Science.gov

Sample records for cancer patient communication

  1. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  2. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  3. Patient-Centered Communication and Prognosis Discussions with Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Cleveland G.; Coker, Casey J.; Poulsen, Shruti S.; Doyle, Jennifer M.; Fiscella, Kevin; Epstein, Ronald M; Griggs, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine physician communication associated with prognosis discussion with cancer patients. Methods We conducted a study of physician-patient communication using trained actors. Thirty-nine physicians, including 19 oncologists and 20 family physicians participated in the study. Actors carried two hidden digital recorders to unannounced visits. We coded recordings for eliciting and validating patient concerns, attentive voice tone, and prognosis talk. Results Actor adherence to role averaged 92% and the suspected detection rate was 14%. In a multiple regression, eliciting and validating patient concerns (ÎČ=.40, C.I. = 0.11-0.68) attentiveness (ÎČ=.32, C.I. = 0.06-0.58) and being an oncologist vs. a family physician (ÎČ=.33, C.I. = 0.33 - 1.36) accounted for 46% of the variance in prognosis communication. Conclusion Eliciting and validating patient concerns and attentiveness voice tone is associated with increased discussion of cancer patient prognosis as is physician specialty. Practice Implications Eliciting and validating patient concerns and attentive voice tone may be markers of physician willingness to discuss emotionally difficult topics. Educating physicians about mindful practice may increase their ability to collect important information and to attend to patient concerns. PMID:19819098

  4. Modeling patient-centered communication: Oncologist relational communication and patient communication involvement in breast cancer adjuvant therapy decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Step, Mary M.; Rose, Julia Hannum; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Cheruvu, Vinay K.; Siminoff, Laura A

    2009-01-01

    Objective Relational communication refers to those messages communicators naturally express that carry meaning about the type and quality of relationship they share. It is expected that patients of oncologists who express positive relational communication will be more communicatively involved in their office visits, and regret their decision for adjuvant therapy following surgery less. Methods One hundred eighty (180) audio-recorded discussions between oncologists (n = 40) and early stage (I–III) breast cancer patients were coded with the Siminoff Communication Content and Affect Program (SCCAP). The data were used to test the relationships between patient demographics, oncologist relational communication, patient communication involvement and self-reported patient decision regret. Results After controlling for clinician clusters, oncologists’ verbal (i.e., confirming messages) and nonverbal (i.e., direct and inclusive speech) relational communication is indirectly associated with lower patient decision regret via the mediating effect of greater patient communication involvement. Conclusion Clinician relational communication provides an influential affective climate for decision-making that appears to have important effects on patients’ decision confidence. Practice Implications Clinicians should recognize the potential of their own relational messages to facilitate patients’ communication involvement in decision-making during cancer care. PMID:19811883

  5. Patient-centered Communication in Cancer Care Symposium

    Cancer.gov

    On May 15-16, 2006, the Outcomes Research Branch (ORB) and the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) organized a symposium on Patient-centered Communication (PCC) in Bethesda, MD. Participants included more than 25 researchers and practitioners from federal agencies, private sector healthcare systems, cancer centers, and other academic departments. The expert panel of researchers and practitioners represented various areas of expertise, including oncology, nursing, primary care, health services research, large delivery systems, communication and behavioral sciences, and patient advocacy.

  6. Communication: the key to improving the prostate cancer patient experience.

    PubMed

    Waldie, Marian; Smylie, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, an estimated 24,600 Canadian men were diagnosed with prostate cancer (Canadian Cancer Society, 2011). Upon diagnosis, men and their family members begin an arduous journey of information gathering surrounding prostate cancer and its various forms of treatment. Men have to consider the impact a treatment may potentially have on their quality of life and, frequently, they experience decisional conflict and require support. In May 2008, the Prostate Cancer Assessment Clinic opened to receive men for an evaluation of a possible prostate cancer. Our inter-professional model of care provides support, guidance and education to our patients from assessment to diagnosis and treatment planning. A major goal of our diagnostic assessment unit has been to improve the patient experience. Communication is defined as "to make known, to exchange information or opinions" (Cayne, Lechner, et al., 1988). Nursing is the critical link for information exchange that is patient-centred and collaborative. The focus of this paper will highlight the development and implementation of nurse-led initiatives within our program to improve the prostate cancer patient experience. These initiatives include: a patient information guide, prostate biopsy care, patient resources, community links, surgery education classes and implementation of a decision aid. Communication is the key. PMID:22764588

  7. Improving Communication Between Doctors and Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Moira; Brown, Judith Belle; Hammerton, Joanne; Donner, Allan; Gavin, Alan; Holliday, Ronald L.; Whelan, Tim; Leslie, Ken; Cohen, Irene; Weston, Wayne; Freeman, Tom

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to assess the effectiveness of intensive education for physicians compared with a traditional session on communicating with breast cancer patients. METHODS A randomized controlled trial was conducted in practices in London, Hamilton, and Toronto, Canada, with 17 family physicians, 16 surgeons, and 18 oncologists, and with 102 patients of the surgeons and oncologists. Doctors were randomized to 1 of 2 continuing education approaches: a traditional 2-hour version (control group), or a new 6-hour intensive version including exploring the patients’ perspectives and reviewing videotapes and receiving feedback (intervention group). Communication behavior of the physicians was measured objectively both before and after the intervention. As well, 4 postintervention patient outcomes were measured, by design only for surgeons and oncologists: patient-centerdness of the visit, satisfaction, psychological distress, and feeling better. RESULTS No significant differences were found on the communication score of the intervention vs the control physicians when controlling for preintervention communication scores. Intervention family physicians, however, had significantly higher communication subscores than control family physicians. Also, patients of the intervention surgeons and oncologists were significantly more satisfied (scores of 82.06 vs 77.78, P = .03) and felt better (88.2% vs 70.6%, P=.02) than patients of the control surgeons and oncologists when controlling for covariates and adjusting for clustering within doctor. CONCLUSIONS The continuing medical education intervention was effective in terms of some but not all physician and patient outcomes. PMID:17893379

  8. Patient-centered communication in cancer care: the role of the NCI's Cancer Information Service.

    PubMed

    Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Hodorowski, Julie Keany; Williams, Laurie A; Kornfeld, Julie; Davis, Nydia Lassalle; Monroe, Maryann; Bright, Mary Anne

    2011-03-01

    While patient-centered care and the reduction of suffering due to cancer are primary goals of the NCI, improvement in the delivery of patient-centered communication has been identified as a key NCI research priority. As research on patient-centered communication evolves, the potential contributions of programs such as the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Cancer Information Service (CIS) cannot be overlooked. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the six core functions of patient-clinician communication described in the literature (fostering healing relationships, exchanging information, responding to emotions, managing uncertainty, making decisions and enabling patient-self management) are embedded in the work of the CIS. The communication process used by the CIS to extend the patient-centered communication role of the clinician will be discussed. CIS training and quality management systems will be described. Lastly, suggestions for the role of CIS in future health information delivery and research will be explored. PMID:20532726

  9. Patient–oncologist communication in advanced cancer: predictors of patient perception of prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Tracy M.; Alexander, Stewart C.; Hays, Margie; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Olsen, Maren K.; Rodriguez, Keri L.; Pollak, Kathryn I.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Arnold, Robert; Tulsky, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Goals of work Advanced cancer patients’ perceptions of prognosis, which are often overly optimistic compared to oncologist estimates, influence treatment preferences. The predictors of patients’ perceptions and the effect of oncologist communication on patient understanding are unclear. This study was designed to identify the communication factors that influence patient–oncologist concordance about chance of cure. Materials and methods We analyzed audiorecorded encounters between 51 oncologists and 141 advanced cancer patients with good (n=69) or poor (n=72) concordance about chance of cure. Encounters were coded for communication factors that might influence oncologist–patient concordance, including oncologist statements of optimism and pessimism. Main results Oncologists made more statements of optimism (mean=3.3 per encounter) than statements of pessimism (mean=1.2 per encounter). When oncologists made at least one statement of pessimism, patients were more likely to agree with their oncologist's estimated chance of cure (OR=2.59, 95%CI=1.31–5.12). Statements of optimism and uncertainty were not associated with an increased likelihood that patients would agree or disagree with their oncologists about chance of cure. Conclusions Communication of pessimistic information to patients with advanced cancer increases the likelihood that patients will report concordant prognostic estimates. Communication of optimistic information does not have any direct effect. The best communication strategy to maximize patient knowledge for informed decision making while remaining sensitive to patients’ emotional needs may be to emphasize optimistic aspects of prognosis while also consciously and clearly communicating pessimistic aspects of prognosis. PMID:18196288

  10. Online communication and support for cancer patients: a relationship-centric design framework.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jacob B; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2005-01-01

    Dealing with a cancer diagnosis and cancer treatment involves communication among clinicians, patients, families, friends and others affected by the illness. The hypothesis of this research is that an informatics system can effectively support the communication needs of cancer patients and their informal caregivers. Two design frameworks for online cancer communication are defined and compared. One is centered primarily on the users' interpersonal relationships, and the other is centered on the clinical data and cancer information. Five types of clinical and supportive relationships were identified and supported by in-depth interviews with cancer patients and their informal caregivers. Focusing the design of an online cancer communication system around the interpersonal relationships of patients and families may be an important step towards designing more effective paradigms for online cancer care and support. PMID:16779150

  11. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  12. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening


  13. Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Promoting Healing and Reducing Suffering

    Cancer.gov

    Effective patient-clinician communication is central to the delivery of high-quality care. It becomes even more crucial in the cancer setting where patients have to deal with stress, uncertainty, complex information, and life-altering medical decisions.

  14. All eyes on the patient: the influence of oncologists' nonverbal communication on breast cancer patients' trust.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Marij A; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Bijker, Nina; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Vermeulen, Daniëlle M; Smets, Ellen M A

    2015-08-01

    Trust in the oncologist is crucial for breast cancer patients. It reduces worry, enhances decision making, and stimulates adherence. Optimal nonverbal communication by the oncologist, particularly eye contact, body posture, and smiling, presumably benefits patients' trust. We were the first to experimentally examine (1) how the oncologist's nonverbal behavior influences trust, and (2) individual differences in breast cancer patients' trust. Analogue patients (APs) viewed one out of eight versions of a video vignette displaying a consultation about chemotherapy treatment. All eight versions varied only in the oncologist's amount of eye contact (consistent vs. inconsistent), body posture (forward leaning vs. varying), and smiling (occasional smiling vs. no smiling). Primary outcome was trust in the observed oncologist (Trust in Oncologist Scale). 214 APs participated. Consistent eye contact led to stronger trust (? = -.13, p = .04). This effect was largely explained by lower educated patients, for whom the effect of consistent eye contact was stronger than for higher educated patients (? = .18, p = .01). A forward leaning body posture did not influence trust, nor did smiling. However, if the oncologist smiled more, he was perceived as more friendly (rs = .31, p < .001) and caring (rs = .18, p = .01). Older (? = .17, p = .01) and lower educated APs (? = -.25, p < .001) were more trusting. Trust was weaker for more avoidantly attached APs (? = -.16, p = .03). We experimentally demonstrated the importance of maintaining consistent eye contact for breast cancer patients' trust, especially among lower educated patients. These findings need to be translated into training for oncologists in how to optimize their nonverbal communication with breast cancer patients while simultaneously managing increased time pressure and computer use during the consultation. PMID:26227472

  15. December 2009 Special Issue on Patient-Centered Cancer Communication Research

    Cancer.gov

    A December 2009 special issue of Patient Education and Counseling highlighted empirical studies from across the world that inform researchers, clinicians, and policy makers about the salience of patient-clinician communication at different phases of the cancer control continuum, from prevention to end-of-life care. The papers highlight the multidisciplinary nature of cancer communication research. A variety of study designs and analytical strategies are employed. Neeraj K.

  16. Using the word `cancer' in communication about an abnormal pap test: Finding common ground with Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Randhawa, Veenu; John, Priya; Makoul, Gregory; Spring, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate provider and patient views about communication regarding cervical cancer screening follow-up. Methods Using qualitative analysis, we interviewed 20 providers and 10 patients from two urban clinics that serve low-income African American and Hispanic women. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups assessed familiarity with National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and reactions to a letter asking women with abnormal Pap test to telephone CIS. The letter suggested questions to ask prior to receiving follow-up. Results No patient or provider was familiar with CIS. Providers but not patients expressed discomfort with use of the word `cancer' in the letter and in CIS's name. Providers feared that reference to cancer would provoke fatalism and impede timely follow-up, whereas patients felt information about cancer risk was needed to prompt timely follow-up. Information providers found necessary to convey in order to accurately explain abnormal Pap tests surpassed patients' literacy levels. Conclusion Qualitative data suggest important gaps in perspective between providers and patients. There is a need to bridge the gap and overcome communication challenges to promote timely medical follow-up and have better health outcomes. Practice Implications Implications and strategies for improving patient-provider education and communication about abnormal pap test are discussed. PMID:20060255

  17. Evaluation of Patient Needs and Patient Navigator Communication about Cervical Cancer Prevention in Appalachian Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elisia L.; Scott, Allison M.; White, Carol R.; Dignan, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies describe the way patient navigation processes may address disparities in treatment and follow-up care for medically underserved populations. Using a social ecological framework, we analyzed survey assessments of 519 patients completing a randomized navigation trial in Appalachia Kentucky to examine patient-reported barriers to follow-up cervical cancer care. We also analyzed in-depth interview transcripts with four lay patient navigators in the trial to identify barriers to follow-up care and to learn what communication strategies navigators use to successfully (or unsuccessfully) help patients navigate around those barriers. Our analysis provides insight into how patient navigation may improve adherence to follow-up care through assisted uncertainty management. We also discuss opportunities for improving navigator training to address disparities in clinical outcomes.

  18. Association of Patient-Provider Communication Domains with Lung Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny J.; Lake, Jessica; Wall, Melanie M.; Berman, Andrew R.; Salazar-Schicchi, John; Powell, Charles; Keller, Steven M.; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-physician communication is critical for helping patients understand and complete the complex steps needed to diagnose stage and treat lung cancer. We assessed which domains of patient-physician communication about lung cancer and its treatment are associated with receipt of disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Methods Patients with recently-diagnosed lung cancer were recruited from four medical centers in New York City from 2008 to 2011. Participants were surveyed about discussions with physicians regarding treatment, symptoms and needs. Multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling were used to assess which communication factors were associated with disease treatment. Results Of the 352 participants, 191 (54%) received disease-directed, stage-appropriate treatment. Unadjusted associations between communication items and treatment found that participants who felt that their physicians explained the risks and disadvantages of lung cancer treatment (P<0.01), discussed their chances of cure (P=0.02), discussed goals of treatment (P<0.01) or who were warm and friendly (P=0.04) were more likely to undergo treatment. Three communication domains were identified: treatment information, physician support, and patient symptoms/needs. After adjusting for known determinants of lung cancer treatment, increased treatment information was associated with higher probability of cancer-directed treatment (P=0.003). Other communication domains (physician support or patient symptoms/needs) were not independent predictors of treatment (P>0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions These data suggest that treatment information is particularly important for increasing the probability of cancer-directed therapy among lung cancer patients. Clinicians should ensure that they clearly discuss treatment goals and options with patients while maintaining empathy, supporting patient needs, and addressing symptoms. PMID:25122421

  19. Factors Influencing Communication Between the Patients with Cancer and their Nurses in Oncology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Nikanfar, Alireza; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Ghahramanian, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as “three-factor effects” that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of “Patient as the center of communication”, “Nurse as a human factor”, and “Organizational structures”. The first category consists of two sub-categories of “Imposed changes by the disease” and the “patient's particular characteristics”. The second category includes sub-categories of “sense of vulnerability” and “perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication”. The third category consists of the sub-categories of “workload and time imbalance”, “lack of supervision”, and “impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs”. Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach. PMID:24600177

  20. Evaluation of a Pilot Communication Skills Training Intervention for Minority Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Carma L.; Goytia, Elliott J.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Bulone, Linda; Horner, Jennifer; Li, Yuelin; Kemeny, Margaret; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to pilot test in a minority cancer patient population a communication workshop to improve doctor-patient communication skills. Thirty-two patients participated. Eighteen evaluated a face-to-face workshop, while 14 completed surveys only. Participants in the workshop group completed the Patient Report of Communication Behavior (PRCB) before and after the workshop and a course evaluation. Participants did not differ on baseline PRCB scores. Post-test scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores (p<.01). All participants agreed or strongly agreed that they would use the communication skills; 93% agreed or strongly agreed that the skills would improve their healthcare. PMID:21966720

  1. Advancing Research Methodology for Measuring & Monitoring Patient-centered Communication in Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    A critical step in facilitating the delivery of patient-centered communication (PCC) as part of routine cancer care delivery is creating a measurement and monitoring system that will allow for the ongoing assessment, tracking, and improvement of these six functions of patient-centered communication. To build the foundation of such a system and to advance research methodology in this area, the ORB has collaborated with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) on a research project conducted within AHRQ's DEcIDE network.

  2. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This study evaluated a 2-day communication skills training program in nursing care through surveys with nurses and patients before and after the training. The training had no effect on patient perception of nurse empathy and attentiveness, patients’ moods, or cancer-related self-efficacy. The training also did not significantly affect nurses on measures related to communication and work-related stress.

  3. A coping and communication support intervention tailored to older patients diagnosed with late-stage cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Julia Hannum; Radziewicz, Rosanne; Bowman, Karen F; O’Toole, Elizabeth E

    2008-01-01

    As our society ages, increasing numbers of older Americans will be diagnosed and eventually will die of cancer. To date, psycho-oncology interventions for advanced cancer patients have been more successful in reaching younger adult age groups and generally have not been designed to respond to the unique needs and preferences of older patients. Theories and research on successful aging (Baltes and Baltes 1990; Baltes 1997), health information processing style (Miller 1995; Miller et al 2001) and non-directive client-centered therapy (Rogers 1951, 1967), have guided the development of a coping and communication support (CCS) intervention. Key components of this age-sensitive and tailored intervention are described, including problem domains addressed, intervention strategies used and the role of the CCS practitioner. Age group comparisons in frequency of contact, problems raised and intervention strategies used during the first six weeks of follow up indicate that older patients were similar to middle-aged patients in their level of engagement, problems faced and intervention strategies used. Middle-aged patients were more likely to have problems communicating with family members at intervention start up and practical problems as well in follow up contacts. This is the first intervention study specifically designed to be age sensitive and to examine age differences in engagement from the early treatment phase for late-stage cancer through end of life. This tailored intervention is expected to positively affect patients’ quality of care and quality of life over time. PMID:18488881

  4. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer Outcomes among Older Patients: Effects of Physician Communication and Patient Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Rose C.; Stein, Judith A.; Umezawa, Yoshiko; Leake, Barbara; Douglas Anglin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine racial/ethnic disparities in older women’s health-related quality of life (QOL) and type of breast cancer treatment as mediated by physician level and individual level variables. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a population-based, consecutive sample identified through the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program of Latina (n = 99), African-American (n = 66), and White (n = 92) women aged 55 years or older (N = 257) between 3 and 9 months after primary breast cancer diagnosis and at least one month post treatment. An exploratory, empirically-developed latent variable model tested the relationships among demographic and physician-related variables, patient attitudes, and health-related outcomes. Health-related outcomes included QOL measures and receipt of breast conserving surgery (BCS). Results Latinas reported less BCS and poorer QOL compared to Whites. Physician communication that can empower patients, in terms of patient efficacy in patient-physician interactions and breast cancer knowledge, mitigated racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of BCS. Physician emotional support was not related to patient cognitive empowerment and treatment outcomes. Medical mistrust in minority women was related to less self-efficacy and less positive coping, as well as, both directly and indirectly, to reduced QOL. Latinas reported poorer QOL in the tested model. Conclusions Physician communication style, specifically information-giving and participatory decision-making, may empower older women with breast cancer and help mitigate racial/ethnic disparities in surgical treatment received. PMID:19025268

  5. The cancer patient's use and appreciation of the internet and other modern means of communication.

    PubMed

    Katz, J E; Roberge, D; Coulombe, G

    2014-10-01

    As computers and smartphones continue to transform the doctor-patient relationship, it is essential that healthcare professionals understand how their patients wish to interact with these devices. The results from a satisfaction questionnaire of 225 Oncology patients treated in 2011 in Quebec, Canada provide insight into the manner in which patients have been and wish to communicate with their healthcare teams. The survey also addressed whether or not patients searched the Internet for supplementary information regarding their condition. Generally, patients were neutral regarding adopting greater usage of modern means of communication. The majority of patients did not want to be contacted via e-mail or SMS, nor did the patients want to make appointments or fill out surveys online. Forty four percent of patients used the Internet to learn more about their condition. Concerning the patients who were not provided with links to medically relevant websites, 44% wished their doctors had supplied them with such links. Though there was much overlap between the 44% of patients who went on the Internet to learn more about their condition and the 44% of the patients who wished their physicians provided them with such links, 14% of all the patients wished their medical teams had provided them with links, but did not independently search for medically relevant information about their condition. Using chi-square testing education level was found to be the best predictor of which patients searched the web for supplementary information about their conditions (p = 0.003). Contrary to findings in other studies, a comparable proportion of patients in each age-group used the Internet to research their condition. Given the wealth of web-resources available to cancer patients, it would be beneficial for both healthcare teams and their patients if physicians consistently offered a list of trustworthy websites to their patients. PMID:24000994

  6. Risk communication with Arab patients with cancer: a qualitative study of nurses and pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Babiker, Alya; Al-Okka, Maha; Jumaat, Ebaa; Al-Yafei, Sumaya M Al Saadi; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore pharmacist and nurse views and experiences in educating patients regarding their treatment safety and tolerability as well as the roles of other professions in this regard. Design In this qualitative study, six focus group discussions were conducted. Setting The National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Participants Eleven pharmacists and 22 nurses providing direct patient care. Results Concepts related to three key themes were drawn from the seeding questions and included factors for determining the level of risk they communicated: the specific treatment regimen in question; the patient; and their assessment of the patient. Patient-related considerations arose from additional subthemes; both nurses and pharmacists described aspects related to the perceived psychological health status of the patient, as well as anticipated comprehension, as ascertained by demonstrated education and language abilities. In all discussions, it was noted that physician and family non-disclosure of cancer diagnosis to the patient profoundly influenced the nature of information they provided. While a high level of cohesion in safety communication prioritisation among these two health disciplines was found, a number of pharmacists asserted a more formal role compared to informal and repeated teaching by nurses. Conclusions Nurses and pharmacists in this Middle East healthcare environment were not reluctant to discuss treatment side effects with patients and draw on similar professional judgements in prioritising treatment risk information. We found that they did not always recognise each other's informal educational encounters and that there are opportunities to explore increased collaboration in this regard to enhance the patient care experience. PMID:25833667

  7. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  8. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  9. Patient-centered Communication Research

    Cancer.gov

    Several recent reports, including NCI's Strategic Plan for Leading the Nation and the NCI-designated cancer center directors' report Accelerating Successes Against Cancer, have recognized the salience of patient-clinician communication in optimizing cancer patients' and survivors' health outcomes.

  10. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians’ perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers’ (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs’ views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). Methods A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006 - September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. Results CSPs’ lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients’ limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient–provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people’s distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff, providing appropriate cultural training for CSPs, cancer education for Aboriginal stakeholders, continuity of care, avoiding use of medical jargon, accommodating patients’ psychosocial and logistical needs, and in-service coordination. Conclusion Individual CSPs identified challenges in cross-cultural communication and their willingness to accommodate culture-specific needs within the wider health care system including better communication with Aboriginal patients. However, participants’ comments indicated a lack of concerted effort at the system level to address Aboriginal disadvantage in cancer outcomes. PMID:24188503

  11. Does the number of cancer patients’ close social ties affect cancer-related information seeking through communication efficacy? Testing a mediation model

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nehama; Martinez, Lourdes S.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether having a broad social network of close friends equips cancer patients with increased efficacy to engage in communication about their cancer, which then leads to an increased likelihood of patients’ actively seeking cancer-related information. Guided by the theory of motivated information management (TMIM: Afifi & Weiner, 2006), the study also tests whether the effect of the number of close social ties on information seeking is mediated, in part, by communication efficacy. Results are based on data collected from a randomly drawn sample from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry of 2,013 cancer patients who completed mail surveys in the Fall of 2006. Results are consistent with a cross-sectional mediation effect in which the number of close social ties in one’s social network is positively associated with communication efficacy (b = .17, p = .001), which, in turn, is positively associated with cancer-related information seeking (b = .13, p < .001). PMID:24673194

  12. Communication about symptoms and quality of life issues in patients with cancer: Provider perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Halpenny, Barbara; Berry, Donna L.

    2014-01-01

    This study used qualitative data collection and analysis methods to describe provider perceptions of addressing patient-initiated communication about common or sensitive symptom and quality of life issues (SQIs) in oncology. Eligible participants were healthcare providers who had participated in a larger trial testing a patient-centered technology to assess cancer SQIs and support self care. Audio-recorded vignettes were simulated based on recorded clinic visits from the larger trial and presented during semi-structured cognitive interviews with each participant. Transcripts of the interviews were content analyzed. Twelve providers participated. Participants’ responses included four themes: the institutional and clinical context, the complexity of addressing SQIs, strategies used to understand SQIs, and creating a plan to address SQIs. Participants felt that approaching SQIs inside and outside of the clinic required ongoing communication within a multidisciplinary team both to gather information and manage the SQI. Forming a relationship with the patient was one strategy to facilitate assessing SQIs. Most participants expressed a need for guidance about effective SQI communication. Providers perceived approaching SQIs as a routine part of interdisciplinary clinical care. The specific symptom and the complexity of its management influenced the process of assessing and managing SQIs. Findings have implications for institutional processes, training, evaluation, and program development. PMID:24748096

  13. Communication about symptoms and quality of life issues in patients with cancer: provider perceptions.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Sheldon, Lisa Kennedy; Halpenny, Barbara; Berry, Donna L

    2014-12-01

    This study used qualitative data collection and analysis methods to describe provider perceptions of addressing patient-initiated communication about common or sensitive symptom and quality of life issues (SQIs) in oncology. Eligible participants were health care providers who had participated in a larger trial testing a patient-centered technology to assess cancer SQIs and support self-care. Audio-recorded vignettes were simulated based on recorded clinic visits from the larger trial and presented during semi-structured cognitive interviews with each participant. Transcripts of the interviews were content analyzed. Twelve providers participated. Participants' responses included four themes: the institutional and clinical context, the complexity of addressing SQIs, strategies used to understand SQIs, and creating a plan to address SQIs. Participants felt that approaching SQIs inside and outside of the clinic required ongoing communication within a multidisciplinary team both to gather information and manage the SQI. Forming a relationship with the patient was one strategy to facilitate assessing SQIs. Most participants expressed a need for guidance about effective SQI communication. Providers perceived approaching SQIs as a routine part of interdisciplinary clinical care. The specific symptom and the complexity of its management influenced the process of assessing and managing SQIs. Findings have implications for institutional processes, training, evaluation, and program development. PMID:24748096

  14. Patient and Clinician Communication Of Self-Reported Insomnia During Ambulatory Cancer Care Clinic Visits

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Hong, Fangxin; Valcarce, Bianca; Berry, Donna L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Insomnia, the most commonly reported sleep wake disturbance in people with cancer, has an adverse affect on quality of life including emotional well being, distress associated with other symptoms, daily functioning, relationships and ability to work. Objective The aim of this study was to describe the content of discussions between clinicians and 120 patients with self-reported insomnia and to examine the associations of socio-demographic, clinical and environmental factors with insomnia. Interventions/Methods A secondary analysis was conducted with self reported symptom data, socio- demographic, clinical and environmental factors. Recordings of clinician and patient discussions during clinic visits were examined by conducting a content analysis. Results Severe insomnia was more likely to be reported by women, minority and lower income individuals. Seven major topics were identified in the discussions. The clinicians did not always discuss insomnia; discussion rates differed by diagnosis and clinical service. Conclusions Reporting of insomnia by the patient and clinician communication about insomnia may have differed by demographic and clinical characteristics. Clinicians attended to insomnia about half the time with management strategies likely to be effective. Explanations may be that insomnia had a low clinician priority for the clinic visit or lack of clear evidence to support insomnia interventions. Implications for Practice A better understanding is needed about why insomnia is not addressed even when reported by patients; it is well known that structured assessments and early interventions can improve quality of life. Research is warranted to better understand potential disparities in cancer care. PMID:23448958

  15. “What am I Going to Say Here?” The Experiences of Doctors and Nurses Communicating with Patients in a Cancer Unit

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Margaret; Cleland, Jennifer A.; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study investigating the provider–patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs, and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a qualitative study using individual interviews and focus group discussions. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to underpin data collection and analysis. Twenty-six staff participated in the project (18 nurses and 8 doctors). Both professional groups identified an inherent emotional strain in their daily interactions with patients. The strategies they adopted to reduce this strain fell into two main categories: (1) Handling or managing the patient to keep negative emotion at bay; and (2) Managing self to keep negative emotion at bay. These strategies allowed staff to maintain a sense of control in an emotionally stressful environment. Most believed that their communication skills were sufficient. In conclusion, communicating with and caring for cancer patients causes considerable psychosocial burden for doctors and nurses. Managing this burden influences their communication with patients. Without recognition of the need for staff to protect their own emotional well-being, communication skills training programs, emphasized in current UK cancer care guidelines, may have little impact on practice. PMID:22144970

  16. Associations Between Patient-Provider Communication And Socio-Cultural Factors In Prostate Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation Of Racial Differences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lixin; Weaver, Mark A.; Chen, Ronald C.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Fontham, Elizabeth; Mohler, James L.; Mishel, Merle; Godley, Paul A.; Sleath, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between socio-cultural factors and patient-provider communication and related racial differences Methods Data analysis included 1854 men with prostate cancer from a population-based study. Participants completed an assessment of communication variables, physician trust, perceived racism, religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and health literacy. A multi-group structural equation modeling approach was used to address the research aims. Results Compared with African Americans, Caucasian Americans had significantly greater mean scores of interpersonal treatment (p <.01), prostate cancer communication (p < .001), and physician trust (p < .001), but lower mean scores of religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and perceived racism (all p values < .001). For both African and Caucasian Americans, better patient-provider communication was associated with more physician trust, less perceived racism, greater religious beliefs (all p-values<.01), and at least high school education (p<.05). Conclusion(s) Socio-cultural factors are associated with patient-provider communication among men with cancer. No evidence supported associations differed by race. Practice implication To facilitate patient-provider communication during prostate cancer care, providers need to be aware of patient education levels, engage in behaviors that enhance trust, treat patients equally, respect religious beliefs, and reduce the difficulty level of the information. PMID:25224313

  17. A Short Communication Course for Physicians Improves the Quality of Patient Information in a Clinical Trial | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This article addresses the question of how to improve the informed consent process. The investigators tested a one-day communications course for physicians and research nurses that included lecture and role-play approaches for its ability to improve the quality of informed consent and the satisfaction of patients who enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  18. How Does an Online Patient-Nurse Communication Service Meet the Information Needs of Men with Recently Diagnosed Testicular Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wibe, Torunn; HellesĂž, Ragnhild; Varsi, Cecilie; Ruland, Cornelia; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Online communication has become a potential means of communication between patients and health care providers, but so far few studies are published about online communication as part of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore how an online patient-nurse communication (OPNC) service meets the information needs of men with newly diagnosed testicular cancer. We applied a qualitative approach by examining the content of online messages sent by patients to nurses in a specialist cancer unit. In addition, individual interviews were conducted with patients who had used the OPNC service. Four themes became distinct through a synthesis of the material from the interviews and the messages: “a means for managing illness-related concerns at home,” “a means for ensuring information flow,” “a means for strategic information seeking,” and “not yet available when needed most.” Individualized information provided by nurses with access to their medical record was shown to be important to these patients. The findings of this study indicate that not only may access to an OPNC service help patients fulfill their otherwise unmet information needs, but also it may prevent delays and discontinuity in care due to informational gaps and lead to improved patient safety. PMID:23251816

  19. Psychosocial Interventions for Patients and Caregivers in the Age of New Communication Technologies: Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    BADR, HODA; CARMACK, CINDY L.; DIEFENBACH, MICHAEL A.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive health communication technologies (IHCTs) present a new opportunity and challenge for cancer control researchers who focus on couple and family-based psychosocial interventions. In this article we first present findings from a systematic review of eight studies that utilized IHCTs in psychosocial interventions with cancer patients and their caregivers. Although this research area is still in its infancy, studies suggest that it is feasible to incorporate IHCTs in such interventions, that IHCTs are generally well-accepted by patients and caregivers, and that the choice of technology is largely dependent on intervention target (i.e., patient, caregiver, or both) and outcomes (e.g., decision-making, symptom management, lifestyle behaviors). A major research gap has been the lack of integration of Web 2.0 technologies (e.g., social media), despite the fact that social support and communication are frequently targeted components of interventions that involve cancer patients and their caregivers. Given this, we next present findings from a qualitative study that we conducted to describe the different needs and preferences of 13 cancer survivors and 12 caregivers with regard to social media use. Finally, we discuss some of the opportunities and challenges of using IHCTs in psychosocial interventions for cancer patients and their caregivers and propose directions for future research. PMID:25629218

  20. Patient-physician communication concerning participation in cancer chemotherapy trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Physicians seem to underestimate patients’ desire for information and their ability to understand it. Patients perceived obtaining as much information as possible about the trial as an asset rather than a burden. Providing detailed and comprehensive treatment information helps patients make decisions about participating in clinical trials.

  1. Web-based cancer communication and decision making systems: connecting patients, caregivers, and clinicians for improved health outcomes.

    PubMed

    DuBenske, Lori L; Gustafson, David H; Shaw, Bret R; Cleary, James F

    2010-01-01

    Over the cancer disease trajectory, from diagnosis and treatment to remission or end of life, patients and their families face difficult decisions. The provision of information and support when most relevant can optimize cancer decision making and coping. An interactive health communication system (IHCS) offers the potential to bridge the communication gaps that occur among patients, family, and clinicians and to empower each to actively engage in cancer care and shared decision making. This is a report of the authors' experience (with a discussion of relevant literature) in developing and testing a Web-based IHCS-the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS)-for patients with advanced lung cancer and their family caregivers. CHESS provides information, communication, and coaching resources as well as a symptom tracking system that reports health status to the clinical team. Development of an IHCS includes a needs assessment of the target audience and applied theory informed by continued stakeholder involvement in early testing. Critical issues of IHCS implementation include 1) need for interventions that accommodate a variety of format preferences and technology comfort ranges; 2) IHCS user training, 3) clinician investment in IHCS promotion, and 4) IHCS integration with existing medical systems. In creating such comprehensive systems, development strategies need to be grounded in population needs with appropriate use of technology that serves the target users, including the patient/family, clinical team, and health care organization. Implementation strategies should address timing, personnel, and environmental factors to facilitate continued use and benefit from IHCS. PMID:21041539

  2. Fear of death, mortality communication, and psychological distress among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bachner, Yaacov G; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-02-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality comunication, fear of death, and psychological distress (i.e., depressive symptomatology, emotional exhaustion) among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. A total of 236 participants were recruited over 18 months within the first year of caregiver bereavement. Retrospectively reported mortality communication was statistically greater among secular caregivers; in contrast, both fear of death and depressive symptoms were greater among the religiously observant. Path analyses subsequently revealed notable differences between groups. Among secular caregivers, a significant inverse relationship between mortality communication and the two indices of caregiver distress emerged. In contrast, the association between mortality communication and psychological distress among the religious was moderated by these caregivers' fear of death. The results of this study suggest that fear of death is a significant predictor of psychological distress among religiously observant caregivers of terminal cancer patients (i.e., fear of their own death as elicited by the caregiving role). Fostering morality communication between secular caregivers and patients would appear to be one means of reducing the likelihood of clinically significant psychological distress. This may be insufficient among religiously observant caregivers, however, for whom fear of death may first need to be redressed. PMID:24501834

  3. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. Objectives. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Methods. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Conclusion. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients’ individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients’ entire pathway of care. PMID:26311705

  4. Web-Based Cancer Communication and Decision Making Systems: Connecting Patients, Caregivers, and Clinicians for Improved Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    DuBenske, Lori L.; Gustafson, David H.; Shaw, Bret R.; Cleary, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Over the cancer disease trajectory, from diagnosis and treatment to remission or end of life, patients and their families face difficult decisions. The provision of information and support when most relevant can optimize cancer decision making and coping. An interactive health communication system (IHCS) offers the potential to bridge the communication gaps that occur among patients, family, and clinicians and to empower each to actively engage in cancer care and shared decision making. This is a report of the authors' experience (with a discussion of relevant literature) in developing and testing a Web-based IHCS—the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS)—for patients with advanced lung cancer and their family caregivers. CHESS provides information, communication, and coaching resources as well as a symptom tracking system that reports health status to the clinical team. Development of an IHCS includes a needs assessment of the target audience and applied theory informed by continued stakeholder involvement in early testing. Critical issues of IHCS implementation include 1) need for interventions that accommodate a variety of format preferences and technology comfort ranges; 2) IHCS user training, 3) clinician investment in IHCS promotion, and 4) IHCS integration with existing medical systems. In creating such comprehensive systems, development strategies need to be grounded in population needs with appropriate use of technology that serves the target users, including the patient/family, clinical team, and health care organization. Implementation strategies should address timing, personnel, and environmental factors to facilitate continued use and benefit from IHCS. An interactive health communication system (IHCS) offers one platform for providing the information, communication, and coaching resources that cancer patients and their families need to understand the disease, find support, and develop decision-making and coping skills. One such IHCS—the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS)—has evolved over the past 20 years. Based on our recent experience creating and testing a new version of CHESS—“Coping with Lung Cancer: A Network of Support”—this article outlines the issues faced in developing and implementing such a system within the cancer context. PMID:21041539

  5. Satisfaction with pain treatment in older cancer patients: Identifying variants of discrimination, trust, communication, and self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tamara A.; O’Connor, Melissa L.; Roker, Rosalyn; Krok, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    How satisfied a patient is with their medical treatment may influence compliance and adherence to medical regimens. While a number of studies have examined patient satisfaction among younger populations, few have determined the impact social factors have on satisfaction with pain treatment among older adults. This study aimed to determine the influence discrimination, trust, communication, and other health characteristics have on satisfaction with pain treatment among older adults receiving outpatient services from a comprehensive cancer center. Participants were surveyed on questions assessing pain symptomatology, and identified social (discrimination, trust, and communication), physical (comorbidities, pain interference), behavioral (self-efficacy), and demographic characteristics. Analyses were calculated to determine the total and indirect effects of trust, communication, and self-efficacy as mediators on the perceived discrimination-patient satisfaction with pain treatment relationship. Data showed a significant relationship of communication and discrimination on patient satisfaction. However, none of the mediating effects were significant. It must be recognized that patient satisfaction is contingent upon a myriad of social factors that are not exclusive, but rather coexisting determinants of health. Particularly among the elderly, perceived discrimination and incidences of poor communication may be significant influences on health and the lived day-to-day experiences of this adult population. PMID:24363611

  6. Communicating about Cancer Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with cancer may be reluctant to discuss their pain with their doctors for a variety of reasons. NCI sponsors research that examines the barriers that prevent patients from talking about pain.

  7. Patient-centered communication.

    PubMed

    Brown, S J

    1999-01-01

    The term patient-centered communication (PCC) has been used to describe a group of communication strategies and behaviors that promote mutuality, shared understandings, and shared decision making in health care encounters. There is evidence to suggest that advanced practice nurse and patients use these strategies to co-produce highly individualized clinical discourse. Although the communication behaviors associated with PCC have been studied separately, their impact as an integrated communications strategy has not been studied. Suggestions for developing PCC as a mid-range theory of health care communication encompassing other more specific communication concepts are offered. PMID:10418654

  8. Physician Communication Regarding Prostate Cancer Screening: Analysis of Unannounced Standardized Patient Visits

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Srinivasan, Malathi; Hoffman, Jerome R.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Griffin, Erin; Dragojevic, Marko; Day, Frank C.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a controversial issue. The present study aimed to explore physician behaviors during an unannounced standardized patient encounter that was part of a randomized controlled trial to educate physicians using a prostate cancer screening, interactive, Web-based module. METHODS Participants included 118 internal medicine and family medicine physicians from 5 health systems in California, in 2007–2008. Control physicians received usual education about prostate cancer screening (brochures from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention). Intervention physicians participated in the prostate cancer screening module. Within 3 months, all physicians saw unannounced standardized patients who prompted prostate cancer screening discussions in clinic. The encounter was audio-recorded, and the recordings were transcribed. Authors analyzed physician behaviors around screening: (1) engagement after prompting, (2) degree of shared decision making, and (3) final recommendations for prostate cancer screening. RESULTS After prompting, 90% of physicians discussed prostate cancer screening. In comparison with control physicians, intervention physicians showed somewhat more shared decision making behaviors (intervention 14 items vs control 11 items, P <.05), were more likely to mention no screening as an option (intervention 63% vs control 26%, P <.05), to encourage patients to consider different screening options (intervention 62% vs control 39%, P <.05) and seeking input from others (intervention 25% vs control 7%, P<.05). CONCLUSIONS A brief Web-based interactive educational intervention can improve shared decision making, neutrality in recommendation, and reduce PSA test ordering. Engaging patients in discussion of the uses and limitations of tests with uncertain value can decrease utilization of the tests. PMID:23835817

  9. A Practical Approach to Teaching about Communication with Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John L.

    1979-01-01

    An exercise was devised at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School, London, to facilitate medical students' ability to discuss death and dying with cancer patients. Students begin with a written situation to problem-solve and then move into pairs and groups to reach a consensus and discuss the problem. A videotaped simulation is also used. (JMD)

  10. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Patient-Provider Communication, Quality-of-Care Ratings, and Patient Activation Among Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Nynikka R.A.; Kent, Erin E.; Forsythe, Laura P.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Rowland, Julia H.; Aziz, Noreen M.; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hamilton, Ann S.; Weaver, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We examined racial and ethnic disparities in patient-provider communication (PPC), perceived care quality, and patient activation among long-term cancer survivors. Methods In 2005 to 2006, survivors of breast, prostate, colorectal, ovarian, and endometrial cancers completed a mailed survey on cancer follow-up care. African American, Asian/Pacific Islander (Asian), Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white (white) survivors who had seen a physician for follow-up care in the past 2 years (n = 1,196) composed the analytic sample. We conducted linear and logistic regression analyses to identify racial and ethnic differences in PPC (overall communication and medical test communication), perceived care quality, and patient activation in clinical care (self-efficacy in medical decisions and perceived control). We further examined the potential contribution of PPC to racial and ethnic differences in perceived care quality and patient activation. Results Compared with white survivors (mean score, 85.16), Hispanic (mean score, 79.95) and Asian (mean score, 76.55) survivors reported poorer overall communication (P = .04 and P < .001, respectively), and Asian survivors (mean score, 79.97) reported poorer medical test communication (P = .001). Asian survivors were less likely to report high care quality (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.72) and reported lower self-efficacy in medical decisions (mean score, 74.71; P < .001) compared with white survivors (mean score, 84.22). No disparity was found in perceived control. PPC was positively associated with care quality (P < .001) and self-efficacy (P < .001). After adjusting for PPC and other covariates, when compared with whites, Asian disparities remained significant. Conclusion Asian survivors report poorer follow-up care communication and care quality. More research is needed to identify contributing factors beyond PPC, such as cultural influences and medical system factors. PMID:25403220

  11. Patient-physician communication.

    PubMed

    Asnani, M R

    2009-09-01

    Extensive research has shown that no matter how knowledgeable the physician might be, if he/she is not able to open good communication channels with the patient, he/she may be of no help to the latter Despite this known fact and the fact that a patient-physician consultation is the most widely performed 'procedure' in a physician's professional lifetime, effective communication with the patient has been found to be sadly lacking. This review article seeks to discuss 'the what', 'the why' and 'the how' of doctor-patient communication. PMID:20099777

  12. The effect of tobacco and alcohol and their reduction/cessation on mortality in oral cancer patients: short communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of tobacco is known to increase the incidence of developing oral cancer by 6 times, while the additive effect of drinking alcohol further increases the risk leading to higher rate of morbidity and mortality. In this short communication, we prospectively assessed the effect of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking in oral cancer patients on the overall mortality from the disease, as well as the effect of smoking and drinking reduction/cessation at time of diagnosis on mortality in the same group. Materials and methods A cohort, involved 67 male patients who were diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma, was included in this study. The smoking and drinking habits of this group were recorded, in addition to reduction/cessation after diagnosis with the disease. Comparisons were made to disease mortality at 3 and 5 years. Results Follow-up resulted in a 3-year survival of 46.8% and a 5-year survival of 40.4%. Reduction of tobacco smoking and smoking cessation led to a significant reduction in mortality at 3 (P < 0.001) and 5 (P < 0.001) years. Reduction in drinking alcohol and drinking cessation led to a significant reduction in mortality at 3 (P < 0.001) and 5 (P < 0.001) years. Conclusion Chronic smoking and drinking does have an adverse effect on patients with oral cancer leading to increased mortality from cancer-related causes. Reduction/cessation of these habits tends to significantly reduce mortality in this group of patients. Smoking and drinking cessation counseling should be provided to all newly diagnosed oral cancer patients. PMID:22409767

  13. The role of health literacy and communication habits on previous colorectal cancer screening among low-income and uninsured patients

    PubMed Central

    Ojinnaka, Chinedum O.; Bolin, Jane N.; McClellan, David A.; Helduser, Janet W.; Nash, Philip; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between health literacy, communication habits and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among low-income patients. Methods Survey responses of patients who received financial assistance for colonoscopy between 2011 and 2014 at a family medicine residency clinic were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression (n = 456). There were two dependent variables: (1) previous CRC screening and (2) CRC screening adherence. Our independent variables of interest were health literacy and communication habits. Results Over two-thirds (67.13%) of respondents had not been previously screened for CRC. Multivariate analysis showed a decreased likelihood of previous CRC screening among those who had marginal (OR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.29–0.92) or inadequate health literacy (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.27–0.87) compared to those with adequate health literacy. Controlling for health literacy, the significant association between educational attainment and previous CRC screening was eliminated. Thus, health literacy mediated the relationship between educational attainment and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between communication habits and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between screening guideline adherence, and health literacy or communication. Conclusion Limited health literacy is a potential barrier to CRC screening. Suboptimal CRC screening rates reported among those with lower educational attainment may be mediated by limited health literacy. PMID:26844065

  14. Barriers and Facilitators to Patient-Provider Communication When Discussing Breast Cancer Risk to Aid in the Development of Decision Support Tools

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham S.; Aguirre, Alejandra N.; Smalletz, Cindy; Dimond, Jill; Finkelstein, Joseph; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; David, Raven; Vargas, Jennifer; Crew, Katherine D.; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to patient-provider communication when discussing breast cancer risk to aid in the development of decision support tools. Four patient focus groups (N=34) and eight provider focus groups (N=10) took place in Northern Manhattan. A qualitative analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The coding yielded 62.3%–94.5% agreement. The results showed that 1) barriers are time constraints, lack of knowledge, low health literacy, and language barriers, and 2) facilitators are information needs, desire for personalization, and autonomy when communicating risk in patient-provider encounters. These results will inform the development of a patient-centered decision aid (RealRisks) and a provider-facing breast cancer risk navigation (BNAV) tool, which are designed to facilitate patient-provider risk communication and shared decision-making about breast cancer prevention strategies, such as chemoprevention. PMID:26958276

  15. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Interviewing patients using interpreters in an oncology setting: initial evaluation of a communication skills module | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The authors developed a communication skills training module for health professionals who work with professional translators in interviewing patients. The module combines didactic presentation of information and group role-play exercises in which trained medical interpreters help trainees communicate with bilingual patients. The module stresses communication strategies, including optimal seating arrangements that strengthen the clinician-patient relationship and de-emphasize interpreter-patient and interpreter-clinician interactions.

