapy, the serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level gradually reduced and computed tomography (CT) revealed that the multiple-organ metastases had remarkably reduced in size. The response was classified as a clinical partial response (cPR). Although adverse events such as peripheral neuropathy, nose bleeding, and high blood pressure were observed, these were all of lesser that Grade 2 severity. The efficacy of chemotherapy was noted for 11 months. PMID:24394122

  17. TEGAFIRI is an effective alternative regimen for the management of recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HSU, TZU-CHI

    2015-01-01

    At present, the global incidence of colorectal cancer is increasing, with numerous individuals succumbing to the disease. The standard treatment strategy for colorectal cancer is curative resection. However, a cure is rarely achieved for metastatic colorectal cancer. Currently, chemotherapy is the main treatment for metastatic and recurrent colorectal cancer. The majority of metastases or recurrences have been found to respond well to chemotherapy. The present study evaluated the response rates of recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with a combination chemotherapy of irinotecan and oral uracil-tegafur (UFUR). In the pilot study, 33 patients with metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer were treated with different regimens of irinotecan and UFUR with or without leucovorin; however, irinotecan (150 mg/m2 every two weeks) with continuous UFUR and leucovorin without interruption resulted in improved survival compared with the other regimens evaluated and, thus, was employed for the present study of 113 patients. The patients that received irinotecan with UFUR and leucovorin without interruption exhibited similar efficacy in terms of overall survival and response rate to that of the pilot study. In addition, the incidences of diarrhea, alopecia and hematologic toxicity were acceptable, which was in agreement with the results of the pilot study. Therefore, combination chemotherapy with irinotecan, oral UFUR and leucovorin appears to be a satisfactory treatment strategy for recurrent or metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:25663857

  18. The Role of Cancer Stem Cells in Recurrent and Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Raagini; Ali, Shadan; Ahmad, Aamir; Philip, Philip A; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 20 %. Considering the treatments currently available, this statistics is shocking. A possible explanation for the disconnect between sophisticated treatments and the survival rate can be related to the post-treatment enrichment of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs), which is one of a sub-set of drug resistant tumor cells with abilities of self-renewal, cancer initiation, and further maintenance of tumors. Lung CSCs have been associated with resistance to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments. CSCs have also been implicated in tumor recurrence because CSCs are not typically killed after conventional therapy. Investigation of CSCs in determining their role in tumor recurrence and drug-resistance relied heavily on the use of specific markers present in CSCs, including CD133, ALDH, ABCG2, and Nanog. Yet another cell type that is also associated with increased resistance to treatment is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic cells. Through the processes of EMT, epithelial cells lose their epithelial phenotype and gain mesenchymal properties, rendering EMT phenotypic cells acquire drug-resistance. In this chapter, we will further discuss the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) especially because miRNA-based therapies are becoming attractive target with respect to therapeutic resistance and CSCs. Finally, the potential role of the natural agents and synthetic derivatives of natural compounds with anti-cancer activity, e.g. curcumin, CDF, and BR-DIM is highlighted in overcoming therapeutic resistance, suggesting that the above mentioned agents could be important for better treatment of lung cancer in combination therapy. PMID:26703799

  19. Multi-Parametric MRI-Directed Focal Salvage Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Locally Recurrent Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, T.; Avital, I.; Stojadinovic, A.; Brücher, B.L.D.M.; Cote, E.; Yu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Even with the technological advances of dose-escalated IMRT with the addition of the latest image guidance technologies, local failures still occur. The combination of MRI-based imaging techniques can yield quantitative information that reflects on the biological properties of prostatic tissues. These techniques provide unique information that can be used for tumor detection in the treated gland. With the advent of these improved imaging modalities, it has become possible to more effectively image local recurrences within the prostate gland. With better imaging, these focal recurrences can be differentially targeted with salvage brachytherapy minimizing rectal and bladder toxicity. Here we report a novel use of MRI-directed focal brachytherapy after local recurrence. This technique offers a unique opportunity to safely and successfully treat recurrent prostate cancer, previously treated with definitive radiation therapy. The use of multi-parametric MRI-directed focal salvage permanent interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a promising strategy to avoid more aggressive and expensive treatments that are associated with increased morbidity, potentially improving survival at potentially lower costs. PMID:23412660

  20. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  1. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomonori Ishimaru, Hideki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Daikoku, Manabu; Honda, Sumihisa; Koshiishi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were {<=}2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p < 0.001). In the remaining three groups, there was no significant difference in local recurrence-free rate between the two treatment methods. Conclusion. A tumor diameter of >2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring {<=}2 cm should be treated by RFA.

  2. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  3. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  4. Accuracy of pelvic multiparametric MRI in diagnosing local recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Case report and revision of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Pietro; Garufi, Antonio; Priolo, Giandomenico; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-12-01

    A Caucasian man (73 years old) six years from radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer (PCa) showed biochemical recurrence (BCR); the follow up based on PSA evaluated every 6 months was negative (0.1 ng/ml) for 5 years, but in the last year PSA increased to 0.3 vs 0.5 ng/ml. The patient was asymptomatic and underwent 3.0 Tesla mpMRI equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil placed around the pelvic area; multiplanar turbo spin-echo T2-weighted (T2W), axial diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), axial dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and spectroscopy were performed. Pelvic mpMRI demonstrated the presence of a nodular tissue with a diameter of 10 mm. located on the left of the prostatic fossa near the rectum that was higly sospicious for local PCa recurrence. The patient underwent salvage RT (64 Gy); one year from RT PSA was 0.1 ng/ml suggesting that the patient was free from recurrence. In conclusion, mpMRI could be combined with PSA kinetics in the evaluation of men with BRC also in the presence of PSA values < 1 ng/ml. PMID:26766811

  5. FDG PET and tumour markers in the diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Siggelkow, Wulf; Rath, Werner; Buell, Udalrich; Zimny, Michael

    2004-06-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the most common cancers in North America and Western Europe. Positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG PET) represents a non-invasive functional imaging modality that is based on metabolic characteristics of malignant tumours. In breast cancer, FDG PET is more accurate than conventional methods for staging of distant metastases or local recurrences and enables early assessment of treatment response in patients undergoing primary chemotherapy. Recent data indicate a rationale for the use of FDG PET in cases of asymptomatically elevated tumour marker levels in the presence of uncertain results of conventional imaging. Despite the fact that PET cannot rule out microscopic disease, it does have particular value in providing, in a single examination, a reliable assessment of the true extent of the disease. This technique is complementary to morphological imaging for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging. It may become the method of choice for the assessment of asymptomatic patients with elevated tumour marker levels. This method, however, cannot replace invasive procedures if microscopic disease is of clinical relevance. PMID:15146295

  6. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer. PMID:26625313

  7. Therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence mechanisms: Unfolding the story of tumour coming back.

    PubMed

    Esmatabadi, Mohammad Javad Dehghan; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Motlagh, Fatemeh Movahedi; Babashah, Sadegh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-09-01

    Cancer recurrence is believed to be one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer treatment strategies. This biological phenomenon could arise from the incomplete eradication of tumour cells after chemo- and radiotherapy. Recent developments in the design of models reflecting cancer recurrence and in vivo imaging techniques have led researchers to gain a deeper and more detailed insight into the mechanisms underlying tumour relapse. Here, we provide an overview of three important drivers of recurrence including cancer stem cells (CSCs), neosis, and phoenix rising. The survival of cancer stem cells is well recognized as one of the primary causes of therapeutic resistance in malignant cells. CSCs have a relatively latent metabolism and show resistance to therapeutic agents through a variety of routes. Neosis has proven to be as an important mechanism behind tumour self-proliferation after treatment which gives rise to the expansion of tumour cells in the injured site via production of Raju cells. Phoenix rising is a prorecurrence pathway through which apoptotic cancer cells send strong signals to the neighbouring diseased cells leading to their multiplication. The mechanisms involved in therapeutic resistance and tumour recurrence have not yet been fully understood and mostly remain unexplained. Without doubt, an improved understanding of the cellular machinery contributing to recurrence will pave the way for the development of novel, sophisticated and effective antitumour therapeutic strategies which can eradicate tumour without the threat of relapse. PMID:27581940

  8. Elevated Platelet Count as Predictor of Recurrence in Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer. PMID:25692418

  9. Risk factors for residual and recurrent uveal melanoma after trans-scleral local resection.

    PubMed Central

    Damato, B E; Paul, J; Foulds, W S

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to report local tumour control after trans-scleral local resection of uveal melanoma and to identify risk factors for (i) clinical residual tumour recognised immediately after surgery, and (ii) delayed tumour recurrence from subclinical microscopic deposits. METHODS: The sample included 310 patients, treated by choroidectomy (188), cyclochoroidectomy (87), or iridocyclectomy (35), with follow up ranging from 42 days to 20.9 years (median 36 months), a mean basal largest tumour diameter of 13.2 mm, and a mean tumour thickness of 7.4 mm. RESULTS: There were 24 patients with residual tumour. Forward stepwise logistic regression indicated that posterior extension to within 1 disc diameter of the optic disc or fovea was the sole best indicator of the risk of residual disease (p < 0.001). After excluding these cases, 286 patients were studied for the development of delayed local recurrence, which occurred in 57 cases. Forward stepwise multivariate analysis showed the statistically significant predictors for recurrent tumour to be epithelioid cellularity (p = 0.002), posterior tumour extension to < 1 disc diameter of disc of fovea (p = 0.002), large tumour diameter > or = 16 mm (p = 0.019) and lack of adjunctive plaque radiotherapy (p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: The recurrence rate at 4 years varied from 6% if no risk factors were present to 57% if there were more than two risk factors. PMID:8814738

  10. Application of Canonical Correlation Analysis for Detecting Risk Factors Leading to Recurrence of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Olfatbakhsh, Asiie; Mehrdad, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advances in treatment options of breast cancer and development of cancer research centers have necessitated the collection of many variables about breast cancer patients. Detection of important variables as predictors and outcomes among them, without applying an appropriate statistical method is a very challenging task. Because of recurrent nature of breast cancer occurring in different time intervals, there are usually more than one variable in the outcome set. For the prevention of this problem that causes multicollinearity, a statistical method named canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a good solution. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the data related to breast cancer recurrence of Iranian females using the CCA method to determine important risk factors. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data of 584 female patients (mean age of 45.9 years) referred to Breast Cancer Research Center (Tehran, Iran) were analyzed anonymously. SPSS and NORM softwares (2.03) were used for data transformation, running and interpretation of CCA and replacing missing values, respectively. Data were obtained from Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Results: Analysis showed seven important predictors resulting in breast cancer recurrence in different time periods. Family history and loco-regional recurrence more than 5 years after diagnosis were the most important variables among predictors and outcomes sets, respectively. Conclusions: Canonical correlation analysis can be used as a useful tool for management and preparing of medical data for discovering of knowledge hidden in them. PMID:27231580

  11. The Role of the 21-Gene Recurrence Score in Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Josee-Lyne; Amir, Eitan

    2016-08-01

    Several multi-gene assays have been developed to predict the risk of recurrence in patients with estrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer and in whom endocrine therapy is planned. The 21-gene assay is widely used and its prognostic value has been retrospectively validated, showing significant differences in the risk of distant recurrence for patients at high versus low risk. Its role in predicting chemotherapy benefit has also been established, showing a clear benefit for high-risk patients and minimal benefit in those at low risk. These findings have been prospectively investigated in TAILORx (Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment), where available data from the low-risk cohort confirms the prognostic value of this diagnostic test. The prognostic utility of the 21-gene assay increases when combined with clinicopathologic variables, and data from integrated models suggest that its use should be limited to patients with tumor characteristics suggestive of potential chemotherapy benefit. Furthermore, the 21-gene assay has been shown to impact clinical decision making in a cost-effective manner, although direct evidence of benefit from modified treatment recommendations is yet to be proven. The prognostic value of this test has also been shown in populations with node-positive or locally advanced disease treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and ongoing trials aim to prospectively validate these findings. PMID:27235162

  12. Intraoperative radiotherapy with low energy photons in recurrent colorectal cancer: a single centre retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Skórzewska, Magdalena; Mielko, Jerzy; Kurylcio, Andrzej; Romanek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) may improve outcome of surgical treatment of recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility, safety and long-term results of surgical treatment of recurrent CRC with orthovolt IORT. Material and methods Fifty-nine consecutive CRC patients with local recurrence (LR), undergoing surgery, were included in the retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The modified Wanebo classification was used to stage LR (Tr). Twenty-five (43%) patients received IORT using INTRABEAM® PRS 500. The complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results There were 32 males and 27 females, with a median age of 63 years. Multi-visceral resections were performed in 37 (63%) patients. Median hospitalization time after surgery with IORT was 7 days. One (1.7%) in-hospital postoperative death was reported. Grade 3/4 postoperative complications were found in 11 (19%) patients. Intraoperative radiotherapy had no effect on the postoperative hospitalization time, morbidity and mortality. Median survival after R0 resection was 32 months. Complete resection (R0), no synchronous liver metastases (M0), and no lateral and posterior pelvic wall involvement, were significant predictors of improved survival. Stage of LR was found to be an independent prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.03); Cox regression model). In patients with LR stage < Tr5, a 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 52%. Conclusions Combination of surgical resection and orthovolt IORT is a safe and feasible procedure that does not increase the risk of postoperative complications or prolongs the hospital stay. Despite aggressive surgery supported by IORT, the advanced stage of LR is a limiting factor of long-term survival. PMID:27095940

  13. Salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound for the recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2012-10-01

    Aim: to investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 22 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and April 1, 2010, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. The mean (range) age was 65 (52-80) years with a mean PSA level before radiation therapy of 14.3 (5.7-118) ng/mL. The mean (range) period after radiation therapy to HIFU was 36 (4-96) months. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 14 patients, brachytherapy in 5 patients (4 patients with high-dose brachytherapy with In192 and 1 with low-dose brachytherapy with Au98) or proton therapy in 3 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 24 months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-, intermediate-and high risk groups were 100%, 86%, and 14%, respectively. All nine patients who received a post HIFU prostate biopsy showed no malignancy. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 4 of the 25 patients (16%) and urinary incontinence in 4 of the 25 patients (16%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (4%). Salvage HIFU is a minimally invasive for patients with low-and intermediate risk group with comparable morbidity to other forms of salvage treatment.

  14. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and June 1, 2010, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. The mean (range) age was 65 (52-80) years with a mean PSA level before radiation therapy of 26.6 (4.8-118) ng/mL. The mean (range) period after radiation therapy to HIFU was 41 (4-96) months. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 13 patients, brachytherapy in 5 patients (4 patients with high-dose brachytherapy with In192 and 1 with low-dose brachytherapy with Au98) or proton therapy in 4 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 21 months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-, intermediate- and high risk groups were 100%, 85.7%, and 18.2%, respectively. All nine patients who received a post HIFU prostate biopsy showed no malignancy. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 4 of the 22 patients (18%) and urinary incontinence in 4 of the 22 patients (18%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (5%). Salvage HIFU is a minimally invasive for patients with low-and intermediate risk group with comparable morbidity to other forms of salvage treatment.