  17. Perceptions of Patient-Provider Communication in Breast and Cervical Cancer-Related Care: A Qualitative Study of Low-Income English- and Spanish-Speaking Women

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Dong, XinQi

    2013-01-01

    To explore patient perceptions of patient-provider communication in breast and cervical cancer-related care among low-income English- and Spanish- speaking women, we examined communication barriers and facilitators reported by patients receiving care at safety net clinics. Participants were interviewed in English or Spanish after receiving an abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening test or cancer diagnosis. Following an inductive approach, interviews were coded and analyzed by the language spoken with providers and patient-provider language concordance status. Of 78 participants, 53% (n = 41) were English-speakers and 47% (n = 37) were Spanish-speakers. All English-speakers were language-concordant with providers. Of Spanish-speakers, 27% (n = 10) were Spanish-concordant; 38% (n = 14) were Spanish-discordant, requiring an interpreter; and 35% (n = 13) were Spanish mixed-concordant, experiencing both types of communication throughout the care continuum. English-speakers focused on communication barriers, and difficulty understanding jargon arose as a theme. Spanish-speakers emphasized communication facilitators related to Spanish language use. Themes among all Spanish-speaking sub-groups included appreciation for language support resources and preference for Spanish-speaking providers. Mixed-concordant participants accounted for the majority of Spanish-speakers who reported communication barriers. Our data suggest that, although perception of patient-provider communication may depend on the language spoken throughout the care continuum, jargon is lost when health information is communicated in Spanish. Further, the respective consistency of language concordance or interpretation may play a role in patient perception of patient-provider communication. PMID:23553683

  18. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Bailey, Zinzi; Krieger, Nancy; Austin, S Bryn; Gottlieb, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings. PMID:25909663

  19. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which


  20. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  1. Meeting deaf patients' communication needs.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Megan; Magowan, Ruth; Magowan, Ruth

    Effective communication between nurses and patients is a vital part of safe and effective nursing care. However, few health professionals receive training in how to communicate with Deaf people; as a result, attempts to communicate with Deaf patients is often inappropriate and undertaken without knowledge or understanding of their communication needs. This article examines the literature on ways in which Deaf patients experience communicating with, and receive care from, nurses. PMID:26016132

  2. Telehealth Personalized Cancer Risk Communication to Motivate Colonoscopy in Relatives of Patients With Colorectal Cancer: The Family CARE Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Anita Y.; Boonyasiriwat, Watcharaporn; Walters, Scott T.; Pappas, Lisa M.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Schwartz, Marc D.; Edwards, Sandra L.; Rogers, Amy; Kohlmann, Wendy K.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Vernon, Sally W.; Simmons, Rebecca G.; Lowery, Jan T.; Flores, Kristina; Wiggins, Charles L.; Hill, Deirdre A.; Burt, Randall W.; Williams, Marc S.; Higginbotham, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The rate of adherence to regular colonoscopy screening in individuals at increased familial risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is suboptimal, especially among rural and other geographically underserved populations. Remote interventions may overcome geographic and system-level barriers. We compared the efficacy of a telehealth-based personalized risk assessment and communication intervention with a mailed educational brochure for improving colonoscopy screening among at-risk relatives of patients with CRC. Methods Eligible individuals age 30 to 74 years who were not up-to-date with risk-appropriate screening and were not candidates for genetic testing were recruited after contacting patients with CRC or their next of kin in five states. Enrollees were randomly assigned as family units to either an active, personalized intervention that incorporated evidence-based risk communication and behavior change techniques, or a mailed educational brochure. The primary outcome was medically verified colonoscopy within 9 months of the intervention. Results Of the 481 eligible and randomly assigned at-risk relatives, 79.8% completed the outcome assessments within 9 months; 35.4% of those in the personalized intervention group and 15.7% of those in the comparison group obtained a colonoscopy. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the telehealth group was almost three times as likely to get screened as the low-intensity comparison group (odds ratio, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.87 to 4.28; P < .001). Persons residing in rural areas and those with lower incomes benefitted at the same level as did urban residents. Conclusion Remote personalized interventions that consider family history and incorporate evidence-based risk communication and behavior change strategies may promote risk-appropriate screening in close relatives of patients with CRC. PMID:24449229

  3. List of Participants in the Patient-centered Communication in Cancer Care Symposium

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  4. Cancer: communicating in the team game.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Frances M; Robinson, Emma; Heinrich, Paul; Dunn, Stewart M

    2004-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that effective communication is a critical means by which surgeons can assist their patients to achieve the best outcomes. This paper examines the processes and outcomes of effective communication by surgeons in cancer teams, and includes: (i). strategies that promote collaborative relationships with patients and lead to more effective treatment; (ii). strategies to improve multidisciplinary team performance; and (iii). methods to minimize the risk of error and litigation. The experience of a cancer diagnosis involves radical changes in patients' lives, somewhat akin to suddenly finding yourself in the middle of a rugby scrum for the first time. The analogy of rugby throws fresh light on such critical factors in communication as prematch preparation, orientation to the game and the team, a good kick off, sizing up the opposition, creative plays and optimizing teamwork to promote quality of life and survival. PMID:15191487

  5. Patient Satisfaction Influenced by interpersonal treatment and communication for African American men: the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP).

    PubMed

    Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B; Knafl, George J; Godley, P A; Carpenter, William R; Bensen, Jeannette T; Mohler, James L; Mishel, Merle

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a particular set of health behaviors of health care providers and African American men (AAM) influence patient satisfaction from the AAM's perspective. This descriptive, correlational study consisted of 505 AAM in North Carolina diagnosed with prostate cancer and enrolled in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP). Analyses consisted of bivariate analyses and multiple regression. Patient-to-provider communication, interpersonal treatment, and provider-to-patient communication accounted for 45% (p ? .0001) of the variability in patient satisfaction. Interpersonal treatment (provider focusing on the patient) explained the greatest amount (F = 313.53, RČ = .39) of patient satisfaction. Since interpersonal treatment focuses on the patient and demonstrated to be the strongest predictor in patient satisfaction, it is noteworthy to consider the emphasis that should be placed on patient-centered care. In addition, knowing important variables positively affecting patient satisfaction provides useful information for developing appropriate interventions to improve AAM health care experiences. PMID:22833311

  6. Fear of Death, Mortality Communication, and Psychological Distress among Secular and Religiously Observant Family Caregivers of Terminal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachner, Yaacov G.; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality communication, fear of death, and…

  7. Fear of Death, Mortality Communication, and Psychological Distress among Secular and Religiously Observant Family Caregivers of Terminal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachner, Yaacov G.; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality communication, fear of death, and


  8. Development of an Educational Video to Improve Patient Knowledge and Communication with Their Healthcare Providers about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider, and system level barriers. Purpose: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of the CRC


  9. Enhancing Patient-Provider Communication With the Electronic Self-Report Assessment for Cancer: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donna L.; Blumenstein, Brent A.; Halpenny, Barbara; Wolpin, Seth; Fann, Jesse R.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Bush, Nigel; Karras, Bryant T.; Lober, William B.; McCorkle, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported cancer symptoms and quality-of-life issues (SQLIs) have been promoted as essential to a comprehensive assessment, efficient and efficacious methods have not been widely tested in clinical settings. The purpose of this trial was to determine the effect of the Electronic Self-Report Assessment–Cancer (ESRA-C) on the likelihood of SQLIs discussed between clinicians and patients with cancer in ambulatory clinic visits. Secondary objectives included comparison of visit duration between groups and usefulness of the ESRA-C as reported by clinicians. Patients and Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 660 patients with various cancer diagnoses and stages at two institutions of a comprehensive cancer center. Patient-reported SQLIs were automatically displayed on a graphical summary and provided to the clinical team before an on-treatment visit (n = 327); in the control group, no summary was provided (n = 333). SQLIs were scored for level of severity or distress. One on-treatment clinic visit was audio recorded for each participant and then scored for discussion of each SQLI. We hypothesized that problematic SQLIs would be discussed more often when the intervention was delivered to the clinicians. Results The likelihood of SQLIs being discussed differed by randomized group and depended on whether an SQLI was first reported as problematic (P = .032). Clinic visits were similar with regard to duration between groups, and clinicians reported the summary as useful. Conclusion The ESRA-C is the first electronic self-report application to increase discussion of SQLIs in a US randomized clinical trial. PMID:21282548

  10. Cancer patient expectations of and communication with oncologists and oncology nurses: the experience of an integrated oncology and palliative care service.

    PubMed

    Sapir, R; Catane, R; Kaufman, B; Isacson, R; Segal, A; Wein, S; Cherny, N I

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate ambulatory cancer patients' knowledge of their diagnosis and stage, their expectations of medical and nursing staff, and issues related to communication with the professional staff. A structured interview was conducted with each of 103 consecutive cancer patients attending the Oncology Day Hospital of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center. There were 77 women and 26 men, and their median age was 56 (18-86) years. Their religious status was elicited: 48% described themselves as religious, 25% as traditional, and 27% as secular. According to their physicians, 41 were in remission, 11 had stable disease, 47 had progressive disease and in 4 the disease status was unknown. Patients tended to underestimate the status of their disease: among those with progressive disease, 36% stated that their disease was stable or in remission. Overwhelmingly, patients expected that their oncologists should be patient and skilled in diagnostic procedures (98%), tactful, considerate and therapeutically skilled (90-95%), and skilled in the management of pain and the psychosocial consequences of cancer (75-85%). When there is bad news to be transmitted, 92% of patients indicated that they would want disclosure, while 6% indicated that they would want the news withheld from them but passed on to their family members. Most patients were very satisfied with the clarity of the information they received about their disease (85%) and the sensitivity with which it was transmitted (90%). Although 88% of patients reported that they relied on their oncologist for therapeutic decision making, 45% indicated that they had sought a second opinion and 32% reported seeking the opinion of a rabbinical medical broker. Almost all, 97%, of patients indicated that they felt comfortable seeking advice from their oncologist, and the oncologist was the staff member most often sought out for both information (69%) and support (66%). The data indicate high patient expectations of nursing and medical oncology staff members' skills and behaviors. Despite expressing a high level of satisfaction, a substantial percentage of patients had an inaccurate understanding of their disease status. PMID:11094990

  11. Communication about cancer near the end of life

    PubMed Central

    Back, Anthony L; Anderson, Wendy G; Bunch, Lynn; Marr, Lisa A; Wallace, James A; Yang, Holly B; Arnold, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Cancer communication near the end of life has a growing evidence base, and requires clinicians to draw on a distinct set of communication skills. Patients with advanced and incurable cancers are dealing with the emotional impact of a life-limiting illness, treatment decisions that are complex and frequently involve consideration of clinical trials, and the challenges of sustaining hope while also having realistic goals. In this review, we sought to provide a guide to important evidence about communication for patients with advanced cancer regarding: Communication at diagnosis; Discussing prognosis; Decision-making about palliative anticancer therapy and Phase 1 trials; Advance care planning, Transitions in focus from anticancer to palliative care; and Preparing patients and families for dying and death. PMID:18798531

  12. [Rehabilitation for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Akira

    2013-09-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with cancer is increasing drastically with the increase in number of elderly people. Therefore, recently, the necessity of rehabilitation for cancer patients has been realized. Cancer rehabilitation can be classified as preventive, restorative, supportive, or palliative and is administered according to the degree of cancer progression. Rehabilitation is of great significance even for patients with progressive cancer as it helps maintain their quality of life. Various forms of impairment, disability, and handicap are associated with cancer rehabilitation. Examples of impairments that cancer patients experience are hemiplegia and higher brain dysfunction in brain tumor cases, paraplegia and quadriplegia in spinal or spinal cord tumor cases, neuropathy and radiculopathy in cases of tumor invasion, complications after surgery, peripheral neuropathy after chemotherapy, and dysphagia after radiotherapy. It is important to evaluate these impairments and the risks associated with rehabilitation. PMID:24047769

  13. Communication: common challenging scenarios in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Owen, Ray; Jeffrey, David

    2008-05-01

    Good communication is at the heart of effective cancer care. Certain situations which occur commonly in cancer care present particular challenges to the communication skills of healthcare professionals. This paper explores some of the reasons why these situations are difficult and provides frameworks for responding, to stimulate thought and discussion. PMID:18364252

  14. PLENARY SESSION: Communications and eHealth - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    Advances in electronic communications have made information more easily accessible to many cancer patients and survivors. Nonetheless, issues remain to be resolved regarding access to records for patients, and communication between doctors is especially important when patients finish treatment and return to a primary care setting in which health care practitioners may be unaware of their needs as cancer survivors.

  15. Standardized Geriatric Assessment or Usual Care in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Older Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Caregivers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized research trial studies standardized geriatric assessment (GA) or usual care in improving communication and quality of life in older patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma and caregivers. A GA measures the issues important to older patients, including function, psychological status, cognitive abilities, social support, and the impact of medical problems on quality of life. A GA may improve communication between patients and their doctors in addressing patient concerns.

  16. A disparity of words: racial differences in oncologist-patient communication about clinical trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  17. Evaluation of an educational program to improve communication with patients about early-phase trial participation. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  18. [COMMUNICATION WITH TERMINALLY ILL PATIENT].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The communication is a essential therapeutic instrument in every process of relationship in the team patient-family, and mainly in the transmission of bad news. The communication is not just a simple transmission of information. It is a process whose goal is to enable the adaptation of the patient and family to their actual situation and where the "what", "how" and "how much do you want to know", are belonged to the own patient. Along this article, we will expose some thoughts that the team has to take into account when informing the patient. We are going to explain the SPIKES protocol, or its Spanish version EPICEE. 6-step protocol, based on those recommended by the experts to deliver bad news procedures. And finally we'll talk about the conspiracy of silence, one of the most common and difficult situations to handle in day to day due to paternalism by professionals and families, in which they prefer to hide the situation to the patient, thinking it's the best for him. PMID:26121886

  19. Comparing Effects in Regular Practice of E-Communication and Web-Based Self-Management Support Among Breast Cancer Patients: Preliminary Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bűrűsund, Elin; Cvancarova, Milada; Moore, Shirley M; Ekstedt, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Background While Web-based interventions have been shown to assist a wide range of patients successfully in managing their illness, few studies have examined the relative contribution of different Web-based components to improve outcomes. Further efficacy trials are needed to test the effects of Web support when offered as a part of routine care. Objective Our aim was to compare in regular care the effects of (1) an Internet-based patient provider communication service (IPPC), (2) WebChoice, a Web-based illness management system for breast cancer patients (IPPC included), and (3) usual care on symptom distress, anxiety, depression, (primary outcomes), and self-efficacy (secondary outcome). This study reports preliminary findings from 6 months’ follow-up data in a 12-month trial. Methods We recruited 167 patients recently diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing treatment from three Norwegian hospitals. The nurse-administered IPPC allowed patients to send secure e-messages to and receive e-messages from health care personnel at the hospital where they were treated. In addition to the IPPC, WebChoice contains components for symptom monitoring, tailored information and self-management support, a diary, and communication with other patients. A total of 20 care providers (11 nurses, 6 physicians, and 3 social workers) were trained to answer questions from patients. Outcomes were measured with questionnaires at study entry and at study months 2, 4, and 6. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were fitted to compare effects on outcomes over time. Results Patients were randomly assigned to the WebChoice group (n=64), the IPPC group (n=45), or the usual care group (n=58). Response rates to questionnaires were 73.7% (123/167) at 2 months, 65.9 (110/167) at 4 months, and 62.3% (104/167) at 6 months. Attrition was similar in all study groups. Among those with access to WebChoice, 64% (41/64) logged on more than once and 39% (25/64) sent e-messages to care providers. In the IPPC group, 40% (18/45) sent e-messages. Linear mixed models analyses revealed that the WebChoice group reported significantly lower symptom distress (mean difference 0.16, 95% CI 0.06-0.25, P=.001), anxiety (mean difference 0.79, 95% CI 0.09-1.49, P=.03), and depression (mean difference 0.79, 95% CI 0.09-1.49, P=.03) compared with the usual care group. The IPPC group reported significant lower depression scores compared with the usual care group (mean difference 0.69, 95% CI 0.05-1.32, P=.03), but no differences were observed for symptom distress or anxiety. No significant differences in self-efficacy were found among the study groups. Conclusions In spite of practice variations and moderate use of the interventions, our results suggest that offering Web support as part of regular care can be a powerful tool to help patients manage their illness. Our finding that a nurse-administered IPPC alone can significantly reduce depression is particularly promising. However, the multicomponent intervention WebChoice had additional positive effects. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov:NCT00971009; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00971009 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6USKezP0Y). PMID:25525672

  20. Family Avoidance of Communication about Cancer: A Dyadic Examination

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Jooyeon; Kim, So Young; Yang, Hyung-Kook; Cho, Juhee; Youm, Jung Ho; Choi, Gyu Seog; Hong, Nam Soo; Cho, BeLong; Park, Jong-Hyock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine the following questions: to what extent do patients and caregivers perceive their family members to be avoidant of communication regarding patient’s cancer, and to what extent do these perceptions interrelate; and how do such perceptions influence their own and each other’s communication behaviors, communication outcome, mental health, and quality of life. Materials and Methods A national survey was performed with 990 patient-caregiver dyads (participation rate, 76.2%). To examine the dyadic interaction, we developed linked patient and family member questionnaires, including the Family Avoidance of Communication about Cancer (FACC) scale. Results The mean scores (standard deviations) of patient- and caregiver-perceived FACC were low at 10.9 (15.5) and 15.5 (17.5), respectively (p < 0.001), and concordance was low, a well (Spearman’s rho, 0.23). Patient-perceived FACC was associated with lower levels of disclosure and behaviors of holding back communication, as well as lower levels of mental health outcome and quality of life. The same was true for caregivers (all p < 0.05). Patient-perceived FACC was associated with caregiver holding back, caregiver’s depression level, and caregiver quality of life (all p < 0.05). Both patient- and caregiver-perceived FACC were independently associated with communication difficulty within the family. Conclusion Future research would benefit from the measurement of FACC from both patients and caregivers, and promote family intervention to enhance openness to communication, which would be helpful for improving mental health and quality of life for both patients and caregivers. PMID:25779366

  1. Alzheimer's disease. Physician-patient communication.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. B.; Molloy, D. W.; Lever, J. A.; Darzins, P.; Ganesan, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The number of cognitively impaired elderly in Canada has increased greatly during the past two decades; nearly all have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The memory problems and changes in language and communication of these patients place tremendous strain on physicians who are searching for a differential diagnosis and are trying to communicate with them. Reviewing the salient language and communication features of AD patients leads to strategies for improving effective physician-patient communication. PMID:8019193

  2. Cell communication in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    Direct intercellular communication is the transfer of ions and small molecules between cells in contact. Cells derived from human breast tissue have been examined to determine their pattern of direct communication, which was measured by the 3H-uridine nucleotide transfer method. The behaviour of mammary epithelium from normal and pathological sources has been compared with that of malignant mammary epithelium. Normal human mammary fibroblasts and epithelium demonstrate selectivity in direct communication. Thus although both transfer nucleotide to and from their own cell type, they do not transfer nucleotide between one another in heterologous co-culture. Further study of a variety of non-human fibroblasts and epithelium showed that cells may be functionally subdivided into selective communicators, non-selective communicators, and non-communicators. None of the malignant human breast cells examined showed selectivity in communication. Thus both primary cultures and established lines were either non-communicators or non-selective communicators. This loss of selectivity could favour the metastasis of malignant cells, enabling them either to ignore inhibitory growth control signals or alternatively to receive stimulatory signals from abnormal sources. PMID:7396358

  3. Understanding patient decisions about clinical trials and the associated communication process: a preliminary report. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This article presents a conceptual model of factors affecting patient decisions about participating in clinical trials and describes videotaping methods for observing interactions between patients, physicians, and family members. Preliminary findings suggest that awareness of the camera during videotaped conversations does not significantly alter the behavior of participants. Further study of this model and methodology may produce results that can be incorporated into provider training.

  4. NCI: SBIR & STTR - Find Funding - Contracts - 262 Health Information Technology to Facilitate Patient-centered Communication in Cancer-related Care

    Cancer.gov

    The 2001 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report titled “Crossing the Quality Chasm” cited a need to make care “patient-centered”. To achieve that end physicians and organizations who are delivering care must begin to see medical care from the patient perspective. As outlined in a recent NCI report on Patient-Centered Communication (2007), “patient-centeredness” is a multi-dimensional concept that goes beyond the notion of satisfaction.

  5. Fatigue in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Smets, E. M.; Garssen, B.; Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; de Haes, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper an overview is presented on what is currently known of fatigue in cancer. Fatigue is considered to be a multi-dimensional concept, that should be measured as such. However, fatigue has been assessed mostly by single items in general symptom checklists. The few specific instruments that have been used in cancer patient populations are discussed. The majority of cancer patients, about 70%, report feelings of fatigue during radio- or chemotherapy. Follow-up results show that, at least for some diagnoses, patients remain fatigued long after treatment has ended. Somatic and psychological mechanisms that have been proposed to explain fatigue are discussed. It is argued that the significance of the results obtained on fatigue as a symptom in cancer depends on comparison with other patient and non-patient populations. Also the occurrence of a response-shift has to be considered, leading to under reporting of fatigue. Finally, possible interventions to decrease feelings of fatigue are presented. PMID:8347475

  6. Two augmentative communication systems for speechless disabled patients.

    PubMed

    Newman, G C; Sparrow, A R; Hospod, F E

    1989-08-01

    Patients may be rendered speechless because of many conditions, including cancer surgery, stroke, cerebral palsy, cervical cord and head trauma, neuromuscular paralysis, and intubation for respiratory failure. These same conditions may also be associated with decreased use of the hands, so that writing and other nonverbal forms of communication are also impaired. Lack of communication can frustrate the patient, the family, and health care personnel; increase the patient's isolation; and lead to poor patient cooperation, thus impeding progress in therapy and producing secondary psychiatric disturbances. Two communication programs that use a Commodore 64 computer are described in this paper. One communication program uses the alphabet and the other is based on the international Morse code. These programs are easy to use and inexpensive to establish, and they accommodate any switching device. PMID:2528298

  7. Communication with older, seriously ill patients.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Liesbeth M; Lindenberger, Elizabeth; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-05-01

    This article describes effective communication strategies in caring for older, seriously ill patients and their surrogates/caregivers. Specific skills in three core functions are highlighted: (i) empathic communication (ii) information provision and (iii) enabling decision making. Empathy skills include using 'NURSE' statements and assuring a continuous relationship. Tailored information and empathic communication can be used to facilitate information processing and overcome age-related communication barriers. Eliciting patients' goals of care is critical in decision making. Surrogates need assistance when making decisions for patients and often themselves have support and information needs. Suggestions are made to ensure patients' and caregivers' needs are met. PMID:25920057

  8. Survivorship: tools for transitioning patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Mary Ann; Denlinger, Crystal S

    2014-12-01

    The number of cancer survivors will be increasing over the next decade. Caring for this burgeoning population will place demands on oncologists and primary care providers to meet the needs of the expected large numbers of new patients as the baby-boom generation ages. Many will live beyond 5 years and possibly for decades after diagnosis. Patients experience many transitions depending on the type and stage of cancer, its treatment, and the long-term or late effects they have from the disease and its treatment. The Institute of Medicine's report, "From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition," recommends that patients be provided with a summary of their cancer treatment and follow-up care plan (ie, survivorship care plan [SCP]), including recommendations on healthy lifestyle behaviors and resources to promote self-care. This plan should be shared with the patient's other health care providers, including the primary care provider. This will facilitate communication among providers and with the patient, which is a key component to quality care. The American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer has also made providing SCPs to patients at completion of treatment a quality standard. Barriers to providing SCPs have been identified and include lack of time, reimbursement, and knowledge of late treatment effects and current guidelines. Survivorship guidelines are being developed by professional organizations that may be useful for providers. This article provides some practical tools that address these recommendations to help providers and patients with transitions along the cancer trajectory. PMID:25505209

  9. Communication with patients suffering from serious physical illness.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Costantini, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Communication is the corner stone of the relationship with the patient in all medical settings with the main aims of creating a good inter-personal relationship, exchanging information, and making treatment-related decisions. In a rapidly changing cultural and social context, the paternalistic approach of doctors knowing the best and deciding what should be done for a patient has been replaced by a shared decision-making approach, with patients being advised to educate themselves, ask questions and influence the course of the discussion with their doctors. Thus, a need for an improvement in the communication skills of physicians is extremely important for patients affected by serious physical illness (e.g. cancer, HIV infection, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Certain attitudes, behaviour and skills (e.g. capacity to impart confidence, being empathetic, providing a 'human touch', relating on a personal level, being forthright, being respectful, and being thorough) are part of effective communication. However, some specific aspects influencing doctor-patient communication and relationships, such as personality variables, coping and attachment styles, as well as cultural factors, should also be taken in to account. The development of training curricula to help doctors acquire proper skills in communication is mandatory, since research has shown that training in communication may facilitate the effectiveness of a doctor-patient relationship and the patient's satisfaction with care and give a general sense of humanity, which is easily lost in a biotechnologically oriented medicine. PMID:25832510

  10. Thrombocytopenia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A

    2014-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of cancer and its treatment. The causes of thrombocytopenia in cancer patients can be diverse and multifactorial. Systemic chemotherapy is the most frequent cause of thrombocytopenia. The degree and duration thrombocytopenia depends upon whether the chemotherapeutic treatment is myeloablative, as used in stem cell transplants, or non-myeloablative, as typically used in solid non-hematologic malignancies. Additional causes of significant thrombocytopenia include tumor involvement of bone marrow and spleen; microangiopathic disorders such as disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic uremia syndrome. Lymphoproliferative malignancies can also be associated with secondary immune thrombocytopenia. Due to the broad differential diagnosis associated with cancer related thrombocytopenia, a careful diagnostic evaluation is indicated. The goal of treatment should be to maintain a safe platelet count to allow effective treatment of the underlying malignancy, prevent bleeding complications and to minimize the use of platelet product transfusion. PMID:24862148

  11. [Pain and cancer Information dedicated to cancer patients and relatives].

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Ivan; Déchelette, Marie; Arbiol, Evelyne; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Cullet, Danièle; Delorme, Thierry; Fontaine, Alain; Lavillat, Dominique; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Torloting, Gérard; Vuillemin, Nicole; Brusco, Sylvie; Carretier, Julien; Delavigne, Valérie; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Fervers, Béatrice; Philip, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    Patient information is a major challenge for public health. It has become part of the patients' rights, in response to their need for information and involvement in medical decision-making. Since 1998, the French National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) has developed an information and education program dedicated to patients and relatives: the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program. The methodology of the program adheres to the quality criteria established for the elaboration of documents containing patient information. The SOR SAVOIR PATIENT guide Pain and Cancer aims to answer patients' questions regarding cancer specific pain and to help them become actively involved in their care. It was elaborated by a multidisciplinary workgroup, which included methodologists, one linguist, pain specialists and twenty patients and relatives. Patients' information needs and personal experience of pain were assessed using focus groups, semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Through eight chapters, which can be read in an independent way, Pain and cancer provides key information on the causes, the mechanisms, the evaluation, the prevention and the treatment of pain. The guide also presents advices and practical tools to facilitate the assessment of the pain and the communication between patients and professionals. Finally, this guide aims to overcome ideas such as that morphine is synonymous of end of life or drug addiction, that pain is a sign of aggravation of cancer and that nurses know how to detect the pain. Intended first for the patients and their close relations, Pain and Cancer is also a useful tool for health professionals. Indeed, it presents knowledge based on the most recent recommendations developed for clinical practice. Thanks to a wide distribution of the guide to patients, their families and the professionals, we trust that this guide will facilitate dialogue around pain, and ultimately its care. This article is an abstract of the guide. The complete SOR SAVOIR PATIENT guide can be downloaded from the SOR website at: www.sor-cancer.fr. PMID:18495574

  12. Nutrition in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Redzović, Arnela; Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Marijan; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Cachexia is defined as an unintended loss of stable weight exceeding 10%. Patients with advanced cachexia express anorexia, early satiety, severe weight loss, weakness, anemia, and edema. Anorexia represents the result of a failure of the usual appetite signals whereas cachexia is the debilitating state of involuntary weight loss. This syndrome, referred to as the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome, (CACS) and usually consists of a combination of anorexia, tissue wasting, malnutrition, weight loss and loss of compensatory increase in feeding. CACS represents the result of a complex interaction between cancer growth and host response and is associated with a poor response to chemotherapy and with an increase in drug-related toxicity. In advanced cachexia (mostly in metastatic cancer and terminally disease) any interventions with nutritional suplements are ineffective. Therefore, nutritional support in the reversion of tumor cachexia and in the importance of maintaining patient weight, muscle mass, quality of life, has the exceptional importance, becouse good nutritional status of patients leads to the possibility of more aggressive and longer treatment and thus to longer survival. PMID:25842774

  13. Nutrition in cancer patients.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dintinjana RD; Redzović A; Cubranić A; Dintinjana M; Vanis N

    2014-12-01

    Cachexia is defined as an unintended loss of stable weight exceeding 10%. Patients with advanced cachexia express anorexia, early satiety, severe weight loss, weakness, anemia, and edema. Anorexia represents the result of a failure of the usual appetite signals whereas cachexia is the debilitating state of involuntary weight loss. This syndrome, referred to as the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome, (CACS) and usually consists of a combination of anorexia, tissue wasting, malnutrition, weight loss and loss of compensatory increase in feeding. CACS represents the result of a complex interaction between cancer growth and host response and is associated with a poor response to chemotherapy and with an increase in drug-related toxicity. In advanced cachexia (mostly in metastatic cancer and terminally disease) any interventions with nutritional suplements are ineffective. Therefore, nutritional support in the reversion of tumor cachexia and in the importance of maintaining patient weight, muscle mass, quality of life, has the exceptional importance, becouse good nutritional status of patients leads to the possibility of more aggressive and longer treatment and thus to longer survival.

  14. Dysphagia in Tongue Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yu Ri; Kim, Tae Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for dysphagia in tongue cancer patients. Dysphagia is a common complication of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in tongue cancer patients. Previous studies have attempted to identify risk factors for dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer, but no studies have focused specifically on tongue cancer patients. Methods This study was conducted on 133 patients who were diagnosed with tongue cancer and who underwent a videofluoroscopy swallowing study (VFSS) between January 2007 and June 2012 at the Asan Medical Center. Data collected from the VFSS were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with aspiration were identified. Results Patients showed a higher incidence of inadequate tongue control, inadequate chewing, delayed oral transit time, aspiration or penetration, vallecular pouch and pyriform residue, and inadequate laryngeal elevation after surgery. Moreover, male gender, extensive tumor resection, a higher node stage, and more extensive lymph node dissection were major risk factors for aspiration in tongue cancer patients. Conclusion Tongue cancer patients have difficulties in the pharyngeal phase as well as the oral phase of swallowing. These difficulties can worsen after tongue cancer surgery. Gender, the extent of tumor resection, and lymph node metastasis affect swallowing in tongue cancer patients. Physicians should take these risk factors into account when administering swallowing therapy to tongue cancer patients. PMID:25932417

  15. [Patient education and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Arfé, Emmanuelle; Bombail, Marie

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic education program set up at the Institut Universitaire du Cancer (University Cancer Institute) in Toulouse accompanies the treatment pathway of breast cancer patients. It includes nine collective workshops. From work organization to application, professionals and patients are closely involved. PMID:26455624

  16. Communication and Technology in Genetic Counseling for Familial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie; Stacey, Mark; Olson, Brooke; Peterson, Susan; Buxbaum, Sarah; Shaw, Trudy; Lynch, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    When a cancer predisposing germline mutation is detected in an index case, the presence of the underlying syndrome is confirmed and the potential for predictive testing of at-risk relatives is established. However, the reporting of a positive family history does not routinely lead to communication of information about risk to close, much less distant relatives. This review summarizes information technology utilized to address penetration or “reach” of knowledge of risk within extended families, including the use of telephone and video counseling to reach distant patients, and anticipate novel internet-based processes for communication between investigators and relatives. PMID:24355094

  17. A Better Patient Experience Through Better Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elvira V.

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of healthcare from a seller’s market to a consumer’s market has pushed the element of patient satisfaction into the forefront of various medical facility evaluation tools, including those used by Medicare when weighing reimbursement to hospitals for patient care. Research has identified good communication skills to be a key factor in ensuring better patient outcomes, and nurturing patient satisfaction. Because of the growing amount of money at stake for patients’ satisfaction with a facility, the communication skills of individual healthcare providers are bound to impact their employees' reimbursement, bonuses, and promotion options. Although the dangers of “poor communication,” are evident: “poor communication” is a primary reason for filing a law suit in >80% of cases (Avery, 1985). Identifying the characteristics of “good communication” has been difficult. One factor that adds to the confusion is that research has found some long accepted codes of professional communication protocol to actually be counterproductive. Another factor that adds to the uncertainty is that accurate interpretations of some communication events are counterintuitive. Fortunately it has been possible to extract observable, proven, and teachable “good communication” behaviors from large-scale trials in the radiology department. The resultant Comfort Talk™ approach to communication includes rapid rapport techniques, patient-centered talking styles, and use of hypnotic language. This article overviews some of the Comfort Talk™ approaches to patients interaction and provides operational summaries of a sampling of specific Comfort Talk™ communication techniques, which nurses, technologists, and other healthcare workers can implement in their own practices. PMID:23471099

  18. Patient satisfaction with physician-patient communication during telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Agha, Zia; Schapira, Ralph M; Laud, Purushottam W; McNutt, Gail; Roter, Debra L

    2009-11-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication is a critical factor in treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction with care. To date, few studies have specifically conducted an in-depth evaluation of the effect of telemedicine (TM) on physician-patient communication in a medical setting. Our objective was to determine whether physical separation and technology used during TM have a negative effect on physician-patient communication. In this noninferiority randomized clinical trial, patients were randomized to receive a single consultation with one of 9 physicians, either in person (IP) or via TM. Patients (n = 221) were recruited from pulmonary, endocrine, and rheumatology clinics at a Midwestern Veterans Administration hospital. Physician-patient communication was measured using a validated self-report questionnaire consisting of 33 items measuring satisfaction with visit convenience and physician's patient-centered communication, clinical competence, and interpersonal skills. Satisfaction for physician's patient-centered communication was similar for both consultation types (TM = 3.76 versus IP = 3.61), and noninferiority of TM was confirmed (noninferiority t-test p = 0.002). Patient satisfaction with physician's clinical competence (TM = 4.63 versus IP = 4.52) and physician's interpersonal skills (TM = 4.79 versus IP = 4.74) were similar, and noninferiority of TM was confirmed (noninferiority t-test p = 0.006 and p = 0.04, respectively). Patients reported greater satisfaction with convenience for TM as compared to IP consultations (TM = 4.41 versus IP = 2.37, noninferiority t-test p < 0.001). Patients were equally satisfied with physician's ability to develop rapport, use shared decision making, and promote patient-centered communication during TM and IP consultations. Our data suggest that, despite physical separation, physician-patient communication during TM is not inferior to communication during IP consultations. PMID:19919189

  19. An Electronic Patient Risk Communication Board

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Caligtan, Christine A.; Benoit, Angela N.; Breydo, Eugene M.; Carroll, Diane L.; Keohane, Carol A.; Bates, David W.; Dykes, John S.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    Communication failures have been identified as the root cause of the majority of medical malpractice claims and patient safety violations. We believe it is essential to share key patient risk information with healthcare team members at the patient’s bedside. In this study, we developed an electronic Patient Risk Communication Board (ePRCB) to assist in bridging the communication gap between all health care team members. The goal of the ePRCB is to effectively communicate the patient’s key risk factors, such as a fall risk or risk of aspiration, to the healthcare team and to reduce adverse events caused by communication failures. The ePRCB will transmit patient risk information and tailored interventions with easy-to-understand icons on an LCD screen at the point of care. A set of patient risk reminder icons was developed and validated by focus groups. We used the results of the evaluation to refine the icons for the ePRCB. PMID:24199109

  20. The influence of graphic format on breast cancer risk communication.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Nattinger, Ann B; McAuliffe, Timothy L

    2006-09-01

    Graphic displays can enhance quantitative risk communication. However, empiric data regarding the effect of graphic format on risk perception is lacking. We evaluate the effect of graphic format elements on perceptions of risk magnitude and perceived truth of data. Preferences for format also were assessed. Participants (254 female primary care patients) viewed a series of hypothetical risk communications regarding the lifetime risk of breast cancer. Identical numeric risk information was presented using different graphic formats. Risk was perceived to be of lower magnitude when communicated with a bar graph as compared with a pictorial display (p < 0.0001), or with consecutively versus randomly highlighted symbols in a pictorial display (p = 0.0001). Data were perceived to be more true when presented with random versus consecutive highlights in a pictorial display (p < 0.01). A pictorial display was preferred to a bar graph format for the presentation of breast cancer risk estimates alone (p = 0.001). When considering breast cancer risk in comparison to heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis, however, bar graphs were preferred pictorial displays (p < 0.001). In conclusion, elements of graphic format used to convey quantitative risk information effects key domains of risk perception. One must be cognizant of these effects when designing risk communication strategies. PMID:16950729

  1. Hyponatremia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Platania, Marco; Verzoni, Elena; Vitali, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients but also a well known poor prognostic factor in cancer patients. Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is often misdiagnosed by oncologist because of difficulties in the interpretation of laboratory tests. Etiology is heterogeneous but the predominant cause is represented by the unbalance between excessive presence of water and serum sodium deficiency. Ectopic production of arginine vasopressin (AVP) develops more frequently in small cell lung cancer but it is not so rare in other malignancies. Neurological impairment may range from subclinical to life-threating symptoms depending by the rate of serum sodium deficiency. Appropriate diagnosis is essential to set a proper therapy. When hyponatremia is caused by SIADH, hypertonic saline infusion is indicated for acute presentation whereas fluid restriction is preferred in case of chronic asymptomatic evolution. Other options include vaptans, vasopressin receptor antagonists, targeted specifically for the correction of euvolemic hyponatremia. The aim of this brief report is to provide concise and specific informations for the management of SIADH in oncology clinical practice. PMID:25908038

  2. Communicating With Hearing-Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Walter S.

    1977-01-01

    One aspect of establishing effective communication between physicians and patients has not received adequate attention: the special needs and challenges presented by patients with impaired hearing. In this article the term “hearing impaired” is generic and is applied to both those persons who are commonly labeled “deaf” and those labeled “hard of hearing” as a result of a bilateral hearing loss. The general skills, both verbal and nonverbal, that a physician must have in order to communicate successfully with a hearing-impaired patient are in essence the same as those required for a hearing patient. Where the divergence occurs is not in the basic skills (empathy, probing and the like) but rather in the means of applying them. Communicating with a hearing-impaired patient makes the use of some combination of the following necessary: speech, hearing, speechreading (lipreading), writing, visual aids, visual language systems and the assistance of an interpreter. PMID:898949

  3. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  4. The needs of patients with advanced, incurable cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rainbird, K; Perkins, J; Sanson-Fisher, R; Rolfe, I; Anseline, P

    2009-01-01

    Background: Limited research has investigated the specific needs of patients with advanced incurable cancer. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of perceived needs among this population. Methods: Medical specialists from two regions in New South Wales, Australia, identified patients with advanced, incurable cancer, who were estimated to have a life expectancy of <2 years and were not receiving formal palliative care. Of the 418 eligible patients, 246 (59%) consented to participate. Consenting patients completed the Needs Assessment for Advanced Cancer Patients questionnaire, which has demonstrable validity and reliability. Patients' perceived needs were assessed across the seven domains of the questionnaire: psychological, daily living, medical communication and information, symptom related, social, spiritual and financial needs. Results: Patients identified the greatest areas of need in relation to psychological and medical communication/information domains. Patients' specific needs were highest in dealing with a lack of energy and tiredness, coping with fears about the cancer spreading, and coping with frustration at not being able to do the things they used to do. Conclusion: This study indicates that patients with advanced, incurable cancer have high levels of unmet needs, especially in relation to the areas of psychological and medical communication/information needs. The data have the potential to guide the development of interventions aimed at meeting the current unmet needs of patients with advanced, incurable cancer. PMID:19654579

  5. Patient–physician communication regarding electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael B.; Giovenco, Daniel P.; Delnevo, Cristine D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smokers are likely asking their physicians about the safety of e-cigarettes and their potential role as a cessation tool; however, the research literature on this communication is scant. A pilot study of physicians in the United States was conducted to investigate physician–patient communication regarding e-cigarettes. Methods A total of 158 physicians were recruited from a direct marketing e-mail list and completed a short, web-based survey between January and April 2014. The survey addressed demographics, physician specialty, patient–provider e-cigarette communication, and attitudes towards tobacco harm reduction. Results Nearly two-thirds (65%) of physicians reported being asked about e-cigarettes by their patients, and almost a third (30%) reported that they have recommended e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool. Male physicians were significantly more likely to endorse a harm reduction approach. Discussion Physician communication about e-cigarettes may shape patients' perceptions about the products. More research is needed to explore the type of information that physicians share with their patients regarding e-cigarettes and harm reduction. PMID:26844056

  6. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care. PMID:25146945

  7. Financial Distress in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Novel diagnostic and therapeutic options offer hope to cancer patients with both localized and advanced disease. However, many of these treatments are often costly and even well-insured patients can face high out-of-pocket costs. Families may also be at risk of financial distress due to lost wages and other treatment-related expenses. Research is needed to measure and characterize financial distress in cancer patients and understand how it affects their quality of life. In addition, health care providers need to be trained to counsel patients and their families so they can make patient-centered treatment decisions that reflect their preferences and values. PMID:24349677

  8. Communication skills to ensure patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shendurnikar, Niranjan; Thakkar, Pareshkumar A

    2013-11-01

    Every pediatrician would want to satisfy their patients and their parents to sustain good practice, earn name and fame and simultaneously to avoid litigation in this era of consumer protection act. This can be achieved only by use of good communication skills. Today the patients demand time, information and want their questions to be answered. They expect politeness, empathy and human touch from doctors. Time constraints, arrogance, telephone calls, language barriers and cultural insensitivity are the important barriers to good communication. Research has shown that doctor, who undergoes training to acquire good communication skills, can better satisfy his patients. Good communication skill is an art which can be acquired or improved by putting conscious efforts in day to day practice. Such skills should also be incorporated as part of medical teaching curriculum. Asking open ended questions, effective listening, appropriate praise, providing enough information as part of advice and finally checking their understanding, are the key areas of communication during medical interview. During this process pediatrician should ensure to address the parental concerns, should empathize with parents and involve parents in decision making. This will not only ensure satisfaction of parents but also their adherence to the therapy and to the pediatrician. PMID:23378053

  9. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality. PMID:20070056

  10. Dermatologic infections in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Mona; Brieva, Joaquin C; Lacouture, Mario E

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic infections are among the most commonly experienced complications of cancer and anti-cancer therapy. Alterations in host immune function secondary to the underlying malignant process and/or its treatment have been linked to an increase in the risk of infections. The skin and its appendages (i.e., hair and nails) represent the first line of defense against infectious microorganism; its dysfunction as a physical barrier and an immunologic organ in cancer patients leads to an increased susceptibility to infectious organisms. Moreover, a cancer patient's vulnerable state facilitates dissemination of infections to other sites, secondarily involving the skin. This chapter delineates dermatologic infections that are unique to cancer patients as a result of their underlying malignancies and associated comorbidities as well as those resulting from antineoplastic therapies. PMID:24706229

  11. Cancer Patient Preferences for Quality and Length of Life

    PubMed Central

    Meropol, Neal J.; Egleston, Brian L.; Buzaglo, Joanne S.; Benson, Al B.; Cegala, Donald J.; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Fleisher, Linda; Miller, Suzanne M.; Sulmasy, Daniel P.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Optimal patient decision making requires integration of patient values, goals, and preferences with information received from the physician. In the case of life-threatening illness such as cancer, the weights placed on quality of life (QOL) and length of life (LOL) represent critical values. The objective of this study is to describe cancer patient values regarding QOL and LOL, and explore associations with communication preferences. Methods Patients with advanced cancer completed a computer-based survey prior to the initial consultation with a medical oncologist. Assessments included sociodemographics, physical and mental health state, values regarding quality and length of life, communication preferences and cancer-related distress. Results Seven hundred forty three advanced cancer patients were enrolled. Among 459 advanced cancer patients, fifty-five percent of patients equally valued QOL and LOL, 27% preferred QOL, and 18% preferred LOL. Patients with a QOL preference had lower levels of cancer-related distress (p < 0.001). QOL preference was associated with older age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.003), and higher education (p = 0.062). Patients who preferred LOL over QOL desired a more supportive and less pessimistic communication style from their oncologists. Conclusions These data indicate that a values preference for length vs. quality of life may be simply measured, and is associated with wishes regarding the nature of oncologist communication. Awareness of these values during the clinical encounter could improve decision making by influencing the style and content of the communication between oncologists and their patients. PMID:18988231

  12. [Communication with ALS patients: neurosurgical approach].

    PubMed

    Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Sawada, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Takanori; Mochizuki, Hideki; Hirata, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    By progression of the disease, motor neurons degenerate in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) eventually lose nearly all voluntary muscles in the body. They are awake and aware but cannot move or communicate (locked-in state). Since the function of the brain is preserved, one possible measure to support their communication is to interpret their motor intention by decoding (deciphering) brain signals and present it with external devices. This technology called "brain-machine interface (BMI)" is now close to clinical use in Japan and USA.In our system, we record electrocorticogram (ECoG) obtained with subudural electrodes during their motor imagery, decode it and determine the movement they intended. So far, one patient of ALS with severe paralysis, implanted with this electrodes, successfully operated the PC communication tool only by thinking. PMID:24292005

  13. Medical Interpreting: Improving Communication with Your Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebble, Helen

    The guide is designed for physicians and other medical practitioners who need to work with medical interpreters to improve communication with patients. Special attention is given to the Australian context. An introductory section discusses the need for medical interpreters and explains the guide's organization. Subsequent sections address these…

  14. The medical communication of deaf patients.

    PubMed

    McEwen, E; Anton-Culver, H

    1988-03-01

    As language is such a fundamental tool in the determination of a diagnosis and in patient education, non-English-speaking patients and deaf patients often suffer from inferior medical care. Deaf adults and adults studying English as a second language (third- to fifth-grade English-comprehension level) were compared. Participants completed a survey and a test of commonly used medical vocabulary. The two populations did not differ significantly in education level or in vocabulary test scores. Deaf patients were often less able to speak to their physician in their customary language (sign language); as a result, they perceive greater difficulties in expressing themselves to their physicians and reexplain themselves less frequently in response to misunderstandings. It is clear that deaf patients should be recognized as a subset of non-English-speaking patients who are at increased risk for poor physician-patient communication. PMID:3346631

  15. Implementing an evidence-based breast cancer support and communication tool to newly diagnosed patients as standard care in two institutions.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Hawkins, Robert P; Dearing, James W; Pingree, Suzanne; Lomax, Jana Bolduan; McDowell, Helen; Morse, Erica Ferro; Barela, BreAnne

    2015-06-01

    While many women turn to the Internet to obtain health information, it is unlikely that unstructured Internet use provides optimal benefit to women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, due to uneven quality, conflicting claims, redundancy, and search engine idiosyncrasies, which may make finding information and assessing its accuracy and applicability difficult. To answer the need for information and support, the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) was developed to provide access to integrated information for decision-making, behavior change, and emotional support, and has been validated in randomized trials. This observational study of real-world implementation focuses on the process of integrating CHESS into standard care in two Denver healthcare systems. Results from this study provide guidance for implementation of other web-based patient information and support programs in large healthcare organizations. PMID:26029282

  16. Communication in the physician-patient relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, A M

    1993-01-01

    Political, legal, ethical, social, economic, and technological changes in the twentieth century have produced a profound effect on the health care and health status of Americans and the way in which physicians and patients communicate. In the latter half of this century, the responsibility for individual health care has shifted from a physician-oriented, paternalistic approach to a patient-centered one. Patients now assume two identities: health consumers and active participants in the medical decision-making process. This phenomenon has created an environment where consumer demand for information has shifted from a single focus on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases to an increasing preoccupation with cost, quality, and access to health care. This shift emphasizes the critical role played by medical librarians in the dissemination of needed information, and it challenges librarians to take a leadership role in opening newer channels of communication between physicians and patients. The 1992 Janet Doe Lecture analyzes the evolutionary change in the physician-patient relationship and its modes of communication, projects future roles for medical librarians, and provides an extensive list of references for further reading. PMID:8428183

  17. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  18. Communication by Mothers with Breast Cancer or Melanoma with Their Children

    PubMed Central

    Gaber, Rikki; Desai, Sapna; Smith, Maureen; Eilers, Steve; Blatt, Hanz; Guevara, Yanina; Robinson, June K.

    2013-01-01

    Communication of familial risk of breast cancer and melanoma has the potential to educate relatives about their risk, and may also motivate them to engage in prevention and early detection practices. With the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy laws, the patient often becomes the sole communicator of such risks to family members. This study surveys mothers diagnosed with either breast cancer or melanoma and their adult children about their family communication style, knowledge of increased risk, and early detection practices. In both cancer groups, most mothers alerted their children of the risk and need for early detection practices. Breast cancer mothers communicated risk and secondary prevention with early detection by breast self-examination and mammograms whereas the melanoma mothers communicated risk and primary prevention strategies like applying sunscreen and avoiding deliberate tanning. Open communication about health matters significantly increased the likelihood that children engaged in early detection and/or primary prevention behaviors. Examining the information conveyed to at-risk family members, and whether such information motivated them to engage in early detection/prevention behaviors, is key to guiding better cancer prevention communication between doctors and patients. PMID:23965923

  19. Understanding frailty in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baijal, Pooja; Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi

    2014-01-01

    As population ages, the number of older adults with cancer is increasing rapidly. Chronological age per se is a poor guide for an oncologist to determine tolerance to cancer treatment. Older adults have been underrepresented in cancer clinical trials, leading to paucity of guidelines to meet the treatment challenges in this population. To evaluate an older adult with cancer, oncologists must understand age-related changes and identify the subset of population who is vulnerable and at risk of cancer treatment toxicity. Comprehensive geriatric assessments focusing on functional status, multimorbidity, nutritional status, cognitive impairment, and psychosocial support help recognize heterogeneity among older adults, leading to individualized approaches toward cancer treatment. The treatment decisions need to be made in collaboration with the patient's values and preferences. PMID:25299146

  20. [Communication with patients about medical incidents].