  15. Copy number analysis of 24 oncogenes: MDM4 identified as a putative marker for low recurrence risk in non muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Samanta; Calistri, Daniele; Gurioli, Giorgia; Carretta, Elisa; Serra, Luigi; Gunelli, Roberta; Zoli, Wainer; Casadio, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs) of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF) using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher's test p=0.023). Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p=0.041). Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients. PMID:25026175

  16. Copy Number Analysis of 24 Oncogenes: MDM4 Identified as a Putative Marker for Low Recurrence Risk in Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Samanta; Calistri, Daniele; Gurioli, Giorgia; Carretta, Elisa; Serra, Luigi; Gunelli, Roberta; Zoli, Wainer; Casadio, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs) of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF) using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher’s test p = 0.023). Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p = 0.041). Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients. PMID:25026175

  17. Randomized Phase II, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Progressing on Treatment With a Nonsteroidal Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A.; Ismail-Khan, Roohi R.; Melichar, Bohuslav; Lichinitser, Mikhail; Munster, Pamela N.; Klein, Pamela M.; Cruickshank, Scott; Miller, Kathy D.; Lee, Min J.; Trepel, Jane B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Entinostat is an oral isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor that targets resistance to hormonal therapies in estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancer. This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II study evaluated entinostat combined with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane versus exemestane alone. Patients and Methods Postmenopausal women with ER+ advanced breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor were randomly assigned to exemestane 25 mg daily plus entinostat 5 mg once per week (EE) or exemestane plus placebo (EP). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Blood was collected in a subset of patients for evaluation of protein lysine acetylation as a biomarker of entinostat activity. Results One hundred thirty patients were randomly assigned (EE group, n = 64; EP group, n = 66). Based on intent-to-treat analysis, treatment with EE improved median PFS to 4.3 months versus 2.3 months with EP (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.07; one-sided P = .055; two-sided P = .11 [predefined significance level of .10, one-sided]). Median overall survival was an exploratory end point and improved to 28.1 months with EE versus 19.8 months with EP (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.97; P = .036). Fatigue and neutropenia were the most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities. Treatment discontinuation because of adverse events was higher in the EE group versus the EP group (11% v 2%). Protein lysine hyperacetylation in the EE biomarker subset was associated with prolonged PFS. Conclusion Entinostat added to exemestane is generally well tolerated and demonstrated activity in patients with ER+ advanced breast cancer in this signal-finding phase II study. Acetylation changes may provide an opportunity to maximize clinical benefit with entinostat. Plans for a confirmatory study are underway. PMID:23650416

  18. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    PubMed Central

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  19. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  20. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Recurrence Patterns in Rectal Cancer: The Cranial Border in Hypofractionated Preoperative Radiotherapy Can Be Lowered

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Kusters, Miranda; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Martijn, Hendrik; Beets, Geerard L.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether and where the radiotherapy (RT) clinical target volume (CTV) could be reduced in short-course preoperative treatment of rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Patients treated in the Dutch total mesorectal excision trial, with a local recurrence were analyzed. For 94 (25 who underwent radiation therapy 69 who did not) of 114 patients with a local recurrence, the location of the recurrence was placed in a three-dimensionalthree (3D) model. The data in the 3D model were correlated to the clinical trial data to distinguish a group of patients eligible for CTV reduction. Effects of CTV reduction on dose to the small bowel was tested retrospectively in a dataset of 8 patients with three-field conformal plans and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT). Results: The use of preoperative RT mainly reduces anastomotic, lateral, and perineal recurrences. In patients without primary nodal involvement, no recurrences were found cranially of the S2-S3 interspace, irrespective of the delivery of RT. In patients without primary nodal involvement and a negative circumferential resection margin (CRM), only one recurrence was found cranial to the S2-S3 interspace. With a cranially reduced CTV to the S2-S3 interspace, over 60% reduction in absolute small bowel exposure at dose levels from 15 to 35 Gy could be achieved with three-field conventional RT, increasing to 80% when IMRT is also added. Conclusions: The cranial border of the CTV can safely be lowered for patients without expected nodal or CRM involvement, yielding a significant reduction of dose to the small bowel. Therefore, a significant reduction of acute and late toxicity can be expected.

  1. Patterns of recurrence and treatment in male breast cancer: A clue to prognosis?

    PubMed

    Henriques Abreu, Miguel; Henriques Abreu, Pedro; Afonso, Noémia; Pereira, Deolinda; Henrique, Rui; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-10-15

    Male breast cancer (MBC) patients seem to have inferior survival compared to female (FBC) ones, which is not fully explained by usual prognostic factors. Recurrence analysis could show differences in relapse patterns and/or in patients' approaches that justify these outcomes. Retrospective analysis of MBC patients treated in a cancer center between 1990 and 2014, looking for relapse. For each patient, three matched FBC patients were selected by: diagnosis' year, age (within 5 years), stage and tumors' type (only luminal-like were considered). Differences between cohorts were assessed by χ(2) test and hierarchical clustering was performed to define subgroups according to relapse local. Survival curves were calculated by Kaplan-Meier and compared using log-rank test. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Groups were balanced according to age, histological grade, stage, expression of hormonal receptors and adjuvant treatments. Median time to recurrence was equivalent, p = 0.72, with the majority of patients presented with distant metastases, p = 0.69, with more lung involvement in male, p = 0.003. Male patients were more often proposed to symptomatic treatment (21.1% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.02). Overall and from recurrence survivals were poorer for male, median: 5 years [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.1-5.9 years] and 1 year (95% CI: 0-2.1 years) vs. 10 years (95% CI: 7.8-12.2 years) and 2 years (95% CI: 1.6-2.4 years), p < 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively, and this tendency remained in the five cluster subgroups, that identified five patterns of relapse, p = 0.003. MBC patients had the worst survival, even after controlling important factors, namely the local of relapse. Palliative systemic treatment had favorable impact in prognosis and its frequently avoidance in male could justify the outcomes differences. PMID:27280781

  2. Examination of the clinical efficacy of eribulin and trastuzumab in HER2-positive recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    KIBA, TAKAYOSHI; MORII, NAO; TAKAHASHI, HIROTOSHI; OZAKI, SHINJI; ATSUMI, MISAO; MASUMOTO, FUMI; SHITAKUBO, YOSHIMI; YAMASHIRO, HIROYASU

    2016-01-01

    There are limited studies reported that describe the efficacy of eribulin and trastuzumab in the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. The present study examined the therapeutic efficacy of eribulin and trastuzumab in the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between October 2011 and August 2013, 5 recurrent breast cancer patients who were treated with eribulin and trastuzumab were included in the study. The cancer stages in the 5 women who received this regimen were stage IIIB in 1 (20%) and stage IV in 4 (80%). The sites of recurrence were the lung in 3 patients, liver in 2, bone in 1, brain in 1, supraclavicular lymph nodes in 1, infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 and mediastinal lymph nodes in 1. The median number of prior treatment regimens was 5 (range, 5–11). Complete response was achieved in 0 patients, 1 achieved partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had progressive disease. The overall response rate was 20%, and the clinical benefit rate was 80%. Patients also reported grade 3/4 neutropenia (80.0%). However, hematological toxicity was reversible and manageable. The most common grade 3/4 nonhematological toxicities were fatigue (20.0%), peripheral neuropathy (20.0%) and appetite loss (20.0%). No patients withdrew from treatment, and favorable compliance was achieved in the study. The results indicated that eribulin and trastuzumab have the potential to be one of the drugs for treatment of recurrent breast cancer. PMID:26870356

  3. [Complete response in a case of anastomotic recurrence of rectal cancer treated with S-1 monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kabashima, Akira; Kitagawa, Dai; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kondo, Naoko; Teramoto, Seiichi; Saito, Genkichi; Funahashi, Tomoru; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2002.A n anastomotic recurrence was diagnosed in July 2011.S he rejected the possibility of colostomy as radical surgery.Chemotherapy consisting of capecitabine+ oxaliplatin (XELOX) or folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) + bevacizumab were not possible because of high costs. In view of the lower costs and the potential for ambulation, S-1 monotherapy was started. After 3 months, a reduction in the recurrent lesion was observed.After 19 months, the recurrent lesion revealed a scar, which was judged by biopsy to be Group 1.We had achieved a pathological complete response (CR).The standard treatment for recurrent colon cancer is surgical resection or multidrug chemotherapy. However, in view of a patient's quality of life (QOL), S-1 monotherapy may be considered as a potential therapy. PMID:25731306

  4. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  5. Cytoreductive surgery plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galaal, Khadra; Naik, Raj; Bristow, Robert E; Patel, Amit; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background Most women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer will ultimately develop recurrent disease after completion of initial treatment with primary surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Secondary cytoreductive surgery may have survival benefits in selected patients. However, a number of chemotherapeutic agents are active in recurrent ovarian cancer and the standard treatment of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer remains poorly defined. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of secondary surgical cytoreduction and chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, (CENTRAL) Issue 1 2009, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to February 2009. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of review articles and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria We searched for RCTs, quasi-randomised trials and non-randomised studies that compared secondary cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy to chemotherapy alone in women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Data collection and analysis Three reviewers independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. No trials were found and therefore no data were analysed. Main results The search strategy identified 1431 unique references of which all were excluded on the basis of title and abstract. Authors’ conclusions We found no evidence from RCTs to inform decisions about secondary surgical cytoreduction and chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Ideally, a large randomised controlled trial or, at the very least, well designed non-randomised studies that use multivariate analysis to adjust for baseline imbalances are needed to compare these treatment modalities. The results of the ongoing RCT AGO

  6. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fackenthal, James D; Zheng, Yonglan; Huo, Dezheng; Hou, Ningqi; Niu, Qun; Zvosec, Cecilia; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Hennis, Anselm J; Leske, Maria Cristina; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2012-07-01

    Recurrent mutations constituted nearly three quarters of all BRCA1 mutations and almost half of all BRCA2 mutations identified in the first cohort of the Nigerian Breast Cancer Study. To further characterize breast/ovarian cancer risks associated with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in the African diaspora, we genotyped recurrent mutations among Nigerian, African American, and Barbadian breast cancer patients. A replication cohort of 356 Nigerian breast cancer patients was genotyped for 12 recurrent BRCA1/2 mutant alleles (Y101X, 1742insG, 4241delTG, M1775R, 4359insC, C64Y, 1623delTTAAA, Q1090X, and 943ins10 from BRCA1, and 1538delAAGA, 2630del11, and 9045delGAAA from BRCA2) by means of SNaPshot followed by direct sequencing or by direct sequencing alone. In addition, 260 African Americans and 118 Barbadians were genotyped for six of the recurrent BRCA1 mutations by SNaPshot assay. Of all the BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations we identified in the first cohort, six were identified in 11 patients in the replication study. These mutation carriers constitute 3.1 % [95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.6-5.5 %] of the replication cohort. By comparison, 6.9 % (95 % CI 4.7-9.7 %) of the discovery cohort carried BRCA1/2 recurrent mutations. For the subset of recurrent mutations we tested in breast cancer cases from Barbados or the United States, only two 943ins10 carriers were identified in African Americans. Nigerian breast cancer patients from Ibadan carry a broad and unique spectrum of BRCA1/2 mutations. Our data suggest that BRCA1/2 mutation testing limited to recurrent mutations is not sufficient to understand the BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk in African populations in the diaspora. As the cost of Sanger sequencing is considerably reduced, deploying innovative technologies such as high throughput DNA sequencing of BRCA1/2 and other cancer susceptibility genes will be essential for identifying high-risk individuals and families to reduce the burden of aggressive early onset breast

  7. [A Case of Lateral Lymph Node Recurrence Five-Years after Curative Surgery for Rectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kiyotaka; Miyake, Masakazu; Uemura, Mamoru; Miyazaki, Michihiko; Ikeda, Masataka; Maeda, Sakae; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Hama, Naoki; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Omiya, Hideyasu; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Hirao, Motohiro; Takami, Koji; Nakamori, Shoji; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old woman had undergone laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in February 2008. The pathological diagnosis was pT2, pN0, M0, pStageⅠ. At her request, she took UFT for 5 years as adjuvant chemotherapy. A CT examination revealed lateral lymph node swelling in January 2014. She was referred to our hospital after a diagnosis of lateral lymph node recurrence. She was administered 6 courses of FOLFIRI plus Cmab as neoadjuvant chemotherapy, after which the tumor size reduced by 62%. The treatment effect was rated as a PR. Laparoscopic right intrapelvic lymph node dissection was performed in July 2014, and the pathological diagnosis was recurrence of rectal cancer in the lateral lymph nodes. We report a case of dissection of lymph node recurrence 5 years after curative surgery for rectal cancer, along with a literature review. PMID:26805111

  8. Models for local implementation of comprehensive cancer control: meeting local cancer control needs through community collaboration.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Bruce; Lofton, Staci; Knight, Margaret L

    2010-12-01

    The comprehensive cancer control approach is used by state, tribes, tribal organizations, territorial and Pacific Island Jurisdiction cancer coalitions to spur local implementation of cancer plans to reduce the burden of cancer in jurisdictions across the country. There is a rich diversity of models and approaches to the development of relationships and scope of planning for cancer control activities between coalitions and advocates in local communities. The national comprehensive cancer control philosophy provides an operational framework while support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention enables coalitions to act as catalysts to bring local partners together to combat cancer in communities. This manuscript describes multiple characteristics of cancer coalitions and how they are organized. Two models of how coalitions and local partners collaborate are described. A case study method was used to identify how five different state and tribal coalitions use the two models to organize their collaborations with local communities that result in local implementation of cancer plan priorities. Conclusions support the use of multiple organizing models to ensure involvement of diverse interests and sensitivity to local cancer issues that encourages implementation of cancer control activities. PMID:20938731

  9. Primary orbital Ewing's sarcoma presenting with local recurrence to maxillary sinus shortly after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Kabukcuoglu, Fevziye; Dirim, Burcu; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a malignant, small-round-cell neoplasm that normally affects the long bones of the limbs or the pelvis. Primary orbital ES of the skull has been considered extremely rare. We describe the case of a 19-year-old female patient with primary ES originating from the inferior orbital rime and, shortly after tumor resection, local recurrence to the maxillary sinus. PMID:26136562

  10. Comparison of Local Recurrence Rate of Three Treatment Modalities for Kimura Disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Wei, Tai; Yu, Guang-Yan; Wu, Li-Ling; Peng, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic hyperplastic lymphogranuloma, also known as Kimura disease, is a benign and chronic inflammatory condition, predominantly involving the head and neck region. Surgical excision, radiotherapy (RA), surgical resection combined with low-dose postoperative radiotherapy and oral corticosteroids are 4 treatment modalities reported to control this disease effectively. Local recurrence, however, is common and the optimum treatment for Kimura disease is controversial. Thus, the present meta-analysis was performed to identify the treatment modality associated with the lowest local recurrence. Electronic databases (Cochrane Library, Wiley Online Library, PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Data) were searched. Data were also obtained from other sources such as related references and communication with the relevant authors. Two reviewers screened the literature according to preselected criteria. All studies involving different treatments for Kimura disease were collected. After data extraction and research quality assessment, the meta-analysis of 22 studies involving 570 patients was conducted using STATA 12.1 software. Meta-analysis revealed that administration of RA or surgical excision alone were inferior in controlling local recurrence compared with surgical resection combined with postoperative RA (risk ratio (RR) = 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.47-5.04 and RR = 4.72; 95% CI, 2.53-8.82). Surgical excision alone did not show significant advantage in controlling local recurrence compared with RA alone (RR = 2.13; 95% CI, 0.88-5.17). Surgical resection combined with postoperative RA is superior to either surgery or RA alone in treating Kimura disease. More large scale prospective randomized controlled trials, however, should be conducted to assess the long-term effects and safety issues. PMID:26674917

  11. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  12. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  13. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, NG Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer. An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate. The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively. Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  14. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA <1 µg/L were 29, PSA 1–2 µg/L were 11 and PSA ≥2 µg/L were 5. Conclusions Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  15. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  16. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-30

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  17. Efficacy of dose escalation on TCP, recurrence and second cancer risks: a mathematical study

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, A; Kohandel, M; Sivaloganathan, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of conventional and hypofractionation protocols by modelling tumour control probability (TCP) and tumour recurrence time, and examined their impact on second cancer risks. The main objectives of this study include the following: (a) incorporate tumour recurrence time and second cancer risks into the TCP framework and analyse the effects of variable doses and (b) investigate an efficient protocol to reduce the risk of a secondary malignancy while maximizing disease-free survival and tumour control. Methods: A generalized mathematical formalism was developed that incorporated recurrence and second cancer risk models into the TCP dynamics. Results: Our results suggest that TCP and relapse time are almost identical for conventional and hypofractionated regimens; however, second cancer risks resulting from hypofractionation were reduced by 22% when compared with the second cancer risk associated with a conventional protocol. The hypofractionated regimen appears to be sensitive to dose escalation and the corresponding impact on tumour recurrence time and reduction in second cancer risks. The reduction in second cancer risks is approximately 20% when the dose is increased from 60 to 72 Gy in a hypofractionated protocol. Conclusion: Our results suggest that hypofractionation may be a more efficient regimen in the context of TCP, relapse time and second cancer risks. Overall, our study demonstrates the importance of including a second cancer risk model in designing an efficient radiation regimen. Advances in knowledge: The impact of various fractionation protocols on TCP and relapse in conjunction with second cancer risks is an important clinical question that is as yet unexplored PMID:25210783

  18. [Prophylactic effects of zhuling and BCG on postoperative recurrence of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Yang, D A; Li, S Q; Li, X T

    1994-07-01

    The prophylactic effects of Chinese herbal medicine Zhuling (Grifola umbellata pilat) and BCG on bladder cancer after TURBT and partial cystectomy were evaluated. 146 patients with bladder cancer were divided into 3 groups, Zhuling, BCG, and control group. Follow-up for 48-124 months (average 70.8 months) showed that the tumor recurrence rate was 33.3%, 34.3% and 65.1%, respectively. Compared to the control group, the recurrence rate of Zhuling group and BCG group was significantly decreased (P < 0.01). The effect of Zhuling was similar to that intravesical BCG. Zhuling was cheaper and convenient in usage, and no side effects. PMID:7842985

  19. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  20. Focal Salvage Guided by T{sub 2}-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prostate Cancer Recurrences

    SciTech Connect

    Moman, Maaike R.; Berg, Cornelis A.T. van den; Boeken Kruger, Arto E.; Battermann, Jan J.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage treatment of the entire prostate for local recurrent cancer after primary radiotherapy is associated with high toxicity rates. Our goal was to show that, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the visualization of a recurrence, focal salvage treatment can be performed, with, potentially, a reduction in toxicity. Methods and Materials: We performed MRI, including a DCE sequence, in 7 patients with biopsy-proven locally recurrent prostate cancer. The specific regions of interest suspect for containing tumor were delineated using DCE and T{sub 2}-weighted MRI scans. Subsequently, focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy plans were created to illustrate the principle of focal salvage. Total salvage treatment plans were also created for comparison. Results: The transfer constant (K{sup trans}) values from the DCE were 0.33-0.67 min{sup -1} for areas suspect for tumor and 0.07-0.25 min{sup -1} for normal tissue. In 4 cases, a focal salvage plan could be generated; 93-100% of the gross tumor volume was covered with the prescribed dose, with relative sparing of the bladder, rectum, and urethra. In the total salvage plans, 24-53% of the gross tumor volume was covered, and the organs at risk received high doses. In 3 cases, a focal salvage plan could not be created because of multifocal tumor, seminal vesicle extension, or capsular extension. Conclusion: Focal salvage treatment plans can be created in patients with local recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. DCE-MRI supports the localization of the target area. This could lead to less toxicity in patients with local recurrent prostate cancer.

  1. Triple bypass for advanced pancreatic head cancer associated with biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and recurrent obstructive pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuzan; Sato, Norihiro; Tamura, Toshihisa; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-12-01

    Bypass surgery for cancer of the pancreatic head is usually done to palliate the obstructive symptoms in the biliary and/or digestive system. However, it is uncommon for patients to require pancreatic duct drainage for recurrent obstructive pancreatitis. In this article, we report a surgical technique of triple bypass consisting of Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, gastrojejunostomy, and pancreaticojejunostomy for advanced pancreatic cancer. A 76-year-old male patient with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic head cancer was referred to our department for biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and recurrent obstructive pancreatitis associated with persistent pancreatic pseudocyst. In an attempt to resolve all these problems simultaneously, a triple bypass was performed. The patient survived and continued to receive chemotherapy for almost 1 year after surgery without any serious complications. Thus, triple bypass is a useful surgical technique that could relief symptoms and offer better quality of life to patients with advanced pancreatic cancer presenting with biliary stricture, duodenal stenosis, and severe obstructive pancreatitis difficult to treat by medication or endoscopic procedures. PMID:27495991

  2. Treatment options in recurrent ovarian cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Luvero, Daniela; Milani, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women. Although significant progress has been made in the treatment of OC, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence and receive second-line and sometimes several lines of treatment. Here we review the options available for the treatment of recurrent disease and discuss how different agents are selected, combined and offered in a rationale sequence in the context of multidisciplinary care. We reviewed published work between 1990 and 2013 and meeting abstracts related to the use of chemotherapy and surgery in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. We discuss treatment regimens, efficacy endpoints and safety profiles of the different therapies. Platinum-based drugs are the most active agents and are selected on the basis of a probability of response to retreatment. Nonplatinum-based chemotherapy regimens are usually given in the ‘platinum-resistant’ setting and have a modest effect on outcome. Molecular targeted therapy of ovarian cancer given alone or integrated with chemotherapy is showing promising results. Many patients are now receiving more than one line of therapy for recurrent disease, usually platinum based until platinum resistance emerges. The sequential use of chemotherapy regimens and the incorporation of molecularly targeted treatments, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, have over the last decade significantly extended the median survival of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:25342990

  3. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in the Management of Locally Recurrent Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Braunstein, Steve E.; Wustrack, Rosanna; Horvai, Andrew; Jahan, Thierry; O'Donnell, Richard J.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy and morbidity of limb-sparing surgery with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for patients with locally recurrent extremity soft tissue sarcoma (ESTS). Methods and Materials. Twenty-six consecutively treated patients were identified in a single institution retrospective analysis of patients with locally recurrent ESTS treated with IORT following salvage limb-sparing resection from May 2000 to July 2011. Fifteen (58%) patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) prior to recurrence (median dose 63 Gy), while 11 (42%) patients received EBRT following IORT (median dose 52 Gy). The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate disease control and survival and subsets were compared using a log rank statistic, Cox's regression model was used to determine independent predictors of disease outcome, and toxicity was reported according to CTCAE v4.0 guidelines. Results. With a median duration of follow-up from surgery and IORT of 34.9 months (range: 4 to 139 mos.), 10 patients developed a local recurrence with 4 subsequently undergoing amputation. The 5-year estimate for local control (LC) was 58% (95% CI: 36–75%), for amputation-free was 81% (95% CI: 57–93%), for metastasis-free control (MFC) was 56% (95% CI: 31–75%), for disease-free survival (DFS) was 35% (95% CI: 17–54%), and for overall survival (OS) was 50% (95% CI: 24–71%). Prior EBRT did not appear to influence disease control (LC, p = 0.74; MFC, p = 0.66) or survival (DFS, p = 0.16; OS, p = 0.58). Grade 3 or higher acute and late toxicities were reported for 6 (23%) and 8 (31%) patients, respectively. The frequency of both acute and late grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred equally between patients who received EBRT prior to or after IORT. Conclusions. IORT in combination with oncologic resection of recurrent ESTS yields good rates of local control and limb-salvage with acceptable morbidity. Within the limitations of small subsets, these data

  4. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  5. [A trial of biweekly paclitaxel administration in consideration of QOL for advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer].

    PubMed

    Fushiki, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Hideo; Ikoma, Tomomi; Ota, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    At present there is no oral medicine available which is effective for advanced or recurrent case of elderly patients with gynecologic cancer. We report that a low-dose biweekly paclitaxel administration preserves quality of life (QOL) and seems to be "tumor dormancy like" therapy of good compliance with few side effects. A total of 11 cases were in ovarian cancer (5), uterine cancer (3), cervical cancer (2), and uterine sarcoma (1). The median age was 68 years old and the age range was 50 to 79 years old. We performed a standard treatment as a first time treatment. Afterwards, we obtained complete informed consent from the patients for progressive or recurrent cancer and administered biweekly paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 (80-100 mg/body) on an outpatient basis. We reviewed the effect, side effect and compliance of the medication. We judged the side effect based on the Japanese cancer treatment society common toxicity criteria. The result was only one patient death from PD and the other 10 patients were PR or a state of NC without side effect. An ovary cancer case patient lived for 67 months at best, an endometrial cancer case patient lived for 62 months at best, a cervical cancer case patient lived for 74 months at best, and a recurrent uterine sarcoma case patient lived for 76 months after recurrence and the QOL was good. In addition, there was no onset of side effect more than grade 2 in all of the cases and a compliance of medical administration was good. In these cases, we thought that a low-dose of biweekly paclitaxel administration was regarded as a therapy to preserve QOL without a serious side effect and a good compliance of medication. Furthermore, we intend to increase more cases and would like to report them in the future. PMID:15918575

  6. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. Study Confirms Letrozole Prevents More Breast Cancer Recurrences than Tamoxifen

    Cancer.gov

    After a median of 8 years of follow-up, women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer who received 5 years of letrozole were less likely to have their cancer recur or to die during follow-up than women who received 5 years of tamoxifen.

  8. Characterization of local complex structures in a recurrence plot to improve nonlinear dynamic discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Structures in recurrence plots (RPs), preserving the rich information of nonlinear invariants and trajectory characteristics, have been increasingly analyzed in dynamic discrimination studies. The conventional analysis of RPs is mainly focused on quantifying the overall diagonal and vertical line structures through a method, called recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). This study extensively explores the information in RPs by quantifying local complex RP structures. To do this, an approach was developed to analyze the combination of three major RQA variables: determinism, laminarity, and recurrence rate (DLR) in a metawindow moving over a RP. It was then evaluated in two experiments discriminating (1) ideal nonlinear dynamic series emulated from the Lorenz system with different control parameters and (2) data sets of human heart rate regulations with normal sinus rhythms (n = 18) and congestive heart failure (n = 29). Finally, the DLR was compared with seven major RQA variables in terms of discriminatory power, measured by standardized mean difference (DSMD). In the two experiments, DLR resulted in the highest discriminatory power with DSMD = 2.53 and 0.98, respectively, which were 7.41 and 2.09 times the best performance from RQA. The study also revealed that the optimal RP structures for the discriminations were neither typical diagonal structures nor vertical structures. These findings indicate that local complex RP structures contain some rich information unexploited by RQA. Therefore, future research to extensively analyze complex RP structures would potentially improve the effectiveness of the RP analysis in dynamic discrimination studies.

  9. Isolated brain metastasis as a late recurrence of completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    JU, LIXIA; HAN, MINGQUAN

    2016-01-01

    The brain is one of the most common sites for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastasis; however, late isolated brain metastasis as a recurrence of NSCLC is rare. The present study describes a case of isolated solitary brain metastasis as a late recurrence of NSCLC, which occurred >2 years following the successful resection of the primary tumor, and was identified by magnetic resonance imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolated brain metastasis as a postoperative recurrence of NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to highlight that, despite its rarity, such recurrence should be considered possible, and particular attention to the treatment of such patients should be paid. PMID:27347208

  10. Prognostic significance of Ki-67 index value at the primary breast tumor in recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, REIKI; OSAKO, TOMOFUMI; NISHIYAMA, YASUYUKI; TASHIMA, RUMIKO; NAKANO, MASAHIRO; FUJISUE, MAMIKO; TOYOZUMI, YASUO; ARIMA, NOBUYUKI

    2014-01-01

    The Ki-67 index value is a prognostic factor in primary breast cancer and is a proliferation marker that also distinguishes between luminal type A and type B breast cancer. Moreover, a change in Ki-67 index values due to treatment and recurrence is considered to be important in treating breast cancer. In this study, we investigated whether the baseline Ki-67 value in the primary tumor is useful as a prognostic factor following disease recurrence. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Ki-67 index was performed on 4,701 patients with primary breast cancer from 1987 until March, 2013. Among these patients, there were 666 consecutive cases exhibiting recurrence after primary surgery. The fraction of proliferating cells was based on a count of at least 500 tumor cells in the area including the hot spot. The Ki-67 values were divided into 3 groups, namely <20, ≥20 and ≥50%. The investigated items included estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tumor size, nodal status for the primary tumor, recurrence site (soft tissue, bone and viscera) and disease-free interval (DFI). The Cox’s proportional hazard model was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the factors associated with overall survival (OS) following recurrence. The median follow-up period was 65.9 months in the surviving group. The median Ki-67 value at baseline was 20% in all the cases and 27% in the recurrent cases. The Ki-67 values were low (24%) in patients with bone metastasis and significantly higher in patients with liver or brain metastasis (38 and 55%, respectively). Moreover, DFI was found to be inversely correlated with the Ki-67 values. Univariate analysis was performed to identify the prognostic factors for OS after recurrence. The significant factors included tumor size, lymph node status, ER, PgR, DFI, recurrence site and Ki-67 index value. Among these factors, a multivariate analysis identified the Ki-67 index value

  11. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  12. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Celecoxib to Prevent Recurrence of Non-Muscle–Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sabichi, Anita L.; Lee, J. Jack; Grossman, H. Barton; Liu, Suyu; Richmond, Ellen; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; De la Cerda, Jorge; Eagle, Craig; Viner, Jaye L.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Lerner, Seth P.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and expense result from frequent recurrences of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after standard treatment, and carcinoma in situ (Tis) is a poor prognostic factor. Predicated on observational and preclinical data strongly supporting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis, and the activity of COX-2 inhibitors, in bladder cancer, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine if celecoxib could reduce the time-to-recurrence (TTR) in NMIBC patients at high risk for recurrence. 146 patients were randomized to celecoxib (200 mg) or placebo orally twice daily for at least 12 months. The average treatment duration was 1.25 years. Primary intent-to-treat analysis revealed celecoxib did not statistically significantly prolong TTR compared with placebo (P = 0.17, log-rank). With a median follow-up of 2.49 years the relative risk of recurrence in the celecoxib vs placebo arms was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.38, 1.17). The recurrence-free rate at 12 months with celecoxib was 88% (95% CI, 0.81,0.96) versus 78% (95% CI, 0.69, 0.89) with placebo. After controlling for covariates with Cox regression analysis, recurrence rates did not differ between the two study arms (HR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.37,1.29). Celecoxib had a marginally significant effect on reducing metachronous recurrences (vs. placebo) with hazard ratio of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.3,1.06; P=0.075). Celecoxib was well tolerated, with similar adverse events and quality-of-life in both arms. Our clinical trial results do not show a clinical benefit for celecoxib in preventing NMIBC recurrence but further investigation of COX-2 inhibitors in this setting is warranted. PMID:21881030

  14. Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts for Recurrence and Death in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    La, Trang H.; Filion, Edith J.; Turnbull, Brit B.; Chu, Jackie N.; Lee, Percy; Nguyen, Khoa; Maxim, Peter; Quon, Andy; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging and other clinical factors in patients treated for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC) at a single institution. Materials and Methods: Between March 2003 and August 2007, 85 patients received positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography-guided chemoradiotherapy for HNC. Metabolically active tumor regions were delineated on pretreatment PET scans semiautomatically using custom software. We evaluated the relationship of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and total metabolic tumor volume (MTV) with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up for surviving patients was 20.4 months. The estimated 2-year locoregional control, DFS, and OS for the group were 88.0%, 69.5%, and 78.4%, respectively. The median time to first failure was 9.8 months among the 16 patients with relapse. An increase in MTV of 17.4 mL (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was significantly associated with an increased hazard of first event (recurrence or death) (1.9-fold, p < 0.001), even after controlling for Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (1.8-fold, p = 0.001), and of death (2.1-fold, p < 0.001). We did not find a significant relationship of maximum SUV, stage, or other clinical factors with DFS or OS. Conclusions: Metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor for disease recurrence and death in HNC. MTV retained significance after controlling for KPS, the only other significant adverse prognostic factor found in this cohort. MTV is a direct measure of tumor burden and is a potentially valuable tool for risk stratification and guiding treatment in future studies.

  15. Contrast dispersion imaging for cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer growth is associated with angiogenic processes in many types of cancer. Several imaging strategies have therefore been developed that target angiogenesis as a marker for cancer localization. To this end, intravascular and extravascular tissue perfusion is typically assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) ultrasound (US) and MRI. All the proposed strategies, however, overlook important changes in the microvascular architecture that result from angiogenic processes. To overcome these limitations, we have recently introduced a new imaging strategy that analyzes the intravascular dispersion kinetics of contrast agents spreading through the microvasculature. Contrast dispersion is mainly determined by microvascular multi-path trajectories, reflecting the underlying microvascular architecture. This paper reviews the results obtained for prostate cancer localization by US and MRI dispersion imaging, also presenting the latest new developments and future perspectives. PMID:25570935

  16. [Two cases of recurrent colorectal cancer treated successfully with folinate/tegafur/uracil (UFT/LV) chemotherapy on an outpatient basis].