    PubMed

    Hannawa, A

    2012-06-01

    Errors in medicine are common and often inevitable. They represent a dramatic situation for patients and their families. Thus, the physician-patient communication after a critical incident is crucial to prevent increased trauma. An error disclosure is a difficult, often overwhelming challenge for physicians. Doctors commonly experience enormous pressures from patient advocates and ethicists, who encourage full disclosure while risk managers and liability insurers demand restraint. Despite increasing institutional and legal protections, physicians are still reluctant to disclose errors to their patients. And those error disclosures that do occur often fail to meet patients' expectations. In fact, there is a substantial gap between what patients want to hear and what physicians typically disclose. Previous research has proposed a series of verbal messages doctors should communicate during error disclosures. However, considering the emotional content of such messages, patients likely derive much of the meaning from physicians' nonverbal behaviors. This article presents a detailed review of the existing literature on this topic area and discusses the verbal and nonverbal components that constitute a competent error disclosure in the medical field. PMID:22653721

  1. Communicating Effectively PDF

    Cancer.gov

    Effective communication is essential for the delivery of quality cancer palliative care. And yet, healthcare providers often lack the skills to communicate effectively with their patients and families.

  2. Closing the patient-oncologist communication gap: a review of historic and current efforts.

    PubMed

    Pham, A Khoa; Bauer, Marianne T; Balan, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Effective communication is essential in developing any relationship--this is particularly true between oncologists and their patients. The patient-oncologist relationship is one of the most delicate in medicine, and given the strong emotions associated with cancer, successful communication plays a paramount role in the wellbeing of patients and oncologists. Significant advances to close the communication gap have occurred over the past several decades, largely by addressing deficiencies in the various stages of an oncologist's lengthy training: undergraduate medical education, residency and fellowship, and continuing medical education. Stemming from several milestones achieved by highly motivated groups of individuals, including the creation of consensus statements and guidelines by communication education experts, progress has been made to improve patient-oncologist communication. This progress is marked by the development of evidence-based communication skills training programs, such as Oncotalk and Comskil, in addition to the creation of distant-learning modalities, such as the Studying Communication in Oncologist-Patient Encounters trial. This review article outlines the history of communication education during medical education and training, and brings to light more recent efforts to promote competent, communication-minded physicians necessary for effective cancer care. PMID:24092531

  3. Discordance between Perceived and Actual Cancer Stage among Cancer Patients in Korea: A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hye-Young; Park, Jong-Hyock; Kim, So-Young; Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Park, Bo Young; Huh, Jung-Sik; Shin, Hee-Young; Won, Young Joo; Seo, Hong Gwan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the accuracy of communication between doctors and patients by evaluating the consistency between patient perception of cancer stage and the medical records, and analyzed the most influential factors of incongruence among cancer patients at 10 cancer centers across Korea. Methods Information was gathered from cancer patients at the National Cancer Center and nine regional cancer centers located in every province of Korea between 1 July 2008 and 31 August 2008. Data were analyzed using Pearson's χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The stages of cancer reported by the 1,854 patients showed a low degree of congruence with the stages given in medical records (k = 0.35, P<0.001). Only 57.1% of the patients had accurate knowledge of their cancer stage. In total, 18.5% underestimated their stage of disease, and the more advanced the cancer stage, the more likely they were to underestimate it, in order of local (14.2%), regional (23.7%), and distant (51.6%). Logistic regression analysis showed that congruence was lower in patients with cervical cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30–0.87), recurrence (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.50–0.83), and treatment at the National Cancer Center (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.39–0.72). Conclusion There are knowledge gaps between patients' perceived and actual stage of cancer. Patients with cervical cancer, recurrence, and who received treatment at a regional cancer center showed less understanding of their cancer stage. PMID:24817193

  4. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  5. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrion should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition. PMID:26886037

  6. [Psychological support of cancer patients in the oncological consultation].

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Friedrich; Rousselle, Ingrid; Guex, Patrice; Bernard, Mathieu

    2007-09-01

    Due to its life threatening character, a cancer diagnosis represents an existential rupture, disturbing an individual's life trajectory perceived beforehand as a continuum. As a consequence, a patient's physical, psychological, social and spiritual equilibrium may be disturbed, calling for a support by clinicians, which surpasses biomedical treatment. A key element of support relies on patient-centered communication, which not only demands technical skills, but also a reflective approach on interpersonal factors which shape the relationship, on the choice and the idealized representation of the clinician's profession as well as its limits. This article summarizes main aspects of patient-physician communication and our experience as teachers of the so-called Communication Skills Training. It provides a review on research in progress in this field and finally indicates other elements of support, which contribute to the < narrative reconstruction > of the patient facing the rupture induced by cancer. PMID:17878106

  7. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1?:?1.08 in young patients and 2.5?:?1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  8. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic spectrum within the context of cancer, emphasizing the close relationship between the origin of dissociative constituents which, according to the scientific literature, compose the traumatic experience. Our results have implications for understanding dissociative symptomatology in a cancer population and can help develop clinical programs of prevention and support for patients. PMID:25759675

  9. Contributions to Cancer Research: Finding a Niche in Communication | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    This past July, I started a journey into the fields of communications and cancer research when I joined the Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) as a fellow in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Health Communications Internship Program (HCIP). Cancer genomics and working in an office were new and uncharted territory for me: before I came to OCG, I was finishing a Ph.D. in cell biology at Vanderbilt University in Dr. Matthew Tyska’s laboratory.

  10. Physician-patient communication: breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Fields, Scott A; Johnson, W Michael

    2012-01-01

    Physicians often struggle with how to manage the task of breaking bad news with patients. Moreover, the arduous nature of the task can contribute to physician detachment from the patient or an avoidance of breaking the news in a timely manner. A plan of action can only improve physician confidence in breaking bad news, and also make the task more manageable. Over a decade ago, Rabow and McPhee offered a strategy; the ABCDE plan, which provided a patient centered framework from which to deliver troubling news to patients and families. At the heart of this plan was the creation of a safe environment, the demonstration of timely communication skills, and the display of empathy on the physician's part. Careful consideration of the doctor's own reactions to death and dying also played an important role. A close review of the five tenets of this plan indicates the relevance of Rabow and McPhee's strategy today. The patient base in our nation and state continues to be older, on average, and physicians are faced with numerous patients who have terminal illness. A constructive plan with specific ideas for breaking bad news can help physicians effectively navigate this difficult task. PMID:22655433

  11. Teaching patients to communicate with physicians: the impact of race.

    PubMed Central

    Post, D. M.; Cegala, D. J.; Marinelli, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    Research on physician-patient communication has focused on the effect of physician communication training on health care outcomes. Much less is known about patient communication training, and even less about the impact of patient race on the effectiveness of patient communication interventions. One hundred and fifty patients of 25 family physicians were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 14-page patient communication workbook received 2-3 days pre-visit, 2-page patient communication handout received in the waiting room, or control group. Racial differences in the impact of patient communication training communication variables, immediate and delayed recall of information, and adherence to treatment were analyzed by t-test and ANOVA techniques. Across analyses, workbook communication skills training had a strong and significant effect on white patients but minimal or no effect on African-American patients. Minimal differences in dependent variables between racial groups existed for the patient handout and control groups. A partial correlation analysis was conducted to factor out the variance due to education. Results suggested that patient race accounted for the results over and above differences in education between racial groups. Our results suggested that the benefits of communication training can be enhanced by taking into account patient characteristics such as race and culture. PMID:12653375

  12. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in cancer patients: an international autopsy survey. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 1992;11:99-109. Pagano L, Akova M, Dimopoulos G, Herbrecht R, Drgona L, Blijlevens N. Risk assessment and ... Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud ...

  13. Improving Physician-Patient Communication through Coaching of Simulated Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitz, Paula; Lancee, William J.; Lawson, Andrea; Maunder, Robert; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Leszcz, Molyn; McNaughton, Nancy; Pain, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication between physicians and their patients is important in optimizing patient care. This project tested a brief, intensive, interactive medical education intervention using coaching and standardized psychiatric patients to teach physician-patient communication to family medicine trainees. Methods: Twenty-six family…

  14. Serious game scores as health condition indicator for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Konrad; Kayali, Fares; Reithofer, Andrea; Wölfle, Rebecca; Mateus-Berr, Ruth; Kuczwara, Jens; Lehner, Zsuzsanna; Lawitschka, Anita; Brunmaier, Barbara; Martinek, Daniel; Silbernagl, Marisa; Hlavacs, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present INTERACCT (Integrating Entertainment and Reaction Assessment into Child Cancer Therapy), a multidisciplinary research project aiming at creating a communication tool for pediatric patients after cancer treatment with HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) in after care. The communication platform should foster communication between patients and clinicians, but also increase motivation for treatment compliance by using appropriate designs and gamification elements. A state of the art web interface enables the physicians to evaluate data submitted by the patients, joining data from various sources (lab data, survey data, physiotherapy performance) using HL7 and visualizing imporant changes. This contribution outlines the challenges of designing such a system and presents a solution for the medical data interface and evaluation. PMID:25991284

  15. An ecological framework for cancer communication: implications for research.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kevin; Intille, Stephen S; Zabinski, Marion F

    2005-07-01

    The field of cancer communication has undergone a major revolution as a result of the Internet. As recently as the early 1990s, face-to-face, print, and the telephone were the dominant methods of communication between health professionals and individuals in support of the prevention and treatment of cancer. Computer-supported interactive media existed, but this usually required sophisticated computer and video platforms that limited availability. The introduction of point-and-click interfaces for the Internet dramatically improved the ability of non-expert computer users to obtain and publish information electronically on the Web. Demand for Web access has driven computer sales for the home setting and improved the availability, capability, and affordability of desktop computers. New advances in information and computing technologies will lead to similarly dramatic changes in the affordability and accessibility of computers. Computers will move from the desktop into the environment and onto the body. Computers are becoming smaller, faster, more sophisticated, more responsive, less expensive, and--essentially--ubiquitous. Computers are evolving into much more than desktop communication devices. New computers include sensing, monitoring, geospatial tracking, just-in-time knowledge presentation, and a host of other information processes. The challenge for cancer communication researchers is to acknowledge the expanded capability of the Web and to move beyond the approaches to health promotion, behavior change, and communication that emerged during an era when language- and image-based interpersonal and mass communication strategies predominated. Ecological theory has been advanced since the early 1900s to explain the highly complex relationships among individuals, society, organizations, the built and natural environments, and personal and population health and well-being. This paper provides background on ecological theory, advances an Ecological Model of Internet-Based Cancer Communication intended to broaden the vision of potential uses of the Internet for cancer communication, and provides some examples of how such a model might inform future research and development in cancer communication. PMID:15998614

  16. The construct of breast cancer risk perception: need for a better risk communication?

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, E. T. M.; Vlasselaer, J.; Van de Putte, G.; Schobbens, J.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer risk assessment and communication are much neglected aspects of women’s health care. Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer-related disease that touches the deepest of a women’s feelings and the subject thus attracts much of the attention of the media. Disease prevalence and media coverage are the roots of inappropriate breast cancer risk perception. Many women overestimate their personal breast cancer risk. Inappropriate risk perception precedes inappropriate health behaviour and it is pivotal to understand the underlying mechanisms in order to plan intervention. Whether interventions such as patient education through counselling and objective risk assessment are effective in restoring inappropriate breast cancer risk perception remains a question unanswered, but the tools to measure breast cancer risk are available and were validated. PMID:25478077

  17. Risk of new primary cancer in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Söderholm, A. L.; Pukkala, E.; Lindqvist, C.; Teppo, L.

    1994-01-01

    The relative risk of subsequent cancers was evaluated for a total of 9,092 patients with lip and oropharyngeal cancer recorded between 1953 and 1989 in the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. The observed numbers of patients were compared with those expected on the basis of the incidence rates in the Finnish population. There were 1,130 patients (12%) with a new cancer. The standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of contracting a new primary cancer was 1.2 for lip cancer patients (95% CI 1.1-1.3) and 1.4 for patients with oropharyngeal cancer (95% CI 1.2-1.4). Among lip cancer patients, a statistically significant excess risk was found for subsequent cancers in the oropharyngeal area (SIR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1), larynx (SIR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-2.9) and lung (SIR 1.4, 95% CI 1.3-1.6), i.e. for cancers with tobacco aetiology. Among patients with oropharyngeal cancer there was an excess of lip cancer (SIR, 3.5, 95% CI 1.5-6.9), lung cancer (SIR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.3) and leukaemia (SIR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-4.3). Radiotherapy for the first primary did not increase the risk of new cancer. PMID:8142267

  18. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, MĂ©lanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance. PMID:26369747

  19. Communication about Cancer Clinical Trials in Internet Cancer-Related Forums | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    A qualitative analysis revealed that Internet-based cancer groups engage in discussion regarding clinical trials. The communication related to diverse aspects of participation and reflected the complex nature of decision making about trial participation. This abstract may be of interest for those designing interventions and recruitment procedures to promote trial participation.

  20. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  1. [Symptoms of Cancer Patients and Kampo Formulas Effective for Them].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Miki; Hoshino, Etsuo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with cancer exhibit various symptoms induced by cancer itself and its therapy leadingto fatigue; however, their vital energy can be restored by administration of Kampo, which is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine. Restoration and maintenance of mental and physical energy are important for successful cancer treatment. For this purpose, appropriate use of Kampo formulas, such as"Ho-zai", formulas to vitalize fatigued patients (eg, Hochu-ekki-to, Juzen-taiho-to, Ninjin-yoeito), "Hojin-zai", formulas to restore energy (eg, Gosha-jinki-gan), and"Kuoketsu-zai ", formulas to resolve stagnant blood flow (eg, Keishi-bukuryo-gan, Tokaku-joki-to, Toki-shakuyaku-san) are administered in combination. Consequently, basic autonomic functions, such as appetite, sleep, defecation, and urination normalize and the nutritional and mental conditions are restored. These favorable changes in the patients' condition allow completion of the standard cancer therapy course, resultingin an improved outcome of cancer therapy and successful treatment. Kampo therapy can be administered as the final treatment option for patients with last-stage cancer who do not have any other effective therapy options. If patients with cancer are administered Kampo formulas, their vital energy is restored, and they develop a will to fight the cancer. As a result, communication becomes easier. PMID:26809299

  2. Practice improvement, part II: update on patient communication technologies.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    Patient portals (ie, secure web-based services for patient health record access) and secure messaging to health care professionals are gaining popularity slowly. Advantages of web portals include timely communication and instruction, access to appointments and other services, and high patient satisfaction. Limitations include inappropriate use, security considerations, organizational costs, and exclusion of patients who are uncomfortable with or unable to use computers. Attention to the organization's strategic plan and office policies, patient and staff expectations, workflow and communication integration, training, marketing, and enrollment can facilitate optimal use of this technology. Other communication technologies that can enhance patient care include automated voice or text reminders and brief electronic communications. Social media provide another method of patient outreach, but privacy and access are concerns. Incorporating telehealthcare (health care provided via telephone or Internet), providing health coaching, and using interactive health communication applications can improve patient knowledge and clinical outcomes and provide social support. PMID:24261435

  3. Improving communication among nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Ozcanhan, Mehmet H; Dalkilic, Gokhan

    2015-07-01

    Patients use nurse call systems to signal nurses for medical help. Traditional push button-flashing lamp call systems are not integrated with other hospital automation systems. Therefore, nurse response time becomes a matter of personal discretion. The improvement obtained by integrating a pager system into the nurse call systems does not increase care efficiency, because unnecessary visits are still not eliminated. To obtain an immediate response and a purposeful visit by a nurse; regardless of the location of nurse in hospital, traditional systems have to be improved by intelligent telephone system integration. The results of the developed Nurse Call System Software (NCSS), the Wireless Phone System Software (WPSS), the Location System Software (LSS) and the communication protocol are provided, together with detailed XML message structures. The benefits of the proposed system are also discussed and the direction of future work is presented. PMID:25935361

  4. The Relationship of Perceived Physician Communicator Style to Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardello, Laura L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines how patients' perceptions of their physicians' communicator styles were related to patient satisfaction. Identifies eight communicator styles and six dimensions of patient satisfaction. Concludes that most significant relationships were nonlinear and that different styles were related to different types of satisfaction. Discusses…

  5. Communicating study results to our patients: Which way is best?

    PubMed Central

    Petrisor, BA; Tornetta III, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Before we are able to communicate evidence and evidence results to patients we must first be familiar with the common ways by which results may be presented to our patients. We describe five approaches (relative risk, risk reduction, odds ratio, absolute risk difference and number needed to treat) of transforming the results of an orthopaedic study for communication with patients. PMID:19826518

  6. I wanted you to know: Breast cancer survivors' control of workplace communication about cancer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lynne; Kocum, Lucie; Loughlin, Catherine; Bryson, Lindsay; Dimoff, Jennifer K

    2015-10-01

    Of working women diagnosed with cancer, approximately one-third will have breast cancer. Communicating about their cancer plays an important role in their workplace experience. It is challenging but helpful in eliciting needed social support and accommodations. Fully understanding such communication experiences is important in order to facilitate the well-being and success of such women in their workplaces. A qualitative study permits a richer account of the details of these workplace communications, and a deeper understanding of how women manage the complex and multifaceted communication process. This study used thematic analysis of semistructured interviews from 19 women working full time at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. We found 3 themes that encapsulated unfolding individual experiences, representing a complex interplay of challenges to maintaining a sense of personal control in workplace responses: challenges to control posed by the experience of sharing information in the workplace about the woman's cancer, women's very individual attempts to control how information about their cancer was shared, and the mixed responses of those who were told. The result was unique individual trajectories in which empathic responses tailored to the individual's needs and preferences were most helpful. These findings can provide guidance on managing cancer communication for survivors, and on how to best support and accommodate women workers with breast cancer, facilitating their ability to control how their cancer impacts their work experience. Our website (http://www.iwantedyoutoknow.ca/) provides a video, tip sheet, and other resources for facilitating supportive communication in the workplace. PMID:25915542

  7. To worry or not to worry: breast cancer genetic counseling communication with low-income Latina immigrants.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Galen; Guerra, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to describe communication practices during hereditary breast cancer genetic counseling (GC) with low-income immigrant Latina patients in a public hospital setting. We utilized qualitative ethnographic methods, including direct observation of GC appointments with Latina patients at a public hospital offering free GC and BRCA testing and in-depth qualitative interviews with patients after they had received their BRCA genetic test results. Twenty-five patients participated; 20 were observed during genetic counseling appointments, and ten participated in interviews after BRCA testing with six participating in both observations and an interview. Analyses of qualitative data from observation field notes and interviews identified both strengths and limitations of current communication practices within the following themes: (1) family health history communication, (2) education regarding genes and genetics and patient information needs, (3) the purpose of the genetic test, (4) genetic test results and cancer risk, (5) building rapport and providing support, and (6) medical interpretation for monolingual Spanish speakers. As access to cancer GC expands in the public safety net settings and for the diverse populations they serve, it is critical to ensure effective communication in order for patients, whether or not they have a BRCA mutation, to understand the nature of their cancer risk and recommended methods of screening and prevention. Intervention strategies that address both structural constraints and patient-provider communication are needed to improve GC communication with immigrant Latinas, especially monolingual Spanish speakers. PMID:25148879

  8. Relationship between outpatients' perceptions of physicians' communication styles and patients' anxiety levels in a Japanese oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Takayama, T; Yamazaki, Y; Katsumata, N

    2001-11-01

    For life-threatening illnesses such as cancer that require a long-term treatment regimen, communication is particularly important between doctors and patients. While it is assumed that the more serious the illness, the greater the need to relieve patients' anxiety, physicians' communication styles can directly influence patients' anxiety levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between outpatients' perceptions of physicians' communication styles and the patients' anxiety levels in oncology settings. Patient anxiety level was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory before and after the consultation. The Perceived Physician's Communication Style Scale was developed in this study. Analysis of responses to the scale resulted in four factors--"acceptive", "patient-centered", "attentive", and "facilitative"--of the physician's communication style and explained 63.7% of the variance. The inter-correlation for overall scale items was 0.95. Patient satisfaction with the medical encounter was also measured to validate the physician's communication style scale. Moderate correlation between the physician's communication style and satisfaction was observed and confirms the relationship between a favorable communication style and a patient's satisfaction. After the consultation, the patients' anxiety levels dropped 5.0 +/- 1.5 points (p<0.001), and the physician's communication style was shown in many cases to be linked to patient anxiety levels after the consultation. The effect of the physician's communication style on patients' post-consultation anxiety levels was small among the patients with an advanced disease status. Also, the findings showed that patients' post-consultation anxiety levels remained low even among those patients with unfavorable examination results if the patients evaluated their physician's communication style as high. This study suggested that the physician's communication style is important not only for moderating patients' anxiety, but could also be helpful for moderating physicians' own stress levels when communicating bad news to patients. PMID:11676404

  9. [Chemotherapy for elderly patients with colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Soda, Hiroaki; Tonooka, Toru; Denda, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty exists about whether elderly patients benefit to the same extent as younger patients from the chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Patients older than 75 years of age are usually excluded from metastatic colorectal cancer randomized studies. Some subset analyses with comparison of younger and elderly patients from these pooled data revealed the significance of the chemotherapy for elderly colorectal cancer patients. This article introduces the review of these subset analyses and JCOG1018 trial which is on-going study to clarify the efficacy of oxaliplatin combination first line chemotherapy for elderly metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24597362

  10. Using Health Communication Best Practices to Develop a Web-Based Provider-Patient Communication Aid: The CONNECT™ Study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Millard, Jennifer; Miller, Suzanne M.; Egleston, Brian L.; Solarino, Nicholas; Trinastic, Jonathan; Cegala, Donald J.; Benson, Al B.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Sulmasy, Daniel; Diefenbach, Michael A.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Although there is broad consensus that careful content vetting and user testing is important in the development of technology-based educational interventions, often these steps are overlooked. This paper highlights the development of a theory-guided, web-based communication aid (CONNECT™), designed to facilitate treatment decision making among patients with advanced cancer. Methods The communication aid included an online survey, patient skills training module and an automated physician report. Development steps included: 1) evidence-based content development, 2) usability testing, 3) pilot testing, and 4) patient utilization and satisfaction. Results Usability testing identified some confusing directions and navigation for the on-line survey and validated the relevance of the “patient testimonials” in the skills module. Preliminary satisfaction from the implementation of the communication aid showed that 66% found the survey length reasonable and 70% found it helpful in talking with the physician. Seventy percent reported the skills module helpful and about half found it affected the consultation. Conclusion Designing patient education interventions for translation into practice requires the integration of health communication best practice including user feedback along the developmental process. Practice Implications This developmental process can be translated to a broad array of community based patient and provider educational interventions. PMID:18417312

  11. Evaluation of New Multimedia Formats for Cancer Communications

    PubMed Central

    Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Background Providing quality, current cancer information to cancer patients and their families is a key function of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Web site. This information is now provided in predominantly-text format, but could be provided in formats using multimedia, including animation and sound. Since users have many choices about where to get their information, it is important to provide the information in a format that is helpful and that they prefer. Objective To pilot and evaluate multimedia strategies for future cancer-information program formats for lay users, the National Cancer Institute created new multimedia versions of existing text programs. We sought to evaluate user performance and preference on these 3 new formats and on the 2 existing text formats. Methods The National Cancer Institute's "What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer" program was the test vehicle. There were 5 testing sessions, 1 dedicated to each format. Each session lasted about 1 hour, with 9 participants per session and 45 users overall. Users were exposed to the assigned cancer program from beginning to end in 1 of 5 formats: text paperback booklet, paperback booklet formatted in HTML on the Web, spoken audio alone, spoken audio synchronized with a text Web page, and Flash multimedia (animation, spoken audio, and text). Immediately thereafter, the features and design of the 4 alternative formats were demonstrated in detail. A multiple-choice pre-test and post-test quiz on the cancer content was used to assess user learning (performance) before and after experiencing the assigned program. The quiz was administered using an Authorware software interface writing to an Access database. Users were asked to rank from 1 to 5 their preference for the 5 program formats, and provide structured and open-ended comments about usability of the 5 formats. Results Significant improvement in scores from pre-test to post-test was seen for the total study population. Average scores for users in each of the 5 format groups improved significantly. Increments in improvement, however, were not statistically different between any of the format groups. Significant improvements in quiz scores were seen irrespective of age group or education level. Of the users, 71.1% ranked the Flash program first among the 5 formats, and 84.4% rated Flash as their first or second choice. Audio was the least-preferred format, ranking fifth among 46.7% of users and first among none. Flash was ranked first among users regardless of education level, age group, or format group to which the user was assigned. Conclusions Under the pilot study conditions, users overwhelmingly preferred the Flash format to the other 4 formats. Learning occurred equally in all formats. Use of multimedia should be considered as communication strategies are developed for updating cancer content and attracting new users. PMID:14517107

  12. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  13. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In


  14. Patient Communication: A Multidisciplinary Approach Using Animated Cartoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiner, Marie; Handal, Gilbert; Williams, Darryl

    2004-01-01

    Communication is a major problem in the management of patients. Miscommunication occurs frequently in populations with low reading skills, illiteracy does not completely account for the observed low rates of recall of communicated information. Transmission of the message also plays an important role. Successful strategies to improve communication…

  15. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality


  16. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  17. Helping Patients Decide: Ten Steps to Better Risk Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing frequency, patients are being asked to make complex decisions about cancer screening, prevention, and treatment. These decisions are fraught with emotion and cognitive difficulty simultaneously. Many Americans have low numeracy skills making the cognitive demands even greater whenever, as is often the case, patients are presented with risk statistics and asked to make comparisons between the risks and benefits of multiple options and to make informed medical decisions. In this commentary, we highlight 10 methods that have been empirically shown to improve patients’ understanding of risk and benefit information and/or their decision making. The methods range from presenting absolute risks using frequencies (rather than presenting relative risks) to using a risk format that clarifies how treatment changes risks from preexisting baseline levels to using plain language. We then provide recommendations for how health-care providers and health educators can best to communicate this complex medical information to patients, including using plain language, pictographs, and absolute risks instead of relative risks. PMID:21931068

  18. Skin cancer in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Gordon Spratt, Elizabeth A; Carucci, John A

    2013-10-01

    Organ transplant recipients suffer from an increased incidence and recurrence rate of nonmelanoma skin cancers. These cancers are often more aggressive than those in the general population, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Often times, routine treatment modalities are not adequate and the use of different management strategies is necessary. Treatment modalities, including surgical excision, Mohs micrographic surgery, physically destructive modalities, topical therapy, and photodynamic therapy may be used. Combinations of these therapies may be used in rotation for treatment of extensive field disease. Chemoprophylaxis with oral retinoids and alteration of the immune suppression regimen may be indicated for specific cases. In addition, newly emerging therapies for squamous cell carcinomas including cetuximab and capecitabine may offer heightened control in organ transplant patients with significant cutaneous disease. PMID:24037934

  19. Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gluyas, Heather

    2015-08-01

    Teamwork requires co-operation, co-ordination and communication between members of a team to achieve desired outcomes. In industries with a high degree of risk, such as health care, effective teamwork has been shown to achieve team goals successfully and efficiently, with fewer errors. This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. The central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination is explored. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care. PMID:26243123

  20. Nurses' experiences of communicating with hospitalized, suddenly speechless patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carmen S; Spring, Heather J; Rowe, Meredeth

    2015-02-01

    We used a qualitative focus group design to explore the experiences and challenges of nurses who work with hospitalized patients experiencing the sudden inability to verbalize their needs, also known as sudden speechlessness. In response to open-ended questions in facilitated focus groups, 18 nurses discussed issues around the care and communication needs of suddenly speechless (SS) patients. Nurses identified multiple, commonly occurring communication challenges when caring for SS patients. They believed these challenges led to poorer recognition of patient needs, with the potential for compromised patient care. Nurses described how the lack of reliable strategies to facilitate communication sometimes resulted in negative patient outcomes, including unmet psychosocial needs and the potential that informed consent and educational issues were being inadequately addressed for the SS patients. Even experienced nurses indicated ongoing problems in communicating with SS patients, despite using a multitude of strategies, leaving many to deal with issues of frustration and role conflict. PMID:25225048

  1. Tailoring communication in consultations with women from high risk breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Lobb, E A; Butow, P N; Meiser, B; Barratt, A; Gaff, C; Young, M A; Kirk, J; Suthers, G K; Tucker, K

    2002-08-27

    This multicentre study examined the influence of patient demographic, disease status and psychological variables on clinical geneticists/genetic counsellors (consultants) behaviours in initial consultations with women from high-risk breast cancer families. One hundred and fifty-eight women completed a pre-clinic self-report questionnaire. The consultations were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and coded. Consultants did not vary their behaviour according to women's expectations. However, significantly more aspects of genetic testing were discussed with women who were affected with breast cancer (P<0.001), screening and management with unaffected women (P=0.01) and breast cancer prevention with younger women (P=0.01). Prophylactic mastectomy was discussed more frequently with women with medical and allied health training (P=0.02), and prophylactic oophorectomy with women affected with breast cancer (P=0.03), those in non-professional occupations (P=0.04) and with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer (P<0.001). Consultants used significantly more behaviours to facilitate understanding with women who were in non-professional occupations (P=0.04); facilitated active patient involvement more with women affected with breast cancer (P<0.001) and used more supportive and counselling behaviours with affected women (P=0.02). This study showed that patient demographics were more likely to predict consultants' communication behaviours than the woman's psychological status. Methods to facilitate assessment of psychological morbidity are needed to allow more tailored communication. PMID:12189544

  2. Communication preferences in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: descriptive results and patient characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Antje; Hauer, Johannes; Farin, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication with patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is often considered difficult. The primary objective of this explorative study was to describe the communication preferences of FMS patients in comparison with other chronic diseases, and the secondary objective was to identify patient-related predictors of those communication preferences. Methods A total of 256 FMS patients were asked to fill out the KOPRA [(Kommunikationspraeferenzen), communication preferences of patients with chronic illness] questionnaire at the beginning of their rehabilitation, answering questions about their communication preferences. The KOPRA’s descriptive parameters were calculated and compared with other diagnosis groups. In order to include as many influencing factors as possible, data on patient-related sociodemographic, medical, pain impact and psychologic variables were gathered. A hierarchical regression analysis with four steps was performed to identify patient-related predictors of patients’ communication preferences. Results FMS patients consider an open and patient-centered communication style to be especially important. Emotionally supportive communication and communication about personal circumstances are important for FMS patients, but the preferences of individual patients vary widely. FMS patients reveal higher values in all the subdimensions of communication preferences compared with patients with low back pain or chronic ischemic heart disease. Only a few variables appear to predict patient communication preferences. The explained variance ranged from 3.1% to 9.7%. Psychologic variables have been identified as predictors in conjunction with all communication preferences. Conclusion Health care providers who communicate with FMS patients should employ an open and patient-centered communication style, and affective communication components should be adapted to accommodate each patient. PMID:24520192

  3. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  4. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  5. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This clinical trial studies lymphedema after surgery in patients with endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, or vulvar cancer. Collecting information over time about how often lymphedema occurs in patients undergoing surgery and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, and vulvar cancer may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

  6. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  7. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.


  8. Prevention of cancer and non-communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Geoffrey; Gupta, Prakash; Gomes, Fabio; Kerner, Jon; Parra, William; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kim, Jeongseon; Moore, Malcolm; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 7.6 million deaths (13% of all deaths) in 2008. Cancer mortality is projected to increase to 11 million deaths in 2030, with the majority occurring in regions of the world with the least capacity to respond. However, cancer is not only a personal, societal and economic burden but also a potential societal opportunity in the context of functional life - the years gained through effective prevention and treatment, and strategies to enhance survivorship. The United Nations General Assembly Special Session in 2011 has served to focus attention on key aspects of cancer prevention and control. Firstly, cancer is largely preventable, by feasible means. Secondly, cancer is one of a number of chronic, non- communicable diseases that share common risk factors whose prevention and control would benefit a majority of the world's population. Thirdly, a proportion of cancers can be attributed to infectious, communicable causal factors (e.g., HPV, HBV, H.pylori, parasites, flukes) and that strategies to control the burden of infectious diseases have relevance to the control of cancer. Fourthly, that the natural history of non-communicable diseases, including cancer, from primary prevention through diagnosis, treatment and care, is underwritten by the impact of social, economic and environmental determinants of health (e.g., poverty, illiteracy, gender inequality, social isolation, stigma, socio-economic status). Session 1 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on the social, economic and environmental, as well as biological and behavioural, modifiers of the risk of cancer through one plenary presentation and four interactive workshop discussions. The workshop sessions concerned 1) the Global Adult Tobacco Survey and social determinants of tobacco use in high burden low- and middle-income countries; 2) the role of diet, including alcohol, and physical activity in modifying the risk of cancer and other non-communicable diseases; 3) the role of infections in modifying the risk of cancer; and 4) the public policies and actions that can be implemented to effectively reduce the risk of cancer at population levels. Workshop discussions highlighted the need for high quality data on the prevalence of modifiable factors in different settings, as well as the social, economic and environmental drivers of these factors, in order to inform prevention and control programs. For some factors, further work needs to be done to develop simple and valid measurement tools. Given that many of these factors are common to both cancer and other non-communicable diseases, cancer prevention should be viewed within the broader perspective of the prevention of non-communicable diseases and should engage all relevant actors, including the general public, health and other professionals, workplaces and institutions, the media, civil society, schools, governments, industry, and multinational bodies. Many policies and plans have been implemented in various settings to control the drivers of modifiable factors and promote health and well-being. Mapping, analysis, and contextualization of those policies that are relevant would be helpful to promote action around cancer prevention in different settings. PMID:22631592

  9. The social gradient in doctor-patient communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective In recent years, the importance of social differences in the physician-patient relationship has frequently been the subject of research. A 2002 review synthesised the evidence on this topic. Considering the increasing importance of social inequalities in health care, an actualization of this review seemed appropriate. Methods A systematic search of literature published between 1965 and 2011 on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication. In this review social class was determined by patient's income, education or occupation. Results Twenty original research papers and meta-analyses were included. Social differences in doctor-patient communication were described according to the following classification: verbal behaviour including instrumental and affective behaviour, non-verbal behaviour and patient-centred behaviour. Conclusion This review indicates that the literature on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication that was published in the last decade, addresses new issues and themes. Firstly, most of the found studies emphasize the importance of the reciprocity of communication. Secondly, there seems to be a growing interest in patient's perception of doctor-patient communication. Practice implications By increasing the doctors' awareness of the communicative differences and by empowering patients to express concerns and preferences, a more effective communication could be established. PMID:22409902

  10. DCCPS: HCIRB: CECCR: Penn’s Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research, University of Pennsylvania

    Cancer.gov

    Skip Navigation Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Health Communication and Informatics Research Home Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication

  11. Upward Communication About Cancer Screening—Adolescent Daughter to Mother

    PubMed Central

    MOSAVEL, MAGHBOEBA; PORTS, KATIE A.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial breast and cervical cancer disparities exist in the United States, particularly among African American women with low social economic status. There is considerable potential for discussions about cancer prevention between mothers and daughters. However, upward communication, from child to parent, remains a relatively novel research area, and it remains unclear how receptive mothers would be to messages from their daughter about cancer, a topic that may be considered culturally inappropriate for daughters to initiate. In this study, we simulated cancer message delivery to daughters and then conducted direct observation of daughters as they recalled and shared the message with their mother or female elder. We found that daughters were able to successfully recall and deliver a cancer appeal to their mother and mothers were generally receptive to this message. Not only did mothers listen to their daughters’ appeals, but also daughters’ knowledge of cancer was considerably improved by the opportunity to educate her female elder. Moreover, daughters’ nonverbal communication suggested a surprisingly relaxed demeanor. The potential of young people to impact the screening behavior of their female elders is very promising in terms of reducing cancer disparities. PMID:25848895

  12. Communicating to Farmers about Skin Cancer: The Behavior Adaptation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Roxanne; Monahan, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Steiner, Carol

    1998-01-01

    States health campaign messages designed to encourage behavior adaptation have greater likelihood of success than campaigns promoting avoidance of at-risk behaviors that cannot be avoided. Tests a model of health risk behavior using four different behaviors in a communication campaign aimed at reducing farmers' risk for skin cancer--questions


  13. A Metasynthesis of Patient-Provider Communication in Hospital for Patients with Severe Communication Disabilities: Informing New Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Balandin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Poor patient–provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication. PMID:25229213

  14. Cancer and fertility preservation: fertility preservation in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Maltaris, Theodoros; Weigel, Michael; Mueller, Andreas; Schmidt, Marcus; Seufert, Rudolf; Fischl, Franz; Koelbl, Heinz; Dittrich, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive chemotherapy has improved the life expectancy for reproductive-age women with breast cancer, but it often causes infertility or premature ovarian failure due to destruction of the ovarian reserve. Many questions concerning fertility preservation in breast cancer patients remain unanswered – for example, whether fertility preservation methods interfere with chemotherapy, and whether subsequent pregnancy has negative effects on the prognosis. Fertility preservation is a critical factor in decision-making for younger breast cancer patients, however, and clinicians should address this. The present article reviews the incidence of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea, and discusses fertility-preservation options and the prognosis for patients who become pregnant after breast cancer. PMID:18492214

  15. Grantee Research Highlight: Taking Account of the Patient's Perspective when Examining the Quality of Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Optimizing patient experiences with care is especially important in cancer because cancer care is often complex and involves communication with and coordination across providers of multiple specialties and across multiple institutional settings. Unsatisfactory interactions with the health care system pose an additional burden on patients when they are already ill and vulnerable. More importantly, less-than-optimal patient experiences can have a significant negative impact on patients’ health-related quality of life.

  16. Guidelines Urge Exercise for Cancer Patients, Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    The benefits of exercise are well documented in a number of cancers. A panel of experts in cancer, fitness, obesity, and exercise training convened by the American College of Sports Medicine is spreading what they believe to be one of the most important messages for cancer patients and survivors: Avoid inactivity.

  17. Thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Gurwith, Meredith M P; Dobromirski, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with cancer and cancer patients requiring non-surgical therapy are considered as non-surgical cancer patients and are at moderate to high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE): approximately 10-30% of these patients may develop asymptomatic or symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and the latter is a leading contributor to deaths in hospital. Other medical conditions associated with a high risk of VTE include cardiac disease, respiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Pre-disposing risk factors in non-surgical cancer patients include a history of VTE, immobilisation, history of metastatic malignancy, complicating infections, increasing age, obesity hormonal or antiangiogenic therapies, thalidomide and lenalidomide therapy. Heparins, both unfractionated (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux have been shown to be effective agents in prevention of VTE in the medical setting with patients having a history of cancer. UFH and LMWH along with semuloparin also have a role in outpatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. However, it has not yet been possible to demonstrate a significant effect on mortality rates in this population. UFH has a higher rate of bleeding complications than LMWH. Thromboprophylaxis has been shown to be effective in medical patients with cancer and may have an effect on cancer outcomes. Thromboprophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy remains controversial and requires further investigation. There is no evidence for the use of aspirin, warfarin or mechanical methods. We recommend either LMWH, or fondaparinux for the prevention of VTE in cancer patients with acute medical illnesses and UFH for those with significant severe renal impairment. For ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy we recommend LMWH or semuloparin. These are safe and effective agents in the thromboprophylaxis of non-surgical cancer patients. PMID:22682125

  18. Is exercise ignored in palliative cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Eyigor, Sibel; Akdeniz, Sedef

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and rehabilitation approaches in palliative care programs for cancer patients affect patients’ symptoms, physical functioning, muscle strength, emotional wellbeing, psychological symptoms, functional capacities, quality of life, mortality and morbidity positively. Based on scientific data, palliative cancer patients should be recommended to participate in exercise programs. There is no standard approach to recipe an exercise regimen for a palliative cancer survivor. Studies for demonstrating the positive effects of exercising in palliative care patients are increasing in number day by day. At this point, increasing awareness about exercising in the entire team monitoring the patient and our efforts in this matter seems to be very important. PMID:25114869

  19. Partnering Against Cancer Today: A Blueprint for Coordinating Efforts Through Communication Science

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the communication revolution over the past decade has been its support for participation, whether that be in the active engagement of patients searching the Web for answers to vital health questions, or in the collective energies of self-organizing communities through social media. At the same time, some of the major obstacles to achieving a full and equitable reach of evidence-based cancer control knowledge have been traced back to discontinuities in communication either within clinical care or the broader public awareness system. Communication scientists from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society joined forces in 2010 to investigate ways in which communication science can be used to improve coordination and enhance participation in cancer control for the nation. From 2010 to 2013, the three organizations worked together in 1) convening two meetings designed to assess the status of funded research in communication science, 2) completing a systematic review of literature published over the previous 10 years, and 3) authoring a blueprint for coordinated efforts using the implications of communication science. The blueprint consists of three major goals: first, to identify high-yield targets of opportunity using the health impact pyramid articulated by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director, Thomas Frieden; second, to leverage opportunities within the new communication environment, including the opportunities catalyzed by national efforts to create an infrastructure for evidence implementation through health information technology; and third, to assist in coordinating efforts across collaborative entities through participative media. PMID:24395998

  20. CANCER IN OTHER WORDS? THE ROLE OF METAPHOR IN EMOTION DISCLOSURE IN CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lanceley, Anne; Clark, Jill Macleod

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence that nurses may play a crucial part in the wellbeing and recovery of cancer patients by facilitating their expression of feelings, research is lacking into the emotional content of nurse–patient talk and patients' use of language in emotion disclosure. In this study, 23 participating nurses in a variety of cancer care settings were asked to tape-record their conversations with patients during daily care. A data set of 60 nurse–patient conversations was collected. Individual expression of emotion by patients was identified through interpretive literary analysis within a framework of psychodynamic theory. Overall the picture of emotion disclosure was intense. In particular, patients' use of metaphor and figurative language to express their distress was powerful and pervasive. Participating nurses demonstrated responsive skills but their responses to figurative expression were often problematic. The study provides evidence of unconscious processes in nurses' work and advocates career-long psychoanalytically informed supervision for nurses to better support them in challenging dialogue with cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of supervision on communications with cancer patients to ensure patients have access to appropriate emotional supportive and care. PMID:24748706

  1. CANCER IN OTHER WORDS? THE ROLE OF METAPHOR IN EMOTION DISCLOSURE IN CANCER PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Lanceley, Anne; Clark, Jill Macleod

    2013-05-01

    Despite evidence that nurses may play a crucial part in the wellbeing and recovery of cancer patients by facilitating their expression of feelings, research is lacking into the emotional content of nurse-patient talk and patients' use of language in emotion disclosure. In this study, 23 participating nurses in a variety of cancer care settings were asked to tape-record their conversations with patients during daily care. A data set of 60 nurse-patient conversations was collected. Individual expression of emotion by patients was identified through interpretive literary analysis within a framework of psychodynamic theory. Overall the picture of emotion disclosure was intense. In particular, patients' use of metaphor and figurative language to express their distress was powerful and pervasive. Participating nurses demonstrated responsive skills but their responses to figurative expression were often problematic. The study provides evidence of unconscious processes in nurses' work and advocates career-long psychoanalytically informed supervision for nurses to better support them in challenging dialogue with cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of supervision on communications with cancer patients to ensure patients have access to appropriate emotional supportive and care. PMID:24748706

  2. Doctor-patient communication: a skill needed in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Elzubier, Ahmed G

    2002-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication is a skill essential for the satisfaction of the patients' needs and expectations. It involves an art that every practicing physician should have. The situations in health care delivery that demands good doctor-patient communication are many. Diabetes care, the management of hypertension, explaining serious disease diagnoses, prognosis, and investigative procedures are some of the common situations where good doctor-patient communication is very essential. Doctor-patient communication assumes a special status in Saudi Arabia where as a result of mixed ethnicity of the manpower in the health service and the expatriate community, there is a vast diversity of languages, health traditions and beliefs. The skill of doctor-patient communication can be developed and improved by the application of the principles of the patient-centered approach, the utilization of patient-oriented evidence that matters, and its inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum in the first few years of medical school. There should be continuous medical education programs for practicing doctors on the skills of doctor-patient communication through seminars and workshops. This would be a further step towards the improvement of the consumer's well-being. PMID:23008663

  3. Health literacy, health communication challenges, and cancer screening among rural Native Hawaiian and Filipino Women

    PubMed Central

    Sentell, Tetine; Cruz, May Rose Dela; Heo, Hyun Hee; Braun, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Native Hawaiians and Filipinos are disproportionately impacted by cancer, and are less likely to participate in cancer screening than whites. Limited information exists about health information pathways and health communication challenges as they relate to cancer screening in these groups. Six focus groups (n=77) of Native Hawaiian and Filipino women age 40+ years were conducted to investigate these research gaps. Participants noted many health information challenges. Challenges were both practical and interpersonal and included both written and oral health communication. Practical challenges included “big” words, complexity of terms, and lack of plain English. Interpersonal issues included doctors rushing, doctors not assessing comprehension, and doctors treating respondents as patients not people. Women noted that they would often not ask questions even when they knew they did not understand because they did not want the provider to think negatively of them. Overarching themes to improve cancer communication gaps included: (1) the importance of family and community in health information dissemination; (2) the key role women play in interpreting health information for others; (3) the importance of personal experience and relationships to the salience of health information; and (4) the desire for local cultural relevance in health communication. Findings are discussed in light of the 2010 National Action Plan for Health Literacy. PMID:23536194

  4. Breast Cancer Patients' Experiences within and outside the Safety Net

    PubMed Central

    Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Elmore, Leisha; Ksiazek, Deborah N.; Margenthaler, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Following reforms to the breast-cancer referral process for our city’s health Safety Net (SN), we compared the experiences from first abnormality to definitive diagnosis of breast-cancer patients referred to Siteman Cancer Center from SN and non-Safety-Net (NSN) providers. Materials and Methods SN-referred patients with any-stage (0–IV) and NSN-referred patients with late-stage (IIB–IV) breast cancer were prospectively identified post-diagnosis during cancer-center consultations conducted between September 2008 and June 2010. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim; transcripts were independently coded by two raters using inductive methods to identify themes. Results Of 82 eligible patients, 57 completed interviews (33/47 SN [70%], 24/35 NSN [69%]). Eighteen (52%) SN-referred patients had late-stage disease at diagnosis, as did all NSN patients (by design). A higher proportion of late-stage SN patients (67%) than either early-stage SN (47%) or NSN (33%) patients reported feelings of fear and avoidance that deterred them from pursuing care for concerning breast findings. A higher proportion of SN late-stage patients than NSN patients reported behaviors concerning for poor health knowledge/behavior (33% vs. 8%), but reported receipt of timely, consistent communication from healthcare providers once they received care (50% vs. 17%). Half of late-stage SN patients reported improper clinical or administrative conduct by healthcare workers that delayed referral and/or diagnosis. Conclusions While SN patients reported receipt of compassionate care once connected with health services, they presented with higher-than-expected rates of late-stage disease. Psychological barriers, life stressors, and provider/clinic delays affected access to and navigation of the healthcare system and represent opportunities for intervention. PMID:24768022

  5. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Vapiwala, Neha; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  6. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  7. Development of a Communication Protocol for Telephone Disclosure of Genetic Test Results for Cancer Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Egleston, Brian L; Fetzer, Dominique; Forman, Andrea; Bealin, Lisa; Rybak, Christina; Peterson, Candace; Corbman, Melanie; Albarracin, Julio; Stevens, Evelyn; Daly, Mary B; Bradbury, Angela R

    2014-01-01

    Background Dissemination of genetic testing for disease susceptibility, one application of “personalized medicine”, holds the potential to empower patients and providers through informed risk reduction and prevention recommendations. Genetic testing has become a standard practice in cancer prevention for high-risk populations. Heightened consumer awareness of “cancer genes” and genes for other diseases (eg, cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s disease), as well as the burgeoning availability of increasingly complex genomic tests (ie, multi-gene, whole-exome and -genome sequencing), has escalated interest in and demand for genetic risk assessment and the specialists who provide it. Increasing demand is expected to surpass access to genetic specialists. Thus, there is urgent need to develop effective and efficient models of delivery of genetic information that comparably balance the risks and benefits to the current standard of in-person communication. Objective The aim of this pilot study was to develop and evaluate a theoretically grounded and rigorously developed protocol for telephone communication of BRCA1/2 (breast cancer) test results that might be generalizable to genetic testing for other hereditary cancer and noncancer syndromes. Methods Stakeholder data, health communication literature, and our theoretical model grounded in Self-Regulation Theory of Health Behavior were used to develop a telephone communication protocol for the communication of BRCA1/2 genetic test results. Framework analysis of selected audiotapes of disclosure sessions and stakeholders’ feedback were utilized to evaluate the efficacy and inform refinements to this protocol. Results Stakeholder feedback (n=86) and audiotapes (38%, 33/86) of telephone disclosures revealed perceived disadvantages and challenges including environmental factors (eg, non-private environment), patient-related factors (eg, low health literacy), testing-related factors (eg, additional testing needed), and communication factors (eg, no visual cues). Resulting modifications to the communication protocol for BRCA1/2 test results included clarified patient instructions, scheduled appointments, refined visual aids, expanded disclosure checklist items, and enhanced provider training. Conclusions Analyses of stakeholders’ experiences and audiotapes of telephone disclosure of BRCA1/2 test results informed revisions to communication strategies and a protocol to enhance patient outcomes when utilizing telephone to disclose genetic test results. PMID:25355401

  8. Cancer and communication: similarities and differences of men with cancer from six different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, I; Lees, S