    PubMed

    Hosotaki, Kiyoshi; Tabira, Yoichi; Shimamoto, Masato; Tamori, Yasuhiro

    2008-04-01

    We report two cases of recurrent colorectal cancer in two patients who were treated successfully with a combined oral chemotherapeutic agent folinate/tegafur/uracil (UFT/LV) dosage. The first case was a 74-year-old woman who underwent Hartmann operation for colon cancer perforation. One year and 7 months after surgery, a local recurrence was found on the CT scan and endoscopy. It ended in exploratory laparotomy though we were operated on. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin (5-FU/LV) was performed six times. Sequentially, UFT/LV internal use was managed at our outpatient clinic. This patient has been living without side effects in the first three postoperative years, and without increase in tumors. The second case was a 65-year-old woman who underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum for rectal cancer. The histologic stage of disease aggravation of the patient was stageI. Post operatively, 2 years and 6 months later, we recognized a metastasis node on the lung upper right lobe of the patient and her CA19-9 value climbed dramatically. The patient took UFT/LV during outpatient visits to the hospital, the lung node shadow disappeared two months later, and CA19-9 decreased, too. The patient is living without a cancer recurrence now. UFT/LV treatment is one of the effective modalities against recurrence of colorectal cancer from outpatient treatment while maintaining QOL. PMID:18408440

  17. Surgical Margins and the Risk of Local-Regional Recurrence After Mastectomy Without Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Chen Yuhui; Duggan, Margaret M.; Golshan, Mehra; Pochebit, Stephen; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although positive surgical margins are generally associated with a higher risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) for most solid tumors, their significance after mastectomy remains unclear. We sought to clarify the influence of the mastectomy margin on the risk of LRR. Methods and Materials: The retrospective cohort consisted of 397 women who underwent mastectomy and no radiation for newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer from 1998-2005. Time to isolated LRR and time to distant metastasis (DM) were evaluated by use of cumulative-incidence analysis and competing-risks regression analysis. DM was considered a competing event for analysis of isolated LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years). The superficial margin was positive in 41 patients (10%) and close ({<=}2 mm) in 56 (14%). The deep margin was positive in 23 patients (6%) and close in 34 (9%). The 5-year LRR and DM rates for all patients were 2.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.0) and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.3) respectively. Fourteen patients had an LRR. Margin status was significantly associated with time to isolated LRR (P=.04); patients with positive margins had a 5-year LRR of 6.2%, whereas patients with close margins and negative margins had 5-year LRRs of 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, positive margins, positive nodes, lymphovascular invasion, grade 3 histology, and triple-negative subtype were associated with significantly higher rates of LRR. When these factors were included in a multivariate analysis, only positive margins and triple-negative subtype were associated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Patients with positive mastectomy margins had a significantly higher rate of LRR than those with a close or negative margin. However, the absolute risk of LRR in patients with a positive surgical margin in this series was low, and therefore the benefit of postmastectomy radiation in this population with otherwise favorable

  18. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58–80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. Methods We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Results Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). Conclusion These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. Impact These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. PMID:25371446

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Centrally and Superiorly Located Stage I or Isolated Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Yang Qiuan; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Bucci, M. Kara; McAleer, Mary F.; Mehran, Reza J.; Roth, Jack A.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in centrally/superiorly located non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: We delivered SBRT to 27 patients, 13 with Stage I and 14 with isolated recurrent NSCLC. A central/superior location was defined as being within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, major vessels, esophagus, heart, trachea, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body, but 1 cm away from the spinal canal. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography-based planning, and daily computed tomography-on-rail guided SBRT. The prescribed dose of 40 Gy (n = 7) to the planning target volume was escalated to 50 Gy (n = 20) in 4 consecutive days. Results: With a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 6-40 months), the crude local control at the treated site was 100% using 50 Gy. However, 3 of 7 patients had local recurrences when treated using 40 Gy. Of the patients with Stage I disease, 1 (7.7%) and 2 (15.4%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastases, respectively. Of the patients with recurrent disease, 3 (21.4%) and 5 (35.7%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis, respectively. Four patients (28.6%) with recurrent disease but none with Stage I disease developed Grade 2 pneumonitis. Three patients (11.1%) developed Grade 2-3 dermatitis and chest wall pain. One patient developed brachial plexus neuropathy. No esophagitis was noted in any patient. Conclusions: Image-guided SBRT using 50 Gy delivered in four fractions is feasible and resulted in excellent local control.

  20. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Hani

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of ‘upfront’ primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI); patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks). Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients. PMID:26759525

  1. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Hani

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of 'upfront' primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI); patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks). Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients. PMID:26759525

  2. Current and emerging therapies in unresectable and recurrent gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jou, Erin; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2016-05-28

    Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide despite many advances and options in therapy. As it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, prognosis is poor with a median overall survival of less than twelve months. Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for these patients but it confers only a moderate survival advantage. There remains a need for new targeted treatment options and a way to better define patient populations who will benefit from these agents. In the past few years, there has been a better understanding of the biology, molecular profiling, and heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Our increased knowledge has led to the identification of gastric cancer subtypes and to the development of new targeted therapeutic agents. There are now two new targeted agents, trastuzumab and ramucirumab, that have recently been approved for the treatment of advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. There are also many other actively investigated targets, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the phosphatadylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, c-Met, poly ADP-ribose polymerase, and immune checkpoint inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current management of advanced gastric cancer as well as emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:27239108

  3. Current and emerging therapies in unresectable and recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Erin; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide despite many advances and options in therapy. As it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, prognosis is poor with a median overall survival of less than twelve months. Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for these patients but it confers only a moderate survival advantage. There remains a need for new targeted treatment options and a way to better define patient populations who will benefit from these agents. In the past few years, there has been a better understanding of the biology, molecular profiling, and heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Our increased knowledge has led to the identification of gastric cancer subtypes and to the development of new targeted therapeutic agents. There are now two new targeted agents, trastuzumab and ramucirumab, that have recently been approved for the treatment of advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. There are also many other actively investigated targets, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the phosphatadylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, c-Met, poly ADP-ribose polymerase, and immune checkpoint inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current management of advanced gastric cancer as well as emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:27239108

  4. IGFBP-3 Gene Methylation in Primary Tumor Predicts Recurrence of Stage II Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Pappou, Emmanouil P.; Guzzetta, Angela A.; de Freitas Calmon, Marilia; Sun, Lifeng; Herrera, Alexander; Li, Fan; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Tong, Weidong; Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the influence of IGFBP-3 methylation on recurrence in patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) from 2 independent cohorts. Background The relationship between IGFBP-3 methylation in primary tumors (PTs) or lymph nodes (LNs) and risk of recurrence in patients with stage II CRC treated with surgery alone is unknown. Methods IGFBP-3 methylation of DNA from 115 PTs and 1641 LNs in patients with stage II CRC from 2 independent cohorts was analyzed. Forty patients developed recurrence, whereas 75 matched patients remained recurrence free for more than 2 years after surgery. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) of recurrence, adjusted for patient and tumor characteristics. Results Methylation of IGFBP-3 in PTs was identified to be significantly associated with risk of recurrence in the training set. The signature was tested in a validation set and classified 40.7% of patients as high risk. Five-year recurrence-free survival rates were 76.4% and 58.3% for low- and high-risk patients, respectively, with an HR of 2.21 (95% confidence interval, 1.04–4.68; P = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, the signature remained the most significant prognostic factor, with an HR of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.10–5.25; P = 0.029). A combined analysis of 1641 LNs from the 2 sets identified IGFBP-3 methylation in LNs was not associated with risk of recurrence. Conclusions Detection of IGFBP-3 methylation in PTs, but not in LNs, provides a powerful tool for the identification of patients with stage II CRC at high risk of recurrence. PMID:25822686

  5. Possible Misinterpretation of Demarcated Solid Patterns of Radiation Fibrosis on CT Scans as Tumor Recurrence in Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Takeda, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Michio; Sanuki, Naoko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi M.D.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze opacity changes near primary lung cancer tumors irradiated by using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) to determine the presence or absence of tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: After review-board approval for a retrospective study, we examined data from 50 patients treated with curative intent for proven or highly suspected localized peripheral-lung cancer and followed up for at least 12 months. All patients had received 50 Gy in five fractions (80% isodose) and were followed up monthly with chest X-ray until clinical and X-ray findings stabilized. Follow-up computed tomography scans were performed 1 and 3 months after HSRT and thereafter at 3-month intervals during the first 2 years. Results: Median follow-up was 30.4 months (range, 12.0-73.8 months). Abnormal opacities that were suspicious for recurrent tumor appeared in 20 patients at a median of 20.7 months (range, 5.9-61.4 months). Only 3 patients were finally found to have recurrence; 14 were recurrence free but were suspected to have fibrosis, and findings for the other 3 patients were considered equivocal because of a short follow-up period ({<=}6 months). Conclusion: Radiation fibrosis, which may occur 1 year or longer after completion of HSRT, is difficult to distinguish from tumor recurrence. Even when opacities increase on follow-up radiologic scans, recurrence cannot be diagnosed conclusively based on image findings; biopsy occasionally is warranted.

  6. The effect of neuraxial anesthesia on cancer recurrence and survival after cancer surgery: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Meilin; Chen, Wankun; Hou, Wenting; Li, Lihong; Ding, Ming; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Several animal and observational studies have evaluated the effects of neuraxial anesthesia on the recurrence and survival of cancer surgery; studies reported benefit, whereas others did not. To provide further evidence that neuraxial anesthesia(combined with or without general anesthesia (GA))may be associated with reduced cancer recurrence and long-term survival after cancer surgery, we conducted this meta-analysis. A total of 21 studies were identified and analyzed, based on searches conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. After data abstraction, adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the impact of neuraxial anesthesia (combined with or without GA) and GA on oncological outcomes after cancer surgery. For overall survival (OS), a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS (HR 0.853, CI 0.741-0.981, P = 0.026, the random-effects model) was observed compared with GA. Specifically, we found a positive association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS in colorectal cancer (HR 0.653, CI 0.430-0.991, P = 0.045, the random-effects model). For recurrence-free survival (RFS), a significant association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved RFS (HR 0.846, CI 0.718-0.998, P = 0.047, the random-effects model) was detected compared with GA. Our meta-analysis suggests that neuraxial anesthesia may be associated with improved OS in patients with cancer surgery, especially for those patients with colorectal cancer. It also supports a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. More prospective studies are needed to elucidate whether the association between neuraxial use and survival is causative. PMID:26918830

  7. Secondary cytoreduction surgery improves prognosis in platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the secondary cytoreduction surgery (CRS) in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. The present study aims to determine the value of secondary CRS and the eligible subgroup for this procedure. Methods 96 platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer patients were recruited from Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research between 1992 and 2011. Follow-up was conducted based on the surveillance protocol of MD Anderson Cancer Center. Cox proportional hazards model and log-rank test were used to assess the associations between the survival durations and covariates. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore optimal secondary CRS related factors. Results Optimal secondary CRS was associated with time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) in patients (p < 0.01 both). Optimal secondary CRS and asymptomatic recurrent were similarly associated with longer OS (median: 79.2 vs. 53.9 and 76.1 vs. 56.0 months with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) and TTP (median: 13.9 vs. 10.5 and 19.3 vs. 9.0 months with p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively) than counterparts. Optimal initial CRS (p = 0.01), asymptomatic recurrent (p = 0.02) and longer progression-free survival duration (p = 0.02) were the independent indicators of optimal secondary CRS. Conclusions Optimal secondary CRS had survival benefit for platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer. Asymptomatic recurrent was one of the recruited factors for this procedure. PMID:24059600

  8. Recurrence and Five -Year Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Seyed Reza; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Asadi, Farshad; Vahedi, Mohsen; Pasha, Sara; Alizadeh, Leila; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancyworldwide and its outcome is most closely related to the extent of disease at presentation. Early diagnosis of an asymptomatic recurrence increases the likelihood of a complete surgical resection. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal cancer recurrence and survival rate within 5 years, after surgery. Patients and Methods: During the 9-year period since 21st Mar, 2004 to 20th Mar, 2013, patients whose primary colorectal cancer were resected in Taleghani hospital, Tehran, Iran were selected in a historical cohort. The necessary data such as demographic, age, gender, family history of CRC, site and size of tumor, stage of tumor, operation details, histological results, treatment method, histopathologic, etc. were collected. Then the recurrence and survival of colorectal cancer within 5 years after operation and their risk factors were evaluated. P value less than 0.05 were considered significant. All analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: A total of 107 patients underwent resection for colorectal cancer during the study period, with mean age of 53.50 ± 12.68 years (range 24 - 76 years), survival rate of 73.8% (rectum 70.0% and colon 75.9%), and mean survival time of 142.17 ± 21.60 month. The recurrence rate of CRC patients, during five years after surgery was 5.7%. Regional lymph nodes, Distance metastasis and Adjuvant therapy were significant prognosis factors of survival after surgery. Conclusions: The rate of recurrence in Iranian patients was low, which could be due to improvement of exactness and expertise of surgeons or better adjuvant therapy. The significant association between survival and adjuvant therapy clarifies this finding. Early diagnosis and primary detection could increase the rate of survival. PMID:26478796

  9. Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer or Recurrent Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  10. Outcomes of Bleomycin-based electrochemotherapy in patients with repeated loco-regional recurrences of vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Antonio; Damiani, Gianluca Raffaello; Mangioni, Costantino; Strippoli, Davide; Loverro, Giuseppe; Cappello, Antonio; Turoli Scd, Daniela; Corso, Silvia; Tartagni, Massimo; Pezzotta, Maria Grazia

    2016-05-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety, local tumor efficacy and relief of symptoms of electrochemotherapy (ECT) treatment in patients affected by recurrence of vulvar cancer (VC), unsuitable for standard treatments. Methods Ten patients were recruited with histological diagnosis of recurrence of VC. Intravenous bleomycin was injected, after an accurate mapping of all lesions and ECT was performed. Response to therapy was evaluated and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated via questionnaires. Results Diagnosis stage of primary tumors, according to the FIGO system, was: four patients respectively at stage IB (40%), and at stage II (40%), one patient at stage IIIA (10%), one patient with Paget cancer (10%). Mean age was 76 years (SD ± 7) at time of enrollment. Eight patients (80%) were previously submitted to surgery and/or radio-chemotherapy. Mean treatment time was 20 (range 10-20) min. After a median follow-up of 12 (3-22) months, six patients (60%) were alive. Conclusions Objective responses (ORs) with local control of the tumor were obtained in 80%. After a mean follow-up of 12 (3-22) months six patients (60%) were alive. The favorable outcome of this study, indicates that ECT is a reliable treatment option that may improve their functioning, thus enhancing the care provided in the palliative setting. PMID:26882959

  11. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  12. Protein-coding and microRNA biomarkers of recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Long, Qi; Johnson, Brent A; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Lai, Yu-Heng; Zhou, Wei; Abramovitz, Mark; Xia, Mingjing; Bouzyk, Mark B; Nam, Robert K; Sugar, Linda; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Williams, Daron J; Leyland-Jones, Brian R; Seth, Arun K; Petros, John A; Moreno, Carlos S