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports the communication aspects of a pilot study, which explored the cancer meanings and experiences of six men with cancer and their significant others from different ethnic groups. A case study design was applied using the principles of phenomenology. In-depth semi-structured individual interviews were conducted in participants' own homes, in London, UK. This paper will only deal with the communication aspects of the findings. Ten themes emerged from the comparative analysis of the study's data, with communication as a cross-cutting theme. Further analysis of this theme revealed similarities and differences of the participants' experiences of communicating with health professionals; families or friends; and God/Allah. In addition, similarities and differences in communicating meanings of cancer in different cultures were revealed. The findings revealed similarities in the way that men from these six cultures communicate with health professionals and their families following a diagnosis of cancer, and differences in how they communicated with God/Allah, which depended on their religious beliefs and practices. PMID:15115471

  9. Spiritual Needs of Cancer Patients: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hatamipour, Khadijeh; Rassouli, Maryam; Yaghmaie, Farideh; Zendedel, Kazem; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis of cancer can cause huge spiritual crisis in a person and affect different aspects of life. At this stage, patients have certain spiritual needs. Aim: This study was conducted to explain spiritual needs of cancer patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, 18 cancer patients, referred to the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran were selected using purposive sampling method, and their spiritual needs emerged out of conventional content analysis of interviews conducted with them. Results: From 1850 initial codes, 4 themes (connection, peace, meaning and purpose, and transcendence) were identified that contained categories of social support, normal behavior, inner peace, seeking forgiveness, hope, acceptance of reality, seeking meaning, ending well, change of life meaning, strengthening spiritual belief, communication with God, and prayer. Conclusions: Spiritual needs of cancer patients should be recognized, realized, and considered in care of patients by the medical team. An all-out support of health system policy makers to meet patients’ spiritual needs is particularly important. PMID:25709188

  10. Gendered communicative construction of patients in consultation settings.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Joel; Ahl, Helene; Rovio-Johansson, Airi; Siouta, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the communication in consultations between patients and health care staff from a gender perspective. We used 23 tape-recorded consultations between patients with Atrial Fibrillation and 5 nurses and 5 physicians at cardiac outpatient clinics at 6 different hospitals in southern Sweden during autumn 2009 to explore the verbal gendered constructions of patients. Through critical discourse analysis, we revealed that the male patients tended to describe their ailments with performance-oriented statements, whereas the female patients usually used emotional-oriented statements. The staff downplayed the male patients' questions and statements, while they acknowledged concern toward the female patients. Both the patients and the staff made conclusions according to a mutual construction. Male patients were constructed as competent, and female patients as fragile through gender-stereotypical communication. Open-ended statements and questions enabled consultations to be less limited by gender stereotypes. PMID:24964371

  11. The Communications Revolution and Health Inequalities in the 21st Century: Implications for Cancer Control

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, K.; Nagler, Rebekah; Bigman-Galimore, Cabral; McCauley, Michael; Jung, Minsoo; Ramanadhan, Shoba

    2012-01-01

    The radical and transformative developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) offer unprecedented opportunities to promote cancer control and enhance population and individual health. However, the current context in which these technologies are being deployed—where cancer incidence and mortality and communication are characterized by inequalities among different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status groups—raises important questions for cancer communication research, policy, and practice. Drawing on illustrative data, this essay characterizes the communications revolution and elucidates on its implications for cancer control, with a particular focus on communication inequalities and cancer disparities. PMID:23045545

  12. The communications revolution and health inequalities in the 21st century: implications for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, K; Nagler, Rebekah H; Bigman-Galimore, Cabral A; McCauley, Michael P; Jung, Minsoo; Ramanadhan, Shoba

    2012-10-01

    The radical and transformative developments in information and communication technologies (ICT) offer unprecedented opportunities to promote cancer control and enhance population and individual health. However, the current context in which these technologies are being deployed--where cancer incidence and mortality and communication are characterized by inequalities among different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic status groups--raises important questions for cancer communication research, policy, and practice. Drawing on illustrative data, this essay characterizes the communications revolution and elucidates its implications for cancer control, with a particular focus on communication inequalities and cancer disparities. PMID:23045545

  13. Communication and Information Barriers to Health Assistance for Deaf Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Patricia Cristina Andrade; Fortes, Paulo Antonio de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil, recent regulations require changes in private and public health systems to make special services available to deaf patients. In the present article, the researchers analyze the perceptions of 25 sign language-using patients regarding this assistance. The researchers found communication difficulties between these patients and health…

  14. Venous thromboembolism in patients with active cancer.

    PubMed

    Seddighzadeh, Ali; Shetty, Ranjith; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2007-09-01

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). To further define the demographics, comorbidities, and risk factors of VTE in these patients, we analyzed a prospective registry of 5,451 patients with ultrasound confirmed deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from 183 hospitals in the United States. Cancer was reported in 1,768 (39%), of whom 1,096 (62.0%) had active cancer. Of these, 599 (54.7%) were receiving chemotherapy, and 226 (20.6%) had metastases. Lung (18.5%), colorectal (11.8%), and breast cancer (9.0%) were among the most common cancer types. Cancer patients were younger (median age 66 years vs. 70 years; p < 0.0001), were more likely to be male (50.4% vs. 44.5%; p = 0.0005), and had a lower average body mass index (26.6 kg/m(2) vs. 28.9 kg/m(2); p < 0.0001). Cancer patients less often received VTE prophylaxis prior to development of DVT compared to those with no cancer (308 of 1,096, 28.2% vs. 1,196 of 3,444, 34.6%; p < 0.0001). For DVT therapy, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) as monotherapy without warfarin (142 of 1,086, 13.1% vs. 300 of 3,429, 8.7%; p < 0.0001) and inferior vena caval filters (234 of 1,086, 21.5% vs. 473 of 3,429, 13.8%; p < 0.0001) were utilized more often in cancer patients than in DVT patients without cancer. Cancer patients with DVT and neurological disease were twice as likely to receive inferior vena caval filters than those with no cancer (odds ratio 2.17, p = 0.005). In conclusion, cancer patients who develop DVT receive prophylaxis less often and more often receive filters than patients with no cancer who develop DVT. Future studies should focus on ways to improve implementation of prophylaxis in cancer patients and to further define the indications, efficacy, and safety of inferior vena caval filters in this population. PMID:17849056

  15. Assessment of dental students’ communication skills with patients

    PubMed Central

    MEMARPOUR, MAHTAB; BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; ZAREI, ZAHRA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Establishment of effective communication between the clinician and patient is essential in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment. These skills have been less investigated among dental students. This study aimed to evaluate communication skills of dental students in Shiraz with patients through direct observation, patients' perspectives and students' self-assessments. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled the fifth and sixth year dental students and one of each student’s patients who was chosen using simple random sampling method. We used a checklist for data collection. Students’ communication skills were assessed at three steps of the student-patient interview – at the beginning of the interview, during the interview, and at the end of the interview. The checklist was completed by three groups: 1) an observer, 2) the patient and 3) the student, as self-assessment. The validity of the checklist was confirmed by clinical professors and the reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Student’s t test. A repeated measure MANOVA was used to compare the mean communication skills in the researcher, patients, and students at each step of the patient interviews. Results There were 110 students (mean age: 22.3±8.4 years) and 110 patients (mean age: 32±8.8 years) who completed the checklists. Overall, the communication skills of dental students were rated as good according to the patients. However, the observer and student participants rated the skills at the moderate level. We observed significant differences between communication skills in all three groups and in the three steps of the patient interviews (p<0.001). According to patients' beliefs and students' self assessments, there were no differences between male and female students in communication skills in the three steps of the patient interviews (all p>0.05). However from the observer’s viewpoint, female students showed better communication skills during the interviews (p=0.001). Conclusion There was a degree of failure in communication skills of dental students with patients in the interview process. It will be necessary that communication skills be taught, particularly for students involved in clinical practice. PMID:26793724

  16. Optimising surgical management of elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Hodigere Sripathy Jois; Pope, Daniel; Gennari, Roberto; Audisio, Riccardo A

    2005-01-01

    Background Elderly population is on rise. It is an ethical dilemma how aggressive one should be when it comes to treat cancer in elderly. Presumed fear of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality has resulted in delivery of sub-optimal cancer surgery. Methods In this review article we visit physiology of the aged, tools available to assess surgical risks in oncogeriatric patients, and current practice in the management of common cancers encountered in surgical oncology, with the view of increasing awareness on optimising surgical management of senior patients with cancer. A pubmed search for cancer, surgery, elderly, was carried out. Results Cancer is on rise with increasing age predominantly affecting breast, gastrointestinal tract and lung. Increasingly more surgeons are offering surgery to elderly cancer patient but selection bias is prevalent. Available data reflect short and long-term outcome of cancer surgery in elderly is not greatly different to that of younger patient. Declining physiological reserve along with inability to respond adequately to physiological stress are salient age related changes. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is not tested in surgical patient. There is need for a tool to define individualised operative risk. Preoperative assessment of cancer in elderly is designed to offer this information based on functional status of an individual utilising currently available tools of risk assessment. Conclusion All elderly cancer patients should be offered optimal treatment depending on their functional status not on chronological age. Oncogeriatric patient would benefit from dedicated multidisciplinary approach. Recruitment of elderly cancer patients to more clinical trials is needed to enhance our knowledge and to offer optimum treatment to this unique subgroup. PMID:15788092

  17. Tunneling Nanotubes: A new paradigm for studying intercellular communication and therapeutics in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lou, Emil; Fujisawa, Sho; Barlas, Afsar; Romin, Yevgeniy; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A S; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-07-01

    Tunneling nanotubes are actin-based cytoplasmic extensions that function as intercellular channels in a wide variety of cell types.There is a renewed and keen interest in the examination of modes of intercellular communication in cells of all types, especially in the field of cancer biology. Tunneling nanotubes -which in the literature have also been referred to as "membrane nanotubes," "'intercellular' or 'epithelial' bridges," or "cytoplasmic extensions" - are under active investigation for their role in facilitating direct intercellular communication. These structures have not, until recently, been scrutinized as a unique and previously unrecognized form of direct cell-to-cell transmission of cellular cargo in the context of human cancer. Our recent study of tunneling nanotubes in human malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinomas demonstrated efficient transfer of cellular contents, including proteins, Golgi vesicles, and mitochondria, between cells derived from several well-established cancer cell lines. Further, we provided effective demonstration that such nanotubes can form between primary malignant cells from human patients. For the first time, we also demonstrated the in vivo relevance of these structures in humans, having effectively imaged nanotubes in intact solid tumors from patients. Here we provide further analysis and discussion on our findings, and offer a prospective 'road map' for studying tunneling nanotubes in the context of human cancer. We hope that further understanding of the mechanisms, methods of transfer, and particularly the role of nanotubes in tumor-stromal cross-talk will lead to identification of new selective targets for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23060969

  18. [Communication Strategies in Dealing with Patients with Glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Sandner, J

    2016-02-01

    When patients with glaucoma meet doctors and their assistants in a doctor's office or a hospital all hope that this contact will be trouble-free, helpful, perhaps even happy and conducted in a constructive spirit. But this is not always the case. Words and gestures may accidently hurt or reject the patient. Often the communication results in harm instead of help and healing. For this reason, it is worthwhile to have a glimpse behind the curtain of the difficult interactions between people. The rules of communication in the medical context will help to facilitate the contact between doctors and patients. Verbal and non-verbal communication play an important role, for example in how to address the individual patient, as well as the timing and wording. Expertise in communication is a key qualification for medical professionals! PMID:26878727

  19. [Patient oriented communication. Dealing with risks and errors].

    PubMed

    Dierks, C

    2007-06-01

    Informed consent builds the basis for a legal medical intervention. Sufficient documentation supports the physician's defence in litigation. In case of negligence, however, special skills for a patient oriented communication are essential. PMID:17563871

  20. Is Nonverbal Communication Disrupted in Interactions Involving Patients With Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nonverbal communication is a critical feature of successful social interaction and interpersonal rapport. Social exclusion is a feature of schizophrenia. This experimental study investigated if the undisclosed presence of a patient with schizophrenia in interaction changes nonverbal communication (ie, speaker gesture and listener nodding). Method: 3D motion-capture techniques recorded 20 patient (1 patient, 2 healthy participants) and 20 control (3 healthy participants) interactions. Participants rated their experience of rapport with each interacting partner. Patients’ symptoms, social cognition, and executive functioning were assessed. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) Compared to controls, patients display less speaking gestures and listener nods. (2) Patients’ increased symptom severity and poorer social cognition are associated with patients’ reduced gesture and nods. (3) Patients’ partners compensate for patients’ reduced nonverbal behavior by gesturing more when speaking and nodding more when listening. (4) Patients’ reduced nonverbal behavior, increased symptom severity, and poorer social cognition are associated with others experiencing poorer rapport with the patient. Results: Patients gestured less when speaking. Patients with more negative symptoms nodded less as listeners, while their partners appeared to compensate by gesturing more as speakers. Patients with more negative symptoms also gestured more when speaking, which, alongside increased negative symptoms and poorer social cognition, was associated with others experiencing poorer patient rapport. Conclusions: Patients’ symptoms are associated with the nonverbal behavior of patients and their partners. Patients’ increased negative symptoms and gesture use are associated with poorer interpersonal rapport. This study provides specific evidence about how negative symptoms impact patients’ social interactions. PMID:22941744

  1. Creating a continuum of care: integrating obstetricians and gynecologists in the care of young cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Betty Y.; Skory, Robin M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy can be lifesaving but significantly diminish female reproductive potential. This review provides an overview of the deleterious effects of cancer treatments on reproductive function, the fertility preservation options currently available for young women and the outcomes of pregnancy after cancer treatment. In addition, special considerations for women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy are discussed. To optimize the continuum of care for the patient, new corridors of communication between obstetricians, gynecologists and oncology specialists must be developed to ensure the best outcomes for the patient, both in terms of cancer treatment and fertility preservation. PMID:22031251

  2. Cultural beliefs and values in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Daher, M

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released its World Cancer Report, which indicated that cancer accounts for approximately 12% of all-cause mortality worldwide. IARC estimated that globally 7.6 million people died from cancer and that 12.4 million new cases were diagnosed in 2008. The report went on to project that, due to increases in life expectancy, improvements in clinical diagnostics, and shifting trends in health behaviors (e.g. increases in smoking and sedentary lifestyles), in the absence of significant efforts to improve global cancer control, cancer mortality could increase to 12.9 million and cancer incidence to 20 million by the year 2030. Looking deeper into the data, it becomes clear that cancer-related stigma and myths about cancer are important problems that must be addressed, although different from a country to another. Stigmas about cancer present significant challenges to cancer control: stigma can have a silencing effect, whereby efforts to increase cancer awareness are negatively affected. The social, emotional, and financial devastation that all too often accompanies a diagnosis of cancer is, in large part, due to the cultural myths and taboos surrounding the disease. Combating stigma, myths, taboos, and overcoming silence will play important roles in changing this provisional trajectory. There are several reasons that cancer is stigmatized. Many people in our area perceived cancer to be a fatal disease. Cancer symptoms or body parts affected by the disease can cultivate stigma. Fears about treatment can also fuel stigma. There was evidence of myths associated with cancer, such as the belief that cancer is contagious, or cancer may be seen as a punishment. After reviewing these different examples of cultural myths and taboos met in cancer care, we can report these lessons learned: 1. Around the world, cancer continues to carry a significant amount of stigma, myths, and taboos; however, there are opportunities to capitalize upon shifting perceptions and positive change. 2. Awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and survival are on the rise; however, too many people still report that they feel uninformed when it comes to cancer. 3. Communication is critical to decreasing cancer-related stigma, raising cancer awareness, and disseminating cancer education. People with a personal history of cancer-especially well-known or celebrity survivors-and multiple mass media channels are key resources for dissemination. 4. The school system represents a potential venue for cancer education, and increasing cancer awareness among children may be an investment with high returns. 5. When facing cancer, people around the world want information and emotional support for themselves and their families. 6. Tobacco use and poor nutrition are widely acknowledged as cancer risks. Programs and policies that help people translate this awareness into action are needed. The global cancer community should capitalize upon positive shifts in attitudes about awareness of cancer and leverage these shifts to develop, and disseminate effective media campaigns and behavioral interventions to decrease the incidence of and morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. PMID:22628419

  3. Study Protocol: A randomized controlled trial of patient navigation-activation to reduce cancer health disparities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer health disparities affecting low-income and minority patients are well documented. Root-causes are multifactorial, including diagnostic and treatment delays, social and financial barriers, and poor communication. Patient navigation and communication coaching (activation) are potential interventions to address disparities in cancer treatment. The purpose of this clinical trial is to test the effectiveness of an intervention combining patient navigation and activation to improve cancer treatment. Methods/Design The Rochester Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) is a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, patient-level randomized trial (RCT) of patient navigation and activation, targeting newly-diagnosed breast and colorectal cancer patients in Rochester, NY. The goal of the program is to decrease cancer health disparities by addressing barriers to receipt of cancer care and promoting patient self-efficacy. The intervention uses trained, paraprofessional patient navigators recruited from the target community, and a detailed training and supervisory program. Recruited patients are randomly assigned to receive either usual care (except for baseline and follow-up questionnaires and interviews) or intervention. The intervention patients receive tailored assistance from their patient navigators, including phone calls, in-person meetings, and behind-the-scenes coordination of care. A total of 344 patients have been recruited. Outcomes measured at three month intervals include timeliness of care, patient adherence, patient satisfaction, quality of life, self-efficacy, health literacy, and cancer knowledge. Discussion This unique intervention combining patient navigation and patient activation is designed to address the multifactorial problem of cancer health disparities. If successful, this study will affect the design and implementation of patient navigation programs. Trials Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00496678 PMID:20939928

  4. Cancer specific risk in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Kyritsis, Athanasios P; Boussios, Stergios; Pavlidis, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease. Studies of cancer risk in MS patients have shown inconsistent findings. A pubmed search of the literature on cancer risk in patients with MS was conducted and found published relative studies. The majority of these studies concluded that there was overall either reduced or no increased risk of developing malignancies between patients with MS compared to the general population. However, several studies suggested that patients with MS may have reduced risk in specific cancers such as of the digestive and respiratory organs, prostate, ovary, or increased risk in breast, brain and bladder tumors. At present it is uncertain if the immunologic profile of MS patients may be related to the increased or reduced frequency of some cancers and warrants further investigation. PMID:26481954

  5. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter. PMID:12296838

  6. Life-Threatening Disparities: The Treatment of Black and White Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Louis A.; Eggly, Susan; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Underwood, Willie; Orom, Heather; Albrecht, Terrance L.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer mortality and survival rates are much poorer for Black patients than for White patients. We argue that Black–White treatment disparities are a major reason for these disparities. We examine three specific kinds of Black–White treatment disparities: disparities in information exchange in oncology interactions, disparities in the treatment of breast cancer, and disparities in the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer. In the final section, we discuss possible causes of these disparities, with a primary focus on communication within medical interactions and the role that race-related attitudes and beliefs may play in the quality of communication in these interactions. PMID:24319297

  7. Communication after cancellations in orthopaedics: The patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Saurabh S; Bryson, David J; Mangwani, Jitendra; Cutler, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine patients’ perceptions on communication surrounding the cancellation of orthopaedic operations and to identify areas for improvement in communication. METHODS: A prospective survey was undertaken at a university teaching hospital within the department of Trauma and Orthopaedics. Patients admitted to an acute orthopaedic unit, whose operations were cancelled, were surveyed to assess patient satisfaction and preferences for notification of cancellation of their operations. Patients with an abbreviated mental test score of < 9, patients unable to complete the survey independently, those under 16 years of age, and any patient notified of the cancellation by any of the authors were excluded from this study. Patients were surveyed the morning after their operation had been cancelled thus ensuring that every opportunity was given for the medical staff to discuss the cancellation with the patient. The survey included questions on whether or not patients were notified of the cancellation of their surgery, the qualifications of the person discussing the cancellation, and patient preferences on the process. Satisfaction was assessed via 5-point Likert scale questions. RESULTS: Sixty-five consecutive patients had their operations cancelled on 75 occasions. Fifty-four point seven percent of the patients who had cancellations were notified by a nurse and 32% by a doctor. No formal communication occurred for 13.3% cancellations and no explanation was provided for a further 16%. Patients reported that they were dissatisfied with the explanation provided for 36 of the 75 (48%) cancellations. Of those patients who were dissatisfied, 25 (69.4%) were notified by a nurse. Twenty-three of the 24 (96%) patients notified by a doctor were satisfied with the explanation and that communication. Of those patients who were notified by a nurse 83% patients reported that they would have preferred it if a doctor had discussed the cancellation with them. There was a significant difference in satisfaction between those counselled by a nurse and those notified by a doctor (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Communication surrounding cancellations does not meet patient expectations. Patients prefer to be notified by a doctor, illustrating the importance of communication in the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:24649413

  8. Patient Communication in Health Care Settings: new Opportunities for Augmentative and Alternative Communication.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Sarah W; Pressman, Harvey

    2016-03-01

    Delivering quality health care requires effective communication between health care providers and their patients. In this article, we call on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) practitioners to offer their knowledge and skills in support of a broader range of patients who confront communication challenges in health care settings. We also provide ideas and examples about ways to prepare people with complex communication needs for the inevitable medical encounters that they will face. We argue that AAC practitioners, educators, and researchers have a unique role to play, important expertise to share, and an extraordinary opportunity to advance the profession, while positively affecting patient outcomes across the health care continuum for a large number of people. PMID:26694249

  9. The evolving concept of "patient-centeredness" in patient-physician communication research.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hirono; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2013-11-01

    Over the past few decades, the concept of "patient-centeredness" has been intensively studied in health communication research on patient-physician interaction. Despite its popularity, this concept has often been criticized for lacking a unified definition and operationalized measurement. This article reviews how health communication research on patient-physician interaction has conceptualized and operationalized patient-centered communication based on four major theoretical perspectives in sociology (i.e., functionalism, conflict theory, utilitarianism, and social constructionism), and discusses the agenda for future research in this field. Each theory addresses different aspects of the patient-physician relationship and communication from different theoretical viewpoints. Patient-centeredness is a multifaceted construct with no single theory that can sufficiently define the whole concept. Different theoretical perspectives of patient-centered communication can be selectively adopted according to the context and nature of problems in the patient-physician relationship that a particular study aims to explore. The present study may provide a useful framework: it offers an overview of the differing models of patient-centered communication and the expected roles and goals in each model; it does so toward identifying a communication model that fits the patient and the context and toward theoretically reconstructing existing measures of patient-centered communication. Furthermore, although patient-centered communication has been defined mainly from the viewpoint of physician's behaviors aimed at achieving patient-centered care, patient competence is also required for patient-centered communication. This needs to be examined in current medical practice. PMID:24034962

  10. Preferences of patients with heart failure for prognosis communication

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Patricia H; Arthur, Heather M; Demers, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication about prognosis is fundamental to discussions and planning for end-of-life (EOL) care for patients with advanced heart failure (HF). Little is known about the preferences of patients that could guide communication about prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To identify the preferences of patients with advanced HF regarding communication about their prognosis and its implications. METHODS: A qualitative study using a grounded theory methodology, based on one-to-one interviews with 20 patients recruited from Heart Function Clinic at the McMaster University Medical Centre in Hamilton, Ontario. RESULTS: The following four main themes about patient preferences were identified: level of wellness – patients wanted to learn about their prognosis and its implications at a time of optimal cognitive function, and not when their capacity for EOL decision making was diminished; opportunity to be informed – patients preferred physicians to initiate discussions about prognosis at the time of diagnosis; tell the truth – there was a strong preference for physicians to disclose prognostic possibilities, treatments and outcomes associated with HF, including the possibilities of deterioration and death; and maintain hope – there was a need for truth to be balanced with hope. Hope for quality of life, symptom control and control over EOL decisions were important to participants. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggested that communication about prognosis between patients and physicians may be difficult and deferred. Preferences identified by patients offer guidance to physicians in planning and initiating dialogue about prognosis. PMID:17703257

  11. Understanding Fertility in Young Female Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Waimey, Kate E; Smith, Brigid M; Confino, Rafael; Jeruss, Jacqueline S; Pavone, Mary Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Young women diagnosed with cancer today have a greater chance of long-term survival than ever before. Successful survivorship for this group of patients includes maintaining a high quality of life after a cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, lifesaving treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery can impact survivors by impairing reproductive and endocrine health. Studies demonstrate that future fertility is a concern for many women diagnosed with cancer, but physician knowledge and attitudinal barriers can still prevent females from receiving care. Today, fertility preservation is an option for girls and women facing a cancer diagnosis, and emerging research is providing clinicians with an increasing number of reproductive and hormonal management tools. Physicians can play an important role in fertility by working closely with oncologists, providing patients with information about fertility preservation options prior to the start of cancer treatment, monitoring reproductive capacity after treatment, and working with cancer survivors to explore potential avenues to parenthood. PMID:26075731

  12. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  13. Optimizing Communication in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Vinciya; Smith, Christine P.; Cole, Therese Kling; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Mirski, Marek A.; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Feller-Kopman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the types of talking tracheostomy tubes available, present four case studies of critically ill patients who used a specialized tracheostomy tube to improve speech, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, propose patient selection criteria, and provide practical recommendations for medical care providers. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients who underwent tracheostomy in 2010. Results Of the 220 patients who received a tracheostomy in 2010, 164 (74.55%) received a percutaneous tracheostomy and 56 (25.45%) received an open tracheostomy. Among the percutaneous tracheostomy patients, speech-language pathologists were consulted on 113 patients, 74 of whom were on a ventilator. Four of these 74 patients received a talking tracheostomy tube, and all four were able to speak successfully while on the mechanical ventilator even though they were unable to tolerate cuff deflation. Conclusions Talking tracheostomy tubes allow patients who are unable to tolerate-cuff deflation to achieve phonation. Our experience with talking tracheostomy tubes suggests that clinicians should consider their use for patients who cannot tolerate cuff deflation. PMID:25429193

  14. Multidisciplinary care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulvat, Melissa C; Hansen, Nora M; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients with breast cancer has become increasingly complex with advancements in diagnostic modalities, surgical approaches, and adjuvant treatments. A multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care is essential to the successful integration of available therapies. This article addresses the key components of multidisciplinary breast cancer care, with a special emphasis on new and emerging approaches over the past 10 years in the fields of diagnostics, surgery, radiation, medical oncology, and plastic surgery. PMID:19186235

  15. Determining the effectiveness of illustrated communication material for communication with intubated patients at an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Otuzoğlu, MĂŒnevver; Karahan, Azize

    2014-10-01

    Communication with non-speaking patients in intensive care unit is stress for both nurse and patients. Semi-experimental study that took place at a University Hospital was to develop illustrated material for patient communication and determine its effectiveness. The study sample consisted of 90 intubated patients at the Adult Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit who had undergone open heart surgery. The patients were divided into the intervention and control groups. Data analysis was with descriptive statistics and the χ(2) test. The illustrated communication material was stated to be helpful by 77.8% and partially helpful by 22.2% of the intervention group patients regarding the communication between the health-care staff and the patients. Control group patients had more difficulties communicating with the health-care staff. Illustrated communication material was an effective method in communicating with intubated patients. PMID:24118470

  16. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Related Programs - Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communications Research

    Cancer.gov

    The novelty and scope of this initiative reflects the enormous potential of cancer communication to improve health, and NCI's recognition that effective communications can and should be used to narrow the gap between discovery and application and to reduce health disparities among our citizens. It is expected that the Centers' interdisciplinary efforts will result in new theories, methods, and interventions, including those for diverse populations.

  17. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≄ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≄ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  18. Cancer Patient Navigator Tasks across the Cancer Care Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Holden, Alan E. C.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tran, Jacqueline H.; Seals, Brenda F.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Harjo, Lisa; Foo, Mary Anne; Ramirez, Amelie G.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patient navigation (PN) programs have been shown to increase access to and utilization of cancer care for poor and underserved individuals. Despite mounting evidence of its value, cancer patient navigation is not universally understood or provided. We describe five PN programs and the range of tasks their navigators provide across the cancer care continuum (education and outreach, screening, diagnosis and staging, treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life). Tasks are organized by their potential to make cancer services understandable, available, accessible, affordable, appropriate, and accountable. Although navigators perform similar tasks across the five programs, their specific approaches reflect differences in community culture, context, program setting, and funding. Task lists can inform the development of programs, job descriptions, training, and evaluation. They also may be useful in the move to certify navigators and establish mechanisms for reimbursement for navigation services. PMID:22423178

  19. Health Care Communication with Low Literate Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Christine A.

    Low literate patients face difficulties when they read health care information. The complex process of reading can be summarized in five steps: input, decoding, encoding, output, and feedback. Each occurs automatically for the fluent reader; the low literate reader might encounter stumbling blocks in one or more of the steps. Once the patient has…

  20. Problems in Communications with Patients in General Surgery Outpatient Practice

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tonguc Utku; Gumus, Enes; Salman, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Communication between the patient and physician is central to medical care. However communication skills in Turkey haven’t been gained so much concern. This situation effect the national quality of health care. Here, we tried to perform some basic communication skills and to find the problems with the possible solution suggestions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a month in general surgery outpatient department located in the slum part of Ankara with low socio-economic population. Basic communication skills were performed. The age, sex, education levels of the patients were obtained. Total symptom expression and interview time were recorded. Previous medical histories were asked. Interruptions including telephone, door knocking were noted. The questions of the patients at the end of the interview classified as hospital setting, nutrition and treatment. Results: Total 410 interviews were analysed. Mean symptom expression and interview times were 22.9 sec and 7.05 min, respectively. Educated patients, males and young patients expressed symptoms longer than the others (p<0.05). There were 174 interruptions in which total interview time signifantly increased than the non interrupted ones (p<0.05). Final questions about hospital setting were signifantly higher in illiterate patients than the educated ones (p<0.05). Awareness of medical history is higher in educated and young patients. Conclusion: Basic communications skills can be performed whether in rural regions. Much more concern should be given to the education of communication skills. The obstacles in communication in medicine are low education levels, and unorganised health system. PMID:26644767

  1. Cancer Patients' Experiences of Forgiveness Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Lynda J.; Osborne, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Used phenomenological method to investigate the lived-experiences of cancer patients (N=5) who participated in a group therapy program called "forgiveness therapy" which focused on relief and dissipation of negative feelings and the resolution of painful psychological issues associated with cancer. Findings suggest that forgiveness process can…

  2. Resilience Among Patients Across the Cancer Continuum: Diverse Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C.; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera; Reding, Kerryn W.; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Rosenberg, Abby R.

    2014-01-01

    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients’ lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demographics and personal attributes (e.g., optimism, social support), mechanisms of adaptation, such as coping and medical experiences (e.g., positive provider communication), as well as psychosocial outcomes, such as growth and quality of life. Promoting resilience is a critical element of patient psychosocial care. Nurses may enable resilience by recognizing and promoting certain baseline characteristics and optimizing mechanisms of adaptation. PMID:24476731

  3. Resilience among patients across the cancer continuum: diverse perspectives.

    PubMed

    Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera; Reding, Kerryn W; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Rosenberg, Abby R

    2014-02-01

    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients' lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demographics and personal attributes (e.g., optimism, social support), mechanisms of adaptation, such as coping and medical experiences (e.g., positive provider communication), as well as psychosocial outcomes, such as growth and quality of life. Promoting resilience is a critical element of patient psychosocial care. Nurses may enable resilience by recognizing and promoting certain baseline characteristics and optimizing mechanisms of adaptation. PMID:24476731

  4. Approach to the older patient with cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Maxine; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cancer increases with advanced age. And as the world population ages, clinicians will be faced with a growing number of older patients with cancer. The challenge that clinicians face involves carefully choosing the type of therapeutic care plan that is most appropriate given a person's level of physical reserve, medical comorbidities, and psychosocial resources. Inclusion of assessment tools in clinical practice such as a comprehensive geriatric assessment can assist clinicians in identifying patients who will benefit from aggressive cancer care or palliative measures. The role of palliative care, especially in the frail older patient, is critical in improving quality of life. Improvement in best care practices in older patients with cancer requires their inclusion in clinical trials. PMID:24172314

  5. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  6. Patient information preferences among breast and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sharpley, C F; Christie, D R H

    2007-04-01

    Preferences for information about their disease and treatment were collected from 392 patients who had been treated for either breast or prostate cancer an average of 2 years previously. Type of information that they had received, their ratings of its value to them and their preferred format for further information were examined. The most common and most preferred form of information was through doctor interview, followed by educational booklets. Prostate cancer patients preferred videotapes; breast cancer patients tended to prefer individualized approaches including a tour of the department. Effects of age, educational levels, occupational backgrounds and self-reports for anxiety and depression at the time of the survey and at time of diagnosis were analysed. Prostate cancer patients who were most severely depressed showed a preference for not receiving any information at all, perhaps reflecting a tendency towards withdrawal. PMID:17419861

  7. [Depression in cancer patients--with focus on cancer patients in the palliative stage].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lise; Birket-Smith, Morten

    2007-10-29

    Depression is a prevalent and significant symptom in many cancer patients, but it is difficult to diagnose and treat. The paper aims to provide a brief review of definition and diagnostic criteria, screening tools and prevalence, differential diagnoses and management of depression in cancer patients. The number of randomised controlled trials on treatment with antidepressants or psychotherapy for depression in cancer patients is still limited. PMID:18028846

  8. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. PMID:25912163

  9. Public figure announcements about cancer and opportunities for cancer communication: a review and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Myrick, Jessica Gall; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Announcements by public figures and celebrities about cancer diagnosis or death represent significant events in public life. But what are the substantive effects of such events, if any? The purpose of this article is to systematically review studies that examined the impact of public figure cancer announcements on cancer-oriented outcomes. Using comprehensive search procedures, we identified k = 19 studies that examined 11 distinct public figures. The most commonly studied public figures were Jade Goody, Kylie Minogue, Nancy Reagan, and Steve Jobs, with the most common cancers studied being breast (53%), cervical (21%), and pancreatic (21%) cancer. Most studies assessed multiple outcome variables, including behavioral outcomes (k = 15), media coverage (k = 10), information seeking (k = 8), cancer incidence (k = 3), and interpersonal communication (k = 2). Results fairly consistently indicated that cancer announcements from public figures had meaningful effects on many, if not most, of these outcome variables. While such events essentially act as naturally occurring interventions, the effects tend to be relatively short term. Gaps in this literature include few contemporary studies of high-profile public figures in the United States and a general lack of theory-based research. Directions for future research as well as implications for cancer communication and prevention are discussed. PMID:23845155

  10. The effect of complications on the patient-surgeon relationship after colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E.; Veenstra, Christine M.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Hendren, Samantha; Ward, Kevin C.; Kato, Ikuko; Morris, Arden M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trust in physicians is an essential part of therapeutic relationships. Complications are common after colorectal cancer procedures, but little is known of their effect on patient-surgeon relationships. We hypothesized that unexpected complications impair trust and communication between patients and surgeons. Methods We performed a population-based survey of surgically diagnosed stage III colorectal cancer patients in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registries for Georgia and Metropolitan Detroit between August 2011 and October 2012. Using published survey instruments, we queried subjects about trust in and communication with their surgeon. The primary predictor was the occurrence of an operative complication. We examined patient factors associated with trust and communication then compared the relationship between operative complications and patient-reported trust and communication with their surgeons. Results Among 622 preliminary respondents (54% response rate), 25% experienced postoperative complications. Those with complications were less likely to report high trust (73% vs 81%, P = .04) and high-quality communication (80% vs 95%, P < .001). Complications reduced trust among only 4% of patient-surgeon dyads with high-quality communication, whereas complications diminished patients’ trust in 50% with poorer communication (P < .001). After controlling for communication ratings, we found there was no residual effect of complications on trust (P = .96). Conclusion Most respondents described trust in and communication with their surgeons as high. Complications were common and were associated with lower trust and poorer communication. However, the relationship between complications and trust was modified by communication. Trust remained high, even in the presence of complications, among respondents who reported high levels of patient-centered communication with their surgeons. PMID:24787111

  11. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muńoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muńoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer-free interval or mortality rates in these women. PMID:25729417

  12. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors. PMID:26614861

  13. Listeria monocytogenes infection in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivero, G A; Torres, H A; Rolston, K V I; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2003-10-01

    Listeriosis (LT) is an important infection in immunocompromised patients, but no large series of LT in cancer patients have been recently described. We reviewed the records of 34 cancer patients with LT at our institution (1990-2001). Twenty patients (59%) had an underlying hematologic malignancy. In 11 patients, LT complicated bone marrow transplantation. Lymphocytopenia was observed in 62% of the patients. Twenty-six patients (76%) received prior corticosteroids. Bacteremia was the most common presentation of LT (74%) followed by meningoencephalitis (21%). The most common treatment of LT was ampicillin with or without gentamicin (68%). The median duration of treatment was 26 days (range, 8-74 days). The rate of response to antimicrobial therapy was 79%. No relapses were identified. LT contributed to death in 9 (75%) of the 12 patients who died. Meningoencephalitis had the worst prognosis (3 of 6 cases were fatal). Treatment of central nervous system LT continues to have a high failure rate. PMID:14522512

  14. [Supervised administration of Alzheimer's patients using information communication technology].

    PubMed

    Noda, Yasuha; Sakata, Yoshifumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kimura, Toru; Ino, Masashi; Tsuji, Teruyuki; Hayashi, Michiyuki; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2014-12-01

    Drug adherence is central to the treatment of dementia, which might reduce compliance due to memory loss, particularly among home-based patients with dementia. In order to improve drug adherence, we suggest the efficient and effective supervised administration by use of information communication technology(ICT). ICT makes face-to-face real-time communication possible, and it also enables picture sharing. Therefore, it might be useful to apply ICT to controlling and supervising medication for patients with dementia to improve drug adherence. Accordingly, we enrolled patients who were supposed to take a newly prescribed anti-dementia patch containing the choline esterase inhibitor rivastigmine(RivastachÂź)and investigated the effect of ICT-based intervention for drug adherence, emotional change, and cognitive change, utilizing Skype, a free communication software program. Scheduled Skype interventions increased drug adherence ratio, levels of subjective satisfaction, and instrumental activities of daily living(IADL). Furthermore, we can provide patients and their caregivers with a feeling of safety through regular bidirectional communication, as patients can easily consult medical staff regarding the adverse effects of newly prescribed drugs. Instead of frequent visits to their primary physicians, ICT-based communications can be used as a substitute for supervision of medication, given the availability of the telecommunication system. By directly connecting the medical institution to the home, we expect that this ICT-based system will expand into the geriatric care field, including the care of elderly individuals living alone. PMID:25595075

  15. Psychosocial, educational and communicative interventions for patients with cachexia and their family carers

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Cancer cachexia has a substantial impact on both patients and their family carers. It has been acknowledged as one of the two most frequent and devastating problems of advanced cancer. The impact of cachexia spans biopsychosocial realms. Symptom management in cachexia is fraught with difficulties and globally, there remains no agreed standard care or treatment for this client group. There is a need to address the psychosocial impact of cachexia for both patients and their family carers. Recent findings Patients living at home and their family carers are often left to manage the distressing psychosocial impacts of cancer cachexia themselves. Successful symptom management requires healthcare professionals to address the holistic impact of cancer cachexia. High quality and rigorous research details the existential impact of cachexia on patients and their family carers. This information needs to inform psychosocial, educational and communicative supportive healthcare interventions to help both patients and their family carers better cope with the effects of cachexia. Summary Supportive interventions need to inform both patients and their family carers of the expected impacts of cachexia, and address how to cope with them to retain a functional, supported family unit who are informed about and equipped to care for a loved one with cachexia. PMID:25144837

  16. Physician-Patient Communication about Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Tarn, Derjung M.; Paterniti, Debora A.; Good, Jeffrey S.; Coulter, Ian D.; Galliher, James M.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Karlamangla, Arun; Wenger, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Describe the content and frequency of provider-patient dietary supplement discussions during primary care office visits. Methods Inductive content analysis of 1477 transcribed audio-recorded office visits to 102 primary care providers was combined with patient and provider surveys. Encounters were collected in Los Angeles, California (2009–2010), geographically-diverse practice settings across the United States (2004–2005), and Sacramento, CA (1998–1999). Results Providers discussed 738 dietary supplements during encounters with 357 patients (24.2% of all encounters in the data). They mentioned: 1) reason for taking the supplement for 46.5% of dietary supplements; 2) how to take the supplement for 28.2%; 3) potential risks for 17.3%; 4) supplement effectiveness for 16.7%; and 5) supplement cost or affordability for 4.2%. Of these five topics, a mean of 1.13 (SD=1.2) topics were discussed for each supplement. More topics were reviewed for non-vitamin non-mineral supplements (mean 1.47 (SD=1.2)) than for vitamin/mineral supplements (mean 0.99 (SD=1.1); p<0.001). Conclusion While discussions about supplements are occurring, it is clear that more discussion might be needed to inform patient decisions about supplement use. Practice Implication Physicians could more frequently address topics that may influence patient dietary supplement use, such as the risks, effectiveness, and costs of supplements. PMID:23466249

  17. New Oral Anticoagulants and the Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Short, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Indications for anticoagulation are common in patients with malignancy. Cancer patients have an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolic events or may have other indications for anticoagulation, such as atrial fibrillation. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are now available that offer increased options for anticoagulation beyond the traditional vitamin K antagonists and low molecular weight heparins that have long been the cornerstone of treatment. This review will focus on the three NOACs that are currently approved for use in the U.S.: the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors, apixaban and rivaroxaban. Oncologists are likely to encounter an increasing number of patients taking these agents at the time of their cancer diagnosis or to have patients who develop indications for anticoagulation during the course of their disease. The basic pharmacology, current clinical indications, and approach to the use of NOACs in the cancer patient will be reviewed. PMID:24319019

  18. Colorectal papillomavirus infection in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bodaghi, Sohrab; Yamanegi, Koji; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Da Costa, Maria; Palefsky, Joel M.; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is associated with the development of cervical cancer, but whether HPVs have a role in colorectal cancer remains controversial. Experimental Design: To determine the relationship between HPV and colorectal cancer, we performed a retrospective, controlled study using tumor and tumor-adjacent colorectal tissues dissected from patients with colorectal cancer, as well as colorectal tissues from control individuals with no cancer. The samples were processed in a blinded fashion for nested PCR and in situ PCR detection of HPV DNAs. The PCR products were gel purified and sequenced for HPV genotyping. Results: We found that colorectal tissues from 28 (51%) of 55 patients with colorectal cancer were positive for HPV DNA. Colorectal tissues from all 10 control individuals were negative for HPV DNA (P=0.0034). Of the 107 usable (GAPDH+) samples collected as paired colorectal tissues (tumor and tumor-adjacent tissues) from the patients, 38 (36%) had HPV16 (n=31), HPV18 (n=5), or HPV45 (n=2), with HPV DNA in both tumor and tumor-adjacent tissues of 10 paired samples, 13 in only the tumor, and 5 in only tumor-adjacent tissues. In situ PCR detection of the tumor tissues confirmed the presence of HPV DNA in tumor cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that colorectal HPV infection is common in patients with colorectal cancer, albeit at a low DNA copy number, with HPV16 being the most prevalent type. HPV infection may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:15837733

  19. Vitamin D in the cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Kennel, Kurt A.; Drake, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To briefly review recent work within the vitamin D and cancer field, whereas also providing context relating how these findings may impact clinical care and future research efforts. Recent findings Vitamin D has now been convincingly shown both in vitro and in preclinical animal models to alter the differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis of cancer cells. Whether vitamin D prevents cancer in humans or limits cancer progression, however, remain open questions. Epidemiologic and observational data relating circulating 25(OH)D levels and cancer risk suggest an inverse relationship for most cancers including breast, colorectal, leukemia and lymphoma, and prostate, although for each malignancy there also exist studies that have failed to demonstrate such an inverse relationship. Likewise, a more recent report failed to confirm a previously reported association of increased pancreatic cancer risk in patients with higher 25(OH)D levels. A large prospective study in which patients aged at least 50 years receive 2000 IU vitamin D3 daily for 5 years, with cancer as a primary endpoint, has recently been launched. Summary Although much effort has attempted to delineate a causal relationship between vitamin D and a wide array of human cancers, we await large-scale randomized controlled trial data for definitive answers. PMID:23912386

  20. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results. PMID:25428194

  1. Efficacy of communication skills training on colorectal cancer screening by GPs: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aubin-Auger, I; Laouénan, C; Le Bel, J; Mercier, A; Baruch, D; Lebeau, J P; Youssefian, A; Le Trung, T; Peremans, L; Van Royen, P

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) mass screening has been implemented in France since 2008. Participation rates remain too low. The objective of this study was to test if the implementation of a training course focused on communication skills among general practitioners (GP) would increase the delivery of gaiac faecal occult blood test and CRC screening participation among the target population of each participating GP. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with GP's practice as a cluster unit. GPs from practices in the control group were asked to continue their usual care. GPs of the intervention group received a 4-h educational training, built with previous qualitative data on CRC screening focusing on doctor-patient communication with a follow-up of 7 months for both groups. The primary outcome measure was the patients' participation rate in the target population for each GP. Seventeen GPs (16 practices) in intervention group and 28 GPs (19 practices) in control group participated. The patients' participation rate in the intervention group were 36.7% vs. 24.5% in the control group (P = 0.03). Doctor-patient communication should be developed and appear to be one of the possible targets of improvement patients adherence and participation rate in the target population for CRC mass screening. PMID:25851842

  2. Fertility preservation in female cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Jeon, Gyun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    With improved survival rates among cancer patients, fertility preservation is now being recognized as an issue of great importance. There are currently several methods of fertility preservation available in female cancer patients and the options and techniques via assisted reproduction and cryopreservation are increasing, but some are still experimental and continues to be evaluated. The established means of preserving fertility include embryo cryopreservation, gonadal shielding during radiation therapy, ovarian transposition, conservative gynecologic surgery such as radical trachelectomy, donor embryos/oocytes, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The experimental methods include oocyte cryopreservation, ovarian cryopreservation and transplantation, in vitro maturation, and ovarian suppression. With advances in methods for the preservation of fertility, providing information about risk of infertility and possible options of fertility preservation to all young patients with cancer, and discussing future fertility with them should be also considered as one of the important parts of consultation at the time of cancer diagnosis. PMID:22462006

  3. Fertility Preservation in Female Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Jeon, Gyun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    With improved survival rates among cancer patients, fertility preservation is now being recognized as an issue of great importance. There are currently several methods of fertility preservation available in female cancer patients and the options and techniques via assisted reproduction and cryopreservation are increasing, but some are still experimental and continues to be evaluated. The established means of preserving fertility include embryo cryopreservation, gonadal shielding during radiation therapy, ovarian transposition, conservative gynecologic surgery such as radical trachelectomy, donor embryos/oocytes, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The experimental methods include oocyte cryopreservation, ovarian cryopreservation and transplantation, in vitro maturation, and ovarian suppression. With advances in methods for the preservation of fertility, providing information about risk of infertility and possible options of fertility preservation to all young patients with cancer, and discussing future fertility with them should be also considered as one of the important parts of consultation at the time of cancer diagnosis. PMID:22462006

  4. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bystricky, B; Mego, M

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a potential non-invasive substitute for real-time tissue biopsy. Moreover, detection of CTCs in breast cancer patients has been reported as a strong prognostic factor. Biomarkers on CTCs have been analysed and correlated to tissue biopsies from breast cancer patients. Discordance in expression of potential biomarkers between primary tumor, metastatic sites and CTCs has been observed. Potential analytical confounding factors include lack of analytical consistency, varying sensitivities and specificities of used assays and differences in analytical ranges among various reported studies. Besides, clonal evolution within primary tumor (and metastatic sites) that leads to intratumor heterogeneity must be accounted for. Nevertheless, several on-going trials are exploring CTCs detection and biomarker profiling in view of personalising cancer treatment based on these real-time results. In this work, we will review CTCs in breast cancer patients and focus on identification of novel prognostic biomarkers. PMID:26639230

  5. Improving communication and coordination of complex perinatal patients.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sara; Aydam, Joan; Hamm, Kenna; Rocha, Morgan; Northcut, Andrea; Roberson, Becky; Shook, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant women with complex medical problems require comprehensive communication among members of their healthcare team. Using the Magnet Hospital model, our Patient and Perinatal Interprofessional Team at Seton Medical Center Austin focused on improving communication and patient satisfaction by initiating Perinatal Patient Care Conferences. Pregnant women with medical or obstetric complications and their families became a part of care plan development prior to admission to promote consistent communication and excellent care. We report our 7-year history of proactive meetings with pregnant women and their families in a nonclinical environment to discuss diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. A collaborative written plan of care is developed that accommodates the woman's needs and wishes and is then disseminated among the healthcare team. This process has decreased women's and caregivers' anxiety and supported a culture of safety across the continuum of care. PMID:25919209

  6. Shared presence in physician-patient communication: A graphic representation.

    PubMed

    Ventres, William B; Frankel, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Shared presence is a state of being in which physicians and patients enter into a deep sense of trust, respect, and knowing that facilitates healing. Communication between physicians and patients (and, in fact, all providers and recipients of health care) is the medium through which shared presence occurs, regardless of the presenting problem, time available, location of care, or clinical history of the patient. Conceptualizing how communication leads to shared presence has been a challenging task, however. Pathways of this process have been routinely lumped together as the biopsychosocial model or patient, person, and relationship-centered care--all deceptive in their simplicity but, in fact, highly complex--or reduced to descriptive explications of one constituent element (e.g., empathy). In this article, we reconcile these pathways and elements by presenting a graphic image for clinicians and teachers in medical education. This conceptual image serves as a framework to synthesize the vast literature on physician-patient communication. We place shared presence, the fundamental characteristic of effective clinical communication, at the center of our figure. Around this focal point, we locate four elemental factors that either contribute to or result from shared presence, including interpersonal skills, relational contexts, actions in clinical encounters, and healing outcomes. By visually presenting various known and emergent theories of physician-patient communication, outlining the flow of successful encounters between physicians and patients, and noting how such encounters can improve outcomes, physicians, other health care professionals, and medical educators can better grasp the complexity, richness, and potential for achieving shared presence with their patients. PMID:26075882

  7. Interrelation between Patient Satisfaction and Patient-Provider Communication in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Ayse Basak; Schou, Lone

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to assess how patient satisfaction with medical provider-patient communication can affect oral health, diabetes, and psychobehavioural measures among type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. It is part of a prospective intervention study among randomly selected T2DM patients, in Turkey. The data analyzed were Community Periodontal Need Index (CPI), HbA1c, patient satisfaction with communication, and psychobehavioural variables. Data was collected initially and at the end of the intervention. The participants were allocated to either health coaching (HC) or health education (HE). At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the HC and the HE groups on any of the measures (P > 0.05). Patients in both the HC and the HE groups had low satisfaction with communication. At postintervention, the increase in patient satisfaction with communication in the HC group was significantly higher than that in the HE group (P = 0.001). Principal component analysis revealed that patient satisfaction with communication shared the same cluster with clinical measures (CPI and HbA1c) and quality of life in the HC group. In conclusion, the present study showed, to our knowledge for the first time, that overall patient satisfaction with medical care provider-patient communication, empowered by HC approach, was interrelated with well-being of T2DM patients, in terms of psychobehavioural and clinical measures. PMID:25614885

  8. Measurement of Physician-Patient Communication—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Jördis M.; Christalle, Eva; Müller, Evamaria; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg; Scholl, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication with health care providers has been found as relevant for physical and psychological health outcomes as well as the patients' adherence. However, the validity of the findings depends on the quality of the applied measures. This study aimed to provide an overview of measures of physician-patient communication and to evaluate the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified measures. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify psychometrically tested instruments which measure physician-patient communication. The search strategy included three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed), reference and citation tracking and personal knowledge. Studies that report the psychometric properties of physician-patient communication measures were included. Two independent raters assessed the methodological quality of the selected studies with the COSMIN (COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INtruments) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated with the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of 25 studies on 20 measures of physician-patient communication were extracted, mainly from primary care samples in Europe and the USA. Included studies reported a median of 3 out of the nine COSMIN criteria. Scores for internal consistency and content validity were mainly fair or poor. Reliability and structural validity were rated mainly of fair quality. Hypothesis testing scored mostly poor. The quality of psychometric properties of measures evaluated with Terwee et al.'s criteria was rated mainly intermediate or positive. Discussion This systematic review identified a number of measures of physician-patient communication. However, further psychometric evaluation of the measures is strongly recommended. The application of quality criteria like the COSMIN checklist could improve the methodological quality of psychometric property studies as well as the comparability of the studies' results. PMID:25532118

  9. [Improving cancer patients' quality of life].

    PubMed

    Boscheron, Nadine

    2015-04-01

    Nurses draw on their creativity to improve patients' quality of life. A private-practice nurse created, with the support of a local network of associations, an original sewing workshop. Patients and volunteers come together to create attractive clothes adapted to the constraints of cancer treatments. PMID:26145425

  10. Clinician-patient E-mail communication: challenges for reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Komives, Eugenie M

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians are rapidly gaining experience with online clinician-patient consultation, and more tools are becoming available to support these efforts. In addition, we now have evidence that using electronic communication is cost-effective to payers and appealing to patients and providers. At present, there appear to be few barriers to the adoption of these solutions for practices that use other online services. Security concerns can easily be overcome by using programs described in this commentary. Larger and longer studies that evaluate the benefits and cost savings in more detail may help convince other payers and providers of the utility of the Web-based programs. More studies are needed to understand the effect of dinician-patient electronic communication on the costs of caring for chronic illness. When these solutions also include support tools, such as electronic prescribing, which could improve patient safety and quality of care, they should be encouraged. In their article entitled, "Electrons in Flight-Email between Doctors and Patients," Delbanco and Sands postulate that the future of e-communication in medicine will be integrated with a patient-controlled health record and will include secure synchronous and asynchronous communication, video conferencing and messaging, instant transcription into the written record, full-patient access to the record, translation into different languages, connectivity to multiple data sources, incorporation of multi-media educational materials. It-will also allow data from home-based diagnostic technology to be sent to clinicians. "Electronic communication will move medicine inexorably toward such transparency, enabling doctors and patients to share knowledge, responsibility, and decision-making more equally. We need to explore rapidly how this change will affect the quality of care for patients and the quality of life for doctors." The widespread dependence on Internet-based electronic communication to support a variety of commercial, educational, and entertainment needs and interests offers us an opportunity to develop innovative approaches to some long-standing problems-assuring the accessibility of clinicians to their patients and the effectiveness and timeliness of communication between them. It is exciting that we now have well-documented examples of how these new technologies can be used to enhance the quality of primary care practice in both large and small practice organizations. PMID:16130953

  11. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Connect Metastasis-Promoting Communication in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Verset, Laurine; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and eventually metastasis is directed in many aspects by a circuitous ecosystem consisting of an extracellular matrix scaffold populated by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), endothelial cells, and diverse immune cells. CAFs are recruited from local tissue-resident fibroblasts or pericryptal fibroblasts and distant fibroblast precursors. CAFs are highly abundant in CRC. In this review, we apply the metastasis-promoting communication of colorectal CAFs to 10 cancer hallmarks described by Hanahan and Weinberg. CAFs influence innate and adaptive tumor immune responses. Using datasets from previously published work, we re-explore the potential messages implicated in this process. Fibroblasts present in metastasis (metastasis-associated fibroblasts) from CRC may have other characteristics and functional roles than CAFs in the primary tumor. Since CAFs connect metastasis-promoting communication, CAF markers are potential prognostic biomarkers. CAFs and their products are possible targets for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25853091

  12. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation. PMID:23822693

  13. A Week of Excitement and Hope: Communicating the Story of Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Peter Garrett, acting director of NCI's communications office, discusses the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer and activities surrounding the broadcast of the documentary film, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.

  14. Fertility preservation in young cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Revel, Ariel; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana

    2010-01-01

    As a result of advances in treatment, almost 80% of children and adolescents who receive a diagnosis of cancer become long-term survivors. The increased survival rate of children and adolescents with cancer has resulted in a major interest in the long-term effects of cancer treatment on the possibility for future fertility. Currently established methods for the preservation of fertility are available only for pubertal males and females. Pubertal male cancer patients should be encouraged to freeze numerous sperm samples even when sperm count and motility are poor. In these cases, intracytoplasmic sperm injection is a powerful technique compared with intrauterine insemination since thawed sperm samples with poor parameters can produce relatively high fertilization rates resulting in normal pregnancies and deliveries. Married pubertal women should be proposed ovulation induction, follicular aspiration, and fertilization with husband sperm. Single women could benefit from vitrification of oocytes. This requires a delay of about 3 weeks in the commencement of chemotherapy to enable follicular growth. Fertility preservation for prepubertal patients is more of a problem. Young girls could be offered cryopreservation of gametes in the gonadal tissue. Cryopreservation of testicular tissue was suggested for fertility preservation for young boys, but this method is totally experimental and not currently offered. Discussing future fertility is part of the consultation of young female and male patients facing potentially gonadotoxic cancer therapy. It is the role of reproductive specialists to create various options in their laboratory to preserve fertility potential of cancer patients. PMID:20607000

  15. Kelp use in patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Jennifer E; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Hammer, Kallista; Gupta-Lawrence, Rebecca L; Lee, Stephanie L

    2014-05-01

    To report on the incidence and use of kelp among patients with thyroid cancer. Data were collected using a web-based online anonymous survey under Institutional Review Board approval from Boston University. This report is based on 27 responses from subjects with thyroid cancer who use kelp. Demographic factors and complementary and alternative use were included. Respondents were primarily over age 40, white, female and have at least a high school education. The top five modalities were multivitamins, special diets, herbal supplements, prayer for health reasons and herbal tea. Only one patient reported perceiving a particular modality had a negative effect on treatment. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was more often perceived as being used to aid their thyroid cancer treatment than to help with symptoms. On average, respondents who use kelp also use at least 11 additional CAM modalities. Only 1/2 of respondents who use kelp reported telling their physicians about their CAM use, and nearly 1/3 of respondents reported their CAM use was neither known, prescribed nor asked about by their physicians. In comparison to both national surveys of the general US population and patients with thyroid cancer, kelp users with thyroid cancer use at least twice the number of additional CAM therapies and report their use far less often. Physicians who treat patients with thyroid cancer should be aware of these data to further assist in their assessment and care. PMID:24573490

  16. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  17. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  18. [Genetic test for cancer and intra-family communication: freedom vs. responsibility].

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M L; Di Raimo, F R; Teleman, A A; Refolo, P

    2015-01-01

    Genetic tests affect not only single patients but also their genetic relatives. In some cases, they in fact allow to acquire information not only about a single patient, but also about those who are genetically linked (genetic relatives). By appealing to the principle of autonomy, the patient can refuse to be informed of the test result, or to inform their relatives on the risk of a pathology. How might the relatives' right to know be reconciled with the will of a patient who refuses to know or to inform? Among the large number of moral dilemmas that this field can raise, the article aims to reply to the above mentioned question and to analyse in depth some aspects of intra-family communication within the field of genetic tests for cancer. PMID:26550809

  19. Talking with text: communication in therapist-led, live chat cancer support groups.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joanne; Collie, Kate; McLeod, Deborah; Rojubally, Adina; Fergus, Karen; Speca, Michael; Turner, Jill; Taylor-Brown, Jill; Sellick, Scott; Burrus, Kimberly; Elramly, Mai

    2014-03-01

    CancerChatCanada is a pan-Canadian initiative with a mandate to make professionally led cancer support groups available to more people in Canada. Although online support groups are becoming increasingly popular, little is known about therapist-led, synchronous groups using live chat. The purpose of this study was to generate a rich descriptive account of communication experiences in CancerChatCanada groups and to gain an understanding of processes associated with previously-reported benefits. We used interpretive description to analyze interview segments from 102 patients, survivors and family caregivers who participated in CancerChatCanada groups between 2007 and 2011. The analysis yielded four inter-related process themes (Reaching Out From Home, Feeling Safe, Emotional Release, and Talking With Text) and one outcome theme (Resonance and Kinship). The findings extend previous research about text-only online support groups and provide novel insights into features of facilitated, live chat communication that are valued by group members. PMID:24581076

  20. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  1. AB021. Doctor-patient sexual communication

    PubMed Central

    Low, Wah-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is often associated with physical, psycho-social and emotional factors. It is a multi-causal and multidimensional problem incorporating the biological, psychological and interpersonal factors. For patients with sexual dysfunction, their sexual and social life has been physically disconcerting, emotionally distressing and socially disruptive. Sexual dysfunctions can be a symptom of deep-seated personality conflict. It is clear that psychosocial factors play an important role, be it causative or as a consequent of sexual dysfunction. With the increasing awareness of the role of psychosocial factors, a variety of therapeutic approaches in the treatment of sexual dysfunction has been developed. Apart from the comprehensive and detailed sexual and psychosocial history, physical examination and other laboratory tests, psychosexual counseling and sex therapy is deem pertinent for sexual dysfunction with a psychosocial or behavioral origin, as majority of these sexual dysfunction stem from psychological, social and attitudinal determinants. Psychosexual counseling together with sex therapy has entered into the mainstream medical professional world since the publication of Master and Johnson’s Human Sexual Inadequacy in the 1970s. This lecture gives an overview of the principles of psychosexual counseling and the PLISSIT model of sex therapy in the treatment of sexual dysfunction. It is important that healthcare providers become knowledgeable and comfortable in the psycho-social evaluation and treatment of sexual dysfunction, so as to increase the quality of life of these patients.

  2. Effective Patient-Physician Communication Based on Osteopathic Philosophy in Caring for Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Noll, Donald R; Ginsberg, Terrie; Elahi, Abdul; Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss effective communication strategies between elderly patients and their physicians from the perspective of osteopathic heritage. The patient-physician communication styles of Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO, and early osteopathic physicians (ie, DOs) may have influenced how DOs today communicate with their patients. Historical literature describes how Still would discuss with his patients the causes of their health problems using analogies and language they would understand, and how, when caring for a patient at the end of life, he empathically provided emotional support for both patients and their families. Early DOs advocated setting clear expectations for patients regarding clinical outcomes and carefully listening to patients to build trust. The Osteopathic Oath, which calls for the DO to view the patient as a friend, may also affect patient-physician communication. Early osteopathic philosophy and culture, as modeled by Dr Still in his approach to elderly patients, should inspire today's DOs in their communication with their elderly patients. PMID:26745563

  3. Sleep disorders in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Marin, Ruben; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-04-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among patients with cancer for many reasons. Sleep problems can be present at any stage during treatment for cancer and in some patients, sleep disturbance may be the presenting symptoms that lead to the diagnosis of some types of cancer. Poor sleep impairs quality of life In people with cancer, but most do not specifically complain of sleep problems unless they are explicitly asked. Insomnia and fatigue are most common sleep disorders in this cohort, although primary sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome, which are common in the general population, have not been carefully studied in the oncology setting despite significant impairment to their quality of life. PMID:25978413

  4. [Counseling: a tool for enhancing the communication with the patient].

    PubMed

    Martí-Gil, C; Barreda-Hernández, D; Marcos-Pérez, G; Barreira-Hernández, D

    2013-01-01

    Counseling is a technique used in psychology that has shown a major impact on health: in deep, it is the methodology recommended by the Worl Health Organization to help HIV-infected patients. Although it has been translated to spanish by assisted counseling or helping relationship, counseling covers a broader concept. It is defined as an interactive process based on communication in which the clinician helps the patients to think about their own health and to take appropiate decisions based on their values and interests. In short, counseling is a tool to enhance communication with the patient, resulting very useful during clinical interview in pharmaceutical care programs in order to improve pharmacotherapy and patient safety. PMID:23789800

  5. An analysis of communication in conversation in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, Marc; Sève, Amandine; Vallet, Marion; Pasquier, Florence; Mackowiak-Cordoliani, Marie Anne

    2010-11-01

    Patients with degenerative dementia often show language disorders, but little is known about their verbal (VC) and non-verbal communication (NVC). Our aim was to analyse VC and NVC in patients with standard criteria of mild-moderately severe dementia (MMSE ?14/30) resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD; 29 cases), behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD; 16), or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; 13). We used the Lille Communication Test, which addresses three domains: participation in communication (PC: greeting, attention, participation), VC (verbal comprehension, speech outflow, intelligibility, word production, syntax, verbal pragmatics and verbal feedback), and NVC (understanding gestures, affective expressivity, producing gestures, pragmatics and feedback). Patients were compared with 47 matching control subjects. AD patients were partially impaired (p?0.01) in PC (greeting), and more definitely in VC, especially by verbal comprehension and word finding difficulties and to a much lesser degree in verbal pragmatics (responding to open questions, presenting new information), while NVC was mostly preserved. FTD patients were severely impaired in PC. VC difficulties were related to lexical-semantic, syntactic and more specifically pragmatic problems. NVC was impaired by difficulties in affective expressivity, pragmatics and feedback management. DLB patients showed modest difficulties with VC. PC, VC and NVC strongly correlated with performance in the dementia rating scale. In conclusion, the profile of communication difficulties was quite different between groups. FTD patients showed most severe difficulties in PC and verbal and non-verbal pragmatics, in relation to their frontal lesions. AD patients had prominent impairment of lexical-semantic operations. PMID:20888846

  6. Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Ryan; Toussaint, Gregory; Bruce Binder, S; Borges, Nicole J

    2014-01-01

    As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP) encounters strengthen third-year medical students' communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios) were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students' self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n=215; response rate, 96%) analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students' perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P<0.05; Bonferroni correction, P<0.006). There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents. PMID:25112449

  7. Communication Tools for the Modern Doctor Bag. Physician Patient Communication Part 1: Beginning of a medical interview.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Sapna Patel

    2011-01-01

    Effective physician patient communication is essential to best practice in medicine. Good communication with patients is critical in making the right diagnosis, improving compliance and overall outcomes for our patients (as well as improving physician satisfaction.) Communication skills can be learned and need to be taught, practiced and given the same emphasis as other core competencies in medicine. The focus of this article is on the Calgary-Cambridge Model for physician patient communication in the context of a medical interview. The beginning of a patient encounter is discussed, with emphasis on appropriate introductions and attentive active listening. PMID:23882333

  8. The Communication of Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis: The Patients' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Maria JosĂš; Dalla Costa, Gloria; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Moiola, Lucia; Colombo, Bruno; Comi, Giancarlo; Martinelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the leading cause of nontraumatic neurological disability in young adults in Europe and in the United States. The uncertainty regarding its evolution makes the diagnosis disclosure a difficult process. Objective. The aim of the study was to provide patients' global perspective towards MS diagnosis communication. Methods. 150 consecutive patients, recently diagnosed with CIS or MS, were asked to complete a 17-item questionnaire assessing factors influencing their satisfaction with the information provided. Results. Eighty-six patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for MS and 64 for CIS. Diagnosis disclosure took place in a private setting and required in most cases (87.3%) less than 30 minutes. Most patients reported being moderately or highly satisfied with the information provided (75%). The degree of satisfaction seems significantly related to patients' younger age, a longer time dedicated to disclose the diagnosis, a CIS diagnosis, and, above all, tailored information and an adequate emotional support. Conclusion. Most patients reported a good degree of satisfaction about the communication of MS or CIS diagnosis. A fruitful relationship between patient and neurologist is essential to obtain a better acceptance of the disease, patients' compliance with chronic treatments and to improve patients' quality of life. PMID:26788369

  9. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  10. Patient Navigation for Underserved Patients Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Aparna; Ko, Naomi; Battaglia, Tracy A.; Chabner, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of breast cancer (BC). Patient navigator programs (PNPs) have been shown to improve rates of BC screening in underserved communities, but there is a dearth of evidence regarding their benefits after the actual diagnosis of BC. We retrospectively examined sociodemographic characteristics, disease characteristics, and concordance to quality measures (QMs) of BC care among women participating in a PNP that services disadvantaged minority communities in the greater Boston area. Of the 186 PNP patients diagnosed with BC in 2001–2011 in three neighborhood community health centers, treatment data was available for 158 (85%) and race and disease stage information was available for 149 (80%). Regarding stage, 25% were diagnosed with in situ cancer, 32% had stage 1, 25% had stage 2, 13% had stage 3, and 5% had stage 4 BC. Guideline-indicated care was received by 70 of 74 patients (95%) for the hormonal therapy QM, 15 of 17 (88%) patients for the chemotherapy QM, and 65 of 71 (92%) patients for the radiation QM, all similar to published concordance rates at elite National Comprehensive Cancer Network institutions. These findings suggest that PNPs may facilitate evidence-based quality care for vulnerable populations. Future research should prospectively analyze quality metrics to assess measures to improve the process and outcomes of patient navigation in diverse underserved settings, compared with control non-navigated populations. PMID:22752069

  11. Myelography in cancer patients: modified technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y Y; Glass, J P; Wallace, S

    1985-10-01

    Because of the frequency of multiple sites of involvement, a thorough evaluation of the entire spinal canal is essential for detection and treatment of spinal compression in cancer patients. For the examination of the entire spinal canal in cancer patients, a modified approach is described using water-soluble contrast medium (metrizamide), oil-based material (Pantopaque), and a "squeezing" technique for a complete myelographic block. Of 240 patients who underwent myelography for possible spinal compression, the squeezing technique was applied through a lumbar puncture to demonstrate a complete block in 39 patients; six of these had more than one block. Of the other 201 patients, the quality of the myelograms was satisfactory or excellent in 189 (94%). PMID:3876000

  12. Vascular Access in the Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    DeWitty, Robert L.; Siram, Suryanarayana M.; Balkissoon, Jay

    1986-01-01

    Patients requiring frequent blood sampling and/or frequent intravenous fluid administration can be difficult to manage clinically once peripheral veins become exhausted. Not only can peripheral vascular access be difficult in these patients, but patients begin to dread the attempts at blood sampling and intravenous line placement more than the chemotherapy regimen. At Howard University Hospital, several different types of commercial vascular access devices have been employed that afford reliable and dependable use in cancer patients requiring chemotherapy and blood monitoring. With the increased use of these devices, one unpleasant aspect in the management of the cancer patient, that of repeated attempts at vascular access, can be eliminated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:3086561

  13. Fertility counseling of young breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Anserini, Paola; Levaggi, Alessia; Poggio, Francesca; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 6% of women with breast cancer are diagnosed before the age of 40. Young age is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and most young breast cancer patients receive systemic treatment with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or both. The loss or impairment of fertility is a potential side effect of antineoplastic treatments. Due to the rising trend to delaying pregnancy in life, an increasing proportion of young cancer patients who are yet to have a pregnancy will face the problem of iatrogenic menopause in the future. The incidence of anticancer-treatment-related ovarian failure depends on the type of chemotherapy regimen administered, the use of tamoxifen and the age of patients. It rises with increasing age, in the range of 22-61% and 61-97% in women aged <40 years and >40 years respectively. Although there is a clear trend to increasing incidence of ovarian failure with the rise in aging, there may be a small proportion of patients who became amenorrhoeic despite the very young age, thus indicating that also individual factors still unknown may affect the probability of treatment-related ovarian failure. A prompt referral of patients to reproductive counseling and a multidisciplinary team including Oncology and Reproductive Units are essential to face the management of fertility issues in cancer patients. Fertility counseling should include a detailed description of all the available techniques to preserve fertility. The main available fertility preservation techniques, standard and experimental, for young breast cancer patients include: temporary ovarian suppression during chemotherapy with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, embryo cryopreservation, cryopreservation of oocytes and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Research efforts are still necessary to improve the efficacy and safety of the available fertility preservation strategies as well as an efficient collaboration between oncologists and gynecologists is necessary to improve patients’ access to the strategies themselves. PMID:23819030

  14. A model for improving cancer patient education.

    PubMed

    Fredette, S L

    1990-08-01

    Adjustment to cancer requires modification of behavior that may be aided through patient education. Numerous programs have been developed to meet this need; however, studies show that even after being taught, patients are not well informed. It seems that the process of educating cancer patients needs to be improved. Authors suggest a progression of psychosocial stages of adjustment to serious illness during which specific behaviors are exhibited and coping mechanisms utilized. Understanding the nature of this process forms the basis for effective patient education since theories of adaptation describe behaviors that impact on motivation to learn, information required, and teaching methodology. Failure to attend to this variable of emotional response to the disease can prevent learning. This article integrates the theories of Weisman, Crate, Engle, and Kubler-Ross into an educational model for the cancer patient consisting of six periods. The model suggests nursing approaches, educational topics, and teaching strategies based on the patient's behavioral responses. Use of this model can improve teaching effectiveness in clinical practice by ensuring that the patient is ready to learn prior to teaching and by utilizing teaching strategies appropriate to the educational period. It can further be used as a tool to teach students of nursing how to use the stages of adjustment to chronic illness when planning patient teaching. PMID:2208096

  15. Health Literacy and Urbanicity Among Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, Julie; Martinez-Donate, Ana; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Walsh, Matthew C.; Strickland, Jeanne Schaaf; Palta, Mari; Smith, Paul D.; Cleary, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Low health literacy is associated with inadequate health care utilization and poor health outcomes, particularly among elderly persons. There is a dearth of research exploring the relationship between health literacy and place of residence (urbanicity). This study examined the association between urbanicity and health literacy, as well as factors related to low health literacy, among cancer patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a population-based sample of 1,841 cancer patients in Wisconsin. Data on sociodemographics, urbanicity, clinical characteristics, insurance status, and health literacy were obtained from the state’s cancer registry and participants’ answers to a mailed questionnaire. Partially and fully adjusted multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to examine: 1) the association between urbanicity and health literacy, and 2) the role of socioeconomic status as a possible mediator of this relationship. Findings Rural cancer patients had a 33% (95% CI: 1.06–1.67) higher odds of having lower levels of health literacy than their counterparts in more urbanized areas of Wisconsin. The association between urbanicity and health literacy attenuated after controlling for socioeconomic status. Conclusions Level of urbanicity was significantly related to health literacy. Socioeconomic status fully mediated the relationship between urbanicity and health literacy. These results call for policies and interventions to assess and address health literacy barriers among cancer patients in rural areas. PMID:24088213

  16. [Support of cancer patients by counseling].

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuka

    2013-12-01

    Special counselors of consultation support centers at cancer hospitals have the difficult task of providing support to patients and families that receive the difficult diagnosis of cancer. Patients and their family first receive a notice and an explanation of the conditions of the disease, along with details of the standard future treatment policy in that country. Such information may not be conveyed by medical experts in a manner in which the patient can understand it, and very few patients are able to select a treatment plan on their own. With the support of a special counselor, the patient can determine the best way to manage the illness, and the counselor supports the decision-making process regarding the best treatment option. Moreover, support is offered to help the patient accept the diagnosis and maintain a balance of daily activities, which facilitate treatment continuation. With the intervention of a special counselor, problems that arise can be addressed directly and the counselor can summarize the patient's intentions and can act immediately to find solutions. Medical social workers understand that the patient is an individual who is concerned and who must be convinced and understand the situation in order to judge the situation and act accordingly. This approach gives courage to the patient, increases the will to live, and helps the patient regain a sense of self. A medical social worker's role is to help find answers and to suggest ideas for problem solving, to allow for patients to care for themselves and others. PMID:24335362

  17. Patient internet use surrounding cancer clinical trials: clinician perceptions and responses

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christian; Schramm, Sarah; Hillis, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Clinician perceptions of patient internet use related to clinical trials are not well documented. This exploratory study surveyed how cancer care providers at one NCI-designated cancer center viewed patient internet use surrounding cancer trials, including whether it affected patient decision making regarding trial enrollment. The sample included 20 oncologists (59%) and 14 (41%) nurses (n=34). Most clinicians (n=26; 76%) perceived the internet as having an effect on whether or not patients decided to enroll in a cancer trial. Two thirds (n=17; 65%) felt that this effect was positive, including in terms of enhancing patient knowledge of, access to, and enrollment in trials. Clinicians were asked if they ever discussed with their patients the topic of going online to find out more about cancer trials. Over half (n=18; 58%) who responded (n=31) to this item said yes; the rest (n=13; 42%) said no. The majority (n=10; 77%) in the “no” category were among those who reported that the internet had an effect on patient decision making. These data provisionally suggest that clinicians may see the internet as having mostly a positive effect on patient decision making about cancer trials, but that their communication efforts with patients do not always logically follow from this perception. Provider-patient discussion about internet use may be an opportunity for clinicians to contribute to improved patient knowledge of and enrollment in cancer trials. More research is needed to confirm and explain the gap between clinician perception and communication regarding trial-related internet use by cancer patients. PMID:20227523

  18. Identifying Barriers to Patient Acceptance of Active Surveillance: Content Analysis of Online Patient Communications

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Mark V.; Bennett, Michele; Vincent, Armon; Lee, Olivia T.; Lallas, Costas D.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Qualitative research aimed at identifying patient acceptance of active surveillance (AS) has been identified as a public health research priority. The primary objective of this study was to determine if analysis of a large-sample of anonymous internet conversations (ICs) could be utilized to identify unmet public needs regarding AS. Methods English-language ICs regarding prostate cancer (PC) treatment with AS from 2002–12 were identified using a novel internet search methodology. Web spiders were developed to mine, aggregate, and analyze content from the world-wide-web for ICs centered on AS. Collection of ICs was not restricted to any specific geographic region of origin. NLP was used to evaluate content and perform a sentiment analysis. Conversations were scored as positive, negative, or neutral. A sentiment index (SI) was subsequently calculated according to the following formula to compare temporal trends in public sentiment towards AS: [(# Positive IC/#Total IC) - (#Negative IC/#Total IC) x 100]. Results A total of 464 ICs were identified. Sentiment increased from -13 to +2 over the study period. The increase sentiment has been driven by increased patient emphasis on quality-of-life factors and endorsement of AS by national medical organizations. Unmet needs identified in these ICs include: a gap between quantitative data regarding long-term outcomes with AS vs. conventional treatments, desire for treatment information from an unbiased specialist, and absence of public role models managed with AS. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential utility of online patient communications to provide insight into patient preferences and decision-making. Based on our findings, we recommend that multidisciplinary clinics consider including an unbiased specialist to present treatment options and that future decision tools for AS include quantitative data regarding outcomes after AS. PMID:24039699

  19. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients. PMID:26573424

  20. Patient-reported quality of care and pain severity in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kathryn A.; Snyder, Claire F.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Dy, Sydney M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite treatment availability, many cancer patients experience severe pain. Although patient assessments of care are increasingly employed to evaluate quality of care, little is known about its association with cancer symptom burden. The objective of our study was to examine the association between patient-reported quality of care and pain severity in a nationally representative cohort of cancer patients. Method Quality of care was measured in three domains: physician communication, care coordination/responsiveness, and nursing care. Quality scores were dichotomized as optimal versus nonoptimal. Pain was measured on a scale of 0 (least) to 100 (worst). We utilized multivariable linear regression to examine the association between patient-reported quality of care and pain severity. Results The analytic sample included 2,746 individuals. Fifty and 54% of patients, respectively, rated physician communication and care coordination/responsiveness as nonoptimal; 28% rated nursing care as nonoptimal. In adjusted models, rating physician communication as nonoptimal (versus optimal) was associated with a 1.8-point higher pain severity (p = 0.018), and rating care coordination/responsiveness as nonoptimal was associated with a 2.2-point higher pain severity (p = 0.006). Significance of results Patient-reported quality of care was significantly associated with pain severity, although the differences were small. Interventions targeting physician communication and care coordination/responsiveness may result in improved pain control for some patients. PMID:24967597

  1. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  2. Chemotherapy in elderly patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Köhne, Claus-Henning; Folprecht, Gunnar; Goldberg, Richard M; Mitry, Emmanuel; Rougier, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Significant advancements in chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have been achieved over the past decade, and the median overall survival duration is now close to 24 months with appropriate treatment. The most widely recommended chemotherapy regimens are based on the use of irinotecan or oxaliplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin; some data suggest further benefit with the addition of the targeted agents bevacizumab or cetuximab. Colorectal cancer primarily affects the elderly; however, much of the defining clinical research in this field has excluded subjects of advanced age or with a poor performance status, making it difficult for clinicians to interpret current treatment paradigms for their older patients. Most clinical trials that have included elderly patients document similar survival rates and toxicity profiles to those seen in younger patients. Moreover, survey data suggest that >70% of elderly patients with cancer are willing to undergo strong, palliative chemotherapy. While these findings suggest that age itself should not determine candidacy for chemotherapy, it is important to note the great heterogeneity of the elderly population with regard to overall health, independence, and performance status. The use of a comprehensive geriatric assessment is recommended to evaluate chemotherapy appropriateness. The management of frail elderly patients and those with a short life expectancy should be focused on palliation, while fit elderly patients can receive aggressive therapy in a similar fashion to younger patients. PMID:18448553

  3. Management of thrombosis in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Nancy; Ansell, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of venous thromboembolism in the cancer patient presents many challenges. The safety and efficacy of anticoagulation in these patients are still evolving. The clinical scenario is often unique to each patient and dictates careful consideration of the method of anticoagulation. Various issues that need to be considered are the length of anticoagulation, the method of administration, and the potential pitfalls of initiating one therapy over another. This review attempts to provide an approach to these issues in the treatment of the cancer patient with venous thromboembolism. The role of warfarin, heparin, and low-molecular-weight heparin is discussed. Additionally, adjunctive measures, such as vena cava filter insertion and thrombotic complications associated with central venous catheters, are discussed. The review is meant to provide clinicians with practical guidelines through a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:15334865

  4. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suhag, Virender; Sunita, B. S.; Sarin, Arti; Singh, A. K.; Dashottar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients’ wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy. PMID:26942145

  5. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  6. Which screening method is appropriate for older cancer patients at risk for malnutrition?

    PubMed

    Isenring, Elizabeth; Elia, Marinos

    2015-04-01

    The risk for malnutrition increases with age and presence of cancer, and it is particularly common in older cancer patients. A range of simple and validated nutrition screening tools can be used to identify malnutrition risk in cancer patients (e.g., Malnutrition Screening Tool, Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form Revised, Nutrition Risk Screening, and the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool). Unintentional weight loss and current body mass index are common components of screening tools. Patients with cancer should be screened at diagnosis, on admission to hospitals or care homes, and during follow-up at outpatient or general practitioner clinics, at regular intervals depending on clinical status. Nutritional assessment is a comprehensive assessment of dietary intake, anthropometrics, and physical examination often conducted by dietitians or geriatricians after simple screening has identified at-risk patients. The result of nutritional screening, assessment and the associated care plans should be documented, and communicated, within and between care settings for best patient outcomes. PMID:25770324

  7. Communicating about cancer through Facebook: a qualitative analysis of a breast cancer awareness page.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Karley; Keefe, Brian; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Social media channels are increasingly being used for health communication and promotion. Social networking sites such as Facebook have become popular platforms for organizations to communicate health messages and encourage user participation around health topics. While the evaluation of social media's effectiveness in health promotion is beginning to emerge in the literature, few studies have examined actual interactions and user behaviors on Facebook Pages hosted by health organizations. The authors present a qualitative case study of a popular Facebook Page from a nonprofit organization devoted to raising awareness about breast cancer. With the goal of identifying the functions and uses of the Page, our study analyzes the content of Wall posts during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, October 2010. Common themes and characteristics are identified, including open mic communication, scarcity of health information, the commodification of breast cancer, unpredictable locations of conversation, and the use of gendered images and language. The findings have potential implications for health promotion efforts using social media platforms. PMID:25495200

  8. Drug management of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, C B

    1985-01-01

    Chronic severe cancer pain is often not well controlled because both patient and physician have a poor understanding of the nature of the pain and of the actions of various potent analgesics. Physicians often fail to tailor analgesic dosages to the needs of the individual and unnecessarily limit the dosage because they have an ill founded fear that the patient will become addicted. The basis of rational management of cancer pain with drugs is an appropriate analgesic given regularly in doses adequate to suppress pain continuously. This review compares the potent analgesics and identifies and discusses those that have a role in treating chronic cancer pain. It emphasizes the value of morphine sulfate and gives information on starting and individualizing dosages and managing side effects. PMID:2856896

  9. National Cancer Information Service in Italy: an information points network as a new model for providing information for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Truccolo, Ivana; Bufalino, Rosaria; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Caruso, Anita; Costantini, Anna; Cognetti, Gaetana; Florita, Antonio; Pero, Dina; Pugliese, Patrizia; Tancredi, Roberta; De Lorenzo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The international literature data report that good information and communication are fundamental components of a therapeutic process. They contribute to improve the patient-health care professional relationship, to facilitate doctor-patient relationships, therapeutic compliance and adherence, and to the informed consent in innovative clinical trials. We report the results of a multicentric national initiative that developed a 17-information-structure network: 16 Information Points located in the major state-funded certified cancer centers and general hospitals across Italy and a national Help-line at the nonprofit organization AIMaC (the Italian oncologic patients, families and friends association), and updated the already existing services with the aim to create the National Cancer Information Service (SION). The project is the result of a series of pilot and research projects funded by the Italian Ministry of Health. The Information Service model proposed is based on some fundamental elements: 1) human interaction with experienced operators, adequately trained in communication and information, complemented with 2) virtual interaction (Help line, Internet, blog, forum and social network); 3) informative material adequate for both scientific accuracy and communicative style; 4) adequate locations for appropriate positioning and privacy (adequate visibility); 5) appropriate advertising. First results coming from these initiatives contributed to introduce issues related to "Communication and Information to patients" as a "Public Health Instrument" to the National Cancer Plan approved by the Ministry of Health for the years 2010-2012. PMID:21989442

  10. Further analysis of a doctor-patient nonverbal communication instrument.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Timothy J; Hartung, Paul J; Gerzina, Holly; Gregory, Stanford W; Merolla, Dave

    2005-06-01

    This study examines the reliability and validity of the relational communication scale for observational measurement (RCS-O) using a random sample of 80 videotaped interactions of medical students interviewing standardized patients (SPs). The RCS-O is a 34-item instrument designed to measure the nonverbal communication of physicians interacting with patients. The instrument was applied and examined in two different interview scenarios. In the first scenario (year 1), the medical student's interview objective is to demonstrate patient-centered interviewing skills as the SP presents with a psychosocial concern. In the second scenario (year 3), the student's interview objective is to demonstrate both doctor-centered and patient-centered skills as the SP presents with a case common in primary care. In the year 1 scenario, 19 of the 34 RCS-O items met acceptable levels of inter-rater agreement and reliability. In the year 3 scenario, 26 items met acceptable levels of inter-rater agreement and reliability. Factor analysis indicated that in both scenarios each of the four primary relational communication dimensions was salient: intimacy, composure, formality, and dominance. Measures of correlation and differences involving the RCS-O dimensions and structural features of the interviews (e.g., number of questions asked by the medical student) are examined. PMID:15893207

  11. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  12. Doctor-patient communication in the e-health era

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The digital revolution will have a profound impact on how physicians and health care delivery organizations interact with patients and the community at-large. Over the coming decades, face-to-face patient/doctor contacts will become less common and exchanges between consumers and providers will increasingly be mediated by electronic devices. In highly developed health care systems like those in Israel, the United States, and Europe, most aspects of the health care and consumer health experience are becoming supported by a wide array of technology such as electronic and personal health records (EHRs and PHRs), biometric & telemedicine devices, and consumer-focused wireless and wired Internet applications. In an article in this issue, Peleg and Nazarenko report on a survey they fielded within Israel's largest integrated delivery system regarding patient views on the use of electronic communication with their doctors via direct-access mobile phones and e-mail. A previous complementary paper describes the parallel perspectives of the physician staff at the same organization. These two surveys offer useful insights to clinicians, managers, researchers, and policymakers on how best to integrate e-mail and direct-to-doctor mobile phones into their practice settings. These papers, along with several other recent Israeli studies on e-health, also provide an opportunity to step back and take stock of the dramatic impact that information & communication technology (ICT) and health information technology (HIT) will have on clinician/patient communication moving forward. The main goals of this commentary are to describe the scope of this issue and to offer a framework for understanding the potential impact that e-health tools will have on provider/patient communication. It will be essential that clinicians, managers, policymakers, and researchers gain an increased understanding of this trend so that health care systems around the globe can adapt, adopt, and embrace these rapidly evolving digital technologies. PMID:22929000

  13. Latino Men and Familial Risk Communication about Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Elisabeth M.; Litwin, Mark S.; Maliski, Sally L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated how familial communication about prostate cancer risk and screening affects sons of men with prostate cancer. It is important to engage Latino families shared decision making toward early detection because first degree relatives of men with PCa are at heightened risk and Latino men are diagnosed at more advanced stages of disease than Non-Hispanic White men. Methods The team conducted semi-structured interviews with seventeen sons of PCa survivors. Eight participants completed a follow up interview an average of seven months later. Therefore, our sample includes twenty-five transcripts. The sons are Latinos living in Southern California. Data were analyzed with a mix of a priori topical codes and grounded theory techniques. Results Sons were under informed about both familial risk and screening options. They became sensitized to PCa, desired information, and held protective intentions. Hopeful intentions came up against cultural taboos around sex, reproductive health, and intimacy that limited discussions between fathers and sons. Fathers were a valued source of information, but play various roles, which affect sons’ screening intentions. Open communication between father and son promoted awareness of screening and familial risk. Discussion Uncertainty about familial risk and screening options, especially early detection strategies, was exacerbated by cultural taboos around PCa. Fathers could have been primary and credible advocates for shared decision making, but sons found it difficult to learn from their fathers’ experience. Nursing Implications Findings from our study can inform community based interventions with Latino families, help to culturally tailor health messaging, and sensitize clinicians to a group which needs concerted counseling about PCa risk and screening. PMID:25158656

  14. Predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Farin, Erik; Gramm, Lukas; Schmidt, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this exploratory study was to identify patient-related predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain for various dimensions of patient-physician communication (patient participation and orientation, effective and open communication, emotionally supportive communication, communication about personal circumstances). Methods Eleven rehabilitation centers from various parts of Germany participated in collection of data between 2009 and 2011. A total of 701 patients with chronic low back pain were surveyed at the start of rehabilitation. The patient questionnaire captured communication preferences, pain impact, pain intensity, and psychologic variables (fear avoidance beliefs, illness coherence, control beliefs, communication self-efficacy, and personality characteristics). The rehabilitation physicians filled out a documentation sheet containing information on diagnosis, inability to work, duration of the illness, and comorbidity at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Results On average, effective, open, and patient-centered communication was very important for patients with back pain, emotionally supportive communication was important, and communication about personal circumstances was somewhat important. The variance in communication preferences explained by the predictors studied here was 8%–19%. Older patients showed a lower preference for patient-centered and open communication, but a higher preference for communication about personal circumstances. Patients with psychologic risk factors (eg, fear avoidance beliefs), extroverted patients, and patients with high self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction generally had higher expectations of the physician’s communicative behavior. Conclusion Providers should take into consideration the fact that patients with back pain have a strong need for effective, open, and patient-centered communication. A flexible approach to communication needs appears to be especially important for communication about emotional and personal circumstances, because the patients differ most clearly in this respect. Personal characteristics provided only initial clues to possible preferences; for more precision, an individual assessment (by means of questionnaires or discussion) is needed. PMID:24187489

  15. African American women's perspectives on breast cancer: implications for communicating risk of basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Allicock, Marlyn; Graves, Neasha; Gray, Kathleen; Troester, Melissa A

    2013-05-01

    African American women suffer a disproportionately high burden of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive subtype that has no targeted therapy. While epidemiologic research has identified key prevention strategies, little is known about how best to communicate risk to this population. This study explored women's knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about breast cancer to learn about risk perceptions. Six focus groups were conducted in North Carolina with 57 women (ages 18-49). Age, race (especially perceptions of cancer as a "White disease"), and lack of family history of breast cancer were all shown to contribute to women's perceptions of low breast cancer susceptibility. Perceptions of low risk were also attributed to conflicting risk information from family, media, and health providers. Women had little to no knowledge of breast cancer subtypes, and emphasized that health communications should be personally relevant, culturally appropriate, and convenient. These findings will assist in developing health communication tools that encourage prevention. PMID:23728042

  16. Identifying Colon Cancer Patients Who May Need More Than Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156799.html Identifying Colon Cancer Patients Who May Need More Than Surgery Small ... easily detected genetic marker could help identify aggressive colon cancer in early stages, telling doctors that these patients ...

  17. Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157996.html Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients Italian trial finds ... News) -- Acupuncture can help alleviate the often-debilitating hot flashes that afflict many breast cancer patients, new ...

  18. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI investigators have identified an inflammatory gene and microRNA biomarker portfolio that can predict aggressive colon cancer, colon cancer patient survival, and patients that are candidates for adjuvant therapy.

  19. Patients' perspectives on the role of their general practitioner after receiving an advanced cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Halkett, G K B; Jiwa, M; Lobb, E A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore patients' perspectives on the role of their general practitioner (GP) after an advanced cancer diagnosis. A qualitative research approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using a constant comparative methodology. Participants were eligible if they were diagnosed with advanced cancer and referred for palliative radiotherapy. Data saturation was achieved after 21 interviews. Key themes included (1) obtaining diagnosis and referral for advanced cancer treatment; (2) preference for specialist oncology care; (3) a preference for GP to act as an advocate; and (4) obtaining ongoing routine care from their GP. GP involvement in the patients' management was dependent on: time since diagnosis, GP's involvement in diagnosis and referral, doctor/patient relationship, additional chronic conditions requiring management, frequency of seeing oncologist and specialist recommendation to involve GP. Patients want GPs to have varying levels of involvement following an advanced cancer diagnosis. Not all communication between GPs and patients was positive suggesting communication skills training may be a priority. Patients wished to maintain continunity of care for their non-cancer related issues and healthcare of their family members. Future research needs to focus on working with GPs to increase their role in the management of advanced cancer. PMID:25132066

  20. Contribution of the geriatrician to the management of cancer in older patients.

    PubMed

    Gosney, Margot

    2007-10-01

    With an increasingly aged population, many patients will present with cancer in their 80s and 90s. Although some may be very fit, frail individuals will require the input of geriatricians to aid in the assessment of co-existing morbidity, in an attempt to assess those most likely to benefit from active treatment of their cancer, and those in whom the 'giants of geriatric medicine' require special consideration before undergoing definitive cancer therapy. The role of the geriatrician in assessment and management of such patients, together with communication and end of life care, may be more important in ensuring a good quality of life, than the cancer therapy itself. Whilst numbers of geriatricians will not be adequate to care for all elderly patients with cancer, a variety of assessment scales will help target financial and manpower resources to those most at risk. PMID:17855073

  1. [Treatment of patients with invasive bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Varlamov, S A; Lazarev, A F; Ne?mark, A I; Tat'ianin, V Iu; Ganov, D I; P'iankova, N Iu

    2002-01-01

    Radical surgery was made in 85 patients with invasive cancer of the bladder. 89.4% patients had the tumor of stage T2-T3. After the operation all 85 patients received 3 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy M-VAC in modification of the Cancer Research Center. The interval between the courses was 3 weeks. The patients were divided into two groups. The test group (n = 43) received surgical treatment, M-VAC chemotherapy and immunocorrection (general magnetotherapy, phytotherapy = cyclopheron). The control group (n = 42) received only surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. It was found that the above immunocorrection reduces the number of postoperative complications 3.8 times, side effects by chemotherapy by 1.4 times. Absolute count of T lymphocytes and their active forms elevated by 42.8 and 35.7%, respectively, while CIC diminished by 48.8%. The addition of immunocorrection to combined treatment of patients with invasive cancer of the bladder decreased the number of recurrences for 2 years twice. 3-year survival was 1.5 times longer. PMID:12577575

  2. Communication for the aphasic stroke patient: assessment and therapy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, R

    1975-06-01

    Loss of communicative ability is one of the most devastating handicaps associated with stroke. The goals of therapy require continuous adjustment. Early ambulation facilitates breathing, chewing and swallowing, which are important factors in voice control. Hearing and vision should also receive concentrated attention. Formal speech therapy should begin when the patient shows an interest in regaining speech. Even before that, however, family members and friends can be of great help in laying the foundation for a good prognosis. PMID:1127199

  3. Visual communication interface for severe physically disabled patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, M. J.; Fernández, E. A.

    2007-11-01

    During the last years several interfaces have been developed to allow communication to those patients suffering serious physical disabilities. In this work, a computer based communication interface is presented. It was designed to allow communication to those patients that cannot use neither their hands nor their voice but they can do it through their eyes. The system monitors the eyes movements by means of a webcam. Then, by means of an Artificial Neural Network, the system allows the identification of specified position on the screen through the identification of the eyes positions. This way the user can control a virtual keyboard on a screen that allows him to write and browse the system and enables him to send e-mails, SMS, activate video/music programs and control environmental devices. A patient was simulated to evaluate the versatility of the system. Its operation was satisfactory and it allowed the evaluation of the system potential. The development of this system requires low cost elements that are easily found in the market.