    2011-07-01

    An important challenge in prostate cancer research is to develop effective predictors of tumor recurrence following surgery to determine whether immediate adjuvant therapy is warranted. To identify biomarkers predictive of biochemical recurrence, we isolated the RNA from 70 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded radical prostatectomy specimens with known long-term outcomes to perform DASL expression profiling with a custom panel that we designed of 522 prostate cancer-relevant genes. We identified a panel of 10 protein-coding genes and two miRNA genes (RAD23B, FBP1, TNFRSF1A, CCNG2, NOTCH3, ETV1, BID, SIM2, LETMD1, ANXA1, miR-519d, and miR-647) that could be used to separate patients with and without biochemical recurrence (P < 0.001), as well as for the subset of 42 Gleason score 7 patients (P < 0.001). We performed an independent validation analysis on 40 samples and found that the biomarker panel was also significant at prediction of biochemical recurrence for all cases (P = 0.013) and for a subset of 19 Gleason score 7 cases (P = 0.010), both of which were adjusted for relevant clinical information including T-stage, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score. Importantly, these biomarkers could significantly predict clinical recurrence for Gleason score 7 patients. These biomarkers may increase the accuracy of prognostication following radical prostatectomy using formalin-fixed specimens. PMID:21703393

  13. A population-based study of gefitinib in patients with postoperative recurrent non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    FURUKAWA, KINYA; ISHIDA, JUNZO; INAGAKI, MASAHARU; TAKABE, KAZUHIKO; ISHIKAWA, SHIGEMI; SAKAI, MITSUAKI; ICHIMURA, HIDEO; KAMIYAMA, KOICHI; KABURAGI, TAKAYUKI; HAYASHIHARA, KENJI; KISHI, KOJI; SAITO, MAKOTO; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2012-01-01

    There is no standard treatment and there are no clearly defined guidelines for the treatment of postoperative recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed a retrospective population-based study to assess the benefits of treatment with gefitinib in patients with a postoperative recurrence of NSCLC in general clinical practice. This retrospective population-based study was conducted on patients with postoperative recurrent NSCLC who had been treated with gefitinib at 14 institutions in Ibaraki Prefecture between July 2002 and September 2007. The objective response rate to gefitinib therapy was 37.6% for local and distant recurrence. The median survival time following the start of gefitinib therapy was 12 months, and the one-year and two-year survival rates were 48.9 and 28.9%, respectively. The median survival time of the females was 19 months, and the median survival time of the males was 9 months (p=0.002). Univariate analysis showed that female gender, adenocarcinoma, a performance status (PS) of 0–1 and absence of smoking history were favorable prognostic factors. Only female gender and a PS of 0–1 were independent statistically significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. The rate of greater than grade 1 interstitial lung damage as an adverse event was 3.5%. Gefitinib is a feasible treatment for postoperative recurrent NSCLC in general clinical practice, and a good response and prolonged survival were obtained, similar to the findings reported in published clinical studies that were conducted on highly selected patients. PMID:22969844

  14. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, Zakiyah Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Azwan, Zairul E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com Raduan, Farhana E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com Sagap, Ismail E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com; Aziz, Nazrina

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  15. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Zakiyah; Aziz, Nazrina; Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Azwan, Zairul; Raduan, Farhana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  16. TERT Promoter Mutations and Tumor Persistence/Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jae Kyung; Kwak, Byung Kuk; Lim, Jung Ah; Lee, Myung-Chul; Kim, Min Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation was identified in thyroid cancer. This TERT promoter mutation is thought to be a prognostic molecular marker, because its association with tumor aggressiveness, persistence/recurrence, and disease-specific mortality in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has been reported. In this study, we attempted to determine whether the impact of the TERT promoter mutation on PTC persistence/recurrence is independent of clinicopathological parameters. Materials and Methods Using propensity score matching, 39 patients with PTC persistence or recurrence were matched with 35 patients without persistence or recurrence, with a similar age, sex, tumor size, multifocality, bilaterality, extrathyroidal extension, and lymph node metastasis. The TERT promoter and the BRAF V600E mutations were identified from PTC samples. Results The TERT promoter mutation was detected in 18% of PTC patients (13/74). No significant difference in the frequency of the TERT promoter mutation was observed between the persistence/recurrence group and the non-recurrence group. Conclusion These results suggest that the prognostic implications of the TERT promoter mutation are dependent on clinicopathological parameters. PMID:26727717

  17. BCG immunotherapy of bladder cancer: inhibition of tumor recurrence and associated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Winters, W D; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1981-07-01

    Fifty-one patients with confirmed bladder cancer have enrolled in a prospective evaluation of BCG immunotherapy. Following resection of existing tumors, patients were stratified according to tumor grade and number of previous recurrences and randomly assigned to control or BCG treatment groups. Immunotherapy consisted of six weekly administrations of Pasteur strain BCG using 120 mg intravesically and 5 mg percutaneously. Immunotherapy side effects were minimal and no patient required postponement of BCG treatments. Eleven control (46%) compared with five (22%) BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence (P = 0.078, chi 2). Prolongation of the disease-free interval with BCG treatment was significantly at the P = 0.016 level by Wilcoxon analysis. Four control and two BCG-treated patients had multiple recurrences. Comparing total episodes of recurrence, nineteen of 79 (24%) control and eight of 85 (7%) BCG group cystoscopic examinations revealed tumor (P = 0.006, chi 2). Immunologic correlates of response to immunotherapy were not statistically significant since only five BCG-treated patients had tumor recurrence. However, four of these five patients evidenced impaired LIF response to PPD at the time of tumor recurrence, and impairment of skin test reactivity and BCG humoral antibody response were more commonly seen in this subgroup of patients. PMID:7016300

  18. Application of laser and PDT to treatment of recurrent cancer in the paranasal sinuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jiang

    1993-03-01

    Forty-one cases of recurrent cancer in the maxillary sinus and ethmoid sinus were treated by Nd:YAG laser, CO2 laser, PDT, and operation. The partial skull fundus invaded by the advanced carcinoma in the maxillary sinus and ethmoid sinus was resected with laser through the cranial facial section. The cancer in the maxillary sinus is the most common in primary paranasal carcinoma, accounting for 80 percent. The malignant tumors in the ethmoid sinus are minor. Radiation and operation are usually performed in them, but it is easy for the cancer to recur after treatment. To save and continue life, 41 cases of recurrent carcinoma in the paranasal sinuses were cured by laser and PDT from 1979 to 1991.

  19. CHEMOTHERAPY: A new standard combination for recurrent ovarian cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Robert C.; Markman, Maurie

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer that recurs more than 6 months following primary chemotherapy can respond to many different drugs, but retreatment with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel has become a standard of care. A combination of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and carboplatin may provide a slightly but significantly greater therapeutic index than carboplatin and paclitaxel. PMID:20877420

  20. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  1. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  2. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Mylin A.; Ballo, Matthew T. . E-mail: mballo@mdanderson.org; Butler, Charles E.; Feig, Barry W.; Cormier, Janice N.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Pisters, Peter W.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication. Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications.

  3. Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer – A case report featuring technical details and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Melich, George; Weber, Michael; Stein, Barry; Minutolo, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo O.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer is controversial. However, recent publications suggest encouraging outcomes with high sacral resections. We present the first case report describing technical aspects, potential pitfalls and treatment of complications associated with total sacrectomy performed as a treatment of recurrent rectal cancer. PRESENTATION OF CASE A fifty-three year old man was previously treated at another institution with a low anterior resection (LAR) followed by chemo-radiation and left liver tri-segmentectomy for metastatic rectal cancer. Three years following the LAR, the patient developed a recurrence at the site of colorectal anastomosis, manifesting clinically as a contained perforation, forming a recto-cutaneous fistula through the sacrum. Abdomino-perineal resection (APR) and complete sacrectomy were performed using an anterior–posterior approach with posterior spinal instrumented fusion and pelvic fixation using iliac crest bone graft. Left sided vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap and right sided gracilis muscle flap were used for hardware coverage and to fill the pelvic defect. One year after the resection, the patient remains disease free and has regained the ability to move his lower limbs against gravity. DISCUSSION The case described in this report features some formidable challenges due to the previous surgeries for metastatic disease, and the presence of a recto-sacral cutaneous fistula. An approach with careful surgical planning including considerationof peri-operative embolization is vital for a successful outcome of the operation. A high degree of suspicion for pseudo-aneurysms formation due infection or dislodgement of metallic coils is necessary in the postoperative phase. CONCLUSION Total sacrectomy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer with acceptable short-term outcomes is possible.A detailed explanation to the patient of the possible complications and expectations including the concept of a

  4. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  5. Pharmacodynamic study of Disulfiram in Men with Non-metastatic Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Lin, Jianqing; Blackford, Amanda; Bardia, Aditya; King, Serina; Armstrong, Andrew J.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preclinical drug screens identified disulfiram as a potent in vitro inhibitor of prostate cancer cell growth. Although many mechanisms for its anticancer activity have been proposed, tumor suppressor gene re-expression through promoter demethylation emerged as one of the more plausible. Methods We conducted an open-label, dose escalation trial of disulfiram in men with non-metastatic recurrent prostate cancer after local therapy. Dose escalation occurred if a demethylating “response” [i.e. ≥10% decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) global 5meC content] was observed in <3 patients in cohort 1. Cohort 1 and 2 received disulfiram 250 mg and 500 mg daily respectively. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with a demethylation response. Secondary endpoints included rate of PSA progression at 6 months, changes in PSA doubling time and safety/tolerability. Results Changes in global 5meC content were observed in 2 of 9 patients (22.2%) in cohort 1 and 3 of 10 (30.0%) in cohort 2. Only 5 subjects were on trial for ≥6 months, all were in cohort 1 and all had PSA progression by 6 months. No changes in PSA kinetics were observed in either cohort. Disulfiram was poorly tolerated with 6 patients experiencing grade 3 AEs (3 per cohort). Three of the responders displayed pre-treatment instability in their 5meC content. Conclusions A minority of patients had transient global PBMC demethylation changes. Instability in 5meC may limit the reproducibility of these findings, limiting our ability to confirm our hypothesis. Given the toxicities and no clinical benefits, further development of disulfiram should not be pursued in this population. PMID:23958896

  6. Salvage Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Gordon W.; Palazzi-Churas, Kerrin L.; Jarrard, David F.; Paolone, David R.; Graf, Andrew K.; Hedican, Sean P.; Wegenke, John D.; Ritter, Mark A.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether hypofractionation is well tolerated and to preliminarily assess biochemical control of this regimen in a postprostatectomy, salvage setting. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed in 50 patients treated between May 2003 and December 2005 with hypofractionated radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Radiotherapy was prescribed to the prostatic fossa to 65-70 Gy in 26-28 fractions of 2.5 Gy each, using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image localization. Toxicities were scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale and the Fox Chase modification of Late Effects Normal Tissue scale. The median follow-up was 18.9 months (range, 5.3-35.9). Results: No Grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities were observed. Grade 2 toxicities included four acute genitourinary, one acute gastrointestinal, two late genitourinary, and two late gastrointestinal toxicities. Of the 50 patients, 39 demonstrated a continuous biochemical response after salvage therapy, 3 had an initial response before prostate-specific antigen failure, and 7 had prostate-specific antigen progression, 1 of whom died of progressive metastatic disease. Finally, 1 patient discontinued therapy because of the diagnosis of a metachronous pancreatic cancer and died without additional prostate cancer follow-up. All remaining patients were alive at the last follow-up visit. A lower presalvage prostate-specific antigen level was the only significant prognostic factor for improved biochemical control. The estimated actuarial biochemical control rate at 2 years was 72.9%. Conclusions: The toxicity and early biochemical response rates were consistent with expectations from conventional fractionation. Additional follow-up is required to better document the biochemical control, but these results suggest that hypofractionation is a well-tolerated approach for salvage radiotherapy.

  7. Gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) as palliative treatment in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M; A'hern, R P; D'ambrosio, C; Tanay, M; Syrigos, K N; Rogers, S J; Box, C; Eccles, S A; Nutting, C M; Harrington, K J

    2006-01-01

    To assess the level of activity and toxicity of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) in a population of patients with locally recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer. Patients were recruited into an expanded access programme through the multidisciplinary head and neck clinics at the Royal Marsden and St George's Hospitals. Patients were required to have received at least one course of standard systemic chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or be medically unfit for chemotherapy. Patients were commenced on single-agent gefitinib at a dose of 500 mg day−1. Clinical, symptomatic and radiological response, time to progression (TTP), survival and toxicity were recorded. A total of 47 patients were enrolled (35 male and 12 female) with a median age of 62 years (range 18–93 years). The observed clinical response rate was 8% with a disease control rate (complete response, partial response, stable disease) of 36%. In all, 34% of patients experienced an improvement in their symptoms. The median TTP and survival were 2.6 and 4.3 months, respectively. Acneiform folliculitis was the most frequent toxicity observed (76%) but the majority of cases were grade 1 or 2. Only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity of any type (all cases of folliculitis). Gefitinib was well tolerated and yielded symptomatic improvement in one-third of patients. However, this agent appeared to possess limited antitumour activity in this group of patients with head and neck cancer in whom the objective response rate, median TTP and survival were all lower than has been reported in a previous study. PMID:16495923

  8. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  9. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Jay P.; Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

  10. Management of Recurrent Post-partum Pregnancy Tumor with Localized Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N Raghavendra; Kumar, P Mohan; Selvi, Tamil; Nalini, H Esther

    2014-05-01

    Pregnancy tumor is a benign, hyperplastic lesion of the gingiva, considered to be reactive or traumatic rather than neoplastic in nature. The term pyogenic granuloma is a misnomer as it is not filled with pus or granulomatous tissue histologically. It is multi factorial in nature, which shows an exaggerated response to stimuli such as low grade or chronic irritation, trauma or hormonal variations. Higher levels of sex hormones during pregnancy produce effects on sub gingival microflora, the immune system, the vasculature and specific cells of periodontium which in turn in the presence of local irritants exaggerate the lesion. Since the lesion is clinically indistinguishable from other type of hyperplastic conditions, histological findings are required for proper diagnosis. We present a case report of recurrent pyogenic tumor which showed the evidence of pre-existing localized periodontitis with extensive horizontal bone destruction. The lesion was excised by electrocautery combined with conventional flap procedure after parturition period. During 3 and 6 months follow-up period post-operative healing showed satisfactory results without recurrence. PMID:24932397

  11. Management of Recurrent Post-partum Pregnancy Tumor with Localized Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, N. Raghavendra; Kumar, P. Mohan; Selvi, Tamil; Nalini, H. Esther

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy tumor is a benign, hyperplastic lesion of the gingiva, considered to be reactive or traumatic rather than neoplastic in nature. The term pyogenic granuloma is a misnomer as it is not filled with pus or granulomatous tissue histologically. It is multi factorial in nature, which shows an exaggerated response to stimuli such as low grade or chronic irritation, trauma or hormonal variations. Higher levels of sex hormones during pregnancy produce effects on sub gingival microflora, the immune system, the vasculature and specific cells of periodontium which in turn in the presence of local irritants exaggerate the lesion. Since the lesion is clinically indistinguishable from other type of hyperplastic conditions, histological findings are required for proper diagnosis. We present a case report of recurrent pyogenic tumor which showed the evidence of pre-existing localized periodontitis with extensive horizontal bone destruction. The lesion was excised by electrocautery combined with conventional flap procedure after parturition period. During 3 and 6 months follow-up period post-operative healing showed satisfactory results without recurrence. PMID:24932397

  12. Surgical Resection of Phyllodes Tumour: a Radical Approach as a Safeguard Against Local Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Badwe, Rajendra A; Kataria, Kamal; Srivastava, Anurag

    2015-04-01

    Phyllodes tumour is a rare benign neoplasm of the breast. It is a mixed tumour of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. The epithelial element is characterized by proliferation of ductolobular units. The fibrous tissue and collagen bundles represent the mesenchymal element. It is also known as "cystosarcoma" phyllodes to characterize some important features, viz. cyst-like or cleft-like spaces within the mass along with a leaf- or frond-like pattern of the stromal element. The tumour is well known for its high potential for local recurrence. Most patients in developing countries present with very large breast tumours with close proximity to the skin and pectoralis major. In these cases, there is a need to perform a three-dimensional en bloc removal of the mass with overlying skin and underlying muscle(s). If a skin flap is raised in the vicinity of the tumour, there is a risk of cutting close to the tumour, increasing risk of local recurrence. Here, we describe a surgical technique that permits a three-dimensional en bloc removal of phyllodes tumour. PMID:26139976