  4. Communication with patient, family and community in the rural world.

    PubMed

    Gracia Ballarin, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The rural world and its population have their own characteristics, different from the urban world, which contribute to creating a unique framework for physician-patient communication and relationship. On most occasions the physician arrives in the village from some other setting and must adapt. He or she must make a good first impression on the neighbours, and learn the language they use to describe the most common illnesses and symptoms (sickness, indigestion, faintness, lack of appetite...), because the doctor must use the patients' language. Moreover, the doctor has to accept being permanently observed and identified. Thus, this Spanish personal view takes the reader into the world of the rural doctor. PMID:16438637

  5. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  6. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  7. Nononcologic Disease in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowitz, Barry B.; Benjamin, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Nononcologic medical problems are common in patients with cancer. Failure to evaluate and treat these problems leads to considerable morbidity and mortality in people who often have potential for both comfortable and productive lives. While a physician is sometimes powerless to prevent the progression of underlying cancer, he must not allow a diagnostic category to color his approach. By seeing only an end point which is inevitable for all people, one could be inclined not to treat what is treatable. With clinical judgment, information and the eternal question of diagnosticians, “What else could this be?”, a physician can focus not on the inevitability of death but on the quality of life. PMID:878475

  8. Patient Beliefs About Colon Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Daly, Jeanette; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    Only about half of eligible individuals undergo colon cancer screening. We have limited knowledge about the patient beliefs that adversely affect screening decisions and about which beliefs might be amenable to change through education. As part of a clinical trial, 641 rural Iowans, aged 52 to 79 years, reported their beliefs about colon cancer screening in response to a mailed questionnaire. Consenting subjects were randomized into four groups, which were distinguished by four levels of increasingly intensive efforts to promote screening. Two of the groups received mailed educational materials and completed a follow-up questionnaire, which allowed us to determine whether their beliefs about screening changed following the education. We also completed a factor analysis to identify underlying (latent) factors that might explain the responses to 33 questions about readiness, attitudes, and perceived barriers related to colon cancer screening. The strongest predictors of a patient's stated readiness to be screened were a physician's recommendation to be screened (1 point difference on 10-point Likert scale, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 1.6 point difference), a family history of colon cancer (0.85-point Likert scale difference, 95 % CI, 0.1 to 1.6), and a belief that health-care decisions should be mostly left to physicians rather than patients (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.21, P < .001). Of the 33 questionnaire items about screening beliefs, 11 (33 %) changed favorably following the educational intervention. In the factor analysis, the 33 items were reduced to 8 underlying factors, such as being too busy to undergo screening and worries about screening procedures. We found a limited number of underlying factors that may help explain patient resistance to colon cancer screening. PMID:25619196

  9. Giving and Receiving Emotional Support Online: Communication Competence as a Moderator of Psychosocial Benefits for Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Woohyun; Namkoong, Kang; Choi, Mina; Shah, Dhavan V; Tsang, Stephanie; Hong, Yangsun; Aguilar, Michael; Gustafson, David H

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the moderating role of emotional communication competence in the relationship between computer-mediated social support (CMSS) group participation, specifically giving and receiving emotional support, and psychological health outcomes. Data were collected as part of randomized clinical trials for women diagnosed with breast cancer within the last 2 months. Expression and reception of emotional support was assessed by tracking and coding the 18,064 messages that 236 patients posted and read in CMSS groups. The final data used in the analysis was created by merging (a) computer-aided content analysis of discussion posts, (b) action log data analysis of system usage, and (c) baseline and six-month surveys collected to assess change. Results of this study demonstrate that emotional communication competence moderates the effects of expression and reception of emotional support on psychological quality of life and breast cancer-related concerns in both desired and undesired ways. Giving and receiving emotional support in CMSS groups has positive effects on emotional well-being for breast cancer patients with higher emotional communication, while the same exchanges have detrimental impacts on emotional well-being for those with lower emotional communication competence. The theoretical and practical implications for future research are discussed. PMID:24058261

  10. Giving and Receiving Emotional Support Online: Communication Competence as a Moderator of Psychosocial Benefits for Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Woohyun; Namkoong, Kang; Choi, Mina; Shah, Dhavan V.; Tsang, Stephanie; Hong, Yangsun; Aguilar, Michael; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the moderating role of emotional communication competence in the relationship between computer-mediated social support (CMSS) group participation, specifically giving and receiving emotional support, and psychological health outcomes. Data were collected as part of randomized clinical trials for women diagnosed with breast cancer within the last 2 months. Expression and reception of emotional support was assessed by tracking and coding the 18,064 messages that 236 patients posted and read in CMSS groups. The final data used in the analysis was created by merging (a) computer-aided content analysis of discussion posts, (b) action log data analysis of system usage, and (c) baseline and six-month surveys collected to assess change. Results of this study demonstrate that emotional communication competence moderates the effects of expression and reception of emotional support on psychological quality of life and breast cancer-related concerns in both desired and undesired ways. Giving and receiving emotional support in CMSS groups has positive effects on emotional well-being for breast cancer patients with higher emotional communication, while the same exchanges have detrimental impacts on emotional well-being for those with lower emotional communication competence. The theoretical and practical implications for future research are discussed. PMID:24058261

  11. Fertility Preservation for Cancer Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ajala, Tosin; Rafi, Junaid; Larsen-Disney, Peter; Howell, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the fore-front the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Oncologists must be aware of situations where their treatment will affect fertility in patients who are being treated for cancer and they must also be aware of the pathways available for procedures such as cryopreservation of gametes and/or embryos. Improved cancer care associated with increased cure rates and long term survival, coupled with advances in fertility treatment means that it is now imperative that fertility preservation is considered as part of the care offered to these patients. This can only be approached within a multidisciplinary setting. There are obvious challenges that still remain to be resolved, especially in the area of fertility preservation in prepubertal patients. These include ethical issues, such as valid consent and research in the area of tissue retrieval, cryopreservation, and transplantation. PMID:20379357

  12. Ask, Understand, Remember: A Brief Measure of Patient Communication Self-Efficacy Within Clinical Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Clayman, Marla L.; Pandit, Anjali U.; Bergeron, Ashley R.; Cameron, Kenzie A.; Ross, Emily; Wolf, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Patients' ability to effectively communicate with their health care providers is an essential aspect of proper self-care, especially for those with chronic conditions. We wanted to develop and validate a brief reliable measure of patient communication self-efficacy within clinical encounters. Consecutively recruited patients (n = 330) with diagnosed hypertension from seven primary care clinics in Chicago, Illinois, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Shreveport, Louisiana completed an in-person interview including chronic disease self-efficacy, hypertension knowledge, health literacy assessments, and items modified from the Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy (CASE) – Cancer scale. Six items from the CASE were candidates for a new scale due to their focus on the patient-provider relationship. Using principal components analysis with varimax rotation, four items strongly loaded onto one factor (Eigenvalue = 2.33; proportion of variance explained = 58%) with a Cronbach's ? coefficient of 0.75. The measure, referred to as the Ask, Understand, Remember Assesment, (AURA) was moderately correlated with the total score from an existing chronic disease management self-efficacy scale (r = 0.31) and disease knowledge (beta coefficient = 0.2, 95% Confidence Interval 0.04 – 0.3, p = .03). Patients with low health literacy had lower scores on the AURA than those with marginal or adequate health literacy (p <.05). The AURA demonstrated high internal consistency and was correlated with both hypertension knowledge and a chronic disease self-efficacy scale. The AURA is brief, valid, has low reading demands, and is an appropriate tool for use among patients with chronic illness. It may also be useful in identifying and assisting patients who are at risk for errors or non-adherence with self-care behaviors. PMID:20845194

  13. Cost Concerns of Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stump, Tammy K.; Eghan, Naa; Egleston, Brian L.; Hamilton, Olivia; Pirollo, Melanie; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Armstrong, Katrina; Beck, J. Robert; Meropol, Neal J.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Health care providers are accustomed to identifying populations for whom cost-related concerns may be a significant barrier, such as the poor, but few empiric data have been collected to substantiate such assumptions, particularly among insured patients. Methods: Patients with cancer from academic and community hospitals completed a questionnaire that included closed-ended items concerning demographic variables, optimism, numeracy, and concerns about present and future medical costs. In addition, they answered open-ended questions regarding cost concerns and medical expenses. Results: Nearly all (99%) participants were insured. In response to the closed-ended questions, 30.3% of patients reported concern about paying for their cancer treatment, 22.3% reported that their family had made sacrifices to pay for their care, and 8.3% stated that their insurance adequately covered their current health care costs, and 17.3% reported concerns about coverage for their costs in the future. On open-ended questions, 35.3% reported additional expenses, and 47.5% reported concerns about health care costs. None of the assessed patient characteristics proved to be a robust predictor across all cost-related concerns. There was a strong association between the identification of concerns or expenses on the open-ended questions and concerns on closed-ended questions. Conclusion: Cost concerns are common among patients with cancer who have health insurance. Health care providers may alleviate concerns by discussing cost-related concerns with all patients, not only those of lower socioeconomic status or those without insurance. A closed-ended screening question may help to initiate these conversations. This may identify potential resources, lower distress, and enable patients to make optimal treatment decisions. PMID:23943901

  14. Doctor-Patient Communication Failure: The Special Case of the Inner-city Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotland, Dawn D.

    Drawing on personal observations and on a study of patient reactions, this paper considers the problem of doctor/patient communication failure in the inner city clinic. It first discusses the role of dialect variation in communication failure, causes of communication failure in the medical interview, factors contributing to doctor/patient…

  15. Maternal Coping and Depressive Symptoms as Predictors of Mother-Child Communication About a Child's Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Erin M; Murphy, Lexa; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Young-Saleme, Tammi; Saylor, Megan; Bemis, Heather; Desjardins, Leandra; Dunn, Madeleine J; Compas, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE : This study sought to identify possible associations between maternal coping and depression and subsequent mother-child communication about cancer following the child's diagnosis.  METHOD : Mothers (N = 100) reported on coping and depressive symptoms shortly after the child's diagnosis (M = 1.9 months). Subsequently, we observed children (age 5-17 years; M = 10.2 years; 48% female; 81% White) and mothers discussing cancer and coded maternal communication.  RESULTS : Higher primary and secondary control coping, and lower depressive symptoms, were generally correlated with more positive, and less harsh and withdrawn communication. In regression models, higher primary control coping (i.e., coping efforts to change the stressor or one's emotional reaction to the stressor) independently predicted less withdrawn communication, and depressive symptoms mediated relations between coping and harsh communication.  CONCLUSIONS : Maternal primary control coping and depressive symptoms predict mothers' subsequent harsh and withdrawn communication about cancer. PMID:26609183

  16. Retaining Low-Income Minority Cancer Patients in a Depression Treatment Intervention Trial: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Wells, Anjanette A; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Williams, Sha-Lai L; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Previously published work finds significant benefit from medical and behavioral health team care among safety-net patients with major depression. This qualitative study assessed clinical social worker, psychiatrist and patient navigator strategies to increase depression treatment among low-income minority cancer patients participating in the ADAPt-C clinical depression trial. Patient care retention strategies were elicited through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with nine behavioral health providers. Using grounded theory, concepts from the literature and dropout barriers identified by patients, guided interview prompts. Retention strategies clustered around five dropout barriers: (1) informational, (2) instrumental, (3) provider-patient therapeutic alliance, (4) clinic setting, and (5) depression treatment. All strategies emphasized the importance of communication between providers and patients. Findings suggest that strong therapeutic alliance and telephone facilitates collaborative team provider communication and depression treatment retention among patients in safety-net oncology care systems. PMID:25544505

  17. Maximize Life Global Cancer Awareness Campaign: improving the lives of cancer patients while increasing global awareness of their needs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Pat; Schwartz, Erin L

    2012-01-01

    In October 2010 The Max Foundation, in partnership with 30 cancer patient associations in emerging countries, organized a global cancer awareness campaign. The aims of the campaign were: (i) to increase awareness of the needs of people living with cancer in developing countries; (ii) to increase local visibility of patient associations in their countries; (iii) to collect more than 10,000 signatures to the World Cancer Declaration (WCD); and (iv) to improve the lives of cancer survivors by providing them with an opportunity to express their feelings about the disease. The campaign was developed as a global effort, to be implemented by local patient associations through their volunteer survivors and caregivers. The methodology at the global level included developing the framework, branding, and communication tools, while making available limited funding and heavy logistical support. Local patient associations were encouraged to adapt the initiative to a culturally accepted format. Key elements of the campaign were the mix of low tech and high tech elements to allow low tech populations to participate while promoting the initiative using social media and high tech tools. Additionally, the participation of survivors and caregivers ensured the campaign provided immediate benefit to cancer patients. Finally, the addition of the World Cancer Declaration provided a strong unifying component. More than 60 events were held in 31 countries around the world, collecting more than 13,000 signatures to the World Cancer Declaration and a similar number of support messages to cancer survivors representing 84 countries. Local events gained local media visibility in many countries, and the campaign was promoted in multiple international forums and Web sites. This initiative involving mobilization of volunteers and the development of a global initiative as a grassroots movement taught important lessons on media outreach and selection of leaders for a cancer awareness campaign. PMID:22910498

  18. The Effects of Expressing Religious Support Online for Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Mclaughlin, Bryan; Yang, JungHwan; Yoo, Woohyun; Shaw, Bret; Kim, Soo Yun; Shah, Dhavan; Gustafson, David

    2016-06-01

    The growth of online support groups has led to an expression effects paradigm within the health communication literature. Although religious support expression is characterized as a typical subdimension of emotional support, we argue that in the context of a life-threatening illness, the inclusion of a religious component creates a unique communication process. Using data from an online group for women with breast cancer, we test a theoretical expression effects model. Results demonstrate that for breast cancer patients, religious support expression has distinct effects from general emotional support messages, which highlights the need to further theorize expression effects along these lines. PMID:26643027

  19. Communication of ALS Patients by Detecting Event-Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS) patients are unable to successfully communicate their desires, although their mental capacity is the same as non-affected persons. Therefore, the authors put emphasis on Event-Related Potential(ERP) which elicits the highest outcome for the target visual and hearing stimuli. P300 is one component of ERP. It is positive potential that is elicited when the subject focuses attention on stimuli that appears infrequently. In this paper, the authors focused on P200 and N200 components, in addition to P300, for their great improvement in the rate of correct judgment in the target word-specific experiment. Hence the authors propose the algorithm that specifies target words by detecting these three components. Ten healthy subjects and ALS patient underwent the experiment in which a target word out of five words, was specified by this algorithm. The rates of correct judgment in nine of ten healthy subjects were more than 90.0%. The highest rate was 99.7%. The highest rate of ALS patient was 100.0%. Through these results, the authors found the possibility that ALS patients could communicate with surrounding persons by detecting ERP(P200, N200 and P300) as their desire.

  20. Communication and pragmatic breakdowns in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bambini, Valentina; Arcara, Giorgio; Martinelli, Ilaria; Bernini, Sara; Alvisi, Elena; Moro, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    While there is increasing attention toward cognitive changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the domain of pragmatics, defined as the ability to integrate language and context to engage in successful communication, remains unexplored. Here we tested pragmatic abilities in 33 non-demented ALS patients and 33 healthy controls matched for age and education through 6 different tasks, ranging from discourse organization to the comprehension of figurative language, further grouped in three composite measures for pragmatic production, pragmatic comprehension and global pragmatic abilities. For a subgroup of patients, assessment included executive functions and social cognition skills. ALS patients were impaired on all pragmatic tasks relative to controls, with 45% of the patients performing below cut-off in at least one pragmatic task, and 36% impaired on the global pragmatic score. Pragmatic breakdowns were more common than executive deficit as defined by the consensus criteria, and approximately as prevalent as deficits in social cognition. Multiple regression analyses support the idea of an interplay of executive and social cognition abilities in determining the pragmatic performance, although all these domains show some degree of independence. These findings shed light on pragmatic impairment as a relevant dimension of ALS, which deserves further consideration in defining the cognitive profile of the disease, given its vital role for communication and social interaction in daily life. PMID:26799425

  1. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication About Cancer.

    PubMed

    RodrĂ­guez, Vivian M; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N; Quillin, John M

    2016-03-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. The women's average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% had graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy, and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that in turn inform cancer prevention interventions. PMID:26735646

  2. Venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: risk assessment, prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Tukaye, Deepali N; Brink, Heidi; Baliga, Ragavendra

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolic events contribute to significant morbidity in cancer patients. Venous thrombosis embolism (which includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) accounts for a large percentage of thromboembolic events. Appropriate identification of cancer patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism and management of thromboembolic event is crucial in improving the quality of care for cancer patients. However, thromboembolism in cancer patients is a complex problem and the management has to be tailored to each individual. The focus of this review is to understand the complex pathology, physiology and risk factors that drive the process of venous thrombosis and embolism in cancer patients and the current guidelines in management. PMID:26919091

  3. Fertility preservation in young patients’ with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Apurva

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of young cancer patients. Though embryo cryostorage is a well-established procedure, it can only be availed by couples. Recent studies have indicated increasing success rates with mature and immature oocyte cryopreservation. Cryostorage induces injuries on the human oocytes which can be minimized by slow freezing and vitrification. Selection of candiidates is crucial so that the most suitable technique can be offered without any delay in initiation of cancer therapy. Factors affecting suitability are age of patient, assessment of ovarian reserve, hormonal status and type and stage of neoplastic disease. Encouraging results have been obtained with oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) followed by vitrification for cryostorage. Data on the use of vitrified eggs in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) show that pregnancy rates can be comparable to those achieved with fresh oocytes. PMID:25540565

  4. Fertility preservation in young patients' with cancer.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of young cancer patients. Though embryo cryostorage is a well-established procedure, it can only be availed by couples. Recent studies have indicated increasing success rates with mature and immature oocyte cryopreservation. Cryostorage induces injuries on the human oocytes which can be minimized by slow freezing and vitrification. Selection of candiidates is crucial so that the most suitable technique can be offered without any delay in initiation of cancer therapy. Factors affecting suitability are age of patient, assessment of ovarian reserve, hormonal status and type and stage of neoplastic disease. Encouraging results have been obtained with oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) followed by vitrification for cryostorage. Data on the use of vitrified eggs in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) show that pregnancy rates can be comparable to those achieved with fresh oocytes. PMID:25540565

  5. Why Breast Cancer Patients Seek Traditional Healers

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Merriam, Sharan; Suhami, Norhasmilia

    2012-01-01

    Traditional healing is a common practice in low and middle income countries such as Malaysia. Eighty percent of Malaysians consult traditional healers or “bomoh” at some time in their life for health-related issues. The purpose of our study was to explore why breast cancer patients visit traditional healers. This is a qualitative study utilizing in-depth interviews with 11 cancer survivors who sought both traditional and Western medicine. The findings revealed the following reasons for which patients seek traditional healers: (1) recommendation from family and friends, (2) sanction from family, (3) perceived benefit and compatibility, (4) healer credibility, and (5) reservation with Western medicine and system delay. These factors work together and are strongly influenced by the Malaysian cultural context. The issue with the Western health system is common in a developing country with limited health facilities. PMID:22295249

  6. Perceptions, Expectations, and Attitudes about Communication with Physicians among Chinese American and non-Hispanic White Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Judy Huei-yu; Adams, Inez F.; Pasick, Rena J.; Gomez, Scarlett L.; Allen, Laura; Ma, Grace X.; Lee, Michael X.; Huang, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Asian Americans have consistently reported poorer communication with physicians compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). This qualitative study sought to elucidate the similarities and differences in communication with physicians between Chinese and NHW breast cancer survivors. Methods Forty-four Chinese and 28 NHW women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0-IIa) from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry participated in focus group discussions or individual interviews. We oversampled Chinese women because little is known about their cancer care experiences. In both interview formats, questions explored patients’ experiences and feelings when communicating with physicians about their diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care. Results Physician empathy at the time of diagnosis was important to both ethnic groups; however, during treatment and follow-up care, physicians’ ability to treat cancer and alleviate physical symptoms was a higher priority. NHW and US-born Chinese survivors were more likely to assert their needs, whereas Chinese immigrants accepted physician advice even when it did not alleviate physical problems (e.g., pain). Patients viewed all physicians as the primary source for information about cancer care. Many Chinese immigrants sought additional information from primary care physicians and stressed optimal communication over language concordance. Conclusions Physician empathy and precise information were important for cancer patients. Cultural differences such as the Western emphasis on individual autonomy vs. Chinese emphasis on respect and hierarchy can be the basis for the varied approaches to physician communication we observed. Interventions based on cultural understanding can foster more effective communication between immigrant patients and physicians ultimately improving patient outcomes. PMID:23903797

  7. [Adjuvant therapy of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Semiglazov, V F; Bavli, Ia L; Moiseenko, V M

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the state of the art in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients. The protocol of the randomized controlled study of the effectiveness of adjuvant chemohormonotherapy conducted at the Petrov Institute since January, 1985 is presented. It is suggested that all oncological institutions concerned should take part in a cooperative investigation to be carried out along the guidelines outlined in the protocol. PMID:3097961

  8. Blood Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiles of HER2 Negative Breast Cancers Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balacescu, Ovidiu; Balacescu, Loredana; Gherman, Claudia; Drigla, Flaviu; Pop, Laura; Bolba-Morar, Gabriela; Tudoran, Oana; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Tumors act systemically to sustain cancer progression, affecting the physiological processes in the host and triggering responses in the blood circulating cells. In this study, we explored blood transcriptional patterns of patients with two subtypes of HER2 negative breast cancers, with different prognosis and therapeutic outcome. Peripheral blood samples from seven healthy female donors and 29 women with breast cancer including 14 triple-negative breast cancers and 15 hormone-dependent breast cancers were evaluated by microarray. We also evaluated the stroma in primary tumors. Transcriptional analysis revealed distinct molecular signatures in the blood of HER2− breast cancer patients according to ER/PR status. Our data showed the implication of immune signaling in both breast cancer subtypes with an enrichment of these processes in the blood of TNBC patients. We observed a significant alteration of “chemokine signaling,” “IL-8 signaling,” and “communication between innate and adaptive immune cells” pathways in the blood of TNBC patients correlated with an increased inflammation and necrosis in their primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of triple-negative breast cancer is associated with an enrichment of altered systemic immune-related pathways, suggesting that immunotherapy could possibly be synergistic to the chemotherapy, to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:26884644

  9. Factors Associated with Use of Interactive Cancer Communication System: An Application of the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong Yeob; Wise, Meg; Kim, Eunkyung; Pingree, Ray; Hawkins, Robert P.; Pingree, Suzanne; McTavish, Fiona; Gustafson, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide insights about cancer patients’ online information seeking behaviors, the present study analyzes individuals’ transaction log data and reports on how demographics, disease-related factors, and psychosocial needs predict patterns of service use within a particular Interactive Cancer Communication System (ICCS). Study sample included 294 recently diagnosed breast cancer patients. Data included pretest survey scores of demographic, disease-related, and psychosocial factors and automatically collected ICCS use data over the 4-month intervention. Statistical analyses correlated pre-test survey scores with subsequent, specific types of ICCS service usage. Patterns of online cancer information seeking differed according to the patients’ characteristics, suggesting that lower income, less educated women and those lacking in information-seeking competence use the computer and online services to the same or a greater degree if those services are made available to them. Results of this study can inform more effective resource development for future eHealth applications. PMID:21760702

  10. Public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs: implications for cancer communication.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Jessica Gall; Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Brown, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the public reaction to the death of Steve Jobs, focusing on general and cancer-specific information seeking and interpersonal communication. Shortly after Jobs's death, employees from a large university in the Southeastern United States (N = 1,398) completed a web-based survey. Every employee had heard about Steve Jobs's death, and 97% correctly identified pancreatic cancer as the cause of his death. General (50%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (7%) information seeking, as well as general (74%) and pancreatic cancer-specific (17%) interpersonal communication, took place in response to Steve Jobs's death. In multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for demographics and several cancer-oriented variables, both identification with Steve Jobs and cancer worry in response to Steve Jobs's death significantly (p < .05) predicted pancreatic cancer information seeking as well as interpersonal communication about pancreatic cancer. Additional analyses revealed that cancer worry partially mediated the effects of identification on these outcome variables. Implications of these results for future research as well as cancer prevention and communication efforts are discussed. PMID:24716627

  11. Suicide In Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Turaga, Kiran K.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Schell, Michael J.; Sarr, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Depression is highly prevalent in patients with pancreatic cancer and can result in fatal outcomes from suicides. The authors report suicide rates among patients with pancreatic cancer in the United States and identify factors associated with greater suicide rates. METHODS The current study reviewed data in the SEER database for patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 1995-2005. Logistic regression models were used to perform multivariate modeling for factors associated with suicide, while Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess factors affecting survival. RESULTS Among 36,221 patients followed for 22,145 person-years, the suicide rate was 135.4 per 100,000 person-years. The corresponding rate in the US population aged 65-74 years was 12.5 per 100,000 person-years, with a Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) of 10.8 (95% CI, 9.2-12.7). Greater suicide rates were noted in males (Odds Ratio (OR) 13.5 [95% CI, 3.2-56.9, P < .001]) and, among males, in patients undergoing an operative intervention (OR 2.5 [95% CI, 1.0-6.5, P = .05]). Married men had a lesser risk of committing suicide (OR 0.3 [95% CI, 0.1-0.6, P = .002]). Median survival among patients undergoing operative intervention was 2 months for those who committed suicide compared with 10 months for those who did not commit suicide. CONCLUSIONS Male patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma have a risk of suicide nearly 11 times that of the general population. Patients who undergo an operative intervention are more likely to commit suicide, generally in the early postoperative period. PMID:20824626

  12. Distress and Patient-Centered Communication among Veterans with Incidental (Not Screen-Detected) Pulmonary Nodules. A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sara E.; Ganzini, Linda; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Au, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Incidental pulmonary nodule detection is postulated to cause distress, but the frequency and magnitude of that distress have not been reported. The quality of patient–clinician communication and the perceived risk of lung cancer may influence distress Objectives: To evaluate the association of communication processes with distress and the perceived risk of lung cancer using validated instruments. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients with incidentally detected nodules who received care at one Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We measured distress with the Impact of Event Scale and patient-centered communication with the Consultation Care Measure, both validated instruments. Risk of lung cancer was self-reported by participants. We used multivariable adjusted logistic regression to measure the association of communication quality with distress. Measurements and Main Results: Among 122 Veterans with incidental nodules, 23%, 12%, and 4% reported experiencing mild, moderate, and severe distress, respectively, at the time they were informed of the pulmonary nodule. Participant-reported risk of lung cancer was not associated with distress. In the adjusted model, high-quality communication was associated with decreased distress (odds ratio [OR]?=?0.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.08–1.00, P?=?0.05). Among participants who reported a risk of malignancy of 30% or less, high-quality communication was associated with decreased distress (OR?=?0.15, 95% CI?=?0.02–0.92, P?=?0.04), but was not associated with distress for those who reported a risk greater than 30% (OR?=?0.12 (95% CI?=?0.00–3.97, P?=?0.24), although the P value for interaction was not significant. Conclusions: Veterans with incidental pulmonary nodules frequently reported inadequate information exchange regarding their nodule. Many patients experience distress after they are informed that they have a pulmonary nodule, and high-quality patient–clinician communication is associated with decreased distress. Communication strategies that only target improved knowledge of the risk of malignancy may not be sufficient to reduce the distress associated with nodule detection. PMID:25521482

  13. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data. PMID:18634801

  14. Effects of Tailored Risk Communications for Skin Cancer Prevention and Detection: The PennSCAPE Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glanz, Karen; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Jepson, Christopher; Ming, Michael E.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention and early detection measures for melanoma, such as sun avoidance and skin examinations, are important, but are practiced inconsistently. In this replication of the Project SCAPE trial, we sought to determine whether tailored print materials were more effective at improving adherence than generic print materials for patients at increased-risk of skin cancer. Methods Participants were randomized to receive personalized mailed communications about their skin cancer risk and recommended sun protection, or generic mailings. Participants were Caucasian adults, at moderate or high risk for skin cancer, recruited in outpatient primary care. The main outcomes were overall sun protection behaviors and specific protective behaviors including use of sunscreen, shirt, hat, sunglasses, shade and sun avoidance; recent sunburns; and skin self-examination and provider skin examination. Results One hundred ninety-two (93.2%) subjects completed the study. Six outcome variables showed significant intervention condition effects in mixed effects models: overall sun protection behavior (p = .025); sunscreen use (p = .026); use of sunglasses (p = .011); sunburns in the past three months (p = .033); recency of last skin self-exam (p = .017); and frequency of skin exams by health care provider (p = .016). Conclusions Relative to generic communications, tailored risk communications resulted in improved adherence to six skin cancer protective behaviors, including a composite sun protection behavior measure, sunburns, and health care provider skin examinations. Impact Tailored interventions can be more effective in improving patient prevention behaviors than non-tailored, generic information for patients at moderate to high risk of skin cancer. PMID:25432953

  15. A Counseling Group for Children of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanko, Cynthia A.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer affects not just the patient but also the entire family system. The effect of a parent's cancer on young children in the family may lead to emotional distress and school problems. This article describes guidelines for a counseling group for elementary school children of cancer patients to be led by the school counselor and meet in the…

  16. Controlling Malglycemia in Patients Undergoing Treatment for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Storey, Susan; Brady, Veronica J; Leak Bryant, Ashley; Davis, Ellen D; Hammer, Marilyn J; Hershey, Denise Soltow; Olausson, Jill; Seley, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Patients with or without preexisting diabetes undergoing treatment for cancer may be at risk for malglycemic events. Malglycemia, particularly hyperglycemia and diabetes in patients with cancer, may lead to adverse outcomes. Prevention, prompt recognition, and early intervention to regulate malglycemia can optimize the effects of cancer treatment, minimize the harmful consequences, and improve quality of life for patients with cancer. The development of evidence-based standards of care and protocols are needed to guide clinical practice when caring for patients with cancer. PMID:26800412

  17. Steroid-withdrawal radiation pneumonitis in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Bertrand, M.; Cecchi, G.R.; Paladugu, R.R.; Kendregan, B.A.

    1984-06-01

    Two cancer patients developed steroid-withdrawal radiation pneumonitis. This complication is a recognized risk in the treatment of patients with Hodgkin's disease and other malignant lymphomas, but is under-recognized in patients receiving treatment for carcinoma.

  18. Patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' anxiety and desire for information.

    PubMed

    Fröjd, Camilla; Lampic, Claudia; Larsson, Gunnel; BirgegÄrd, Gunnar; von Essen, Louise

    2007-12-01

    The aim was to describe the patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors, considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' worry about how the disease may develop and the desire for information about the disease and its treatment. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews with 19 doctors regarding 29 patients within endocrine oncology and haematology care, and the data were analysed by content analysis. The doctors considered the patients' verbal expressions, verbal behaviours, questions, body language, and facial expressions together with their own professional knowledge and experience, when estimating the patients' worry and desire for information. The doctors also considered contextual factors, patients' demographical factors, and medical situation when estimating the patients' worry, and also when estimating the patients' desire for information. The findings illustrate that estimating patients' worry and desire for information is a multifaceted and complex task, and that doctors consider not only the patients' verbal and nonverbal cues, but also factors, such as their own professional knowledge and experience, contextual factors, and patients' demographical variables. The findings should be communicated to doctors who meet cancer patients in medical consultations in order to illuminate the complexity of the medical consultation. The awareness of potentially important patient cues and other factors may aid doctors in their efforts to gain insight about their patients' emotions and informational needs. PMID:18036016

  19. Motives of cancer patients for using the Internet to seek social support.

    PubMed

    Yli-Uotila, T; Rantanen, A; Suominen, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe why Finnish cancer patients choose the internet as a source of social support. The data were collected in May 2010, using an online questionnaire with open-ended questions, through four discussion forums on the websites of the non-profit Cancer Society of Finland. Seventy-four adult patients with cancer participated. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. The mean age of the participants was 53 years and they were predominantly women. The most common cancer was breast cancer and more than three quarters of the participants had suffered from cancer for less than 5 years. The initial stimuli to use the internet as a source of social support were the ease of communication and access to information as well as the need for emotional and informational support. The actual motives that drove the use of the internet as a source of social support were the requirements for information and peer support, internet technology, a lack of support outside the internet and the negative experiences caused by the illness. The fact that there is an enormous need for information as well as for emotional support and that cancer treatment in Finland is concentrated in major hospitals, to which cancer patients may travel a considerable distance, suggests that nurses should learn to make more frequent virtual contact with their patients. PMID:23320398

  20. General care of the older cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Gosney, M

    2009-03-01

    With increasing age, there are greater numbers of older people who will be diagnosed with cancer. It must be remembered that such individuals have increased frailty and have a number of geriatric syndromes and conditions particularly pertinent to older age, including incontinence, poor cognition and impaired nutrition. It is often difficult to define the effects of cancer and its treatment or complications, and separate these from the effects of normal ageing and geriatric syndromes. The documentation of poor nutrition and its management must combine knowledge from both geriatric medicine and oncology. Nutrition serves to identify key healthcare professionals who are all essential in any patient at risk or suffering from malnutrition. Incontinence must be actively sought, its cause identified and efforts made to either 'cure' it or, in certain circumstances, 'manage' it. Older patients with cancer are cared for predominantly by older relations and informal care mechanisms and special consideration of their physical and practical needs are paramount. In this area, nurses, doctors, therapists and social workers should work to identify formal and informal mechanisms to support particularly the older carer. PMID:19059769

  1. Predictors of supportive message expression and reception in an interactive cancer communication system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Han, Jeong Yeob; Shah, Dhavan; Shaw, Bret; McTavish, Fiona; Gustafson, David H; Fan, David

    2011-11-01

    Social support in computer-mediated settings is an important variable in health communication research, yet little is known about the factors that influence the amount of social support one gives and receives in online support groups. To shed some light on this issue, the authors examined demographics, disease-related factors, psychosocial factors, and strategies for coping with breast cancer as potential determinants of which patients provide support to others and which ones consume it. Data collected from 177 participants in the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System "Living With Breast Cancer" program revealed that individuals who are younger, have higher levels of positive reframing, and lower levels of self-blame are more likely to provide emotional support in online settings. In contrast, individuals who are more educated, have less perceived availability of social support, and have lower levels of religious coping are more likely to receive emotional support from others. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical implications for providing effective psychosocial support for women with breast cancer. PMID:22070449

  2. Expectations About the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Incurable Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aileen B.; Cronin, Angel; Weeks, Jane C.; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A.; Malin, Jennifer; Hayman, James A.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although radiation therapy (RT) can palliate symptoms and may prolong life, it is not curative for patients with metastatic lung cancer. We investigated patient expectations about the goals of RT for incurable lung cancers. Patients and Methods The Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium enrolled a population- and health system–based cohort of patients diagnosed with lung cancer from 2003 to 2005. We identified patients with stage wet IIIB or IV lung cancer who received RT and answered questions on their expectations about RT. We assessed patient expectations about the goals of RT and identified factors associated with inaccurate beliefs about cure. Results In all, 384 patients completed surveys on their expectations about RT. Seventy-eight percent of patients believed that RT was very or somewhat likely to help them live longer, and 67% believed that RT was very or somewhat likely to help them with problems related to their cancer. However, 64% did not understand that RT was not at all likely to cure them. Older patients and nonwhites were more likely to have inaccurate beliefs, and patients whose surveys were completed by surrogates were less likely to have inaccurate beliefs. Ninety-two percent of patients with inaccurate beliefs about cure from RT also had inaccurate beliefs about chemotherapy. Conclusion Although patients receiving RT for incurable lung cancer believe it will help them, most do not understand that it is not at all likely to cure their disease. This indicates a need to improve communication regarding the goals and limitations of palliative RT. PMID:23775958

  3. Spiritual Coping: A Gateway to Enhancing Family Communication During Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Anne M; Fischer, Judith; Purdom, Ann; Cobos, Everardo; Helmeke, Karen B

    2016-02-01

    The researchers examined the spiritual coping, family communication, and family functioning of 95 participants in 34 families by an online survey. Multilevel linear regression was used to test whether individuals' and families' higher endorsement of more use of spiritual coping strategies to deal with a member's cancer would be associated with higher scores on family communication and family functioning, and whether better communication would also be associated with higher family functioning scores. Results revealed that spiritual coping was positively associated with family communication, and family communication was positively associated with healthier family functioning. The researchers provide suggestions for further research. PMID:26311053

  4. Tube feeding in the elderly cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    In elderly cancer patients tube feeding, via a nasogastric tube or a (percutaneous) gastrostomy may be an efficient way of nutritionally supporting patients with extreme anorexia or dysphagia caused by a head&neck tumor or with an oro-pharyngeal-esophageal mucositis due to radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. There is no definite difference, with regard to the clinical benefit, between nasogastric and gastrostomy feeding. Both procedures achieve good results in allowing the proper completion of the oncologic therapy. Whether to use a nasogastric tube or a (percutaneous) gastrostomy and whether to perform the procedure prophylactically or a la demande is a matter of controversy and depends more on the policy of the single institution and preferences of the patients than on evidence-based results. PMID:25770328

  5. Breaking bad news of cancer diagnosis – Perception of the cancer patients in a rural community in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Mathew Gabriel; Lian, Cheah Whye; Thon, Chang Ching

    2014-01-01

    Context: Breaking of bad news is an important component in the management of cancer patients. Aims: This study aimed to assess the perceptions of breaking bad news of cancer diagnosis. Settings and Design: It was a cross-sectional study using Breaking Bad News Assessment Schedule (BAS) questionnaire on cancer patients in Serian district. Materials and Methods: Using snowballing sampling method, a total of 134 patients were interviewed face-to-face after the consent was obtained from each of the respondents. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 19.0. Results: Majority were comfortable with the current method of breaking bad news. The main aspects found to be the areas of concern were the importance of the usage of body language, management of time and identifying patients’ key area of concerns. There were significant difference between sex and “information giving” (P = 0.028) and “general consideration” (P = 0.016) and also between “the age and setting the scene” (P = 0.042). Significant difference was also found between the types of cancer and “the setting of scene” (P = 0.018), “breaking bad news technique” (P = 0.010), “eliciting concerns” (P = 0.003) and “information giving” (P = 0.004). Conclusion: Good and effective communication skill of breaking bad news is vital in the management of cancer patients. As the incidence of new cases of cancer increase every year, breaking of bad news has become a pertinent to the medical professionals’ role. Specific aspects of communication skills based on local characteristics should be more emphasized in the formulation of training for doctors. PMID:24818107

  6. Diagnosis, disease stage, and distress of Chinese cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyan; Chen, Huiping; Deng, Yaotiao; Yi, Tingwu; Wang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective is to assess how cancer patients know about their diagnosis what they know about their real stage, and the relationship between cancer stage and psychological distress. Methods A questionnaire including the Distress Thermometer was delivered to 422 cancer inpatients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Most of patients (68.7%) knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis. Half of patients knew their diagnosis directly from medical reports. Nearly one third of patients were informed by doctors. Cancer stages, which patients believed, differed significantly from their real disease stages (P<0.001). Over half of patients did not know their real disease stages. Patients with stage I–III cancer were more likely to know their real disease stage than patients with stage IV cancer (P<0.001). Distress scores of cancer patients were determined by the real cancer stage (P=0.012), not the stage which patients believed. Conclusions Although most of participants knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis, less than half of them knew their real disease stage. Patient with stage I–III cancer was more likely to know the real disease stage and had a DT score <4 than patient with stage IV disease. PMID:27004220

  7. Instrumental and socioemotional communications in doctor-patient interactions in urban and rural clinics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Location of practice, such as working in a rural or urban clinic, may influence how physicians communicate with their patients. This exploratory pilot study examines the communication styles used during doctor-patient interactions in urban and rural family practice settings in Western Canada. Methods We analyzed observation and interview data from four physicians practicing in these different locations. Using a grounded theory approach, communications were categorized as either instrumental or socioemotional. Instrumental communication refers to “cure-oriented interactions” and tends to be more task-oriented focusing on the patient’s health concerns and reason for the appointment. In contrast, socioemotional communication refers to more “care-oriented interactions” that may make the patient feel comfortable, relieve patient anxiety and build a trusting relationship. Results The physicians in small, rural towns appear to know their patients and their families on a more personal level and outside of their office, and engage in more socioemotional communications compared to those practicing in suburban clinics in a large urban centre. Knowing patients outside the clinic seems to change the nature of the doctor-patient interaction, and, in turn, the doctor-patient relationship itself. Interactions between urban doctors and their patients had a mixture of instrumental and socioemotional communications, while interactions between rural doctors and their patients tended to be highly interpersonal, often involving considerable socioemotional communication and relationship-building. Conclusions Despite the different ways that doctors and patients communicate with each other in the two settings, rural and urban doctors spend approximately the same amount of time with their patients. Thus, greater use of socioemotional communication by rural doctors, which may ease patient anxiety and increase patient trust, did not appear to add extra time to the patient visit. Research suggests that socioemotional communication may ultimately lead to better patient outcomes, which implies that health differences between rural and urban settings could be linked to differences in doctor-patient communication styles. PMID:23835062

  8. Suicides among Danish cancer patients 1971–1999

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, U; Christensen, M-LM; Engholm, G; Storm, H H

    2005-01-01

    Compared to the general population, the suicide risk among Danish cancer patients diagnosed in 1971–1986 was increased by 50% for men and 30% for women. We updated the earlier study to evaluate both long-term and recent trends in the suicide risk. Cancer patients with a first cancer diagnosed between 1971 and 1999 in Denmark were followed-up for completed suicide through 1999. Excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, 564 508 cancer patients were included and 1241 suicides observed. Both the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) of suicide relative to the general population and the suicide rates were analysed with Poisson regression methods. The overall SMR was increased to 1.7 (95% CI. 1.6–1.9) for men and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.5) for women. Following the cancer diagnosis, the suicide risk was highest in the first 3 months for men and between months 3 and 12 for women. The risk was higher for nonlocalised cancer and for cancers with perceived poor prognosis. Breast cancer patients had a higher risk than other cancer patients with similar good prognosis. The suicide rates among cancer patients decreased with calendar time, but less so than the rates in the general population. The suicide risk among cancer patients has not decreased as much as in the Danish population and reasons for this should be explored. Breast cancer might be believed by patients to be more life threatening than it is. Assessment and treatment of depression could improve the quality of life for cancer patients who suffer from unrecognised depressions and in turn reduce the risk of suicide in cancer patients. PMID:15756279

  9. The importance of patient-provider communication in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Rice, Timothy R; Dobry, Yuriy; Novakovic, Vladan; Appel, Jacob M

    2012-12-01

    Successful formulation and implementation of end-of-life care requires ongoing communication with the patient. When patients, for reasons of general medical or psychiatric illness, fail to verbally communicate, providers must be receptive to messages conveyed through alternate avenues of communication. We present the narrative of a man with schizophrenia who wished to forgo hemodialysis as a study in the ethical importance of attention to nonverbal communication. A multilayered understanding of the patient, as may be provided by both behavioral and motivational models, can inform the provider's ability to receive, process, and represent communicated content to the patient or his or her surrogate decision-maker. PMID:23188403

  10. Some Prostate Cancer Patients May Not Benefit from Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154753.html Some Prostate Cancer Patients May Not Benefit From Hormone Therapy Analysis ... TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer who also have had a heart attack may ...

  11. Survival Improves for Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 156009.html Survival Improves for Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer Study finds better prognosis in women whose tumors ... News) -- American women diagnosed with advanced, stage 4 breast cancer have a better chance of survival, and are ...

  12. Facilitating the Pediatric Cancer Patient's Return to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Judith W.; Scarvalone, Susan A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the educational needs of the pediatric cancer patient in returning to school. Discusses attitudes of parents and school personnel. Presents a seminar for teachers and school nurses of elementary pupils treated at a cancer center. (RC)

  13. More Young Breast Cancer Patients Getting Gene Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157201.html More Young Breast Cancer Patients Getting Gene Test New study finds nearly ... News) -- A growing number of young women with breast cancer are being tested for the BRCA gene mutations ...

  14. Early Chemo Less Likely to Help Black Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... html Early Chemo Less Likely to Help Black Breast Cancer Patients: Study More research needed to explain why ... is less likely to benefit black women with breast cancer than those in other racial and ethnic groups, ...

  15. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  16. Radioimmunodetection in patients with suspected ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pateisky, N.; Philipp, K.; Skodler, W.D.; Czerwenka, K.; Hamilton, G.; Burchell, J.

    1985-12-01

    Twenty-five patients, having either unilateral ovarian tumors of unknown etiology or suspected of having ovarian cancer recurrence were investigated by the method of immunoscintigraphy to rule out primary and/or metastatic tumor sites. Four-hundred micrograms of the tumor-associated monoclonal mouse antibody HMFG-2, raised against human milk fat globulin membranes and labeled with 123I, were used for each patient to display the tumor sites by external scintigraphy. The dose ranged between 0.5 and 2.2 mCi, the specific activity between 1.25 and 5.5 mCi per mg of antibody. Nineteen of the patients underwent operations a few days after immunoscintigraphy. The remaining six patients were investigated by transmission computed tomography (TCT) to establish the presence or absence of tumor of the imaging. In 22 of the 25 cases the scintigraphic results correlated with the situation found at the subsequent operation, or by TCT, respectively, as well as with the histological diagnosis of the tumor type. Overall, there were just two false-negative and one false-positive scan report, the latter due to faulty reading of the scintigrams. Sixteen out of 18 tumor sites in 25 patients could be revealed by immunoscintigraphy, the smallest one being 1.5 cm in diam. In four of the patients immunoscintigraphy was the only noninvasive investigation method that could reveal the malignant tumor sites prior to the operation.

  17. Metabolic phenotyping for monitoring ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chaofu; Li, Ang; Hou, Yan; Sun, Meng; Yang, Kai; Cheng, Jinlong; Wang, Jingtao; Ge, Tingting; Zhang, Fan; Li, Qiang; Li, Junnan; Wu, Ying; Lou, Ge; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most deadly of the gynecological cancers. New approaches and better tools for monitoring treatment efficacy and disease progression of EOC are required. In this study, metabolomics using rapid resolution liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was applied to a systematic investigation of metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence. The results revealed considerable metabolic differences between groups. Moreover, 37, 30, and 26 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for primary, surgical and recurrent EOC, respectively. Primary EOC was characterized by abnormal lipid metabolism and energy disorders. Oxidative stress and surgical efficacy were clear in the post-operative EOC patients. Recurrent EOC patients showed increased amino acid and lipid metabolism compared with primary EOC patients. After cytoreductive surgery, eight metabolites (e.g. l-kynurenine, retinol, hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) corrected towards levels of the control group, and four (e.g. hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) went back again to primary EOC levels after disease relapse. In conclusion, this study delineated metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence, and identified biomarkers that could facilitate both understanding and monitoring of EOC development and progression. PMID:26996990

  18. A Test of a Cultural Model of Patients' Motivation for Verbal Communication in Patient-Doctor Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Min-Sun; Klingle, Renee Storm; Sharkey, William F.; Park, Hee Sun; Smith, David H.; Cai, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Tests the effects of patients' culture and cultural orientations on assertiveness and communication apprehension during medical interviews. Suggests that the greater the patient's construal-of-self as interdependent, the more negative her/his beliefs regarding patient participation, which, in turn, leads to a higher degree of communication…

  19. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical


  20. Intensive care admission of cancer patients: a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Monique M E M; Verburg, Ilona W M; Dumaij, Ineke; Stouthard, Jacqueline; Nortier, Johannes W R; Richel, Dick; van der Zwan, Eric PA; de Keizer, Nicolette F; de Jonge, Evert

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain insight into which proportion of cancer patients is admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and how their survival, demographic, and clinical characteristics relate to cancer patients not admitted to the ICU. Data from patients registered with cancer between 2006 and 2011 in four hospitals in the Netherlands were linked to the Dutch National Intensive Care Evaluation registry. About 36,860 patients with cancer were identified, of whom 2,374 (6.4%) were admitted to the ICU. Fifty-six percent of ICU admissions were after surgery, whereas 44% were for medical reasons. The risk for ICU admission was highest among cancer patients treated with surgery either alone or combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Only 80 of 1,073 medical ICU admissions (3.3%) were for cancer-specific reasons. Although more women (54.0%) than men were registered with cancer, the proportion of male cancer patients admitted to an ICU was much higher (9.3 vs. 4.0%, P < 0.001). Five-year survival of cancer patients admitted to the ICU was substantial (41%) although median survival was much lower (1,104 days) than in patients not admitted to the ICU (median survival time not reached, P < 0.001). These results show that one out of 16 cancer patients was admitted to an ICU and that ICU support for this group should not be considered futile. PMID:25891471

  1. Antecedent Characteristics of Online Cancer Information Seeking Among Rural Breast Cancer Patients: An Application of the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) Model

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Bret R.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Han, Jeong Yeob; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Bush, Nigel; Gustafson, David H.; McTavish, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Little research has examined the antecedent characteristics of patients most likely to seek online cancer information. This study employs the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model as a framework to understand what psychosocial characteristics precede online cancer-related information seeking among rural breast cancer patients who often have fewer healthcare providers and limited local support services. Examining 144 patients who were provided free computer hardware, Internet access and training for how to use an Interactive Cancer Communication System, pre-test survey scores indicating patients’ psychosocial status were correlated with specific online cancer information seeking behaviors. Each of the factors specified by the C-SHIP model had significant relationships with online cancer information seeking behaviors with the strongest findings emerging for cancer-relevant encodings and self-construals, cancer-relevant beliefs and expectancies and cancer-relevant self-regulatory competencies and skills. Specifically, patients with more negative appraisals in these domains were more likely to seek out online cancer information. Additionally, antecedent variables associated with the C-SHIP model had more frequent relationships with experiential information as compared to didactic information. This study supports the applicability of the model to discern why people afflicted with cancer may seek online information to cope with their disease. PMID:18569368

  2. Improved Survival Outcomes in Cancer Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, F. Lee; Fairfield, Kathleen; Miller, Heather; Brooks, Peter; Vary, Calvin P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder characterized by deficiency in endoglin, an angiogenic protein. The net effect of endoglin expression on cancer outcomes from animal studies has proven controversial. We evaluated whether reduced systemic endoglin levels, expected in patients diagnosed with HHT, impacted clinical outcomes for cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis using SEER-Medicare was conducted to evaluate the effect of HHT on survival among patients diagnosed with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer between 2000 and 2007 (n=540,520). We generated Kaplan-Meir survival curves and Cox models to compare the effect of HHT on all cause survival for a composite of the four cancers, and separate models by cancer, adjusting for demographic variables, cancer type, cancer stage, and comorbidities. Results All cause survival analysis for a composite of the four cancers showed an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.51-0.91, p=0.009) for HHT, indicating significantly improved survival outcome. When stratified by cancer type, HHT diagnosis showed a significant protective effect among breast cancer patients with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.31 (CI: 0.13-0.75, p=0.009). Conclusions There was a significant association between HHT and improved survival outcome for a composite of patients with breast, prostate, colorectal, and lung cancer, and in analysis stratified by cancer, the association was significant for HHT patients with breast cancer. PMID:24192008

  3. Cancer Risk in HBV Patients With Statin and Metformin Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-I.; Kuan, Ching-Feng; Fang, Yu-Ann; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Liu, Ju-Chi; Wu, Li-Li; Chang, Chun-Jen; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Hwang, Jaulang; Miser, James S.; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) often causes chronic inflammation of the liver with an increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV-infected individuals may also have an increased incidence of nonliver cancers. Taking statin or metformin may decrease inflammation and infiltration, which may, as a result, reduce the risk of liver cancer or other major cancers in patients with HBV infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that statin and metformin could reduce the incidence of liver cancer (HCC) or nonliver cancers in patients with HBV. Using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 to 2008, this cohort study comprised patients with a recorded diagnosis of HBV (N?=?71,847) between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2008. Each patient was followed-up until the end of 2008. The occurrence of HCC or a nonliver cancer was evaluated in patients who either were or were not taking statin or metformin. Cox proportional hazard regressions were used to evaluate the cancer incidence after adjusting for known confounding factors. In total, 71,824 HBV-infected patients comprised the study cohort. Our study showed that either metformin or statin use was associated with a reduction in the incidence of cancer. This was most prominent in patients taking both statin and metformin. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for patients using only statin were 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48–0.57) for all cancers, 0.28 (95% CI, 0.23–0.35) for liver cancer, and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.57–0.70) for nonliver cancers. Patients taking only metformin had risk-adjusted HRs of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.75–0.90) for all cancers, 0.97 (95% CI, 0.84–1.14) for liver cancer, and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.67–0.84) for nonliver cancers. A dose-dependent effect of statin use for chemoprevention was observed for all cancers, including both liver cancer and nonliver cancers. A dose-dependent effect of metformin was also seen in liver cancer and nonliver cancers without stratification into different cumulative daily doses of statin use. This population-based cohort study investigated the protective effect of statin and metformin against cancer events in patients with HBV infection. Our study demonstrated that either statin or metformin served as independent chemopreventive agents with a dose–response effect in reducing the incidence of cancer with a dose–response effect of the agents and an additive or synergistic effect of combining statin and metformin use in reducing the incidence of many cancers. PMID:25674734

  4. Challenges in ductal carcinoma in situ risk communication and decision-making: report from an American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute workshop.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Elmore, Joann G; Saslow, Debbie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Schnitt, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute convened a conference to review current issues in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) risk communication and decision-making and to identify directions for future research. Specific topics included patient and health care provider knowledge and attitudes about DCIS and its treatment, how to explain DCIS to patients given the heterogeneity of the disease, consideration of nomenclature changes, and the usefulness of decision tools/aids. This report describes the proceedings of the workshop in the context of the current literature and discusses future directions. Evidence suggests that there is a lack of clarity about the implications and risks of a diagnosis of DCIS among patients, providers, and researchers. Research is needed to understand better the biology and mechanisms of the progression of DCIS to invasive breast cancer and the factors that predict those subtypes of DCIS that do not progress, as well as efforts to improve the communication and informed decision-making surrounding DCIS. PMID:22488610

  5. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  6. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and


  7. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  8. Survival Analysis of Patients with Interval Cancer Undergoing Gastric Cancer Screening by Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interval cancer is a key factor that influences the effectiveness of a cancer screening program. To evaluate the impact of interval cancer on the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, the survival rates of patients with interval cancer were analyzed. Methods We performed gastric cancer-specific and all-causes survival analyses of patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group and radiographic screening group using the Kaplan-Meier method. Since the screening interval was 1 year, interval cancer was defined as gastric cancer detected within 1 year after a negative result. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the risk factors associated with gastric cancer-specific and all-causes death. Results A total of 1,493 gastric cancer patients (endoscopic screening group: n = 347; radiographic screening group: n = 166; outpatient group: n = 980) were identified from the Tottori Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The gastric cancer-specific survival rates were higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the radiographic screening group and the outpatients group. In the endoscopic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer and the patients with interval cancer were nearly equal (P = 0.869). In the radiographic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer was higher than that of the patients with interval cancer (P = 0.009). For gastric cancer-specific death, the hazard ratio of interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group was 0.216 for gastric cancer death (95%CI: 0.054-0.868) compared with the outpatient group. Conclusion The survival rate and the risk of gastric cancer death among the patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer were not significantly different in the annual endoscopic screening. These results suggest the potential of endoscopic screening in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. PMID:26023768

  9. Targeting cancer stem cells: a new therapy to cure cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yapeng; Fu, Liwu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been defined as cells within tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. They have been identified in blood, breast, brain, colon, melanoma, pancreatic, prostate, ovarian, lung cancers and so on. It is often considered to be associated with chemo-resistance and radio-resistance that lead to the failure of traditional therapies. Most therapies are directed at the fast growing tumor mass but not the slow dividing cancer stem cells. Eradicating cancer stem cells, the root of cancer origin and recurrence, has been thought as a promising approach to improve cancer survival or even to cure cancer patients. Understanding the characteristics of cancer stem cells will help to develop novel therapies to eliminate the initiating cancer stem cell, and the relevant patents on the cancer stem cell and cancer therapy by cancer stem cells will be discussed. PMID:22679565

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Cancer Patients and Determination of Affecting Factors: A Questionnaire Study.

    PubMed

    ÜstĂŒndağ, Sema; Demir Zencirci, Ayten

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the use and effects of complementary and alternative medicine on cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The research was conducted in Daytime Chemotherapy Unit of the College District Outpatients in the Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital and comprised 397 patients in the oncology outpatients. Written informed consents were obtained from all participants. Among the participants, 52.6% were women, 85.1% married, 10.6% illiterate, 41.1% housewife, and 8.8% civil servants. Among the patients participated in the study, 27.7% had cancer in the family, 22.6% had gastrointestinal cancer, and 22.1% had breast cancer. Most of the patients (92.2%) resorted to religious and cultural approaches, and some patients (33.8%) used nutritional and herbal products besides medical treatment. The nutritional and herbal products used as remedy included stinging nettle (22.3%), fennel flower (20.1%), and herbal products that were advertised by herbalists in media (9.7%). It was determined that most of the patients resorting to complementary or alternative medicine were women (52.6%), housewife (51.5%), and patients with a history of cancer in the family (37.7%). Complementary and alternative medicine use as a remedy for cure is common among patients in Turkey. But when it is considered that many of these products had the potential to negatively affect cancer therapy, it is crucial that nurses providing care to cancer patients should be well informed about complementary therapies, be aware of the potential risks and benefits, and communicate openly with patients on their health care choices. PMID:26465625

  11. Pilot study to train dentists to communicate about oral cancer: the impact on dentists' self-reported behaviour, confidence and beliefs.

    PubMed

    Awojobi, O; Newton, J T; Scott, S E

    2016-01-22

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a brief, focused training session on the use of an oral cancer communication guide on dentists' intentions, self-efficacy and beliefs with regards to communicating about oral cancer with patients.Design Pre-post intervention study.Setting The training session took place in a lecture theatre at King's College London.Subjects and methods Dentists working in various settings were trained on the use of the oral cancer communication guide via a structured session that included an update on oral cancer, modelling the use of the guide in practice, and role playing. Dentists (n = 39) completed questionnaires pre-training, immediately post-training (n = 31) and after 2 weeks (n = 23). Questionnaires assessed current practice, self-efficacy and barriers to discussing oral cancer.Results A significantly higher proportion of dentists reported that they informed patients that they were being screened for oral cancer post-training (44%) than pre-training (16%). Significantly fewer perceived barriers and higher self-efficacy to discuss oral cancer were also reported.Conclusion Training dentists in the use of the guide showed positive impact by reducing perceived barriers and increasing self-efficacy. PMID:26794112

  12. [Cooperation between a Hospital without Dentists and Local Dental Associations in Oral Management of Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Kayukawa, Satoshi; Ina, Kenji; Iwasaki, Miki; Koga, Chiaki; Nagao, Seiji; Kabeya, Megumi; Yuasa, Shu; Ninomiya, Tomoaki; Kidukuri, Hiroki

    2015-10-01

    Severe oral mucositis induced by cancer chemotherapy can cause intolerable pain and increase the risk of systemic infections, necessitating dose reduction and discontinuation of antineoplastic agents. Moreover, this adverse effect may have an impact on patient nutrition and quality of life. An effective and prophylactic intervention should be useful for alleviating this complication. Because Nagoya Memorial Hospital has neither a dentistry nor an oral surgery department, we collaborated with dental associations near the hospital. First, we performed a questionnaire survey on the present status of the members of the local dental associations. The survey showed that 86% of the community dentists were interested in communicating with our hospital. In addition, they agreed to provide us with information on their specialty and status of amenities. In discussion with the community dentists, we decided on fax-based communication for collaboration to improve the quality of oral management in cancer patients. Three seminar series were conducted to share updated information on cancer treatment and enhance communication between the medical doctors and the dentists. Our hospital has registered 129 community dentists and enrolled 81 cancer patients in this medical and dental cooperation initiative. PMID:26489553

  13. Taxanes in the elderly patient with metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A

    2015-01-01

    More than 40% of all breast cancer cases are diagnosed in patients aged ≄65 years, accounting for an ever-increasing disease burden in the elderly. Historically, however, this growing population of breast cancer patients has been underrepresented in clinical trials, resulting in a paucity of data that clinicians can reference in making treatment decisions for their older patients. A consequence may be the undertreatment of elderly patients, who have the highest incidence of breast cancer. However, subgroup analyses of elderly patients in multiple early-Phase (I or II) studies and a handful of small studies with elderly-specific populations have suggested that older patients may experience similar benefit from cancer therapy as younger patients with otherwise similar baseline characteristics. Although steps should be taken to avoid undertreating older patients, a balance must be achieved to avoid overtreatment. Guidelines have been released detailing recommendations for the treatment of elderly breast cancer patients, including a discussion of various geriatric assessments that might aid physicians in selecting patients appropriate for recommended treatment options. Chemotherapy remains a key component of treatment regimens for many older patients. However, the benefit of some agents may be limited by tolerability issues. Taxanes, one of the most established classes of chemotherapy for breast cancer, are known to be highly active and efficacious and to have well-characterized safety profiles. This review discusses factors that influence treatment choices for elderly patients with metastatic breast cancer, and then focuses on clinical data for taxanes in this patient population. PMID:26379446

  14. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  15. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment. PMID:26506520

  16. Locating relationship and communication issues among stressors associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kirsten M; Solomon, Denise Haunani

    2008-11-01

    This article clarifies how the social contexts in which breast cancer survivors live can contribute to the stress they experience because of the disease. Guided by Solomon and Knobloch's (2004) relational turbulence model and Petronio's (2002) communication privacy management theory, this study explores personal relationship and communication boundary issues within stressors that are associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and early survivorship of breast cancer. A qualitative analysis of discourse posted on breast cancer discussion boards and weblogs using the constant comparative method and open-coding techniques revealed 12 sources of stress. Using axial coding methods and probing these topics for underlying relationship and communication issues yielded 5 themes. The discussion highlights the implications of the findings for the theories that guided this investigation and for breast cancer survivorship more generally. PMID:19089702

  17. Adjustment to Cancer: Anxiety and Distress (PDQ)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the difficult emotional responses many cancer patients experience. This summary focuses on normal adjustment issues, psychosocial distress, and adjustment disorders.

  18. Can we deconstruct cancer, one patient at a time?

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Liakopoulou, Effie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer face an ever-widening gap between the exponential rate at which technology improves and the linear rate at which these advances are translated into clinical practice. Closing this gap will require the establishment of learning loops that intimately link lab and clinic and enable the immediate transfer of knowledge, thereby engaging highly motivated patients with cancer as true partners in research. Here, we discuss the goal of creating a distributed network that aims to place world-class resources at the disposal of select patients with cancer and their oncologists, and then use these intensively monitored individual patient experiences to improve collective understanding of how cancer works. PMID:23102584

  19. Anxiety in patients with cancer and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kerrihard, T; Breitbart, W; Dent, R; Strout, D

    1999-04-01

    Physicians who treat patients with cancer or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections frequently encounter the psychological and physical manifestations of anxiety in these populations. This chapter provides a review of the prevalence of anxiety disorders in cancer and HIV patients. The problems in assessment and diagnosis of anxiety in these patients are discussed, and a literature review of the types of anxiety disorders commonly identified in the context of cancer and HIV/AIDS is presented. Finally, the treatment of anxiety in cancer and HIV patients utilizing both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities is reviewed. PMID:10378955

  20. Mitochondrial D310 instability in Chinese lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian-Zhong; Fang, Yu; Shi, Yan-Hai; Cui, Jing-Hui; Li, Long-Yan; Xu, Yong-Chen; Ling, Bin

    2016-03-01

    To characterize the somatic mutation spectrum of mitochondrial DNA at D310 in Chinese lung cancer patients and evaluate its potential significance in Chinese lung cancer diagnosis, in this study, 237 samples, including lung tumor, adjacent normal tissue and blood samples of 79 lung cancer patients were analyzed. By comparing sequences of D310 between lung cancer tissues, adjacent normal tissue and blood samples, the somatic mutations at D310 were detected in 17.72% (14/79) of Chinese lung cancer patients; this implied that somatic mutations at D310 could be served as valuable biomarker for diagnostic of Chinese lung cancer. Further analyses indicated that deletion and heterogeneity were the predominant characters for somatic mutations detected at D310 of Chinese lung cancer patients. PMID:25010070

  1. Fertility preservation options in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; von Wolff, Michael; Franuli?, Daniela; ?ehi?, Ermin; Klepac-Pulani?, Tajana; Oreškovi?, Slavko; Juras, Josip

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyse current options for fertility preservation in young women with breast cancer (BC). Considering an increasing number of BC survivors, owing to improvements in cancer treatment and delaying of childbearing, fertility preservation appears to be an important issue. Current fertility preservation options in BC survivors range from well-established standard techniques to experimental or investigational interventions. Among the standard options, random-start ovarian stimulation protocol represents a new technique, which significantly decreases the total time of the in vitro fertilisation cycle. However, in patients with oestrogen-sensitive tumours, stimulation protocols using aromatase inhibitors are currently preferred over tamoxifen regimens. Cryopreservation of embryos and oocytes are nowadays deemed the most successful techniques for fertility preservation in BC patients. GnRH agonists during chemotherapy represent an experimental method for fertility preservation due to conflicting long-term outcome results regarding its safety and efficacy. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue, in vitro maturation of immature oocytes and other strategies are considered experimental and should only be offered within the context of a clinical trial. An early pretreatment referral to reproductive endocrinologists and oncologists should be suggested to young BC women at risk of infertility, concerning the risks and benefits of fertility preservation options. PMID:26370157

  2. Doctor-Patient Communication in a Southeast Asian Setting: The Conflict between Ideal and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claramita, Mora; Utarini, Adi; Soebono, Hardyanto; Van Dalen, Jan; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2011-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication has been extensively studied in non-Western contexts and in relation to patients' cultural and education backgrounds. This study explores the perceived ideal communication style for doctor-patient consultations and the reality of actual practice in a Southeast Asian context. We conducted the study in a teaching…

  3. Association of goals of care meetings for hospitalized cancer patients at risk for critical care with patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Apostol, Colleen C; Waldfogel, Julie M; Pfoh, Elizabeth R; List, Donald; Billing, Lynn S; Nesbit, Suzanne A; Dy, Sydney Morss

    2015-01-01

    Background Caring for cancer patients with advanced and refractory disease requires communication about care preferences, particularly when patients become ill enough to be at risk for critical care interventions potentially inconsistent with their preferences. Aim To describe the use of goals of care discussions in patients with advanced/refractory cancer at risk for critical care interventions and evaluate associations between these discussions and outcomes. Design Cohort study describing patients/families’ perceptions of goals of care meetings and comparing health care utilization outcomes of patients who did and did not have discussions. Setting/participants Inpatient units of an academic cancer center. Included patients had metastatic solid tumors or relapsed/refractory lymphoma or leukemia and were at risk for critical care, defined as requiring supplemental oxygen and/or cardiac monitor. Results Of 86 patients enrolled, 34 (39%) had a reported goals of care discussion (study group). Patients/families reported their needs and goals were addressed moderately to quite a bit during the meetings. Patients in the study group were less likely to receive critical care (0% vs 22%, p = 0.003) and more likely to be discharged to hospice (48% vs 30%, p = 0.04) than the control group. Only one patient in the study group died during the index hospitalization (on comfort care) (3%) compared with 9(17%) in the control group (p = 0.08). Conclusion Goals of care meetings for advanced/refractory cancer inpatients at risk for critical care interventions can address patient and family goals and needs and improve health care utilization. These meetings should be part of routine care for these patients. PMID:25527528

  4. Pulmonary Venous Obstruction in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Chuang-Chi; Chang, Hung; Yang, Tsai-Sheng; Wen, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background. We study the clinical significance and management of pulmonary venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort study to characterize the syndrome that we term “pulmonary vein obstruction syndrome” (PVOS) between January 2005 and March 2014. The criteria for inclusion were (1) episodes of shortness of breath; (2) chest X-ray showing abnormal pulmonary hilum shadow with or without presence of pulmonary edema and/or pleural effusion; (3) CT scan demonstrating pulmonary vein thrombosis/tumor with or without tumor around the vein. Results. Two hundred and twenty-two patients developed PVOS. Shortness of breath was the main symptom, which was aggravated by chemotherapy in 28 (13%), and medical/surgical procedures in 21 (9%) and showed diurnal change in intensity in 32 (14%). Chest X-rays all revealed abnormal pulmonary hilum shadows and presence of pulmonary edema in 194 (87%) and pleural effusion in 192 (86%). CT scans all showed pulmonary vein thrombosis/tumor (100%) and surrounding the pulmonary veins by tumor lesions in 140 patients (63%). PVOS was treated with low molecular weight heparin in combination with dexamethasone, and 66% of patients got clinical/image improvement. Conclusion. Physicians should be alert to PVOS when shortness of breath occurs and chest X-ray reveals abnormal pulmonary hilum shadows. PMID:26425121

  5. Communication in cancer care: psycho-social, interactional, and cultural issues. A general overview and the example of India

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Strohschein, Fay J.; Saraf, Gayatri; Loiselle, Carmen G.

    2014-01-01

    Communication is a core aspect of psycho-oncology care. This article examines key psychosocial, cultural, and technological factors that affect this communication. Drawing from advances in clinical work and accumulating bodies of empirical evidence, the authors identify determining factors for high quality, efficient, and sensitive communication and support for those affected by cancer. Cancer care in India is highlighted as a salient example. Cultural factors affecting cancer communication in India include beliefs about health and illness, societal values, integration of spiritual care, family roles, and expectations concerning disclosure of cancer information, and rituals around death and dying. The rapidly emerging area of e-health significantly impacts cancer communication and support globally. In view of current globalization, understanding these multidimensional psychosocial, and cultural factors that shape communication are essential for providing comprehensive, appropriate, and sensitive cancer care. PMID:25452741

  6. Variability in the Practice of Fertility Preservation for Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kasey A.; Grindler, Natalia M.; Rhee, Julie S.; Cooper, Amber R.; Ratts, Valerie S.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Jungheim, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is important to women and men with cancer. While options for fertility preservation (FP) are available, knowledge regarding the medical application of FP is lacking. Therefore we examined FP practices for cancer patients among reproductive endocrinologists (REs). A 36 item survey was sent to board-certified REs. 98% of respondents reported counseling women with cancer about FP options. Oocyte and embryo cryopreservation were universally offered by these providers, but variability was noted in reported management of these cases—particularly for women with breast cancer. 86% of the respondents reported using letrozole during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer to minimize patient exposure to estrogen. 49% of respondents who reported using letrozole in COS for patients with ER+ breast cancer reported that they would also use letrozole in COS for women with ER negative breast cancer. Variability was also noted in the management of FP for men with cancer. 83% of participants reported counseling men about sperm banking with 22% recommending against banking for men previously exposed to chemotherapy. Overall, 79% of respondents reported knowledge of American Society for Clinical Oncology FP guidelines—knowledge that was associated with providers offering gonadal tissue cryopreservation (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14–2.90). These findings demonstrate that RE management of FP in cancer patients varies. Although some variability may be dictated by local resources, standardization of FP practices and communication with treating oncologists may help ensure consistent recommendations and outcomes for patients seeking FP. PMID:26010087

  7. Variability in the practice of fertility preservation for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Kasey A; Grindler, Natalia M; Rhee, Julie S; Cooper, Amber R; Ratts, Valerie S; Carson, Kenneth R; Jungheim, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    Fertility is important to women and men with cancer. While options for fertility preservation (FP) are available, knowledge regarding the medical application of FP is lacking. Therefore we examined FP practices for cancer patients among reproductive endocrinologists (REs). A 36 item survey was sent to board-certified REs. 98% of respondents reported counseling women with cancer about FP options. Oocyte and embryo cryopreservation were universally offered by these providers, but variability was noted in reported management of these cases-particularly for women with breast cancer. 86% of the respondents reported using letrozole during controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) in patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer to minimize patient exposure to estrogen. 49% of respondents who reported using letrozole in COS for patients with ER+ breast cancer reported that they would also use letrozole in COS for women with ER negative breast cancer. Variability was also noted in the management of FP for men with cancer. 83% of participants reported counseling men about sperm banking with 22% recommending against banking for men previously exposed to chemotherapy. Overall, 79% of respondents reported knowledge of American Society for Clinical Oncology FP guidelines-knowledge that was associated with providers offering gonadal tissue cryopreservation (RR 1.82, 95% CI 1.14-2.90). These findings demonstrate that RE management of FP in cancer patients varies. Although some variability may be dictated by local resources, standardization of FP practices and communication with treating oncologists may help ensure consistent recommendations and outcomes for patients seeking FP. PMID:26010087

  8. Insights into the experiences of patients with cancer in London: framework analysis of free-text data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2012/2013 from the two London Integrated Cancer Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Theresa; Lucas, Grace; Sangha, Amrit; Randolph, Anuska; Stapleton, Sarah; Pattison, Natalie; O'Gara, Geraldine; Harris, Katherine; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Dolan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Objective To shed light on experiences of patients with cancer in London National Health Service (NHS) trusts that may not be fully captured in national survey data, to inform improvement action plans by these trusts. Design Framework analysis of free-text data from 2012/2013 National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from the 2 London Integrated Cancer Systems. Setting and participants Patients with a cancer diagnosis treated by the NHS across 27 trusts in London. Main outcome measures Free-text data received from patients categorised into what patients found good about their cancer care and what could be improved. Methods Using Framework analysis, a thematic framework was created for 15?403 comments from over 6500 patients. Themes were identified across the London data set, by tumour group and by trust. Results Two-thirds of free-text comments from patients in London were positive and one-third of those related to the good quality of care those patients received. However, the majority of comments for improvement related to quality of care, with a focus on poor care, poor communication and waiting times in outpatient departments. Additionally, 577 patients (9% of those who returned free-text data in London) commented on issues pertaining to the questionnaire itself. Some patients who experienced care from multiple trusts were unclear on how to complete the questionnaire for the single trust whose care they were asked to comment on, others said the questions did not fit their experiences. Conclusions NCPES free-text analysis can shed light on the experiences of patients that closed questions might not reveal. It further indicates that there are issues with the survey itself, in terms of ambiguities in the questionnaire and difficulties in identifying patients within specific trusts. Both of these issues have the potential to contribute to knowledge and understanding of the uses and limitations of free-text data in improving cancer services. PMID:26482767

  9. Talking to cancer patients about complementary therapies: is it the physician’s responsibility?

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, M.J.; Boon, H.S.; Page, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background To ensure the safety and effectiveness of cancer management, it is important for physicians treating cancer patients to know whether their patients are using complementary and alternative medicine (cam) and if so, why. Objective Here, we discuss the ethical and legal obligations of physicians to discuss cam use in an oncology setting, and we provide practical advice on how patient–provider communication about cam can be improved. Results Physicians have both ethical and legal obligations to their patients, including the obligation to respect patient autonomy. This latter obligation extends to use of cam by patients and needs to be addressed beginning early in the patient–provider relationship. Because lack of education in this field and lack of time during patient consultations are barriers to talking with patients about cam, we provide resources to facilitate such discussions. These resources include suggestions on how to discuss the topic of cam and a wide range of information sources. Conclusions Discussing cam with patients is the physician’s responsibility, and such discussion will facilitate evidence-based, patient-centred cancer care. PMID:18769581

  10. A voice that wraps around the body--communication problems in the advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R. J.; Chamberlain, R. M.; Khuri, F. R.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Significant problems in clinician-patient communication have been described in the oncology literatures. Advanced stage non-small lung cancer a devastating disease, can cause the communication between survivors, significant others, and clinicians to falter. To date, however, no studies have used qualitative methods to examine experiential aspects of living with non-small cell lung cancer. Nor have any studies evaluated the tools survivors might use to repair some of the damage caused by living with this disease. METHODS: Exploratory, two-part qualitative design. RESULTS: Survivors of non-small cell lung cancer live with multiple fears and losses. These include a diminished sense of self, the loss of health, fears of pain in a future tainted by the threat of death, and increased feelings of alienation due to the loss of previous sources of meaning in life. These experiences significantly affect cancer survivors abilities to communicate with clinicians and significant others. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of non-small cell lung cancer often have difficulty sharing their experiences with others not suffering a similar affliction. Through their narratives with other survivors, however, patients are better able to initiate a biopsychosocial mechanism which enables them to create a cognitive map. This cognitive map helps survivors share their experiences with others, thereby repairing some of the damage caused by this disease, including the harm done to their communication with other people. PMID:11922184

  11. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite approach. Physicians also prefer to communicate the reality of the disease at the time of diagnosis, but in actuality, they instead disclose it progressively during treatment. Faith is helpful for acceptance of the diagnosis, and families play a key role in the support of the patients. An open discussion involving all members of society is necessary to attain a better understanding of this issue and to promote timely disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26300677

  12. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  13. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  14. Inequalities in reported cancer patient experience by socio-demographic characteristic and cancer site: evidence from respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, CL; Abel, GA; Lyratzopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    Patient experience is a critical dimension of cancer care quality. Understanding variation in experience among patients with different cancers and characteristics is an important first step for designing targeted improvement interventions. We analysed data from the 2011/2012 English Cancer Patient Experience Survey (n = 69 086) using logistic regression to explore inequalities in care experience across 64 survey questions. We additionally calculated a summary measure of variation in patient experience by cancer, and explored inequalities between patients with cancers treated by the same specialist teams. We found that younger and very old, ethnic minority patients and women consistently reported worse experiences across questions. Patients with small intestine/rarer lower gastrointestinal, multiple myeloma and hepatobiliary cancers were most likely to report negative experiences whereas patients with breast, melanoma and testicular cancer were least likely (top-to-bottom odds ratio = 1.91, P < 0.0001). There were also inequalities in experience among patients with cancers treated by the same specialty for five of nine services (P < 0.0001). Specifically, patients with ovarian, multiple myeloma, anal, hepatobiliary and renal cancer reported notably worse experiences than patients with other gynaecological, haematological, gastrointestinal and urological malignancies respectively. Initiatives to improve cancer patient experience across oncology services may be suitably targeted on patients at higher risk of poorer experience. PMID:25327713

  15. MicroRNAs as mediators and communicators between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kohlhapp, F J; Mitra, A K; Lengyel, E; Peter, M E

    2015-11-26

    Cancer cells grow in an environment comprised of multiple components that support tumor growth and contribute to therapy resistance. Major cell types in the tumor microenvironment are fibroblasts, endothelial cells and infiltrating immune cells all of which communicate with cancer cells. One way that these cell types promote cancer progression is by altering the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate protein expression, either in the cancer cells or in the associated normal cells. Changes in miRNA expression can be brought about by direct interaction between the stromal cells and cancer cells, by paracrine factors secreted by any of the cell types or even through direct communication between cells through secreted miRNAs. Understanding the role of miRNAs in the complex interactions between the tumor and cells in its microenvironment is necessary if we are to understand tumor progression and devise new treatments. PMID:25867073

  16. microRNAs as mediators and communicators between cancer cells and the tumor micro-environment

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhapp, Frederick J.; Mitra, Anirban K.; Lengyel, Ernst; Peter, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells grow in an environment comprised of multiple components that support tumor growth and contribute to therapy resistance. Major cell types in the tumor micro-environment are fibroblasts, endothelial cells and infiltrating immune cells all of which communicate with cancer cells. One way that these cell types promote cancer progression is by altering expression of miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate protein expression, either in the cancer cells or in associated normal cells. Changes in miRNA expression can be brought about by direct interaction between the stromal cells and cancer cells, by paracrine factors secreted by any of the cell types, or even through direct communication between cells through secreted miRNAs. Understanding the role of miRNAs in the complex interactions between the tumor and cells in its micro-environment is necessary if we are to understand tumor progression and devise new treatments. PMID:25867073

  17. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  18. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy


  19. Quality of life in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiagia, Maria; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    QOL is highly affected in individuals suffering from pancreatic cancer. One parameter that influences negatively QOL in these patients is cancer -cachexia syndrome. During the ASCO Annual Meeting 2014, one abstract focusing on cancer-cachexia syndrome (Abstract #15208) emphasized the fact that cachexia is under diagnosed even in patients with pancreatic cancer who constitute a high-risk group for presenting this syndrome. In addition the abstract raises concerns about the benefit of the use of dronabinol and megestrol acetate in treating the cachexia syndrome in this group of patients. Another important factor that determines QOL in pancreatic cancer patients is surgical procedures-pancreatectomies that these patients may undergo. A very interesting abstract presented also at the ASCO Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #15234) explores the benefit of using pasireotide perioperative in ameliorating QOL of patients who had surgical intervention. PMID:25076331

  20. Informing cancer patient based on his type of personality:The self-sacrificing patient.

    PubMed

    Kallergis, George

    2015-01-01

    Imparting the bad news has become a hard task for the doctor, and is usually perceived as unpleasant by the patient to whom the bad news is revealed. It is vital that the physician's approach be tailored to the cancer patient's personality. Gathering by the informing process protocols already suggested the hardest step for the doctors to take is empathic understanding which, presupposes tailoring to the individual's needs. The aim of this article was to describe the self-sacrificing type of personality thoroughly, so that any physician can make a diagnosis and tailor the information strategy to their needs. As method of research was used the qualitative method through groups with doctors and nurses, while research within groups lasted for 5 years. Assessing the denial mechanism is hard for a person that regards disease as punishment and propitiation. The physician must mobilize his countertransference, the sense he gets from the discussions with the patient and their overall communication. If he finds that the patient has self-control, then the approach of imparting the news resembles that of the controlling-orderly personality. If he ascertains that the patient has a lasting embarrassment, he should be more careful and impart the news gradually, his approach resembling that of the dependent person. PMID:26011361

  1. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  2. Right-to-try laws and individual patient "compassionate use" of experimental oncology medications: A call for improved provider-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Expanded Access program allows patients with life-threatening diagnoses, such as advanced cancer, to use experimental medications without participating in clinical research (colloquially, "Compassionate Use"). Sixteen U.S. states recently passed "right-to-try" legislation aimed at promoting Expanded Access. Acknowledging popular support, Expanded Access could undermine clinical trials that benefit public health. Moreover, existing norms in oncologic care, for example, often lead patients to pursue intense treatments near the end of life, at the expense of palliation, and improved communication about the risks and benefits of Expanded Access would more often discourage its use. PMID:26313583

  3. Challenges in managing hepatitis C virus infection in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Roy A; Torres, Harrys A

    2014-03-21

    Cancer patients have unique problems associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and treatment not seen in the general population. HCV infection poses additional challenges and considerations for the management of cancer, and vice versa. HCV infection also can lead to the development of cancer, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In severely immunocompromised cancer patients, diagnosis of HCV infection requires increased reliance on RNA detection techniques. HCV infection can affect chemotherapy, and delay of HCV infection treatment until completion of chemotherapy and achievement of cancer remission may be required to decrease the potential for drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic agents and HCV therapeutics and potentiation of side effects of these agents. In addition, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients have an increased risk of early development of cirrhosis and fibrosis. Whether this increased risk applies to all patients regardless of cancer treatment is unknown. Furthermore, patients with cancer may have poorer sustained virological responses to HCV infection treatment than do those without cancer. Unfortunately, not all cancer patients are candidates for HCV infection therapy. In this article, we review the challenges in managing HCV infection in cancer patients and HSCT recipients. PMID:24659870

  4. Breast cancer, prostaglandins and patient survival.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A.; Stamford, I. F.; Berstock, D. A.; Dische, F.; Singh, L.; A'Hern, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Prostaglandins may have both undesirable and desirable effects in malignant disease. Their possible roles in breast cancer were studied by examining the relationships between different variables and the amounts of prostaglandin-like material (PG-LM) extracted from 141 breast carcinomas. Univariate analysis indicates a direct correlation with patient age and menopausal status, with a greater yield from cancers of post- compared with pre-menopausal women. Tumours up to 2 cm diameter yielded more PG-LM than those measuring greater than 2-5 cm. Although there was also a direct correlation with bone metastasis near to the time of surgery, this was because no positive bone scans occurred in patients whose tumours yielded little total PG-LM (less than 16 ng PGE2 equivalents per g tissue). Since tumour PG-LM did not predict later spread to bone, and yields of greater than 16 ng g-1 were similar in the positive and negative bone scan groups, tumour PG-LM appears to be unimportant for skeletal metastasis. There was no obvious relationship of tumour PG-LM to the grade of malignancy, tumour type, amounts of fibrous tissue (and therefore malignant cells), invasion of blood vessels and lymphatics or presence of plasma cells. Multivariate analysis indicates that disease-free survival is longest with an intermediate production of tumour total PG-LM. Of the 82 patients now dead, the cause was attributed to metastatic disease in 69 cases. No relationship of PG-LM to the length of survival was seen with univariate or multivariate analysis. However, when just the post-menopausal patients who died within the first 3 postoperative years were analysed, there was a highly significant inverse correlation between the tumour total PG-LM and the time to death. The reason(s) for these different findings on overall survival compared with just the patients who died are not understood, but the results may indicate that one or more other variables must co-exist with a high tumour PG-LM to hasten death. PMID:2930691

  5. [Gynecological cancers in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Schmalzing, M; Krockenberger, M; Honig, A; Tony, H-P

    2016-02-01

    The risk of gynecological cancers in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases only seems to be elevated with respect to cervical cancer and mainly in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. There is increasing evidence for an influence of the immune system on tumor control of gynecological malignancies; however, an adverse influence of immunosuppressive treatment in rheumatic patients was indicated only for the risk of cervical cancer. In contrast, biologics could not be shown to cause an increased risk of cervical cancer but data on this topic are limited. General screening recommendations exist for breast cancer and cervical cancer. Recommendations for follow-up after oncological treatment are presented. Because of limited evidence immunosuppressive and biological treatment should be applied with great restraint at least within the first 5 years after curative oncological treatment also for gynecological tumors. As far as breast cancer is concerned an even longer interval is under discussion. PMID:26813689

  6. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  7. Exosomal transfer of functional small RNAs mediates cancer-stroma communication in human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from a variety of cell types. Recent evidence indicates that human cells communicate with each other by exchanging exosomes. Cancer cells closely interact with neighboring stromal cells, and together they cooperatively promote disease via bidirectional communication. Here, we investigated whether exosomes can play roles in intercellular communication between cancer cells and neighboring fibroblasts. Endometrial fibroblasts were isolated from normal endometrial tissues and from endometrial cancer tissues, and cell-to-cell transfer of endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa-derived exosomes was examined. The isolated fibroblasts were cultured in conditioned media from CD63-GFP-expressing Ishikawa cells, and we found that GFP-positive exosomes were transferred from Ishikawa cells to the fibroblasts. Next, we introduced a shRNA for a luciferase gene into Ishikawa cells. This shRNA was encapsulated into exosomes, was transferred to the fibroblasts, and then downregulated luciferase expression in the fibroblasts. The mature microRNAs naturally expressed in Ishikawa-derived exosomes were also transported into the endometrial fibroblasts, and they altered the microRNA expression profiles of the fibroblasts. These results indicated that endometrial cancer cells could transmit small regulatory RNAs to endometrial fibroblasts via exosomes. Our findings document a previously unknown mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells and related fibroblasts in human endometrium. PMID:26700550

  8. Patient preference: a comparison of electronic patient-completed questionnaires with paper among cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Brown, M C; Espin-Garcia, O; Cuffe, S; Pringle, D; Mahler, M; Villeneuve, J; Niu, C; Charow, R; Lam, C; Shani, R M; Hon, H; Otsuka, M; Xu, W; Alibhai, S; Jenkinson, J; Liu, G

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we compared cancer patients preference for computerised (tablet/web-based) surveys versus paper. We also assessed whether the understanding of a cancer-related topic, pharmacogenomics is affected by the survey format, and examined differences in demographic and medical characteristics which may affect patient preference and understanding. Three hundred and four cancer patients completed a tablet-administered survey and another 153 patients completed a paper-based survey. Patients who participated in the tablet survey were questioned regarding their preference for survey format administration (paper, tablet and web-based). Understanding was assessed with a 'direct' method, by asking patients to assess their understanding of genetic testing, and with a 'composite' score. Patients preferred administration with tablet (71%) compared with web-based (12%) and paper (17%). Patients <65 years old, non-Caucasians and white-collar professionals significantly preferred the computerised format following multivariate analysis. There was no significant difference in understanding between the paper and tablet survey with direct questioning or composite score. Age (<65 years) and white-collar professionals were associated with increased understanding (both P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in understanding between the tablet and print survey in a multivariate analysis. Patients overwhelmingly preferred computerised surveys and understanding of pharmacogenomics was not affected by survey format. PMID:25899560

  9. Mastering Difficult Communications: Explaining Clinical Trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content The National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov The National Institutes of Health AccrualNetTM STRATEGIES, TOOLS AND RESOURCES TO SUPPORT ACCRUAL TO CLINICAL TRIALS User menu Register Sign In Search form Search Main menu Protocol Accrual

  10. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer.

  11. Adaptation of Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Chinese Immigrant Cancer Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of the study is to modify a type of counseling called "Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy" to meet the needs of Chinese cancer patients. Many cancer patients use counseling or other resources to help cope with the emotional burden of their illnesses. Counseling often helps them cope with cancer by giving them a place to express their feelings. "Meaning-Centered" counseling aims to teach cancer patients how to maintain or even increase a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives, despite cancer. |

  12. The effect of anxiety on breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baqutayan, Shadiya Mohamed Saleh

    2012-04-01

    Cancer is a disease wherein abnormal cells divide without control and are able to attack other tissues. Most of the patients and their families face some degree of depression, anxiety, and fear when cancer becomes a part of their lives. They feel helpless and eager to find ways on how to get rid of it. The study focuses on anxiety among breast cancer patients. It aims at investigating cancer, its symptoms, and effects the disease has on the anxiety level of patients. PMID:23162185

  13. Quebec public funding facilitates fertility preservation for male cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, M.B.; GarcĂ­a, A.; Buckett, W.; Tulandi, T.; Chan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sperm cryopreservation remains the only clinically feasible option to preserve male fertility. The quality of counselling provided by the treating physicians and the cost of sperm cryopreservation can both influence a patient’s decision about whether to preserve sperm. On 5 August 2010, the Quebec government introduced provincial coverage of assisted reproductive technologies, with sperm cryopreservation included as a covered service. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether and how such a program affects the behaviour of cancer patients with respect to sperm cryopreservation. Methods We analyzed the database derived from male patients undergoing sperm cryopreservation from August 2008 to August 2012 at our centre. The retrieved data included patient age, male infertility or oncologic diagnosis, sperm quality parameters, and details about the number of visits for sperm cryopreservation. Results The number of cancer patients who cryopreserved sperm before and after the policy change did not differ significantly, but a marked increase in the number of non-cancer patients was observed. Further analysis revealed that, after implementation of the public funding program, the total number of sperm cryopreservation sessions per patient increased significantly in cancer patients but not in non-cancer patients. Conclusions It appears that cancer patients who are willing to freeze sperm are keen to return for more sessions of sperm banking when no fees are associated with the service. Those findings suggest that cost reduction is an important factor for improving delivery of fertility preservation services to male cancer patients. PMID:26966400

  14. How to Conduct the Patient Interview. Communicating successfully with patients requires strategy, flexibility and practice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mike

    2015-10-01

    As community paramedicine and other nonemergent initiatives become commonplace in EMS, caregivers are going to need communication skills that go beyond SAMPLE checklists. A minimalist approach to dialogue with patients, considered preferred if not essential in what was once almost exclusively a light-and-sirens environment, isn't acceptable when prehospital interventions require a thorough understanding not only of chief complaints, but also how the physical part of illness and injury is framed by the patient's environment. Be considerate, be as thorough as time permits, and pay attention! Next time we'll talk about interviewing prospective employees. PMID:26554214

  15. [Canine cancer patients are included in translational research].

    PubMed

    Bűrresen, Betina; Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Cancer bearing dogs represent a unique clinical cancer model with a direct potential for accelerating translation into human patients. A research collaboration between the veterinary and human medical facilities at Copenhagen University and Rigshospitalet has taken offset in this. Canine cancer patients are implemented for development of new strategies in molecular imaging and radiotherapy. The obtained results will be used to guide human clinical trials. PMID:25291999

  16. Sex and sexuality in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, P W

    1995-12-01

    The number of cancer survivors is increasing dramatically. Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) will have the opportunity to work with cancer survivors as part of their clinical practice and can have influence on the cancer survivor's sexuality as part of the normalization process. Consequently, the cancer survivor's journey will be much richer with an even greater potential for a better quality of life. PMID:8547812

  17. Prevalence of Pathogenic Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes among Pancreatic Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Bamlet, William R; Moore, Raymond M; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Eckloff, Bruce W; Lee, Yean K; Petersen, Gloria M; McWilliams, Robert R; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well-defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12-month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 13 patients (13.5%) were identified in eight genes: four in ATM, two in BRCA2, CHEK2, and MSH6, and one in BARD1, BRCA1, FANCM, and NBN. These included nine mutations (9.4%) in established pancreatic cancer genes. Three mutations were found in patients with a first-degree relative with PDAC, and 10 mutations were found in patients with first- or second-degree relatives with breast, pancreas, colorectal, ovarian, or endometrial cancers. These results suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with PDAC carry germline mutations in predisposition genes associated with other cancers and that a better understanding of pancreatic cancer risk will depend on evaluation of families with broad constellations of tumors. These findings highlight the need for recommendations governing germline gene-panel testing of patients with pancreatic cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(1); 207-11. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26483394

  18. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-31

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  19. The Effect of Patient-Provider Communication on Medication Adherence in Hypertensive Black Patients: Does Race Concordance Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Allegrante, John P.; Chaplin, William; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear. Purpose To determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence. Methods Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates. Results 390 patients were in race-concordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p=0.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p=0.24). Conclusions Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients’ adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers. PMID:22270266

  20. Effective Physician-Nurse Communication: A Patient Safety Essential for Labor & Delivery

    PubMed Central

    LYNDON, Audrey; ZLATNIK, Marya G.; WACHTER, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication is a hallmark of safe patient care. Challenges to effective interprofessional communication in maternity care include differing professional perspectives on clinical management, steep hierarchies, and lack of administrative support for change. In this paper we review principles of high reliability as they apply to communication in clinical care, and discuss principles of effective communication and conflict management in maternity care. Effective clinical communication is respectful, clear, direct, and explicit. We use a clinical scenario to illustrate a historical style of nurse-physician communication, and then demonstrate how communication can be improved to promote trust and patient safety. Consistent execution of successful communications requires excellent listening skills, superb administrative support, and collective commitment to move past traditional hierarchy and professional stereotyping. PMID:21640970

  1. Evaluation and improvement of doctor–patient communication competence for emergency neurosurgeons: a standardized family model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Wang, Zhinong; Hong, Bo; Shen, Shengjuan; Guo, Yan; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Disease treatments have been significantly influenced by the communications between patients, their families, and doctors the lack of which may lead to malpractice allegations and complaints. In particular, inadequate communication may delay diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, for doctors communication and interpersonal skills, are as important as clinical skills and medical knowledge. In this study we intended to develop two detailed communication content checklists and a modified interpersonal skills inventory, aiming to evaluate their integrity in the midst of communication skills assessments, to provide feedback for some participants, and to observe their communication competence in both aspects PMID:25018623

  2. [Patient-provider communication in chronic illness: current state of research in selected areas].

    PubMed

    Farin, E

    2010-10-01

    Communication between patient and providers is extremely important, especially for the treatment of chronically ill patients, characterized by a biopsychosocial disease model. This article presents an overview of the current status of research on patient-provider communication in 3 selected areas: the communication preferences of chronically ill persons, the correlation between communication and relevant endpoints, and interventions to improve patient-provider communication. One major result of the research is that patients display a rather high degree of inter- and intra-individual variability with respect to the preference of certain communication styles (e.g. patient participation); there are differences among them, and they develop varying preferences in the course of their illness. However, communicative behavior of the provider that is generally perceived by many patients to be positive can also be identified: affective behavior (for example, asking the patient about his/her feelings, being sensitive to these feelings and responding to them), providing information in an understandable, proactive manner, and attempting to understand the patient's perceptions, expectations, and cognitive concepts. Successful communication requires a certain congruence between the patient's communication preferences and the provider's behavior. It has been sufficiently documented in literature that successful communication leads to greater adherence. The correlation to patient satisfaction is not documented quite as clearly but has often been shown. The findings vary with respect to the improvement in the patient's health status. The effectiveness of communication training for providers has been documented quite well regarding the immediate endpoints in patient-provider interaction (e.g., patient-oriented behavior); the evidence with respect to medium-term endpoints such as patient satisfaction varies, also due to the number of possible operationalizations of the endpoints. Supplementing provider training with communication-related training for patients appears to be an important and useful method as many studies have shown that the behavior of providers can be influenced using relatively simple measures that start with the patient. There is a need for further development of research on patient-provider communication, in particular with respect to a more solid theoretical basis, integration of methods including qualitative and quantitative methods, self-evaluations, and interaction analyses, and also concerning conducting more longitudinal studies. PMID:20963669

  3. Integrating cancer survivors' experiences into UK cancer registries: design and development of the ePOCS system (electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors)

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, L; Jones, H; Thomas, J; Forman, D; Newsham, A; Morris, E; Johnson, O; Velikova, G; Wright, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Understanding the psychosocial challenges of cancer survivorship, and identifying which patients experience ongoing difficulties, is a key priority. The ePOCS (electronic patient-reported outcomes from cancer survivors) project aims to develop and evaluate a cost-efficient, UK-scalable electronic system for collecting patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), at regular post-diagnostic timepoints, and linking these with clinical data in cancer registries. Methods: A multidisciplinary team developed the system using agile methods. Design entailed process mapping the system's constituent parts, data flows and involved human activities, and undertaking usability testing. Informatics specialists built new technical components, including a web-based questionnaire tool and tracking database, and established component-connecting data flows. Development challenges were overcome, including patient usability and data linkage and security. Results: We have developed a system in which PROMs are completed online, using a secure questionnaire administration tool, accessed via a public-facing website, and the responses are linked and stored with clinical registry data. Patient monitoring and communications are semiautomated via a tracker database, and patient correspondence is primarily Email-based. The system is currently honed for clinician-led hospital-based patient recruitment. Conclusions: A feasibility test study is underway. Although there are possible challenges to sustaining and scaling up ePOCS, the system has potential to support UK epidemiological PROMs collection and clinical data linkage. PMID:22048035

  4. Oxaliplatin Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-24

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  5. [Cancer Survivorship: the patient and medical care staff - how will society deal with cancer ?].

    PubMed

    Honda, Mayumi

    2011-07-01

    Instead of being preoccupied with treatment effectiveness, rates of survival, and asking how much longer will I live?, let us think in terms of how will I live my life the way I want to live it? In recent years, a new way of thinking called Cancer Survivorship has emerged in the United States, and has been drawing attention in Japan. Cancer Survivorship is a concept developed by a cancer patient support group in the United States in 1986, focusing on the experience of living with, through, and beyond cancer. Opposing society's narrow view of cancer patients as victims handed out a death sentence, Cancer Survivorship focuses on living life to the fullest from the time of cancer diagnosis until the moment of death,and works as a movement appealing to society to allow cancer survivors the right to live as they wish. This way of thinking has spread globally, and in Italy, a movement aimed at protecting cancer survivors' freedom to do paid work has unfolded. Even in Japan, with an increase in the number of cancer patients and an improved five-year survival rate, patient support groups have been emerging with the Cancer Survivorship mentality. However, Japanese society still has not given the movement sufficient recognition, and the question now is if cancer patients, even those in the terminal stage, can seize their lives and be someone who lives in the present. PMID:21772088

  6. Evaluation of serum Amphiregulin levels in breast cancer patients and cancer-free controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor ligand, Amphiregulin, has been associated with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. As Amphiregulin is proteolytically released from the surface of breast cancer cells, we investigated the levels of Amphiregulin in the serum of breast cancer patients and cancer-free women to evaluate its potential utility as a breast cancer biomarker. Findings Serum Amphiregulin levels were quantified by ELISA from 125 cancer-free women and 114 breast cancer patients. No significant association between serum Amphiregulin levels and breast cancer status was detected at two cut-points evaluated. Conclusions Measurement of serum Amphiregulin levels lacks the necessary sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer screening in the general population. PMID:24010672

  7. Fears, Feelings, and Facts: Interactively Communicating Benefits and Risks of Medical Radiation With Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Balter, Rochelle; Williamson, Matthew J.; St. Germain, Jean

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE As public awareness of medical radiation exposure increases, there has been heightened awareness among patients and physicians of the importance of holistic benefit-and-risk discussions in shared medical decision making. CONCLUSION We examine the rationale for informed consent and risk communication, draw on the literature on the psychology of radiation risk communication to increase understanding, examine methods commonly used to communicate radiation risk, and suggest strategies for improving communication about medical radiation benefits and risk. PMID:21427321

  8. Strategic physician communication and oncology clinical trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Videotaped interactions during which physicians present the option of clinical trial participation to patients at a Comprehensive Cancer Center revealed that discussing the benefits of participating and potential side effects of the protocol, addressing patient concerns, and offering tangible resources to manage the concerns raised by patients were associated with patient decisions to accrue to a trial.