  13. [Detection of second tumors in 11C-choline PET/CT studies performed due to biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    García, J R; Ponce, A; Canales, M; Ayuso, J; Moragas, M; Soler, M

    2014-01-01

    Early localization of biochemical recurrence in patients after radical treatment of prostate cancer is a widely accepted clinical indication of (11)C-choline PET/CT. Its widespread clinical use has prompted the depiction of incidentalomas, unusual sites of metastatic lesions, as well as false positive and negative cases. Over the last 6 years, a total of 454 (11)C-choline PET/CT studies have been performed in our institution to locate biochemical recurrence of patients with prostate cancer. With these studies, a second neoplasm has been found in 7 patients (1.54%): 3 lung, 2 colorectal, 1 esophagus and 1 esophageal junction, respectively. Although the clinical usefulness of this technique for detecting cancer lesions other than prostate origin is known for those patients who undergo this technique in the accepted indication, the diagnosis of a second tumor has a significant impact on their therapeutic management. PMID:23499124

  14. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  16. ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun; Wu, Jie-Ying; Hou, Guo-Liang; Lu, Min-Hua; Shi, Zhi; Di, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic ameloblast associated protein (ODAM) is a protein contributed to cell adhesion and has been shown to express in normal prostate tissue, but the expression and significance of ODAM in prostate cancer remain unknown. In this study, we detected the protein expressions of ODAM in 88 prostate cancer tissues with immunohistochemical staining, and found that 53 cases (60.2%) was high expression of ODAM, which was shown in the cytoplasm and paranuclear regions. Furthermore, low expression of ODAM was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, preoperative PSA and Gleason score, but not with mean age, follow-up duration, PSM rate and distribution of pathological T stage. Additionally, our results of multivariate analysis showed that low ODAM expression was an independent predictor of biomedical recurrence, while the positive lymph node metastasis, Gleason score, and preoperative PSA were not the independent risks for biomedical recurrence. Overexpression of ODAM did not inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells PC3, but significant suppressed their invasion and migration with decrease of the protein levels of MMP-2. These results suggest that ODAM is a predictor for biomedical recurrence and inhibits the migration and invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:27158359

  17. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for recurrent locally advanced rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, C.G.; Shellito, P.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Eliseo, R.; Convery, K.; Wood, W.C. )

    1991-03-15

    A multimodality approach of moderate-dose to high-dose preoperative radiation therapy, surgical resection, and intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IORT) has been used for patients with locally recurrent rectal or rectosigmoid carcinoma. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival for 30 patients undergoing this treatment program were 26% and 19%, respectively. The most important factor predicting a favorable outcome was complete resection with negative pathologic resection margins. The determinant local control and disease-free survival for 13 patients undergoing complete resection were 62% and 54%, respectively, whereas for 17 patients undergoing partial resection these figures were 18% and 6%, respectively. There did not appear to be a difference in local control or survival based on the original surgical resection (abdominoperineal resection versus low anterior resection). However, the likelihood of obtaining a complete resection after preoperative radiation therapy was higher in patients who had previously undergone a low anterior resection than patients undergoing prior abdominoperineal resection. For the 30 patients undergoing external beam irradiation, resection, and IORT, the most significant toxicities were soft tissue or sacral injury and pelvic neuropathy. Efforts to further improve local control are directed toward the concurrent use of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil with and without leucovorin) as radiation dose modifiers during external beam irradiation and the use of additional postoperative radiation therapy.

  18. Fruit and vegetable intakes and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenomas in the PLCO cancer screening trial.

    PubMed

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Cantwell, Marie M; Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2016-04-15

    The roles of fruits and vegetables in colorectal cancer development are unclear. Few prospective studies have assessed the association with adenoma, a known precursor to colorectal cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the association between fruit and vegetable intake and colorectal cancer development by evaluating the risk of incident and recurrent colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer. Study participants were identified from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured using a self-reported dietary questionnaire. Total fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with reduced incident or recurrent adenoma risk overall, but a protective association was observed for multiple adenomas (Odds ratio 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38, 1.00). Higher fruit and vegetable intakes were associated with a borderline reduced risk of colorectal cancer (Hazard ratio (HR) 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.01), which reached significance amongst individuals with high processed meat intakes (HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.99). Our results suggest that increased fruit and vegetable intake may protect against multiple adenoma development and may reduce the detrimental effects of high processed meat intakes on colorectal cancer risk. PMID:26559156

  19. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. The impact of obesity on prostate cancer recurrence observed after exclusion of diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Agalliu, Ilir; Williams, Steve; Adler, Brandon; Androga, Lagu; Siev, Michael; Lin, Juan; Xue, Xiaonan; Huang, Gloria; Strickler, Howard D.; Ghavamian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although overall there is a positive association between obesity and risk of prostate cancer (PrCa) recurrence, results of individual studies are somewhat inconsistent. We investigated whether the failure to exclude diabetics in prior studies could have increased the likelihood of conflicting results. Methods A total of 610 PrCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy between 2005 and 2012 were followed for recurrence, defined as a rise in serum PSA ≥ 0.2 ng/ml following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) and history of type 2 diabetes were documented prior to PrCa surgery. The analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazard models. Results Obesity (25.6 %) and diabetes (18.7 %) were common in this cohort. There were 87 (14.3 %) recurrence events during a median follow-up of 30.8 months after surgery among the 610 patients. When analyzed among all PrCa patients, no association was observed between BMI/obesity and PrCa recurrence. However, when analysis was limited to non-diabetics, obese men had a 2.27-fold increased risk (95 % CI 1.17–4.41) of PrCa recurrence relative to normal weight men, after adjusting for age and clinical/pathological tumor characteristics. Conclusions This study found a greater than twofold association between obesity/BMI and PrCa recurrence in non-diabetics. We anticipated these results because the relationship between BMI/obesity and the biologic factors that may underlie the PrCa recurrence–BMI/obesity association, such as insulin, may be altered by the use of anti-diabetes medication or diminished beta-cell insulin production in advanced diabetes. Studies to further assess the molecular factors that explain the BMI/obesity–PrCa recurrence relationship are warranted. PMID:25771797

  1. Prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tantraworasin, Apichat; Saeteng, Somcharoen; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Arreyakajohn, Nuttapon; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have an excellent outcome; however tumor recurs in 30%–77% of patients. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic features of patients with any operable stage of NSCLC to identify the prognostic factors that influence tumor recurrence, including intratumoral blood vessel invasion (IVI), tumor size, tumor necrosis, and intratumoral lymphatic invasion. Methods From January 2002 to December 2011, 227 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups: the “no recurrence” group and the “recurrence” group. Recurrence-free survival was analyzed by multivariable Cox regression analysis, stratified by tumor staging, chemotherapy, and nodal involvement. Results IVI, tumor necrosis, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and nodal involvement were identified as independent prognostic factors of tumor recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR) of patients with IVI was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without IVI (95% confident interval [CI]: 1.4–3.2) (P = 0.001).The HR of patients with tumor necrosis was 2.1 times higher than that of patients without tumor necrosis (95% CI: 1.3–3.4) (P = 0.001). Patients who had a maximum tumor diameter greater than 5 cm had significantly higher risk of recurrence than patients who had a maximum tumor diameter of less than 5 cm (HR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.0–3.5) (P = 0.033). Conclusion IVI, tumor diameter more than 5 cm, and tumor necrosis are prognostic factors of tumor recurrence in completely resected NSCLC. Therefore, NSCLC patients, with or without nodal involvement, who have one or more prognostic factors of tumor recurrence may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy for prevention of tumor recurrence. PMID:23785244

  2. Secondary external-beam radiotherapy and hyperthermia for local recurrence after 125-iodine implantation in adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Kapp, D.S.; Bagshaw, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    At Standford, six patients underwent a course of external radiotherapy after local recurrence following 125-iodine implantation. Four of the six patients also received concomitant hyperthermia. Four patients were initially managed with hormonal manipulation at time of local relapse and subsequently received external beam radiotherapy with or without hyperthermia. The hyperthermia was non-invasively induced using an annular phased array radiative electromagnetic system. Treatment was well tolerated, and none of the patients experienced severe rectal or bladder complications. Three patients are free from disease; one patient experience local-regional recurrence based on biopsy; one recurred in the bladder, was treated with cystoprostatectomy and subsequently succumbed to metastatic disease; and one patient died of presumed metastatic disease. External-beam irradiation with concurrent hyperthermia can be safely delivered to treat locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma after 125-iodine implantation.

  3. Peritoneal expression of matrilysin helps identify early post-operative recurrence of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Giuseppe S.; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Monteleone, Giovanni; Candi, Eleonora; Amelio, Ivano; Catani, Valeria; Sibio, Simone; Divizia, Andrea; Tema, Giorgia; Iaculli, Edoardo; Gaspari, Achille L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) following a potentially curative resection is a challenging clinical problem. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is over-expressed by CRC cells and supposed to play a major role in CRC cell diffusion and metastasis. MMP-7 RNA expression was assessed by real-time PCR using specific primers in peritoneal washing fluid obtained during surgical procedure. After surgery, patients underwent a regular follow up for assessing recurrence. transcripts for MMP-7 were detected in 31/57 samples (54%). Patients were followed-up (range 20–48 months) for recurrence prevention. Recurrence was diagnosed in 6 out of 55 patients (11%) and two patients eventually died because of this. Notably, all the six patients who had relapsed were positive for MMP-7. Sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100% and 49% respectively. Data from patients have also been corroborated by computational approaches. Public available coloncarcinoma datasets have been employed to confirm MMP7 clinical impact on the disease. Interestingly, MMP-7 expression appeared correlated to Tgfb-1, and correlation of the two factors represented a poor prognostic factor. This study proposes positivity of MMP-7 in peritoneal cavity as a novel biomarker for predicting disease recurrence in patients with CRC. PMID:25596746

  4. Nodal Stage of Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Its Effect on Recurrence Patterns and Overall Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John M.; Yao, Aaron N.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Recht, Abe; Flickinger, John; Andrei, Adin; Reed, Michael F.; Toth, Jennifer W.; Fizgerald, Thomas J.; Higgins, Kristin; Zheng, Xiao; Shelkey, Julie; and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 involvement. We investigated the relationship between nodal stage and local-regional recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR) and overall survival (OS) for patients having an R0 resection. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional database of consecutive patients undergoing R0 resection for stage I-IIIA NSCLC from 1995 to 2008 was used. Patients receiving any radiation therapy before relapse were excluded. A total of 1241, 202, and 125 patients were identified with N0, N1, and N2 involvement, respectively; 161 patients received chemotherapy. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated for LR and DR as first sites of failure, and Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for OS. Competing risk analysis and proportional hazards models were used to examine LR, DR, and OS. Independent variables included age, sex, surgical procedure, extent of lymph node sampling, histology, lymphatic or vascular invasion, tumor size, tumor grade, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and visceral pleural invasion. Results: The median follow-up time was 28.7 months. Patients with N1 or N2 nodal stage had rates of LR similar to those of patients with N0 disease, but were at significantly increased risk for both DR (N1, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.59; P=.001; N2, HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.55-3.48; P<.001) and death (N1, HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18-1.81; P<.001; N2, HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.78-3.04; P<.001). LR was associated with squamous histology, visceral pleural involvement, tumor size, age, wedge resection, and segmentectomy. The most frequent site of LR was the mediastinum. Conclusions: Our investigation demonstrated that nodal stage is directly associated with DR and OS but not with LR. Thus, even some patients with, N0-N1 disease are at relatively high risk of local recurrence. Prospective

  5. [Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigetaka; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ito, Toshinori; Nakai, Sumio; Morimoto, Yoshikazu; Kitagawa, Tohru; Kurihara, Youjirou; Nishimura, Junichi

    2003-01-01

    Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication was performed for 8 patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. In this regimen, 500 ml of physiological saline with vitamins was administered in a 3-hour infusion. After 30 minutes of infusion, dexamethasone 10 mg, chlorpheniramine maleate 5 mg, famotidine 20 mg and ramosetron hydrochloride 0.3 mg were administered intravenously. After 30 more minutes of infusion, paclitaxel at a dose of 65 mg/m2 was admixed in the residual normal physiological saline and administered over 2 hours. Administration was continued for 3 weeks with a 1 week rest. Though the partial response rate was 25%, clinical symptoms improved in all patients. Moreover, both hematological and non-hematological toxicities were mild. Weekly administration of paclitaxel with a short course of premedication is an effective and well-tolerated method for patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. PMID:12557707

  6. Impact of Dose on Local Failure Rates After Image-Guided Reirradiation of Recurrent Paraspinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Wright, Jean; Bilsky, Mark; Hsu, Meier; Zhang Zhigang; Lovelock, Michael; Cox, Brett; Zatcky, Joan; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of dose on local failure (LF) rates in the re-treatment of recurrent paraspinal metastases with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients with in-field recurrence after previous spine radiation (median dose, 30 Gy) who received salvage IG-IMRT with either five 4-Gy (20-Gy group, n = 42) or five 6-Gy (30-Gy group, n = 55) daily fractions between January 2003 and August 2008 were reviewed. Institutional practice was 20 Gy before April 2006, when it changed to 30 Gy. A total of 47 cases (48%) were treated adjuvantly, after surgery to decompress epidural disease. LF after IG-IMRT was defined radiographically. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 months (range, 0.2-63.6 months). The 1-year cumulative incidences of LF after 20 Gy and 30 Gy IG-IMRT were 45% and 26%, respectively (p = 0.04). Of all treatment characteristics examined (20-Gy vs. 30-Gy dose group, dose to 95% of the planned and gross target volume, tumor size, histology, receipt of surgery, and interval between first and second radiation), only dose group had a significant impact on actuarial LF incidence (p = 0.04; unadjusted HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.96). There was no incidence of myelopathy. Conclusions: A significant decrease in LF after IG-IMRT with five 6-Gy fractions compared with five 4-Gy fractions was observed without increased risk of myelopathy. Until prospective data comparing stereotactic hypofractionated and single-fraction regimens become available, when reirradiating recurrent paraspinal metastases with IG-IMRT, administration of five 6-Gy daily fractions is reasonable.