  9. Use of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Awar, Zeina; Sheikh-Taha, Marwan

    2009-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with malignancies have a four-fold greater risk of venous thromboembolism compared with patients without malignancies. Underuse of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis persists, despite guidelines supporting its use in hospitalized cancer patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the use of DVT prophylaxis and its appropriateness in hospitalized cancer patients. This retrospective study included cancer patients admitted to Rafik Hariri University Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Beirut, Lebanon, over 2-month period, who were hospitalized for at least 2 days. We evaluated the use of anticoagulants for DVT prophylaxis in the absence of contraindications for their use. The risk factor profiles of the patients were reported in addition to the choice of the anticoagulant and the use of mechanical prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. One hundred and thirty patients were studied out of which 34 (26.2%) had contraindications to anticoagulation use. In addition, 21 patients out of 95 (22.1%) who qualified for DVT prophylaxis received pharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant (76.2% of the patients). Of those who received anticoagulation, only 47.6% received appropriate agent and dose. Among patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, only three (8.8%) received mechanical devices as nonpharmacologic DVT prophylaxis. DVT prophylaxis in hospitalized cancer patients is significantly underutilized. Several options are available to increase physicians' awareness of the problem. PMID:19587584

  10. Considerations when communicating with awake patients undergoing image-guided neuro-interventions.

    PubMed

    Stafa, Altin; Simonetti, Luigi; Di Paola, Francesco; Leonardi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    The authors empirically evaluated the context of intra-procedural physician-patient communication during imaging-guided procedures in a radiology/neuroradiology interventional clinical framework. Different intra-procedural communicative scenarios are reported.They conclude that the quality of intra-procedural physician-patient communication should be considered an important element of individual and team ethical and professional behaviour, able to strongly influence the therapeutic alliance. As for the whole medical communication strategy, an approach which takes into account the psychological and cultural background of the individual patient is preferred. PMID:26261155

  11. Management of fatigue in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Pauline; Portenoy, Russell K

    2002-03-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms experienced by patients with cancer and other progressive diseases. Although reported to be a major obstacle to maintaining normal daily activities and quality of life, remarkably few studies of this syndrome have been conducted. This trend is slowly changing with the recognition of fatigue as a diagnosis by the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision-Clinical Modification; the introduction of new instruments for the measurement of fatigue; and the publication of practice guidelines. An adequate evaluation of fatigue must assess its severity, clarify other characteristics, and determine the impact on daily activities. Potential etiologies include the underlying disease, treatment of the disease, concurrent conditions, and psychological disorders. Interventions for fatigue involve therapies targeted at the correction of the potential etiologies and symptomatic therapies that may be pharmacologic or nonpharmacologic. Possible primary therapies include modification of the patient's drug regimen, correction of metabolic abnormalities, nutritional support, and pharmacologic treatments for anemia, insomnia, or depression. Symptomatic interventions include specific drug treatment, modification of activity, exercise, and cognitive therapies. PMID:15046393

  12. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually


  13. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the…

  14. Medicated Hypertensive Patients' Views and Experience of Information and Communication Concerning Antihypertensive Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisper, Lotta; Isacson, Dag; Sjoden, Per-Olow; Bingefors, Kerstin

    1997-01-01

    Hypertensive patients (N=21) were interviewed regarding their views and experience of information and communication with respect to antihypertensive medicines. Patients' attitudes toward hypertension and antihypertensive drugs, communication with pharmacist and physician, perceptions of drug information, and the information environment are…

  15. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  16. Improving Clinical Communication and Promoting Health through Concordance-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; D'Agostino, Thomas A.; Ho, Evelyn Y.; Chewning, Betty A.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, communication education has been used as a means of improving the clinician-patient relationship and promoting health. The focus of these interventions has primarily centered on clinician training. An area that has received less focus, although equally important, is training patients to be good communicators. The purpose of the


  17. Results of an intervention study to improve communication about randomised clinical trials of cancer therapy. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The authors conducted an intervention study to improve communication during consultation about randomized trials. Questionnaires were used to collect information about patients’ information needs and their attitudes toward clinical trials. The Preferences for Information Questionnaire was helpful to doctors in understanding their patients’ interest in receiving specific details about clinical trials. The Patient Attitudes to Trials Questionnaire accurately predicted which patients would consent to enroll in the trials they were offered.

  18. Closure of oroantral communications with BichatŽs buccal fat pad. Level of patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-González, Rocío; Peńarrocha-Diago, María; Peńarrocha-Oltra, David; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the closure of oroantral communications with the pedicled buccal fat pad in a series of patients, and to determine the level of patient satisfaction after the surgery. Study Design: A prospective study of patients diagnosed of unilateral or bilateral oroantral communication (OAC) closed using the buccal fat pad between May 2012 and January 2013 was performed. Data analysis extended to: age, sex, and cause, location and size of oroantral communication. Complications and success related to buccal fat pad surgery were evaluated. Also, patient satisfaction was assessed after six months of surgery. Results: Nine patients (3 men and 6 women) with a mean age of 50.5 years and 11 OAC treated with buccal fat pads were included. The most common cause of oroantral communication was the extraction of molars. The average widest diameter of the oroantral communication was 7.1 mm. One week after the surgeries no complications were found. One month after surgery, one patient presented persistence of the oroantral communication; in this patient, the buccal fat pad technique was considered a failure, and a second intervention was performed using a buccal mucoperiosteal flap to achieve primary closure of soft tissues. After six months, patient showed closure of the communication and complete healing. All the other communications had been solved with BichatŽs ball technique, yielding a success rate of 90.9%. Mean patient overall satisfaction was 9.1 out of 10; patients were satisfied with phonetics (9.4), aesthetics (9) and chewing (9). Conclusions: The buccal fat pad technique was successful in closing 10 out of 11 oroantral communications and few complications were found. Patients were highly satisfied in overall with the treatment and with phonetics, aesthetics and chewing. Key words:Bichat’s fat pad, buccal fat pad, oroantral communication. PMID:25810838

  19. Pain management in veterinary patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Timothy M

    2014-09-01

    Pain is a widespread clinical symptom in companion animals with cancer, and its aggressive management should be a priority. Education and skills can be acquired by health care professionals and caregivers to better understand, recognize, and treat cancer-associated pain. The early and rational institution of multimodality analgesic protocols can be highly effective and maximize the chances of improving quality of life in dogs and cats with cancer. This article describes the pathophysiology of pain in companion animals diagnosed with cancer. The foundational causes of cancer-associated pain and treatment strategies for alleviating discomfort in companion animals with cancer are discussed. PMID:25174912

  20. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in cancer predisposition genes among pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N.; Bamlet, William R.; Moore, Raymond M.; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Lee, Yean K.; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12 month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 13 patients (13.5%) were identified in eight genes: four in ATM, two in BRCA2, CHEK2, and MSH6, and one in BARD1, BRCA1, FANCM, and NBN. These included nine mutations (9.4%) in established pancreatic cancer genes. Three mutations were found in patients with a first degree relative with PDAC, and 10 mutations were found in patients with first or second-degree relatives with breast, pancreas, colorectal, ovarian, or endometrial cancer. These results suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with PDAC carry germline mutations in predisposition genes associated with other cancers, and that a better understanding of pancreatic cancer risk will depend on evaluation of families with broad constellations of tumors. These findings highlight the need for recommendations governing germline gene-panel testing of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26483394

  1. Present Status of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Elderly Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loibl, Sibylle; Reinisch, Mattea

    2012-01-01

    Summary Elderly breast cancer patients are underrepresented in clinical trials, leading to a lack of knowledge regarding their tolerance of modern chemotherapy regimens. In addition, physicians are often reluctant to treat older patients with chemotherapy due to potential side effects. This article summarizes the up-to-date literature on chemotherapy in elderly patients with breast cancer, evaluates the impact of the patients’ comorbidities and treatment alterations and aims to encourage treating patients adequately according to their disease in combination with the biological age rather than the chronological age alone. Finally, a short overview is given of the recruiting studies in Europe evaluating chemotherapy in elderly patients. PMID:24715824

  2. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mariama; Jewell, Andrew Paul

    2007-01-01

    The use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among cancer patients is widespread and appears to be increasing. However, it is not clear whether patients use CAM as an 'alternative' to standard oncology care or as an adjunct to the conventional treatment they receive. This study reviews the role of CAM therapies in the management of cancer, from the view of both patients and health professionals and it highlights issues relating to the efficacy of CAM used by cancer patients. Most patients use CAM to 'complement' the conventional therapies of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy and surgery. Health professionals in general have expressed positive views when CAM is used 'complementarily' and not as an 'Alternative'. Results so far published have shown that CAM can contribute to improving the quality of life of cancer patients and their general well-being. PMID:17470282

  3. Enduring impact of communication skills training: results of a 12-month follow-up. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Communication difficulties between oncologists and their patients impede patient accrual to clinical trials because patients are left uncertain about their diagnosis or prognosis, and confused about disease management options or the therapeutic intent of treatment. Oncologists are lacking adequate communication skills training. A three-day intensive training course involving feedback on videotaped consultations with simulated patients resulted in significant and lasting improvements in clinicians’ communication skills. Implementing communication skills training courses may lead to increased recruitment to clinical trials.

  4. Clinical studies with anticoagulants to improve survival in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Papageorgiou, Chryssoula; Hatmi, Mohamed; Samama, Meyer-Michel; Elalamy, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is linked with hypercoagulability and risk of thrombosis and this close association was recognized by Armand Trousseau in 1865. The relation between cancer and blood coagulation is reciprocal: cancer induces a hypercoagulable state and predisposes to thrombosis and activation of platelets, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis interfere with tumor cell biology, tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastatic process. In the present article, we analyze the clinical trials which assessed the influence of anticoagulant treatment on the survival of patients with cancer. The available data show that low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) tend to be more effective and safer than vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in improving survival in patients with cancer. The beneficial effect of anticoagulation with either LMWHs or VKA is not universal for all patients with cancer. There are some histological types of cancers which, at early stages, appear to be more sensitive than others to the effect of anticoagulant treatment. The available clinical trials, although limited, are encouraging for the beneficial effect of anticoagulant treatment on the survival of cancer patients. More clinical trials are needed, targeting groups of patients homogenous regarding the type of cancer, the stage of the disease and life expectancy. The forthcoming clinical trials have to address some issues regarding the optimal dose, the timing and the duration of treatment with LMWH in relation to chemotherapy or other anticancer therapies. PMID:19176993

  5. Communication of pharmacogenetic research results to HIV-infected treated patients: standpoints of professionals and patients

    PubMed Central

    Moutel, Grégoire; Duchange, Nathalie; Raffi, François; Sharara, Lama I.; Theodorou, Ioannis; Noël, Violaine; de Montgolfier, Sandrine; Callies, Ingrid; Bricaire, François; Hervé, Christian; Leport, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The aim of pharmacogenetic studies is to adapt therapeutic strategies to individual genetic profiles, thus maximising their efficacy and minimising the likelihood of adverse side effects. Since the advent of personalised medicine, the issue of communicating research results to participants has become increasingly important. We addressed this question in the context of HIV infection, as patients and associations are particularly concerned by research and therapeutic advances. We explored the standpoints of both research professionals and participants involved in a pharmacogenetics study conducted in a cohort of HIV-infected patients. The setting of the research protocol was followed over a 2 years period. Participants’ standpoints were collected through a questionnaire and interviews were conducted with research professionals. Of 125 participants, 76% wished to receive individual results and 71% wished to receive collective results; 39% did not know when results might be expected. Communication of global research results is a principle that is generally accepted by professionals. Concerning individual feedback, the professionals felt that it was necessary if it could be of direct benefit to the participant, but they expressed doubts for situations with no recognised benefit. Our results highlight the necessity to consider this issue in greater detail. We suggest the need to anticipate the debates concerning individual feedback, to differentiate between situations and the importance of further investigations on the opportunities and modalities of communication. Finally, our work emphasised the opposite pressures between the pursuit of scientific knowledge and the therapeutic orientation of clinical trials. PMID:15957002

  6. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing. PMID:26904776

  7. Salivary MicroRNA in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Humeau, Marine; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Sicard, Flavie; Martins, Frédéric; Bournet, Barbara; Buscail, Louis; Torrisani, Jérôme; Cordelier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Western countries, with the lowest 1-year survival rate among commonly diagnosed cancers. Reliable biomarkers for pancreatic cancer diagnosis are lacking and are urgently needed to allow for curative surgery. As microRNA (miRNA) recently emerged as candidate biomarkers for this disease, we explored in the present pilot study the differences in salivary microRNA profiles between patients with pancreatic tumors that are not eligible for surgery, precancerous lesions, inflammatory disease or cancer-free patients as a potential early diagnostic tool. Methods Whole saliva samples from patients with pancreatic cancer (n = 7), pancreatitis (n = 4), IPMN (n = 2), or healthy controls (n = 4) were obtained during endoscopic examination. After total RNA isolation, expression of 94 candidate miRNAs was screened by q(RT)PCR using Biomark Fluidgm. Human-derived pancreatic cancer cells were xenografted in athymic mice as an experimental model of pancreatic cancer. Results We identified hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-23a, hsa-miR-23b and miR-29c as being significantly upregulated in saliva of pancreatic cancer patients compared to control, showing sensitivities of 71.4%, 85.7%, 85,7% and 57%, respectively and excellent specificity (100%). Interestingly, hsa-miR-23a and hsa-miR23b are overexpressed in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer precursor lesions. We found that hsa-miR-210 and let-7c are overexpressed in the saliva of patients with pancreatitis as compared to the control group, with sensitivity of 100% and 75%, and specificity of 100% and 80%, respectively. Last hsa-miR-216 was upregulated in cancer patients as compared to patients diagnosed with pancreatitis, with sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 100%. In experimental models of PDAC, salivary microRNA detection precedes systemic detection of cancer cells markers. Conclusions Our novel findings indicate that salivary miRNA are discriminatory in pancreatic cancer patients that are not eligible for surgery. In addition, we demonstrate in experimental models that salivary miRNA detection precedes systemic detection of cancer cells markers. This study stems for the use of salivary miRNA as biomarker for the early diagnosis of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26121640

  8. Palliative Cancer Care: Music Video for AYA-Parent Communication and Resilience | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  9. Resources, Parent-Child Communication and Adjustment to Pediatric Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  10. Variations in GP–patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jenni; Lloyd, Cathy; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctor–patient communication is a key driver of overall satisfaction with primary care. Patients from minority ethnic backgrounds consistently report more negative experiences of doctor–patient communication. However, it is currently unknown whether these ethnic differences are concentrated in one gender or in particular age groups. Aim To determine how reported GP–patient communication varies between patients from different ethnic groups, stratified by age and gender. Design and setting Analysis of data from the English GP Patient Survey from 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, including 1 599 801 responders. Method A composite score was created for doctor–patient communication from five survey items concerned with interpersonal aspects of care. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-specific differences between white British patients and patients of the same age and gender from each other ethnic group. Results There was strong evidence (P<0.001 for age by gender by ethnicity three-way interaction term) that the effect of ethnicity on reported GP–patient communication varied by both age and gender. The difference in scores between white British and other responders on doctor–patient communication items was largest for older, female Pakistani and Bangladeshi responders, and for younger responders who described their ethnicity as ‘Any other white’. Conclusion The identification of groups with particularly marked differences in experience of GP–patient communication — older, female, Asian patients and younger ‘Any other white’ patients — underlines the need for a renewed focus on quality of care for these groups. PMID:26541182

  11. Intercellular Communication by Exosome-Derived microRNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannafon, Bethany N.; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2013-01-01

    The development of human cancers is a multistep process in which normal cells acquire characteristics that ultimately lead to their conversion into cancer cells. Many obstacles must be overcome for this process to occur; of these obstacles, is the ability to survive an inhospitable microenvironment. It is recognized that the intercommunication between tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment is essential to overcoming this obstacle and for the tumor to progress, metastasize and establish itself at distant sites. Exosomes are membrane-derived vesicles that have recently been recognized as important mediators of intercellular communication, as they carry lipids, proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs that can be transferred to a recipient cell via fusion of the exosome with the target cell membrane. In the context of cancer cells, this process entails the transfer of cancer-promoting cellular contents to surrounding cells within the tumor microenvironment or into the circulation to act at distant sites, thereby enabling cancer progression. In this process, the transfer of exosomal microRNAs to a recipient cell where they can regulate target gene expression is of particular interest, both in understanding the basic biology of cancer progression and for the development of therapeutic approaches. This review discusses the exosome-mediated intercellular communication via microRNAs within the tumor microenvironment in human cancers, with a particular focus on breast cancer exosomes. PMID:23839094

  12. Designing Asynchronous Communication Tools for Optimization of Patient-Clinician Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Eschler, Jordan; Liu, Leslie S.; Vizer, Lisa M.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Lozano, Paula; Pratt, Wanda; Ralston, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous communication outside the clinical setting has both enriched and complicated patient-clinician interactions. Many patients can now interact with a patient portal 24 hours a day, asking questions of their clinicians via secure message, checking lab results, ordering medication refills, or making appointments. However, the mode of communication (asynchronous) and the nature of the interaction (lacking tone or body language) strip valuable information from each side of patient-clinician asynchronous communication. Using interviews with 34 individuals who actively manage a chronic illness of their own, or for a child or partner, we elicited narratives about patients’ experiences and expectations for using asynchronous communication to address medical issues with their clinicians. Based on these perspectives, we present opportunities for designing asynchronous communication tools to better facilitate understanding of and coordination around care activities between patients and clinicians. PMID:26958188

  13. Communication interaction in ICU--Patient and staff experiences and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Victoria S; Turkington, Leisa

    2006-06-01

    Patients on intensive care units (ICU) have difficulty with communication [Menzel LK. Factors related to the emotional responses of intubated patients to being unable to speak. Heart Lung 1998; 27(4):245-52]. Feelings of anger and low mood have been reported, which can lead to reduced participation in rehabilitation. For members of the multidisciplinary team breakdown in communication with patients may be frustrating and related to a limited knowledge of strategies and resources to facilitate communication. The NHS Modernisation Agency Critical Care Programme (2002) identified speech and language therapists (SLTs) as having a role in the assessment and management of patients with communication difficulties on ICU. This multi-centre pilot study aimed to investigate staff and patient perceptions and experiences of communication within ICUs. A short questionnaire was devised using semi-structured interviews to collect quantitative and qualitative information. Patterns were identified including insights into SLT service delivery and possible directions for future research and development. PMID:16298132

  14. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  15. Systemic Therapy for Elderly Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Joleen M.; Grothey, Axel; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of patients with gastrointestinal cancers are over the age of 65. This age group comprises the minority of the patients enrolled in clinical trials, and it is unknown whether older patients achieve similar results as younger patients in terms of survival benefit and tolerability. In addition, there are few studies specifically designed for patients over 65 years. Subset analyses of individual trials and studies using pooled patient data from multiple trials provide some understanding on outcomes in older patients with gastrointestinal cancers. This article reviews the evidence on chemotherapeutic regimens in the elderly with colorectal, pancreatic, and gastroesophageal cancers, and discusses a practical approach to provide the best outcomes for older patients. PMID:21603244

  16. Salivary gland dysfunction (dry mouth) in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew; Hall, Sally

    2011-10-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction (SGD) is a common problem in patients with advanced cancer, and is associated with significant morbidity in this group of patients. The management of SGD involves treatment of the cause, treatment of the symptoms (preferably with saliva stimulants), prevention of the complications, and treatment of the complications. This article reviews the evidence for the clinical utility of various management strategies, highlighting those strategies that have been investigated in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:22068117

  17. Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, San-Chi; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Hung, Man-Hsin; Hung, Yi-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Improvements in therapeutic modalities have prolonged the survival of gastric cancer patients. Comorbidities such as thromboembolic events that emerge as a result of disease complexities and/or treatments received have not been considered. The objectives of this study are to examine the relationship between gastric cancer and ischemic stroke, and to determine predictive risk factors. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. A total of 45,060 gastric cancer patients and non-cancer counterparts without antecedent stroke were recruited. Hazard ratios (HRs) and the cumulative incidence of ischemic stroke were calculated, and risk factors for ischemic stroke were assessed. Gastric cancer patients were associated with higher risk of ischemic stroke (HR 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–1.19, P?=?0.007), especially in participants younger than 65 years (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.39–1.86, P?cancer patients included age, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia, and having received major surgery for gastric cancer. Our findings suggest the importance of stroke surveillance and prevention strategies in high-risk patients. Having received major surgery for gastric cancer is a significant risk factor in these patients. PMID:26376378

  18. Communication between health care professionals and deaf patients.

    PubMed

    Ludders, B B

    1987-01-01

    A review of the literature about communication between health care professionals and deaf people demonstrates that a continuum of accuracy in perceptions of deaf people and their communication problems exists in health care settings. The author provides information on deaf culture, history, population size, sign language, and communication needs that is used to evaluate professional journal articles. Examples of research on this topic are presented and the need for further studies and the role of social workers are discussed. PMID:3679018

  19. Give cancer patients a choice about fertility.

    PubMed

    Breuton-Smith, Grete

    2015-03-18

    Surveys by Breast Cancer Care suggest that younger women with breast cancer can be denied the chance to preserve their fertility. Treatments, including chemotherapy, can cause infertility, so healthcare professionals should discuss options such as egg freezing beforehand. PMID:25783256

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang T.; Lee, Eun Joo; Huang, Melinda Gingman; Park, Young In; Khullar, Aashish; Plodkowski, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system, representing 3.8% of all new cancer cases in the United States and is the ninth most common cancer overall. The American Cancer Society estimates that 62,450 people in the United States will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2015, and 1950 deaths will result from the disease. Objective To review the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. Discussion Over the past 3 decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of people diagnosed with thyroid cancer, which may be attributable to the wide use of imaging studies, including ultrasounds, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans that incidentally detect thyroid nodules. Thyroid cancer is divided into several main types, with papillary thyroid cancer being the most common. The treatment options for patients with thyroid cancer include the surgical removal of the entire thyroid gland (total thyroidectomy), radioactive iodine therapy, and molecular-targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This article summarizes the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer, with recommendations from the American Thyroid Association regarding thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Recently approved drugs and treatment trends are also explored. Conclusion The prognosis and treatment of thyroid cancer depend on the tumor type and its stage at the time of diagnosis. Many thyroid cancers remain stable, microscopic, and indolent. The increasing treatment options for patients with thyroid cancer, including therapies that were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, have kept the mortality rate from this malignancy low, despite the increase in its incidence. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve prognosis and reduce mortality. PMID:25964831

  1. How does patient-clinician information engagement influence self-reported cancer-related problems? Findings from a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andy SL; Bourgoin, Angel; Gray, Stacy W; Armstrong, Katrina; Hornik, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Background Past research has linked patient-physician communication with improved emotional, physical, and social health. One component of communication, patient-clinician information engagement (PCIE) predicts improved short-term patient-reported outcomes such as treatment satisfaction through perceptions of feeling informed. However, the relationship between PCIE and longer term cancer-related problems has not previously been examined. Objective This study examines the influence of PCIE on self-reported problems associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment based on a longitudinal survey among a randomly selected sample from the 2005 Pennsylvania Cancer Registry. Methods We surveyed 1,293 respondents diagnosed with colorectal, breast, or prostate cancers in 2006 and 2007 (baseline response rate was 64%, retention rate was 65%). We predicted an index of cancer-related problems at one-year follow-up with the baseline cancer-related problem index and PCIE, controlling for demographic and clinical factors using regression analyses. The mean age of participants was 65 years, about half were female, and 86% were White. Results Having more cancer-related problems and PCIE at baseline significantly predicted more cancer-related problems at follow-up. Additionally, baseline cancer-related problems and PCIE interacted significantly (p=0.01) – PCIE was associated with more cancer-related problems at follow-up among participants who reported more rather than fewer symptoms at baseline. Conclusion If respondents reported engaging more with their physicians at baseline, they reported experiencing more cancer-related issues at follow-up; this pattern was stronger among those reporting more baseline problems. Increased discussion of cancer information with physicians may maintain the salience of these problems in cancer survivors’ minds over time. PMID:24048804

  2. Mangosteen for the cancer patient: facts and myths.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Mangosteen is a tropical fruit native to Southeast Asia. It is consumed both as food and medicine. Data from in vitro and animal studies revealed that it has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells. Xanthones, the major components of mangosteen fruit, have been implicated in such effects. It is yet to be studied in humans. However, despite lack of clinical evidence, mangosteen products are marketed to cancer patients as dietary supplements. Cancer patients should use caution before consuming mangosteen products as they can potentially interact with cancer treatments and also affect blood sugar levels. PMID:19442348

  3. Characterization of the salivary microbiome in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Pedro J.; Fletcher, Erin M.; Gibbons, Sean M.; Bouvet, Michael; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of pancreatic cancer often do not occur until the cancer has undergone metastasis, resulting in a very low survival rate. In this study, we investigated whether salivary bacterial profiles might provide useful biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Using high-throughput sequencing of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene, we characterized the salivary microbiota of patients with pancreatic cancer and compared them to healthy patients and patients with other diseases, including pancreatic disease, non-pancreatic digestive disease/cancer and non-digestive disease/cancer. A total of 146 patients were enrolled at the UCSD Moores Cancer Center where saliva and demographic data were collected from each patient. Of these, we analyzed the salivary microbiome of 108 patients: 8 had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, 78 with other diseases and 22 were classified as non-diseased (healthy) controls. Bacterial 16S rRNA sequences were amplified directly from salivary DNA extractions and subjected to high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Several bacterial genera differed in abundance in patients with pancreatic cancer. We found a significantly higher ratio of Leptotrichia to Porphyromonas in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer than in the saliva of healthy patients or those with other disease (Kruskal–Wallis Test; P < 0.001). Leptotrichia abundances were confirmed using real-time qPCR with Leptotrichia specific primers. Similar to previous studies, we found lower relative abundances of Neisseria and Aggregatibacter in the saliva of pancreatic cancer patients, though these results were not significant at the P < 0.05 level (K–W Test; P = 0.07 and P = 0.09 respectively). However, the relative abundances of other previously identified bacterial biomarkers, e.g., Streptococcus mitis and Granulicatella adiacens, were not significantly different in the saliva of pancreatic cancer patients. Overall, this study supports the hypothesis that bacteria abundance profiles in saliva are useful biomarkers for pancreatic cancer though much larger patient studies are needed to verify their predictive utility. PMID:26587342

  4. Attitudes of Patients With Cancer About Personalized Medicine and Somatic Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stacy W.; Hicks-Courant, Katherine; Lathan, Christopher S.; Garraway, Levi; Park, Elyse R.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dramatic advances in genomic technology stand to revolutionize cancer care; however, little is known about patients' understanding and acceptance of personalized medicine and widespread genetic testing (GT). Patients and Methods: We conducted a formative, semi-structured interview study with a random sample of patients with lung, colorectal, and breast cancers to assess awareness of personalized medicine and GT and attitudes about somatic GT. Willingness to undergo GT was elicited through hypothetic scenarios. Results: Sixty-nine patients participated; 71% were women; 42% were black; median age was 59 years; and 42% had an education level ? college. We found that a majority of patients either were not aware of the term “personalized medicine” or defined it in unexpected ways. Although many patients identified relevant benefits of somatic testing (eg, informs treatment), many patients also expressed significant concerns (ie, psychological harm and discrimination). A majority of patients expressed a willingness to undergo somatic (predictive, 96%, prognostic, 93%) and germline (cancer risk without incidental information, 87%; cancer risk with incidental information, 81%; pharmacogenetic, 91%) testing; however, far fewer patients expressed a willingness to undergo full genome sequencing (62%). Reluctance was attributed to concerns over incidental findings, information overload, and the lack of a clear benefit. Conclusion: Many patients relayed misunderstandings about somatic testing and a reluctance to undergo full sequencing; oncologists must carefully consider how they present testing to patients so that concerns over discrimination and psychological harm do not hinder test uptake. More work is needed to identify effective ways to communicate complex genomic concepts to patients and research participants. PMID:23598841

  5. [Treatment of venous thromboembolic disease in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Farge-Bancel, D; Florea, L; Bosquet, L; Debourdeau, P

    2008-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease, as defined by the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, occurs among 4 to 20% of patients with cancer and is a leading cause of death among these patients. Use of classical anticoagulation to treat VTE in a cancer patient is associated with a higher risk of major bleeding and of VTE recurrence as compared to noncancer patients. Updated comprehensive and systematic review of current data from the medical literature allows to reconsider the classical approach used for anticoagulant treatment in cancer patients and to implement adapted recommendations. In 2008, the use of daily subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for at least three to six months is recommended as first line therapy to treat VTE disease in cancer patients. If LMWH are contra-indicated (renal insufficiency), other therapeutic approaches are warranted, such as use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) with early introduction of anti-vitamin K for at least three months or venous cava filter in case of absolute contra-indications to anticoagulation. VTE prophylaxis in cancer patients relies on the same therapeutic approaches as currently used for noncancer patients at high risk of VTE. The definition of more specific prophylactic approaches for patients with cancer considered at higher risks of VTE, will be the subject of many clinical trials in the forthcoming years. PMID:18394821

  6. Recruiting Ethnically Diverse General Internal Medicine Patients for a Telephone Survey on Physician-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles-Springer, Anna M; Santoyo, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of recruitment methods among diverse populations. OBKECTIVE Describe response rates by recruitment stage, ethnic-language group, and type of initial contact letter (for African-American and Latino patients). DESIGN Tracking of response status by recruitment stage and ethnic-language group and a randomized trial of ethnically tailored initial letters nested within a cross-sectional telephone survey on physician-patient communication. PARTICIPANTS Adult general medicine patients with ?1 visit during the preceding year, stratified by 4 categories: African-American (N= 1,400), English-speaking Latino (N= 894), Spanish-speaking Latino (N= 965), and non-Latino white (N= 1,400). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Ethnically tailored initial letters referred to shortages of African-American (or Latino) physicians and the need to learn about the experiences of African-American (or Latino) patients communicating with physicians. Of 2,482 patients contacted, eligible, and able to participate (identified eligibles), 69.9% completed the survey. Thirty-nine percent of the sampling frame was unable to be contacted, with losses higher among non-Latino whites (46.5%) and African Americans (44.2%) than among English-speaking (32.3%) and Spanish-speaking Latinos (25.1%). For identified eligibles, response rates were highest among Spanish-speaking Latinos (75.2%), lowest for non-Latino whites (66.4%), and intermediate for African Americans (69.7%) and English-speaking Latinos (68.1%). There were no differences in overall response rates between patients receiving ethnically tailored letters (72.2%) and those receiving general letters (70.0%). CONCLUSIONS Household contact and individual response rates differed by ethnic-language group, highlighting the importance of tracking losses by stage and subpopulation. Careful attention to recruitment yielded acceptable response rates among all groups. PMID:15963168

  7. Recruiting and Communicating with Participants | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    At this stage, it is vital to continue to be thoughtful about participants, staff, and those in the community with access to participants such as physicians and partner organizations. Use good communication skills (like being participant-friendly) and habits (like keeping referring physicians in the loop).

  8. A qualitative exploration of Malaysian cancer patients' perspectives on cancer and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer patients' knowledge about cancer and experiences with its treatment play an important role in long-term adherence in their disease management. This study aimed to explore cancer patients' knowledge about cancer, their perceptions of conventional therapies and the factors that contribute to medication adherence in the Malaysian population. Methods A qualitative research approach was adopted to gain a better understanding of the current perceptions and knowledge held by cancer patients. Twenty patients were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. A saturation point was reached after the 18th interview, and no new information emerged with the subsequent 2 interviews. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by means of a standard content analysis framework. Results The majority of patients related the cause of their cancer to be God's will. Participants perceived conventional therapies as effective due to their scientific methods of preparations. A fear of side effects was main reasons given for delay in seeking treatment; however, perceptions were reported to change after receiving treatment when effective management to reduce the risk of side effects had been experienced. Conclusions This study provides basic information about cancer patients' perceptions towards cancer and its treatment. These findings can help in the design of educational programs to enhance awareness and acceptances of cancer screening. Priorities for future research should focus on patients who refused the conventional therapies at any stage. PMID:21718547

  9. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  10. Self-Reported Financial Burden and Satisfaction With Care Among Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chino, Fumiko; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Taylor, Donald H.; Lu, Ying; Samsa, Gregory; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health care-related costs and satisfaction are compelling targets for quality improvement in cancer care delivery; however, little is known about how financial burden affects patient satisfaction. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional, survey-based study assessing patient-reported financial burden (FB). Eligible patients were ?21 years with solid tumor malignancy and were receiving chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for ?1 month. The Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire Short-Form assessed patient satisfaction with health care. Subjective FB related to cancer treatment was measured on a 5-point Likert scale. Results. Of 174 participants (32% response rate), 47% reported significant/catastrophic FB. Participants reported highest satisfaction with interpersonal manner and lowest satisfaction with financial aspects of care. In adjusted analysis, high FB was negatively associated with general satisfaction (coefficient: ?.29), satisfaction with technical quality (coefficient: ?.26), and satisfaction with financial aspects of care (coefficient: ?.62). Older age was associated with higher scores in all satisfaction subscales except patient-physician communication and financial aspects. Annual household income of <$20,000 was associated with lower satisfaction scores in all subscales except time spent with doctor. High FB was not associated with patient satisfaction scores for accessibility and convenience, communication, interpersonal manner, or time spent with doctor. Conclusion. FB is a potentially modifiable correlate of poor satisfaction with cancer care including general satisfaction and satisfaction with the technical quality of care. Addressing cancer-associated FB may lead to improved satisfaction, which in turn can influence adherence, outcomes, and quality of life. PMID:24668333

  11. What Patients Value When Oncologists Give News of Cancer Recurrence: Commentary on Specific Moments in Audio-Recorded Conversations

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Susan B.; Hopley, Elizabeth K.; Arnold, Robert M.; Baile, Walter F.; Edwards, Kelly A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Recommendations for communicating bad or serious news are based on limited evidence. This study was designed to understand patient perspectives on what patients value when oncologists communicate news of cancer recurrence. Study Design and Methods. Participants were 23 patients treated for a gastrointestinal cancer at a tertiary U.S. cancer center within the past 2 years, who had semistructured qualitative interviews in which they listened to audio recordings of an oncology fellow discussing news of cancer recurrence with a standardized patient. Participants paused the audio recording to comment on what they liked or disliked about the oncologist's communication. Results. Three themes were identified that refine existing approaches to discussing serious news. The first theme, recognition, described how the oncologist responded to the gravity of the news of cancer recurrence for the patient. Participants saw the need for recognition throughout the encounter and not just after the news was given. The second theme, guiding, describes what participants wanted after hearing the news, which was for the oncologist to draw on her biomedical expertise to frame the news and plan next steps. The third theme, responsiveness, referred to the oncologist's ability to sense the need for recognition or guidance and to move fluidly between them. Conclusion. This study suggests that oncologists giving news of cancer recurrence could think of the communication as going back and forth between recognition and guidance and could ask themselves: “Have I demonstrated that I recognize the patient's experience hearing the news?” and “Have I provided guidance to the next steps?” PMID:21349951

  12. Clinical features of second primary cancers arising in early gastric cancer patients after endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Jang, Jae-Young; Chang, Young Woon; Kim, Yong Ho

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence and distribution of second primary cancers (SPCs) in early gastric cancer (EGC) patients who underwent endoscopic resection (ER), compared to advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients who underwent surgery. METHODS: The medical records of 1021 gastric cancer (GC) patients were retrospectively reviewed from January 2006 to December 2010. The characteristics and incidence of SPCs were investigated in those with EGC that underwent curative ER (the EGC group) and those with AGC who underwent curative surgical resection (the AGC group). RESULTS: We ultimately enrolled 184 patients in the EGC group and 229 patients in the AGC group. A total of 38 of the 413 (9.2%) GC patients had SPCs; the rate was identical in both groups. Of these 38 patients, 18 had synchronous and 20 had metachronous cancers. The most common SPC was lung cancer (18.4%), followed by colorectal cancer (13.2%) and esophageal cancer (13.2%). No significant risk factors were identified for the development of SPCs. CONCLUSION: Endoscopists should provide close surveillance and establish follow-up programs to ensure SPC detection in GC patients undergoing curative resection regardless of their clinical characteristics. PMID:26217087

  13. Factors Associated with Perceived Patient-Provider Communication Quality among Puerto Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Calo, William A.; Ortiz, Ana P.; Colon, Vivian; Krasny, Sarah; Tortolero-Luna, Guillemo

    2014-01-01

    Patient-provider communication is an important factor influencing patients' health outcomes. This study examined the relationship between patient-provider communication quality and sociodemographic, health care access, trusted information sources, and health status variables. Data were from a representative sample of 450 Puerto Rican adults who participated in the Health Information National Trends Survey. A composite score rating perceived patient-provider communication quality was created from five items (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). A multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted. Patient-provider communication ratings were lower among the unemployed (p=0.049), those who do not trust a lot in the information provided by their providers (p=0.003), and respondents with higher depressive symptoms scores (p=0.036). Perceived patient-provider communication quality, however, was higher among respondents who visited their providers five or more times in the last year (p=0.023). Understanding patient perceptions of provider communication may serve to develop system-level interventions aimed at eliminating communication disparities and improving patients' health outcomes. PMID:24858864

  14. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate communication is at the heart of successful, healthy social interactions in humans. Deficits in social communication are a hallmark of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, very little research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying these issues. It has been suggested that dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter system involved in stimulating communication in individuals that are not highly motivated to communicate. A typical model to study dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans is represented by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, who show motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of social communication on actions in non-demented PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the communicative intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. In two main conditions, participants were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either simply lift it (individual condition) or lift it with the intent to communicate a meaning to a partner (communicative condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to communicative intention and that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating communicative intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients. Although the to-be-grasped object remained the same both the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'individual' and the 'communication' conditions. The PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. We contend that social and communicative impairments are associated with abnormalities in dopaminergic pathways. PMID:26922506

  15. Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Kristy; Arenberg, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer diagnosis and treatment has evolved to require the input and expertise of multiple diverse medical and surgical specialties. The approach to lung cancer patients requires the adherence to a few principles that include thorough use of staging modalities to assure the proper treatment for each patient, and an understanding of the limitations and advantages of each of these modalities. Evidence is continuing to emerge that supports the notion that diagnostic workup and treatment of lung cancer patients is best done within the context of a multidisciplinary team devoted to this purpose. PMID:20161592

  16. Palliative Care and Symptom Management in Older Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with cancer are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with palliative care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of patients with cancer with an emphasis on quality of life. This article discusses the evaluation and management of pain and other common nonpain symptoms that occur in elderly patients with cancer, as well as end-of-life care. PMID:26614860

  17. Prognostic Impact of Comorbidity in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Megwalu, Ifeanyichukwu I.; Vlahiotis, Anna; Radwan, Mohamed; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of comorbidity on survival of bladder cancer patients. Methods The population included 675 patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer whose medical information was abstracted from a hospital cancer registry. Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27, a validated instrument, was used to prospectively categorize comorbidity. Independent variables assessed include comorbidity, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade, age, gender, and race. Outcome measure was overall survival. We analyzed the entire cohort, patients with noninvasive disease, and patients requiring cystectomy. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess impact of independent variables on survival. Results Median age at diagnosis for the entire cohort was 71 yr and median follow-up was 45 mo. Of 675 patients, 446 had at least one comorbid condition and 301 died during follow-up. On multivariable analysis for the entire cohort, comorbidity (p = 0.0001), AJCC stage (p = 0.0001), age (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0045) significantly predicted overall survival. On subset analysis of noninvasive bladder cancer patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0001) independently predicted overall survival, whereas stage, grade, race, and gender did not. On subset analysis of cystectomy patients, comorbidity (p = 0.0053), stage (p = 0.0001), and race (p = 0.0449) significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions Comorbidity is an independent predictor of overall survival in the entire cohort of bladder cancer patients, the subset with noninvasive disease, and the subset treated with cystectomy. PMID:17997024

  18. The health of healthcare, Part II: patient healthcare has cancer.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the etiologic diagnosis for a sick patient named Healthcare: the cancer of greed. When we explore the two forms of this cancer--corporate and bureaucratic--we find the latter is the greater danger to We the Patients. The "treatments" applied to patient Healthcare by the Congressional "doctors" have consistently made the patient worse, not better. At the core of healthcare's woes is the government's diversion of money from healthcare services to healthcare bureaucracy. As this is the root cause, it is what we must address in order to cure, not sedate or palliate, patient Healthcare. PMID:24236323

  19. Development of a Barbershop-Based Cancer Communication Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Wynn, Theresa A.; Lewis, Ivey; Litaker, Mark S.; Jeames, Sanford; Huckaby, Francine; Stroud, Leonardo; Southward, Penny L.; Simons, Virgil; Lee, Crystal; Ross, Louis; Mitchell, Theodies

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate and colorectal cancer (CRC) rates are disproportionately high among African-American men. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an intervention in which barbers were trained to educate clients about early detection for prostate and CRC. Design/methodology/approach: Working with an advisory panel of local…

  20. Development of a Barbershop-Based Cancer Communication Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Cheryl L.; Wynn, Theresa A.; Lewis, Ivey; Litaker, Mark S.; Jeames, Sanford; Huckaby, Francine; Stroud, Leonardo; Southward, Penny L.; Simons, Virgil; Lee, Crystal; Ross, Louis; Mitchell, Theodies

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate and colorectal cancer (CRC) rates are disproportionately high among African-American men. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an intervention in which barbers were trained to educate clients about early detection for prostate and CRC. Design/methodology/approach: Working with an advisory panel of local


  1. MicroRNAs transported by exosomes in body fluids as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salido-Guadarrama, Iván; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-cell communication is an important and complex process, achieved through a diversity of mechanisms that allows tumor cells to mold and influence their environment. In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that cells communicate via the release and delivery of microRNAs (miRNAs) packed into tumor-released (TR) exosomes. Understanding the role and mode of action of miRNAs from TR exosomes is of paramount importance in the field of cancer biomarker discovery and for the development of new biomedical applications for cancer therapeutics. In this review, we focus on miRNAs secreted via TR exosomes, which by acting in a paracrine or endocrine manner, facilitate a diversity of signaling mechanisms between cancer cells. We address their contribution as signaling molecules, to the establishment, maintenance, and enhancement of the tumor microenvironment and the metastatic niche in cancer. Finally, we address the potential role of these molecules as biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and prognosis and their impact as a biomedical tool in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25092989

  2. Designing for Diffusion: How Can We Increase Uptake of Cancer Communication Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Dearing, James W.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The best innovations in cancer communication do not necessarily achieve uptake by researchers, public health and clinical practitioners, and policy makers. This paper describes design activities that can be applied and combined for the purpose of spreading effective cancer communication innovations. Methods A previously developed Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model is used to organize and highlight the types of activities that can be deployed during the design phase of innovations. Scientific literature about the diffusion of innovations, knowledge utilization, marketing, public health, and our experiences in working to spread effective practices, programs, and policies are used for this purpose. Results Attempts to broaden the reach, quicken the uptake, and facilitate the use of cancer communication innovations can apply design activities to increase the likelihood of diffusion. Some simple design activities hold considerable promise for improving dissemination and subsequent diffusion. Conclusion Augmenting current dissemination practices with evidence-based concepts from diffusion science, marketing science, and knowledge utilization hold promise for improving results by eliciting greater market pull. Practice Implications Inventors and change agencies seeking to spread cancer communication innovations can experience more success by explicit consideration of design activities that reflect an expanded version of the Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model. PMID:21067884

  3. Opportunities for Public Health Communication, Intervention, and Future Research on Breast Cancer in Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Natasha; Roland, Katherine B.; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Fairley, Temeika

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 6% of breast cancers in the United States occur in women under the age of 40 years. Compared with women ? 40 years of age, younger women are diagnosed at later stages, have higher rates of recurrence and death, and may be predisposed to secondary breast or ovarian cancer. An informal meeting of experts discussed opportunities for research and public health communication related to breast cancer among young (< 40 and/or premenopausal) women. Methods In September 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted 18 experts in oncology, genetics, behavioral science, survivorship and advocacy, public health, communication, ethics, nutrition, physical activity, and environmental health. They (1) reviewed research and programmatic knowledge on risk and preventive factors, early detection, and survivorship; and (2) discussed ideas for research, communication, and programmatic efforts related to young women diagnosed with or at risk for early onset breast cancer. Results Levels of evidence and themes for future research regarding risk and preventive factors, including exposures, were discussed. Early detection strategies, including screening, risk assessment, and genetic counseling, as well as survivorship issues, follow-up care, fertility and reproductive health, and psychosocial care were highlighted. Conclusion Community and academic researchers, providers, advocates, and the federal public health community discussed strategies and opportunities for this unique population. Although the evidence is limited, future research and communication activities may be useful to organize future public health initiatives. PMID:23514347

  4. Silent Partners to Cancer Patients: Formal Caregivers and Oncologists.

    PubMed

    Goldzweig, G; Rottenberg, Yakir; Peretz, Tamar; Baider, Lea

    2015-12-01

    Given the worldwide aging of the population, the projected increase of older people diagnosed with cancer, and the changes in the structure of society and family, it is predictable that larger numbers of aged cancer patients will be supported by formal caregivers. This exploratory study attempts to gain insight into and to make recommendations to oncologists based on the comparison of two groups of foreign formal caregivers-those providing care to elderly cancer patients and those providing care to the elderly suffering from other chronic illnesses. Our sample included 108 Filipino formal caregivers to older persons (age 65+) suffering from cancer or other chronic diseases. Participants completed a short questionnaire targeting background information, subjective perception of distress, attachment to the care recipient family, and the Distress Thermometer. Participants reported extreme levels of distress, with only seven (6.48%) scoring less than 5 on the Distress Thermometer. Caregivers to cancer patients reported significantly higher levels of distress and tended to feel less attached to the family of the patient in comparison to caregivers to patients with other chronic illnesses. Cultural differences regarding cancer among the elderly may explain the higher levels of distress reported among Filipino formal caregivers and need to be acknowledged by oncologists. As a precondition for simultaneously improving the caregiver's well-being and the patient's quality of care, it is recommended that oncologists relate directly to formal caregivers, specifically to their extreme distress and apprehension regarding cancer. PMID:25316613

  5. Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elizabeth; Spiceland, Clayton; Sandhu, Nicole P; Jatoi, Aminah

    2016-04-01

    We sought to report incidence, risk factors, and survival related to bowel obstruction in 311 ovarian cancer patients with recurrent disease. A total of 68 (22%) had a documented bowel obstruction during their cancer course, and 49 (16%) developed it after cancer recurrence. Surprisingly, 142 (45%) fit into an "unknown" category (3+ months of data lacking from last contact/death). No risk factors were identified; management included surgery (n = 21), conservative measures (n = 21), and other (n = 7). Documented bowel obstruction was not associated with a statistically significant reduction in survival after cancer recurrence. In conclusion, although bowel obstruction occurs in only a subgroup of patients with ovarian cancer and does not appear to detract from survival after cancer recurrence, limited end-of-life information may be resulting in an underestimation of incidence. PMID:25552305

  6. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Management of Patients with Radioiodine Nonresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) has a favorable prognosis with an 85% 10-year survival. The patients that recur often require surgery and further radioactive iodine to render them disease-free. Five percent of thyroid cancer patients, however, will eventually succumb to their disease. Metastatic thyroid cancer is treated with radioactive iodine if the metastases are radioiodine avid. Cytotoxic chemotherapies for advanced or metastatic noniodine avid thyroid cancers show no prolonged responses and in general have fallen out of favor. Novel targeted therapies have recently been discovered that have given rise to clinical trials for thyroid cancer. Newer aberrations in molecular pathways and oncogenic mutations in thyroid cancer together with the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth have been central to these discoveries. This paper will focus on the management and treatment of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers that do not take up radioactive iodine. PMID:22530159

  7. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, Chiara; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Spinelli, Cristiana; Yang, Julie; Reis-Sobreiro, Mariana; de Candia, Paola; Minciacchi, Valentina Renè; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types. PMID:26861306

  8. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciardiello, Chiara; Cavallini, Lorenzo; Spinelli, Cristiana; Yang, Julie; Reis-Sobreiro, Mariana; de Candia, Paola; Minciacchi, Valentina RenĂš; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types. PMID:26861306

  9. Fertility preservation in female cancer patients</