  7. Targeted gene therapy and in vivo bioluminescent imaging for monitoring postsurgical recurrence and metastasis in mouse models of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Yao, C L; Li, L; Xin, Z; Jing, Z K; Li, L X

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of combined targeted gene therapy on recurrence and metastasis after liver cancer resection in nude mice. Twenty BALB/C mice were randomly divided into control and treatment groups with 10 mice in each group and a male/female ratio of 1:1. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H was then used to prepare a carcinoma model. An optical in vivo imaging technique (OIIT) was used 10 days later to detect the distribution of tumor cells, followed by partial liver resection and gene therapy. In the treatment group, 100 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing 1 x 1012 rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene viral vectors was injected into liver sections and peritumoral posterior peritoneal tissues; in the control group, the same amount of PBS containing 1 x 1012 empty viral vectors was injected at the same sites. OIIT was then used to detect the in vivo tumor metastasis 21 days later. Luciferase gene-labeled human primary hepatic carcinoma cell line MHCC97-H successfully infected 20 nude mice, and OIIT showed that the two groups exhibited metastasis after local tumor resection, but there were more tumor cells in the control group (P < 0.05). rAAV/AFP/IL-24 gene therapy can inhibit recurrence after liver cancer resection. PMID:27525931

  8. Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Autologous Versus Implant-based Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, Elena; Chow, Whitney; Angelaki, Anna; Cirwan, Cleona; Hamed, Hisham; Farhadi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent papers and guidelines agree that patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) should be offered breast reconstruction. Yet, the type of reconstruction in this group of patients is still a point of controversy. Methods: One hundred fourteen patients, treated for LABC from 2007 to 2013, were divided into 3 groups based on the reconstructive option: no reconstruction (NR), implant-based/expander-based reconstruction (IBR), and autologous tissue reconstruction (ATR). We analyzed demographics and compared delay in adjuvant therapy, length of hospitalization, surgical complications, failure of reconstruction, local recurrence, and disease-free survival. Results: Twenty-six patients had NR, 38 had IBR, and 50 had ATR. No significant difference was found in the percentage of patients who had their adjuvant treatment delayed [16% (NR) vs 22% (IBR) vs 14% (ATR)]. Mean length of hospitalization for the NR, IBR, and ATR groups was 2.7, 6, and 7.5 days, respectively. Complication rates requiring readmission were 36% (NR), 42% (IBR), and 32% (ATR). In the IBR group, 37% of implants were removed because of complications. Failure of reconstruction was 37% and 0% for the IBR and ATR groups, respectively. Local recurrence rates in the NR and Reconstruction (groups IBR and ATR combined) groups were 7% and 2%, respectively. Mean survival times in patients were 18 (NR), 10.3 (IBR), and 12.2 (ATR) months. Conclusions: No significant difference was found in the hospital stay length, adjuvant treatment delay, and complication rates between IBR and ATR. High rates of failed reconstruction suggest that the use of implants should be considered very carefully in patients with LABC. PMID:27014551

  9. A quantitative microscopic approach to predict local recurrence based on in vivo intraoperative imaging of sarcoma tumor margins.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jenna L; Fu, Henry L; Mito, Jeffrey K; Whitley, Melodi J; Chitalia, Rhea; Erkanli, Alaattin; Dodd, Leslie; Cardona, Diana M; Geradts, Joseph; Willett, Rebecca M; Kirsch, David G; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2015-11-15

    The goal of resection of soft tissue sarcomas located in the extremity is to preserve limb function while completely excising the tumor with a margin of normal tissue. With surgery alone, one-third of patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity will have local recurrence due to microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed. Currently, a limited number of intraoperative pathology-based techniques are used to assess margin status; however, few have been widely adopted due to sampling error and time constraints. To aid in intraoperative diagnosis, we developed a quantitative optical microscopy toolbox, which includes acriflavine staining, fluorescence microscopy, and analytic techniques called sparse component analysis and circle transform to yield quantitative diagnosis of tumor margins. A series of variables were quantified from images of resected primary sarcomas and used to optimize a multivariate model. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating positive from negative ex vivo resected tumor margins was 82 and 75%. The utility of this approach was tested by imaging the in vivo tumor cavities from 34 mice after resection of a sarcoma with local recurrence as a bench mark. When applied prospectively to images from the tumor cavity, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating local recurrence was 78 and 82%. For comparison, if pathology was used to predict local recurrence in this data set, it would achieve a sensitivity of 29% and a specificity of 71%. These results indicate a robust approach for detecting microscopic residual disease, which is an effective predictor of local recurrence. PMID:25994353

  10. Inflammatory Breast Cancer Management in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN): The Disease, The Recurrence Pattern, and The Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Matro, Jennifer M.; Li, Tianyu; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Hughes, Melissa E.; Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Weeks, Jane C.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an uncommon clinicopathologic entity characterized by rapid progression and aggressive behavior. We used the NCCN Outcomes Database to characterize recurrence patterns and outcomes. Methods Patients with newly diagnosed IBC treated between 1999 and 2009 at 12 NCCN institutions were identified and baseline characteristics obtained. Patients had multimodality therapy if they received two of three treatments: surgery, perioperative (neoadjuvant or adjuvant) chemotherapy, or perioperative radiation. First site of recurrence/metastatic diagnosis was identified. Overall survival was calculated based on stage at diagnosis and receipt of multimodality therapy. Results We identified 673 patients, of which 195 (29%) had metastatic disease at presentation. Median follow-up was 29 months. Of stage III patients, 82% received >1 treatment modality. Among 203 stage III patients who recurred, the most frequent sites of first recurrence were bone (28%), central nervous system (CNS), lung, and liver (all 21%). HER2 positive and triple negative subtypes had higher rates of CNS recurrence (p=0.001). Median survival was 66 months (95% CI 54-107) for stage III and 26 months (95% CI 22-33) for stage IV. Among 82% of stage III patients receiving multimodality therapy, median survival was 107 months (95% CI 71-Not Reached). Conclusions This large, retrospective, multi-institutional study confirms the aggressive clinical features, unique recurrence patterns and adverse prognosis of IBC. The high rate of CNS recurrence among high-risk subtypes, despite the inflammatory nature of the breast cancer, suggests that new strategies are needed for earlier detection or prevention of brain metastases to improve long-term prognosis. PMID:25034439

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Na, Dong Gyu; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Shin, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyung; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Seon; Kim, Kyu Sun; Baek, Seon Mi; Lee, Younghen; Chong, Semin; Sim, Jung Suk; Huh, Jung Yin; Bae, Jae-Ik; Kim, Kyung Tae; Han, Song Yee; Bae, Min Young; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Thermal ablation using radiofrequency is a new, minimally invasive modality employed as an alternative to surgery in patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the optimal use of radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies, and expert consensus. PMID:22438678

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent oral cancer and metastasis of cervical lymph node.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ariyoshi, Y; Shimahara, M; Miyatake, S; Kawabata, S; Ono, K; Suzuki, M; Maruhashi, A

    2009-07-01

    We treated 6 patients with recurrent oral cancer and metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes after conventional treatments in 5 and non-conventional in 1 using BNCT, and herein report our results. The clinical response in our patients ranged from CR to PD. In 5 cases, spontaneous pain decreased immediately after BNCT. Three of the 6 are alive at the time of writing and we found that BNCT contributed to QOL improvement in all. PMID:19395269

  13. TOP2A RNA Expression and Recurrence in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Sledge, George W.; Gray, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between TOP2A RNA expression and recurrence in patients with operable estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. We evaluated TOP2A expression in a pooled analysis of 4 independent data sets with gene expression data including 752 patients with early stage, ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, most of whom received either no adjuvant therapy or endocrine therapy without chemotherapy. We also used an algorithm to simulate the Oncotype DX Recurrence Score (simRS) and the proliferation component of the Recurrence Score (simPS). Results are expressed as the hazard ratio (HR) for estimates of the effect of a one standard deviation increase in the value of the log gene expression (x + 1SD vs. x) as a continuous function. TOP2A expression was significantly associated with recurrence (HR 1.56, p<0.0001), and after adjustment for simRS (HR 1.26, p=0.003). TOP2A correlated somewhat with simRS (0.45), but more strongly with simPS (0.69). For those with an intermediate simRS, high TOP2A expression (above the median) was associated with significantly higher relapse rates at five years (HR 1.82, p=0.007). TOP2A expression provides prognostic information in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, a population known to have low incidence of TOP2A gene alterations. These findings confirm prior reports indicating that TOP2A expression provides prognostic information in ER-positive breast cancer. TOP2A expression may also be useful for identifying those with an intermediate RS who are more likely to relapse, although additional validation in datasets including measured rather than simulated RS will be required. PMID:22706628

  14. Predictors for local invasive recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xining; Dai, Hongji; Liu, Ben; Song, Fengju

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of mammographic screening has considerably increased the detection rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has a high probability of recurrence. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the predictive factors including biomarkers, tumor characteristics, and modes of detection on the risk of local invasive recurrence (LIR) following DCIS. Searches were performed in PubMed and EMBASE up to 8 July 2014. Risk estimates (hazard ratios, odds ratios, and relative risks) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted to calculate the strength of the associations between predictive factors and the risk of LIR after treatment of DCIS. STATA 12.0 was used to combine results in this meta-analysis. A total of 18 articles were included in the analysis. Pooled risk estimates and 95% CIs were 1.36 (1.04–1.69) for the positive margin, 1.38 (1.12–1.63) for the nonscreening detection method, 1.04 (0.84–1.24) for high nuclear grade 1, 1.32 (0.98–1.66) for intermediate nuclear grade 2, 1.18 (0.98–1.37) for comedonecrosis, 1.00 (0.92–1.08) for large tumor size, 1.34 (0.82–1.87) for multifocality, 0.74 (0.36–1.12) for estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 0.89 (0.47–1.31) for progesterone receptor-positive tumors, and 1.25 (0.7–1.81) for HER2/neu-positive tumors. Positive margin and non-screening-detected cancers were associated with a higher risk of LIR following DCIS. These predictive factors, after further validation, could be considered to tailor treatment for individual patients. PMID:25714649

  15. Salvage brachytherapy in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy: predicting factors for control and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy. Methods and materials Between 1993 and 2007, we retrospectively analyzed 56 consecutively patients (pts) undergoing salvage brachytherapy. After local biopsy-proven recurrence, pts received 145 Gy LDR-BT (37 pts, 66%) or HDR-BT (19 pts, 34%) in different dose levels according to biological equivalent doses (BED2 Gy). By the time of salvage BT, only 15 pts (27%) received ADT. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control and toxicities. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were graded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up after salvage BT was 48 months. The 5-year FFbF was 77%. HDR and LDR late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in 21% and 24%. Late grade 3 GI toxicities were observed in 2% (HDR) and 2.7% (LDR). On univariate analysis, pre-salvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 10 ng/ml (p = 0.004), interval to relapse after initial treatment < 24 months (p = 0.004) and salvage HDR-BT doses BED2 Gy level < 227 Gy (p = 0.012) were significant in predicting biochemical failure. On Cox multivariate analysis, pre-salvage PSA, and time to relapse were significant in predicting biochemical failure. HDR-BT BED2 Gy (α/β 1.5 Gy) levels ≥ 227 (p = 0.013), and ADT (p = 0.049) were significant in predicting grade ≥ 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions Prostate BT is an effective salvage modality in some selected prostate local recurrence patients after radiation therapy. Even, we provide some potential predictors of biochemical control and toxicity for prostate salvage BT, further investigation is recommended. PMID:24885287

  16. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Unresectable Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Surgical Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hiroshi Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takao, Motoshi; Taguchi, Osamu; Yamada, Tomomi; Takeda, Kan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: A retrospective evaluation was done of clinical utility of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation in recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical intervention. Methods: During May 2003 to October 2010, 44 consecutive patients (26 male and 18 female) received curative lung RF ablation for 51 recurrent NSCLC (mean diameter 1.7 {+-} 0.9 cm, range 0.6 to 4.0) after surgical intervention. Safety, tumor progression rate, overall survival, and recurrence-free survival were evaluated. Prognostic factors were evaluated in multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 55 lung RF sessions were performed. Pneumothorax requiring pluerosclerosis (n = 2) and surgical suture (n = 1) were the only grade 3 or 4 adverse events (5.5%, 3 of 55). During mean follow-up of 28.6 {+-} 20.3 months (range 1 to 98), local tumor progression was found in 5 patients (11.4%, 5 of 44). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 97.7, 72.9, and 55.7%, respectively. The 1- and 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 76.7 and 41.1%, respectively. Tumor size and sex were independent significant prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. The 5-year survival rates were 73.3% in 18 women and 60.5% in 38 patients who had small tumors measuring {<=}3 cm. Conclusion: Our results suggest that lung RF ablation is a safe and useful therapeutic option for obtaining long-term survival in treated patients.

  17. Murine Model for Non-invasive Imaging to Detect and Monitor Ovarian Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sumi, Natalia J.; Lima, Eydis; Pizzonia, John; Orton, Sean P.; Craveiro, Vinicius; Joo, Wonduk; Holmberg, Jennie C.; Gurrea, Marta; Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Alvero, Ayesha; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States. Although patients initially respond to the current standard of care consisting of surgical debulking and combination chemotherapy consisting of platinum and taxane compounds, almost 90% of patients recur within a few years. In these patients the development of chemoresistant disease limits the efficacy of currently available chemotherapy agents and therefore contributes to the high mortality. To discover novel therapy options that can target recurrent disease, appropriate animal models that closely mimic the clinical profile of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer are required. The challenge in monitoring intra-peritoneal (i.p.) disease limits the use of i.p. models and thus most xenografts are established subcutaneously. We have developed a sensitive optical imaging platform that allows the detection and anatomical location of i.p. tumor mass. The platform includes the use of optical reporters that extend from the visible light range to near infrared, which in combination with 2-dimensional X-ray co-registration can provide anatomical location of molecular signals. Detection is significantly improved by the use of a rotation system that drives the animal to multiple angular positions for 360 degree imaging, allowing the identification of tumors that are not visible in single orientation. This platform provides a unique model to non-invasively monitor tumor growth and evaluate the efficacy of new therapies for the prevention or treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:25407815

  18. Identifying Reproducible Molecular Biomarkers for Gastric Cancer Metastasis with the Aid of Recurrence Information

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyao; Hong, Guini; Cheng, Jun; Li, Jing; Cai, Hao; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Tong, Mengsha; Li, Hongdong; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    To precisely diagnose metastasis state is important for tailoring treatments for gastric cancer patients. However, the routinely employed radiological and pathologic tests for tumour metastasis have considerable high false negative rates, which may retard the identification of reproducible metastasis-related molecular biomarkers for gastric cancer. In this research, using three datasets, we firstly shwed that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between metastatic tissue samples and non-metastatic tissue samples could hardly be reproducibly detected with a proper statistical control when the metastatic and non-metastatic samples were defined by TNM stage alone. Then, assuming that undetectable micrometastases are the prime cause for recurrence of early stage patients with curative resection, we reclassified all the “non-metastatic” samples as metastatic samples whenever the patients experienced tumour recurrence during follow-up after tumour resection. In this way, we were able to find distinct and reproducible DEGs between the reclassified metastatic and non-metastatic tissue samples and concordantly significant DNA methylation alterations distinguishing metastatic tissues and non-metastatic tissues of gastric cancer. Our analyses suggested that the follow-up recurrence information for patients should be employed in the research of tumour metastasis in order to decrease the confounding effects of false non-metastatic samples with undetected micrometastases. PMID:27109211

  19. Predictors of Regional Lymph Node Recurrence after Initial Thyroidectomy in Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Amirsina; Shojaeifard, Abolfazl; Soroush, Ahmadreza; Jafari, Mehdi; Abdehgah, Ali Ghorbani; Mahmoudzade, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background. Regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR) is common in patients with thyroid cancer but clinicopathological predictors are unclear. We aimed to clarify these predictors and identify patients who would benefit from prophylactic lymph node dissection the most. Method. 343 patients with different types of thyroid cancer were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy between 2007 and 2013. Results. The median ± interquartile range of patients' age was 40 ± 25 years. 245 (71.4%) patients were female. Regarding the risk of regional lymph node recurrence, we found that male gender, age ≥45 years, non-PTC (i.e., medullary, follicular, and anaplastic types) histopathology, T3 (i.e., tumor size >4 cm in the greatest dimension limited to the thyroid or any tumor with minimal extrathyroid extension), stage IVa, and isolated cervical lymphadenopathy as initial manifestation (ICL) are significant risk factors. T3 (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 156.41, 95% CI [55.72–439.1]) and ICL (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 77.79, 95% CI [31.55–191.81]) were the strongest predictors of regional lymph node recurrence. Conclusion. We found easily achievable risk factors for RLNR in thyroid cancers patients. We suggested that patients with specific clinicopathological features like male gender, age ≥45 years, larger tumor size, and extrathyroidal extension be considered as prophylactic lymphadenectomy candidates. PMID:27403370

  20. Intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer: The UCSF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; Singer, Mark I.; Garcia, Joaquin; Kaplan, Michael J.; Chan, Albert S.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To review a single-institutional experience with the use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for recurrent head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 137 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for recurrence or persistence of locoregional cancer of the head and neck. One hundred and thirteen patients (83%) had previously received external beam radiation as a component of definitive therapy. Ninety-four patients (69%) had squamous cell histology. Final surgical margins were microscopically positive in 56 patients (41%). IORT was delivered using either a modified linear accelerator or a mobile electron unit and was administered as a single fraction to a median dose of 15 Gy (range, 10-18 Gy). Median follow-up among surviving patients was 41 months (range, 3-122 months). Results: The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year estimates of in-field control after salvage surgery and IORT were 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively. Positive margins at the time of IORT predicted for in-field failure (p = 0.001). The 3-year rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 51%, 46%, and 36%, respectively. There were no perioperative fatalities. Complications included wound infection (4 patients), orocutaneous fistula (2 patients), flap necrosis (1 patient), trismus (1 patient), and neuropathy (1 patient). Conclusions: Intraoperative RT results in effective disease control with acceptable toxicity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent or persistent cancers of the head and neck.

  1. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients. This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II–VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan–Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72–12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458–3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan–Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation. The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut

  2. Optimal Cut-Off Values of Lymph Node Ratio Predicting Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul Gi; Ho, Joon; Choi, Jung Bum; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Min Jhi; Ban, Eun Jeong; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2016-02-01

    Regional lymph node (LN) metastasis has a significant impact for prediction of recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid cancers (PTC); however, the prognostic value of the lymph node ratio (LNR), which is defined as the ratio of the number of metastatic LNs to the total number of investigated LNs, is controversial. In this study, we determined the optimal cut-off values of LNRs for the prediction of recurrence in PTC patients.This large cohort study retrospectively evaluated 2294 patients who had undergone total thyroidectomy for PTC at a single institution from October 1985 to June 2009. The prediction probability of central LNR (cLNR, level VI) and total LNR (tLNR, levels II-VI) were estimated by binominal logistic regression analysis. Hazard ratios of the cut-off LNR values for cancer recurrence were calculated for relevant covariates using multivariate Cox regression analyses. Kaplan-Meier analyses were also utilized to assess the effects of estimated LNR cut-off values on recurrence-free survival (RFS).Of the 2294 patients, 138 (6.0%) presented cancer recurrence during the follow-up period (median duration = 107.1 months). The prediction probability indicated that LNRs of 0.4 and 0.5 for central LN and total LN, respectively, are optimal cut-off values for precise prediction with minimization of outliers. Multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cLNR ≥0.4 was independently predictive of recurrence in patients with N0 and N1a PTCs (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.016, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.72-12.986, P < 0.001) and that tLNR ≥0.5 indicated a significantly increased risk of recurrence in patients with N1b PTCs (HR: 2.372, 95% CI: 1.458-3.860, P < 0.001). In addition, Kaplan-Meier analyses clearly demonstrated that these LNR cut-off values are precisely operational in RFS estimation.The cut-off LNR values of 0.4 and 0.5 for cLNR and tLNR, respectively, were identified. Risk stratification combined with these LNR cut-off values may prove

  3. Perioperative Blood Transfusion as a Significant Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence and Survival after Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Kwon; Kim, Hyung Suk; Park, Juhyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Hyun Hoe; Kwak, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There have been conflicting reports regarding the association of perioperative blood transfusion (PBT) with oncologic outcomes including recurrence rates and survival outcomes in prostate cancer. We aimed to evaluate whether perioperative blood transfusion (PBT) affects biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) following radical prostatectomy (RP) for patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 2,713 patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. We performed a comparative analysis based on receipt of transfusion (PBT group vs. no-PBT group) and transfusion type (autologous PBT vs. allogeneic PBT). Univariate and multivariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to evaluate variables associated with BRFS, CSS, and OS. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival estimates for BRFS, CSS, and OS, and log-rank test was used to conduct comparisons between the groups. Results The number of patients who received PBT was 440 (16.5%). Among these patients, 350 (79.5%) received allogeneic transfusion and the other 90 (20.5%) received autologous transfusion. In a multivariate analysis, allogeneic PBT was found to be statistically significant predictors of BRFS, CSS, and OS; conversely, autologous PBT was not. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly decreased 5-year BRFS (79.2% vs. 70.1%, log-rank, p = 0.001), CSS (98.5% vs. 96.7%, log-rank, p = 0.012), and OS (95.5% vs. 90.6%, log-rank, p < 0.001) in the allogeneic PBT group compared to the no-allogeneic PBT group. In the autologous PBT group, however, none of these were statistically significant compared to the no-autologous PBT group. Conclusions We found that allogeneic PBT was significantly associated with decreased BRFS, CSS, and OS. This provides further support for the immunomodulation hypothesis for allogeneic

  4. Predictors of Local Recurrence Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Lyden, Maureen; Beitsch, Peter; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze a pooled set of nearly 2,000 patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) Mammosite Registry Trial and at William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) to identify factors associated with local recurrence following accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,961 women underwent partial breast irradiation between April 1993 and November 2010 as part of the ASBS Registry Trial or at WBH. Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed for each group and for the pooled cohort. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed including age, tumor stage/size, estrogen receptor status, surgical margins, and lymph node status to determine their association with IBTR. Results: The two groups weres similar, but WBH patients were more frequently node positive, had positive margins, and were less likely to be within the American Society for Radiation Oncology-unsuitable group. At 5 years, the rates of IBTR, RR, DM, DFS, CSS, and OS for the pooled group of patients were 2.9%, 0.5%, 2.4%, 89.1%, 98.5%, and 91.8%, respectively. The 5-year rate of true recurrence/marginal miss was 0.8%. Univariate analysis of IBTR found that negative estrogen receptor status (odds ratio [OR], 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.55-5.13, p = 0.0007) was the only factor significantly associated with IBTR, while a trend was seen for age less than 50 (OR 1.80, 95% confidence interval 0.90-3.58, p = 0.10). Conclusions: Excellent 5-year outcomes were seen following APBI in over 1,900 patients. Estrogen receptor negativity was the only factor associated with IBTR, while a trend for age less than 50 was noted. Significant differences in factors associated with IBTR were noted between cohorts, suggesting that factors driving IBTR may be predicated based on the risk

  5. Targeted cancer exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tenedini, E; Bernardis, I; Artusi, V; Artuso, L; Roncaglia, E; Guglielmelli, P; Pieri, L; Bogani, C; Biamonte, F; Rotunno, G; Mannarelli, C; Bianchi, E; Pancrazzi, A; Fanelli, T; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, G; Ferrari, S; Manfredini, R; Vannucchi, A M; Tagliafico, E

    2014-05-01

    With the intent of dissecting the molecular complexity of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we designed a target enrichment panel to explore, using next-generation sequencing (NGS), the mutational status of an extensive list of 2000 cancer-associated genes and microRNAs. The genomic DNA of granulocytes and in vitro-expanded CD3+T-lymphocytes, as a germline control, was target-enriched and sequenced in a learning cohort of 20 MPN patients using Roche 454 technology. We identified 141 genuine somatic mutations, most of which were not previously described. To test the frequency of the identified variants, a larger validation cohort of 189 MPN patients was additionally screened for these mutations using Ion Torrent AmpliSeq NGS. Excluding the genes already described in MPN, for 8 genes (SCRIB, MIR662, BARD1, TCF12, FAT4, DAP3, POLG and NRAS), we demonstrated a mutation frequency between 3 and 8%. We also found that mutations at codon 12 of NRAS (NRASG12V and NRASG12D) were significantly associated, for primary myelofibrosis (PMF), with highest dynamic international prognostic scoring system (DIPSS)-plus score categories. This association was then confirmed in 66 additional PMF patients composing a final dataset of 168 PMF showing a NRAS mutation frequency of 4.7%, which was associated with a worse outcome, as defined by the DIPSS plus score. PMID:24150215

  6. Global transcriptome analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer specimens identifies biomarkers of disease recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Xu, Jianpeng; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Sannigrahi, Soma; Johnson, Brent A.; Zhou, Wei; Gillespie, Theresa; Park, Jong Y.; Nam, Robert K.; Sugar, Linda; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Seth, Arun K.; Petros, John A.; Moreno, Carlos S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in American men and there is an unmet need for biomarkers to identify patients with aggressive disease. In an effort to identify biomarkers of recurrence, we performed global RNA sequencing on 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostatectomy samples from 100 patients at three independent sites, defining a 24-gene signature panel. The 24 genes in this panel function in cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, PI3K signaling, steroid metabolism, translation, chromatin modification and transcription. Sixteen genes have been associated with cancer with five specifically associated with prostate cancer (BTG2, IGFBP3, SIRT1, MXI1 and FDPS). Validation was performed on an independent publicly available dataset of 140 patients, where the new signature panel outperformed markers published previously in terms of predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR). Our work also identified differences in gene expression between Gleason Pattern 4+3 and 3+4 tumors, including several genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and developmental pathways. Overall, this study defines a novel biomarker panel that has the potential to improve the clinical management of prostate cancer. PMID:24713434

  7. Nomogram of Naive Bayesian Model for Recurrence Prediction of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojae; Kim, Ku Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer has a high rate of recurrence, resulting in the need for aggressive treatment and close follow-up. However, previously established classification guidelines, based on expert panels or regression models, are controversial. Prediction models based on machine learning show excellent performance, but they are not widely used because they cannot explain their decisions and cannot be presented on paper in the way that knowledge is customarily represented in the clinical world. The principal objective of this study was to develop a nomogram based on a naïve Bayesian model for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence within 5 years after breast cancer surgery. Methods The nomogram can provide a visual explanation of the predicted probabilities on a sheet of paper. We used a data set from a Korean tertiary teaching hospital of 679 patients who had undergone breast cancer surgery between 1994 and 2002. Seven prognostic factors were selected as independent variables for the model. Results The accuracy was 80%, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of the model was 0.81. Conclusions The nomogram can be easily used in daily practice to aid physicians and patients in making appropriate treatment decisions after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27200218

  8. Survival Impact of Secondary Cytoreductive Surgery for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer in an Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rani Akhil; Chia, Yin Nin; Lim, Yong Kuei; Yam, Kwai Lam; Lim, Cindy; Teo, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of secondary cytoreductive surgery in Asian patients with recurrent ovarian cancer and to assess prognostic variables on overall post-recurrence survival time. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who underwent secondary cytoreduction at the Gynaecological Cancer Center at the KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, between 1999 and 2009. Eligible patients included those who had been firstly treated by primary cytoreductive surgery and followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and had a period of clinical remission of at least six months and subsequently underwent secondary cytoreductive surgery for recurrence. Univariate analysis was performed to evaluate various variables influencing the overall survival. Results Twenty-five patients met our eligibility criteria. The median age was 52 years (range=31–78 years). The median time from completion of primary treatment to recurrence was 25.1 months (range=6.4–83.4). Secondary cytoreduction was optimal in 20 of 25 patients (80%). The median follow-up duration was 38.9 months (range=17.8–72.4) and median overall survival time was 33.1 months (95% confidence interval, 15.3–undefined.). Ten (40.0%) patients required bowel resection, but no end colostomy was performed. One (4.0%) patient had wedge resection of the liver, one (4.0%) had a distal pancreatectomy, one (4.0%) had a unilateral nephrectomy, and one (4.0%) had adrenalectomy. There were no operative deaths. The overall survival of patients who responded to secondary cytoreductive surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly longer than those patients who did not respond to the treatment. Of those patients who responded to the surgical management, patients with clear cell carcinoma fared well compared to those with the endometrioid, mucinous adenocarcinoma, and papillary serous type (p<0.001). Complete secondary cytoreductive surgery appeared to

  9. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  10. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin or High-Dose Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-27

    Anterior Urethral Cancer; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Posterior Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  11. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. A statistical framework for evaluating neural networks to predict recurrent events in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorunescu, Florin; Gorunescu, Marina; El-Darzi, Elia; Gorunescu, Smaranda

    2010-07-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women today. Sometimes, breast cancer can return after primary treatment. A medical diagnosis of recurrent cancer is often a more challenging task than the initial one. In this paper, we investigate the potential contribution of neural networks (NNs) to support health professionals in diagnosing such events. The NN algorithms are tested and applied to two different datasets. An extensive statistical analysis has been performed to verify our experiments. The results show that a simple network structure for both the multi-layer perceptron and radial basis function can produce equally good results, not all attributes are needed to train these algorithms and, finally, the classification performances of all algorithms are statistically robust. Moreover, we have shown that the best performing algorithm will strongly depend on the features of the datasets, and hence, there is not necessarily a single best classifier.

  13. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of thyroid gland with local recurrence: ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland (PSCCT) is a rare malignancy that presents with advanced disease and poor prognosis. It is difficult to diagnose PSCCT in its early stage because of its rarity and lack of typical imaging findings. We experienced an elderly woman with PSCCT confirmed by surgery. Although preoperative fine-needle aspiration revealed no malignancy, surgical resection was performed because the ultrasonogram showed diffuse microcalcifications, which suggested malignancy, and clinically, the mass grew rapidly to compress the trachea. Local tumor recurrence was noted at 3 months after surgery. Surgical resection or repeat biopsy should be considered if a cytologically benign thyroid mass shows imaging or clinical features of malignancy. PMID:24936508

  14. HIV Positivity but not HPV/p16 Status is Associated with Higher Recurrence Rate in Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Joshua E.; Panico, Vinicius J. A.; Marconato, Heloisa M. F.; Sherr, David L.; Christos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Aim Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a pathogenic factor of squamous cell carcinoma in various mucosal locations, including anal carcinoma (ACA). It is also known that patients positive for HIV are at high risk of ACA. The goal of this study was to examine clinical outcome in ACA in relation to HPV/p16 positivity, histologic tumor differentiation, and HIV status. Patients with oropharyngeal cancers that are positive for HPV and show overexpression of p16 as well as having non-keratinizing/basaloid histology have been reported to have better outcomes following chemoradiation (CRT). However, such relationships in ACA remain unknown. Methods Forty-two patients with SCC of the anus treated with CRT between 1997 and 2009 were identified. The tumors were subclassified as either non-keratinizing (including basaloid) or keratinizing categories. HPV testing was performed using SPF10-PCR, and all cases were immunostained for p16. Results There were 23 men and 19 women; 43 % of men and 11 % of women were HIV-positive (p =0.04). Fifty-five percent of patients had local disease (stages I and II) and 41 % were stages III and IV, with 4 % stage unknown. All tumors were positive for high-oncogenic risk HPVs, and all were positive with p16 immunostain. Sixty-four percent of tumors were non-keratinizing/basaloid and 36 % were keratinizing. The keratinizing tumors were more common in HIV-positive patients (67 %), whereas non-keratinizing/basaloid tumors were more common in HIV-negative patients (77 %) (p =0.008). Thirty-one percent of patients had recurrence of disease, including 50 % HIV-positive patients and 23 % HIV-negative patients (p =0.09). There was no difference in the recurrence rate between non-keratinizing and keratinizing tumor subtypes (p =0.80). The 24-month recurrence-free survival for the cohort was 66 % (95 % CI=46 %, 81 %), with HIV-positive patients having worse recurrence-free survival compared to HIV-negative patients (HR=2.85, 95 % CI= 0.95, 8.53; p =0

  15. Recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population do not associate with increased breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingjing; Prager–van der Smissen, Wendy J. C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Collée, J. Margriet; Cornelissen, Sten; Lamping, Roy; Nieuwlaat, Anja; Foekens, John A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Verhoef, Senno; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Martens, John W. M.; Hollestelle, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    The HOXB13 p.G84E mutation has been firmly established as a prostate cancer susceptibility allele. Although HOXB13 also plays a role in breast tumor progression, the association of HOXB13 p.G84E with breast cancer risk is less evident. Therefore, we comprehensively interrogated the entire HOXB13 coding sequence for mutations in 1,250 non-BRCA1/2 familial breast cancer cases and 800 controls. We identified two predicted deleterious missense mutations, p.G84E and p.R217C, that were recurrent among breast cancer cases and further evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in a larger study. Taken together, 4,520 familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases and 3,127 controls were genotyped including the cases and controls of the whole gene screen. The concordance rate for the genotyping assays compared with Sanger sequencing was 100%. The prostate cancer risk allele p.G84E was identified in 18 (0.56%) of 3,187 cases and 16 (0.70%) of 2,300 controls (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.41–1.59, P = 0.54). Additionally, p.R217C was identified in 10 (0.31%) of 3,208 cases and 2 (0.087%) of 2,288 controls (OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 0.76–33.57, P = 0.14). These results imply that none of the recurrent HOXB13 mutations in the Dutch population are associated with breast cancer risk, although it may be worthwhile to evaluate p.R217C in a larger study. PMID:27424772

  16. Paclitaxel combined with capecitabine as first-line chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meiqin; Yang, Yunshan; Lv, Wangxia; Song, Zhengbo; Zhong, Haijun

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy is of crucial importance in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients, in order to obtain palliation of symptoms and improve survival. To date, no standard chemotherapy regimen has been established for AGC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate