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Sample records for cancer patients phase

  1. Phase I study of a new cancer vaccine of ten mixed peptides for advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Satoru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Heike, Yuji; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-05-01

    A phase I study of a new cancer vaccine (KRM-10), consisting of a mixture of 10 different short peptides, was conducted for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Primary or secondary endpoints included the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), or safety and immune responses, respectively. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), together with soluble inflammatory factors, were measured before and after vaccination. Twenty-one patients were vaccinated with KRM-10 at dose levels of 10 (n = 6), 20 (n = 8) or 30 mg (n = 7) of peptides every week for 6 weeks. No DLT were observed in the dose range evaluated. Common treatment-related adverse events were a grade 1 injection site reaction in 15 patients, and fever in three patients (grade 1 in two patients and grade 2 in one patient). CTL activity to at least one peptide at the time of the third and sixth vaccination increased in 2 and 3 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 2 and 1 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. IgG levels, at the third and sixth vaccination, were also increased in 1 and 1 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 1 and 3 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. The KRM-10 vaccine consisting of 20 mg of peptides was determined as the optimal dose for a coming phase II trial because of its safety, and also for demonstrating the most potent activity for augmenting the immune response of the three doses tested. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000008820. PMID:26920496

  2. Paclitaxel and carboplatin in early phase studies: Roswell Park Cancer Institute experience in the subset of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Creaven, P J; Raghavan, D; Pendyala, L; Loewen, G; Kindler, H L; Berghorn, E J

    1997-08-01

    The combination of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) given by 3-hour infusion followed by carboplatin infused over 30 minutes has been evaluated in a series of phase I studies and is currently being explored in a phase II study in patients with limited- and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Pharmacokinetic measurements were performed at all dose levels in the phase I studies, in which the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in previously treated patients enabled more than twice the dose of paclitaxel to be given with low to moderate doses of carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the concentration-time curve of 4.0 mg x min x mL[-1]). Treatment-naive patients tolerated high paclitaxel doses (270 mg/m2) with carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the curve of 4.5 mg x min x mL[-1]) without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. Twenty-three patients (including previously treated and untreated) with non-small cell lung cancer were entered at a variety of paclitaxel doses in the phase I studies. At 100 to 205 mg/m2 paclitaxel, none of nine treated patients responded; at 230 to 290 mg/m2, four (29%) of 14 responded. In the phase II study of paclitaxel 250 mg/m2 in previously untreated patients with small cell lung cancer, two of five evaluable patients with extensive-stage disease have shown a partial response. In a preliminary analysis of the pharmacodynamics of paclitaxel in relation to neurotoxicity (dose limiting in two of three phase I studies), neurotoxicity correlated with the total dose of paclitaxel, the area under the curve, and the peak paclitaxel concentration, but not with the length of time plasma paclitaxel levels remained above 0.05 micromol/L. These correlations were not strong, however, and analysis of these data is ongoing. PMID:9331139

  3. Phase I study of postoperative radiotherapy concurrent with S-1 in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Meng; Peng, Xing-chen; Bi, Feng; Wang, Xin; Li, Qiu; Xu, Feng; Li, Zhi-ping; Shen, Ya-li; Liu, Ji-yan; Zhao, Ya-qing; Cao, Dan; Gou, Hong-feng; Yang, Yu; Chen, Ye; Yi, Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil is the standard care for gastric cancer patients after curative surgery. The previous studies revealed that the subgroup of patients with high recurrence risk would benefit most from adjuvant CRT. S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, has showed very effective in metastatic gastric cancer and became the standard option for gastric cancer with D2 dissection. The safety and dosage of S-1 combined with postoperative radiotherapy have not yet been evaluated. This study is to determine the maximum tolerate dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of S-1 given concurrently with postoperative high-dose radiotherapy in gastric cancer. Patients with more advanced stage (pT4 and/or pN+) after R0 resection were recruited. Eligible patients received one cycle standard SOX (S-1 plus oxaliplatin) chemotherapy, then S-1 monotherapy with concurrent radiotherapy for 6 weeks, followed by additional three cycles of SOX. During the concurrent CRT, S-1 was administered on every radiotherapy treatment day according to a predefined dose-escalation schedule. Radiotherapy (3D-RT or IMRT) was given to a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. DLT was defined as grade 3 or 4 hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity. From March 2011 to October 2012, 21 patients were enrolled at five dose levels: 40 (n = 3), 50 (n = 3), 60 (n = 6), 70 (n = 6) and 80 mg/m(2)/day (n = 3). D2-dissection was performed in 18 patients (85.7 %) and 15 patients (71.4 %) had stage III disease. The most common dose-related toxicity was anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue and leucopenia. DLT was occurred in one patient at 60 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 fatigue), one patient at 70 mg/m(2)/day (grade 3 vomiting and anorexia), two patients at 80 mg/m(2)/day (one with grade 3 vomiting and anorexia; another with grade 3 febrile leucopenia). Four patients did not complete CRT as planned. Overall, this phase I study demonstrated that postoperative CRT with daily S-1

  4. Phase Angle for Prognostication of Survival in Patients with Advanced Cancer: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bansal, Swati; Morgado, Margarita; Dev, Rony; Chisholm, Gary; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate survival prediction is essential for decision-making in cancer therapies and care planning. Objective physiologic measures may improve the accuracy of prognostication. In this prospective study, we determined the association of phase angle, hand grip strength, and maximal inspiratory pressure with overall survival in patients with advanced cancer. Methods We enrolled hospitalized patients with advanced cancer who were seen by palliative care for consultation. We collected information on phase angle, hand grip strength, maximal inspiratory pressure and known prognostic factors including Palliative Prognostic Score (PaP), Palliative Prognostic Index, serum albumin and body composition. We conducted univariate and multivariate survival analysis, and examined the correlation between phase angle and other prognostic variables. Results 222 patients were enrolled: average age 55 (range 22–79), female 59%, mean Karnofsky Performance Status 55, and median overall survival 106 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 71–128 days). The median survival for patients with phase angle 2–2.9°, 3–3.9°, 4–4.9°, 5–5.9° and ≥6° was 35, 54, 112, 134 and 220 days, respectively (P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, phase angle (hazard ratio [HR]=0.86 per degree increase; 95% CI 0.74–0.99; P=0.04), PaP (HR=1.07; 95% CI 1.02–1.13, P=0.008), serum albumin (HR=0.67, 95% CI 0.50–0.91; P=0.009), and fat free mass (HR=0.98, CI=0.96–0.99; P=0.02) were significantly associated with survival. Phase angle was only weakly (γ<0.4) associated with other prognostic variables. Conclusions Phase angle was a novel predictor of poor survival, independent of established prognostic factors in the advanced cancer setting. This objective and non-invasive tool may be useful for bedside prognostication. PMID:24899148

  5. Phase II dose-finding study of balugrastim in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gladkov, Oleg; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Bondarenko, Igor N; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Barash, Steven; Adar, Liat; Bias, Peter; Avisar, Noa

    2015-06-01

    Balugrastim is a once-per-cycle, fixed-dose recombinant protein comprising human serum albumin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor under development for prevention of severe neutropenia in cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. This phase II, multicenter, active-controlled, dose-finding pilot study evaluated balugrastim safety and efficacy versus pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients scheduled to receive myelosuppressive chemotherapy and investigated two doses with similar efficacy to pegfilgrastim for a subsequent phase III study. Patients received four cycles of doxorubicin/docetaxel chemotherapy and with each successive cycle were randomized sequentially to escalating doses of balugrastim [30 (n = 11), 40 (n = 21), or 50 mg (n = 20)] or a fixed dose of pegfilgrastim [6 mg (n = 26)] post-chemotherapy. Balugrastim doses were escalated as planned. The incidence of adverse events was similar among the balugrastim groups and between all balugrastim doses and pegfilgrastim. The most frequently reported adverse events were neutropenia, alopecia, and nausea. During cycle 1, severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count of <0.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred in 40, 67, and 50 % and febrile neutropenia occurred in 20.0, 9.5, and 10.0 % of patients receiving balugrastim 30, 40, and 50 mg, respectively; in patients receiving pegfilgrastim, 48 % experienced severe neutropenia and 8 % experienced febrile neutropenia. Duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) for each treatment group was 0.9, 1.6, 1.1, and 0.9 days, respectively. In the remaining three chemotherapy cycles, DSN was ≤1 day across all treatment groups. Balugrastim 50 mg was comparable to pegfilgrastim in terms of safety and overall efficacy in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:25966791

  6. Outcomes of patients with advanced cancer and KRAS mutations in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Ye, Yang; Falchook, Gerald Steven; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Zinner, Ralph; Blumenschein, George R.; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David S.; Piha-Paul, Sarina Anne; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Palmer, Gary A.; Aldape, Kenneth; Hess, Kenneth R.; Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background KRAS mutation is common in human cancer. We assessed the clinical factors, including type of KRAS mutation and treatment, of patients with advanced cancer and tumor KRAS mutations and their association with treatment outcomes. Methods Patients referred to the Phase I Clinic for treatment who underwent testing for KRAS mutations were analyzed. Results Of 1,781 patients, 365 (21%) had a KRAS mutation. The G12D mutation was the most common mutation (29%). PIK3CA mutations were found in 24% and 10% of patients with and without KRAS mutations (p<0.0001). Of 223 patients with a KRAS mutation who were evaluable for response, 56 were treated with a MEK inhibitor-containing therapy and 167 with other therapies. The clinical benefit (partial response and stable disease lasting ≥ 6 months) rates were 23% and 9%, respectively, for the MEK inhibitor versus other therapies (p=0.005). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.3 and 2.2 months, respectively (p=0.09). The respective median overall survival was 8.4 and 7.0 months (p=0.38). Of 66 patients with a KRAS mutation and additional alterations, higher rates of clinical benefit (p=0.04), PFS (p=0.045), and overall survival (p=0.02) were noted in patients treated with MEK inhibitor-containing therapy (n=9) compared to those treated with targeted therapy matched to the additional alterations (n=24) or other therapy (n=33). Conclusions MEK inhibitors in patients with KRAS-mutated advanced cancer were associated with higher clinical benefit rates compared to other therapies. Therapeutic strategies that include MEK inhibitors or novel agents combined with other targeted therapies or chemotherapy need further investigation. PMID:25313136

  7. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups. PMID:25904313

  8. Phase 1 Study of Intravenous Oncolytic Poxvirus (vvDD) in Patients With Advanced Solid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Guo, Zong Sheng; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Breitbach, Caroline J; O'Malley, Mark E; Jones, Heather L; Moon, Anne; McCart, Judith Andrea; Shuai, Yongli; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted a phase 1 study of intravenous vvDD, a Western Reserve strain oncolytic vaccinia virus, on 11 patients with standard treatment-refractory advanced colorectal or other solid cancers. The primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose and associated toxicity while secondary endpoints were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immune responses, and antitumor activity. No dose-limiting toxicities and treatment related severe adverse events were observed. The most common adverse events were grades 1/2 flu-like symptoms. Virus genomes were detectable in the blood 15-30 minutes after virus administration in a dose-dependent manner. There was evidence of a prolonged virus replication in tumor tissues in two patients, but no evidence of virus replication in non-tumor tissues, except a healed injury site and an oral thrush. Over 100-fold of anti-viral antibodies were induced in patients' sera. A strong induction of inflammatory and Th1, but not Th2 cytokines, suggested a potent Th1-mediated immunity against the virus and possibly the cancer. One patient showed a mixed response on PET-CT with resolution of some liver metastases, and another patient with cutaneous melanoma demonstrated clinical regression of some lesions. Given the confirmed safety, further trials evaluating intravenous vvDD in combination with therapeutic transgenes, immune checkpoint blockade or complement inhibitors, are warranted. PMID:27203445

  9. Early downregulation of acute phase proteins after doxorubicin exposition in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Bufalo, Aedra Carla; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy remains the first-choice option for adjuvant therapy in breast cancer. Here, we investigated the impact of the first chemotherapic cycle of doxorubicin on the plasmatic-proteomic profiling of women diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 87). Blood samples were obtained from the same patient before and after doxorubicin infusion (1 h, 60 mg/m(2)) and processed for label-free LC-MS proteomic screening. A total of 80 proteins were downregulated after chemotherapy. In silico analysis revealed that the main biological process enrolled was inflammation and canonical pathways involving acute phase proteins. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, TGF-β1, clusterin, and gelsolin were chosen as relevant for further validation. All selected targets presented reduced plasmatic levels after treatment. Our results indicate that doxorubicin downregulated acute phase proteins immediately after its infusion. Since such proteins are cancer promoting, its downregulation could support the effectiveness of doxorubicin along treatment. PMID:26472721

  10. A multiple-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Knost, J A; Fein, S; Abrams, P G; Foon, K A; Ochs, J J; Schoenberger, C; Maluish, A E; Oldham, R K

    1982-11-19

    Eighty-one patients with a variety of refractory disseminated malignant neoplasms have been treated in the first multiple fixed-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA). Each patient received IFL-rA by intramuscular injection, three times weekly for 28 days. Dosages were escalated in different patients from 1 to 136 x 10(6) units per injection. The toxic reactions seen with IFL-rA resembled those of nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon and included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, myalgia, headache, occasional nausea and vomiting, and dose-dependent reversible leukopenia and hepatic transaminase elevations. The pharmacokinetics of IFL-rA were also comparable with nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon. Objective evidence of antitumor activity was seen in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, and melanoma, indicating that IFL-rA, the first genetically engineered biological response modifier available for testing in cancer patients, is biologically active in vivo. PMID:6752447

  11. A Phase I study of olaparib and irinotecan in patients with colorectal cancer: Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND 187.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric X; Jonker, Derek J; Siu, Lillian L; McKeever, Karyn; Keller, Deborah; Wells, Julie; Hagerman, Linda; Seymour, Lesley

    2016-08-01

    Background Olaparib is an orally available inhibitor of PARP-1. In pre-clinical studies, olaparib was shown to potentiate anti-tumor effects of irinotecan in colon cancer cell lines. This phase I study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of olaparib in combination with irinotecan. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced colorectal cancer whose disease progressed after at least one systemic therapy regimen were enrolled. Dose escalation and de-escalation were based on toxicity assessment. Pharmacokinetic samples were collected in Cycle 1 for olaparib, irinotecan and SN-38. Results Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 11 patients on a schedule of continuous olaparib and irinotecan every 3 weeks (Part A) and 14 patients on a schedule of intermittent olaparib and irinotecan every 2 weeks (Part B). Continuous olaparib administration was associated with higher than expected toxicities and was not considered to be tolerable. Intermittent olaparib administration was better tolerated, and the recommended phase 2 doses were olaparib 50 mg p.o twice daily days 1-5 and irinotecan 125 mg/m(2) i.v. every 2 weeks. Common toxicities included fatigue, anorexia, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and abdominal pain. Nine patients had stable disease as the best response, 2 from Part A (3 and 9 months respectively), and 7 from Part B (median duration: 7.4 months; range: 4 to 13 months). There was no pharmacokinetic interaction between olaparib and irinotecan. Conclusions Olaparib can be combined with irinotecan if administered intermittently. Both olaparib and irinotecan required significant dose reductions. The lack of anti-tumor efficacy observed in this trial makes this combination of little interest for further clinical development. Trial Registration ID NCT00535353. PMID:27075016

  12. Phase I clinical trial of multiple-peptide vaccination for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) is extremely poor and only a few standard treatments are available for this condition. We performed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, immune response and anti-tumor effect of vaccination with three peptides derived from cancer-testis antigens. Methods This study was conducted as a phase I trial. Nine patients with advanced BTC who had unresectable tumors and were refractory to standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Three HLA-A*2402 restricted epitope peptides-cell division cycle associated 1 (CDCA1), cadherin 3 (CDH3) and kinesin family member 20A (KIF20A)-were administered subcutaneously, and the adverse events and immune response were assessed. The clinical effects observed were the tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The three-peptide vaccination was well-tolerated up to a dose of 3 mg per peptide (9 mg total). No grade 3 or 4 adverse events were observed after vaccination. Peptide-specific T cell immune responses were observed in all patients and stable disease was observed in 5 of 9 patients. The median PFS and OS were 3.4 and 9.7 months. The Grade 2 injection site reaction and continuous vaccination after PD judgment appeared to be prognostic of OS. Conclusions Multiple-peptide vaccination was well tolerated and induced peptide-specific T-cell responses. Trial registration This study was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR000003229). PMID:24606884

  13. A Phase I Study of Everolimus and Docetaxel in Patients With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kevin D.; Manola, Judith B.; Elfiky, Aymen A.; Ross, Robert; Oh, William K.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Loda, Massimo; Priolo, Carmen; Kantoff, Philip; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling cascade, often through loss of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor, is frequent in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We assessed the safety and efficacy of combining the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus with docetaxel in a phase I clinical trial of men with metastatic CRPC, and evaluated the ability of fluorine–18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to predict response to treatment. The observed clinical activity of tolerable dose levels of everolimus with docetaxel was low. FDG-PET might serve as a biomarker for target inhibition by mTOR inhibitors in metastatic CRPC. Background The PTEN tumor suppressor is frequently lost in CRPC, with activation of Akt-mTOR signaling, driving growth. We conducted a phase I trial of the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, and docetaxel in CRPC. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had progressive, metastatic, chemotherapy-naive CRPC. Patients received everolimus 10 mg daily for 2 weeks and underwent a restaging FDG-PET/computed tomography scan. Patient cohorts were subsequently treated at 3 dose levels of everolimus with docetaxel: 5 mg to 60 mg/m2, 10 mg to 60 mg/m2, and 10 mg to 70 mg/m2. The primary end point was the safety and tolerability of combination therapy. Results Accrual was 4 patients at level 1, 3 patients at level 2, and 8 patients at level 3. Common toxicities were hematologic and fatigue. Serum concentrations of everolimus when administered with docetaxel were 1.5 to 14.8 ng/mL in patients receiving 5 mg everolimus and 4.5 to 55.4 ng/mL in patients receiving 10 mg everolimus. Four patients had partial metabolic response (PMR) using FDG-PET, 12 had stable metabolic disease, and 2 had progressive metabolic disease after a 2-week treatment with everolimus alone. Five of 12 evaluable patients experienced a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reduction ≥ 50

  14. Phase 1 Studies of Sirolimus Alone or in Combination with Pharmacokinetic Modulators in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra EW; Wu, Kehua; Hartford, Christine; Kocherginsky, Masha; Eaton, Kimberly Napoli; Zha, Yuanyuan; Nallari, Anitha; Maitland, Michael L; Fox-Kay, Kammi; Moshier, Kristin; House, Larry; Ramirez, Jacqueline; Undevia, Samir D; Fleming, Gini F; Gajewski, Thomas F; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Sirolimus is the eponymous inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR); however, only its analogues have been approved as cancer therapies. Nevertheless, sirolimus is readily available, has been well-studied in organ transplant patients, and demonstrates efficacy in several preclinical cancer models. Experimental Design Three simultaneously conducted phase I studies in advanced cancer patients utilized an adaptive escalation design to find the dose of oral, weekly sirolimus alone or in combination with either ketoconazole or grapefruit juice that achieves similar blood concentrations as its intravenously administered and approved prodrug, temsirolimus. Additionally, the effect of sirolimus on inhibition of p70S6 kinase phosphorylation in peripheral T cells was determined. Results Collectively, the three studies enrolled 138 subjects. The most commonly observed toxicities were hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and lymphopenia in 52%, 43%, and 41% of subjects, respectively. The target sirolimus area under the concentration curve (AUC) of 3810 ng-hr/ml was achieved at sirolimus doses of 90 mg, 16 mg, and 25 mg in the sirolimus alone, sirolimus plus ketoconazole, and sirolimus plus grapefruit juice studies, respectively. Ketoconazole and grapefruit juice increased sirolimus AUC approximately 500% and 350%, respectively. Inhibition of p70 S6 kinase phosphorylation was observed at all doses of sirolimus and correlated with blood concentrations. One partial response was observed in a patient with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. Conclusion Sirolimus can be feasibly administered orally, once weekly with a similar toxicity and pharmacokinetic profile compared to other mTOR inhibitors and warrants further evaluation in studies of its comparative effectiveness relative to recently approved sirolimus analogues. PMID:22872575

  15. Phase I trial of thymidylate synthase poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) vaccine in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cusi, Maria Grazia; Botta, Cirino; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Rossetti, Maria Grazia; Dreassi, Elena; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Fioravanti, Antonella; Martino, Elodia Claudia; Gandolfo, Claudia; Pagliuchi, Marco; Basile, Assunta; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Ricci, Veronica; Micheli, Lucia; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Pirtoli, Luigi; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) is a 27-mer peptide vaccine containing the amino acidic sequences of three epitopes with HLA-A2.1-binding motifs of TS, an enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells, which plays a crucial role in DNA repair and replication. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we designed a phase Ib trial (TSPP/VAC1) to investigate, in a dose escalation setting, the safety and the biological activity of TSPP vaccination alone (arm A) or in combination with GM-CSF and IL-2 (arm B) in cancer patients. Twenty-one pretreated metastatic cancer patients, with a good performance status (ECOG ≤ 1) and no severe organ failure or immunological disease, were enrolled in the study (12 in arm A, nine in arm B) between April 2011 and January 2012, with a median follow-up of 28 months. TSPP resulted safe, and its maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 dermatological reactions to the vaccine injection, cough, rhinitis, fever, poly-arthralgia, gastro-enteric symptoms and, to a lesser extent, moderate hypertension and hypothyroidism. We detected a significant rise in auto-antibodies and TS-epitope-specific CTL precursors. Furthermore, TSPP showed antitumor activity in this group of pretreated patients; indeed, we recorded one partial response and seven disease stabilizations (SD) in arm A, and three SD in arm B. Taken together, our findings provide the framework for the evaluation of the TSPP anti-tumor activity in further disease-oriented clinical trials. PMID:26031574

  16. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of IV vinflunine in cancer patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Delord, J P; Ravaud, A; Bennouna, J; Fumoleau, P; Favrel, S; Pinel, M C; Ferré, P; Saliba, F

    2013-06-01

    Vinflunine is a novel tubulin-targeted agent that is currently indicated as a monotherapy in bladder cancer patients. The recommended dose of 320 mg/m(2) is given as an intravenous infusion once every 3 weeks. Vinflunine is metabolized through CYP3A4 and mainly eliminated via the feces. A phase I trial was designed to explore the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of vinflunine in cancer patients with ranging degrees of liver dysfunction (LD). A sequential design was used for patient accrual, with the objective of determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended dose (RD) of vinflunine in 3 groups of increasing LD levels. Vinflunine and its only active metabolite 4-O-deacetylvinflunine were quantified in serial whole blood samples. PK parameters were derived and compared between LD groups and with a reference PK database. Vinflunine and 4-O-deacetylvinflunine PK parameters were not affected in any of the explored LD levels. Geometric mean values for vinflunine total clearance were 47.8, 37.5 and 45.4 L/h in the 3 groups of increasing degrees of LD, as compared to 42.5 L/h in reference patients with no LD. No relationship was found between vinflunine clearance and the presence or absence of cirrhosis, nor was it found with the presence or absence of liver metastasis or with liver-related biochemical parameters. Based on the observed tolerability profile, the recommended doses of i.v. vinflunine are 320 mg/m(2), 250 mg/m(2) or 200 mg/m(2) for patients with increasing degrees of liver dysfunction. PMID:22996801

  17. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Mlak, Radoslaw; Smolen, Agata; Morshed, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    Malnutrition, which can be determined by subjective and objective methods, has a high prevalence in head and neck cancer patients. Subjective Global Assessment is a subjective method of nutritional status evaluation. Phase angle, determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis, is proposed as an objective nutritional marker in various disease conditions. The study was conducted to investigate the association between phase angle and Subjective Global Assessment to validate the determination of the nutrition status in adult patients with head and neck cancer. In a prospective cohort study, patients were classified as either well-nourished or malnourished using the Subjective Global Assessment. Phase angle measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis was planned in 75 naive patients with histologically confirmed head and neck cancer. Receiver operating characteristic curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to determine the optimal cut-off level of phase angle. The study was conducted on a cohort population of 75 patients. Well-nourished patients (n = 45) had a statistically significantly higher (p = 0.005) median phase angle score (5.25º) as compared to those who were malnourished (4.73º) (n = 30). A phase angle cut-off of 4.73 was 80 % sensitive and 56.7 % specific in detecting malnutrition diagnosed by SGA in these populations. Phase angle is considered to be a nutritional indicator in patients with head and neck cancer in detecting malnutrition. Further observations are needed to calculate survival, and validate the prognostic significance of phase angle. For future studies, it is important to indicate the specificity of the PA in comparison to SGA measurement. PMID:25859939

  18. Effects of laser immunotherapy on late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients in a Phase II clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), a novel technique with a local intervention to induce systemic antitumor effects, was developed to treat metastatic cancers. The pre-clinical studies of LIT have shown its unique characteristics in generating a specific antitumor immunity in treating metastatic tumors in rats and mice. For late-stage, metastatic breast cancer patients, who were considered to be out of other available treatment options, we conducted a small Phase II clinical trial using LIT starting in 2009 in Lima, Peru. This Phase II study was closed in December of 2012, as acknowldged by the Ministry of Health (MOH) of Peur letter 438-2014-OGITT/INS dated March 5th, 2014. Ten patients were enrolled and received LIT in one or multiple 4-week treatment cycles. At the study closing date, four patients were alive and two of them remained cancer free. Here, following the successful conclusion of our Phase II study, we report the clinical effects of LIT on metastatic breast cancer patients. Specifically, we present the overall status of all the patients three years after the treatment and also the outcomes of two long-term surviving patients.

  19. The prognostic significance of left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with advanced cancer treated in phase I clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Said, R.; Banchs, J.; Wheler, J.; Hess, K. R.; Falchook, G.; Fu, S.; Naing, A.; Hong, D.; Piha-Paul, S.; Ye, Y.; Yeh, E.; Wolff, R. A.; Tsimberidou, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background New targeted agents may cause acute cardiac events. The purpose of our study was to investigate the incidence and the prognostic significance of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in phase I trials. Patients and methods Between October 2008 and September 2011, the records of 1166 consecutive patients with advanced cancer treated in the Phase I Clinic who underwent echocardiography were retrospectively reviewed. Results Most of the patients were White (78%), and the most common tumor types were colorectal cancer and melanoma. Of 1166 patients, 177 (15.2%) patients had an LVEF of <50%. No difference in overall survival (OS) between patients with LVEF ≥ 50% and patients with LVEF < 50% was seen (median OS 7.4 versus 7.0 months, P = 0.84). Patients with LVEF ≤ 35% had shorter survival compared with those with LVEF between 35% and 50% (median 4.2 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In multivariate analysis of patients with LVEF < 50%, independent factors predicting longer survival were LVEF > 35%, ≤2 prior systemic therapies, ≤2 metastatic sites, and normal lactate dehydrogenase and albumin levels. Conclusion Echocardiography would improve patient selection for enrollment in phase I clinical trials. These data suggest that it is safe to treat patients with LVEF between 35% and 50%. PMID:24356639

  20. A phase I dose escalation study of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy in elderly patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yongling; Qiu, Guoqing; Sheng, Liming; Sun, Xiaojiang; Zheng, Yuanda; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) are often associated with significant incidence of toxic effects in elderly patients with esophageal cancer. This phase I trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of S-1, an oral 5-FU derivative, when given with radiotherapy in elderly patients. Methods Patients who were age of 70 years or older with histologically confirmed esophageal cancer, and had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score of 0–2 were eligible for this study. Radiotherapy was administered in 1.8 Gy fractions 5 times weekly to a total dose of 54 Gy. S-1 was administered on days 1–14 and 29–42 at the following dosages: 60, 70, and 80 mg/m2/day. Trial registration: NCT01175447 (ClinicalTrials.gov). Results Twelve previously untreated patients were enrolled in this study. No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in six patients treated at the 60 and 70 mg/m2 dose levels. DLT was observed in four of six patients treated at the 80 mg/m2 dose level. Two patients developed grade 3 esophagitis, one patient developed grade 3 esophagitis and pneumonitis, and one patient developed grade 3 thrombocytopaenia. Endoscopic complete response (CR) was observed in eight patients (66.7%). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 20 months and median overall survival was 29 months. Conclusions The MTD of S-1 was 80 mg/m2, and the recommended dose (RD) for phase II studies was 70 mg/m2. This regimen was well tolerated and active in elderly patients with esophageal cancer, meriting further investigation in phase II studies. PMID:27076940

  1. Palliative care needs at different phases in the illness trajectory: a survey study in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Beernaert, K; Pardon, K; Van den Block, L; Devroey, D; De Laat, M; Geboes, K; Surmont, V; Deliens, L; Cohen, J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the growing consensus on the benefits of initiating palliative care early in the disease trajectory, it remains unclear at what point palliative care needs emerge. This study investigates quality of life and unmet palliative care needs at three phases in the cancer trajectory, curative, life-prolonging and most advanced (prognosis <6 months/no further disease-modifying treatment). We collected self-reported data from 620 patients with cancer in the University Hospital of Ghent, Belgium. They completed a questionnaire on quality of life (using the EORTC QLQ-C30) and unmet care needs within the domains of palliative care. We used European reference values of the EORTC QLQ-C30 to compare the mean scores with a norm group. The groups further on in the cancer trajectory reported statistically and clinically poorer functioning compared with earlier phases, also when controlled for the effects of sex, age or type of cancer. Higher symptom burdens for fatigue, pain, dyspnoea and appetite loss were found in groups further into the trajectory, p < .001. Patients in the curative phase experienced physical symptoms and had clinically worse functioning than a European reference group. This paper demonstrates the ongoing need for oncologists to address the broader palliative care needs of patients from diagnosis onwards. PMID:27271354

  2. Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Cancer; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Carcinoma Breast Stage IV; Hormone-refractory Prostate Cancer; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Head and Neck Cancers- Squamous Cell; Renal Cell Cancer; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme

  3. Phase II trial of carboplatin plus oral etoposide for elderly patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K.; Masuda, N.; Fukuoka, M.; Yana, T.; Hirashima, T.; Komiya, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawahara, M.; Atagi, S.; Ogawara, M.; Negoro, S.; Kudoh, S.; Furuse, K.

    1998-01-01

    A phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the Egorin's carboplatin dosing formula with 14-day oral etoposide in 38 elderly patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The overall response rate was 81%. Median survival times were 15.1 months for 16 limited-disease (LD) and 8.6 months for 22 extensive-disease (ED) patients. Myelosuppression was the principal side-effect. This regimen is an active regimen in the treatment of elderly SCLC patients. PMID:9667675

  4. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer: A multicentric phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Brucker, Janina; Mayer, Christine; Gebauer, Gerhard; Mallmann, Peter; Belau, Antje Kristina; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Eichbaum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Patients with non-platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis. Non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet®) is a promising drug that may be able to improve treatment for such patients. In the current study, patients with recurrent ovarian cancer relapsing within 12 months after primary treatment received non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin at 75 mg/m2 d1q22 and 60 mg/m2 d1q22 after study dose modification, respectively. There were 29 patients enrolled in the trial, and 124 cycles of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin were administered in total. All 29 patients were evaluable for toxicity. The clinical benefit rate (defined as the proportion of patients with either complete remission or partial remission, or with stable disease for >6 months) was 50%. The predominant non-hematological toxicity was nausea and vomiting (18 patients, grade I/II), whilst no palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia was observed. In 3 patients, a grade III hematological toxicity occurred, and the treatment schedule was consequently modified to 60 mg/m2 d1q22. The findings suggest that non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin administered in a schedule of 60 mg/m2 d1q22 is well-manageable and is associated with tolerable non-hematological toxicities (predominantly nausea). PMID:27446420

  5. Hepatic cytochrome P450 3A drug metabolism is reduced in cancer patients who have an acute-phase response

    PubMed Central

    Rivory, L P; Slaviero, K A; Clarke, S J

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory disease states (infection, arthritis) are associated with reduced drug oxidation by the cytochrome P450 3A system. Many chemotherapy agents are metabolised through this pathway, and disease may therefore influence inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to assess cytochrome P450 3A function in patients with advanced cancer, and its relation to the acute-phase response. We evaluated hepatic cytochrome P450 3A function in 40 patients with advanced cancer using the erythromycin breath test. Both the traditional C20min measure and the recently proposed 1/TMAX values were estimated. The marker of acute-phase response, C-reactive protein and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 were measured in serum or plasma at baseline. Cancer patients with an acute phase response (C-reactive protein >10 mg l−1, n=26) had reduced metabolism as measured with the erythromycin breath test 1/TMAX (Kruskal–Wallis Anova, P=0.0062) as compared to controls (C-reactive protein ⩽10 mg l−1, n=14). Indeed, metabolism was significantly associated with C-reactive protein over the whole concentration range of this acute-phase marker (r=−0.64, Spearman Rank Correlation, P<0.00001). C-reactive protein serum levels were significantly correlated with those of IL-6 (Spearman coefficient=0.58, P<0.0003). The reduction in cytochrome P450 3A function with acute-phase reaction was independent of the tumour type and C-reactive protein elevation was associated with poor performance status. This indicates that the sub-group of cancer patients with significant acute-phase response have compromised drug metabolism, which may have implications for the safety of chemotherapy in this population. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 277–280. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600448 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177794

  6. Phase II Trial of Sorafenib in Patients with Chemotherapy Refractory Metastatic Esophageal and Gastroesophageal (GE) Junction Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Vakiani, Efsevia; Ku, Geoffrey Y.; Herrera, Jessica M.; Tang, Laura H.; Bouvier, Nancy; Viale, Agnès; Socci, Nicholas D.; Capanu, Marinela; Berger, Michael; Ilson, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR2) directed therapies result in a modest survival benefit for patients with advanced esophageal and gastroesophageal (GE) junction cancer. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) may contribute to escape from VEGFR2 inhibition. We evaluated the efficacy of sorafenib, a broad spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting VEGFR2 and PDGFR as well as RET and RAF1, in patients with metastatic chemotherapy refractory esophageal and GE junction cancer. Patients and Methods This phase II trial of sorafenib 400 mg twice daily enrolled chemotherapy refractory patients with metastatic esophageal and GE junction cancer with primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) rate at two months. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, objective response rate and toxicity. Results Among 34 patients, 8 week Kaplan-Meier estimated PFS was 61% (90%CI 45 to 73%). Median PFS is 3.6 months (95% CI 1.8 to 3.9 months), with median overall survival OS 9.7 months (95% CI 5.9 to 11.6 months). Grade 3 toxicities were uncommon and included hand foot skin reaction, rash, dehydration and fatigue. One patient (3%) with ongoing complete response and remains on trial for over 5 years. Whole exome sequencing of this tumor revealed mutations in many cancer-associated genes including ARID1A, PIK3CA, and TP53, and focal amplifications of HMGA2 and MET. Conclusion Sorafenib therapy results in disease stabilization and encouraging PFS in patients with refractory esophageal and GE junction cancer. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00917462 PMID:26275293

  7. Lack of patient-reported outcomes assessment in phase III breast cancer studies: a missed opportunity for informed decision making.

    PubMed

    Blinder, Victoria S

    2014-01-01

    A phase III study comparing capecitabine monotherapy to combination treatment with capecitabine and sunitinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer failed to demonstrate a benefit in terms of progression-free or overall survival. Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated with some differences noted in the specific toxicity profiles. However, the study failed to incorporate an assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as self-reported pain, quality of life, or employment outcomes. This is a missed opportunity. If more clinical trials included such measures, they would provide valuable information to patients and clinicians choosing from a wide array of available and otherwise similarly effective systemic therapies for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25841482

  8. Twenty-Seven Years of Phase III Trials for Patients with Extensive Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Disappointing Results

    PubMed Central

    Oze, Isao; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. Methods and Findings We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. Results: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS) increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE) regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine–based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. Conclusions and Significance The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care. PMID:19915681

  9. Phase 1 Study of Intratumoral Pexa-Vec (JX-594), an Oncolytic and Immunotherapeutic Vaccinia Virus, in Pediatric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Timothy P; Ngo, Minhtran C; Geller, James I; Louis, Chrystal U; Currier, Mark A; Racadio, John M; Towbin, Alexander J; Rooney, Cliona M; Pelusio, Adina; Moon, Anne; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Burke, James M; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Breitbach, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec, JX-594) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus designed to destroy cancer cells through viral lysis and induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-driven tumor-specific immunity. Pexa-Vec has undergone phase 1 and 2 testing alone and in combination with other therapies in adult patients, via both intratumoral and intravenous administration routes. We sought to determine the safety of intratumoral administration in pediatric patients. In a dose-escalation study using either 106 or 107 plaque-forming units per kilogram, we performed one-time injections in up to three tumor sites in five pediatric patients and two injections in one patient. Ages at study entry ranged from 4 to 21 years, and their cancer diagnoses included neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and Ewing sarcoma. All toxicities were ≤ grade 3. The most common side effects were sinus fever and sinus tachycardia. All three patients at the higher dose developed asymptomatic grade 1 treatment-related skin pustules that resolved within 3–4 weeks. One patient showed imaging evidence suggestive of antitumor biological activity. The two patients tested for cellular immunoreactivity to vaccinia antigens showed strong responses. Overall, our study suggests Pexa-Vec is safe to administer to pediatric patients by intratumoral administration and could be studied further in this patient population. PMID:25531693

  10. Phase I/II Trial of Imatinib and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Melanoma and Other Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Betty K.; Rosen, Mark A.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gallagher, Maryann; Chen, Helen; Sehgal, Chandra; O’Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor signaling in the tumor microenvironment appear to cooperate in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a phase I trial combining bevacizumab (i.v. every 2 weeks) and imatinib (oral daily). Once a recommended phase II dose combination was established, a phase II trial was initiated in patients with metastatic melanoma. A Simon 2-stage design was used with 23 patients required in the first stage and 41 patients in total should the criteria to proceed be met. We required that 50% of the patients be progression-free at 16 weeks. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography were performed in patients with metastatic tumors amenable to imaging with these methods at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results. A total of 17 patients were accrued to 4 dose and combination levels. Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks could be safely combined with imatinib 800 mg daily. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, vomiting, edema, proteinuria, and anemia, but were not commonly severe. A total of 23 patients with metastatic melanoma (48% with American Joint Commission on Cancer stage M1c; median age, 63 years) were enrolled in the first stage of phase II. The 16-week progression-free survival rate was 35%, leading to termination of phase II after the first stage. In the small subset of patients who remained on study with lesions evaluable by DCE-MRI, significant decreases in tumor vascular permeability were noted, despite early disease progression using the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. Conclusion. Bevacizumab and imatinib can be safely combined at the maximum doses used for each agent. We did not observe significant clinical activity with this regimen in melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy has proven clinical efficacy as a

  11. Using Quality of Life Measures in a Phase I Clinical Trial of Noni in Patients with Advanced Cancer to Select a Phase II Dose

    PubMed Central

    Issell, Brian F.; Gotay, Carolyn C.; Pagano, Ian; Franke, A. Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a Phase I study of noni in patients with advanced cancer. Quality of life measures were examined as an alternate way to select a Phase II dose of this popular dietary supplement. Patients and Methods Starting at two capsules twice daily (2 grams), the dose suggested for marketed products, dose levels were escalated by 2 grams daily in cohorts of at least five patients until a maximum tolerated dose was found. Patients completed QLQ-C30 Quality of Life, and the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), questionnaires at baseline and at four week intervals. Scopoletin was measured in blood and urine collected at baseline and at approximately four week intervals. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled at seven dose levels. Seven capsules four times daily (14 grams) was the maximum tolerated dose. No dose limiting toxicity was found but four of eight patients at this level withdrew from the study due to the challenges of ingesting so many capsules. There was a dose response for self reported physical functioning and the control of pain and fatigue. Patients taking four capsules four times daily experienced less fatigue than patients taking lower or higher doses. A relationship between noni dose and blood and urinary scopoletin concentrations was found. Conclusion Measuring quality of life to determine a dose for subsequent Phase II testing is feasible. A noni dose of four capsules four times daily (8 grams) is recommended for Phase II testing where controlling fatigue and maintaining physical function is the efficacy of interest. Scopoletin is a measurable noni ingredient for pharmacokinetic studies in patients with cancer. PMID:22435516

  12. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, Greetta; Joensuu, Timo; Nokisalmi, Petri

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  13. Phase II Pilot Study of Vemurafenib in Patients With Metastatic BRAF-Mutated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Desai, Jayesh; Chan, Emily; Hecht, Joel Randolph; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Maru, Dipen; Morris, Van; Janku, Filip; Dasari, Arvind; Chung, Woonbook; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Gibbs, Peter; James, Brian; Powis, Garth; Nolop, Keith B.; Bhattacharya, Suman; Saltz, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BRAF V600E mutation is seen in 5% to 8% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) and is associated with poor prognosis. Vemurafenib, an oral BRAF V600 inhibitor, has pronounced activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, but its activity in patients with BRAF V600E–positive metastatic CRC was unknown. Patients and Methods In this multi-institutional, open-label study, patients with metastatic CRC with BRAF V600 mutations were recruited to an expansion cohort at the previously determined maximum-tolerated dose of 960 mg orally twice a day. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled, of whom 20 had received at least one prior metastatic chemotherapy regimen. Grade 3 toxicities included keratoacanthomas, rash, fatigue, and arthralgia. Of the 21 patients treated, one patient had a confirmed partial response (5%; 95% CI, 1% to 24%) and seven other patients had stable disease by RECIST criteria. Median progression-free survival was 2.1 months. Patterns of concurrent mutations, microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylation status, PTEN loss, EGFR expression, and copy number alterations were not associated with clinical benefit. In contrast to prior expectations, concurrent KRAS and NRAS mutations were detected at low allele frequency in a subset of the patients' tumors (median, 0.21% allele frequency) and were apparent mechanisms of acquired resistance in vemurafenib-sensitive patient-derived xenograft models. Conclusion In marked contrast to the results seen in patients with BRAF V600E–mutant melanoma, single-agent vemurafenib did not show meaningful clinical activity in patients with BRAF V600E mutant CRC. Combination strategies are now under development and may be informed by the presence of intratumor heterogeneity of KRAS and NRAS mutations. PMID:26460303

  14. RESPIRATORY–SWALLOW PHASE PATTERNS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO SWALLOWING IMPAIRMENT IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Martin B.; McFarland, David H.; Dozier, Thomas S.; Blair, Julie; Ayers, Christopher; Michel, Yvonne; Gillespie, M. Boyd; Day, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Unstable respiratory–swallowing coordination has been associated with disorders and disease. The goals of this study were (1) to describe respiratory–swallow patterns in patients with dysphagia consequent to treatments for cancers of the oropharynx and (2) to determine the association between respiratory–swallow patterns, airway invasion, and overall severity of swallowing impairment. Methods This prospective, cross-sectional design compared respiratory–swallow patterns in 20 patients treated for oropharyngeal cancer and 20 healthy, age-matched control participants. Nasal airflow direction was synchronously recorded with videofluoroscopic imaging in participants who swallowed 5-mL thin liquid barium boluses. Results Respiratory–swallow patterns differed between groups. Most control participants initiated and completed swallowing bracketed by expiratory airflow. Swallowing in patients often interrupted inspiratory flow and was associated with penetration or aspiration of the bolus. Conclusions We suggest nonexpiratory bracketed respiratory–swallowing phase patterns in patients with oropharyngeal cancer may place patients at greater risk of airway penetration or aspiration during swallowing. PMID:19780056

  15. A phase I dose-escalation study of a biosimilar trastuzumab in Chinese metastasis breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinna; Yu, Jing; Wang, Wenmiao; Song, Guohong; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Jun; Di, Lijun; Wang, Xinghe

    2015-01-01

    Trastuzumab has been widely used among the breast cancer patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression. The genetically engineered trastuzumab traded as Cipterbin® was developed in China since 2003. We have disclosed the phase I clinical trial data of safety, pharmacokinetic profile (PK) in patients with metastasis breast cancer. Subjects identified as HER2 strong positive received single intravenously doses of 100, 250 or 500 mg Cipterbin® in dose-escalation manner. The safety evaluations were recorded and plasma concentration profiles for the drug were analyzed. 27 Chinese metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Patients in each group of different dosage were well-tolerated. The most frequently drug-related adverse events were fever (59.3 %), transaminase increased (22.2 %), chills (18.5 %) and arrhythmia (18.5 %). Only one patient with severe adverse event was observed in 250 mg group revealing brachycardia. PK profile analysis showed that sera steady concentration could be reached in dose-proportional manner, except volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL), which reached peak values at 250 mg administration cohort. This genetically engineered HER2-target antibody had demonstrated the accepted safety with well-tolerated. PMID:26702392

  16. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a dose escalating phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3–6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85–90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P=0.006) and high-dose groups (P=0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  17. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: A dose escalating phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-12-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3-6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85-90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P = 0.006) and high-dose groups (P = 0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  18. Phase II study of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Vukelja, Sasha; Marsland, Thomas; Kimmel, Gary; Ratnam, Suresh; Pippen, John E

    2004-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Sixty-four patients were enrolled, the majority of whom (95%) had been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane before study enrollment. Eligible women were treated with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m(2) weekly for 2 weeks with the third week off on a 21-day cycle) plus weekly doses of trastuzumab (4-mg/kg loading dose; 2 mg/kg thereafter) until disease progression. The median patient age was 55 years, and the median number of previously administered (including adjuvant) chemotherapy regimens was 3. Twenty-two patients were scored as 2+ for HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry; 39 patients scored 3+. Three patients were assessed as HER2-negative on central pathology review and were ineligible for evaluation. Fifty-nine of the 61 patients remained evaluable for response. The objective response rates were 38% in the intent-to-treat population (23 of 61) and 44% among the 39 patients with HER2 3+ expression. The median response duration was 5.8 months, median overall survival was 14.7 months, and median time to disease progression was 5.8 months. Trastuzumab plus gemcitabine was well tolerated. No cases of clinical congestive heart failure occurred. Grade 3/4 toxicities included asthenia in 4 patients, fever in 4, neutropenia in 18, dyspnea in 6, abdominal or back pain in 3, and edema and nausea in 1 patient each. The combination of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine appears to be well tolerated and effective for patients with HER2-positive MBC previously treated with chemotherapy. PMID:15245619

  19. Phase I study of temozolomide in paediatric patients with advanced cancer. United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Estlin, E. J.; Lashford, L.; Ablett, S.; Price, L.; Gowing, R.; Gholkar, A.; Kohler, J.; Lewis, I. J.; Morland, B.; Pinkerton, C. R.; Stevens, M. C.; Mott, M.; Stevens, R.; Newell, D. R.; Walker, D.; Dicks-Mireaux, C.; McDowell, H.; Reidenberg, P.; Statkevich, P.; Marco, A.; Batra, V.; Dugan, M.; Pearson, A. D.

    1998-01-01

    A phase I study of temozolomide administered orally once a day, on 5 consecutive days, between 500 and 1200 mg m(-2) per 28-day cycle was performed. Children were stratified according to prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosourea therapy. Sixteen of 20 patients who had not received prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosourea therapy were evaluable. Myelosuppression was dose limiting, with Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in one of six patients receiving 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle, and two of four patients treated at 1200 mg m(-2) per cycle. Therefore, the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle. The MTD was not defined for children with prior craniospinal irradiation because of poor recruitment. Plasma pharmacokinetic analyses showed temozolomide to be rapidly absorbed and eliminated, with linear increases in peak plasma concentrations and systemic exposure with increasing dose. Responses (CR and PR) were seen in two out of five patients with high-grade astrocytomas, and one patient had stable disease. One of ten patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma achieved a long-term partial response, and a further two patients had stable disease. Therefore, the dose recommended for phase II studies in patients who have not received prior craniospinal irradiation or nitrosoureas is 1000 mg m(-2) per cycle. Further evaluation in diffuse intrinsic brain stem gliomas and other high-grade astrocytomas is warranted. Images Figure 5 p658-b Figure 6 p659-b PMID:9744506

  20. Phase II Trial of FOLFOX6, Bevacizumab and Cetuximab in Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  1. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  2. A phase I study of dexosome immunotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael A; Garst, Jennifer; Osada, Takuya; Khan, Shubi; Hobeika, Amy; Clay, Timothy M; Valente, Nancy; Shreeniwas, Revati; Sutton, Mary Ann; Delcayre, Alain; Hsu, Di-Hwei; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Lyerly, H Kim

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a continued need to develop more effective cancer immunotherapy strategies. Exosomes, cell-derived lipid vesicles that express high levels of a narrow spectrum of cell proteins represent a novel platform for delivering high levels of antigen in conjunction with costimulatory molecules. We performed this study to test the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (DEX) loaded with the MAGE tumor antigens in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods This Phase I study enrolled HLA A2+ patients with pre-treated Stage IIIb (N = 4) and IV (N = 9) NSCLC with tumor expression of MAGE-A3 or A4. Patients underwent leukapheresis to generate DC from which DEX were produced and loaded with MAGE-A3, -A4, -A10, and MAGE-3DPO4 peptides. Patients received 4 doses of DEX at weekly intervals. Results Thirteen patients were enrolled and 9 completed therapy. Three formulations of DEX were evaluated; all were well tolerated with only grade 1–2 adverse events related to the use of DEX (injection site reactions (N = 8), flu like illness (N = 1), and peripheral arm pain (N = 1)). The time from the first dose of DEX until disease progression was 30 to 429+ days. Three patients had disease progression before the first DEX dose. Survival of patients after the first DEX dose was 52–665+ days. DTH reactivity against MAGE peptides was detected in 3/9 patients. Immune responses were detected in patients as follows: MAGE-specific T cell responses in 1/3, increased NK lytic activity in 2/4. Conclusion Production of the DEX vaccine was feasible and DEX therapy was well tolerated in patients with advanced NSCLC. Some patients experienced long term stability of disease and activation of immune effectors PMID:15723705

  3. Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in selected breast-cancer patients: late results of the Montpellier phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Montpellier cancer institute phase II trial started in 2004 and evaluated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a sole radiation treatment for patients with an excellent prognostic and very low recurrence risk. Methods Forty-two patients were included between 2004 and 2007. Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 65 years old, T0-T1, N0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, free-margin > 2 mm. IORT was delivered using dedicated linear accelerator. One fraction of 21 Gy was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. Primary end-point was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, specific and overall survival. Results At inclusion, median age was 72 years (range, 66–80). Median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Late cosmetic results were good at 5 years despite the poor agreement of accuracy assessment between patients and physicians. Four patients (9.5%) experienced a local failure and underwent salvage mastectomy. The 5 year-disease free survival is 92.7% (range 79.1−97.6). All patients are still alive with a median follow-up of 72 months (range 66–74). Conclusion Our results confirm with a long-term follow-up that exclusive partial breast IORT is feasible for early-breast cancer in selected patients. IORT provides good late cosmetics results and should be considered as a safe and very comfortable “one-step” treatment procedure. Nevertheless, patient assessments are essential for long-term quality results. PMID:23902825

  4. A Phase 1 First-in-Human Study of TRC105 (Anti-Endoglin Antibody) in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Lee S.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Wong, Michael K.; Goldman, Jonathan; Mendelson, David S.; Figg, William D.; Spencer, Shawn; Adams, Bonne J.; Alvarez, Delia; Seon, Ben K.; Theuer, Charles P.; Leigh, Bryan R.; Gordon, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose TRC105 is a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds CD105 (endoglin). This first-in-human, phase 1, open label study assessed safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of TRC105 in patients with advanced refractory solid tumors. Patients and Methods Patients received escalating doses of intravenous TRC105 until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity using a standard 3 + 3 phase 1 design. Results Fifty patients were treated with escalating doses of TRC105. The maximum tolerated dose was exceeded at 15 mg/kg every week due to dose-limiting hypoproliferative anemia. TRC105 exposure increased with increasing dose, and continuous serum concentrations that saturate CD105 receptors were maintained at 10 mg/kg weekly (the maximum tolerated dose) and 15 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Common adverse events including anemia, telangiectasias and infusion reactions reflected the mechanism of action of the drug. Antibodies to TRC105 were not detected in patients treated with TRC105 from Chinese hamster ovary cells being used in ongoing phase 1b and phase 2 studies. Stable disease or better was achieved in 21 of 45 evaluable patients (47%) including two ongoing responses at 48 and 18 months. Conclusion TRC105 was tolerated at 10 mg/kg every week and 15 mg/kg every 2 weeks with a safety profile that was distinct from that of VEGF inhibitors. Evidence of clinical activity was seen in a refractory patient population. Ongoing clinical trials are testing TRC105 in combination with chemotherapy and VEGF inhibitors and as a single agent in prostate, ovarian, bladder, and hepatocellular cancer. PMID:22767667

  5. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  6. Phase I Imaging and Pharmacodynamic Trial of CS-1008 in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciprotti, Marika; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Lee, Fook-Thean; Lee, Sze-Ting; Gan, Hui K.; McKee, David C.; O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Gong, Sylvia J.; Chong, Geoffrey; Hopkins, Wendie; Chappell, Bridget; Scott, Fiona E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Tse, Archie N.; Jansen, Mendel; Matsumura, Manabu; Kotsuma, Masakatsu; Watanabe, Rira; Venhaus, Ralph; Beckman, Robert A.; Greenberg, Jonathan; Scott, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose CS-1008 (tigatuzumab) is a humanized, monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) agonistic antibody to human death receptor 5. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of CS-1008 dose on the biodistribution, quantitative tumor uptake, and antitumor response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients and Methods Patients with mCRC who had received at least one course of chemotherapy were assigned to one of five dosage cohorts and infused with a weekly dose of CS-1008. Day 1 and day 36 doses were trace-labeled with indium-111 (111In), followed by whole-body planar and regional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging at several time points over the course of 10 days. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled. 111In-CS-1008 uptake in tumor was observed in only 12 patients (63%). 111In-CS-1008 uptake and pharmacokinetics were not affected by dose or repeated drug administration. 111In-CS-1008 biodistribution showed gradual blood-pool clearance and no abnormal uptake in normal tissue. No anti–CS-1008 antibody development was detected. One patient achieved partial response (3.7 months duration), eight patients had stable disease, and 10 patients had progressive disease. Clinical benefit rate (stable disease + partial response) in patients with 111In-CS-1008 uptake in tumor was 58% versus 28% in patients with no uptake. An analysis of individual lesions showed that lesions with antibody uptake were one third as likely to progress as those without antibody uptake (P = .07). Death-receptor–5 expression in archived tumor samples did not correlate with 111In-CS-1008 uptake (P = .5) or tumor response (P = .6). Conclusion Death-receptor–5 imaging with 111In-CS-1008 reveals interpatient and intrapatient heterogeneity of uptake in tumor, is not dose dependent, and is predictive of clinical benefit in the treatment of patients who have mCRC. PMID:26124477

  7. Phase I study of indicine N-oxide in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, T; Sridhar, K S; Ratner, L H; Holland, J F

    1982-07-01

    Indicine N-oxide is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid isolated from Heliotropium indicum, one of the widely used herbs in Ayurvedic medicine. Thirty-seven patients with solid tumors received the drug: 15 men and 22 women (mean age, 53 years). All had had prior chemotherapy, and 25 had had prior radiotherapy. Eighty-four percent had a performance status of 0-3 (Cancer and Leukemia Group B criteria). The drug was given as a short infusion over 15 minutes and repeated with a median interval of 4 weeks. Doses were escalated from 1 to 9 g/m2. A total of 55 courses were evaluable. Dose-limiting toxic effects were leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, and the toxicity was cumulative with repeated doses. Other toxic effects included nausea and vomiting, anemia, and hepatic dysfunction. The hematologic toxicity tended to be more pronounced in patients with hepatic dysfunction, poor marrow reserve, and heavy prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There were no complete or partial responses. One patient with skin melanoma and another with ovarian carcinoma had improvement lasting 2 months. The maximally tolerated dose is 9 g/m2 in our population. A recommended dose for therapeutic study is 7 g/m2. High-risk patients should be started at a dose of 5 g/m2. The treatment may be repeated at 4-week intervals with close monitoring of wbc and platelet counts. Dose reductions may be necessary for repeated courses. PMID:7093966

  8. A preliminary Phase I trial of partially purified interferon-gamma in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, S A; Foon, K A; Abrams, P G; Heyman, M R; Ochs, J J; Watson, T; Maluish, A; Oldham, R K

    1984-12-01

    Thirty-three patients were treated in an escalating single-dose trial of partially purified nonrecombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The first seven patients received intramuscular injections of IFN-gamma in doses up to 20 X 10(6) units/m2. When it became clear that these patients had no detectable antiviral activity in their serum, subsequent patients were treated by the intravenous route of administration, generally with 2-h infusions. A total of 26 patients received the agent intravenously in single escalating doses ranging from 0.2 to 60 X 10(6) units/m2, on a twice-weekly schedule for 4-6 weeks. The most common toxicities encountered included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and occasional nausea and vomiting. No myelosuppression or hepatic toxicity was observed. A maximum tolerated dose for single-dose intravenous administration was defined as 50 X 10(6) units/m2 on the basis of unacceptable fatigue and prolonged systolic hypotension. Antiviral activity was detected in the serum following doses greater than 2 X 10(6) units/m2 when the IFN-gamma was administered intravenously. No evidence of antitumor activity was seen in this Phase I trial, although the treatment regimen employed did not lead to high or prolonged levels of serum IFN activity in the majority of patients. An accurate assessment of the antitumor activity of this particular IFN-gamma preparation will require Phase II trials employing multiple-treatment regimens. PMID:6439828

  9. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and "flu-like" symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  10. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and “flu-like” symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  11. Subgroup analysis of Japanese patients in a phase 3 study of lenvatinib in radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Naomi; Schlumberger, Martin; Muro, Kei; Ando, Yuichi; Takahashi, Shunji; Kawai, Yasukazu; Wirth, Lori; Robinson, Bruce; Sherman, Steven; Suzuki, Takuya; Fujino, Katsuki; Gupta, Anubha; Hayato, Seiichi; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Lenvatinib significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC) in the phase 3 Study of (E7080) Lenvatinib in Differentiated Cancer of the Thyroid (SELECT) trial. This subanalysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of lenvatinib in Japanese patients who participated in SELECT. Outcomes for Japanese patients (lenvatinib, n = 30; placebo, n = 10) were assessed in relationship to the SELECT population (lenvatinib, n = 261; placebo, n = 131). The primary endpoint was PFS; secondary endpoints included overall survival, overall response rate, and safety. Lenvatinib PFS benefit was shown in Japanese patients (median PFS: lenvatinib, 16.5 months; placebo, 3.7 months), although significance was not reached, presumably due to sample size (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-1.57; P = 0.067). Overall response rates were 63.3% and 0% for lenvatinib and placebo, respectively. No significant difference was found in overall survival. The lenvatinib safety profile was similar between the Japanese and overall SELECT population, except for higher incidences of hypertension (any grade: Japanese, 87%; overall, 68%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 80%; overall, 42%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (any grade: Japanese, 70%; overall, 32%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 3%; overall, 3%), and proteinuria (any grade: Japanese, 63%; overall, 31%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 20%; overall, 10%). Japanese patients had more dose reductions (Japanese, 90%; overall, 67.8%), but fewer discontinuations due to adverse events (Japanese, 3.3%; overall, 14.2%). There was no difference in lenvatinib exposure between the Japanese and overall SELECT populations after adjusting for body weight. In Japanese patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer, lenvatinib showed similar clinical outcomes to the overall SELECT population. Some differences in adverse event frequencies and dose

  12. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H. . E-mail: elin@u.washington.edu

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative {>=}T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor {<=}5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC.

  13. Phase I Study of Axitinib in Combination with Cisplatin and Capecitabine in Patients with Previously Untreated Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Doi, Toshihiko; Shirao, Kuniaki; Lee, Keun-Wook; Park, Sook Ryun; Chen, Ying; Yang, Liqiang; Valota, Olga; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase I trial evaluated the question of whether the standard starting dose of axitinib could be administered in combination with therapeutic doses of cisplatin/capecitabine in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer, and assessed overall safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of this combination. Materials and Methods Patients in dose level (DL) 1 received axitinib 5 mg twice a day (days 1 to 21) with cisplatin 80 mg/m2 (day 1) and capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice a day (days 1 to 14) in 21-day cycles. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was the highest dose at which ≤ 30% of the first 12 patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during cycle 1. Ten additional patients were enrolled and treated at the MTD in order to obtain additional safety and pharmacokinetic data. Results Three DLTs occurred during cycle 1 in three (25%) of the first 12 patients: ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, acute renal failure, and > 5 consecutive days of missed axitinib due to thrombocytopenia. DL1 was established as the MTD, since higher DL cohorts were not planned. Common grade 3/4 non-hematologic adverse events in 22 patients treated at DL1 included hypertension (36.4%) and decreased appetite and stomatitis (18.2% each). Cisplatin/capecitabine slightly increased axitinib exposure; axitinib decreased capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil exposure. Eight patients (36.4%) each had partial response or stable disease. Median response duration was 9.1 months; median progression-free survival was 3.8 months. Conclusion In patients with advanced gastric cancer, standard doses of axitinib plus therapeutic doses of cisplatin and capecitabine could be administered in combination. Adverse events were manageable. PMID:25687867

  14. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  15. The value of bioelectrical impedance analysis and phase angle in the evaluation of malnutrition and quality of life in cancer patients--a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, O; Yoon, S L; Williams, J J

    2015-12-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and especially its derived parameter phase angle have been widely used in different populations. The variability of BIA measures has often been cited as a major limitation for its clinical use in evaluating nutritional status and overall health of patients. Cancer patients often present with malnourishment and cachexia, which complicate the course of treatment and affect outcomes. PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCO and Cochrane Library have been searched for relevant publications in English for BIA in cancer patients. Out of 197 total results, 27 original research articles related to BIA measures in cancer patients were included in this review. Studies indicate that the use of BIA and phase angle measures can benefit in the clinical management of cancer patients in multiple ways: in the prevention; diagnosis; prognosis; and outcomes related to treatments that affect nutritional and overall health status. Phase angle and fat-free mass measures were most commonly evaluated and correlated with nutritional status and survival rate. One limitation of BIA measures is the high interpatient variability which requires careful interpretation of results in the context of the individual patient rather than comparison with population data. The BIA and phase angle provide practitioners for the evaluation of nutritional and overall health status in cancer patients with a convenient and non-invasive technique and should be encouraged. PMID:26220573

  16. Mistletoe and gemcitabine in patients with advanced cancer: a model for the phase I study of botanicals and botanical-drug interactions in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Grem, Jean; Wallerstedt, Dawn B; Monahan, Brian P; Blackman, Marc R

    2003-12-01

    Plant extracts of the European mistletoe (MTE), Viscum album, the most widely used cancer treatment in Germany, have been used in European countries as sole intervention or as adjunct to conventional cancer therapies for more than 80 years. Preclinical data suggest immunostimulatory and cytotoxic effects of MTE. While the clinical efficacy of MTE in cancer is being investigated, toxicity and potential interactions of MTE with standard chemotherapeutic agents are unknown. Gemcitabine is an approved antimetabolite chemotherapeutic agent effective as single agent in patients with solid tumors (ST). The documented metabolism and pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine make this agent well suited for the study of botanical-chemotherapy drug interactions (BDIA) in cancer. Based on reports of altered drug metabolism associated with botanical preparations, research into BDIA has intensified. The phase I, 2-stage, dose-escalation study outlined here will test MTE with gemcitabine as a paradigm for the phase I investigation of botanical-drug combination treatments in patients with advanced ST. The protocol including the following components has been reviewed and approved by the National Cancer Institute Institutional Review Board (IRB), the National Naval Medical Center IRB, and the Navy Clinical Investigation Program (study 02-074): (1) use of a standardized MTE, approved by the Food and Drug Administration for investigational use; (2) independent verification of key MTE components considered biologically active; (3) identification of contaminants and adulterants; (4) pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its principal metabolites before and upon exposure to MTE; (5) safety and toxicity data collection; (6) assays of plasma ML antibody production in vivo; and (7) pharmacodynamic studies of the botanical-drug combination. PMID:14713326

  17. Hypofractionated Helical Tomotherapy for Older Aged Patients With Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Phase I-II Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xia; Du, Lei; Yu, Wei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Xu, Shou-Ping; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In our center, the feasibility and related acute toxicities of hypofractionated helical tomotherapy have been evaluated in older aged patients with prostate cancer . Between February 2009 and February 2014, 67 patients (older than 65 years) were enrolled in a prospective phase I-II study (registered number, ChiCTR-ONC-13004037). Patients in cohort 1 (n = 33) and cohort 2 (n = 34) received 76 Gy in 34 fractions (2.25 Gy/F) and 71.6 Gy in 28 fractions (2.65 Gy/F), respectively, to the prostate and seminal vesicles, while 25 patients in cohort 2 also received integrated elective lymph node irradiation (50.4 Gy). All patients were treated with helical tomotherapy, and daily image guidance was performed before each treatment. Acute toxicities were assessed with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. No significant difference was detected between the 2 cohorts in the incidence of acute toxicities. In cohort 1, the incidences of grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 45.5% and 45.4%, respectively, and without grade 3 and 4 toxicities. In cohort 2, the incidences of acute grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 47.1% and 55.9%, respectively, and grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (hematuria) was noted only in 1 patient. No significant difference was detected in the incidence of acute toxicities between the patients receiving integrated elective lymph node irradiation and those receiving irradiation to prostate and seminal vesicle in cohort 2. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with clinical parameters. Only the baseline weight was found negatively correlated with genitourinary toxicities at a weak level (relative risk = 0.946, 95% confidence interval 0.896-0.998], P = .043). This study shows that 2 hypofractionation regimens (76 Gy/34F and 71.6 Gy/28F) delivered with HT are well tolerated in older aged patients having prostate cancer

  18. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  19. PHASE II TRIAL OF THE CYCLIN-DEPEDENT KINASE INHIBITOR PD 0332991 IN PATIENTS WITH CANCER

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult Solid Tumor; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Benign Teratoma; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Familial Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Ovarian Immature Teratoma; Ovarian Mature Teratoma; Ovarian Monodermal and Highly Specialized Teratoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Testicular Immature Teratoma; Testicular Mature Teratoma

  20. Phase I trial of intramuscularly administered tumor necrosis factor in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, A A; Casper, E S; Gabrilove, J L; Templeton, M A; Sherwin, S A; Oettgen, H F

    1989-03-01

    A phase I trial of intramuscularly administered recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was conducted in 19 adult patients with advanced solid tumors. The agent was administered daily for up to five consecutive days every other week for two to four courses. Doses of rTNF ranged from 5 to 200 micrograms/m2/d. Dose-limiting toxicities were encountered at doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d. Toxicities included tenderness, erythema and induration at the site of injection, fatigue, fever, chills, headache, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Moderate to marked reductions in WBC and platelet counts were observed regularly at the highest dose levels, but none were clinically significant. Hepatic enzyme elevation was seen frequently, and two patients developed hyperbilirubinemia. Only one of seven patients treated with doses greater than 100 micrograms/m2/d completed the planned course of therapy. Even at the highest dose levels, serum concentrations of rTNF could only rarely be detected in the serum. No therapeutic responses were observed. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of rTNF in this trial was 150 micrograms/m2/d, administered for two courses. PMID:2918329

  1. Phase II trial of gemcitabine/doxorubicin/paclitaxel administered every other week in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rovira, P; Jaén, A; González, E; Porras, I; Dueñas, M R; Medina, B; Mohedano, N; Fernández, M; Martos, M; Lozano, A

    2000-10-01

    The present trial was designed to determine the efficacy of the combination of gemcitabine/doxorubicin/paclitaxel (GAT) delivered every other week as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. From February 1998 to September 1999, 41 patients were included in this trial. Doses delivered were doxorubicin 30 mg/m2 on day 1 and paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 plus gemcitabine 2500 mg/m2 both given on day 2, every 14 days. Doses were selected from a previous phase I trial conducted at our institution. Eligibility criteria for the phase II trial included histologically confirmed metastatic breast cancer with bidimensionally measurable lesions; no prior therapy for metastatic disease; adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy was allowed if given more than 1 year before and cumulative doses of doxorubicin or epirubicin were less than 200 mg/m2 or 360 mg/m2, respectively; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or less; and adequate hematological, hepatic, and renal function. Prophylactic use of granulocyte colony-simulating factor (G-CSF) was allowed if patients were not fully recovered (absolute neutrophil count greater than 1500/microL) from chemotherapy administration before the next dose. Left ventricular ejection fraction was determined initially, at the end of the study, and every 6 months thereafter. The patients' median age was 55 years (range, 33-68 years), and their median ECOG performance status was 0 (range, 0-1). Twenty-eight patients had received adjuvant therapy, 17 with epirubicin (none with doxorubicin). Metastases were present in the bone (19 patients), lung (19 patients), liver (11 patients), and soft tissues (18 patients). Twenty patients had one metastatic site and 21 had two or more sites. Efficacy was assessed on an intent-to-treat basis. A total of 216 cycles of GAT were given. Twenty-two percent of the courses were delayed or given at reduced doses mostly due to neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. G-CSF was required in

  2. A phase I study of the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 in patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gulliford, T.; English, J.; Colston, K. W.; Menday, P.; Moller, S.; Coombes, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that the vitamin D analogue EB 1089 has significantly less calcaemic activity than its parent compound 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) and significant anti-tumour activity. This phase I trial was designed to evaluate the calcaemic effect of the drug in patients with advanced cancer. EB 1089 was given to 36 patients with advanced breast and colorectal cancer in doses of between 0.15 and 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Serial serum and urine calcium, urine creatinine and serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) were monitored. Hypercalcaemia was seen in all patients receiving 17.0 microg m(-2) day(-1). Hypercalcaemia attributable to EB 1089 was reversible by discontinuing or reducing EB 1089 therapy. During the first 5 days of treatment, urine calcium (P = 0.0001) and serum-corrected calcium (P = 0.027) were related to EB 1089 dose, whereas serum parathyroid hormone (P = 0.0001) showed an inverse relationship. Twenty-one patients received compassionate treatment for between 10 and 234 days. No complete or partial responses were seen. Six patients on treatment for more than 90 days showed stabilization of disease. EB 1089 was well tolerated and adverse events considered to be caused by EB 1089 were limited to dose-dependent effects on calcium metabolism. The dose estimated to be tolerable for most patients from this study is around 7 microg m(-2) day(1). These data support previous work that has demonstrated EB 1089 to be significantly less calcaemic than 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:9662243

  3. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of methotrexate in cancer patients serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-dong; Li, Yan; Liang, Ning-sheng; Yang, Fan; Kuang, Zhi-peng

    2015-10-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the determination of methotrexate in human serum. After deproteinization of the serum with 40% silver nitrate solution, methotrexate and internal standard (IS) were separated on a reversed-phase column with a mobile phase consisting of 10mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH6.40)-methanol (78:22%, v/v) and ultraviolet detection at 310nm. The linearity is evaluated by a calibration curve in the concentration range of 0.05-10.0μg/mL and presented a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The absolute recoveries were 97.52±3.9% and 96.87±3.7% for methotrexate and ferulic acid (internal standard), respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision were less 6.19 and 5.89%, respectively (n=6). The limit of quantitation was 0.02μg/mL and the limit of detection was 0.006μg/mL. The complete analysis was achieved less than 10min with no interference from endogenous components or 22 examined drugs. This method was validated by using serum samples from high-dose methotrexate treated patients with osteosarcoma, breast cancer, acute leukemia and lymphoma. The method was demonstrated to be a simple, rapid and reliable approach in quantification of methotrexate in serum samples from patients with high-dose methotrexate therapy. PMID:26319303

  4. A phase II trial of Reiki for the management of pain in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Olson, Karin; Hanson, John; Michaud, Mary

    2003-11-01

    This trial compared pain, quality of life, and analgesic use in a sample of patients with cancer pain (n=24) who received either standard opioid management plus rest (Arm A) or standard opioid management plus Reiki (Arm B). Participants either rested for 1.5 hr on Days 1 and 4 or received two Reiki treatments (Days 1 and 4) one hour after their first afternoon analgesic dose. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain ratings, blood pressure, heart rate, and respirations were obtained before and after each treatment/rest period. Analgesic use and VAS pain scores were reported for 7 days. Quality of life was assessed on Days 1 and 7. Participants in Arm B experienced improved pain control on Days 1 and 4 following treatment, compared to Arm A, and improved quality of life, but no overall reduction in opioid use. Future research will determine the extent to which the benefits attributed to Reiki in this study may have been due to touch. PMID:14585550

  5. Phase I trial of tirapazamine, cisplatin, and concurrent accelerated boost reirradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Loh, Elwyn; Shen, Liji; Lusinchi, Antoine; Vokes, Everett E.; Bourhis, Jean

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation (re-RT) with concurrent chemotherapy offers a therapeutic option in patients who have locoregional recurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC). The hypoxic cell sensitizer, tirapazamine (TPZ), has demonstrated promising results in first-line therapy for HNC. This phase I trial was designed to test the feasibility of giving TPZ in the re-RT setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent HNC who received prior radiotherapy (RT) were enrolled and received TPZ (260 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) Weeks 1, 3, and 5 concurrently with RT (72 Gy, 42 fractions over 6 weeks). TPZ (160 mg/m{sup 2}) alone was added on Days 1, 3, and 5 of Week 2 (cohort 1) or Weeks 2 and 4 (cohort 2). Results: Twenty-five subjects were enrolled, 7 and 18 on cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Significant toxicities included Grade 3 dermatitis (20%) and Grade 3 mucositis (40%). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed on cohort 2 (1 patient with aspiration pneumonia). Four deaths occurred during treatment. Two fatalities occurred after completing therapy as a result of carotid artery rupture. With a minimum and median follow-up of 14 and 24 months, respectively, median overall survival was 14 months with actuarial 1-year and 2-year survival of 56% and 27%, respectively. Conclusion: Reirradiation with concomitant chemotherapy including TPZ in patients with unresectable recurrent HNC is feasible and results in long-term survival in a significant proportion of patients.

  6. GROWTH PLATE ABNORMALITIES IN PEDIATRIC CANCER PATIENTS UNDERGOING PHASE 1 ANTI-ANGIOGENIC THERAPY: A REPORT FROM THE CHILDREN’S ONCOLOGY GROUP PHASE I CONSORTIUM

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Stephan D.; Glade-Bender, Julia; Spunt, Sheri L.; DuBois, Steven G.; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Park, Julie R.; Leary, Sarah E. S.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Adamson, Peter C.; Blaney, Susan M.; Weigel, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pre-clinical studies suggest that anti-angiogenic agents may be toxic to the developing growth plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of growth plate abnormalities in children with refractory cancer undergoing anti-angiogenic therapy. Materials and methods Targeted radiographic studies from 53 subjects enrolled on six separate Children’s Oncology Group Phase 1 and Pilot Consortium clinical trials evaluating new anti-cancer agents agents interfering with angiogenesis were reviewed. Subjects received tyrosine kinase inhibitors with anti-angiogenic effects (n=35), monoclonal antibodies targeting VEGF (n=13), or angiopoietin (n=5). Radiographs of their distal femur/proximal tibia were obtained at baseline. Follow-up radiographs were obtained after odd-numbered treatment cycles in patients with open growth plates who did not experience disease progression prior to cycle 3. Results Baseline and follow-up growth plate radiographs were acquired in 48/53 (90%) of patients. Five patients (9.4%), all of whom received a specific VEGF/VEGFR blocking agent [sunitinib (n=1) or pazopanib (n=4)], had growth plate abnormalities. Four patients had growth plate widening that was apparent on at least two successive radiographs, but was not confirmed by MRI. The fifth patient had progressive growth plate widening and evidence of physeal cartilage hypertrophy on MRI. Subsequent off treatment radiographs showed that the growth plate changes were reversible. Conclusion Growth plate abnormalities occur in a small, but relevant number of patients undergoing anti-angiogenic therapy. These results support the need for growth plate monitoring in children with open growth plates who are receiving anti-angiogenic therapy, and for improved methods to assess toxicity of anti-angiogenic agents to the developing skeleton. PMID:25257751

  7. Phase 1b dose-finding study of motesanib with docetaxel or paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Richard H; Kotasek, Dusan; White, Shane; Koczwara, Bogda; Mainwaring, Paul; Chan, Arlene; Melara, Rebeca; Ye, Yining; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Sikorski, Robert; Kaufman, Peter A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of motesanib when combined with docetaxel or paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer. In this open-label, dose-finding, phase 1b study, patients received motesanib 50 or 125-mg orally once daily (QD), beginning day 3 of cycle 1 of chemotherapy, continuously in combination with either paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28-day cycle (Arm A) or docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 21-day cycle (Arm B). Dose escalation to motesanib 125 mg QD occurred if the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs, primary endpoint) was ≤ 33 %. If the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motesanib was established in Arm B, additional patients could receive motesanib at the MTD plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2). Forty-six patients were enrolled and 45 received ≥ 1 dose of motesanib. The incidence of DLTs was <33 % in all cohorts; thus, motesanib 125 mg QD was established as the MTD. Seven patients (16 %) had grade 3 motesanib-related adverse events including cholecystitis (2 patients) and hypertension (2 patients). Pharmacokinetic parameters of motesanib were similar to those reported in previous studies. The objective response rate was 56 % among patients with measurable disease at baseline who received motesanib in combination with taxane-based chemotherapy. The addition of motesanib to either paclitaxel or docetaxel was generally tolerable up to the 125-mg QD dose of motesanib. The objective response rate of 56 % suggests a potential benefit of motesanib in combination with taxane-based chemotherapy. PMID:22872523

  8. A lecture program on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients--evaluation of the pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Huebner, J; Ebel, M; Muenstedt, K; Micke, O; Prott, F J; Muecke, R; Hoppe, A

    2015-06-01

    About half of all patients with cancer use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). In 2013, we started a lecture program for patients, followed by evidence-based recommendations on counseling on CAM. These recommendations have been published before by this working group. The aim of the program is to provide scientific facts on the most often used CAM methods in standardized presentations which help patients discuss the topic with their oncologists and support shared decision making. The article presents the evaluation of the pilot phase. Participants received a standardized questionnaire before the start of the lecture. The questionnaire comprises four parts: demographic data, data concerning experience with CAM, satisfaction with the lecture, and needs for further information on CAM. In 2013, seven lectures on CAM were given in cooperation with regional branches of the German Cancer Society in several German states. Four hundred sixty patients and relatives took part (75% females and 16% males). Forty-eight percent formerly had used CAM. Most often named sources of information on CAM were print media (48%) and the Internet (37%). Most participants rated additional written information valuable. About one third would like to have an individual consultation concerning CAM. A standardized presentation of evidence on CAM methods most often used, together with recommendations on the self-management of symptoms, is highly appreciated. The concept of a highly interactive lecture comprising is feasible and if presented in lay terminology, adequate. In order to give additional support on the topic, written information should be provided as the first step. PMID:25056420

  9. A Phase I trial of high dose gefitinib for patients with leptomeningeal metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cioffredi, Leigh A.; Jacobs, Lorraine; Sharmeen, Farhana; Morse, Linda K.; Lucca, Joan; Plotkin, Scott R.; Marcoux, Paul J.; Rabin, Michael S.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are few effective treatment options for leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study assessed the feasibility of high-dose gefitinib in patients with LM from NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations or prior systemic response to EGFR-TKI. Methods This phase I open-label trial of a novel gefitinib dosing schedule employed a 3+3 design. Eligible NSCLC patients with LM had known EGFR mutations and/or prior response to EGFR-TKI. Patients alternated 2 weeks of high-dose daily gefitinib (dose levels: 750 mg, 1000 mg, 1250 mg) with 2 weeks of maintenance therapy (500 mg daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), neurological progression-free survival, radiological response, and cytological response in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Results Seven patients were treated: 3 at 750 mg dose level, 4 at 1000 mg dose level. There were no DLTs at the 750 mg dose level, and one DLT (toxic epidermal necrolysis) at the 1000 mg dose level. The study was closed due to slow accrual. Median neurological PFS was 2.3months (range 1.6–4.0 months); median OS was 3.5months (range 1.6–5.1months). Though there were no radiologically documented remissions of LM disease, four patients had improvement in neurological symptoms. One patient cleared their CSF of NSCLC cells, while 2 others had decrease in malignant cells in CSF. Conclusion Although the MTD was not defined due to slow accrual, this study provides important information about the tolerability and CSF penetration of high-dose gefitinib as a therapeutic option for modest palliation for NSCLC patients with LM and a known EGFR mutation. PMID:25784657

  10. Metronomic cyclophosphamide therapy in hormone-naive patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrent prostate cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Fabien; Mouillet, Guillaume; Adotevi, Olivier; Maurina, Tristan; Nguyen, Thierry; Montcuquet, Philippe; Curtit, E; Kleinclauss, F; Pivot, Xavier; Borg, Christophe; Thiery-Vuillemin, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    After curative local therapy, biochemical recurrence is a mode of relapse among patient with prostate cancer (PC). Deferring androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or offering non-hormonal therapies may be an appropriate option for these non-symptomatic patients with no proven metastases. Metronomic cyclophosphamide (MC) has shown activity in metastatic PC setting and was chosen to be assessed in biochemical relapse. This prospective single-arm open-label phase II study was conducted to evaluate MC regimen in patients with biochemical recurrent PC. MC was planned to be administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg for 6 months. Primary endpoint was PSA response. Thirty-eight patients were included and treated. Median follow-up was 45.5 months (range 17-100). Among them, 14 patients (37 %) achieved PSA stabilisation and 22 patients (58 %) experienced PSA progression. Response rate was 5 % with one complete response (2.6 %), and 1 partial response with PSA decrease >50 % (2.6 %). The median time until androgen deprivation therapy initiation was around 15 months. The treatment was well tolerated. Neither grade 3-4 toxicity nor serious adverse events were observed. This first prospective clinical trial with MC therapy in patients with non-metastatic biochemical recurrence of PC displayed modest efficacy when measured with PSA response rate, without significant toxicity. It might offer a new safe and non-expensive option to delay initiation of ADT. These results would need to be confirmed with larger prospective randomised trials. PMID:27400698

  11. Phase II trial of panitumumab with irinotecan as salvage therapy for patients with advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer (TOPIC study)

    PubMed Central

    NISHI, TOMOHIRO; HAMAMOTO, YASUO; NAGASE, MICHITAKA; DENDA, TADAMICHI; YAMAGUCHI, KENSEI; AMAGAI, KENJI; MIYATA, YOSHINORI; YAMANAKA, YASUHIRO; YANAI, KAI; ISHIKAWA, TSUTOMU; KUROKI, YOSHIFUMI; FUJII, HIROFUMI

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical impact of salvage panitumumab with irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. The present study conducted a single-arm, multicenter phase II trial for mCRC with skin toxicity prevention program. The subjects were mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS, who showed resistance to fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin and irinotecan. Panitumumab was administered at a dose of 6 mg/kg every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 60 min, and irinotecan was administered at a dose of 100–180 mg/m2 every 2 weeks by intravenous infusion over 90 min, depending on the preceding treatment dose. To prevent skin toxicities, a moisturizer was applied and oral antibiotics (100 mg minocycline twice daily) were initiated for 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was the response rate (RR) determined by independent reviewers. Secondary endpoints were the disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS) time, overall survival (OS) time and adverse events. A total of 35 patients were enrolled between October 2010 and March 2012. The median age was 61 years (range, 41–76 years), with 25 male and 10 female patients. The initial irinotecan dose was 150 mg/m2 in 19 patients and 180 mg/m2 in 1 patient. The remaining patients were treated with ≤120 mg/m2. A central review indicated a partial response in 8 patients (22.9%) and stable disease in 6 patients (17.1%), with an RR of 22.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.1–39.0) and a DCR of 40%. The RR of the patients with standard-dose irinotecan (150 or 180 mg/m2) was 30%, although that of low-dose irinotecan (100–120 mg/m2) was 13%. The median PFS time was 2.7 months, and the median OS time was 6.3 months. A grade 3 or above acne-like rash developed in 25.7% of patients. In conclusion, panitumumab and irinotecan as salvage therapy for mCRC KRAS wild-type patients with skin toxicity prevention exhibits limited efficacy. In particular, the effect of low-dose irinotecan with panitumumab appears to be

  12. A phase 1 trial of recombinant human IL-21 in combination with cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steele, N; Anthony, A; Saunders, M; Esmarck, B; Ehrnrooth, E; Kristjansen, P E G; Nihlén, A; Hansen, L T; Cassidy, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pre-clinical data indicate enhanced anti-tumour activity when combining recombinant human interleukin-21 (rIL-21), a class 1 cytokine, with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor. This phase 1 trial assessed the safety and tolerability of escalating doses of rIL-21 in combination with cetuximab in chemo-naïve patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. Patients and methods: Sequential cohorts of PS 0–1, asymptomatic patients, were treated weekly with cetuximab 250 mg m−2 intravenously (i.v.) plus escalating i.v. doses of rIL-21 following an initial loading dose of cetuximab 400 mg m−2. Initial treatment period was 8 weeks, with extension permitted in patients without disease progression. Results: In all, 15 patients were included in this study. Adverse events related to rIL-21 or rIL-21 plus cetuximab included lethargy, nausea/vomiting, stomatitis, lymphopenia and pyrexia and were mainly ⩽ grade 2. One dose limiting toxicity occurred (grade 3 diarrhoea). Maximum tolerated dose was not determined because of the premature study closure. Maximum administered dose was 100 μg kg−1 rIL-21 weekly. In all, 60% of the patients had stable disease. Immune activation was confirmed by various T- and NK-cell activation biomarkers, including dose-dependent increases in serum sCD25. Conclusion: rIL-21 weekly combined with cetuximab is well tolerated at doses up to 100 μg kg−1 and results in activation of immune response biomarkers. PMID:22315057

  13. Effects of the commercial extract of aronia on oxidative stress in blood platelets isolated from breast cancer patients after the surgery and various phases of the chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Glowacki, Rafal; Bald, Edward; Czernek, Urszula; Szydłowska-Pazera, Katarzyna; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz

    2012-03-01

    Since the extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa presents antioxidative properties in plasma and in blood platelets, not only from healthy group, but also from patients with benign breast diseases and in patients with invasive breast cancer before surgery, the aim of our present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress by measuring the level of various biomarkers of this process such as the generation of superoxide anion radicals (O(2)(-·)), the amount of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins or the amount of glutathione in blood platelets isolated from breast cancer patients after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy in the presence of A. melanocarpa extract (Aronox) in vitro. We demonstrated in platelet proteins from patients with invasive breast cancer (after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) higher level of carbonyl groups than in control healthy group. The level of 3-nitrotyrosine in platelet proteins from patients with invasive breast cancer was also significantly higher than in healthy subject group. We observed an increase of other biomarkers of oxidative stress such as O(2)(-·) and a decrease of GSH in platelets from patients with breast cancer (after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) compared to the healthy group. In model system in vitro our results showed that the commercial extract from berries of A. melanocarpa due to antioxidant action, significantly reduced the oxidative/nitrative stress in platelets from patients with invasive breast cancer caused by the surgery and various phases of the chemotherapy. PMID:22101070

  14. Daily Pomegranate Intake Has No Impact on PSA Levels in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer - Results of a Phase IIb Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Cathomas, Richard; Renner, Christoph; Petrausch, Ulf; Sulser, Tullio; Spanaus, Katharina; Seifert, Hans Helge; Strebel, Räto Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Samaras, Panagiotis; Müntener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate has been shown to prolong PSA doubling time in early prostate cancer, but no data from a placebo controlled trial has been published yet. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the impact of pomegranate juice in patients with prostate cancer. We conducted a phase IIb, double blinded, randomized placebo controlled trial in patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. Only patients with a PSA value ≥ 5ng/ml were included. The subjects consumed 500 ml of pomegranate juice or 500 ml of placebo beverage every day for a 4 week period. Thereafter, all patients received 250 ml of the pomegranate juice daily for another 4 weeks. PSA values were taken at baseline, day 14, 28 and on day 56. The primary endpoint was the detection of a significant difference in PSA serum levels between the groups after one month of treatment. Pain scores and adherence to intervention were recorded using patient diaries. 102 patients were enrolled. The majority of patients had castration resistant prostate cancer (68%). 98 received either pomegranate juice or placebo between October 2008 and May 2011. Adherence to protocol was good, with 94 patients (96%) completing the first period and 87 patients (89%) completing both periods. No grade 3 or higher toxicities occurred within the study. No differences were detected between the two groups with regard to PSA kinetics and pain scores. Consumption of pomegranate juice as an adjunct intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer does not result in significant PSA declines compared to placebo. PMID:24069070

  15. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  16. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wood, Laura D.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Ellsworth, Susannah; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Hidalgo, Manuel; Donehower, Ross C.; Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H.; Choti, Michael A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; and others

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

  17. Phase I study of epigenetic modulation with 5-azacytidine and valproic acid in patients with advanced cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braiteh, Fadi; Soriano, Andres O; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Hong, David; Johnson, Marcella M; De Padua Silva, Leandro; Yang, Hui; Alexander, Stefanie; Wolff, Johannes; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) is a DNA hypomethylating agent. Valproic acid is a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Combining hypomethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors produces synergistic anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of this evidence, we conducted a phase I study of the combination of 5-AZA and valproic acid in patients with advanced cancers. Experimental Design 5-AZA was administered subcutaneously daily for 10 days. Valproic acid was given orally daily with a goal to titrate to plasma levels of 75-100 mcg/mL (therapeutic for seizures). Cycles were 28 days long. 5-AZA was started at 20 mg/m2 and escalated using an adaptive algorithm based on the toxicity profile in the prior cohort (6+6 design). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell global DNA methylation and histone H3 acetylation were estimated with the LINE pyrosequencing assay and Western blots respectively, on days 1 and 10 of each cycle when patients agreed to provide them. Results Fifty-five patients were enrolled. Median age was 60 years (range, 12-77 years). The maximum tolerated dose was 75 mg/m2 of 5-AZA in combination with valproic acid. Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenic fever and thrombocytopenia, which occurred at a dose of 94 mg/m2 of 5-AZA. Stable disease lasting 4-12 months (median = 6 months) was observed in 14 patients (25%). A significant decrease in global DNA methylation and induction of histone acetylation were observed. Conclusion The combination of 5-AZA and valproic acid is safe at doses up to 75 mg/m2 for 5-AZA in patients with advanced malignancies. PMID:18829512

  18. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  19. Arandomized multicenter Phase II study of perioperative tiotropium intervention in gastric cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Oyama, Katsunobu; Kaji, Masahide; Hirono, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Jun; Tsukada, Tomoya; Nezuka, Hideaki; Nakano, Tatsuo; Noto, Masahiro; Nishijima, Koji; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Tiotropium, a long-acting inhaled anticholinergic drug, has been widely used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the issue of whether perioperative tiotropium improves postoperative outcomes for gastric cancer patients with COPD remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of perioperative tiotropium intervention for gastric cancer patients with COPD. Patients and methods Eighty-four gastric cancer patients with mild-to-moderate COPD were randomly assigned to receive perioperative pulmonary rehabilitation alone (control group) or pulmonary rehabilitation with 18 µg of tiotropium once daily (tiotropium group). The patients in the tiotropium group received tiotropium for more than 1 week before surgery and for 2 weeks after surgery. Spirometry was performed prior to group assignment and at 2 weeks after surgery. Postoperative complications, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in second to forced vital capacity (%) were compared between the two groups. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, body mass index, smoking, gastrectomy incision, operation time, and bleeding volume (all P>0.05). Postoperative complications and pulmonary functions did not differ significantly between the control and tiotropium groups. A subgroup analysis of gastric cancer patients with moderate COPD showed that perioperative tiotropium intervention significantly decreased the rate of postoperative complications compared with the control group (P=0.046). However, even after gastrectomy, many patients with mild COPD in both the control and tiotropium groups showed improved pulmonary function. Conclusion Although perioperative tiotropium intervention had no significant effects in gastric cancer patients with mild COPD, it may be beneficial in those with moderate COPD. Therefore, the next prospective study

  20. Preliminary results of a phase I/II trial of paclitaxel in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Bokemeyer, C; Schmoll, H J; Natt, F; Knoche, M; Beyer, J; Souchon, R

    1994-01-01

    Paclitaxel represents a novel antitumour agent with demonstrated activity in cisplatin-sensitive tumours, particularly ovarian cancer. In addition, responses to paclitaxel have been observed in patients with cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer. The role of paclitaxel in the treatment of testicular cancer has not been explored so far. Despite the generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic testicular cancer, patients with relapsed disease not responding to platin-based salvage chemotherapy have an extremely poor prognosis. In a phase I/II trial 10 patients with relapsed, cisplatin-refractory malignant germ-cell tumours were treated with paclitaxel as 6-h infusions (8 patients) or 3-h infusions (2 patients) at doses from 135 mg/m2 to 310 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Three patients achieved a response to paclitaxel, but disease recurred shortly in two patients after two and four cycles of therapy, respectively. One patient has remained in marker-negative partial response for more than 5 months. The toxicity of paclitaxel was tolerable for a dose range from 135 mg/m2 to 225 mg/m2. Granulocytopenia, WHO grades 3 and 4, occurred in all patients but was of short duration (median 3 days; range: 2-7 days). Other toxicities such as mucositis (5 patients grade 1), neurotoxicity (1 patient grade 1, 2 patients grade 2), infection (1 patient grade 3) and diarrhoea (1 patient grade 2) were not dose-limiting. There were no hypersensitivity reactions, but 1 patient developed severe myalgias during therapy with paclitaxel. Six patients with documented cisplatin-refractory disease were retreated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy after paclitaxel treatment and, in 4 of these, tumour responses of 3, 4, 5 and more than 5 months duration were achieved. In order to explore the role of paclitaxel in relapsed and/or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer a phase II study using a 3-h infusion of 225 mg/m2 paclitaxel every 3 weeks, conducted by the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

  1. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borad, Mitesh J.; Reddy, Shantan G.; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E.; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L.; Schelman, William R.; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J.; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A.; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m2 (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m2 (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Results Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (−5,398 v −549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302–related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. Conclusion PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study

  2. Phase II Study of Vinorelbine and Estramustine in Combination With Conformational Radiotherapy for Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan; Nogue, Miguel; Sole, Josep M.; Foro, Palmira; Domenech, Montserrat; Suarez, Marta; Gallardo, Enrique; Garcia, Dario; Ferrer, Ferran; Gelabert-Mas, Antoni; Gayo, Javier; Fabregat, Xavier

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients received estramustine, 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily, and vinorelbine, 25 mg/m{sup 2}, on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for three cycles in combination with 8 weeks of 3D-CRT (total dose of 70.2 gray [Gy] at 1.8-Gy fractions or 70 Gy at 2.0-Gy fractions). Additionally, patients received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for 3 years. Results: All patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52-86). All patients who relapsed had only biochemical relapse. The most frequent severe toxicities were cystitis (16% of patients), leucopenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), neutropenia (8% of patients), and proctitis (8% of patients). Six patients (12%) did not complete study treatment due to the patient's decision (n = 1) and to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity, proctitis, paralytic ileus, and acute myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with 3D-CRT is a safe and effective regimen for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial is needed to determine whether the results of this regimen are an improvement over the results obtained with radiotherapy and androgen ablation.

  3. A randomised phase II multicentre trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) using four different schedules in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, N E; Kuppens, I E L M; Moiseyenko, V; Glimelius, B; Kjaer, M; Starkhammer, H; Richel, D J; Smaaland, R; Bertelsen, K; Poulsen, J P; Voznyi, E; Norum, J; Fennelly, D; Tveit, K M; Garin, A; Gruia, G; Mourier, A; Sibaud, D; Lefebvre, P; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; ten Bokkel Huinink, W W

    2004-10-18

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to compare the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of four irinotecan schedules for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. In total, 174 5-fluorouracil pretreated patients were randomised to: arm A (n=41), 350 mg m(-2) irinotecan as a 90-min i.v. infusion q3 weeks; arm B (n=38), 125 mg m(-2) irinotecan as a 90-min i.v. infusion weekly x 4 weeks q6 weeks; arm C (n=46), 250 mg m(-2) irinotecan as a 90-min i.v. infusion q2 weeks; or arm D (n=49), 10 mg m(-2) day(-1) irinotecan as a 14-day continuous infusion q3 weeks. No significant differences in efficacy across the four arms were observed, although a shorter time to treatment failure was noted for arm D (1.7 months; P=0.02). Overall response rates were in the range 5-11%. Secondary end points included median survival (6.4-9.4 months), and time to progression (2.7-3.8 months) and treatment failure (1.7-3.2 months). Similarly, there were no significant differences in the incidence of grade 3-4 toxicities, although the toxicity profile between arms A, B, and C and D did differ. Generally, significantly less haematologic toxicity, alopecia and cholinergic syndrome were observed in arm D; however, there was a trend for increased gastrointestinal toxicity. Irinotecan is an effective and safe second-line treatment for colorectal cancer. The schedules examined yielded equivalent results, indicating that there is no advantage of the prolonged vs short infusion schedules. PMID:15381932

  4. A phase II, randomized study of aprepitant in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapies in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    ARIDOME, KUNIAKI; MORI, SHIN-ICHIROU; BABA, KENJI; YANAGI, MASAYUKI; HAMANOUE, MASAHIRO; MIYAZONO, FUTOSHI; TOKUDA, KOUKI; IMAMURA, HIROSHI; OGURA, YOSHITO; KANEKO, KOUICHI; KIJIMA, FUMIO; MAEMURA, KOUSEI; ISHIGAMI, SUMIYA; NATSUGOE, SHOJI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to study the efficacy of aprepitant in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) for colorectal cancer (CRC), and comprised a multicenter, phase II, open-label, randomized, parallel comparative study conducted as part of the Kagoshima aprepitant study for colon cancer in Japan. Patients with advanced or recurrent CRC were treated with standard MEC regimens (FOLFOX, XELOX or FOLFIRI) and received either standard chemotherapy [5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist (5-HT3RA) + dexamethasone] or aprepitant regimen chemotherapy (5-HT3 RA + reduced-dose dexamethasone + aprepitant). The primary endpoint of the present study was the proportion of patients who achieved a complete response (CR) during the overall, acute, and delayed phases of the first planned chemotherapy cycle. Secondary endpoints were complete protection, the proportions of patients without emetic episodes or nausea, patients with no more than moderate nausea during the overall, acute and delayed phases, and the time to treatment failure. The CR rates in the overall, acute and delayed phases were similar in the aprepitant and the standard-regimen groups. Additionally, there were no significant differences in secondary endpoints between the two groups. In summary, aprepitant in combination with 5-HT3 RA and reduced-dose corticosteroids was well tolerated and effective in preventing CINV associated with moderately emetogenic antitumor agents in Japanese patients with CRC. PMID:26998290

  5. Peripheral blood cells from weight-losing cancer patients control the hepatic acute phase response by a primarily interleukin-6 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Riordain, M G; Falconer, J S; Maingay, J; Fearon, K C; Ross, J A

    1999-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is associated with an elevated hepatic acute phase protein response, poor outcome and elevated cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This study investigates the mechanism by which PBMC can induce a hepatic acute phase response. Supernatants from the peripheral blood cells of cancer patients induced significantly higher C-reactive protein (CRP) from hepatocytes (198+/-21 ng ml-1) than did supernatants from healthy controls (64+/-20, p<0.005). CRP production in vitro correlated with IL-6 production by PBMC from patients with pancreatic cancer (r=0.76, p<0.0001). This C-reactive protein production was reduced by 84% using neutralising antibody to IL-6 (p<0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between PBMC-induced hepatocyte C-reactive protein production and survival (r=-0.45, p<0.01). PBMC from cancer patients induce the hepatic acute phase response via a primarily IL-6-dependent mechanism. PMID:10493968

  6. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2 in refractory cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pautier, Patricia; Locher, Clara; Robert, Caroline; Deroussent, Alain; Flament, Caroline; Le Cesne, Axel; Rey, Annie; Bahleda, Ratislav; Ribrag, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vassal, Gilles; Eggermont, Alexander; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie; Paci, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a small molecule inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases. In addition to its direct effect on malignant cells, it has been suggested IM may activate of natural killer (NK) cells, hence exerting immunomodulatory functions. In preclinical settings, improved antitumor responses have been observed when IM and interleukin-2 (IL-2), a cytokine that enhances NK cells functions, were combined. The goals of this study were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of IL-2 combined with IM at a constant dose of 400 mg, the pharmacokinetics of IM and IL-2, as well as toxicity and clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic regimen in patients affected by advanced tumors. The treatment consisted in 50 mg/day cyclophosphamide from 21 d before the initiation of IM throughout the first IM cycle (from D-21 to D14), 400 mg/day IM for 14 d (D1 to D14) combined with escalating doses of IL-2 (3, 6, 9 and 12 MIU/day) from days 10 to 14. This treatment was administered at three week intervals to 17 patients. Common side effects of the combination were mild to moderate, including fever, chills, fatigue, nausea and hepatic enzyme elevation. IL-2 dose level II, 6 MIU/day, was determined as the MTD with the following dose-limiting toxicities: systemic capillary leak syndrome, fatigue and anorexia. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the area under the curve and the maximum concentration of IM and its main metabolite CGP74588 increased significantly when IM was concomitantly administered with IL-2. In contrast, IM did not modulate IL-2 pharmacokinetics. No objective responses were observed. The best response obtained was stable disease in 8/17 (median duration: 12 weeks). Finally, IL-2 augmented the impregnation of IM and its metabolite. The combination of IM (400 mg/day) and IL-2 (6 MIU/day) in tumors that express IM targets warrants further investigation. PMID:23525192

  7. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  8. Phase I study of intravenously applied bispecific antibody in renal cell cancer patients receiving subcutaneous interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Kroesen, B. J.; Buter, J.; Sleijfer, D. T.; Janssen, R. A.; van der Graaf, W. T.; The, T. H.; de Leij, L.; Mulder, N. H.

    1994-01-01

    In a phase I trial the toxicity and immunomodulatory effects of combined treatment with intravenous (i.v.) bispecific monoclonal antibody BIS-1 and subcutaneous (s.c.) interleukin 2 (IL-2) was studied in renal cell cancer patients. BIS-1 combines a specificity against CD3 on T lymphocytes with a specificity against a 40 kDa pancarcinoma-associated antigen, EGP-2. Patients received BIS-1 F(ab')2 fragments intravenously at doses of 1, 3 and 5 micrograms kg-1 body weight during a concomitantly given standard s.c. IL-2 treatment. For each dose, four patients were treated with a 2 h BIS-1 infusion in the second and fourth week of IL-2 therapy. Acute BIS-1 F(ab')2-related toxicity with symptoms of chills, peripheral vasoconstriction and temporary dyspnoea was observed in 2/4 and 5/5 patients at the 3 and 5 micrograms kg-1 dose level respectively. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of BIS-1 F(ab')2 was 5 micrograms kg-1. Elevated plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) were detected at the MTD. Flow cytometric analysis showed a dose-dependent binding of BIS-1 F(ab')2 to circulating T lymphocytes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated after treatment with 3 and 5 micrograms kg-1 BIS-1, showed increased specific cytolytic capacity against EGP-2+ tumour cells as tested in an ex vivo performed assay. Maximal killing capacity of the PBMCs, as assessed by adding excess BIS-1 to the assay, was shown to be decreased after BIS-1 infusion at 5 micrograms kg-1 BIS-1 F(ab')2. A BIS-1 F(ab')2 dose-dependent disappearance of circulating mononuclear cells from the peripheral blood was observed. Within the circulating CD3+ CD8+ lymphocyte population. LFA-1 alpha-bright and HLA-DR+ T-cell numbers decreased preferentially. It is concluded that i.v. BIS-1 F(ab')2, when combined with s.c. IL-2, has a MTD of 5 micrograms kg-1. The treatment endows the T lymphocytes with a specific anti-EGP-2-directed cytotoxic potential. PMID

  9. Phase I clinical trial of hepatic arterial infusion of cisplatin in combination with intravenous liposomal doxorubicin in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, Stacy; Fu, Siqing; Wen, Sijin; Naing, Aung; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Daring, Shawn; Uehara, Cynthia; Ng, Chaan; Wallace, Michael; Camacho, Luis; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) cisplatin and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement. Methods Patients were treated with HAI cisplatin 100–125 mg/m2 (and 3,000 IU heparin) intraarterially and liposomal doxorubicin (doxil) 20–35 mg/m2 IV (day 1) every 28 days. A “3 + 3” study design was used. Results Thirty patients were treated (median age, 56 years). Diagnoses were breast cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 8), ocular melanoma (n = 4), and other (n = 7). The median number of prior therapies was 5. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was at the 100/35 mg/m2 level. Dose-limiting toxicities were Grade 4 neutropenia (2 of 4 patients), and Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n = 1) at the cisplatin 125 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2 dose level. The most common toxicities were nausea/vomiting and fatigue. Of 24 patients evaluable for response, 4 (17%) had a partial response (PR) and 7 (29%) had stable disease (SD) for ≥4 months. Of the 11 patients with breast cancer, 3 (27%) had a PR and 5 (45%) had SD for ≥4 months. Of 4 patients with ocular melanoma, 1 had a PR and 1 SD for 4 months. One patient with hepatocellular carcinoma had SD for 4 months. Of 12 evaluable patients treated at the MTD, 2 (17%) had a PR and 5 (42%) had SD. Conclusion The MTD was HAI cisplatin 100 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2. This regimen demonstrated anti-tumor activity, especially in breast cancer. PMID:20204368

  10. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  11. Capecitabine in patients with breast cancer relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation--a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Bokemeyer, C; Knop, S; Schupp, M; Mayer, F; Kanz, L

    2002-04-01

    Capecitabine, a tumor-selective, oral fluoropyrimidine, has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer. In this open-label monocenter phase II study the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer who relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy was examined. Female patients 18-65 years of age, with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, who relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy (adjuvant and/or metastatic) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and who had been treated in their course of the disease with an anthracycline and/or an anthracycline/taxane containing regimen were included into this clinical study. Capecitabine was applied as the first salvage chemotherapy at relapse after high-dose chemotherapy (1250 mg/m(2) b.i.d. p.o. for 14 days followed by 7 days rest period). Responding patients or those with stable disease after two treatment cycles were offered to continue treatment until tumor progression. Response rate, time to disease progression, survival, toxicity and quality of life were assessed. Fourteen patients between 35 and 60 years (median 45.5 years) entered this study and received a median number of 5 cycles (range 1-19) of capecitabine. All patients were evaluable for response. All patients had been pretreated with 1-2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy plus PBSCT. Furthermore, 13 patients had additionally received local radiotherapy. On average, the patients showed metastatic disease in two organ sites (range 1-4 sites). One patient obtained a complete response and five patients a partial response, accounting for a response rate of 42.9% [95% confidence interval (17.7%; 71.1%)]. All responses were already achieved at the first observation time point 6 weeks after treatment initiation. Two further patients obtained stable disease for at least 12 weeks. At the time of final analysis all patients have progressed. Median

  12. Tetracaine oral gel in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Final results of a phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Alterio, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.alterio@ieo.it; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Zuccotti, Gabriele Fulvio Phar; Leon, Maria Elena; Omodeo Sale, Emanuela Phar; Pasetti, Marcella; Modena, Tiziana Phar; Perugini, Paola; Mariani, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a phase II study to assess feasibility, pain relief, and toxicity of a tetracaine-based oral gel in the treatment of radiotherapy (RT)-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with RT for head-and-neck cancer with clinical evidence of acute oral mucositis of grade {>=}2 were scheduled to receive the tetracaine gel. A questionnaire evaluating the effect of the gel was given to all subjects. Results: In 38 patients (79.2%), a reduction in oral cavity pain was reported. Thirty-four patients (82.9%) reported no side effect. Seventy-one percent of patients had no difficulties in gel application. Unpleasant taste of the gel and interference with food taste were noticed in 5 (12%) and 16 patients (39%), respectively. Planned RT course was interrupted less frequently in patients who reported benefit from gel application than in patients who did not (p = 0.014). None of the patients who experienced pain relief needed a nasogastric tube, opposite to the patients who did not report any benefit from gel application (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Tetracaine oral gel administration seemed feasible and safe while reducing RT-induced mucositis-related oral pain in a sizeable proportion of treated head-and-neck cancer patients. A trial designed to compare efficacy of this gel vs. standard treatment is warranted.

  13. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  14. A phase I trial of DNA vaccination with a plasmid expressing prostate-specific antigen in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, M; Roos, A-K; Lundqvist, A; Palmborg, A; Miller, A M; Ozenci, V; Bergman, B; Egevad, L; Hellström, M; Kiessling, R; Masucci, G; Wersäll, P; Nilsson, S; Pisa, P

    2004-08-16

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease secreted at low levels by normal luminal epithelial cells of the prostate and in significantly higher levels by prostate cancer cells. Therefore, PSA is a potential target for various immunotherapeutical approaches against prostate cancer. DNA vaccination has been investigated as immunotherapy for infectious diseases in patients and for specific treatment of cancer in certain animal models. In animal studies, we have demonstrated that vaccination with plasmid vector pVAX/PSA results in PSA-specific cellular response and protection against tumour challenge. The purpose of the trial was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and biological efficacy of pVAX/PSA vaccine in the clinic. A phase I trial of pVAX/PSA, together with cytokine granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (Molgramostim) and IL-2 (Aldesleukin) as vaccine adjuvants, was carried out in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer. To evaluate the biologically active dose, the vaccine was administered during five cycles in doses of 100, 300 and 900 microg, with three patients in each cohort. Eight patients were evaluable. A PSA-specific cellular immune response, measured by IFN-gamma production against recombinant PSA protein, and a rise in anti-PSA IgG were detected in two of three patients after vaccination in the highest dose cohort. A decrease in the slope of PSA was observed in the two patients exhibiting IFN-gamma production to PSA. No adverse effects (WHO grade >2) were observed in any dose cohort. We demonstrate that DNA vaccination with a PSA-coding plasmid vector, given with GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with prostate cancer, is safe and in doses of 900 microg the vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immune responses against PSA protein. PMID:15280930

  15. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity Is Not a Common Effect in Normal Asynchronous and G2-Phase Fibroblasts of Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Słonina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Kabat, Damian; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Gasińska, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: In our previous study, using the micronucleus assay, a low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS)-like phenomenon was observed for normal fibroblasts of 2 of the 40 cancer patients investigated. In this article we report, for the first time, the survival response of primary fibroblasts from 25 of these patients to low-dose irradiation and answer the question regarding the effect of G2-phase enrichment on HRS elicitation. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic survival of asynchronous as well as G2-phase enriched fibroblast populations was measured. Separation of G2-phase cells and precise cell counting was performed using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Sorted and plated cells were irradiated with single doses (0.1-4 Gy) of 6-MV x-rays. For each patient, at least 4 independent experiments were performed, and the induced-repair model was fitted over the whole data set to confirm the presence of HRS effect. Results: The HRS response was demonstrated for the asynchronous and G2-phase enriched cell populations of 4 patients. For the rest of patients, HRS was not defined in either of the 2 fibroblast populations. Thus, G2-phase enrichment had no effect on HRS elicitation. Conclusions: The fact that low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity is not a common effect in normal human fibroblasts implies that HRS may be of little consequence in late-responding connective tissues with regard to radiation fibrosis.

  16. Phase I trial of vandetanib in combination with gemcitabine and capecitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors with an expanded cohort in pancreatic and biliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Elizabeth R; Eckhardt, S Gail; Pitts, Todd M; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L; O'byrant, Cindy L; Messersmith, Wells A; Nallapreddy, Sujatha; Weekes, Colin; Spratlin, Jennifer; Lieu, Christopher H; Kane, Madeleine A; Eppers, Sarah; Freas, Elizabeth; Leong, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Background Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that affects vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and rearranged during transfection (RET) mediated receptors which are important for growth and invasion of biliary and pancreatic cancers. This phase I study evaluated the safety profile of vandetanib in combination with standard doses of gemcitabine and capecitabine in order to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods In this single center phase I trial, patients received gemcitabine intravenously (IV) at 1000 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 in a 28 day cycle, capecitabine orally at 850 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1-21, and escalating doses of vandetanib (200 or 300 mg orally daily). Once the MTD was defined, an expansion cohort of patients with advanced biliary cancers and locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer was enrolled. Blood samples were also collected at predetermined time points for biomarker analysis. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled: 9 in the dose escalation and 14 in the dose expansion cohort. One dose limiting toxicity (DLT), of grade 4 neutropenia, occurred in the 200 mg vandetanib cohort. The most common adverse effects were diarrhea (39 %), nausea and vomiting (34 %), and rash (33 %). There were 3 partial responses and stable disease of >2 months (range 2-45, median 5) was observed in 15/23 patients. There was no association between changes in biomarker analytes and disease response. Conclusion The combination of gemcitabine, capecitabine and vandetanib is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 weekly for three consecutive weeks, capecitabine 850 mg/m2 BID days 1-21, and vandetanib 300 mg daily, every 28 days. This combination demonstrated promising activity in pancreaticobiliary cancers and further evaluation is warranted in these diseases. NCT00551096. PMID:26715573

  17. Efficacy and safety of lipegfilgrastim versus pegfilgrastim: a randomized, multicenter, active-control phase 3 trial in patients with breast cancer receiving doxorubicin/docetaxel chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lipegfilgrastim is a novel glyco-pegylated granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in development for neutropenia prophylaxis in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. This phase III, double-blind, randomized, active-controlled, noninferiority trial compared the efficacy and safety of lipegfilgrastim versus pegfilgrastim in chemotherapy-naïve breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin/docetaxel chemotherapy. Methods Patients with high-risk stage II, III, or IV breast cancer and an absolute neutrophil count ≥1.5 × 109 cells/L were randomized to a single 6-mg subcutaneous injection of lipegfilgrastim (n = 101) or pegfilgrastim (n = 101) on day 2 of each 21-day chemotherapy cycle (4 cycles maximum). The primary efficacy endpoint was the duration of severe neutropenia during cycle 1. Results Cycle 1: The mean duration of severe neutropenia for the lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim groups was 0.7 and 0.8 days, respectively (λ = −0.218 [95% confidence interval: –0.498%, 0.062%], p = 0.126), and no severe neutropenia was observed in 56% and 49% of patients in the lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim groups, respectively. All cycles: In the efficacy population, febrile neutropenia occurred in three pegfilgrastim-treated patients (all in cycle 1) and zero lipegfilgrastim-treated patients. Drug-related adverse events in the safety population were reported in 28% and 26% of patients i006E the lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim groups, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrates that lipegfilgrastim 6 mg is as effective as pegfilgrastim in reducing neutropenia in patients with breast cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Trial Registration Eudra EEACTA200901599910 The study protocol, two global amendments (Nos. 1 and 2), informed consent documents, and other appropriate study-related documents were reviewed and approved by the Ministry of Health of Ukraine Central Ethics Committee and local independent ethics committees

  18. A phase II trial of dasatinib in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated previously with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Przemyslaw W; Beumer, Jan H; Chen, C S; Kraft, Andrew S; Chatta, Gurkamal S; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Ye, Wei; Christner, Susan M; Lilly, Michael B

    2013-08-01

    There is a need for efficacious therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after disease progression on docetaxel. The SRC tyrosine kinase and its related family members may be important drivers of prostate cancer and can be inhibited by dasatinib. mCRPC patients, after one previous chemotherapy, started dasatinib at 70 mg twice daily, amended to 100 mg daily. The primary endpoint was the disease control (DC) rate, defined as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) in prostate specific antigen (PSA), RECIST, bone scan, and FACT-P score. Up to 41 patients were to be accrued (two-stage design, 21+20) to rule out a null-hypothesized effect of 5 versus 20% (α=0.05, β=0.1). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic correlatives. Of 38 patients, 27 were evaluable for response or toxicity. The median duration of therapy was 55 days (6-284). Five patients showed DC after 8 weeks of therapy (18.5% DC, 95% CI: 6.3-38.1%). One PR (3.7% response rate, 95% CI: 0.1-19.0%) was observed in a patient treated for 284 days. Twelve patients (43%) discontinued treatment for toxicity. Dasatinib induced a decrease in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CSF2, CD40L, GZMB, and IL-2 mRNAs in blood cells, indicating target engagement. Decreases in plasma IL-6 and bone alkaline phosphatase, and in urinary N-telopeptide, were associated with DC. Dasatinib has definite but limited activity in advanced mCRPC, and was poorly tolerated. The observation of a patient with prolonged, objective, clinically significant benefit warrants molecular profiling to select the appropriate patient population. PMID:23652277

  19. A phase II trial of dasatinib in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated previously with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Twardowski, Przemyslaw W.; Beumer, Jan H.; Chen, C.S.; Kraft, Andrew S.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Ye, Wei; Christner, Susan M.; Lilly, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for efficacious therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after disease progression on docetaxel. The SRC tyrosine kinase and its related family members may be important drivers of prostate cancer and can be inhibited by dasatinib. mCRPC patients, after one previous chemotherapy, started dasatinib at 70mg twice daily, amended to 100mg daily. The primary endpoint was the disease control (DC) rate, defined as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) in prostate specific antigen (PSA), RECIST, bone scan, and FACT-P score. Up to 41 patients were to be accrued (two-stage design, 21+20) to rule out a null-hypothesized effect of 5 versus 20% (α=0.05, β=0.1). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic correlatives. Of 38 patients, 27 were evaluable for response or toxicity. The median duration of therapy was 55 days (6–284). Five patients showed DC after 8 weeks of therapy (18.5% DC, 95% CI: 6.3–38.1%). One PR (3.7% response rate, 95% CI: 0.1–19.0%) was observed in a patient treated for 284 days. Twelve patients (43%) discontinued treatment for toxicity. Dasatinib induced a decrease in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CSF2, CD40L, GZMB, and IL-2 mRNAs in blood cells, indicating target engagement. Decreases in plasma IL-6 and bone alkaline phosphatase, and in urinary N-telopeptide, were associated with DC. Dasatinib has definite but limited activity in advanced mCRPC, and was poorly tolerated. The observation of a patient with prolonged, objective, clinically significant benefit warrants molecular profiling to select the appropriate patient population. PMID:23652277

  20. Phase II Trial of Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer That Progressed During Prior Trastuzumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, José; Gelmon, Karen A.; Verma, Shailendra; Wardley, Andrew; Conte, PierFranco; Miles, David; Bianchi, Giulia; Cortes, Javier; McNally, Virginia A.; Ross, Graham A.; Fumoleau, Pierre; Gianni, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pertuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –targeted monoclonal antibody, potently inhibits HER2 dimerization and HER-mediated signaling pathways. Pertuzumab and the approved HER2-targeted monoclonal antibody trastuzumab have complementary mechanisms of action and result in enhanced antitumor activity when combined. This phase II trial assessed the efficacy and safety profile of the combination in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer whose disease had progressed during prior trastuzumab-based therapy. Patients and Methods This was a multicenter, open-label, single-arm, Simon two-stage study. Patients with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer in whom disease progression had occurred during prior trastuzumab-based therapy received trastuzumab weekly (4 mg/kg loading dose, then 2 mg/kg every week) or every 3 weeks (8 mg/kg loading dose, then 6 mg/kg every 3 weeks) and pertuzumab every 3 weeks (840 mg loading dose, then 420 mg every 3 weeks). Treatment continued until disease progression or excessive toxicity. Results All 66 patients were assessable for efficacy and safety. The objective response rate was 24.2%, and the clinical benefit rate was 50%. Five patients (7.6%) experienced a complete response, 11 patients (16.7%) experienced a partial response, and 17 patients (25.8%) experienced stable disease of ≥ 6 months. Median progression-free survival was 5.5 months. Overall, the combination of pertuzumab and trastuzumab was well tolerated, and adverse events were mild to moderate. Cardiac dysfunction was minimal, and no patients withdrew as a result of cardiac-related adverse events. Conclusion The combination of pertuzumab and trastuzumab is active and well tolerated in patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer who had experienced progression during prior trastuzumab therapy. PMID:20124182

  1. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  2. Randomized Phase II Trial of Onartuzumab in Combination With Erlotinib in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spigel, David R.; Ervin, Thomas J.; Ramlau, Rodryg A.; Daniel, Davey B.; Goldschmidt, Jerome H.; Blumenschein, George R.; Krzakowski, Maciej J.; Robinet, Gilles; Godbert, Benoit; Barlesi, Fabrice; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Patel, Taral; Orlov, Sergey V.; Wertheim, Michael S.; Yu, Wei; Zha, Jiping; Yauch, Robert L.; Patel, Premal H.; Phan, See-Chun; Peterson, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Increased hepatocyte growth factor/MET signaling is associated with poor prognosis and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) –targeted drugs in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated whether dual inhibition of MET/EGFR results in clinical benefit in patients with NSCLC. Patients and Methods Patients with recurrent NSCLC were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to receive onartuzumab plus erlotinib or placebo plus erlotinib; crossover was allowed at progression. Tumor tissue was required to assess MET status by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Coprimary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) and MET-positive (MET IHC diagnostic positive) populations; additional end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, and safety. Results There was no improvement in PFS or OS in the ITT population (n = 137; PFS hazard ratio [HR], 1.09; P = .69; OS HR, 0.80; P = .34). MET-positive patients (n = 66) treated with erlotinib plus onartuzumab showed improvement in both PFS (HR, .53; P = .04) and OS (HR, .37; P = .002). Conversely, clinical outcomes were worse in MET-negative patients treated with onartuzumab plus erlotinib (n = 62; PFS HR, 1.82; P = .05; OS HR, 1.78; P = .16). MET-positive control patients had worse outcomes versus MET-negative control patients (n = 62; PFS HR, 1.71; P = .06; OS HR, 2.61; P = .004). Incidence of peripheral edema was increased in onartuzumab-treated patients. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib was associated with improved PFS and OS in the MET-positive population. These results combined with the worse outcomes observed in MET-negative patients treated with onartuzumab highlight the importance of diagnostic testing in drug development. PMID:24101053

  3. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  4. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231. PMID:27476518

  5. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  6. Insomnia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Joseph F

    2004-01-01

    Insomnia affects up to 50% of patients with cancer, but has received little attention from the oncology community compared with other symptoms such as pain and fatigue. Insomnia and subsequent sleep disturbances can lead to fatigue, mood disturbances, and contribute to immunosuppression, which can have a profound impact on quality of life and perhaps affect the course of disease. Insomnia in cancer patients must be distinguished from cancer-related fatigue. Although they are 2 distinct conditions, insomnia and fatigue are interrelated. Insomnia often leads to daytime fatigue that interferes with normal functioning. Conversely, daytime fatigue can lead to behaviors such as napping, which result in insomnia. The primary goal of insomnia treatment should first be to relieve any underlying disorder (eg, cancer pain, depression, anxiety) that may be causing the sleep disturbance. Because insomnia in this patient population may be due to a variety of causes, treatment must be multimodal and include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. A plan that combines attention to sleep hygiene and cognitive-behavioral therapy with prescription of hypnotic medications can help relieve the symptoms of insomnia in cancer patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:15675652

  7. A pilot phase II Study of digoxin in patients with recurrent prostate cancer as evident by a rising PSA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianqing; Zhan, Tingting; Duffy, Danielle; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Kilpatrick, Deborah; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Chervoneva, Inna; Limentani, Kimberly; Kennedy, Brooke; Kessler, Sarah; Gomella, Leonard; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Carducci, Michael A.; Force, Thomas; Kelly, Wm. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Digoxin was found to inhibit prostate cancer (PCa) growth via the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis in a mouse model. We hypothesized that a therapeutic dose of digoxin could inhibit human PCa growth and disease progression. Methods An open label, single arm pilot study was performed. Patients (pts) with non-metastatic, biochemically relapsed PCa with prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) of 3–24 months and no hormonal therapy within the past 6 months were enrolled. All pts had testosterone > 50 ng/dL at baseline. Digoxin was taken daily with dose titration to achieve a target therapeutic level (0.8 – 2 ng/ml); patients had routine follow-up including cardiac monitoring with 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) and digoxin levels. The primary endpoint was the proportion of pts at 6 months post-treatment with a PSADT ≥ 200% from the baseline. HIF-1α downstream molecule vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in plasma. Results Sixteen pts were enrolled and 14 pts finished the planned 6 months of treatment. Twenty percent (3/15) of the pts had PSA decrease >25% from baseline with a medium duration of 14 months. At 6 months, 5 of 13 (38%) pts had PSADT ≥ 200% of the baseline PSADT and were continued on study for an additional 24 weeks of treatment. Two patients had durable PSA response for more than 1 year. Digoxin was well tolerated with possible relation of one grade 3 back pain. No patients had evidence of digoxin toxicity. The digoxin dose was lowered in 2 patients for significant ECGs changes (sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation), and there were probable digoxin-related ECG changes in 3 patients. Plasma VEGF was detected in 4 (25%) patients. Conclusions Digoxin was well tolerated and showed a prolongation of PSDAT in 38% of the patients. However, there was no significant difference comparing that of similar patients on placebo from historical data. Digoxin at the dose used in this study may have limited benefit for

  8. ZD9331 as second- or third-line therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a phase II multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Keller, A; Canfield, V; Parker, G; Douglass, E

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of ZD9331 as second- or third-line treatment for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC). One hundred patients were recruited to the study: 45 in group 1 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen) and 55 in group 2 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen and second-line irinotecan). Patients received ZD9331 as a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle, and treatment continued until disease progression (PD) or withdrawal. After a median of 4 cycles of treatment, there were no objective responses in group 1 (N = 37), 25 (67.6%) patients had a best overall response of stable disease (SD), and 12 (32.4%) had PD. After a median of 3 cycles of treatment, there were 2 (4.5%) partial responses in group 2 (N = 44), 21 (47.7%) patients had a best overall response of SD, 20 (45.4%) had PD, and 1 (2.3%) had clinical progression. At data cut-off, 59.5% and 77.3% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, had PD. The main adverse events were neutropenia (69%), fatigue (53%), nausea (46%), and diarrhea (40%), and most (72.3%) were grade I/II. ZD9331 demonstrated minimal antitumor activity, and manageable toxicity, in the second- or third-line treatment of aCRC. PMID:15289725

  9. A Prospective Randomised Phase III Clinical Trial Testing the Role of Prophylactic Cranial Radiotherapy in Patients Treated with Trastuzumab for Metastatic Breast Cancer - Anglo Celtic VII.

    PubMed

    Canney, P; Murray, E; Dixon-Hughes, J; Lewsley, L-A; Paul, J

    2015-08-01

    A high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases has been reported in patients with HER2-positive tumours receiving trastuzumab therapy for metastatic breast cancer. This study tested whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) could reduce the incidence of CNS metastases in this setting. This was a prospective, randomised phase III trial. Patients were randomised 1:1 to no PCI or PCI delivered at around 6 weeks after study entry. Cognitive function was assessed prospectively. In total, 51 patients were randomised over a 3 year period; 25 received PCI and 26 did not. The cumulative incidence of CNS metastases at 2 years was 32.4% (standard error = 9.8%) on the no PCI arm and 21.0% (standard error = 8.6%) on the PCI arm; the associated hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.18-1.74; P = 0.32). There was no evidence of cognitive dysfunction in PCI patients. PMID:25976296

  10. A Phase II study of acute toxicity for Celebrex{sup TM} (celecoxib) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0128

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Dicker, Adam P.; Miller, Brigitte; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ryu, Janice; Avizonis, Vilija; Fromm, Mitch; Greven, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size {>=}5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered every 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer.

  11. Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Sacha; Bucher, Stephan E.; Bernier, Jacques; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zouhair, Aberrahim; Ries, Gerhard; Lombrieser, Norbert; Lippuner, Thomas; Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

  12. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Afonso, Sergio Luis; Cardoso Tavares, Vivian; Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  13. Docetaxel in combination with 5-fluorouracil in patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy: a phase I, dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Lortholary, A; Maillard, P; Delva, R; Boisdron-Celle, M; Perard, D; Vernillet, L; Besenval, M; Gamelin, E

    2000-09-01

    This phase I study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose of docetaxel in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. 32 patients received docetaxel at 60, 75, 85 or 100 mg/m(2) by 1-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion, followed, after a 1-h interval, by 5-FU at 250, 350, 500 or 750 mg/m(2)/day by continuous infusion over 5 days every 3 weeks. Dose-limiting stomatitis defined the maximum tolerated dose at a docetaxel dose of 100 mg/m(2) with 5-FU 750 mg/m(2)/day. None of 5 patients treated at the previous dose level (docetaxel 85 mg/m(2) with 5-FU 750 mg/m(2)/day) had a dose-limiting toxicity in the first cycle, and this was, therefore, considered the recommended dose. The combination was generally well tolerated. Grade 4 neutropenia was common (29 patients; 91%), but no patient experienced febrile neutropenia of duration >3 days requiring i.v. antibiotics. An objective response was achieved by 18 patients overall (56%), and in 4 out of 5 patients treated with the determined recommended dose. No pharmacokinetic interaction between docetaxel and 5-fluorouracil was apparent. The activity of docetaxel 85 mg/m(2) with 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/m(2)/day will be explored more extensively in phase II studies of patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. PMID:10974625

  14. A Phase I Study of EKB-569 in Combination with Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laheru, Dan; Croghan, Gary; Bukowski, Ronald; Rudek, Michelle; Messersmith, Wells; Erlichman, Charles; Pelley, Robert; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross; Boni, Joseph; Abbas, Richat; Martins, Patricia; Zacharchuk, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), characterize the principal toxicities, and assess the pharmacokinetics of EKB-569, an oral selective irreversible inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, in combination with capecitabine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Experimental Design Patients were treated with EKB-569 daily for 21days and capecitabine twice daily for14 days of a 21-day cycle. The dose levels of EKB-569 (mg/day) and capecitabine (mg/m2 twice daily) assessed were 25/750, 50/750, 50/1,000 and 75/1,000. An expanded cohort was enrolled at the MTD to better study toxicity and efficacy. Samples of plasma were collected to characterize the pharmacokinetics of the agents. Treatment efficacy was assessed every other cycle. Results A total of 37 patients, the majority of whom had prior chemotherapy, received a total of 163 cycles of treatment. Twenty patients were treated at the MTD, 50 mg EKB-569, daily and 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhea and rash. No patients had complete or partial responses but 48% had stable disease. The conversion of capecitabine to 5-fluorouracil was higher for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine (321 ± 151 ng*h/mL) than for capecitabine alone (176 ± 62 ng*hours/mL; P = 0.0037). Conclusion In advanced colorectal cancer, 50 mg EKB-569 daily can be safely combined with 1,000 mg/m2 capecitabine twice a day. A statistically significant increase in plasma levels of 5-fluorouracil for the combination of EKB-569 and capecitabine may be due to the single-dose versus multiple-dose exposure difference, variability in exposure or a potential drug interaction. PMID:18765554

  15. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m{sup 2}/week, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  16. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  17. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the pre-treatment phase of final-line chemotherapy predicts the outcome of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KEIICHIRO; NAGASAKA, TAKESHI; NISHIDA, TAKESHI; HARUMA, TOMOKO; OGAWA, CHIKAKO; KUSUMOTO, TOMOYUKI; SEKI, NORIKO; HIRAMATSU, YUJI

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and tumor immunology are associated with prognosis in a variety of cancers. The aim of the present retrospective study was to identify associations between the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), cancer antigen 125 (CA125) concentrations, tumor response, performance status (PS) and survival of patients that developed recurrent ovarian cancer subsequent to receiving chemotherapy. The NLR and PLR measured prior to fourth-line chemotherapy were significantly increased compared with those measured prior to second-line chemotherapy (P=0.029 and 0.049, respectively). By using receiver operating characteristic curves, the cut-off values were determined for the NLR, PLR and CA125 levels that were measured during the pre-treatment phase, which predicted the outcomes. According to univariate analyses, pre-treatment NLR >3.91, PLR >299.0 and PS 2 were each significantly associated with poor outcomes (P=0.001, 0.005 and 0.021, respectively). According to multivariate analyses, only pre-treatment NLR was associated with poor outcome (P=0.035). The present findings indicate that pre-treatment NLR is an important predictor of prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer that experience recurrence following chemotherapy. PMID:27313726

  18. Phase I Trial of Neoadjuvant Preoperative Chemotherapy With S-1 and Irinotecan Plus Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takeo; Kokuba, Yukihito; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okayasu, Isao; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended dose (RD) of irinotecan combined with preoperative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: We gave preoperative radiotherapy (total dose, 45 Gy) to 23 patients with locally advanced (T3/T4) rectal cancer. Concurrently, S-1 was given orally at a fixed dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day on Days 1-5, 8-12, 22-26, and 29-33, and irinotecan was given as a 90-min continuous i.v. infusion on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29. The dose of irinotecan was initially 40 mg/m{sup 2}/day and gradually increased to determine the MTD and RD of this regimen. Results: Among the 4 patients who received 90 mg/m{sup 2} irinotecan, 2 had Grade 4 neutropenia and 1 had Grade 3 diarrhea. Because dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred in 3 of the 4 patients, 90 mg/m{sup 2} irinotecan was designated as the MTD. Consequently, 80 mg/m{sup 2} irinotecan was given to 7 additional patients, with no DLT, and this was considered the RD. Of the patients who received irinotecan at the RD or lower doses, 6 (31.6%) had a complete pathologic response (Grade 3) and 9 (47.4%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. Conclusions: With our new regimen, the MTD of irinotecan was 90 mg/m{sup 2}, and the RD of irinotecan for Phase II studies was 80 mg/m{sup 2}. Although our results are preliminary, this new neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was considered safe and active, meriting further investigation in Phase II studies.

  19. Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Papillary Histology Renal Cell Cancer: SWOG S0317

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Hussey, Michael; Nagle, Raymond B.; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Dutcher, Janice; Samlowski, Wolfram; Clark, Joseph I.; Quinn, David I.; Pan, Chong-Xian; Crawford, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell cancer (pRCC) have poor survival after systemic therapy; the reported median survival time is 7 to 17 months. In this trial, we evaluated the efficacy of erlotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with advanced pRCC, a tumor type associated with wild-type von Hippel Lindau gene. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed, advanced, or metastatic pRCC were treated with erlotinib 150 mg orally once daily. A RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) response rate (RR) of ≥ 20% was considered a promising outcome. Secondary end points included overall survival and 6-month probability of treatment failure. Results Of 52 patients registered, 45 were evaluable. The overall RR was 11% (five of 45 patients; 95% CI, 3% to 24%), and the disease control rate was 64% (ie five partial response and 24 stable disease). The median overall survival time was 27 months (95% CI, 13 to 36 months). Probability of freedom from treatment failure at 6 months was 29% (95% CI, 17% to 42%). There was one grade 5 adverse event (AE) of pneumonitis, one grade 4 thrombosis, and nine other grade 3 AEs. Conclusion Although the RECIST RR of 11% did not exceed prespecified estimates for additional study, single-agent erlotinib yielded disease control and survival outcomes of interest with an expected toxicity profile. The design of future trials of the EGFR axis in pRCC should be based on preclinical or molecular data that define appropriate patient subgroups, new drug combinations, or potentially more active alternative schedules. PMID:19884559

  20. Phase II Trial of Simple Oral Therapy with Capecitabine and Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: SWOG S0430

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, William E.; Albain, Kathy S.; Chew, Helen K.; Wade, James L.; Lanier, Keith S.; Lew, Danika L.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Gralow, Julie R.; Livingston, Robert B.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Interest in oral agents for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has increased because many patients prefer oral to i.v. regimens. We evaluated a simple oral combination of capecitabine with cyclophosphamide (CPA) for MBC. Methods. The trial was designed to determine whether or not combination therapy would achieve a 42% response rate (RR) using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) in MBC. Patients with two or fewer prior chemotherapy regimens for MBC were eligible. Those with estrogen receptor–positive MBC had to have progressed on endocrine therapy. Patients had measurable disease or elevated mucin (MUC)-1 antigen and received CPA, 100 mg daily on days 1–14, and capecitabine, 1,500 mg twice daily on days 8–21, in 21-day cycles. Results. In 96 eligible patients, the median progression-free survival (PFS) interval was 5.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7–8.0 months) and median overall survival (OS) time was 18.8 months (95% CI, 13.1–22.0 months). The RR was 36% (95% CI, 26%–48%) in 80 patients with measurable disease. The MUC-1 antigen RR was 33% (95% CI, 20%–48%), occurring in 15 of 46 patients with elevated MUC-1 antigen. Toxicity was mild, with no treatment-related deaths. Conclusions. PFS, OS, and RR outcomes with capecitabine plus CPA compare favorably with those of capecitabine monotherapy and combination therapy with bevacizumab, sorafenib, or ixabepilone. The addition of these other agents to capecitabine does not improve OS time in MBC patients, and this single-arm study does not suggest that the addition of CPA to capecitabine has this potential in an unselected MBC population. When OS prolongation is the goal, clinicians should choose single-agent capecitabine. PMID:22267853

  1. A phase 2, single-arm study of an autologous dendritic cell treatment against mucin 1 in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucin 1 antigen, highly expressed by epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), is a potential target for immunotherapy. A previous successful phase 1 trial was conducted in patients with adenocarcinoma who were injected with Cvac, autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) incubated with mannosylated mucin 1 protein (M-FP). The present study was a phase 2 trial of Cvac in patients with advanced EOC. Methods Eligible patients had EOC with progressive disease, defined as an increase in CA125 of ≥ 25% in 1 month. The primary endpoint was CA125 response or stabilization. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected by leukapheresis and cultured to generate DCs. The DC were incubated with M-FP, and after washing were prepared for injection into the patient intradermally every 4 weeks for 3 doses, then every 10 weeks for up to 12 months. Results All 28 patients recruited were evaluable for safety and 26 for efficacy. All had undergone surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, and 57% of patients received ≥ 3 chemotherapy regimens. There were no Grade 3 or 4 toxicities considered related to Cvac. Four patients showed CA125 response or stabilization (2 patients with major responses, 1 minor response, 1 stabilization) of median duration 10.3 months (5.3–16.3 months). An additional patient had > 25% CA125 reduction (not confirmed). Conclusions Cvac immunotherapy was well tolerated. Clinical activity in EOC was evident based on decline or stabilization of CA125 in some patients, supporting ongoing development of Cvac in ovarian carcinoma and planning of additional trials of patients in remission is currently underway. PMID:24995129

  2. Phase I study of capecitabine combined with radioembolization using yttrium-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres) in patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S J; Konski, A A; Putnam, S; Ball, D S; Meyer, J E; Yu, J Q; Astsaturov, I; Marlow, C; Dickens, A; Cade, D N; Meropol, N J

    2014-01-01

    Background: This was a prospective single-centre, phase I study to document the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and the recommended phase II dose for future study of capecitabine in combination with radioembolization. Methods: Patients with advanced unresectable liver-dominant cancer were enrolled in a 3+3 design with escalating doses of capecitabine (375–1000 mg/m2 b.i.d.) for 14 days every 21 days. Radioembolization with 90Y-resin microspheres was administered using a sequential lobar approach with two cycles of capecitabine. Results: Twenty-four patients (17 colorectal) were enrolled. The MTD was not reached. Haematologic events were generally mild. Common grade 1/2 non-haematologic toxicities included transient transaminitis/alkaline phosphatase elevation (9 (37.5%) patients), nausea (9 (37.5%)), abdominal pain (7 (29.0%)), fatigue (7 (29.0%)), and hand-foot syndrome or rash/desquamation (7 (29.0%)). One patient experienced a partial gastric antral perforation with a capecitabine dose of 750 mg/m2. The best response was partial response in four (16.7%) patients, stable disease in 17 (70.8%) and progression in three (12.5%). Median time to progression and overall survival of the metastatic colorectal cancer cohort was 6.4 and 8.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: This combined modality treatment was generally well tolerated with encouraging clinical activity. Capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 b.i.d. is recommended for phase II study with sequential lobar radioembolization. PMID:24983373

  3. Subgroup Analyses from a Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized Study of Eribulin Mesylate Versus Capecitabine in Pretreated Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, Chris; Awada, Ahmad; Cortes, Javier; Yelle, Louise; Velikova, Galina; Olivo, Martin S.; Song, James; Dutcus, Corina E.; Kaufman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE AND METHODS Our secondary analyses compared survival with eribulin versus capecitabine in various patient subgroups from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Eligible women aged ≥18 years with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced/metastatic disease), including an anthracycline and taxane, were randomized 1:1 to intravenous eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 or twice-daily oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1–14 (21-day cycles). RESULTS In the intent-to-treat population (eribulin 554 and capecitabine 548), overall survival appeared longer with eribulin than capecitabine in various subgroups, including patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (15.9 versus 13.5 months, respectively), estrogen receptor-negative (14.4 versus 10.5 months, respectively), and triple-negative (14.4 versus 9.4 months, respectively) disease. Progression-free survival was similar between the treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, estrogen receptor-, or triple-negative disease may gain particular benefit from eribulin as first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION (PRIMARY STUDY) This study reports the subgroup analyses of eribulin versus capecitabine from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). PMID:27398025

  4. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Kenneth D.; Loo, Billy W.; Gerber, David E.; Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak; Diehn, Maximilian; Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan; Wardak, Zabi; Sher, David; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Corona, Irma; Sharma, Akanksha; Wadsworth, Margaret E.; Timmerman, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  5. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769 PMID:19807917

  6. Phase Ib placebo-controlled, tissue biomarker trial of diindolylmethane (BR-DIMNG) in patients with prostate cancer who are undergoing prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jason R; Saltzstein, Daniel R; Messing, Edward; Kim, KyungMann; Kolesar, Jill; Huang, Wei; Havighurst, Thomas C; Harris, Linda; Wollmer, Barbara W; Jarrard, David; House, Margaret; Parnes, Howard; Bailey, Howard H

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiologic, preclinical, and early phase I studies of the cruciferous vegetable bioactive metabolite, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), support its potential prostate cancer chemopreventive ability. We performed a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of DIM in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and scheduled for radical prostatectomy. A total of 45 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer were randomized to 21-28 days of an absorption-enhanced formulation of DIM (BR-DIM) at doses of 100 or 200 mg per os twice daily or to placebo twice daily. Prostate tissue levels of DIM were the primary endpoint, with selected secondary biomarker endpoints including blood levels of DIM, total prostate-specific antigen, testosterone, and the insulin-like growth factor-1: insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 ratio and the urinary 2-hydroxyestrone/16-hydroxyestrone ratio, obtained at baseline, at day 15, and before surgery, as well as tissue expression of androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, Ki67, caspase 3 with cytochrome p450 mRNA expression and genotyping (polymorphisms). DIM was well tolerated with excellent study compliance and relatively rapid accrual of all 45 patients within 1 year. DIM levels were detected in only seven of 28 prostate tissue specimens. There was a statistically significant difference in the change in the urinary 2-hydroxyestrone/16-hydroxyestrone ratio from baseline until before surgery between the placebo and 400 mg DIM groups, with otherwise statistically nonsignificant changes in plasma biomarker expression. The administration of BR-DIM to prostate cancer patients before prostatectomy yields detectable plasma levels but without consistent or significant tissue accumulation or biomarker modulation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of biologic evaluation of relatively nontoxic preventive agents in the preprostatectomy setting with the potential for rapid accrual. PMID:26313229

  7. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  8. Phase 1 study of intravenous rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a novel benzyl styryl sulfone structure producing G2/M arrest and apoptosis, in adult patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Takao; Lehrer, Deborah; Ren, Chen; Cho, Sool Yeon; Maniar, Manoj; Silverman, Lewis; Sung, Max; Gretz, Herbert F; Benisovich, Vladimir; Navada, Shyamala; Akahoho, Eugene; Wilck, Eric; Taft, David R; Roboz, John; Wilhelm, Francois; Holland, James F

    2013-01-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a synthetic novel benzyl styryl sulfone, was administered to 28 patients with advanced cancer in a Phase I trial in order to characterize its pharmacokinetic profile, determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), define the recommended phase II dose (RPTD) and to document any antitumor activity. Patients with advanced malignant neoplasms refractory to standard therapy were given escalating doses of rigosertib (50, 100, 150, 250, 325, 400, 650, 850, 1,050, 1,375, 1,700 mg/m2/24h) as a 3-day continuous infusion (CI) every 2 weeks. An accelerated Fibonacci titration schedule with specified decreases for toxicities was used for escalation until grade ≥2 toxicity occurred. Intrapatient dose escalation was allowed if toxicity was grade ≤2 and the disease remained stable. Plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) and urinary PK assessments were studied in the 1st and 4th cycles. Twenty-nine patients (12 men and 17 women; age 36-87 y with a median of 63 y) were registered, but one died before study drug was given. Twenty-eight patients received a median of 3 cycles of therapy. Most common grade ≥2 toxicities attributable to rigosertib included fatigue, anorexia, vomiting and constipation. DLTs included muscular weakness, hyponatremia, neutropenia, delirium and confusional state. Risk factors for severe toxicities include pre-existing neurological dysfunction or advanced gynecologic cancer after pelvic surgery. Rigosertib pharmacokinetics showed rapid plasma distribution phases and urinary excretion. Elevations in plasma Cmax and AUC due to decreases in plasma clearance were associated with acute grade ≥3 toxicities. Of 22 evaluable patients, 9 (41%) achieved a best overall response of stable disease; all other patients (n=13; 59%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 50 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37-80 days). Nine (41%) patients survived for over 1 y. In summary, prolonged IV infusions of rigosertib were generally well

  9. Phase 1 study of intravenous rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a novel benzyl styryl sulfone structure producing G2/M arrest and apoptosis, in adult patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takao; Lehrer, Deborah; Ren, Chen; Cho, Sool Yeon; Maniar, Manoj; Silverman, Lewis; Sung, Max; Gretz, Herbert F; Benisovich, Vladimir; Navada, Shyamala; Akahoho, Eugene; Wilck, Eric; Taft, David R; Roboz, John; Wilhelm, Francois; Holland, James F

    2013-01-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a synthetic novel benzyl styryl sulfone, was administered to 28 patients with advanced cancer in a Phase I trial in order to characterize its pharmacokinetic profile, determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT), define the recommended phase II dose (RPTD) and to document any antitumor activity. Patients with advanced malignant neoplasms refractory to standard therapy were given escalating doses of rigosertib (50, 100, 150, 250, 325, 400, 650, 850, 1,050, 1,375, 1,700 mg/m(2)/24h) as a 3-day continuous infusion (CI) every 2 weeks. An accelerated Fibonacci titration schedule with specified decreases for toxicities was used for escalation until grade ≥2 toxicity occurred. Intrapatient dose escalation was allowed if toxicity was grade ≤2 and the disease remained stable. Plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) and urinary PK assessments were studied in the 1st and 4th cycles. Twenty-nine patients (12 men and 17 women; age 36-87 y with a median of 63 y) were registered, but one died before study drug was given. Twenty-eight patients received a median of 3 cycles of therapy. Most common grade ≥2 toxicities attributable to rigosertib included fatigue, anorexia, vomiting and constipation. DLTs included muscular weakness, hyponatremia, neutropenia, delirium and confusional state. Risk factors for severe toxicities include pre-existing neurological dysfunction or advanced gynecologic cancer after pelvic surgery. Rigosertib pharmacokinetics showed rapid plasma distribution phases and urinary excretion. Elevations in plasma Cmax and AUC due to decreases in plasma clearance were associated with acute grade ≥3 toxicities. Of 22 evaluable patients, 9 (41%) achieved a best overall response of stable disease; all other patients (n=13; 59%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 50 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37-80 days). Nine (41%) patients survived for over 1 y. In summary, prolonged IV infusions of rigosertib were generally well

  10. Phase II Trial of Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Bevacizumab in Combination With Attenuated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Rademaker, Alfred; Bentrem, David J.; Benson, Al B.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Talamonti, Mark S.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate response rate, survival, and toxicity in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients received three cycles of therapy over 10 weeks. In total, treatment consisted of intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, every 1 to 2 weeks (7 doses), IV bevacizumab, 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks (5 doses), and 36 Gy of radiotherapy (2.4-Gy fractions during cycle two). Response was assessed by cross-sectional imaging and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels. Patients with resectable tumors underwent surgery 6 to 8 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Maintenance gemcitabine and bevacizumab doses were delivered to patients who had unresected tumors and no progression. Results: Twenty-eight of the 32 enrolled patients completed all three cycles. The median follow-up was 11.07 months. Most grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in the initial treatment phase; the most frequent toxicities were leukopenia (21%), neutropenia (17%), and nausea (17%). At week 10, 1 patient (4%) had a complete response, 2 patients (7%) had partial responses, 21 patients (75%) had stable disease, and 4 patients (14%) had progressive disease. The median pretreatment and posttreatment CA 19-9 levels (25 patients) were 184.3 and 57.9 U/ml, respectively (p = 0.0006). One of 10 patients proceeding to surgery experienced a major complication. Two of 6 patients undergoing resection had complete pathologic responses. The median progression-free and overall survival durations were 9.9 months and 11.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: The combination of full-dose gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and radiotherapy was active and was not associated with a high rate of major surgical complications.

  11. A phase I/II trial of a polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) in breast cancer patients: immunological effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Seidman, Andrew; Fornier, Monica; D’Andrea, Gabriella; Wesa, Kathleen; Yeung, Simon; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Vickers, Andrew J.; Cassileth, Barrie

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer patients commonly use dietary supplements to “boost immune function”. A polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake extract) showed immunomodulatory effects in preclinical studies and therefore the potential for clinical use. Whether oral administration in human produces measurable immunologic effects, however, is unknown. Methods In a phase I/II dose escalation trial, 34 postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free of disease after initial treatment, were enrolled sequentially in five cohorts. Maitake liquid extract was taken orally at 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3, or 5 mg/kg twice daily for 3 weeks. Peripheral blood was collected at days −7, 0 (prior to the first dosing), 7, 14, and 21 for ex vivo analyses. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Results No dose-limiting toxicity was encountered. Two patients withdrew prior to completion of the study due to grade I possibly related side effects: nausea and joint swelling in one patient; rash and pruritus in the second. There was a statistically significant association between Maitake and immunologic function (p < 0.0005). Increasing doses of Maitake increased some immunologic parameters and depressed others; the dose–response curves for many endpoints were non-monotonic with intermediate doses having either immune enhancing or immune suppressant effects compared with both high and low doses. Conclusions Oral administration of a polysaccharide extract from Maitake mushroom is associated with both immunologically stimulatory and inhibitory measurable effects in peripheral blood. Cancer patients should be made aware of the fact that botanical agents produce more complex effects than assumed, and may depress as well as enhance immune function. PMID:19253021

  12. Cetuximab in Combination With Capecitabine, Irinotecan, and Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Results of a Phase II MARGIT Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Horisberger, Karoline; Treschl, Anne; Mai, Sabine; Barreto-Miranda, Manuel; Kienle, Peter; Stroebel, Philipp; Erben, Philipp; Woernle, Christoph; Dinter, Dietmar; Kaehler, Georg; Hochhaus, Andreas; Post, Stefan; Willeke, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) in combination with cetuximab, capecitabine, and irinotecan in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with rectal cancer (clinical stage T3/4 or N+) were scheduled to receive cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, 250 mg/m{sup 2} Days 8, 15, 22, 29) in combination with weekly irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2} and capecitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily (Days 1-38). RT was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 + 5.4 Gy). Primary endpoint was toxicity, and antitumor activity as assessed by the pathologic complete remission (pCR) rate was a secondary endpoint. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled; 88% showed T3 or T4 and 76% nodal-positive tumors with a median distance from the anal verge of 7.5 cm. The actual dose intensity was as follows (median/mean, %): cetuximab 100/92, irinotecan 100/91, capecitabine 100/89). Main adverse events Grades 2/3/4 were (National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 3.0, %): leukocytopenia 6/2/2, nausea/vomiting 4/2/0, diarrhea 34/30/0, proctitis 26/2/0, elevation of liver transaminases 8/10/0, and acnelike skin rash 46/6/0. All patients underwent surgery, and no postoperative deaths occurred. Eighty-four percent underwent low-anterior resection, and 68% of the specimen exhibited moderate or good tumor regression, but only 4 patients had a pCR. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab-CapIri-RT has manageable toxicity, with diarrhea being the most commonly observed adverse event. Nevertheless, the efficacy of this regimen with a pCR rate of only 8% was significantly lower than that observed in a previous Phase I trial.

  13. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  14. Docetaxel plus cisplatin is effective for patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to previous anthracycline treatment: a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Hoon; Cho, Eun Kyung; Bang, Soo-Mee; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Don

    2005-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are frequently exposed to high cumulative doses of anthracyclines and are at risk of resistance and cardiotoxicity. This phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel plus cisplatin, as salvage chemotherapy in patients with MBC resistant to prior anthracyclines. Methods Patients with MBC that had progressed after at least one prior chemotherapy regimen containing anthracyclines received docetaxel 75 mg/m2 followed by cisplatin 60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for a maximum of 6 cycles or until disease progression. Results Between Jan 2000 and May 2002, 24 patients with tumors primary resistant and 15 with secondary resistant disease were accrued. All 39 patients were evaluable for safety and 36 for efficacy. The objective response rate was 31% (95% CI, 16–45%) with 3 complete responses. The median time to disease progression was 7 months, and the median overall survival was 23 months (median follow-up of 41 months). Neutropenia was the most frequently observed severe hematologic toxicity (39% of patients), whereas asthenia and nausea were the most common non-hematologic toxicities. No treatment-related death was observed. Conclusion In conclusion, we found docetaxel plus cisplatin to be an active and safe chemotherapy regimen for patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines. PMID:15723709

  15. Phase I study of recombinant leukocyte A human interferon combined with BCNU in selected patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Kovach, J S; Long, H J; Richardson, R L

    1986-03-01

    Interferons manifest diverse immunomodulatory and antiproliferative characteristics. Since their spectrum of toxicities includes primarily fatigue and anorexia rather than the myelosuppression concomitant with cytotoxic therapies, it is conceptually appealing to combine both modalities. We conducted a phase I trial among 18 patients using the combination of leukocyte A recombinant interferon (IFN-rA) and BCNU. The intramuscular (IM) IFN-rA dose for the initial 12 patients was 12 X 10(6) U/m2 three times a week for an anticipated duration of 12 weeks. Among these patients, we escalated the monthly intravenous (IV) BCNU dose from 50 mg/m2 to 150 mg/m2. Six subsequent patients received IFN-rA 12 X 10(6) U/m2, days 1 to 3, and BCNU 150 mg IV on day 3 of each monthly cycle. Dose-limiting toxicities from both regimens were fatigue and myelosuppression. We recognize the limitation of small sample sizes. Nevertheless, in the absence of a significant number of life-threatening toxicities, it appears that near maximal doses of BCNU and concomitant IFN-rA can be administered with safety in an outpatient setting. PMID:3950678

  16. A Prospective Phase III Randomized Trial of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. Results: The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}8, or T {>=}2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF.

  17. A Phase II Biomarker-Embedded Study of Lapatinib plus Capecitabine as First-line Therapy in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    LaBonte, Melissa J; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Wilson, Peter M; Nagarwala, Yasir M; Koch, Kevin M; Briner, Colleen; Kaneko, Tomomi; Rha, Sun-Young; Gladkov, Oleg; Urba, Susan G; Sakaeva, Dina; Pishvaian, Michael J; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Lee, Wei-Ping; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2016-09-01

    An exploratory phase II biomarker-embedded trial (LPT109747; NCT00526669) designed to determine the association of lapatinib-induced fluoropyrimidine gene changes with efficacy of lapatinib plus capecitabine as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma independent of tumor HER2 status. Tumor biopsies obtained before and after 7-day lapatinib (1,250 mg) to analyze changes in gene expression, followed by a 14-day course of capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily, 14/21 days) plus lapatinib 1,250 mg daily. Blood samples were acquired for pharmacokinetic analysis. Primary clinical objectives were response rate (RR) and 5-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary objectives were overall survival (OS), PFS, time to response, duration of response, toxicity, and identification of associations between lapatinib pharmacokinetics and biomarker endpoints. Primary biomarker objectives were modulation of 5-FU-pathway genes by lapatinib, effects of germline SNPs on treatment outcome, and trough steady-state plasma lapatinib concentrations. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled; (75% gastric cancer, 25% gastroesophageal junction). Twelve patients (17.9%) had confirmed partial response, 31 (46.3%) had stable disease, and 16 (23.9%) had progressive disease. Median PFS and OS were 3.3 and 6.3 months, respectively. Frequent adverse events included diarrhea (45%), decreased appetite (39%), nausea (36%), and fatigue (36%). Lapatinib induced no changes in gene expression from baseline and no significant associations were found for SNPs analyzed. Elevated baseline HER3 mRNA expression was associated with a higher RR (33% vs. 0%; P = 0.008). Lapatinib plus capecitabine was well tolerated, demonstrating modest antitumor activity in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The association of elevated HER3 and RR warrants further investigation as an important player for HER-targeted regimens in combination with capecitabine. Mol Cancer Ther

  18. Two phase I dose-escalation/pharmacokinetics studies of low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) and mild local hyperthermia in heavily pretreated patients with local regionally recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Formenti, Silvia; Rugo, Hope; O’Connor, Brigid; Myerson, Robert; Stauffer, Paul; Hsu, I-Chow; Diederich, Chris; Straube, William; Boss, Mary-Keara; Boico, Alina; Craciunescu, Oana; Maccarini, Paolo; Needham, David; Borys, Nicholas; Blackwell, Kimberly L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Unresectable chest wall recurrences of breast cancer (CWR) in heavily pretreated patients are especially difficult to treat. We hypothesised that thermally enhanced drug delivery using low temperature liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD), given with mild local hyperthermia (MLHT), will be safe and effective in this population. Patients and methods This paper combines the results of two similarly designed phase I trials. Eligible CWR patients had progressed on the chest wall after prior hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Patients were to get six cycles of LTLD every 21–35 days, followed immediately by chest wall MLHT for 1 hour at 40–42 °C. In the first trial 18 subjects received LTLD at 20, 30, or 40 mg/m2; in the second trial, 11 subjects received LTLD at 40 or 50 mg/m2. Results The median age of all 29 patients enrolled was 57 years. Thirteen patients (45%) had distant metastases on enrolment. Patients had received a median dose of 256 mg/m2 of prior anthracyclines and a median dose of 61 Gy of prior radiation. The median number of study treatments that subjects completed was four. The maximum tolerated dose was 50 mg/m2, with seven subjects (24%) developing reversible grade 3–4 neutropenia and four (14%) reversible grade 3–4 leucopenia. The rate of overall local response was 48% (14/29, 95% CI: 30–66%), with. five patients (17%) achieving complete local responses and nine patients (31%) having partial local responses. Conclusion LTLD at 50 mg/m2 and MLHT is safe. This combined therapy produces objective responses in heavily pretreated CWR patients. Future work should test thermally enhanced LTLD delivery in a less advanced patient population. PMID:25144817

  19. A Phase Ib/II Study Evaluating the Combination of Weekly Docetaxel and Cisplatin Together with Capecitabine and Bevacizumab in Patients with Advanced Esophago-Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaty, Michal; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Amit, Limor; Abramovich, Amir; Sadeh Gonik, Udi; Idelevich, Efraim; Gordon, Noa; Medalia, Gal; Sulkes, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current treatment options for advanced esophagogastric cancer (AEGC) are still unsatisfactory. The aim of this prospective phase Ib/II study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel regimen, AVDCX, consisting of weekly docetaxel and cisplatin together with capecitabine and bevacizumab, in AEGC. Methods Patients with AEGC received treatment with different dose levels of AVDCX (cisplatin and docetaxel 25–35 mg/m2, days 1,8, capecitabine 1,600 mg/m2 days 1–14, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, day 1, Q:21 days). The study's primary objectives were to establish the recommended phase II doses of docetaxel and cisplatin in AVDCX (phase Ib part) and to determine the tumor response rate (phase II part). Results The study was closed early, after the accrual of 22 patients, due to accumulating toxicity-related deaths. The median age was 59 years and 77% of patients had gastric or gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. Grade ≥3 adverse events were documented in 18 patients (82%), usually neutropenia (36%), fatigue (54%) or diarrhea (23%). There were three fatal toxicities (14%): mesenteric thromboembolism, gastric perforation and pancytopenic sepsis. The recommended phase II doses of cisplatin and docetaxel were determined to be 25 mg/m2 and 30 mg/m2, respectively. Twenty-one patients were evaluable for response: 12 (54%) had partial response (PR), 4 (18%) had stable disease (SD) and none had complete response (CR). Hence, the objective response rate (CR+PR) was 54% and the disease control rate (CR+PR+SD) was 72%. For the 17 patients treated at the MTD, the objective response rate was 41% and the disease control rate was 88%. The median overall survival (OS) for these patients was 13.9 months (range, 1.5–52.2 months) and the median progression-free survival was 7.6 months (range, 1.3–26.6 months). The 2-year OS rate reached 23.7%. Conclusions AVDCX was associated with a high rate of regimen related fatal adverse events and is not appropriate for further

  20. Cediranib combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer (CIRCCa): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R Paul; Gourley, Charlie; Davidson, Susan; Carty, Karen; McCartney, Elaine; Rai, Debbie; Banerjee, Susana; Jackson, David; Lord, Rosemary; McCormack, Mary; Hudson, Emma; Reed, Nicholas; Flubacher, Maxine; Jankowska, Petra; Powell, Melanie; Dive, Caroline; West, Catharine M L; Paul, James

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients treated with standard chemotherapy for metastatic or relapsed cervical cancer respond poorly to conventional chemotherapy (response achieved in 20–30% of patients) with an overall survival of less than 1 year. High tumour angiogenesis and high concentrations of intratumoural VEGF are adverse prognostic features. Cediranib is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR1, 2, and 3. In this trial, we aimed to assess the effect of the addition of cediranib to carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or recurrent cervical cancer. Methods In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial, which was done in 17 UK cancer treatment centres, patients aged 18 years or older initially diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma or who subsequently developed metastatic disease or local pelvic recurrence after radical treatment that was not amenable to exenterative surgery were recruited. Eligible patients received carboplatin AUC of 5 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 by infusion every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles and were randomised centrally (1:1) through a minimisation approach to receive cediranib 20 mg or placebo orally once daily until disease progression. The stratification factors were disease site, disease-free survival after primary therapy or primary stage IVb disease, number of lines of previous treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and investigational site. All patients, investigators, and trial personnel were masked to study drug allocation. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat, and the safety analysis included all patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This trial is registered with the ISCRTN registry, number ISRCTN23516549, and has been completed. Findings Between Aug 19, 2010, and July 27, 2012, 69 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to cediranib (n=34) or placebo (n=35). After a median

  1. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m{sup 2} of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2} of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  2. Revisiting dosing regimen using PK/PD modeling: the MODEL1 phase I/II trial of docetaxel plus epirubicin in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hénin, Emilie; Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; You, Benoit; Guitton, Jérôme; Iliadis, Athanassios; Freyer, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    The MODEL1 trial is the first model-driven phase I/II dose-escalation study of densified docetaxel plus epirubicin administration in metastatic breast cancer patients, a regimen previously known to induce unacceptable life-threatening toxicities. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of this densified regimen. Study of the efficacy was a secondary objective. Her2-negative, hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients were treated with escalating doses of docetaxel plus epirubicin every 2 weeks for six cycles with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support. A total of 16 patients were treated with total doses ranging from 85 to 110 mg of docetaxel plus epirubicin per cycle. Dose escalation was controlled by a non-hematological toxicity model. Dose densification was guided by a model of neutrophil kinetics, able to optimize docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing with respect to pre-defined acceptable levels of hematological toxicity while ensuring maximal efficacy. The densified treatment was safe since hematological toxicity was much lower compared to previous findings, and other adverse events were consistent with those observed with this regimen. The maximal tolerated dose was 100 mg given every 2 weeks. The response rate was 45 %; median progression-free survival was 10.4 months, whereas 54.6 months of median overall survival was achieved. The optimized docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing regimen led to fewer toxicities associated with higher efficacy as compared with standard or empirical densified dosing. This study suggests that model-driven dosage adjustment can lead to improved efficacy-toxicity balance in patients with cancer when several anticancer drugs are combined. PMID:27002506

  3. A phase I study of nimotuzumab plus docetaxel in chemotherapy-refractory/resistant patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Zhuo, Minglei; Wang, Zhijie; Duan, Jianchun; Wang, Yuyan; Wang, Shuhang; An, Tongtong; Wu, Meina

    2016-01-01

    Background To determine the safety and therapeutic efficacy of nimotuzumab (h-R3) combined with docetaxel in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who have failed to respond to prior first-line chemotherapy. Methods In this single-center, open-label, dose-escalating phase I trial, patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing stage IV NSCLC were treated with nimotuzumab plus docetaxel according to a dose escalation schedule. The safety and efficacy of the combination treatment were observed and analyzed. Results There were 12 patients with EGFR-expressing stage IV NSCLC enrolled. The dose of nimotuzumab was escalated from 200 to 600 mg/week. The longest administration of study drug was 40 weeks at the 600 mg/week dose level. Grade III–IV toxicities included neutropenia and fatigue, and other toxicities included rash. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred with Grade 3 fatigue at the 200 mg dose level of nimotuzumab and Grade 4 neutropenia with pneumonia at the 600 mg dose level of nimotuzumab. No objective responses were observed, and stable disease was observed in eight patients (66.7%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.4 months in all patients, 1.3 months in patients with the EGFR mutation, and 4.4 months in those with wild type EGFR (EGFR WT). The median survival time (MST) was 21.1 months in all patients, 21.1 months in patients with EGFR mutation, and 26.4 months in patients with EGFR WT. Conclusions Nimotuzumab and docetaxel combination therapy was found to be well tolerated and efficacious. Further study of nimotuzumab is warranted in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:27041923

  4. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  5. A randomised phase 2 study combining LY2181308 sodium (survivin antisense oligonucleotide) with first-line docetaxel/prednisone in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechno, Paweł; Somer, Bradley G; Mellado, Begoña; Chłosta, Piotr L; Cervera Grau, José Manuel; Castellano, Daniel; Reuter, Christoph; Stöckle, Michael; Kamradt, Jörn; Pikiel, Joanna; Durán, Ignacio; Wedel, Steffen; Callies, Sophie; André, Valérie; Hurt, Karla; Brown, Jacqueline; Lahn, Michael; Heinrich, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is partially characterised by overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, such as survivin. In this phase 2 study, patients with metastatic CRPC (n=154) were randomly assigned (1:2 ratio) to receive standard first-line docetaxel/prednisone (control arm) or the combination of LY2181308 with docetaxel/prednisone (experimental arm). The primary objective was to estimate progression-free survival (PFS) for LY2181308 plus docetaxel. Secondary efficacy measures included overall survival (OS), several predefined prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-derived end points, and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) scores. The median PFS of treated patients for the experimental arm (n=98) was 8.64 mo (90% confidence interval [CI], 7.39-10.45) versus 9.00 mo (90% CI, 7.00-10.09) in the control arm (n=51; p=0.755). The median OS for the experimental arm was 27.04 mo (90% CI, 19.94-33.41) compared with 29.04 mo (90% CI, 20.11-39.26; p=0.838). The PSA responses (≥ 50% PSA reduction), BPI, and FACT-P scores were similar in both arms. In the experimental arm, patients had a numerically higher incidence of grades 3-4 neutropenia, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and sensory neuropathy. In conclusion, this study failed to detect a difference in efficacy between the two treatment groups. PMID:24246407

  6. Sunitinib Plus Androgen Deprivation and Radiation Therapy for Patients With Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Phase 1 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, Paul G.; Song, Danny Y.; Heath, Elisabeth; Maier, Jordan; Meyn, Raymond; Kuban, Deborah; DePetrillo, Thomas A.; Mathew, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of administering sunitinib in combination with androgen deprivation therapy and external-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (XRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventeen men with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate with cT2c-cT4 or Gleason 8-10 or prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL received initial androgen deprivation (leuprolide 22.5 mg every 12 weeks plus oral bicalutamide 50 mg daily) for 4-8 weeks before oral sunitinib 12.5, 25, or 37.5 mg daily for 4 weeks as lead-in, then concurrently with and 4 weeks after XRT (75.6 Gy in 42 fractions to prostate and seminal vesicles). A 3+3 sequential dose-escalation design was used to assess the frequency of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and establish a maximal tolerated dose of sunitinib. Results: Sunitinib at 12.5- and 25-mg dose levels was well tolerated. The first 4 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg experienced a DLT during lead-in, and a drug interaction between sunitinib and bicalutamide was suspected. The protocol was revised and concurrent bicalutamide omitted. Of the next 3 patients enrolled at 37.5 mg, 2 of 3 receiving concurrent therapy experienced DLTs during radiation: grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 proctitis, respectively. Only 1 of 7 patients completed sunitinib at 37.5 mg daily, whereas 3 of 3 patients (25 mg as starting dose) and 3 of 4 patients (25 mg as reduced dose) completed therapy. Conclusions: The feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor therapy, androgen deprivation, and radiation therapy for prostate cancer was established. Using a daily dosing regimen with lead-in, concurrent, and post-XRT therapy, the recommended phase 2 dose of sunitinib is 25 mg daily.

  7. A non-randomized dose-escalation Phase I trial of a protein-based immunotherapeutic for the treatment of breast cancer patients with HER2-overexpressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Limentani, Steven A; Campone, Mario; Dorval, Thierry; Curigliano, Giuseppe; de Boer, Richard; Vogel, Charles; White, Shane; Bachelot, Thomas; Canon, Jean-Luc; Disis, Mary; Awada, Ahmad; Berlière, Martine; Amant, Frédéric; Levine, Ellis; Burny, Wivine; Callegaro, Andrea; de Sousa Alves, Pedro Miguel; Louahed, Jamila; Brichard, Vincent; Lehmann, Frédéric F

    2016-04-01

    This Phase I dose-escalation study (NCT00058526) assessed the safety and immunogenicity of an anti-cancer immunotherapeutic (recombinant HER2 protein (dHER2) combined with the immunostimulant AS15) in patients with early-stage HER2-overexpressing breast cancer (BC). Sixty-one trastuzumab-naive patients with stage II-III HER2-positive BC received the dHER2 immunotherapeutic after surgical resection and adjuvant therapy. They were allocated into four cohorts receiving different doses of dHER2 (20, 100, 500 µg) combined with a fixed AS15 dose. Safety and immunogenicity (dHER2-specific antibody responses) were assessed. After completing the immunization schedule (three or six doses over 14 weeks) and a six-month follow-up, the patients were followed for 5 years for late toxicity, long-term immunogenicity, and clinical status. The immunizations were well tolerated, and increasing doses of dHER2 had no impact on the frequency or severity of adverse events. Few late toxicities were reported, and after 5 years 45/54 patients (83.3 %) were still alive, while 28/45 (62 %) with known disease status were disease free. Regarding the immunogenicity of the compound, a positive association was found between the dHER2 dose, the immunization schedule, and the prevalence of dHER2-specific humoral responses. Among the patients receiving the most intense immunization schedule with the highest dHER2 dose, 6/8 maintained their dHER2-specific antibody response 5 years after immunization. The dHER2 immunotherapeutic had an acceptable safety profile in early HER2-positive BC patients. dHER2-specific antibody responses were induced, with the rate of responders increasing with the dHER2 dose and the number and frequency of immunizations. PMID:26993131

  8. Randomized Phase Ib/II Study of Gemcitabine Plus Placebo or Vismodegib, a Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor, in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V.T.; Junttila, Melissa R.; Karrison, Theodore; Bahary, Nathan; Horiba, Margit N.; Nattam, Sreenivasa R.; Marsh, Robert; Wallace, James; Kozloff, Mark; Rajdev, Lakshmi; Cohen, Deirdre; Wade, James; Sleckman, Bethany; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Stiff, Patrick; Kumar, Pankaj; Xu, Peng; Henderson, Les; Takebe, Naoko; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Xi; Stadler, Walter M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Kindler, Hedy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sonic hedgehog (SHH), an activating ligand of smoothened (SMO), is overexpressed in > 70% of pancreatic cancers (PCs). We investigated the impact of vismodegib, an SHH antagonist, plus gemcitabine (GV) or gemcitabine plus placebo (GP) in a multicenter phase Ib/randomized phase II trial and preclinical PC models. Patients and Methods Patients with PC not amenable to curative therapy who had received no prior therapy for metastatic disease and had Karnofsky performance score ≥ 80 were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to GV or GP. The primary end point was progression-free-survival (PFS). Exploratory correlative studies included serial SHH serum levels and contrast perfusion computed tomography imaging. To further investigate putative biologic mechanisms of SMO inhibition, two autochthonous pancreatic cancer models (KrasG12D; p16/p19fl/fl; Pdx1-Cre and KrasG12D; p53R270H/wt; Pdx1-Cre) were studied. Results No safety issues were identified in the phase Ib portion (n = 7), and the phase II study enrolled 106 evaluable patients (n = 53 in each arm). Median PFS was 4.0 and 2.5 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 2.5 to 5.3 and 1.9 to 3.8, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.21; P = .30). Median overall survival (OS) was 6.9 and 6.1 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 5.8 to 8.0 and 5.0 to 8.0, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.58; P = .84). Response rates were not significantly different. There were no significant associations between correlative markers and overall response rate, PFS, or OS. Preclinical trials revealed no significant differences with vismodegib in drug delivery, tumor growth rate, or OS in either model. Conclusion The addition of vismodegib to gemcitabine in an unselected cohort did not improve overall response rate, PFS, or OS in patients with metastatic PC. Our preclinical and clinical results revealed no statistically significant

  9. Sunitinib Plus Paclitaxel Versus Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel for First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Nicholas J.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Minton, Susan E.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Smith, John W.; Richards, Paul D.; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F.; Kern, Kenneth A.; Davis, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. Results The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16–2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. Conclusion The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21569994

  10. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  11. A phase I trial of docetaxel and 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M.; Watanabe, T.; Sasaki, Y.; Ying, D. F.; Omuro, Y.; Katsumata, N.; Narabayashi, M.; Tokue, Y.; Fujii, H.; Igarashi, T.; Wakita, H.; Ohtsu, T.; Itoh, K.; Adachi, I.; Taguchi, T.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated doses (MTDs), the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and the recommended doses for further trials of docetaxel in combination with a 5-day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in advanced or recurrent breast cancer patients who had been treated previously with at least one chemotherapeutic regimen, patients were treated with docetaxel as a 1-h infusion on day 1 followed by 5-FU as a continuous infusion on days 1 through 5 every 3-4 weeks. Three or six patients were assessed at the following escalating dose levels of docetaxel/5-FU per day: 40/150, 40/300, 50/300, 50/500 and 60/500 mg m(-2). Nineteen patients entered this trial, of whom 18 could be assessed for adverse event and therapeutic efficacy. The DLTs were neutropenia and diarrhoea. The MTDs were 60 mg m(-2) of docetaxel on day 1 and 500 mg m(-2) per day of 5-day continuous infusion of 5-FU. One of 18 patients achieved a complete response and eight achieved partial response (over all response rate: 50%). The recommended doses of docetaxel and 5-day continuous infusion of 5-FU for a phase II trial are 50 mg m(-2) and 500 mg m(-2) per day every 3 or 4 weeks. PMID:9667671

  12. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of misoprostol rectal suppositories to prevent acute radiation proctitis in patients with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, Andrea . E-mail: ahille@med.uni-goettingen.de; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hermann, Robert M.; Christiansen, Hans; Saile, Bernhard; Pradier, Olivier; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis is the most relevant complication of pelvic radiation and is still mainly treated supportively. Considering the negative impact of acute proctitis symptoms on patients' daily activities and the potential relationship between the severity of acute radiation injury and late damage, misoprostol was tested in the prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer were entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. Radiation-induced toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Between the placebo and the misoprostol groups, no significant differences in proctitis symptoms occurred: 76% of patients in each group had Grade 1 toxicity, and 26% in the placebo group and 36% in the misoprostol group had Grade 2 toxicity. No differences were found in onset or symptom duration. Comparing the peak incidence of patients' toxicity symptoms, significantly more patients experienced rectal bleeding in the misoprostol group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Misoprostol given as a once-daily suppository did not decrease the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis and may increase the incidence of acute bleeding.

  13. A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 Plus Irinotecan and Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Clinical Feasibility and Response Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takeo; Ozawa, Heita; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Onosato, Wataru; Naito, Masanori; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Ihara, Atsushi; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Okayasu, Isao; Yamashita, Keishi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: We aimed to validate our hypothesis that a preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimen with S-1 plus irinotecan is feasible, safe, and active for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer in a single-arm Phase II setting. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had previously untreated, locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. Radiotherapy was administered in fractions of 1.8Gy/d for 25 days. S-1 was administered orally in a fixed daily dose of 80mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 to 5, 8 to 12, 22 to 26, and 29 to 33. Irinotecan (80mg/m{sup 2}) was infused on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29. Four or more weeks after the completion of the treatment, total mesorectal excision with lateral lymph node dissection was performed. The primary endpoint was the rate of completing treatment in terms of feasibility. The secondary endpoints were the response rate and safety. Results: We enrolled 43 men and 24 women in the study. The number of patients who completed treatment was 58 (86.6%). Overall, 46 patients (68.7%) responded to treatment and 24 (34.7%) had a complete histopathologic response. Three patients had Grade 3 leukopenia, and another three patients had Grade 3 neutropenia. Diarrhea was the most common type of nonhematologic toxicity: 3 patients had Grade 3 diarrhea. Conclusions: A preoperative regimen of S-1, irinotecan, and radiotherapy to the rectum was feasible, and it appeared safe and effective in this nonrandomized Phase II setting. It exhibited a low incidence of adverse events, a high rate of completion of treatment, and an extremely high rate of pathologic complete response.

  14. Phase II, multicenter, open-label, randomized study of YM155 plus docetaxel as first-line treatment in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Michael R; Gladkov, Oleg A; Gartner, Elaina; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Crown, John; Steinberg, Joyce; Jie, Fei; Keating, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of YM155, a survivin suppressor, in combination with docetaxel, compared with docetaxel alone in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. This phase II, multicenter, open-label, 2-arm study randomized patients (≥18 years) with histologically or cytologically confirmed stage IV HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer and ≥1 measurable lesion, to receive docetaxel alone or docetaxel plus YM155. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), duration of response (DOR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), time to response (TTR), biomarker assessment, and analysis of circulating tumor cells. Patients were women diagnosed with HER2-negative breast cancer; most had received prior drug therapies. The median PFS was 8.4 months with YM155 plus docetaxel (n = 50) and 10.5 months with docetaxel alone (n = 51; HR 1.53; 95 % CI 0.83, 2.83; P = 0.176). No statistically significant differences were observed for secondary endpoints, although slightly greater OS (630 vs 601 days; P = 0.768), CBR (84.3 vs 82.0 %; P = 0.855), DOR, and TTR were observed with docetaxel alone compared with YM155 plus docetaxel, whereas ORR was similar (25.5 vs 26.0). The most common TEAEs observed with YM155 plus docetaxel compared with docetaxel alone were neutropenia (83.3 vs 84.3 %), alopecia (62.5 vs 52.9 %), fatigue (50 vs 41.2 %), and nausea (37.5 vs 41.2 %). Although YM155 is a novel drug that suppresses survivin, YM155 plus docetaxel exhibited no statistically significant differences in endpoints compared with docetaxel alone. The combination regimen was well tolerated. PMID:25547219

  15. Phase I Study of DMOT4039A, an Antibody-Drug Conjugate Targeting Mesothelin, in Patients with Unresectable Pancreatic or Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Colin D; Lamberts, Laetitia E; Borad, Mitesh J; Voortman, Johannes; McWilliams, Robert R; Diamond, Jennifer R; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Verheul, Henk M; Lieu, Christopher H; Kim, George P; Wang, Yulei; Scales, Suzie J; Samineni, Divya; Brunstein, Flavia; Choi, YounJeong; Maslyar, Daniel J; Colon-Otero, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    DMOT4039A, a humanized anti-mesothelin mAb conjugated to the antimitotic agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), was given to patients with pancreatic and ovarian cancer every 3 weeks (0.2-2.8 mg/kg; q3w) or weekly (0.8-1.2 mg/kg). A 3+3 design was used for dose escalation followed by expansion at the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) to evaluate safety and pharmacokinetics. Antitumor response was evaluated per RECIST 1.1 and serum CA19-9 or CA125 declines. Tumor mesothelin expression was determined by IHC. Seventy-one patients (40 pancreatic cancer; 31 ovarian cancer) were treated with DMOT4039A. For the q3w schedule (n = 54), the MTD and RP2D was 2.4 mg/kg, with dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 hyperglycemia and grade 3 hypophosphatemia at 2.8 mg/kg. For the weekly schedule (n = 17), the maximum assessed dose was 1.2 mg/kg, with further dose escalations deferred because of toxicities limiting scheduled retreatment in later cycles, and therefore the RP2D level for the weekly regimen was determined to be 1 mg/kg. Across both schedules, the most common toxicities were gastrointestinal and constitutional. Treatment-related serious adverse events occurred in 6 patients; 4 patients continued treatment following dose reductions. Drug exposure as measured by antibody-conjugated MMAE and total antibody was generally dose proportional over all dose levels on both schedules. A total of 6 patients had confirmed partial responses (4 ovarian; 2 pancreatic) with DMOT4039A at 2.4 to 2.8 mg/kg i.v. q3w. DMOT4039A administered at doses up to 2.4 mg/kg q3w and 1.0 mg/kg weekly has a tolerable safety profile and antitumor activity in both pancreatic and ovarian cancer. PMID:26823490

  16. Cytoreductive Surgery plus Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Improves Survival for Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal Cancer: A Phase II Study from a Chinese Center

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Yang; Yonemura, Yutaka; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is a difficult clinical challenge in colorectal cancer (CRC) because conventional treatment modalities could not produce significant survival benefit, which highlights the acute need for new treatment strategies. Our previous case-control study demonstrated the potential survival advantage of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) over CRS alone. This phase II study was to further investigate the efficacy and adverse events of CRS+HIPEC for Chinese patients with CRC PC. Methods A total of 60 consecutive CRC PC patients underwent 63 procedures consisting of CRS+HIPEC and postoperative chemotherapy, all by a designated team focusing on this combined treatment modality. All the clinico-pathological information was systematically integrated into a prospective database. The primary end point was disease-specific overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were perioperative safety profiles. Results By the most recent database update, the median follow-up was 29.9 (range 3.5–108.9) months. The peritoneal cancer index (PCI) ≤20 was in 47.0% of patients, complete cytoreductive surgery (CC0-1) was performed in 53.0% of patients. The median OS was 16.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.2–19.8) months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 70.5%, 34.2%, 22.0% and 22.0%, respectively. Mortality and grades 3 to 5 morbidity rates in postoperative 30 days were 0.0% and 30.2%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified 3 parameters with significant effects on OS: PCI ≤20, CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy over 6 cycles. On multivariate analysis, however, only CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy ≥6 cycles were found to be independent factors for OS benefit. Discussion CRS+HIPEC at a specialized treatment center could improve OS for selected CRC PC patients from China, with acceptable perioperative safety. PMID:25259574

  17. A phase II study of nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin in combination with thoracic radiation in patients with locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Takaaki; Futamura, Yohei; Horiba, Akane; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Toshitaka; Kato, Tatsuo; Kaito, Daizo; Ohno, Yasuhi; Iida, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Shinya; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-PTX) and carboplatin (CBDCA) with concurrent radiotherapy for unresectable locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with Stage III NSCLC and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1 were eligible. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisted of weekly administration of nab-PTX (40 mg/m2) plus CBDCA (area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) 2) and thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) for a total of 6 weeks. After concurrent chemoradiotherapy, patients received an additional two cycles of consolidation phase chemotherapy that consisted of 4-week cycles of nab-PTX (100 mg/m2 on Days 1, 8 and 15)/CBDCA (AUC 5 mg/ml/min on Day 1). Response was evaluated in accordance with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A total of 10 patients were enrolled in this trial between September 2013 and January 2014 from three institutes. The overall response rate was 40.0% and the median progression-free survival was 6.7 months. Treatment-related death occurred in two patients. Grade 2 or worse severe radiation pneumonitis was observed in all three patients that had the volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) >30%. The results of this study indicate that no further investigation is warranted into nab-PTX and CBDCA with concurrent thoracic radiation for Stage III NSCLC with V20 > 30% due to severe toxicity. PMID:26442970

  18. Vaccination of prostate cancer patients with modified vaccinia ankara delivering the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax): a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Amato, Robert J; Drury, Noel; Naylor, Stuart; Jac, Jaroslaw; Saxena, Somya; Cao, Amy; Hernandez-McClain, Joan; Harrop, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax). TroVax has been evaluated in an open-label phase 2 trial in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients in which the vaccine was administered either alone or in combination with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The comparative safety and immunologic and clinical efficacy of TroVax alone or in combination with GM-CSF was determined. Twenty-seven patients with metastatic hormone refractory prostate cancer were treated with TroVax alone (n=14) or TroVax+GM-CSF (n=13). 5T4-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by quantifying prostate-specific antigen concentrations and measuring changes in tumor burden by computer-assisted tomography scan. TroVax was well tolerated in all patients with no serious adverse events attributed to vaccination. Of 24 immunologically evaluable patients, all mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses. Periods of disease stabilization from 2 to >10 months were observed. Time to progression was significantly greater in patients who mounted 5T4-specific cellular responses compared with those who did not (5.6 vs. 2.3 mo, respectively). There were no objective clinical responses seen in this study. In this study, the combination of GM-CSF with TroVax showed similar clinical and immunologic responses to TroVax alone. The high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses and relationship with enhanced time to progression is encouraging and warrants further investigation. PMID:18528296

  19. Identifying Clinical Improvement in Consolidation Single-arm Phase II Trials in Ovarian Cancer Patients in Second or Greater Clinical Remission

    PubMed Central

    Iasonos, Alexia; Sabbatini, Paul; Spriggs, David R.; Aghajanian, Carol A.; O’Cearbhaill, Roisin E.; Hensley, Martee L.; Thaler, Howard T.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Estimates of Progression-Free Survival (PFS) from single-arm Phase II consolidation/maintenance trials for recurrent ovarian cancer are usually interpreted in the context of historical controls. We illustrate how the duration of second-line therapy (SLT), the time on the investigational therapy (IT) and patient enrollment plan can affect efficacy measures from maintenance trials and might result in underpowered studies. METHODS Efficacy data from three published single-arm consolidation therapies in second remission in ovarian cancer were used for illustration. The studies were designed to show an increase in estimated median PFS from 9 to 13.5 months. We partitioned PFS as the sum of the duration of SLT, treatment-free interval (TFI), and duration of IT. We calculated the statistical power when IT is given concurrently with SLT or following SLT by varying the start of IT. We compared the sample sizes required when PFS includes the time on SLT vs PFS that starts following SLT at initiation of IT. RESULTS Required sample sizes varied with duration of SLT. If IT starts with initiation of SLT, only 34 patients are needed to provide 80% power to detect a 33% hazard reduction. In contrast, 104 patients are required for a single arm study for 80% power, if IT begins 7.5 months after SLT initiation. CONCLUSIONS Designs of non-randomized consolidation trials that aim to prolong PFS must consider the effect of the duration of SLT on the endpoint definition and on required sample size. If IT is given concurrently with SLT, and following SLT, then SLT duration must be restricted per protocol eligibility, so that a comparison with historical data from other single-arm Phase II studies is unbiased. If IT is given following SLT, duration of SLT should be taken into account in the design stage since it will affect statistical power and sample size. PMID:22080877

  20. A Phase II prospective nonrandomized trial of magnetic resonance imaging-guided hematopoietic bone marrow-sparing radiotherapy for gastric cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianyang; Tian, Yuan; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Xin; Li, Ning; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Feng, Yanru; Wang, Shulian; Song, Yongwen; Liu, Yueping; Wang, Weihu; Li, Yexiong; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to spare hematopoietical bone marrow (BM) identified by magnetic resonance (MR) radiation in order to alleviate acute hematologic toxicity (HT) for gastric cancer patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods A prospective, open-label, single-arm Phase II study (Clinicaltrials.gov; NCT 01863420) was conducted in 25 patients with gastric cancer who were eligible for postoperative concurrent CRT. The MR images of vertebral body T8-L4 were fused with images of simulating computed tomography. Hematopoietical BM was contoured according to the MR and spared in radiotherapy plan. The CRT regimen consisted of daily capecitabine (1600 mg/m2/d) and 45 Gy of radiation at 1.8 Gy per day. Primary endpoints were grade ≥3 HT that occurred within 2 months of initiation of CRT. The relationship between HT and dose–volume of BM was estimated by multivariable linear regression model. Results Twenty four patients (96%) had T3–4 disease and 22 (88%) had disease with node positive. The median age was 53 years (range, 28–73 years). Before concurrent CRT, adjuvant chemotherapy was administered with a mean cycle of 4.3±0.5. Only five patients (20%) developed grade 3–4 HT during treatment, among whom two (8.0%) patients experienced grade 3–4 leucopenia, two (8.0%) experienced neutropenia, and two (8.0%) experienced thrombocytopenia, respectively. None of the patients showed grade 3–4 anemia. Multivariable linear regression revealed increased BM-V5 (P=0.03) and BM-V20 (P=0.002) were found to be significantly associated with decreased white blood cells nadirs in multivariable regression; increased BM-V20 (P<0.001) with decreased absolute neutrophil count nadirs, increased BM-V30 (P=0.002) and volume of BM (P=0.001) with decreased platelet count nadirs. Conclusion Irradiation of active BM identified by MR is associated with HTs. Techniques to limit low-dose radiation, especially V20, to BM could reduce HT in gastric cancer patients

  1. S-1 and Cisplatin With or Without Nimotuzumab for Patients With Untreated Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Randomized, Open-Label Phase 2 Trial.

    PubMed

    Du, Feng; Zheng, Zhaoxu; Shi, SuSheng; Jiang, Zhichao; Qu, Tao; Yuan, Xinhua; Sun, Yongkun; Song, Yan; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Jiuda; Wang, Jinwan; Chi, Yihebali

    2015-06-01

    This open-label, randomized phase II trial was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab plus S-1 and cisplatin (NCS) versus S-1 and cisplatin (CS) alone in patients with untreated unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer in the first-line setting. Eligible participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either NCS or CS. The treatment consisted of 3-week cycles of twice-daily S-1 40 mg/m² (on days 1-14) and intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m² (on days 1, 2), with or without weekly nimotuzumab (200 mg/m²). The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). The second endpoint included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), safety and association between efficacy and tumor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Between October, 2009, and February, 2012, we enrolled 62 patients in Cancer Hospital Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS). The ORR for 31 patients allocated NCS was 54.8% compared with 58.1% for 31 patients who were allocated to receive CS alone (P = 0.798). Median PFS for patients in CS arm was significantly improved than that in NCS arm [7.2 months vs. 4.8 months HR = 2.136 (95% CI 1.193-3.826), P = 0.011]. There was also a trend toward better overall survival for patients in CS arm compared with NCS arm [14.3 months vs. 10.2 months; HR = 1.776 (95% CI 0.972-3.246), P = 0.062]. In the EGFR 2+/3+ subgroup, adding nimotuzumab also failed to show additional benefit than chemotherapy alone. Both groups were well tolerated. Less than 10% of patients in both arms developed grade 3/4 toxicity. Combination of nimotuzumab and S-1-cisplatin provided no additional benefit than chemotherapy alone in the first-line treatment of unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:26061330

  2. QuickSilver: A Phase II Study Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria to Identify “Good Prognosis” Rectal Cancer Patients Eligible for Primary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, two nonrandomized, prospective cohort studies used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the circumferential resection margin to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery and have reported favorable outcomes. Objective The objective of this project was to conduct a Phase II trial to assess the safety and feasibility of MRI criteria to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery in the North American setting. Methods Patients with newly diagnosed primary rectal cancer attending surgical clinics at participating centers will be invited to participate in the study. The inclusion criteria for the study are: (1) diagnosis of rectal cancer (0-15 cm) from the anal verge on endoscopy and proximal extent of tumor at or below the sacral promontory on computed tomography (CT) or MRI; (2) meets all MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal tumor as defined by the study protocol; (3) 18 years or older; and (4) able to provide written consent. The initial assessment will include: (1) clinical and endoscopic examination of the primary tumor; (2) CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis; and (3) pelvic MRI. All potentially eligible cases will be presented at a multidisciplinary cancer conference to assess for eligibility based on the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” tumor which include: (1) predicted circumferential resection margin (CRM) > 1 mm; (2) definite T2, T2/early T3, or definite T3 tumor with < 5 mm of extramural depth of invasion (EMD); (3) any N0, N1, or N2; and (4) absence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI). All patients fulfilling the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal cancer and the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be invited to participate in the study and proceed to primary surgery. The safety of the MRI criteria will be evaluated by assessing the positive CRM rate and is the primary outcome for the study. Results We expect to have a minimum of 300 potentially

  3. Prospective phase II trial of pazopanib plus CapeOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Su Jin; Park, Se Hoon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Joon Oh

    2016-04-26

    We designed a single-arm, open label phase II study to determine the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of pazopanib with CapeOx (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in metastatic /recurrent advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients. Previously untreated AGC patients received capecitabine (850 mg/m2 bid, day 1-14) plus oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with pazopanib (800 mg, day 1-21) every three weeks. Treatment was continued until progression of the disease or intolerable toxicity was observed. In all, 66 patients were treated with pazopanib plus CapeOx. The median age of the patients was 51.5 years (range, 23.0-77), and the median ECOG performance status was 1 (0-1). Among all 66 patients, one complete response and 37 partial responses were observed (overall response rate, 62.4%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 45.7-73.5% accounting for the 2-stage design of this trial). Stable disease was observed in 23 patients (34.8%), revealing a 92.4% disease control rate. The median progression free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.6-7.4) and 10.5 months (95% CI, 8.1-12.9), respectively. Thirty-four patients (51.5%) experienced a treatment-related toxicity of grade 3 or more. The most common toxicities of grade 3 or more were neutropenia (15.1%), anemia (10.6%), thrombocytopenia (10.6%), anorexia (7.6%), nausea (3.0%), and vomiting (3.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. The combination of pazopanib and CapeOx showed moderate activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as a first-line treatment in metastatic / recurrent AGC patients (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130805). PMID:27003363

  4. Mitomycin C plus S-1 as second-line therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer: a noncomparative phase II study.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Young Saing; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Nam, Eunmi; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Woon Kee; Chung, Min

    2008-03-01

    S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine consisting of the 5-fluorouracil prodrug tegafur combined with two modulating substances, gimeracil and potassium oxonate. On the basis of the potential additive effect between mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-fluorouracil as a continuous infusion, we conducted a phase II study to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the combination of S-1 and MMC as second-line chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Patients with measurable AGC, progressive after one prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, received MMC (7 mg/m2) on day 1 and S-1 (40 mg/m2) twice daily as an intermittent regimen of 4 weeks of treatment followed by a 2-week rest. Treatment was repeated every 6 weeks. The primary objective was the response rate. For 43 patients registered, 42 patients were treated with MMC plus S-1. A total of 121 chemotherapy cycles were delivered (median: 2; range: 1-6). The patients' median age was 53 years (range: 31-75) and nine (21%) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. In an intent-to-treat analysis, nine patients (21%) achieved an objective response, which was maintained for 4.1 months. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.4 months (95% confidence interval: 2.3-4.5) and 8.0 months (95% confidence interval: 6.1-9.9), respectively. Although fatigue was the most frequently encountered toxicity safety profiles were generally predictable and manageable. One patient developed hemolytic anemia, which was resolved spontaneously. Grade > or = 2 hand-foot syndrome was observed in only three patients. Second-line chemotherapy with MMC and S-1 is an active and tolerable regimen for AGC patients with good performance status. PMID:18510177

  5. Vaccination of castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with TroVax (MVA-5T4) in combination with docetaxel: a randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Chu, Franklin; Gabrail, Nashat; Srinivas, Sandy; Blount, Daniel; Ferrari, Anna

    2013-09-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax®). Here, we report results from a randomized open-label phase II trial in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients in which TroVax was administered in combination with docetaxel and compared against docetaxel alone. The aim was to recruit 80 patients (40 per arm), but the study was terminated early due to recruitment challenges. Therefore, this paper reports the comparative safety and immunological and clinical efficacy in 25 patients, 12 of whom were treated with TroVax plus docetaxel and 13 with docetaxel alone. 5T4-specific immune responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by measuring changes in tumor burden by CT and bone scan and by quantifying PSA concentrations. TroVax was well tolerated in all patients. Of 10 immunologically evaluable patients, 6 mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses. Patients treated with TroVax plus docetaxel showed a greater median progression-free survival of 9.67 months compared with 5.10 months for patients on the docetaxel alone arm (P = 0.097; HR = 0.31; 95% CI 0.08-1.24). Importantly, a pre-treatment biomarker previously demonstrated to predict 5T4 immune response and treatment benefit showed a strong association with 5T4 antibody response and a statistically significant association with progression-free survival in patients treated with TroVax plus docetaxel, but not docetaxel alone. PMID:23877659

  6. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Chin, Keisho; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI) is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV) as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC. Methods Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2), and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS). Results The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44): median age, 60 years (range 32–80); male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months), and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six patients and diarrhea in five patients. There were no other severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths. Conclusion In mCRC patients with wild-type or heterozygous UGT1A1*6 or *28 genotype, biweekly XELIRI + BV is effective and feasible as second-line chemotherapy. Biweekly XELIRI + BV is considered a valid substitute for FOLFIRI

  7. A first-in-human phase I trial of LY2780301, a dual p70 S6 kinase and Akt Inhibitor, in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Azaro, Analia; Rodon, Jordi; Calles, Antonio; Braña, Irene; Hidalgo, Manuel; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P; Munoz, Manuel; Westwood, Paul; Miller, Joel; Moser, Brian A; Ohnmacht, Ute; Bumgardner, William; Benhadji, Karim A; Calvo, Emiliano

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this phase I study of LY2780301, a dual p70 S6 kinase and Akt inhibitor, was to determine the recommended phase II dose as a single agent in patients with advanced cancer. Secondary objectives included safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic analyses, and co-clinical analyses in Avatar models. Eligible patients received total daily doses of LY2780301 100-500 mg, given orally as a single dose or divided into 2 doses for 28-day cycles. Dose escalation followed 3 + 3 design. The primary pharmacodynamic endpoint was inhibition of S6 assessed by skin and tumor biopsy. Thirty-two patients were treated. Common toxicities possibly related to treatment included constipation (19 %), fatigue (13 %), nausea (9 %), and diarrhea (9 %). Grade 3/4 toxicities potentially related to treatment were anemia (n = 2), increased alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT) (n = 1), and increased gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (n = 1). One patient experienced best overall response of prolonged stable disease for 6 cycles. Plasma exposures of LY2780301 exceeded predicted efficacious exposures, but were not dose proportional. Among patients receiving 500 mg daily >50 % exhibited reduced S6 in skin biopsies at Day 8 of treatment, but the effect was not maintained. Plasma concentrations of LY2780301 and/or its metabolites were not correlated with S6 expression in the epidermis. There was minimal antitumor activity against the model, CRC 019. Avatar models showed minimal pharmacodynamic effects consistent with the observed antitumor effects. This study suggests a dose of LY2780301 500 mg QD for future studies. PMID:25902900

  8. Phase II Study of Single-Agent Navitoclax (ABT-263) and Biomarker Correlates in Patients with Relapsed Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Hann, Christine L.; Garon, Edward B.; Ribeiro de Oliveira, Moacyr; Bonomi, Philip D.; Camidge, D. Ross; Chu, Quincy; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Khaira, Divis; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Ranson, Malcolm R.; Dive, Caroline; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Chyla, Brenda J.; Dowell, Barry L.; Chakravartty, Arunava; Nolan, Cathy E.; Rudersdorf, Niki; Busman, Todd A.; Mabry, Mack H.; Krivoshik, Andrew P.; Humerickhouse, Rod A.; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Gandhi, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bcl-2 is a critical regulator of apoptosis that is overexpressed in the majority of small cell lung cancers (SCLC). Nativoclax (ABT-263) is a potent and selective inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. The primary objectives of this phase IIa study included safety at the recommended phase II dose and preliminary, exploratory efficacy assessment in patients with recurrent and progressive SCLC after at least one prior therapy. Experimental Design Thirty-nine patients received navitoclax 325 mg daily, following an initial lead-in of 150 mg daily for 7 days. Study endpoints included safety and toxicity assessment, response rate, progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS), as well as exploratory pharmacodynamic correlates. Results The most common toxicity associated with navitoclax was thrombocytopenia, which reached grade III–IV in 41% of patients. Partial response was observed in one (2.6%) patient and stable disease in 9 (23%) patients. Median PFS was 1.5 months and median OS was 3.2 months. A strong association between plasma pro–gastrin-releasing peptide (pro-GRP) level and tumor Bcl-2 copy number (R = 0.93) was confirmed. Exploratory analyses revealed baseline levels of cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1, neuron-specific enolase, pro-GRP, and circulating tumor cell number as correlates of clinical benefit. Conclusion Bcl-2 targeting by navitoclax shows limited single-agent activity against advanced and recurrent SCLC. Correlative analyses suggest several putative biomarkers of clinical benefit. Preclinical models support that navitoclax may enhance sensitivity of SCLC and other solid tumors to standard cytotoxics. Future studies will focus on combination therapies. PMID:22496272

  9. Final overall survival results of phase III GCIG CALYPSO trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and carboplatin vs paclitaxel and carboplatin in platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, U; Marth, C; Largillier, R; Kaern, J; Brown, C; Heywood, M; Bonaventura, T; Vergote, I; Piccirillo, M C; Fossati, R; Gebski, V; Lauraine, E P

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CALYPSO phase III trial compared CD (carboplatin-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD)) with CP (carboplatin-paclitaxel) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). Overall survival (OS) data are now mature. Methods: Women with ROC relapsing >6 months after first- or second-line therapy were randomised to CD or CP for six cycles in this international, open-label, non-inferiority trial. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The OS analysis is presented here. Results: A total of 976 patients were randomised (467 to CD and 509 to CP). With a median follow-up of 49 months, no statistically significant difference was observed between arms in OS (hazard ratio=0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.85, 1.16); log-rank P=0.94). Median survival times were 30.7 months (CD) and 33.0 months (CP). No statistically significant difference in OS was observed between arms in predetermined subgroups according to age, body mass index, treatment-free interval, measurable disease, number of lines of prior chemotherapy, or performance status. Post-study cross-over was imbalanced between arms, with a greater proportion of patients randomised to CP receiving post-study PLD (68%) than patients randomised to CD receiving post-study paclitaxel (43% P<0.001). Conclusion: Carboplatin-PLD led to delayed progression and similar OS compared with carboplatin-paclitaxel in platinum-sensitive ROC. PMID:22836511

  10. Phase I study of weekly nab-paclitaxel combined with S-1 in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Junji; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Masaki; Nishina, Shinichi; Makimura, Chihiro; Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Kunio; Yamashita, Toshinari; Aruga, Tomoyuki; Shigekawa, Takashi; Komoike, Yoshifumi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study of a weekly nab-paclitaxel and S-1 combination therapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The primary objective was to estimate the maximum tolerated and recommended doses. Each treatment was repeated every 21 days. Levels 1, 2a, 2b, and 3 were set depending on the S-1 dose (65 or 80 mg/m2) and nab-paclitaxel infusion schedule (days 1 and 8 or days 1, 8, and 15). Fifteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in one patient at Level 3 (100 mg/m2 nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8, and 15 with 80 mg/m2 S-1 daily for 14 days, followed by 7 days of rest). Although the maximum tolerated dose was not reached, the recommended dose was determined to be Level 3. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse event. For patients with measurable lesions, the response rate was 50.0% and the median time to treatment failure and median progression-free survival was 13.2 and 21.0 months, respectively. The present results show the feasibility and potential for long-term administration of this combination therapy. PMID:25786335

  11. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of the Novel Anti-androgen BMS-641988 in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rathkopf, Dana; Liu, Glenn; Carducci, Michael A; Eisenberger, Mario A; Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Slovin, Susan F; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Takahashi, Shunji; Ozono, Seiichiro; Fung, Nga Kit Eliza; Cheng, Shinta; Gan, Jinping; Gottardis, Marco; Obermeier, Mary T.; Reddy, Jyotsna; Zhang, Steven; Vakkalagadda, Blisse J.; Wilding, George; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose BMS-641988 is an androgen receptor antagonist with increased potency relative to bicalutamide in both in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. A first-in-man phase I study was conducted to define the safety and tolerability of oral BMS-641988 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Experimental Design Doses were escalated from 5 to 150 mg based on discrete pharmacokinetic parameters in cohorts of 3 to 6 subjects. After establishing safety with 20 mg of BMS-641988 in the United States, a companion study was opened in Japan to assess differences in drug metabolism between populations. Results Sixty-one men with CRPC were treated with daily BMS-641988. The pharmacokinetics of BMS-641988 and its active metabolites were proportional to dose. One patient experienced an epileptic seizure at a dose of 60 mg administered twice. Despite achieving target drug exposures, anti-tumor activity was limited to 1 partial response. Seventeen of 23 evaluable patients (74%) exhibited stable disease on imaging (median 15 weeks; range 8–32), and 10 of 61 patients (16%) achieved a ≥30%. decline in levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Partial agonism was seen within the context of this study upon removal of the drug as evidenced by a decrease in PSA. Conclusions Although the clinical outcomes of predominantly stable disease and partial agonism were similar to what was observed in the preclinical evaluation of the compound, the limited anti-tumor activity of BMS-641988 at therapeutic dose levels coupled with an episode of seizure activity led to study closure. PMID:21131556

  12. Phase II clinical study of eribulin monotherapy in Japanese patients with metastatic breast cancer who had well-defined taxane resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Okubo, Katsuhiko; Kimizuka, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Takashi; Ishizuna, Kazuo; Hata, Satoshi; Kai, Toshihiro; Kurosumi, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    No clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of eribulin monotherapy has been obtained by a prospective clinical study in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who had well-defined taxane resistance. The present Phase II, multicenter, single-arm, open-label study aimed to obtain the evidence. Japanese female patients, aged 33-74 years who had the metastasis of taxane-resistant and histopathologically confirmed breast cancer, received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m(2) (equivalent to eribulin 1.23 mg/m(2) [expressed as free base]) as a 2- to 5-min intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle. The primary endpoint was the clinical benefit rate (CBR) [complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and long-term stable disease (LSD) ≥24 weeks]. A total of 51 patients underwent chemotherapy cycles (median 4; range 1-42 cycles). The CBR was 39.2 % (CR 2.0 %; PR 23.5 %; and LSD 13.7 %), and the rate of progressive disease was 49.0 %. The median progression-free survival and the median overall survival were 3.6 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.6-4.6 months] and 11.7 months (95 % CI 9.2-14.2 months), respectively. Grade 3 or greater adverse events were leukopenia (23.5 %), neutropenia (35.3 %), anemia (5.9 %), and febrile neutropenia (7.8 %). The incidences of grade 3 and 4 peripheral sensory neuropathy were 2.0 and 0 %, respectively. Eribulin showed a clinically manageable tolerability profile by dose adjustments or symptomatic treatment. Eribulin was effective and well tolerated in heavily pretreated patients with MBC who had well-defined taxane resistance, thus providing a potential therapeutic option in the clinical settings. PMID:27125669

  13. Final results of a phase II study of nab-paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and gemcitabine as first-line therapy for patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Christopher; Lopes, Gilberto; Baez, Odalys; Castrellon, Aurelio; Ferrell, Annapoorna; Higgins, Connie; Hurley, Erin; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha; Richman, Stephen; Seo, Pearl; Silva, Orlando; Slingerland, Joyce; Tukia, Keleni; Welsh, Catherine; Glück, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    In order to examine the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P) in combination with bevacizumab (B) and gemcitabine (G) for the first-line treatment of patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC). In this single-center, open-label phase II trial, patients with HER2-negative MBC received gemcitabine 1500 mg/m(2), nab-paclitaxel 150 mg/m(2), and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg (each administered intravenously) on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point was progression free survival (PFS); secondary end points were overall response rate (ORR), complete (CR) and partial (PR) response rates, clinical benefit (ORR + stable disease), overall survival (OS), and safety. Thirty patients were enrolled. One patient was ineligible and was not included in analysis. Median PFS was 10.4 months (95% CI: 5.6-15.2 months). ORR was 75.9%, comprising eight (27.6%) CRs and 14 (48.3%) PRs; five patients had stable disease (SD) and two patients (6.9%) had progressive disease (PD) as their best response. The clinical benefit rate was 93.1% (27/29) in the overall group and 84.6% in the triple-negative cohort (11/13). The 18-month survival rate was 77.2% (95% CI: 51.1-90.5%). Eight (27.6%) patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicity: grade 4 neutropenic fever (n = 1) and grade 3 infection (n = 6), leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, peripheral neuropathy, seizure, shortness of breath, hematuria, and cardiac tamponade (one each). First-line therapy with nab-P, B, and G demonstrated a median PFS of 10.4 months and a 75.9% ORR with acceptable toxicity; this novel combination warrants investigation in a randomized study. PMID:20585851

  14. A phase I feasibility study of multi-modality imaging assessing rapid expansion of marrow fat and decreased bone mineral density in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Susanta K; Arentsen, Luke; Sueblinvong, Thanasak; Brown, Keenan; Bolan, Pat; Ghebre, Rahel G; Downs, Levi; Shanley, Ryan; Hansen, Karen E.; Minenko, Anne G.; Takhashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Zhang, Yan; Geller, Melissa; Reynolds, Margaret; Lee, Chung K; Blaes, Anne H.; Allen, Sharon; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Le, Chap; Froelich, Jerry; Rosen, Clifford; Yee, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer survivors are at an increased risk for fractures, but lack of effective and economical biomarkers limits quantitative assessments of marrow fat (MF), bone mineral density (BMD) and their relation in response to cytotoxic cancer treatment. We report dual energy CT (DECT) imaging, commonly used for cancer diagnosis, treatment and surveillance, as a novel biomarker of MF and BMD. Methods We validated DECT in pre-clinical and Phase I clinical trials and verified with water-fat MRI (WF-MRI), quantitative CT (QCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Basis material composition framework was validated using water and small-chain alcohols simulating different components of bone marrow. Histologic validation was achieved by measuring percent adipocyte in cadaver vertebrae and compared with DECT and WF-MRI. For a Phase I trial, sixteen patients with gynecologic malignancies (treated with oophorectomy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy) underwent DECT, QCT, WF-MRI and DXA before and 12 months after treatment. BMD and MF percent and distribution were quantified in lumbar vertebrae and the right femoral neck. Results Measured precision (3 mg/cm3) was sufficient to distinguish test solutions. Adiposity in cadaver bone histology was highly correlated with MF measured using DECT and WF-MRI (r = 0.80 and 0.77, respectively). In the clinical trial, DECT showed high overall correlation (r = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.83) with WF-MRI. MF increased significantly after treatment (p<0.002). Chemotherapy and radiation caused greater increases in MF than oophorectomy (p<0.032). L4 BMD decreased 14% by DECT, 20% by QCT, but only by 5% by DXA (p<0.002 for all). At baseline, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between MF and BMD which was dramatically attenuated after treatment. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that DECT, similar to WF-MRI, can accurately measure marrow adiposity. Both imaging modalities show rapid increase in MF following cancer treatment

  15. Treatment-Related Death in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Phase III Trials over the Last Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Oze, Isao; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment-related death (TRD) remains a serious problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), despite recent improvements in supportive care. However, few studies have formally assessed time trends in the proportion of TRD over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of TRD over time. Methods We examined phase 3 trials conducted between 1990 and 2010 to address the role of systemic treatment for SCLC. The time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results In total, 97 trials including nearly 25,000 enrolled patients were analyzed. The overall TRD proportion was 2.95%. Regarding the time trend, while it was not statistically significant, it tended to decrease, with a 0.138% decrease per year and 2.76% decrease per two decades. The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia without any significant time trend in its incidence over the years examined (p = 0.139). However, deaths due to febrile neutropenia as well as all causes in patients treated with non-platinum chemotherapy increased significantly (p = 0.033). Conclusions The overall TRD rate has been low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for SCLC over the past two decades. PMID:22880112

  16. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... mould-related diseases in immunocompromised patients. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud P. Fungal ... al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update ...

  17. A Phase II Study of Modulated-Capecitabine and Docetaxel in Chemonaive Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Bertino, Erin M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Fernandez, Soledad; Diasio, Robert B.; Karim, Nagla A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This phase II single-arm trial of docetaxel and capecitabine in previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was designed to evaluate response rate of this regimen based on promising efficacy data from phase II testing in pre-treated NSCLC patients. The trial also evaluated the correlation between peripheral blood dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression and efficacy/toxicity. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC (metastatic, including malignant pleural effusion) without prior chemotherapy were enrolled. Baseline DPD screening was performed; patients with baseline DPD level < 0.07 nmol/min/mg protein were considered ineligible for the study. Treatment included a 28-day cycle of docetaxel 36 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 and capecitabine 1250 mg/m2/day in divided doses on days 5–18. Overall response rate (RR) was the primary endpoint with a target RR of 50%. Correlative studies included evaluation of DPD activity levels in peripheral blood and correlation with clinical responses. Results Twenty-eight patients received 86 cycles of treatment (median 3 cycles) and were evaluable for response. The RR was 18% (5 patients); RR did not meet the pre-specified efficacy endpoint and the trial was stopped. 14 patients had stable disease (SD - 50%) and 4 pts had SD > 12 weeks. Median time to progression was 3.3 months (95% CI 1.5 – 4.6 months). Median overall survival was 10.5 months (95% CI: 3.2 – 15 months). Main toxicities included fatigue, stomatitis and leukopenia. DPD levels ranged from 0.06 to 0.26 nmol/min/mg. The majority of responders (4/5) had DPD levels ≤ 0.1 nmol/min/mg. Most of the responders (4/5) experienced grade 3 toxicities including leukopenia, dehydration, fatigue, and diarrhea. None of the patients (0/4) with higher DPD levels (>0.2 nmol/min/mg) had a response. Conclusion The response rate for the regimen did not demonstrate sufficient activity and further study of this regimen in this setting is not indicated

  18. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  19. Phase 1 Study of ABT-751 in Combination With CAPIRI (Capecitabine and Irinotecan) and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudek, Michelle A; Dasari, Arvind; Laheru, Daniel; He, Ping; Jin, Runyan; Walker, Rosalind; Taylor, Gretchen E; Jimeno, Antonio; Donehower, Ross C; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A; Purcell, W Thomas

    2016-08-01

    ABT-751 is an orally bioavailable sulfonamide with antimitotic properties. A nonrandomized phase 1 dose-escalation study of ABT-751 in combination with CAPIRI (capecitabine and irinotecan) and bevacizumab was conducted to define the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and pharmacokinetics in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Patients were treated with ABT-751 daily for 7 days (alone) and then began 21-day cycles of treatment with ABT-751 daily and capecitabine twice daily for 14 days plus irinotecan on day 1 intravenously. Bevacizumab was added as standard of care at 7.5 mg/kg on day 1 after the first 2 dose levels. Because of intolerance to the regimen, a reduced dose of ABT-751 was also explored with reduced-dose and full-dose CAPIRI with bevacizumab. ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics, ABT-751 glucuronidation, and protein binding were explored. Twenty-four patients were treated over 5 dose levels. The maximum tolerated dose was ABT-751 125 mg combined with full-dose CAPIRI and bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg on day 1. DLTs were hypokalemia, elevated liver tests, and febrile neutropenia. ABT-751 is metabolized by UGT1A8 and to a lesser extent UGT1A4 and UGT1A1. Irinotecan and APC exposure were increased, SN-38 exposure was similar, and SN-38 glucuronide exposure was decreased. Clinically relevant alterations in ABT-751 and irinotecan pharmacokinetics were not observed. Despite modest efficacy, the combination of ABT-751, CAPIRI, and bevacizumab will not be studied further in colorectal cancer. PMID:26632033

  20. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU. PMID:11367875

  1. CAM Provider Use and Expenditures by Cancer Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, William E.; Tyree, Patrick T.; Devlin, Sean M.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Diehr, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess cancer patients’ utilization of complementary and alternative medical providers and the associated expenditures by specific treatment phases. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of medical services utilization and expenditures during three therapeutic intervals: an initial treatment phase, continuing care, and end-of-life. Methods Analysis of an insurance claims database that had been matched to the Washington State SEER cancer registry. Results Of 2,900 registry-matched cancer patients 63.2% were female, the median age was 54 years, and 92.7% were white. Breast cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (52.7%), followed by prostate cancer (24.7%), lung cancer (10.1%), colon cancer (7.0%), and hematologic malignancies (5.6%). CAM provider using patients were 26.5% of the overall cohort (18.5% used chiropractors, 7.7% naturopathic physicians, 5.3% massage therapists, and 4.2% saw acupuncturists). The proportion of CAM using patients was similar during each treatment phase. All patients used some conventional care. Female gender, a breast cancer diagnosis, age, and white race were significant predictors of CAM use. Diagnosis of a musculoskeletal problem occurred at sometime during the study for 72.1% of cancer patients. CAM provider visits were 7.2% of total outpatient medical visits and 85.1% of CAM visits resulted in a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Expenditures for CAM providers were 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.1% of all expenditures during the initial, continuing, and end-of-life phases respectively. Conclusion For cancer patients, musculoskeletal issues were the most commonly listed diagnosis made by a CAM provider. Although expenditures associated with CAM are a small proportion of the total, additional studies are necessary to determine the importance patients place on access to these services. PMID:18471036

  2. A randomized phase II study of cediranib alone versus cediranib in combination with dasatinib in docetaxel resistant, castration resistant prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Anna; Chi, Kim N.; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Smith, David C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Kavsak, Peter; Wong, Tracy S.; Wang, Lisa; Ivy, S. Percy; Mukherjee, Som Dave; Kollmannsberger, Christian K.; Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Takebe, Naoko; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Siu, Lillian L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the oncogenic Src pathway has been implicated in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in preclinical models. Cediranib and dasatinib are multi-kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFR and Src respectively. Phase II studies of cediranib and dasatinib in CRPC have shown single agent activity. Methods Docetaxel-pretreated CRPC patients were randomized to arm A: cediranib alone (20 mg/day) versus arm B: cediranib (20 mg/day) plus dasatinib (100 mg/day) given orally on 4-week cycles. Primary endpoint was 12-week progression-free survival (PFS) as per the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group (PCWG2). Patient reported outcomes were evaluated using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Prostate (FACT-P) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scales. Correlative studies of bone turnover markers (BTM), including bone alkaline phosphate (BAP) and serum beta-C telopeptide (B-CTx) were serially assayed. Results A total of 22 patients, 11 per arm, were enrolled. Baseline demographics were similar in both arms. Median number of cycles =4 in arm A (range 1–12) and 2 in arm B (range 1–9). Twelve-week PFS was 73 % in arm A versus 18 % in arm B (p=0.03). Median PFS in months (arm A versus B) was: 5.2 versus 2.6 (95 % CI: 1.9–6.5 versus 1.4-not reached). Most common grade 3 toxicities were hypertension, anemia and thrombocytopenia in arm A and hypertension, diarrhea and fatigue in arm B. One treatment-related death (retroperitoneal hemorrhage) was seen in arm A. FACT-P and PPI scores did not significantly change in either arm. No correlation between BTM and PFS was seen in either arm. Conclusions Although limited by small numbers, this randomized study showed that the combination of VEGFR and Src targeted therapy did not result in improved efficacy and may be associated with a worse outcome than VEGFR targeted therapy alone in patients with CRPC. PMID:24788563

  3. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  4. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  5. Phase II trial of yttrium-90-DOTA-biotin pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Knox, S J; Goris, M L; Tempero, M; Weiden, P L; Gentner, L; Breitz, H; Adams, G P; Axworthy, D; Gaffigan, S; Bryan, K; Fisher, D R; Colcher, D; Horak, I D; Weiner, L M

    2000-02-01

    A Phase II study of yttrium-90-tetra-azacyclododecanetetra-acetic acid-biotin (90Y-DOTA-biotin) pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin (SA) was performed. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this therapy in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Twenty-five patients were treated with a single dose of 110 mCi/m2 (mean administered dose, 106.5 +/- 10.3 mCi/m2) of 90Y-DOTA-biotin. There were three components of the therapy. Patients first received NR-LU-10/SA on day 1. A clearing agent (biotin-galactose-human serum albumin) was administered approximately 48 h after the NR-LU-10/SA to remove residual circulating unbound NR-LU-10/SA. Lastly, 24 h after administration of clearing agent, patients received biotin-DOTA-labeled with 110 mCi/m2 90Y. All three components of the therapy were administered i.v. Both hematological and nonhematological toxicities were observed. Diarrhea was the most frequent grade 4 nonhematological toxicity (16%; with 16% grade 3 diarrhea). Hematological toxicity was less severe with 8% grade 3 and 8% grade 4 neutropenia and 8% grade 3 and 16% grade 4 thrombocytopenia. The overall response rate was 8%. Two partial responders had freedom from progression of 16 weeks. Four patients (16%) had stable disease with freedom from progression of 10-20 weeks. Despite the relatively disappointing results of this study in terms of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity, proof of principle was obtained for the pretargeting approach. In addition, valuable new information was obtained about normal tissue tolerance to low-dose-rate irradiation that will help to provide useful guidelines for future study designs. PMID:10690517

  6. Phase II trial of yttrium-90-DOTA-biotin pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin in patients with metastatic colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S J.; Goris, M L.; Tempero, M; Weiden, P L.; Gentner, L; Breitz, H; Adams, G P.; Axworthy, D; Gaffigan, S; Bryan, K; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Colcher, D; Horak, I D.; Weiner, L M.

    1999-12-01

    A Phase II study of yttrium-90-tetra-azacyclododecanetetra-acetic acid-biotin (Y-90-DOTA-biotin) pretargeted by NR-LU-10 antibody/streptavidin (SA) was performed. The primary objectives of the study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this therapy in patients with metastatic colon cancer. Twenty-five patients were treated with a single dose of 110 mCi/m{sup 2} (mean administered dose, 106.5-10.3 mCi/m{sup 2}) of Y-90-DOTA-biotin. There were three components of the therapy. Patients first received NR-LU-10/SA on day 1. A clearing agent (biotin-galactose-human serum albumin) was administered 48 h after the NR-LU-10/SA to remove residual circulating unbound NR-LU-10/SA. Lastly, 24 h after administration of clearing agent, patients received biotin-DOTA-labeled with 110 mCi/m{sup 2} Y-90. All three components of the therapy were administered i.v. Both hematological and nonhematological toxicities were observed. Diarrhea was the most frequent grade 4 nonhematological toxicity (16%; with 16% grade 3 diarrhea). Hematological toxicity was less severe with 8% grade 3 and 8% grade 4 neutropenia and 8% grade 3 and 16% grade 4 thrombocytopenia. The overall response rate was 8%. Two partial responders had freedom from progression of 16 weeks. Four patients (16%) had stable disease with freedom from progression of 10-20 weeks. Despite the relatively disappointing results of this study in terms of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity, proof of principle was obtained for the pretargeting approach. In addition, valuable new information was obtained about normal tissue tolerance to low-dose-rate irradiation that will help to provide useful guidelines for future study designs.

  7. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  8. Afatinib beyond progression in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer following chemotherapy, erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib: phase III randomized LUX-Lung 5 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, M.; Yang, J. C.-H.; Park, K.; Kim, J.-H.; Bennouna, J.; Chen, Y.-M.; Chouaid, C.; De Marinis, F.; Feng, J.-F.; Grossi, F.; Kim, D.-W.; Liu, X.; Lu, S.; Strausz, J.; Vinnyk, Y.; Wiewrodt, R.; Zhou, C.; Wang, B.; Chand, V. K.; Planchard, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Afatinib has demonstrated clinical benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer progressing after treatment with erlotinib/gefitinib. This phase III trial prospectively assessed whether continued irreversible ErbB-family blockade with afatinib plus paclitaxel has superior outcomes versus switching to chemotherapy alone in patients acquiring resistance to erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib monotherapy. Patients and methods Patients with relapsed/refractory disease following ≥1 line of chemotherapy, and whose tumors had progressed following initial disease control (≥12 weeks) with erlotinib/gefitinib and thereafter afatinib (50 mg/day), were randomized 2:1 to receive afatinib plus paclitaxel (40 mg/day; 80 mg/m2/week) or investigator's choice of single-agent chemotherapy. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Other end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), safety and patient-reported outcomes. Results Two hundred and two patients with progressive disease following clinical benefit from afatinib were randomized to afatinib plus paclitaxel (n = 134) or single-agent chemotherapy (n = 68). PFS (median 5.6 versus 2.8 months, hazard ratio 0.60, P = 0.003) and ORR (32.1% versus 13.2%, P = 0.005) significantly improved with afatinib plus paclitaxel. There was no difference in OS. Global health status/quality of life was maintained with afatinib plus paclitaxel over the entire treatment period. The median treatment duration was 133 and 51 days with afatinib plus paclitaxel and single-agent chemotherapy, respectively; 48.5% of patients receiving afatinib plus paclitaxel and 30.0% of patients receiving single-agent chemotherapy experienced drug-related grade 3/4 adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were consistent with those previously reported with each agent. Conclusion Afatinib plus paclitaxel improved PFS and ORR compared with single-agent chemotherapy in patients who acquired resistance to

  9. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II, Presurgical Biomarker Trial of Celecoxib Versus Exemestane in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Aristarco, Valentina; Serrano, Davide; Gandini, Sara; Johansson, Harriet; Macis, Debora; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Feroce, Irene; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Pagani, Gianmatteo; Toesca, Antonio; Caldarella, Pietro; DeCensi, Andrea; Bonanni, Bernardo

    2016-05-01

    In breast cancer presurgical trials, the Ki-67 labeling index predicts disease outcome and offers clues to the preventive potential of drugs. We conducted a placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the activity of exemestane and celecoxib before surgery. The main endpoint was the change in Ki-67. Secondary endpoints were the modulation of circulating biomarkers. Postmenopausal women with histologically confirmed estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer were randomly assigned to exemestane 25 mg/day (n = 50), or celecoxib 800 mg/day (n = 50), or placebo (n = 25) for 6 weeks before surgery. Changes in biomarkers were analyzed through an ANCOVA model adjusting for baseline values. Exemestane showed a median absolute 10% reduction in Ki-67 [from 22 (interquartile range, IQR, 16-27), to 8 (IQR 5-18)], and a 15% absolute reduction in PgR expression [from 50 (IQR 3-90) to 15 (IQR -0-30)] after 6 weeks of treatment. Exemestane significantly increased testosterone [median change 0.21 ng/mL, (IQR 0.12-0.35)], decreased SHBG [median change -14.6 nmol/L, (IQR -23.1 to -8.6)], decreased total and HDL cholesterol by -10 mg/dL (IQR -21-2) and -7 mg/dL, (IQR -14 to -2), respectively. Triglycerides were reduced by both agents [median change -0.5 mg/dL (IQR -17.5-13.5) and -8 mg/dL (IQR -28-9) for celecoxib and exemestane, respectively]. Exemestane showed a remarkable antiproliferative effect on breast cancer, whereas celecoxib did not affect breast cancer proliferation. Given the proven preventive efficacy of exemestane, these findings support the use of Ki-67 to explore the optimal exemestane dose and schedule in the prevention setting. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 349-56. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26928670

  10. Randomized Phase II Study of Pemetrexed, Carboplatin, and Thoracic Radiation With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 30407

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bogart, Jeffrey; Stinchcombe, Thomas; Wang, Xiaofei; Hodgson, Lydia; Kratzke, Robert; Garst, Jennifer; Brotherton, Timothy; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a randomized phase II trial to investigate two novel chemotherapy regimens in combination with concurrent thoracic radiation therapy (TRT). Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to carboplatin (area under the curve, 5) and pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) every 21 days for four cycles and TRT (70 Gy; arm A) or the same treatment with cetuximab administered concurrent only with TRT (arm B). Patients in both arms received up to four cycles of pemetrexed as consolidation therapy. The primary end point was the 18-month overall survival (OS) rate; if the 18-month OS rate was ≥ 55%, the regimen(s) would be considered for further study. Results Of the 101 eligible patients enrolled (48 in arm A and 53 in arm B), 60% were male; the median age was 66 years (range, 32 to 81 years); 44% and 35% had adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma, respectively; and more patients enrolled onto arm A compared with arm B had a performance status of 0 (58% v 34%, respectively; P = .04). The 18-month OS rate was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 74%) in arm A and 54% (95% CI, 42% to 70%) in arm B. No significant difference in OS between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC was observed (P = .667). The toxicities observed were consistent with toxicities associated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Conclusion The combination of pemetrexed, carboplatin, and TRT met the prespecified criteria for further evaluation. This regimen should be studied further in patients with locally advanced unresectable nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:21747084

  11. Phase I study utilizing a novel antigen-presenting cell-targeted vaccine with Toll-like receptor stimulation to induce immunity to self antigens in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael A.; Chapman, Robert; Powderly, John; Blackwell, Kimberly; Keler, Tibor; Green, Jennifer; Riggs, Renee; He, Li-Zhen; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; Zhao, Biwei; Butler, Stephen A.; Hobeika, Amy; Osada, Takuya; Davis, Thomas; Clay, Timothy; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The use of tumor-derived proteins as cancer vaccines is complicated by tolerance to these self antigens. Tolerance may be broken by immunization with activated, autologous, ex vivo generated and antigen-loaded, antigen-presenting cells (APC); however, targeting tumor antigen directly to APC in vivo would be a less complicated strategy. We wished to test whether targeted delivery of an otherwise poorly immunogenic, soluble antigen to APC through their mannose receptors (MR) would induce clinically relevant immunity. Experimental Design Two phase I studies were performed with CDX-1307, a vaccine composed of human chorionic gonadotropin beta chain (hCG-β) fused to a MR-specific monoclonal antibody, administered either locally (intradermally) or systemically (intravenously) in patients with advanced epithelial malignancies. An initial dose-escalation of single agent CDX-1307 was followed by additional cohorts of CDX-1307 combined with GM-CSF and the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 agonist poly-ICLC and TLR7/8 agonist resiquimod to activate the APC. Results CDX-1307 induced consistent humoral and T cell responses to hCG-β when co-administered with TLR agonists. Greater immune responses and clinical benefit, including the longest duration of stable disease, were observed with immunization combined with local TLR agonists. Immune responses were induced equally efficiently in patients with elevated and non-elevated levels of serum hCG-β. Antibodies within the serum of vaccinated participants had tumor suppressive function in vitro. Toxicity consisted chiefly of mild injection site reactions. Conclusions APC targeting and activation induce adaptive immunity against poorly immunogenic self antigens which has implications for enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21632857

  12. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  13. Dose modification and efficacy of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: phase III MPACT trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Moore, Malcolm; Macarulla, Teresa; Goldstein, David; Hammel, Pascal; Kunzmann, Volker; Liu, Helen; McGovern, Desmond; Romano, Alfredo; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dose modifications following adverse events (AEs) are an important part of the management of patients with pancreatic cancer treated with chemotherapy. While dose modifications are utilized to ensure patient safety, the subsequent influence of dose adjustments on treatment exposure and efficacy have not been reported in detail. This exploratory analysis examined the influence of dose modifications on treatment exposure and efficacy in the phase III MPACT trial, which demonstrated superior efficacy of nab-paclitaxel (nab-P) plus gemcitabine (Gem) to Gem alone for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Methods Patients received either nab-P 125 mg/m2 + Gem 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks or Gem 1,000 mg/m2 weekly for the first 7 of 8 weeks (cycle 1) and then days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks (cycle ≥2). The protocol allowed up to 2 dose reductions per agent. Dose delays were also used to manage toxicities. Results Toxicities that most commonly led to dose modifications were neutropenia, peripheral neuropathy, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue for nab-P and neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue for Gem alone. Baseline characteristics were similar in patients with dose modifications and the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Among the 421 treated patients in the nab-P + Gem arm, all patients initiated treatment at the per-protocol nab-P starting dose of 125 mg/m2; 172 (41%) had a nab-P dose reduction, and 300 (71%) had a nab-P dose delay during the study. Most dose modifications occurred after the first 3 months (2 cycles) of treatment. The majority of patients (104/172, 60%) required only 1 nab-P dose reduction, and over half of patients (163/300) had either 1 or 2 dose delays. Patients who underwent dose modifications of nab-P had greater treatment exposure than those who did not in terms of treatment duration, number of cycles administered, and cumulative dose of nab-P delivered. Overall survival (OS) was shorter in the nab-P + Gem

  14. Phase II study of lonidamine in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pronzato, P.; Amoroso, D.; Bertelli, G.; Conte, P. F.; Cusimano, M. P.; Ciottoli, G. B.; Gulisano, M.; Lionetto, R.; Rosso, R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer were entered in a phase II study with oral lonidamine. Twenty-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and 25 for response. A partial remission was obtained in four patients (16%) and disease stability in 11 (44%): 10 patients progressed (40%). Toxicity was acceptable, consisting mainly of myalgias (39% of patients) and asthenia (21.4%). No myelotoxicity was observed. The drug is active in previously treated metastatic breast cancer and, because of its peculiar pattern of action and toxicity, deserves to be evaluated in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:2930690

  15. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland. PMID:22765936

  16. Randomized phase II trial of TEGAFIRI (tegafur/uracil, oral leucovorin, irinotecan) compared with FOLFIRI (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan) in patients with unresectable/recurrent colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Kohei; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Okabayashi, Koji; Tsuruta, Masashi; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kondo, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-08-15

    Irinotecan-based chemotherapy with bevacizumab is one of the first-line standard therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). TEGAFIRI (UFT/LV + irinotecan) is an irinotecan-based chemotherapy regimen. Currently, few clinical data regarding TEGAFIRI are available. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of TEGAFIRI in Japanese patients with mCRC. This is a multicenter, randomized, phase II study. The major inclusion criteria were previously untreated patients with mCRC (age: 20-75 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status: 0-1). Eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either FOLFIRI ± bevacizumab or TEGAFIRI ± bevacizumab. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints were response rate, overall survival, dose intensity and toxicity. From November 2007 to October 2011, 36 and 35 patients assigned to the FOLFIRI and TEGAFIRI groups were included in the primary analysis. No significant difference in PFS was observed between the groups {median PFS: TEGAFIRI 9.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 6.5-14.7], FOLFIRI 10.6 months [95% CI, 7.7-16.5]; Hazard ratio, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.57-1.66, p = 0.930}. The response rates in the FOLFIRI and TEGAFIRI groups were 56% and 66%, respectively. Relative dose intensity was similar between the groups. The most common Grade 3/4 adverse event was diarrhea (26%) in TEGAFIRI group and neutropenia (39%) in the FOLFIRI group. The results of the present study indicate that TEGAFIRI ± bevacizumab is an effective and tolerable first-line treatment regimen for mCRC. PMID:27061810

  17. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  18. Phase I Study of Celecoxib with Concurrent Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy for Patients with Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei, Xiong; Allen, Pamela K.; Liao, Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Cox, James D.; O’Reilly, Michael S.; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Jeter, Melenda; Blumenschein, George R.; Kies, Merrill S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preclinical findings suggest that adding targeted therapies to combination radiation-chemotherapy can enhance treatment efficacy; however, this approach may enhance normal tissue toxicity. We investigated the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, and response rate when the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib is added to concurrent irinotecan, cisplatin, and radiation therapy for patients with inoperable stage II–III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients were analyzed in a phase I clinical dose-escalation trial. Celecoxib was given daily beginning 5 days before radiation followed by maintenance doses for 12 weeks. Toxicity was graded with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V3.0 and response with the World Health Organization system. Primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose of celecoxib and treatment toxicity; secondary endpoints were response and survival rates. Results: The maximum tolerated dose of celecoxib was not reached, in part owing to discontinuation of the drug supply. At doses of 200 or 400 mg/day, no patients experienced any dose-limiting toxicity (acute grade ≥4 esophagitis or pneumonitis, neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia requiring transfusion, or acute grade ≥3 diarrhea). Grade 3 toxicities were leukopenia (five patients), fatigue (3), pneumonitis (2), dyspnea (1), pain (1), and esophageal stricture (1). Interestingly, pulmonary fibrosis (a late toxicity) was no more severe in the higher-dose (400-mg) group and may have been less common than in the lower-dose group. The clinical response rate was 100% (8 complete, 10 partial). Two-year rates were: overall survival 65%; local-regional control 69%; distant metastasis-free survival 71%; and disease-free survival 64%. Conclusion: Although preliminary, our results suggest that adding celecoxib to concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable NSCLC is safe and can improve outcome without increasing normal

  19. Phase I Trial of Radiation With Concurrent and Consolidation Pemetrexed and Cisplatin in Patients With Unresectable Stage IIIA/B Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; MacRae, Robert; Laurie, Scott; Sun, Alex; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha; Pearson, Shannon; Southwood, Bernadette; Wang, Lisa; McGill, Shauna; Iscoe, Neill; Shepherd, Frances A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of concurrent pemetrexed/cisplatin/thoracic radiotherapy followed by consolidation pemetrexed/cisplatin for unresectable Stage IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with <5% weight loss and good performance status received two cycles of pemetrexed (300, 400, or 500 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 22 for Dose Levels 1, 2, and 3/4, respectively) and cisplatin (25 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1-3 for Dose Levels 1-3; 20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1-5 for Dose Level 4) concurrent with thoracic radiation (61-66 Gy in 31-35 fractions). Consolidation consisted of two cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin (500 mg/m{sup 2}, 75 mg/m{sup 2}) 21 days apart, after concurrent therapy. Results: Between January 2006 and October 2007, 16 patients entered the study. Median follow-up was 17.2 months. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Median radiation dose was 64 Gy (range, 45-66 Gy). Rates of significant Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity were 38% and 7%, respectively. One patient experienced Grade 3 acute esophagitis, and 2 experienced late (Grade 3) esophageal stricture, successfully managed with dilation. One patient experienced Grade 3 pneumonitis. The overall response rate was 88%. One-year overall survival was 81%. Conclusions: Full systemic dose pemetrexed seems to be safe with full-dose cisplatin and thoracic radiation in Stage IIIA/B NSCLC. Pemetrexed is the first third-generation cytotoxic agent tolerable at full dose in this setting. A Phase II study evaluating Dose Level 4 is ongoing.

  20. FemZone trial: a randomized phase II trial comparing neoadjuvant letrozole and zoledronic acid with letrozole in primary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this prospectively randomized phase II trial (Trial registration: EUCTR2004-004007-37-DE) was to compare the clinical response of primary breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant therapy with letrozole alone (LET) or letrozole and zoledronic acid (LET + ZOL). Methods Patients were randomly assigned to receive either LET 2.5 mg/day (n = 79) or the combination of LET 2.5 mg/day and a total of seven infusions of ZOL 4 mg every 4 weeks (n = 89) for 6 months. Primary endpoint was clinical response rate as assessed by mammogram readings. The study was terminated prematurely due to insufficient recruitment. We report here on an exploratory analysis of this data. Results Central assessment of tumor sizes during the treatment period was available for 131 patients (66 LET, 65 LET + ZOL). Clinical responses (complete or partial) were seen in 54.5% (95% CI: 41.8-66.9) of the patients in the LET arm and 69.2% (95% CI: 56.6-80.1) of those in the LET + ZOL arm (P = 0.106). A multivariate model showed an OR of 1.72 (95% CI: 0.83-3.59) for the experimental arm. Conclusion No increase in the clinical response rate was observed with the addition of ZOL to a neoadjuvant treatment regimen with LET. However a trend towards a better reponse in the LET + ZOL arm could be observed. This trend is consistent with previous studies that have investigated the addition of ZOL to chemotherapy, and it may support the evidence for a direct antitumor action of zoledronic acid. PMID:24499441

  1. Randomized phase II trial of docetaxel with or without PSA-TRICOM vaccine in patients with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer: A trial of the ECOG-ACRIN cancer research group (E1809)

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G; Chen, Yu-Hui; Gulley, James L; Dwyer, Alexander J; Madan, Ravi A; Carducci, Michael A; DiPaola, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor vaccines have demonstrated efficacy in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. One vaccine, Prostvac-VF®, using a heterologous prime-boost strategy with vaccinia and fowlpox viral vectors encoding PSA, is currently being evaluated in a registration phase III multinational clinical trial. The current trial was planned to assess the clinical efficacy of this vaccine in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer receiving subsequent docetaxel chemotherapy. 10 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with a predicted survival of at least 18 months, were enrolled out of a planned 144 patients. Eight of 10 patients were treated and were randomized to receive docetaxel chemotherapy alone (Arm B, n = 2) versus treatment with Prostvac-VF (days 1, 15, 29, 43, 57) followed by docetaxel (Arm A, n = 6) chemotherapy beginning at month 3. The primary endpoint of the trial was overall survival, and secondary endpoints included time to radiographic progression and immunological response. The trial was opened within the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, but due to slow accrual was closed by CTEP after only 10 patients were enrolled within 13 months. Results: Presented here are the safety, clinical, and immunological results from 8 eligible patients who underwent treatment. Two of 6 patients treated on Arm A, with vaccine followed by docetaxel, had a >50% PSA response, with one of these patients experiencing a PSA decline during treatment with vaccine. Significant PSA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and IgG antibody responses specific for PSA were not detected. The primary endpoint of overall survival cannot be assessed due to limited accrual. The lack of T-cell responses, even in this small cohort, suggests that further validation and development of immune biomarkers will be important for future studies. Other trials remain ongoing to evaluate the role of anti-tumor vaccination in sequence

  2. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality. PMID:20070056

  3. Cross-trial analysis of immunologic and clinical data resulting from phase I and II trials of MVA-5T4 (TroVax) in colorectal, renal, and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Shingler, William; Kelleher, Michelle; de Belin, Jackie; Treasure, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus MVA has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (MVA-5T4; TroVax), a surface glycoprotein expressed by most solid tumors. MVA-5T4 has been tested in 2 phase I/II and 7 phase II clinical trials in colorectal (4 trials), renal (4 trials), and prostate (1 trial) advanced cancer patients. Data have been collated from all 9 studies and used to investigate the magnitude and kinetics of 5T4-specific antibody responses after vaccination and to identify potential associations between the immune response and patient survival. Antibody responses specific for the 5T4 tumor antigen and the MVA viral vector were quantified in plasma samples taken from cancer patients before and after the treatment with MVA-5T4. Immunologic and survival data were analyzed using proportional hazards regression adjusting for age and gender. Both survival and immunologic response data were available for 189 patients with colorectal (n=73), renal (n=89), and prostate (n=27) cancer. Before the treatment with MVA-5T4, 5T4-specific antibody levels were significantly elevated in cancer patients compared with healthy donors. After MVA-5T4 administration, 5T4-specific antibody responses increased significantly and peaked after 3 to 4 vaccinations. Exploratory analyses showed significant associations between 5T4 antibody responses and overall survival across all 9 trials and in patients with colorectal cancer. The 5T4-specific antibodies were present at higher levels in cancer patients compared with healthy donors and increased significantly after treatment with MVA-5T4. Although the studies were uncontrolled, there were encouraging signs of activity which is associated with the magnitude of 5T4-specific antibody responses. PMID:20948436

  4. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC). This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD) with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21) or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28). Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93), with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS) 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI) of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016). The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23%) and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454). No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%). More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016), skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE) grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, P< 0.001), while grade 3 neurotoxicity and alopecia were higher in CP (7% versus 0%, P = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003). PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279 PMID

  5. Phase II Evaluation of Gefitinib in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Grade 4 Astrocytoma: Mayo/North Central Cancer Treatment Group Study N0074

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Joon H.; Ballman, Karla V.; Wu Wenting; Giannini, Caterina; Krauss, J.C.; Buckner, Jan C.; James, C.D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Behrens, Robert J.; Flynn, Patrick J.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Dakhill, Shaker R.; Jaeckle, Kurt A.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene represents one of the most frequent gene alterations in glioblastoma (GBM). In the current study, we evaluated gefitinib, a potent EGFR inhibitor, in the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight patients (96 evaluable) were accrued between May 18, 2001, and August 2, 2002. All were newly diagnosed GBM patients who were clinically and radiographically stable/improved after radiation treatment (enrollment within 5 weeks of radiation completion). No prior chemotherapy was permitted. EGFR amplification/mutation, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, was not required for treatment with gefitinib but was studied when tissues were available. Gefitinib was administered at 500 mg each day; for patients receiving dexamethasone or enzyme-inducing (CYP3A4) agents, dose was escalated to a maximum of 1,000 mg QD. Treatment cycles were repeated at 4-week intervals with brain magnetic resonance imaging at 8-week intervals. Results: Overall survival (OS; calculated from time of initial surgery) at 1 year (primary end point) with gefitinib was 54.2%, which was not statistically different compared with that of historical control population (48.9%, data from three previous Phase III North Central Cancer Treatment Group studies of newly diagnosed GBM patients). Progression-free survival (PFS) at 1 year post-RT (16.7%) was also not significantly different to that of historical controls (30.3%). Clinical outcome was not affected by EGFR status (amplification or vIII mutation). Fatigue (41%), rash (62%), and loose stools (58%) constituted the most frequent adverse events, the majority of these being limited to Grade 1/2. Of note, the occurrence of drug-related adverse effects, such as loose stools was associated with improved OS. Conclusions: In our evaluation of nearly 100 patients with newly diagnosed GBM, treatment with adjuvant

  6. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  7. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Straker, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective as an approach to understanding the psychological conflicts and the psychiatric symptoms of cancer patients as well as to planning useful psychological interventions. The author recommends that the psychotherapist who treats cancer patients be familiar with the following: 1) the natural course and treatment of the illness, 2) a flexible approach in accord with the medical status of the patient, 3) a common sense approach to defenses, 4) a concern with quality-of-life issues, and 5) counter- transference issues as they relate to the treatment of very sick patients. Case reports illustrate the unique problems facing psychotherapists who are treating cancer patients. Further, these cases show the effective use of psychodynamic principles to inform the therapist of successful psychotherapeutic interventions. PMID:9407471

  8. A RANDOMIZED PHASE II TRIAL OF THE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE INHIBITOR BMS-275291 IN HORMONE-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS WITH BONE METASTASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: BMS-275291 is a selective matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) that does not inhibit sheddases implicated in the dose-limiting arthritis of older MMPIs. We conducted a randomized phase II trail of two doses of BMS-275291 (1,200 versus 2,400 mg) in hormone-refractory prostate cancer ...

  9. A phase 1 study of a heterologous prime-boost vaccination involving a truncated HER2 sequence in patients with HER2-expressing breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Jeongeun; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2015-01-01

    A phase 1 clinical trial was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of a heterologous prime-boost strategy involving plasmid DNA (pHM-GM-CSF, expressing truncated human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulation factor (GM-CSF) as a bicistronic message) and an adenoviral vector (Ad-HM, containing the same modified HER2 sequence only), in patients with stage III–IV metastatic breast cancer expressing HER2. Nine eligible subjects were divided into three cohorts based on the dosages (2, 4, and 8 mg/patient/visit) of pHM-GM-CSF used as the primer, which was intramuscularly injected three times at weeks 0, 2, and 4. It was followed by a single injection of Ad-HM (3 × 109 virus particles), used as a booster, at week 6. During the 6-month follow-up period, adverse events (AEs), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and HER2-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated. Seven cases of minor grade 1 toxicities in four of nine subjects and no serious drug-related AEs were reported. HER2-specific cell-mediated or humoral immunity was produced in all (100%) or three subjects (33%), respectively. One subject showed a partial response, and seven subjects had stable diseases. However, there were no differences in clinical tumor response and HER2-specific immune responses among the cohorts. These results showed that intramuscular injections of pHM-GM-CSF and Ad-HM were well tolerated and safe. PMID:26445724

  10. Efficacy and safety of leuprorelin acetate 6-month depot in prostate cancer patients: a Phase III, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, comparative study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Namiki, Mikio; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Kudou, Kentarou; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leuprorelin acetate (TAP-144-SR) is commonly used worldwide in prostate cancer patients. This study was conducted to assess the non-inferiority of a 6-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [6M]) 22.5 mg to a 3-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [3M]) 11.25 mg in prostate cancer patients in Japan. Methods This was a 48-week Phase III, open-label, parallel-group comparative study. TAP-144-SR (6M) 22.5 mg (6M group) and TAP-144-SR (3M) 11.25 mg (3M group) were administered to 81 and 79 subjects, respectively. The primary endpoint was the rate of serum testosterone suppression to the castrate level (≤100 ng/dl). Results Serum testosterone of all subjects excluding one subject in the 3M group was suppressed to the castrate level throughout 48 weeks. The estimated between-group difference (6M group − 3M group) in suppression rate was 1.3% (95% confidence interval: −3.4, 6.8), and its lower confidence interval was more than −10% of the pre-determined allowable limit value to judge the non-inferiority. The prostate-specific antigen concentrations were stable throughout the study in both groups. Progressive disease in the best overall response based on the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors was 0.0% for the 6M group and 2.6% for the 3M group. Adverse events occurred in 92.6% in the 6M group and 89.9% in the 3M group. Adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported in 2.5% in the 6M group and 3.8% in the 3M group. Conclusions TAP-144-SR (6M) was not inferior to TAP-144-SR (3M) for the suppressive effect on serum testosterone level. TAP-144-SR (6M) was also as well tolerated as TAP-144-SR (3M). PMID:26486824

  11. Serum differential protein identification of Xinjiang Kazakh esophageal cancer patients based on the two-dimensional liquid-phase chromatography and LTQ MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Cui; Xia, Guo; Jianqing, Zhang; Mei, Yang; Ge, Bai; Li, Zhang

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of chemo-radiotherapy on serum protein expression of the esophageal cancer patients and discover potential biomarkers by detecting serum proteins mass spectrometry of the healthy Kazakh people in Xinjiang as well as the patients before and after their chemo-radiotherapy. In order to separate and compare the three serum samples (the healthy group's, the patients' before and after chemo-radiotherapy) with two-dimensional protein liquid chromatography system (Proteome LabTM PF-2D), then detect the differential protein spots with linear trap quadruple mass spectrometer (LTQ MS/MS). (1) The Kazakh esophageal cancer patients got 21 expressed protein spots peaks with significant difference after chemo-radiotherapy compared with before; before the treatment there were 10 different expressed protein spots compared with the healthy group, and after it there were four peaks in the expression of protein spots compared with the healthy group. (2) After LTQ mass spectrometric detection, 22 proteins were up-regulated in serum samples of the healthy group, 22 were up-regulated of the patients before medical treatment and 5 were up-regulated after chemo-radiotherapy. (3) 8 proteins including APOA1 can be served as serum markers in Kazakh esophageal cancer diagnosis, and proteins like CLU can be served as serum markers in judging the resistance and sensitivity towards chemo-radiotherapy. (4) The abnormal expressions of APOC2, APOC3, Antithrombin-III in esophageal cancer were discovered for the first time. Specific protein spots related to Xinjiang Kazakh esophageal cancer diagnosis and chemo-radiotherapy can be identified in the serum, which will probably become a maker in Kazakh esophageal cancer diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. PMID:24469726

  12. Epigenetic Therapy Using Belinostat for Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Multicenter Phase I/II Study With Biomarker and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tumors From Patients in the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Cancer Therapeutics Research Group

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Winnie; Chung, Hyun C.; Chan, Stephen L.; Wang, Ling Z.; Lim, Robert; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Koh, Jane; Rha, Sun Y.; Hui, Edwin P.; Jeung, Hei C.; Roh, Jae K.; Yu, Simon C.H.; To, Ka F.; Tao, Qian; Ma, Brigette B.; Chan, Anthony W.H.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Erlichman, Charles; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Goh, Boon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic aberrations have been reported in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study of patients with unresectable HCC and chronic liver disease, epigenetic therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat was assessed. The objectives were to determine dose-limiting toxicity and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), to assess pharmacokinetics in phase I, and to assess activity of and explore potential biomarkers for response in phase II. Patients and Methods Major eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed unresectable HCC, European Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≤ 2, and adequate organ function. Phase I consisted of 18 patients; belinostat was given intravenously once per day on days 1 to 5 every 3 weeks; dose levels were 600 mg/m2 per day (level 1), 900 mg/m2 per day (level 2), 1,200 mg/m2 per day (level 3), and 1,400 mg/m2 per day (level 4). Phase II consisted of 42 patients. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), and the main secondary end points were response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory analysis was conducted on pretreatment tumor tissues to determine whether HR23B expression is a potential biomarker for response. Results Belinostat pharmacokinetics were linear from 600 to 1,400 mg/m2 without significant accumulation. The MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered. Dose level 4 was used in phase II. The median number of cycles was two (range, one to 12). The partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 2.4% and 45.2%, respectively. The median PFS and OS were 2.64 and 6.60 months, respectively. Exploratory analysis revealed that disease stabilization rate (complete response plus PR plus SD) in tumors having high and low HR23B histoscores were 58% and 14%, respectively (P = .036). Conclusion Epigenetic therapy with belinostat demonstrates tumor stabilization and is generally well-tolerated. HR23B

  13. Patient-Reported Outcome Results From the Open-Label Phase III AURELIA Trial Evaluating Bevacizumab-Containing Therapy for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stockler, Martin R.; Hilpert, Felix; Friedlander, Michael; King, Madeleine T.; Wenzel, Lari; Lee, Chee Khoon; Joly, Florence; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Arranz, José Angel; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sorio, Roberto; Freudensprung, Ulrich; Sneller, Vesna; Hales, Gill; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of bevacizumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs; secondary end point) in the AURELIA trial. Patients and Methods Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to chemotherapy alone (CT) or with bevacizumab (BEV-CT). PROs were assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Ovarian Cancer Module 28 (EORTC QLQ-OV28) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Ovarian Cancer symptom index (FOSI) at baseline and every two or three cycles (8/9 weeks) until disease progression. The primary PRO hypothesis was that more patients receiving BEV-CT than CT would achieve at least a 15% (≥ 15-point) absolute improvement on the QLQ-OV28 abdominal/GI symptom subscale (items 31-36) at week 8/9. Patients with missing week 8/9 questionnaires were included as unimproved. Questionnaires from all assessments until disease progression were analyzed using mixed-model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine the effects of differing assumptions and methods for missing data. Results Baseline questionnaires were available from 89% of 361 randomly assigned patients. More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved a ≥ 15% improvement in abdominal/GI symptoms at week 8/9 (primary PRO end point, 21.9% v 9.3%; difference, 12.7%; 95% CI, 4.4 to 20.9; P = .002). MMRM analysis covering all time points also favored BEV-CT (difference, 6.4 points; 95% CI, 1.3 to 11.6; P = .015). More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved ≥ 15% improvement in FOSI at week 8/9 (12.2% v 3.1%; difference, 9.0%; 95% CI, 2.9% to 15.2%; P = .003). Sensitivity analyses gave similar results and conclusions. Conclusion Bevacizumab increased the proportion of patients achieving a 15% improvement in patient-reported abdominal/GI symptoms during chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24687829

  14. Patterning of Facial Expressions among Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonoff, Steven R.; Spilka, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Evaluated the possible significance of nonverbal communication in 49 terminal cancer patients using the Facial Affect Scoring Technique. Results showed fear was highest in early stages of illness. Sadness increased regularly from the early to late phase. (JAC)

  15. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  16. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  17. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  18. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Ake; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  19. Uracil/ftorafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results of randomised phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E; Di Bartolomeo, M; Buzzoni, R; Mariani, L; Zilembo, N; Ferrario, E; Lo Vullo, S; Aitini, E; Isa, L; Barone, C; Jacobelli, S; Recaldin, E; Pinotti, G; Iop, A

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluates the safety and efficacy profile of uracil/tegafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX). One hundred and forty-three patients with measurable, non-resectable metastatic colorectal cancer were randomised in a multicentre study to receive TEGAFIRI (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, irinotecan 240 mg m−2 day 1; q21) or TEGAFOX (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, oxaliplatin 120 mg m−2 day 1; q21). Among 143 randomised patients, 141 were analysed (68 received TEGAFIRI and 73 TEGAFOX). The main characteristics of the two arms were well balanced. The most common grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (13% of cases with TEGAFIRI; 1% in the TEGAFOX group). Diarrhoea was prevalent in the TEGAFIRI arm (16%) vs TEGAFOX (4%). Six complete remission (CR) and 19 partial remission (PR) were recorded in the TEGAFIRI arm (odds ratio (OR): 41.7; 95% confidence limit (CL), 29.1–55.1%), and six CR and 22 PR were recorded in the TEGAFOX group, (OR: 38.9; 95% CL, 27.6–51.1). At a median time follow-up of 17 months (intequartile (IQ) range 12–23), a median survival probability of 20 and 19 months was obtained in the TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX groups, respectively. Median time to progression was 8 months for both groups. TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX are both effective and tolerable first-line therapies in MCRC patients. The employment of UFT/LV given in doublet combination is interesting and the presented data appear comparable to equivalent infusion regimens described in the literature. The safety profile of the two combinations also allows an evaluation with other biological agents such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17245343

  20. Treatment of older patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel: subgroup analyses from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial (CLEOPATRA).

    PubMed

    Miles, David; Baselga, José; Amadori, Dino; Sunpaweravong, Patrapim; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Ross, Graham; Swain, Sandra M

    2013-11-01

    Although the incidence of cancer increases with age, older patients are under-represented in cancer treatment trials, resulting in limited data availability in this patient population. Here we present results from pre-defined subgroup analyses conducted by age group (<65 vs ≥ 65 years) from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients who had not received previous chemotherapy or biological therapy for HER2-positive locally recurrent, unresectable or metastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned to treatment with placebo, trastuzumab, and docetaxel or with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel. Primary endpoint was independently assessed progression-free survival. We performed pre-specified subgroup analyses of progression-free survival according to age. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00567190. 808 patients were enrolled. Of those, 127 patients were 65 years of age or older (placebo arm: 67, pertuzumab arm: 60). Patients in both age groups experienced progression-free survival benefit with treatment in the pertuzumab arm (<65 years: HR: 0.65; 95 % CI 0.53-0.80; ≥65 years: HR: 0.52; 95 % CI 0.31-0.86). Diarrhoea, fatigue, asthenia, decreased appetite, vomiting, and dysgeusia were reported more frequently in patients 65 years of age or older compared with younger patients. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were reported less frequently in the older age group. The efficacy and safety data reported in CLEOPATRA suggest that the combined use of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel should not be limited by patient age. PMID:24129974

  1. [Fertility in testicular cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Miyata, Akane; Arai, Gaku; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Testicular cancer(TC)is the most common and curable cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Successful treatment approaches have resulted in longer life expectancy in TC survivors. The most frequently used treatment for TC is a combination of inguinal orchiectomy, and either radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In many TC patients, sperm quality is already abnormal and there may even be a lack of viable spermatozoa at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, the effect of cancer treatment on fertility is a potentially significant issue. Fertility preservation in these men has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. The only currently established fertility preservation method is the cryopreservation of sperm before therapy. For most patients seeking cryopreservation, the semen sample is collected via masturbation. If the patient is unable to ejaculate for any reason, other techniques such as vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation can be performed. In azoospermic or severely oligozoospermic patients, testicular sperm extraction at the time of the inguinal orchiectomy is a useful technique for obtaining spermatozoa before cytotoxic therapy. We herein present an overview of the current topics on fertility in TC patients, including the effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. We also describe the strategy for fertility preservation in these patients. PMID:25812494

  2. Transfusion issues in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa

    2012-04-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) therapy plays a major role in the case of patients with cancer. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are given for increased oxygen-carrying capacity, platelets concentrates (PC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for the cessation and prevention of bleeding due to thrombocytopenia and other defects of hemostasis associated with neoplasia. All these blood components can induce complications and/or adverse reactions in cancer patients including transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD), transfusion transmitted diseases, alloimmunization to blood cell antigens, pulmonary decompensation, immunomodulation. Therefore, specific modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients should be introduced to reduce the risk of these complications. Patients undergoing hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation are a unique group and present complex concerns related to transfusion, including major and minor ABO incompatibility and chimeric blood cells. Therefore, transfusion for patients undergoing treatment with cellular therapies requires careful blood component selection. The process of HPC infusion itself carries many risks including DMSO toxicity and hemolytic reactions. In all areas of transfusion therapy, new advances such as pathogen inactivation and synthetic alternatives to blood components should help to increase the safety and tolerance of transfusion in cancer patients. PMID:22682136

  3. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in combination with mitomycin C, infusional 5-fluorouracil and sodium folinic acid. A phase-I-study in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofheinz, R-D; Willer, A; Weisser, A; Gnad, U; Saussele, S; Kreil, S; Hartmann, J T; Hehlmann, R; Hochhaus, A

    2004-05-17

    Mitomycin C (MMC) in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil (FU) plus folinic acid (FA) is an effective treatment for metastatic gastrointestinal cancer. Anthracyclines are commonly used in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of liposomal, pegylated doxorubicin (Caelyx) in combination with infusional 5-FU/sodium FA and MMC. Escalating doses of Caelyx (15-25-30-35 mg m(-2) corresponding to dose levels I-IV) were applied on days 1 and 29, given to fixed doses of 24-h 5-FU (2000 mg m(-2)) and sodium FA (500 mg m(-2), mixed with 5-FU in one pump) weekly for 6 weeks, and MMC 7 mg m(-2) on days 8 and 36. At least three patients were treated at each dose level. A total of 25 patients are evaluable. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed on level I (n=3). On level II, DLT occurred in three out of five patients (mucositis and leucopenia). Owing to the early DLTs at this dose, we added a 20 mg m(-2) Caelyx dose level (Ia). In total, 17 patients were treated at this dose level. Among these, only two patients experienced DLT in cycle one and 37 complete cycles have been administered in association with a low toxicity profile. The median dose intensity was 100% for each drug during the first course and no treatment delay exceeding 7 days was required. The recommended dose of 4-weekly Caelyx in combination with weekly 24-h 5-FU/sodium FA and 4-weekly MMC is 20 mg m(-2). Preliminary antitumour activity has been observed in patients with pretreated pancreatic cancer and in untreated gastric cancer. PMID:15138468

  4. A phase I study of the chinese herbal medicine PHY906 as a modulator of irinotecan-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; Copur, M Sitki; Rose, Michal; Wadler, Scott; Stephenson, Joe; O'Rourke, Mark; Brenckman, Wayne; Tilton, Robert; Liu, Shwu-Huey; Jiang, Zaoli; Su, Tahmun; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chu, Edward

    2011-06-01

    PHY906 is a novel Chinese herbal preparation that has been used in the Orient for over 1800 years to treat a wide range of gastrointestinal side effects including diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, fever, and headache. Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to further investigate the biologic and clinical activities of this herbal medicine. To ensure standardization and maintain interbatch reliability of PHY906, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to establish a "chemical fingerprint" of PHY906. In vivo preclinical studies using the murine Colon 39 tumor model showed that PHY906 protected against the weight loss associated with irinotecan treatment. In the presence of PHY906, mice were able to tolerate otherwise lethal doses of irinotecan. Significantly improved antitumor activity and overall survival were observed in animals treated with the combination of irinotecan and PHY906 versus irinotecan alone. The combination of PHY906 with irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and leucovorin (LV) also resulted in at least additive antitumor activity with no increased host toxicity. Based on these in vivo studies, a phase I multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose escalation, cross-over study of PHY906 as a modulator of the weekly, bolus regimen of irinotecan, 5-FU, and LV (IFL) in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) was conducted. The specific objectives of this clinical trial were to determine the safety and tolerability of PHY906 when administered concomitantly with the bolus, weekly IFL regimen. Treatment with PHY906 did not alter the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU, irinotecan, or the irinotecan metabolite SN-38. PMID:21859559

  5. A 12 Week, Open Label, Phase I/IIa Study Using Apatone® for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have Failed Standard Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tareen, Basir; Summers, Jack L.; Jamison, James M.; Neal, Deborah R.; McGuire, Karen; Gerson, Lowell; Diokno, Ananias

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of oral Apatone® (Vitamin C and Vitamin K3) administration in the treatment of prostate cancer in patients who failed standard therapy. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with 2 successive rises in PSA after failure of standard local therapy were treated with (5,000 mg of VC and 50 mg of VK3 each day) for a period of 12 weeks. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) levels, PSA velocity (PSAV) and PSA doubling times (PSADT) were calculated before and during treatment at 6 week intervals. Following the initial 12 week trial, 15 of 17 patients opted to continue treatment for an additional period ranging from 6 to 24 months. PSA values were followed for these patients. Results: At the conclusion of the 12 week treatment period, PSAV decreased and PSADT increased in 13 of 17 patients (p ≤ 0.05). There were no dose-limiting adverse effects. Of the 15 patients who continued on Apatone after 12 weeks, only 1 death occurred after 14 months of treatment. Conclusion: Apatone showed promise in delaying biochemical progression in this group of end stage prostate cancer patients. PMID:18392145

  6. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y.; Alawami, Hussain M.; Alburki, Abdussalam M.; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not. The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group. In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  7. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  8. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrition should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition. PMID:26886037

  9. Hypogonadism in male cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Burney, Basil O; Garcia, Jose M

    2012-09-01

    Prevalence of hypogonadism in men with cancer has been reported between 40% and 90%, which is significantly higher than in the general population. Hypogonadism is likely to affect the quality of life in these patients by contributing to non-specific symptoms, including decreased energy, anorexia, sarcopenia, weight loss, depression, insomnia, fatigue, weakness, and sexual dysfunction. Pathogenesis of hypogonadism in cancer patients is thought to be multi-factorial. Inflammation may play an important role, but leptin, opioids, ghrelin, and high-dose chemotherapy through different mechanisms have all been implicated as the cause. Hypogonadism is also associated with poor survival in cancer patients. Data looking into the treatment of hypogonadal male cancer patients with testosterone are limited. However, improvements in body weight, muscle strength, lean body mass, and quality of life have been shown in hypogonadal men with other chronic diseases on testosterone replacement therapy. Prospective and interventional trials are needed to test the efficacy and safety of testosterone treatment in improving quality of life of these patients. PMID:22528986

  10. Four-Week Neoadjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Validation Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arbea, Leire; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Moreno, Marta; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Ramos, Luis Isaac; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nunez, Jorge; Chopitea, Ana; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gaztanaga, Miren; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Aristu, Javier

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To validate tolerance and pathological complete response rate (pCR) of a 4-week preoperative course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with T3 to T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer received preoperative IMRT (47.5 Gy in 19 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d., Monday to Friday) and oxaliplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15). Surgery was scheduled 4 to 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Primary end points were toxicity and pathological response rate. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were also analyzed. Results: A total of 100 patients were evaluated. Grade 1 to 2 proctitis was observed in 73 patients (73%). Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 9% of the patients. Grade 3 proctitis in 18% of the first 50 patients led to reduction of the dose per fraction to 47.5 Gy in 20 treatments. The rate of Grade 3 proctitis decreased to 4% thereafter (odds ratio, 0.27). A total of 99 patients underwent surgery. A pCR was observed in 13% of the patients, major response (96-100% of histological response) in 48%, and pN downstaging in 78%. An R0 resection was performed in 97% of the patients. After a median follow-up of 55 months, the LC, DFS, and OS rates were 100%, 84%, and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative CAPOX-IMRT therapy (47.5 Gy in 20 fractions) is feasible and safe, and produces major pathological responses in approximately 50% of patients.

  11. Randomized phase III trial of treatment duration for oral uracil and tegafur plus leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer: final results of JFMC33-0502

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kondo, K.; Katsumata, K.; Nishimura, G.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Sato, S.; Koda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Morita, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Usuki, H.; Hamada, C.; Kodaira, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While adjuvant chemotherapy is preferable for high-risk colon cancer, treatment duration is controversial. Oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/leucovorin (LV) is widely used as a standard adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer in Japan. We conducted a phase III trial to investigate the optimal duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Patients and methods Patients with curatively resected stage IIB/III colon cancer were eligible for enrollment in this trial. Patients were registered within 6 weeks after surgery and were randomly assigned to receive UFT/LV for 28 of 35 days for 6 months in the control group or for 5 consecutive days per week for 18 months in the study group. The primary end point was the disease-free survival (DFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and safety. Result A total of 1071 patients were registered from 233 centers. A statistically significant difference in DFS was not observed between the study group and the control group; the 5-year DFS was 69% in the study group and 69% in the control group. The 5-year OS was 85% in the study group and 85% in the control group. Conclusion Eighteen-month treatment with UFT/LV did not improve DFS or OS compared with 6-month UFT/LV treatment in patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer. The important finding from this study is that not 18 months but 6 months of treatment is enough for postoperative UFT/LV for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Clinical trial number UMIN-CTR C000000245. PMID:26347106

  12. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  13. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD, a Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Bicistronic Adenovirus, in Patients with Recurrent Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Dmitriev, Igor; O’Malley, Janis P.; Wang, Minghui; Saddekni, Souheil; You, Zhiying; Preuss, Meredith A.; Harris, Raymond D.; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Siegal, Gene P.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Curiel, David T.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD is an infectivity-enhanced adenovirus expressing a therapeutic thymidine kinase suicide gene and a somatostatin receptor that allows for noninvasive gene transfer imaging. The purpose of this study was to identify the MTD, toxicities, clinical efficacy and biologic effects of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Experimental Design Eligible patients were treated intraperitoneally (IP) for 3 days with 1×109 to 1×1012 vp/dose of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD followed by intravenous ganciclovir for 14 days. Toxicity and clinical efficacy were assessed utilizing CTC Adverse Events grading and RECIST criteria. Imaging utilizing In-111 pentetreotide was obtained before and after treatment. Tissue samples were obtained to evaluate for gene transfer, generation of wild-type virus, viral shedding and antibody response. Results Twelve patients were treated in three cohorts. The most common vector-related clinical toxicities were grade 1–2 constitutional or pain symptoms, experienced most often in patients treated at the highest dose. MTD was not identified. Five patients demonstrated stable disease; all others experienced progressive disease. One patient with stable disease experienced complete resolution of disease and normalization of CA125 on further follow-up. Imaging detected increased In-111 pentetreotide retention in patients treated at the highest dose. Ancillary studies demonstrated presence of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD virus and HSV1-tk expression in ascites samples collected at various time points in most patients treated within the higher dose cohorts. Conclusions This study demonstrates the safety, potential efficacy, and possible gene transfer imaging capacity of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Further development of this novel gene therapeutic appears to be warranted. PMID:22510347

  14. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  15. [Anal cancer in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Quéro, Laurent; Duval, Xavier; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Despite effective highly active antiretroviral treatment, anal cancer incidence has recently strongly increased in HIV-infected population. Treatment strategy in HIV-infected patients does not differ from general population. HIV-infected patients treated by chemo-radiotherapy are exposed to high-grade toxicities and should be closely monitored to deliver the optimal treatment. Close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is highly recommended to adjust antiretroviral therapy if necessary. PMID:25418596

  16. Metformin intervention in obese non-diabetic patients with breast cancer: phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Ma, Seung Hyun; Yang, Jae-Jeong; Hwang, Yunji; Ahn, Choonghyun; Cho, Young-Min; Noh, Dong-Young; Park, Byung-Joo; Han, Wonshik; Park, Sue K

    2015-09-01

    Previous observational studies have suggested that metformin in diabetes patients may reduce breast cancer risk more than the reductions from other anti-diabetes medications. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of metformin for controlling physical and metabolic profiles related to prognosis and adverse events in non-diabetic breast cancer patients. Female breast cancer patients (N = 105), at least 6 months post-mastectomy, with obesity (≥25 kg/m(2)) and/or pre-diabetes (fasting blood sugar levels ≥100 mg/dL), were randomly assigned to three groups (placebo, metformin 500 mg, and metformin 1000 mg) stratified by tamoxifen use. A linear mixed model for repeated measurements among three groups and ANOVA for profile differences during 6 months of treatment were used for the intention-to-treat analysis. The metformin 1000 mg group had a significantly greater decline in glucose and HbA1c levels between treatment weeks 0 and 6 month (p = 0.008 and 0.009, respectively), and the declines increased with an increase in body mass index (BMI) level (p interaction with BMI = 0.007 and 0.067, respectively). A marginally significant different effect from the metformin 1000 mg treatment was detected for glucose and HbA1c levels (p interaction = 0.084 and 0.063, respectively) in the intention-to-treat analysis. Metformin 1000 mg treatment had a favorable effect on controlling glucose and HbA1C levels in obese non-diabetic breast cancer patients, indicating prognostic importance. Further trials are needed to elucidate the risk-benefit ratio of long-term use of metformin. PMID:26293146

  17. Evaluation of oral care to prevent oral mucositis in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with everolimus (Oral Care-BC): randomized controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Naoki; Ota, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Naoki; Naito, Mariko; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Yamashita, Toshinari; Mukai, Hirofumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    This is a randomized, multi-center, open-label, phase III study to evaluate the efficacy of professional oral care in preventing oral mucositis induced by everolimus in postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients will be randomized into professional oral care and control groups (1:1 ratio). All patients will receive everolimus with exemestane and will continue everolimus until disease progression. In the professional oral care group, patients will receive teeth surface cleaning, scaling and tongue cleaning before starting everolimus, and will continue to receive professional oral care weekly from oral surgeons throughout the 8 week treatment. In the control group, patients will brush their own teeth and gargle with 0.9% sodium chloride solution or water. The primary endpoint is the incidence of all grades of oral mucositis. Target accrual is 200 patients with a two-sided type I error rate of 5% and 80% power to detect 25% risk reduction. PMID:27365521

  18. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  19. Motivational Deficit in Depressed Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, Christopher; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Tested accuracy of motivational theory of depression for adjustment disorder with depressed mood in 48 patients with terminal and nonterminal cancer. Results supported motivational theory: cancer patients exhibited low expectations and low values; hence, they were unmotivated and depressed. (NRB)

  20. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  1. A phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccination in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: prolongation of prostate-specific antigen doubling time

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer vaccine is one of the attractive treatment modalities for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, because of delayed immune responses, its clinical benefits, besides for overall survival (OS), are not well captured by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Several surrogate markers for evaluation of cancer vaccine, including prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT), are currently sought. The purpose of this study was to assess prospectively the PSA kinetics and immune responses, as well as the efficacy, safety, and biomarkers of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) in progressive CRPC. Methods One hundred patients with progressive CRPC were treated with PPV using 2–4 positive peptides from 31 candidate peptides determined by both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class IA types and the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) against each peptide. The association between immune responses and PSADT as well as overall survival (OS) was studied. Results PPV was safe and well tolerated in all patients with a median survival time of 18.8 months. Peptide-specific IgG and T-cell responses strongly correlated with PSADT (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0007, respectively), which in turn showed correlation with OS (p = 0.018). Positive IgG responses and prolongation of PSADT during PPV were also significantly associated with OS (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004) by multivariate analysis. Conclusions PSADT could be an appropriate surrogate marker for evaluation of the clinical benefit of cancer vaccine. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm these results. Trial registration UMIN000001850 PMID:24373380

  2. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Quadriceps in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy: A Randomized Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Halliday, Vanessa; Chauhan, Alpna; Taylor, Victoria; Nelson, Annmarie; Sampson, Cathy; Byrne, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduced exercise capacity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therapeutic exercise can be beneficial and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps muscles may represent a practical approach. The primary aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of NMES of the quadriceps to patients with NSCLC used alongside palliative chemotherapy. Secondary aims explored aspects of safety and efficacy of NMES in this setting. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC due to receive first-line palliative chemotherapy were randomized to usual care with or without NMES. They were asked to undertake 30 minute sessions of NMES, ideally daily, but as a minimum, three times weekly. For NMES to be considered acceptable, it was predetermined that ≥80% of patients should achieve this minimum level of adherence. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients to explore factors influencing adherence. Safety was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass, and physical activity level were assessed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy. Results 49 patients (28 male, median (IQR) age 69 (64−75) years) participated. Of 30 randomized to NMES, 18 were eligible for the primary endpoint, of whom 9 (50% [90% CI, 29 to 71]) met the minimum level of adherence. Adherence was enhanced by incorporating sessions into a daily routine and hindered by undesirable effects of chemotherapy. There were no serious adverse events related to NMES, nor significant differences in quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass or physical activity level between groups. Conclusions NMES is not acceptable in this setting, nor was there a suggestion of benefit. The need remains to explore NMES in patients with cancer in other settings. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 42944026 www

  3. Randomized phase II study of lapatinib plus capecitabine or lapatinib plus topotecan for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Eierman, Wolfgang; Greil, Richard; Campone, Mario; Kaufman, Bella; Steplewski, Klaudia; Lane, Stephen R; Zembryki, Denise; Rubin, Stephen D; Winer, Eric P

    2011-12-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with advanced, HER2-positive breast cancer develop brain metastases. A significant proportion of women experience central nervous system (CNS) progression after standard radiation therapy. The optimal treatment in the refractory setting is undefined. This study evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of lapatinib in combination with chemotherapy among patients with HER2-positive, progressive brain metastases. Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer with progressive brain metastases after trastuzumab and cranial radiotherapy were included. The primary endpoint was CNS objective response, defined as a ≥ 50% volumetric reduction of CNS lesion(s) in the absence of new or progressive CNS or non-CNS lesions, or increasing steroid requirements. The study was closed early after 22 of a planned 110 patients were enrolled due to excess toxicity and lack of efficacy in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. The objective response rate (ORR) in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm was 38% (exact 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.9-68.4). No responses were observed in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. Although the study was stopped prior to full enrollment, some promising indications of CNS activity were noted for lapatinib plus capecitabine. The combination of lapatinib plus topotecan was not active and was associated with excess toxicity. PMID:21706359

  4. A clinical phase II study with sorafenib in patients with progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer: a study of the CESAR Central European Society for Anticancer Drug Research-EWIV

    PubMed Central

    Steinbild, S; Mross, K; Frost, A; Morant, R; Gillessen, S; Dittrich, C; Strumberg, D; Hochhaus, A; Hanauske, A-R; Edler, L; Burkholder, I; Scheulen, M

    2007-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity. The activity of sorafenib in progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients was investigated in a phase II clinical study. Progressive HRPC patients received sorafenib 400 mg bid p.o. continuously. Only patients with no prior chemotherapy, and either one-unidimensional measurable lesion according to RECIST-criteria or increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values reflecting a hormone-refractory situation, were eligible for study entry. The primary study objective was the rate of progression-free survival of ⩾12 weeks (PFS12). Secondary end points were overall response, overall survival, and toxicity. Fifty-seven patients with PC were enrolled. Two patients had to be withdrawn from the set of eligible patients. According to RECIST criteria, 4 patients out of 55 evaluable patients showed stable disease (SD). According to PSA–response, we saw 11 patients with SD PSA and 2 patients were responders at 12 weeks (PFS12=17/55=31%). Among the 257 adverse events, 15 were considered drug related of maximum CTC-grade 3. Twenty-four serious adverse events occurred in 14 patients (14/55=26%). Seven of them were determined to be drug related. No treatment-related death was observed. Sorafenib has antitumour activity in HRPCP when evaluated for RECIST- and PSA-based response. Further investigation as a component of combination regimens is necessary to evaluate its definite or overall clinical benefit for HRPCP. PMID:18040273

  5. A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Murphy, Barbara A.; Netterville, James L.; Burkey, Brian B.; Shyr, Yu; Shakhtour, Bashar; Kish, Bonnie; Raben, David; Chen Changhu; Song, John I.; Kane, Madeleine A.; Cmelak, Anthony J. . E-mail: anthony.cmelak@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To determine efficacy and toxicities of postoperative concurrent chemoradiation using docetaxel in high-risk head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk patients were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. Treatment included 60 Gy for 6 weeks with weekly docetaxel 25 mg/m{sup 2} and erythropoietin alpha 40,000 U for hemoglobin {<=}12 g/dL. Primary endpoints included locoregional control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and patterns of failure (POF). Secondary endpoints were toxicity and quality of life. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (14 male, 4 female), aged 24-70 years (median, 55 years). Primary site included oropharynx = 7, oral cavity 8, hypopharynx = 1, and larynx = 2. Pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage was III = 3 patients, IV = 15 patients. High-risk eligibility included {>=}2 positive lymph nodes = 13, extracapsular extension = 10, positive margins = 8 (11 patients with two or more risk factors). Docetaxel was reduced to 20 mg/m{sup 2}/week after 5 patients had prolonged Grade 3 or higher mucositis. Overall, number of doses delivered was 2 of 6 = 1, 3 of 6 2, 4 of 6 = 2, 5 of 6 = 4, 6 of 6 = 9 patients. With median follow-up of 30 months (range, 5-66), 10 (56%) patients are alive and have no evidence of disease (NED); POF: three local recurrences (two with distant) and 1 distant only. One-year survival was 76%, median PFS and DFS had not been reached. Three-year LC was 82%. No Grade 3 or higher late toxicities were observed, although a few cases of prolonged mucositis and taste loss (>3 months) were seen, particularly at 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Conclusion: Postoperative radiation therapy with weekly docetaxel 20 or 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week for high-risk postoperative head and neck cancer caused intolerable mucosal toxicity, prompting early study termination. Further studies should consider 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Actuarial 3-year LC is 82%, similar to cisplatin-based chemoradiation regimens. Distant metastasis remains an

  6. Genotype-Driven Phase I Study of Irinotecan Administered in Combination With Fluorouracil/Leucovorin in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Giuseppe; Cecchin, Erika; Gasparini, Giampiero; D'Andrea, Mario; Azzarello, Giuseppe; Basso, Umberto; Mini, Enrico; Pessa, Sergio; De Mattia, Elena; Lo Re, Giovanni; Buonadonna, Angela; Nobili, Stefania; De Paoli, Paolo; Innocenti, Federico

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of irinotecan in patients with cancer with UGT1A1*1/*1 and *1/*28 genotypes. We hypothesize that the patients without the *28/*28 genotype tolerate higher doses of irinotecan. Patients and Methods Patients undergoing first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) eligible for treatment with irinotecan plus infusional fluorouracil/leucovorin (FOLFIRI) were screened for the UGT1A1*28/*28 genotype and excluded from the study. Fifty-nine white patients with either the *1/*1 or the *1/*28 genotype were eligible for dose escalation of irinotecan. The starting dose of biweekly irinotecan was 215 mg/m2 for both genotype groups, whereas the dose of infusional fluorouracil was fixed. Pharmacokinetic data of irinotecan and metabolites were also obtained. Results The dose of irinotecan was escalated to 370 mg/m2 in patients with the *1/*28 genotype and to 420 mg/m2 in those with the *1/*1 genotype. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in two of four of *1/*28 patients at 370 mg/m2 and in two of three of *1/*1 patients at 420 mg/m2. No DLTs were observed in 10 *1/*28 patients at 310 mg/m2 and in 10 *1/*1 patients at 370 mg/m2; hence these dose levels were the MTD for each genotype group. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were neutropenia and diarrhea. The pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and SN-38 exhibit linear kinetics. Conclusion The recommended dose of 180 mg/m2 for irinotecan in FOLFIRI is considerably lower than the dose that can be tolerated when patients with the UGT1A1*28/*28 genotype are excluded. Prospective genotype-driven studies should test the efficacy of higher irinotecan doses in the FOLFIRI schedule. PMID:20038727

  7. Hypofractionated radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for patients with intermediate-risk localised prostate cancer: 2-year patient-reported outcomes of the randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 CHHiP trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Mossop, Helen; Syndikus, Isabel; Khoo, Vincent; Bloomfield, David; Parker, Chris; Logue, John; Scrase, Christopher; Patterson, Helen; Birtle, Alison; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Panades, Miguel; Eswar, Chinnamani; Graham, John; Russell, Martin; Kirkbride, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Gao, Annie; Cruickshank, Clare; Griffin, Clare; Dearnaley, David; Hall, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) might detect more toxic effects of radiotherapy than do clinician-reported outcomes. We did a quality of life (QoL) substudy to assess PROs up to 24 months after conventionally fractionated or hypofractionated radiotherapy in the Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer (CHHiP) trial. Methods The CHHiP trial is a randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial done in 71 centres, of which 57 UK hospitals took part in the QoL substudy. Men with localised prostate cancer who were undergoing radiotherapy were eligible for trial entry if they had histologically confirmed T1b–T3aN0M0 prostate cancer, an estimated risk of seminal vesicle involvement less than 30%, prostate-specific antigen concentration less than 30 ng/mL, and a WHO performance status of 0 or 1. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a standard fractionation schedule of 74 Gy in 37 fractions or one of two hypofractionated schedules: 60 Gy in 20 fractions or 57 Gy in 19 fractions. Randomisation was done with computer-generated permuted block sizes of six and nine, stratified by centre and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group. Treatment allocation was not masked. UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI), including Short Form (SF)-36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P), or Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) and SF-12 quality-of-life questionnaires were completed at baseline, pre-radiotherapy, 10 weeks post-radiotherapy, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial completed accrual on June 16, 2011, and the QoL substudy was closed to further recruitment on Nov 1, 2009. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary endpoint of the QoL substudy was overall bowel bother and comparisons between fractionation groups were done at 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial is registered with ISRCTN registry

  8. A Phase II Study of Weekly Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine as a Second-Line Therapy in Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tak; Kim, Heung Tae; Han, Ji-Youn; Yoon, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyae Young; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Paclitaxel (P) and gemcitabine (G) are clinically synergistic in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We evaluated the efficacy of PG as a salvage treatment for SCLC patients whose disease progressed after a platinum-containing regimen. Materials and Methods Eligibility included histologically confirmed SCLC, one dimensionally measurable disease, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and progressive disease after platinum-based chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of P (80 mg/m2) and G (1,000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 of each cycle of 21 days until disease progression. Results Thirty-three patients seen between December 2005 and February 2009 were selected into this study. Thirty patients (91%) had received irinotecan-platinum, and three had received etoposide-platinum. Sixteen patients (49%) had a treatment-free interval of less than 3 months. The overall response rate was 30.3% (29.4% in sensitive relapse and 31.3% in refractory relapse). The median time to progression was 12.0 weeks and median overall survival (OS) 31.0 weeks, with a 1-year OS rate of 30.3%. Toxicities were moderate and manageable with 18.2% grade (G) 4 neutropenia, 24.2% G3 thrombocytopenia, 6.1% G3 sensory neuropathy, and 3% G3 asthenia. One patient developed febrile neutropenia. Conclusion Second-line paclitaxel and gemcitabine were well-tolerated and moderately active in SCLC patients previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26044164

  9. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  10. Cediranib (AZD2171) in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Phase II North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) Clinical Trial1

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Fitch, Tom R.; Kim, George P.; Morlan, Bruce W.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Gross, Howard M.; Nair, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be overexpressed in several studies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Cediranib is a potent inhibitor of VEGF signaling. We assessed the efficacy and toxicity of cediranib in patients with HCC. Methods Twenty-eight patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC were enrolled on this study. Patients received 45 mg of cediranib orally, once daily, for 28 day cycles. The primary objective of this Phase II study was to assess six-month survival. Secondary objectives were to assess tumor response, time-to-progression, and toxicity. Results All 28 patients were evaluable for efficacy outcomes. Twelve patients (42.9%) survived 6 months, 15 (53.6%) died within 6 months, and one (3.6%) was lost to follow-up before 6 months. The median overall survival was 5.8 months (95% CI: 3.4–7.3 months). No patients experienced confirmed response. The median time-to-progression was 2.8 months (95% CI: 2.3 – 4.4 months). Twenty-six patients (93%) experienced a grade 3+ adverse event (AE) with the most common AEs being fatigue (46%), anorexia (25%), hypertension (21%), and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (18%). Conclusions Due to toxicity, cediranib at this dose and schedule is not an effective treatment in patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC. PMID:21422991

  11. Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/ Gemcitabine and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Without Prior Systemic Therapy: EORTC Intergroup Study 30987

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M.; Skoneczna, Iwona; De Santis, Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Boehle, Andreas; Chevreau, Christine; Paz-Ares, Luis; Laufman, Leslie R.; Winquist, Eric; Raghavan, Derek; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra; Sylvester, Richard; de Wit, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival. Patients and Methods We conducted a randomized phase III study to compare paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine (PCG) with GC in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and toxicity. Results From 2001 to 2004, 626 patients were randomly assigned; 312 patients were assigned to PCG, and 314 patients were assigned to GC. After a median follow-up of 4.6 years, the median OS was 15.8 months on PCG versus 12.7 months on GC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .075). OS in the subgroup of all eligible patients was significantly longer on PCG (3.2 months; HR, 0.82; P = .03), as was the case in patients with bladder primary tumors. PFS was not significantly longer on PCG (HR, 0.87; P = .11). Overall response rate was 55.5% on PCG and 43.6% on GC (P = .0031). Both treatments were well tolerated, with more thrombocytopenia and bleeding on GC than PCG (11.4% v 6.8%, respectively; P = .05) and more febrile neutropenia on PCG than GC (13.2% v 4.3%, respectively; P < .001). Conclusion The addition of paclitaxel to GC provides a higher response rate and a 3.1-month survival benefit that did not reach statistical significance. Novel approaches will be required to obtain major improvements in survival of incurable urothelial cancer. PMID:22370319

  12. Methylphenidate and/or a Nursing Telephone Intervention for Fatigue in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Eduardo; Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Palmer, J. Lynn; Perez-Cruz, Pedro E.; Frisbee-Hume, Susan; Allo, Julio A.; Williams, Janet L.; Cohen, Marlene Z.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-related-fatigue (CRF) is common in advanced cancer. The primary objective of the study was to compare the effects of methylphenidate (MP) with those of placebo (PL) on CRF as measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT-F) fatigue subscale. The effect of a combined intervention including MP plus a nursing telephone intervention (NTI) was also assessed. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced cancer with a fatigue score of ≥ 4 out of 10 on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) were randomly assigned to one of the following four groups: MP+NTI, PL+NTI, MP + control telephone intervention (CTI), and PL+CTI. Methylphenidate dose was 5 mg every 2 hours as needed up to 20 mg per day. The primary end point was the median difference in FACIT-F fatigue at day 15. Secondary outcomes included anxiety, depression, and sleep. Results One hundred forty-one patients were evaluable. Median FACIT-F fatigue scores improved from baseline to day 15 in all groups: MP+NTI (median score, 4.5; P = .005), PL+NTI (median score, 8.0; P < .001), MP+CTI (median score, 7.0; P = .004), and PL+CTI (median score, 5.0; P = .03). However, there were no significant differences in the median improvement in FACIT-F fatigue between the MP and PL groups (5.5 v 6.0, respectively; P = .69) and among all four groups (P = .16). Fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), depression (P = .02), anxiety (P = .01), drowsiness (P < .001), appetite (P = .009), sleep (P < .001), and feeling of well-being (P < .001), as measured by the ESAS, significantly improved in patients who received NTI. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events did not differ between MP and PL (40 of 93 patients v 29 of 97 patients, respectively; P = .06). Conclusion MP and NTI alone or combined were not superior to placebo in improving CRF. PMID:23690414

  13. Phase II study of pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab in Japanese patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Takashi; Torii, Yoshitaro; Katashiba, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Tanijiri, Tsutomu; Ogata, Makoto; Inagaki, Noriko; Kibata, Kayoko; Hayashi, Mina; Niki, Maiko; Shimizu, Toshiki; Miyara, Takayuki; Kurata, Takayasu; Nomura, Shosaku

    2014-12-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed, carboplatin and bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, in chemotherapy-naïve patients with stage IIIB/IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were administered pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2)), carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6.0 mg/ml × min) and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) intravenously every three weeks for up to six cycles. Patients who did not experience tumor progression remained on maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. Of the 26 patients enrolled between March 2010 and April 2011, three were excluded due to brain metastases, therefore the intention-to-treat (ITT) population consisted of 23 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 40-74 years) and 15 patients were male. In total, six patients had a performance status of 0, and 20 had stage IV tumors. The response rate was 69.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 47.1-86.8], the disease control rate was 100% and the time to response was 1.2 months (95% CI, 0.72-1.93). The median progression-free survival time was 8.6 months (95% CI, 5.9-10.9) and the median overall survival time was 18.6 months (95% CI, 12.9-24.8). There were no grade 3 or worse hemorrhagic events and the feasibility was modest. Overall, pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, was effective and tolerable in the patients with non-squamous NSCLC, and the time to response was relatively short. PMID:25364406

  14. Phase II study of pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab in Japanese patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    YOKOI, TAKASHI; TORII, YOSHITARO; KATASHIBA, YUICHI; SUGIMOTO, HIROYUKI; TANIJIRI, TSUTOMU; OGATA, MAKOTO; INAGAKI, NORIKO; KIBATA, KAYOKO; HAYASHI, MINA; NIKI, MAIKO; SHIMIZU, TOSHIKI; MIYARA, TAKAYUKI; KURATA, TAKAYASU; NOMURA, SHOSAKU

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed, carboplatin and bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, in chemotherapy-naïve patients with stage IIIB/IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were administered pemetrexed (500 mg/m2), carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6.0 mg/ml × min) and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) intravenously every three weeks for up to six cycles. Patients who did not experience tumor progression remained on maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. Of the 26 patients enrolled between March 2010 and April 2011, three were excluded due to brain metastases, therefore the intention-to-treat (ITT) population consisted of 23 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 40–74 years) and 15 patients were male. In total, six patients had a performance status of 0, and 20 had stage IV tumors. The response rate was 69.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 47.1–86.8], the disease control rate was 100% and the time to response was 1.2 months (95% CI, 0.72–1.93). The median progression-free survival time was 8.6 months (95% CI, 5.9–10.9) and the median overall survival time was 18.6 months (95% CI, 12.9–24.8). There were no grade 3 or worse hemorrhagic events and the feasibility was modest. Overall, pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, was effective and tolerable in the patients with non-squamous NSCLC, and the time to response was relatively short. PMID:25364406

  15. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  16. A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1/2 study of tivantinib (ARQ 197) in combination with irinotecan and cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type KRAS who have received first-line systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Eng, Cathy; Bessudo, Alberto; Hart, Lowell L; Severtsev, Aleksey; Gladkov, Oleg; Müller, Lothar; Kopp, Mikhail V; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Langdon, Robert; Kotiv, Bogdan; Barni, Sandro; Hsu, Ching; Bolotin, Ellen; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Schwartz, Brian; Bendell, Johanna C

    2016-07-01

    Cetuximab in combination with an irinotecan-containing regimen is a standard treatment in patients with KRAS wild-type (KRAS WT), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We investigated the addition of the oral MET inhibitor tivantinib to cetuximab + irinotecan (CETIRI) based on preclinical evidence that activation of the MET pathway may confer resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. Previously treated patients with KRAS WT advanced or mCRC were enrolled. The phase 1, open-label 3 + 3, dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and maximally tolerated dose of tivantinib plus CETIRI. The phase 2, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of biweekly CETIRI plus tivantinib or placebo was restricted to patients who had received only one prior line of chemotherapy. The phase 2 primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The recommended phase 2 dose was tivantinib (360 mg/m(2) twice daily) with biweekly cetuximab (500 mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (180 mg/m(2)). Among 117 patients evaluable for phase 2 analysis, no statistically significant PFS difference was observed: 8.3 months on tivantinib vs. 7.3 months on placebo (HR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.33; P = 0.38). Subgroup analyses trended in favor of tivantinib in patients with MET-High tumors by immunohistochemistry, PTEN-Low tumors, or those pretreated with oxaliplatin, but subgroups were too small to draw conclusions. Neutropenia, diarrhea, nausea and rash were the most frequent severe adverse events in tivantinib-treated patients. The combination of tivantinib and CETIRI was well tolerated but did not significantly improve PFS in previously treated KRAS WT mCRC. Tivantinib may be more active in specific subgroups. PMID:26891420

  17. Ovarian stimulation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Hakan; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2013-05-01

    The patients referred for fertility preservation owing to a malignant disease do not represent the typical population of subfertile patients treated in IVF units. Cancer may affect multiple tissues throughout the body and can result in a variety of complications during controlled ovarian stimulation. Determination of the controlled ovarian stimulation protocol and gonadotropin dose for oocyte/embryo cryopreservation requires an individualized assessment. This review highlights the new protocols that are emerging to reduce time constraints and emphasizes management considerations to decrease complications. PMID:23635348

  18. Differentiation of irradiation and cetuximab induced skin reactions in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer undergoing radioimmunotherapy: the HICARE protocol (Head and neck cancer: ImmunoChemo and Radiotherapy with Erbitux) – a multicenter phase IV trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LASCCHN) not being capable to receive platinum-based chemoradiation, radiotherapy can be intensified by addition of cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The radioimmunotherapy with cetuximab is a feasible treatment option showing a favourable toxicity profile. The most frequent side effect of radiotherapy is radiation dermatitis, the most common side effect of treatment with cetuximab is acneiform rash. Incidence and severity of these frequent, often overlapping and sometimes limiting skin reactions, however, are not well explored. A clinical and molecular differentiation between radiogenic skin reactions and skin reactions caused by cetuximab which may correlate with outcome, have never been described before. Methods/design The HICARE study is a national, multicenter, prospective phase IV study exploring the different types of skin reactions that occur in patients with LASCCHN undergoing radioimmun(chemo)therapy with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab. 500 patients with LASCCHN will be enrolled in 40 participating sites in Germany. Primary endpoint is the rate of radiation dermatitis NCI CTCAE grade 3 and 4 (v. 4.02). Radioimmunotherapy will be applied according to SmPC, i.e. cetuximab will be administered as loading dose and then weekly during the radiotherapy. Irradiation will be applied as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or 3D-dimensional radiation therapy. Discussion The HICARE trial is expected to be one of the largest trials ever conducted in head and neck cancer patients. The goal of the HICARE trial is to differentiate skin reactions caused by radiation from those caused by the monoclonal antibody cetuximab, to evaluate the incidence and severity of these skin reactions and to correlate them with outcome parameters. Besides, the translational research program will

  19. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. Methods We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746–750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Results The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusions Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. Trial registration This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436

  20. Armodafinil in Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With High Grade Glioma | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies armodafinil to see how well it works in reducing cancer-related fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. Armodafinil may help relieve fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. |

  1. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  2. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  3. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R; Danishefsky, Samuel J; Sabbatini, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011-Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient's pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36-68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2-39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  4. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  5. Phase 3 Study of Bavituximab Plus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel Alone in Patients With Late-stage Non-squamous Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-01

    Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IIIB; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IV; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Episodic pain in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2002-01-01

    Episodic pain is a common problem for patients with advanced cancer and is often difficult to manage successfully. In this article, the daily variations in cancer-related episodic pain in a patient with metastatic lung cancer are described. The definition, etiology, prevalence, and pharmacological management of episodic pain are also reviewed PMID:12141792

  7. Intra- and postoperative catumaxomab in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: safety and two-year efficacy results from a multicentre, single-arm, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J; Reinthaller, A; Marth, C; Reimer, D; Reimer, T; Stummvoll, W; Angleitner-Boubenizek, L; Brandt, B; Chekerov, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: This is the first study investigating the safety and efficacy of the trifunctional antibody catumaxomab administered i.p. at the end of cytoreductive surgery and postoperatively prior to standard chemotherapy in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Patients received i.p. catumaxomab 10 μg intraoperatively and 10, 20, 50 and 150 μg on days 7, 10, 13 and 16, respectively, postoperatively. After the study, patients received standard chemotherapy and were followed for 23 months. The primary endpoint was the rate of postoperative complications. Results: Forty-one patients entered the study and were evaluable for safety and 34 were alive at 24 months. Complete tumour resection rate was 68%. Postoperative complications were observed in 51%, the most common anastomotic leakage (7%) and wound infections (5%). The most common catumaxomab-related adverse events were abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and pyrexia. Thirty-nine percent discontinued catumaxomab therapy, and 98% received chemotherapy post study. Kaplan–Meier estimates of disease-free and overall survival after 24 months were 56% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Intra- and close postoperative catumaxomab seems feasible, but efficacy and safety were limited by postsurgical complications. In the future prospective trials are needed to investigate the best schedule of integration of catumaxomab into current treatment strategies for EOC. PMID:25225907

  8. A Phase I Study of Unimolecular Pentavalent (Globo-H-GM2-sTn-TF-Tn) Immunization of Patients with Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    O’Cearbhaill, Roisin E.; Ragupathi, Govind; Zhu, Jianglong; Wan, Qian; Mironov, Svetlana; Yang, Guangbin; Spassova, Maria K.; Iasonos, Alexia; Kravetz, Sara; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Spriggs, David R.; Danishefsky, Samuel J.; Sabbatini, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study in ovarian cancer patients to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a synthetic unimolecular pentavalent carbohydrate vaccine (Globo-H, GM2, sTn, TF, and Tn) supported on a peptide backbone, conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), and mixed with immunological adjuvant QS-21. Twenty-four advanced-stage, poor-risk, first-remission ovarian cancer patients were enrolled from January 2011–Septermber 2013. Three dose levels were planned (25, 50, 100 mcg) with three cohorts of six patients each, with an additional 6-patient expansion cohort at the MTD. ELISA serologic IgM and IgG responses for each antigen was defined as positive response if antibody titers were ≥1:80 over the respective patient’s pre-vaccination serum. The study would be considered positive if at least four of 12 patients treated at the MTD showed immune responses for at least three of the five antigens. Twenty-four patients (median age, 54 years [range, 36–68]) were included in the safety analysis. Histology was high-grade serous in 22 patients (92%); 18 had stage III and six stage IV disease. The vaccine was well-tolerated at all doses, with no DLTs. At the highest treated dose, IgG and/or IgM responses were recorded against ≥3 antigens in 9/12 patients (75%), ≥4 in 7/12 (58%), and 5 in 3/12 (25%). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range, 2–39), 20 patients (83%) recurred and six (25%) died. The unimolecular pentavalent vaccine construct was shown to be safe and immunogenic. Such a construct greatly simplifies regulatory requirements and manufacturing, facilitates scalability, and provides adaptability. PMID:27110823

  9. Randomized Phase II Study of Gefitinib Compared With Placebo in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Poor Performance Status

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A.; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U.; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. Patients and Methods NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Results Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. Conclusion There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors. PMID:19289623

  10. Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and ZD1839 (Gefitinib-Iressa) in Combination With Preoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase I and II Trial (1839IL/0092)

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Antonino; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta Mantini, Giovanna; Ratto, Carlo; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Barbaro, Brunella; Innocente, Roberto; Rossi, Carlo; Boz, Giovanni; Barba, Maria Cristina; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Lupattelli, Marco; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report the final data of a Phase I and II study (1839IL/0092) on the combination of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drug (gefitinib), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received 45 Gy in the posterior pelvis plus a boost of 5.4 Gy on the tumor and corresponding mesorectum. Infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and gefitinib (250 and 500 mg/day) were delivered during all radiotherapy course. An IORT boost of 10 Gy was allowed. The main endpoints of the study were to establish dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and to evaluate the rate of pathologic response according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) Mandard score. Results: A total of 41 patients were enrolled. The DLT was not reached in the 6 patients enrolled in the dose-escalation part of the study. Of the 33 patients in the Phase II, TRG 1 was recorded in 10 patients (30.3%) and TRG 2 in 7 patients (21.2 %); overall 17 of 33 patients (51.5%) had a favorable endpoint. Overall, Grade 3+ toxicity was recorded in 16 patients (41%); these included Grade 3+ gastrointestinal toxicity in 8 patients (20.5%), Grade 3+ skin toxicity in 6 (15.3%), and Grade 3+ genitourinary toxicity in 4 (10.2%). A dose reduction of gefitinib was necessary in 24 patients (61.5%). Conclusions: Gefitinib can be associated with 5-FU-based preoperative chemoradiation at the dose of 500 mg without any life-threatening toxicity and with a high pCR (30.3%). The relevant rate of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity suggests that 250 mg would be more tolerable dose in a neaoadjuvant approach with radiotherapy and infusional 5-FU.

  11. A gynecologic oncology group phase II trial of two p53 peptide vaccine approaches: subcutaneous injection and intravenous pulsed dendritic cells in high recurrence risk ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahma, Osama E.; Ashtar, Ed; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szajnik, Marta E.; Wieckowski, Eva; Bernstein, Sarah; Herrin, Vincent E.; Shams, Mortada A.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Merino, Maria; Gooding, William; Visus, Carmen; DeLeo, Albert B.; Wolf, Judith K.; Bell, Jeffrey G.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Khleif, Samir N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Peptide antigens have been administered by different approaches as cancer vaccine therapy, including direct injection or pulsed onto dendritic cells; however, the optimal delivery method is still debatable. In this study, we describe the immune response elicited by two vaccine approaches using the wild-type (wt) p53 vaccine. Experimental design Twenty-one HLA-A2.1 patients with stage III, IV, or recurrent ovarian cancer over-expressing the p53 protein with no evidence of disease were treated in two cohorts. Arm A received SC wt p53:264-272 peptide admixed with Montanide and GM-CSF. Arm B received wt p53:264-272 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells IV. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) was administered to both cohorts in alternative cycles. Results Nine of 13 patients (69%) in arm A and 5 of 6 patients (83%) in arm B developed an immunologic response as determined by ELISPOT and tetramer assays. The vaccine caused no serious systemic side effects. IL-2 administration resulted in grade 3 and 4 toxicities in both arms and directly induced the expansion of T regulatory cells. The median overall survival was 40.8 and 29.6 months for arm A and B, respectively; the median progression-free survival was 4.2 and. 8.7 months, respectively. Conclusion We found that using either vaccination approach generates comparable specific immune responses against the p53 peptide with minimal toxicity. Accordingly, our findings suggest that the use of less demanding SC approach may be as effective. Furthermore, the use of low-dose SC IL-2 as an adjuvant might have interfered with the immune response. Therefore, it may not be needed in future trials. PMID:21927947

  12. Phase III Trial of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Compared With Observation in Patients With Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Neurocognitive and Quality-of-Life Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Alexander; Bae, Kyounghwa; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Wong, Stuart J.; Meyers, Christina A.; Bonner, James A.; Schild, Steven E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Bogart, Jeffery A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Choy, Hak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There are scant data regarding the effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on neurocognitive function (NCF) and quality of life (QOL). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0214 showed no overall survival (OS) benefit for PCI in stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at 1 year. However, there was a significant decrease in brain metastases (BM). This analysis focuses on the impact of PCI on NCF and QOL. Patients and Methods Patients with stage III NSCLC who completed definitive therapy without progression were randomly assigned to PCI or observation. NCF was assessed with Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS), and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT). QOL was assessed with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core tool (QOL Questionnaire-QLQC30) and brain module (QLQBN20). Results There were no statistically significant differences at 1 year between the two arms in any component of the EORTC-QLQC30 or QLQBN20 (P > .05), although a trend for greater decline in patient-reported cognitive functioning with PCI was noted. There were no significant differences in MMSE (P = .60) or ADLS (P = .88). However, for HVLT, there was greater decline in immediate recall (P = .03) and delayed recall (P = .008) in the PCI arm at 1 year. Conclusion PCI in stage III NSCLC significantly decreases the risk of BM without improving 1-year OS. There were no significant differences in global cognitive function (MMSE) or QOL after PCI, but there was a significant decline in memory (HVLT) at 1 year. This study provides prospective data regarding the relative risks and benefits of PCI in this setting and the need to use sensitive cognitive assessments. PMID:21135267

  13. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  14. Phase I trial of erlotinib with radiation therapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group protocol N0177

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil . E-mail: skrishnan@mdanderson.org; Brown, Paul D.; Ballman, Karla V.; Fiveash, John B.; Uhm, Joon H.; Giannini, Caterina; Jaeckle, Kurt A.; Geoffroy, Francois J.; Nabors, L. Burt; Buckner, Jan C.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of erlotinib plus radiation therapy (RT) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in a multicenter phase I trial. Methods and Materials: Patients were stratified on the basis of the use of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (EIACs). After resection or biopsy, patients were treated with erlotinib for 1 week before concurrent erlotinib and 6 weeks (60 Gy) of RT and maintained on erlotinib until progression. The erlotinib dose was escalated in cohorts of 3 starting at 100 mg/day. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 were evaluable for the MTD and efficacy endpoints. Of these patients, 14 were males and 5 were females, with a median age of 54 years. Seven had undergone biopsy only, 5 had subtotal resections, and 7 had gross total resections. The highest dose level was 150 mg/day erlotinib for patients not on EIACs (Group 1) and 200 mg/day for patients on EIACs (Group 2). MTD was not reached in either group. In Group 1 at 100 mg (n = 6) and at 150 mg (n = 4), only 1 dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred (stomatitis at 100 mg). No DLTs have occurred in Group 2 at 100 mg (n = 3), 150 mg (n = 3), and 200 mg (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 52 weeks, progression was documented in 16 patients and 13 deaths occurred. Median time to progression was 26 weeks, and median survival was 55 weeks. Conclusion: Toxicity is acceptable at the current doses of erlotinib plus RT. The study was modified to include concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide, and accrual is in progress.

  15. Vaccination of renal cell cancer patients with modified vaccinia Ankara delivering the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) alone or administered in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha): a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Amato, Robert J; Shingler, William; Goonewardena, Madusha; de Belin, Jackie; Naylor, Stuart; Jac, Jaroslaw; Willis, James; Saxena, Somyata; Hernandez-McClain, Joan; Harrop, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax). MVA-5T4 has been evaluated in an open-label phase 2 trial in metastatic renal cell cancer patients in which the vaccine was administered alone or in combination with interferon-alpha-2b (IFN-alpha). The safety, immunologic, and clinical efficacy of MVA-5T4 with or without IFN-alpha was determined. Twenty-eight patients with metastatic renal cell cancer were treated with MVA-5T4 alone (13) or plus IFN-alpha (15). The 5T4-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by measuring changes in tumor burden by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan. MVA-5T4 was well tolerated with no serious adverse event attributed to vaccination. Of 23 intent-to-treat patients tested for immune responses postvaccination, 22 (96%) mounted 5T4-specific antibody and/or cellular responses. One patient treated with MVA-5T4 plus IFN-alpha showed a partial response for >7 months, whereas an additional 14 patients (7 receiving MVA-5T4 plus IFN and 7 receiving MVA-5T4 alone) showed periods of disease stabilization ranging from 1.73 to 9.60 months. Median progression free survival and overall survival for all intent-to-treat patients was 3.8 months (range: 1 to 11.47 mo) and 12.1 months (range: 1 to 27 mo), respectively. MVA-5T4 administered alone or in combination with IFN-alpha was well tolerated in all patients. Despite the high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses, it is not possible to conclude that patients are receiving clinical benefit. The results are encouraging and warrant further investigation. PMID:19561532

  16. A phase I/II trial of irinotecan-cisplatin combined with an anti-late-diarrhoeal programme to evaluate the safety and antitumour response of this combination therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Tsuduki, E; Izumi, S; Hojo, M; Kamimura, M; Naka, G; Kobayashi, K; Kudo, K

    2005-12-12

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to increase the therapeutic index of the cisplatin-irinotecan combination by institution of an anti-late-diarrhoeal program (ADP). A total of 77 chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. The cisplatin dose was fixed at 60 mg m(-2) (Day 1). Irinotecan was escalated in 5 mg m(-2) increments, starting from 60 mg m(-2) (Days 1 and 8). ADP consisted of oral sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water, and ursodeoxycholic acid, and was administered orally for 4 days with each dose of irinotecan. In the phase I portion, irinotecan pharmacokinetics was also examined. After the recommended dose of irinotecan with ADP was determined, a phase II study was conducted to evaluate the response. Maximum tolerated dose was reached at an irinotecan dose of 80 mg m(-2) (Grade 4 diarrhoea and neutropenia). Pharmacokinetic studies show that the maximum concentration and the area under the curve of both irinotecan and SN38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) tend to increase in the dose-dependent manner of irinotecan. The phase II portion of the study included 48 patients, who were treated with 75 mg m(-2) of irinotecan. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 65%, leucopenia in 33%, and late diarrhoea in 6% of the patients. During this treatment, PS did not change in 65% of patients. At the end of the chemotherapy, PS did not decline in 90% of patients. In the phase II portion, a response occurred in 63% (95% confidential interval (CI), 47-76%) of patients. Median time to progression was 19 weeks (95% CI, 15-22 weeks), and median survival was 52 weeks (95% CI, 39-64 weeks). This regimen of irinotecan and cisplatin with ADP resulted in promising efficacy with acceptable toxicity for patients with advanced NSCLC. This regimen is a candidate for the experimental arm towards future phase III studies. PMID:16288302

  17. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:24403266

  18. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yasumasa Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2}) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m{sup 2}), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m{sup 2}) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC.

  19. A phase I multicenter study of antroquinonol in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer who have received at least two prior systemic treatment regimens, including one platinum-based chemotherapy regimen

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YU-CHIN; HO, CHING-LIANG; KAO, WOEI-YAU; CHEN, YUH-MIN

    2015-01-01

    Antroquinonol is isolated from Antrodia camphorata, a camphor tree mushroom, and is a valuable traditional Chinese herbal medicine that exhibits pharmacological activities against several diseases, including cancer. This first-in-human phase I study of antroquinonol included patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer who had received at least two prior systemic treatment regimens. An open-label, dose escalation, pharmacokinetic (PK) study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerable dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and safety/tolerability and preliminary efficacy profiles of antroquinonol. The patients received escalating doses of once-daily antroquinonol in 4-week cycles (up to 3 cycles). The escalated doses were 50–600 mg. PKs were evaluated on day 1 and 28 of cycle 1. Between January, 2011 and October, 2012, 13 patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled. No DLTs occurred in any patient at any dose level. Tmax was observed between 1.00 and 3.70 h under single-dose conditions, and at 1.92–4.05 h under multiple-dose conditions. The mean elimination half-life ranged between 1.30 and 4.33 h, independent of the treatment dose. Antroquinonol at all dose levels had a mild toxicity profile, with no reported treatment-related mortality. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea, vomiting and nausea. The best tumor response was stable disease in 3 patients. In conclusion, antroquinonol at all dose levels, administered daily for 4 weeks, was generally safe and well tolerated, without DLTs. The recommended dose level for a phase II study is ≥600 mg daily. PMID:26807250

  20. Randomized Phase III Trial of Ixabepilone Plus Capecitabine Versus Capecitabine in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Previously Treated With an Anthracycline and a Taxane

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Vrdoljak, Eduard; Rixe, Oliver; Xu, Binghe; Manikhas, Alexey; Medina, Carlos; Ventilari Da Costa, Susanne Crocamo; Ro, Jungsil; Rubio, Gonzalo; Rondinon, Monica; Perez Manga, Gumersindo; Peck, Ronald; Poulart, Valerie; Conte, Pierfranco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We sought to determine whether the combination of ixabepilone plus capecitabine improved overall survival (OS) compared with capecitabine alone in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. Patients and Methods A total of 1,221 patients with MBC previously treated with anthracycline and taxanes were randomly assigned to ixabepilone (40 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1) plus capecitabine (2,000 mg/m2 orally on days 1 through 14) or capecitabine alone (2,500 mg/m2 on the same schedule) given every 21 days. The trial was powered to detect a 20% reduction in the hazard ratio (HR) for death. Results There was no significant difference in OS between the combination and capecitabine monotherapy arm, the primary end point (median, 16.4 v 15.6 months; HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 078 to 1.03; P = .1162). The arms were well balanced with the exception of a higher prevalence of impaired performance status (Karnofsky performance status 70% to 80%) in the combination arm (32% v 25%). In a secondary Cox regression analysis adjusted for performance status and other prognostic factors, OS was improved for the combination (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.98; P = .0231). In 79% of patients with measurable disease, the combination significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS; median, 6.2 v 4.2 months; HR = 0.79; P = .0005) and response rate (43% v 29%; P < .0001). Grade 3 to 4 neuropathy occurred in 24% treated with the combination, but was reversible. Conclusion This study confirmed a previous trial demonstrating improved PFS and response for the ixabepilone-capecitabine combination compared with capecitabine alone, although this did not result in improved survival. PMID:20530276

  1. Genetic variants in VEGF pathway genes in neoadjuvant breast cancer patients receiving bevacizumab: Results from the randomized phase III GeparQuinto study.

    PubMed

    Hein, Alexander; Lambrechts, Diether; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Häberle, Lothar; Eidtmann, Holger; Tesch, Hans; Untch, Michael; Hilfrich, Jörn; Schem, Christian; Rezai, Mahdi; Gerber, Bernd; Dan Costa, Serban; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Schwedler, Kathrin; Kittel, Kornelia; Fehm, Tanja; Kunz, Georg; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hanusch, Claus; Huober, Jens; Liedtke, Cornelia; Mau, Christine; Moisse, Matthieu; Müller, Volkmar; Nekljudova, Valentina; Peuteman, Gilian; Rack, Brigitte; Rübner, Matthias; Van Brussel, Thomas; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Loibl, Sibylle; Fasching, Peter A

    2015-12-15

    Studies assessing the effect of bevacizumab (BEV) on breast cancer (BC) outcome have shown different effects on progression-free and overall survival, suggesting that a subgroup of patients may benefit from this treatment. Unfortunately, no biomarkers exist to identify these patients. Here, we investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGF pathway genes correlate with pathological complete response (pCR) in the neoadjuvant GeparQuinto trial. HER2-negative patients were randomized into treatment arms receiving either BEV combined with standard chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone. In a pre-planned biomarker study, DNA was collected from 729 and 724 patients, respectively from both treatment arms, and genotyped for 125 SNPs. Logistic regression assessed interaction between individual SNPs and both treatment arms to predict pCR. Five SNPs may be associated with a better response to BEV, but none of them remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The two SNPs most strongly associated, rs833058 and rs699947, were located upstream of the VEGF-A promoter. Odds ratios for the homozygous common, heterozygous and homozygous rare rs833058 genotypes were 2.36 (95% CI, 1.49-3.75), 1.20 (95% CI, 0.88-1.64) and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.34-1.12). Notably, some SNPs in VEGF-A exhibited a more pronounced effect in the triple-negative subgroup. Several SNPs in VEGF-A may be associated with improved pCR when receiving BEV in the neoadjuvant setting. Although none of the observed effects survived correction for multiple testing, our observations are consistent with previous studies on BEV efficacy in BC. Further research is warranted to clarify the predictive value of these markers. PMID:26100253

  2. Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159759.html Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients Unfortunately, they're often deadly To use ... in 12 -- already diagnosed with one form of cancer end up developing a second type of unrelated ...

  3. Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159759.html Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients Unfortunately, they're often deadly To use ... in 12 -- already diagnosed with one form of cancer end up developing a second type of unrelated ...

  4. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  5. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC.

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Phase II Trial of High-Dose Radiation With Concurrent 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin in Patients With Anal Cancer (ECOG E4292)

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Catalano, Paul J.; Martenson, James A.; Mondschein, Joshua K.; Wagner, Henry; Mansour, Edward G.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Benson, Al Bowen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Although chemoradiation using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) is the standard of care in the treatment of anal cancer, many patients are unable to tolerate MMC. This Phase II clinical trial was performed to determine whether cisplatin could replace MMC in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with localized anal cancer were enrolled. One patient registered but never received any assigned therapy and was excluded from all analyses. Between February 1, 1993, and July 21, 1993, 19 patients were accrued to Cohort 1. Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and pelvic nodes, followed by a boost to the primary and involved nodes to 59.4 Gy. A planned 2-week treatment break was used after 36 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/day on Days 1 to 4 and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1. A second course of 5-FU and cisplatin was given after 36 Gy, when the patient resumed radiation therapy. Between April 4, 1996, and September 23, 1996, an additional 13 patients (Cohort 2) were accrued to the study and received the same treatment except without the planned treatment break. Results: Complete response was seen in 78% (90% CI, 63-89) of patients and was higher in patients who did not get a planned treatment break (92% vs. 68%). The overall Grade 4 toxicity rate was 31%. One treatment-related death (Grade 5) occurred in a patient who developed sepsis. The 5-year overall survival was 69%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy, cisplatin, and 5-FU resulted in an overall objective response (complete response + partial response) of 97%. Although the 5-year progression-free survival was only 55%, the overall 5-year survival was 69%. Given the excellent salvage provided by surgery, this study affirms that cisplatin-based regimens may be an alternative for patients who cannot tolerate the severe hematologic toxicities associated with mitomycin-based chemoradiation regimens.

  7. Effect of subcutaneous recombinant human erythropoietin in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: final report of a randomized, open-labelled, phase II trial.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, P. J.; Nicolae, D.; Ignacio, L.; Chen, L.; Roach, M.; Wara, W.; Marcus, K. C.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety, efficacy and impact on quality of life of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) for cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). An open-labelled randomized design was used, with patients randomized to either treatment or control arms. Patients in the treatment arm received r-HuEPO given by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 200 units kg(-1) day(-1) plus oral iron supplements (ferrous sulphate 325 mg p.o. t.i.d.). Entry was restricted to patients with carcinoma of the lung, uterine cervix, prostate or breast who presented for RT with anaemia parameters reflective of 'the anaemia of chronic disease'. Radiotherapy policies (portals, doses, fraction size, etc.) were determined by the site and stage of disease. Complete blood counts (CBCs) were obtained weekly. The target level of haemoglobin was 15 g dl(-1) for men and 14 g dl(-1) for women. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed weekly by using an analogue scale to judge energy, activities of daily living and overall quality of life. Forty-eight patients were entered in the study, 24 in the treatment arm and 24 in the control arm. The prerandomization demographic characteristics and mean laboratory values were comparable in both arms. The mean haemoglobin at completion was 13.6 g dl(-1) for r-HuEPO-treated patients compared with 11.0 g dl(-1) for control subjects (P = 0.0012). Patients who received r-HuEPO demonstrated a mean weekly haemoglobin increase of 0.41 g dl(-1) compared with a decrease in mean haemoglobin level in controls for 6 of the 7 weeks of the study (mean weekly decrease of 0.073 g dl(-1)). Target levels of haemoglobin were achieved by 41.6% of r-HuEPO-treated patients compared with none of the control subjects. The mean platelet count declined in both arms of the study with RT but the decline from pretreatment was less rapid in r-HuEPO-treated patients (11.2% decrease) compared with controls (26.3% decrease) and was statistically significant

  8. Bevacizumab in Combination with Modified FOLFOX6 in Heavily Pretreated Patients with HER2/Neu-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhonghua; Ragaz, Joseph; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Si; Cao, Jun; Lv, Fangfang; Wang, Leiping; Zhang, Sheng; Ni, Chen; Wu, Zhenhua; Xie, Jie; Hu, Xichun

    2015-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab combined with modified FOLFOX6 is a standard regimen for colorectal cancer. The present study was to determine the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab-modified FOLFOX6 regimen in heavily pretreated patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu)-negative MBC. Methods Bevacizumab, 5 mg/kg every two weeks or 7.5 mg/kg every three weeks, was administered with modified FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2, leucovorin 400 mg/m2, 5-FU 400 mg/m2 on day 1, followed by 5-FU 2400 mg/m2 intravenous infusion over 46 hours every 2 weeks) to patients who failed at least 1 chemotherapy regimen in the metastatic setting. The primary objective was progression free survival (PFS). Secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), overall survival (OS), safety, and the change of tumor size and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status. Results 69 patients were enrolled. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% CI, 5.0 to 8.5 months), ORR was 50.0% and median OS was 10.5 months (95% CI, 7.9 to 13.1 months). Patients showing objective responses had a 4.2-month median PFS gain and 5.7-month median OS gain compared with those who did not (P < 0.05). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurring in more than one patient were neutropenia (53/69, 76.8%), leukopenia (36/69, 52.2%), thrombocytopenia (13/69, 18.8%), anemia (3/69, 4.3%) and hypertension (3/69, 4.3%). Conclusions Adding bevacizumab to modified FOLFOX6 does have significant anti-tumor activity and good safety profile in heavily pretreated HER2/neu-negative MBC patients. Further trials are required to confirm whether the high ORR can translate into a long-term PFS and even OS benefit. Trial Registration www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01658033 PMID:26186012

  9. Improving cancer patient care: development of a generic cancer consumer quality index questionnaire for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Cancer Care questionnaire for measuring experiences with hospital care of patients with different types of cancer. Methods We derived quality aspects from focus group discussions, existing questionnaires and literature. We developed an experience questionnaire and sent it to 1,498 Dutch cancer patients. Another questionnaire measuring the importance of the quality aspects was sent to 600 cancer patients. Data were psychometrically analysed. Results The response to the experience questionnaire was 50 percent. Psychometric analysis revealed 12 reliable scales. Patients rated rapid and adequate referral, rapid start of the treatment after diagnosis, enough information and confidence in the healthcare professionals as most important themes. Hospitals received high scores for skills and cooperation of healthcare professionals and a patient-centered approach by doctors; and low scores for psychosocial guidance and information at completion of the treatment. Conclusions The CQI Cancer Care questionnaire is a valuable tool for the evaluation of the quality of cancer care from the patient’s perspective. Large scale implementation is necessary to determine the discriminatory powers of the questionnaire and may enable healthcare providers to improve the quality of cancer care. Preliminary results indicate that hospitals could improve their psychosocial guidance and information provision. PMID:23617741

  10. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  11. Radiation-related quality of life parameters after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a new treatment approach for early stage breast cancer. This study reports on the effects of IORT on radiation-related quality of life (QoL) parameters. Methods Two hundred and thirty women with stage I-III breast cancer (age, 31 to 84 years) were entered into the study. A single-center subgroup of 87 women from the two arms of the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A (TARGeted Intra-operative radioTherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer) was analyzed. Furthermore, results were compared to non-randomized control groups: n = 90 receiving IORT as a tumor bed boost followed by external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) outside of TARGIT-A (IORT-boost), and n = 53 treated with EBRT followed by an external-beam boost (EBRT-boost). QoL was collected using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires C30 (QLQ-C30) and BR23 (QLQ-BR23). The mean follow-up period in the TARGIT-A groups was 32 versus 39 months in the non-randomized control groups. Results Patients receiving IORT alone reported less general pain (21.3 points), breast (7.0 points) and arm (15.1 points) symptoms, and better role functioning (78.7 points) as patients receiving EBRT (40.9; 19.0; 32.8; and 60.5 points, respectively, P < 0.01). Patients receiving IORT alone also had fewer breast symptoms than TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT followed by EBRT for high risk features on final pathology (IORT-EBRT; 7.0 versus 29.7 points, P < 0.01). There were no significant differences between TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT-EBRT compared to non-randomized IORT-boost or EBRT-boost patients and patients receiving EBRT without a boost. Conclusions In the randomized setting, important radiation-related QoL parameters after IORT were superior to EBRT. Non-randomized comparisons showed equivalent parameters in the IORT-EBRT group and the control groups. PMID:23294485

  12. Phase III Randomized Trial of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With N2 or N3 Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Agulnik, Mark B.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E.; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. Conclusion IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:25049329

  13. [Postoperative nutritional management for esophageal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kenichiro; Kimura, Y

    2008-07-01

    High incidence of malnutrition is found in esophageal cancer patients. It is well known that to maintain good nutritional preoperative condition is very important to prevent postoperative morbidity and mortality. Hence, preoperative oral or nasogastric feeding is recommended when the patient is malnourished, at a total dose of 30 kcal/kg/day. During postoperative period, enteral nutrition should be primarily performed because of its favorable effects on immune-status and intestinal integrity to avoid septic complications. It is also important to keep circulatory volume sufficient to provide oxygen demand during catabolic phase, which leads earlier recovery from critical illness. Enteral nutrition should be immediately started afterward. An initial dose of 5-10 kcal/kg/day of the enteral nutrition is performed from the 1st or 2nd postoperative day and gradually increased to the full dose at 30 kcal/kg/ day. In cases of not administering scheduled dose of the enteral nutrition, either total or peripheral parenteral nutrition is required complementing total caloric intake. When total parenteral nutrition is used, blood glucose level should be controlled less than 150 mg/dl by pertinently administering insulin or limiting glycemic intake. Immunonutrition is promising nutritional management for critical surgical patients such as those performed esophageal cancer surgery. Continuing immune-enhancing diet at a dose of 750 to 1,000 ml/day for 5 to 7 days before surgery is necessary to bring good postoperative outcome. PMID:20715418

  14. Acetylsalicylic Acid and Eflornithine in Treating Patients at High Risk for Colorectal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This phase II trial is studying how well giving acetylsalicylic acid together with eflornithine works in treating patients at high risk for colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of acetylsalicylic acid and eflornithine may prevent colorectal cancer. |

  15. A phase I dose-escalation study to a predefined dose of a transforming growth factor-β1 monoclonal antibody (TβM1) in patients with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    COHN, ALLEN; LAHN, MICHAEL M.; WILLIAMS, KRISTEN E.; CLEVERLY, ANN L.; PITOU, CELINE; KADAM, SUNIL K.; FARMEN, MARK W.; DESAIAH, DURISALA; RAJU, ROBERT; CONKLING, PAUL; RICHARDS, DONALD

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) plays an important role in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) designed to specifically block the TGF-β ligands, are expected to inhibit tumor progression in patients with metastatic cancer. TβM1 is a humanized mAb optimized for neutralizing activity against TGF-β1. The objective of this clinical trial was to assess the safety and tolerability of TβM1 in patients with metastatic cancer. In this phase I, uncontrolled, non-randomized, dose-escalation study, 18 eligible adult patients who had measurable disease per RECIST and a performance status of ≤2 on the ECOG scale were administered TβM1 intravenously over 10 min at doses of 20, 60, 120 and 240 mg on day 1 of each 28-day cycle. Safety was assessed by adverse events (as defined by CTCAE version 3.0) and possible relationship to study drug, dose-limiting toxicities and laboratory changes. Systemic drug exposure and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters were assessed. TβM1 was safe when administered once monthly. The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile was consistent with a mAb with a mean elimination half-life approximately 9 days. Although anticipated changes in PD markers such as serum VEGF, bFGF and mRNA expression of SMAD7 were observed in whole-blood, suggesting activity of TβM1 on the targeted pathway, these changes were not consistent to represent a PD effect. Additionally, despite the presence of an activated TGF-β1 expression signature in patients’ whole blood, the short dosing duration did not translate into significant antitumor effect in the small number of patients investigated in this study PMID:25270361

  16. Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Hypofractionated Thoracic Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing; Hong, Ling-Zhi; Cai, Xu-Wei; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Fan, Min; Mao, Jing-Fang; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang; Fu, Xiao-Long

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated hypofractionated thoracic radiation therapy (HypoTRT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy in the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), with the hypothesis that both high radiation dose and short radiation time are important in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated LS-SCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate organ function were eligible. HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction over 30 days was given on the first day of the second or third cycle of chemotherapy. An etoposide/cisplatin regimen was given to 4 to 6 cycles. Patients who had a good response to initial treatment were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. The primary endpoint was the 2-year progression-free survival rate. Results: Fifty-nine patients were enrolled from July 2007 through February 2012 (median age, 58 years; 86% male). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 49.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.3%-62.7%). Median survival time was 28.5 months (95% CI 9.0-48.0 months); the 2-year overall survival rate was 58.2% (95% CI 44.5%-71.9%). The 2-year local control rate was 76.4% (95% CI 63.7%-89.1%). The severe hematologic toxicities (grade 3 or 4) were leukopenia (32%), neutropenia (25%), and thrombocytopenia (15%). Acute esophagitis and pneumonitis of grade ≥3 occurred in 25% and 10% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-eight patients (64%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusion: Our study showed that HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction daily concurrently with etoposide/cisplatin chemotherapy has favorable survival and acceptable toxicity. This radiation schedule deserves further investigation in LS-SCLC.

  17. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  18. HIPEC ROC I: a phase I study of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion followed by postoperative intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Oliver; Abramian, Alina; Kullmann, Maximilian; Fuhrmann, Christine; Coch, Christoph; Hoeller, Tobias; Ruehs, Hauke; Keyver-Paik, Mignon Denise; Rudlowski, Christian; Weber, Stefan; Kiefer, Nicholas; Poelcher, Martin L; Thiesler, Thore; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Mallmann, Michael; Schaefer, Nico; Permantier, Maryse; Latten, Sandra; Kalff, Joerg; Thomale, Juergen; Jaehde, Ulrich; Kuhn, Walther C

    2015-02-01

    This phase I study tested the safety, feasibility, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cisplatin administered as hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery followed by postoperative platinum-based intravenous chemotherapy. Twelve patients with operable, recurrent platinum-sensitive EOC (recurrence ≥6 months after first-line therapy) were included according to the classical 3+3 dose-escalation design at three dose levels-60, 80 and 100 mg/m(2). After surgical cytoreduction, a single dose of cisplatin was administered via HIPEC for 90 min at 41-43°C. Postoperatively, all patients were treated with standard intravenous platinum-based combination chemotherapy. One of six patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (grade 3 renal toxicity) at a dose of 100 mg/m(2). The remaining five patients treated with 100 mg/m(2) tolerated their treatment well. The recommended phase II dose was established at 100 mg/m(2). The mean peritoneal-to-plasma AUC ratio was 19·5 at the highest dose level. Cisplatin-induced DNA adducts were confirmed in tumor samples. Common postoperative grade 1-3 toxicities included fatigue, postoperative pain, nausea, and surgical site infection. The ability to administer standard intravenous platinum-based chemotherapy after HIPEC was uncompromised. Cisplatin administered as HIPEC at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) has an acceptable safety profile in selected patients undergoing secondary cytoreductive surgery for platinum-sensitive recurrent EOC. Favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of HIPEC with cisplatin were confirmed at all dose levels, especially at 100 mg/m(2). The results are encouraging to determine the efficacy of HIPEC as a complementary treatment in patients with EOC. PMID:24895230

  19. Hospice benefits and phase I cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Byock, Ira; Miles, Steven H

    2003-02-18

    Medicare denies hospice coverage to patients with terminal illnesses who enroll as participants in phase I studies, which assess the toxicity and dosing of potential treatments for incurable diseases. Federal regulations require patients to forgo curative therapies, and they interpret phase I agents as treatment for the terminal condition for which hospice care was elected. Thus, by enrolling as a participant in a phase I trial, a patient otherwise eligible for hospice is rendered ineligible. Private insurers have similar provisions for children and adults younger than 65 years of age. Such exclusions are not defensible on ethical or clinical grounds. Policymakers, insurers, and institutional review boards all have a role in resolving this problem. PMID:12585832

  20. A phase I study of concurrent chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) and thoracic radiotherapy with swallowed manganese superoxide dismutase plasmid liposome protection in patients with locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tarhini, Ahmad A; Belani, Chandra P; Luketich, James D; Argiris, Athanassios; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Gooding, William; Pennathur, Arjun; Petro, Daniel; Kane, Kevin; Liggitt, Denny; Championsmith, Tony; Zhang, Xichen; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S

    2011-03-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a genetically engineered therapeutic DNA/liposome containing the human MnSOD transgene. Preclinical studies in mouse models have demonstrated that the expression of the human MnSOD transgene confers protection of normal tissues from ionizing irradiation damage. This is a phase I study of MnSOD plasmid liposome (PL) in combination with standard chemoradiation in surgically unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) was given weekly (for 7 weeks), concurrently with radiation. MnSOD PL was swallowed twice a week (total 14 doses), at three dose levels: 0.3, 3, and 30 mg. Dose escalation followed a standard phase I design. Esophagoscopy was done at baseline, day 4, and 6 weeks after radiation with biopsies of the squamous lining cells. DNA was extracted and analyzed by PCR for the detection of the MnSOD transgene DNA. Ten patients with AJCC stage IIIA (three) and IIIB (seven) completed the course of therapy. Five had squamous histology, two adenocarcinoma, one large cell, and two not specified. Patients were treated in three cohorts at three dose levels of MnSOD PL: 0.3 (three patients), 3 (three patients), and 30 mg (four patients). The median dose of radiation was 77.7 Gy (range 63-79.10 Gy). Overall response rate for the standard chemoradiation regimen was 70% (n = 10). There were no dose-limiting toxicities reported in all three dosing tiers. It is concluded that the oral administration of MnSOD PL is feasible and safe. The phase II recommended dose is 30 mg. PMID:20873987

  1. A phase II study of paclitaxel, weekly, 24-hour continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Quietzsch, D; Haag, C; Lingenfelser, T; Schroeder, M; Hartmann, J T; Baronius, W; Hempel, V; Clemens, M; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin and 24 h continuous infusion of 5-FU/folinic acid in patients (pts) with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Forty-five chemotherapy-naive pts (28 male and 17 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 35–74) were enrolled. 5-FU 2 g/m2was given weekly over 24 h i.v. preceded by folinic acid 500 mg/m2as a 2 h infusion. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2was administered as a 3 h-infusion on days 1 and 22 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2as 1 h infusion on days 8 and 29. Six weeks of therapy (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36) followed by 2 weeks rest were considered one cycle. A median of 3 cycles (range 1–4) were administered to 45 pts assessable for response, survival and toxicity. Five pts (11%) obtained a CR and 18 pts (40%) a PR (ORR 51%; 95% Cl: 35.8–66.3%). Responses were achieved in the liver, lymph nodes, lungs and at the site of the primary tumour. Nine pts (20%) had stable disease. Thirteen pts (29%) were considered to have failed treatment, 8 pts (18%) due to progressive disease and 5 pts (11%) who did not receive one complete cycle of therapy due to acute non-haematologic toxicity. The median progression-free and overall survival times were 9 months (range 1–36+) and 14 months (range 2–36+), respectively. Neutropenia WHO III°/IV° occurred in 7 pts (15%) with only 1 pt having grade IV. Additional non-haematologic WHO III°/IV° toxicities included nausea/vomiting in 5 (11%), alopecia in 22 (49%), and diarrhoea in 1 patient each (2%). Dose reductions or treatment delays were necessary in 8 pts (17%), mainly due to neutropenia. All pts were treated on an outpatient basis. The combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and continuously infused 5-FU/folinic acid appears to be a highly active regimen for the treatment of pts with advanced gastric cancer. While the overall acceptable toxicity allows its use in the palliative setting, it may also be an attractive

  2. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  3. CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, E. G.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Reni, M.; Arena, F. P.; Infante, J. R.; Bathini, V. G.; Wood, T. E.; Mainwaring, P. N.; Muldoon, R. T.; Clingan, P. R.; Kunzmann, V.; Ramanathan, R. K.; Tabernero, J.; Goldstein, D.; McGovern, D.; Lu, B.; Ko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. Patients and methods Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. Results Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8. PMID:26802160

  4. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  5. Dose Escalation of Gemcitabine Is Possible With Concurrent Chest Three-Dimensional Rather Than Two-Dimensional Radiotherapy: A Phase I Trial in Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zinner, Ralph G. Cox, James D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Pisters, Katherine M.W.; Herbst, Roy S.; Kies, Merril; Hong, Waun K.; Fossella, Frank V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase I study the maximum tolerated dose of weekly gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as the relationship between the volume of the esophagus irradiated and severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage III NSCLC received gemcitabine initially at 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk over 7 weeks concurrently with chest radiotherapy to 63 Gy in 34 fractions. The first 9 patients underwent treatment with two-dimensional (2D) radiotherapy; the remaining 12 patients, with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and target volume reduced to clinically apparent disease. Consolidation was 4 cycles of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m{sup 2}/wk and cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: In the 2D group, the dose-limiting toxicity, Grade 3 esophagitis, occurred in 3 of 6 patients in the 150-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort and 2 of 3 patients in the 125-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort. No cases of Grade 3 esophagitis occurred at these doses in the 3D group. At gemcitabine 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, 2 of 6 patients in the 3D cohort had Grade 3 esophagitis. The mean percentages of esophagus irradiated to 60 Gy were 68% in the 2D cohort and 18% in the 3D cohort. Conclusions: We could not escalate the dose of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy when using 2D planning because of severe acute esophagitis. However, we could escalate the dose of gemcitabine to 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk when using 3D planning. The Phase II dose is 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk. Three-dimensional CRT permitted the use of higher doses of gemcitabine.

  6. Biomarker Analyses from a Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study Evaluating Erlotinib ± Onartuzumab in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: MET Expression Levels Are Predictive of Patient Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Hartmut; Yu, Wei; Zha, Jiping; Pandita, Ajay; Penuel, Elicia; Rangell, Linda; Raja, Rajiv; Mohan, Sankar; Patel, Rajesh; Desai, Rupal; Fu, Ling; Do, An; Parab, Vaishali; Xia, Xiaoling; Januario, Tom; Louie, Sharianne G.; Filvaroff, Ellen; Shames, David S.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lipkind, Marina; Huang, Jenny; Lazarov, Mirella; Ramakrishnan, Vanitha; Amler, Lukas; Phan, See-Chun; Patel, Premal; Peterson, Amy; Yauch, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a recent phase II study of onartuzumab (MetMAb), patients whose non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue scored as positive for MET protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC) experienced a significant benefit with onartuzumab plus erlotinib (O+E) versus erlotinib. We describe development and validation of a standardized MET IHC assay and, retrospectively, evaluate multiple biomarkers as predictors of patient benefit. Experimental Design Biomarkers related to MET and/or EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling were measured by IHC, FISH, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, mutation detection techniques, and ELISA. Results A positive correlation between IHC, Western blotting, and MET mRNA expression was observed in NSCLC cell lines/tissues. An IHC scoring system of MET expression taking proportional and intensity-based thresholds into consideration was applied in an analysis of the phase II study and resulted in the best differentiation of outcomes. Further analyses revealed a nonsignificant overall survival (OS) improvement with O+E in patients with high MET copy number (mean ≥5 copies/cell by FISH); however, benefit was maintained in “MET IHC-positive”/MET FISH-negative patients (HR, 0.37; P = 0.01). MET, EGFR, amphiregulin, epiregulin, or HGF mRNA expression did not predict a significant benefit with onartuzumab; a nonsignificant OS improvement was observed in patients with high tumor MET mRNA levels (HR, 0.59; P = 0.23). Patients with low baseline plasma hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exhibited an HR for OS of 0.519 (P = 0.09) in favor of onartuzumab treatment. Conclusions MET IHC remains the most robust predictor of OS and progression-free survival benefit from O+E relative to all examined exploratory markers. PMID:24687921

  7. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  8. Treatment strategies for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Imano, Motohiro; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-03-01

    Although the treatment of gastric cancer improves the clinical outcomes, the survival of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis is still very poor. Effective drugs against peritoneal metastasis, coupled with new therapeutic modalities, are needed to improve the prognoses of these patients. Paclitaxel and TS-1 are candidate drugs for peritoneal metastasis, and intraperitoneal chemotherapy and targeted therapy are potential new therapeutic modalities. Two phase II studies using TS-1 and intraperitoneal and systemic paclitaxel for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis showed respectable survival results. In addition, peritoneal metastatic lesions showed high levels of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (ECAM) and very low levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), thus indicating that an anti-ECAM monoclonal antibody, catumaxomab, would be effective against gastric cancer-derived peritoneal metastasis. Although catumaxomab and intraperitoneally administered paclitaxel are not generally used in Japan at present, these treatment strategies might therefore be effectively used in Japan in the near future. PMID:23677598

  9. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Halyard, Michele Y.; Jatoi, Aminah . E-mail: Jatoi.aminah@mayo.edu; Sloan, Jeff A.; Bearden, James D.; Vora, Sujay A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Perez, Edith A.; Soori, Gammi; Zalduendo, Anthony C.; Zhu, Angela; Stella, Philip J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive {>=}2,000 cGy of external beam RT to {>=}30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. {>=}6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sour taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx.

  10. Anti-angiogenic activity of VXM01, an oral T-cell vaccine against VEGF receptor 2, in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H; Hohmann, Nicolas; Niethammer, Andreas G; Friedrich, Tobias; Lubenau, Heinz; Springer, Marco; Breiner, Klaus M; Mikus, Gerd; Weitz, Jürgen; Ulrich, Alexis; Buechler, Markus W; Pianka, Frank; Klaiber, Ulla; Diener, Markus; Leowardi, Christine; Schimmack, Simon; Sisic, Leila; Keller, Anne-Valerie; Koc, Ruhan; Springfeld, Christoph; Knebel, Philipp; Schmidt, Thomas; Ge, Yingzi; Bucur, Mariana; Stamova, Slava; Podola, Lilli; Haefeli, Walter E; Grenacher, Lars; Beckhove, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    VEGFR-2 is expressed on tumor vasculature and a target for anti-angiogenic intervention. VXM01 is a first in kind orally applied tumor vaccine based on live, attenuated Salmonella bacteria carrying an expression plasmid, encoding VEGFR-2. We here studied the safety, tolerability, T effector (Teff), T regulatory (Treg) and humoral responses to VEGFR2 and anti-angiogenic effects in advanced pancreatic cancer patients in a randomized, dose escalation phase I clinical trial. Results of the first 3 mo observation period are reported. Locally advanced or metastatic, pancreatic cancer patients were enrolled. In five escalating dose groups, 30 patients received VXM01 and 15 placebo on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Treatment was well tolerated at all dose levels. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Salmonella excretion and salmonella-specific humoral immune responses occurred in the two highest dose groups. VEGFR2 specific Teff, but not Treg responses were overall increased in vaccinated patients. We furthermore observed a significant reduction of tumor perfusion after 38 d in vaccinated patients together with increased levels of serum biomarkers indicative of anti-angiogenic activity, VEGF-A, and collagen IV. Vaccine specific Teff responses significantly correlated with reductions of tumor perfusion and high levels of preexisting VEGFR2-specific Teff while those showing no antiangiogenic activity had low levels of preexisting VEGFR2 specific Teff, showed a transient early increase of VEGFR2-specific Treg and reduced levels of VEGFR2-specific Teff at later time points – pointing to the possibility that early anti-angiogenic activity might be based at least in part on specific reactivation of preexisting memory T cells. PMID:26137397

  11. An Open Label Phase 1b Dose Escalation Study of TRC105 (Anti-Endoglin Antibody) with Bevacizumab in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Robert, Francisco; Matei, Daniela; Mendelson, David S.; Goldman, Jonathan W.; Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Strother, Robert M.; Seon, Ben K.; Figg, William D.; Peer, Cody J.; Alvarez, Delia; Adams, Bonne J.; Theuer, Charles P.; Rosen, Lee S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Endoglin, an endothelial cell membrane receptor expressed on angiogenic tumor vessels, is essential for angiogenesis and upregulated in the setting of VEGF inhibition. TRC105 is an anti-endoglin IgG1 monoclonal antibody that potentiates VEGF inhibitors in preclinical models. This study assessed safety, pharmacokinetics, and anti-tumor activity of TRC105 in combination with bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients (n=38) with advanced solid tumors, Eastern Cooperative Group performance status 0–1, and normal organ function were treated with escalating doses of TRC105 plus bevacizumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity using a standard 3 + 3 phase 1 design. Results TRC105 and bevacizumab were well tolerated at their recommended single agent doses (10 mg/kg) when the initial dose of TRC105 was delayed by one week and divided over two days to limit the frequency of headache. The concurrent administration of bevacizumab and TRC105 did not otherwise potentiate known toxicities of TRC105 or bevacizumab. Hypertension and proteinuria were observed, though not at rates expected for single agent bevacizumab. Several patients who had previously progressed on bevacizumab or VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR TKI) treatment experienced reductions in tumor volume, including two partial responses by RECIST, and six remained without progression for longer periods than during their prior VEGF inhibitor therapy. Conclusion TRC105 was well tolerated with bevacizumab and clinical activity was observed in a VEGF inhibitor refractory population. Ongoing clinical trials are testing TRC105 in combination with bevacizumab in glioblastoma, and with VEGFR TKIs in renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:25261556

  12. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy by delineations on CT-based simulation in different respiratory phases for the treatment of senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weifeng; Yuan, Feng; Wang, Guoping; Lin, Zhiren; Pan, Yanling; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to evaluate the application of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on computed tomography (CT) simulations in different respiratory phases. Methods A total of 64 patients aged >70 years old with NSCLC were treated by 3D-CRT using CT images in different respiratory phases. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) at the end of inspiration and end of expiration were combined to obtain the total GTV, which was close to the motional range of tumors during respiration, and no additional expansion of the clinical target volume (CTAV) to planning target volume (PTV) (CTAV:PTV) was included during the recording of respiratory movements. Patients were also planned according to the classic 3D-CRT approach. Efficacy, prognostic factors, and side effects were evaluated. Results Compared with the classic approach, the average PTV was 18.9% lower (median: 17.3%), and the average lung volume receiving a prescribed dose for a tumor was 22.4% lower (median: 20.9%). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 70.6%, 54.9%, and 29.4%, respectively, with an overall tumor response rate of 79.7%. The Karnofsky performance status and N stage were independent prognostic factors, whereas age was not. Conclusion Without affecting therapeutic effects, CT simulations in different respiratory phases were well-tolerated in elderly patients with NSCLC, could effectively reduce PTV, and could improve the quality of life. PMID:26392773

  14. A Phase I study of an intravesically administered immunotoxin targeting EpCAM for the treatment of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer in BCGrefractory and BCG-intolerant patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Mark; Entwistle, Joycelyn; Cizeau, Jeannick; Niforos, Demi; Loewen, Shauna; Chapman, Wendy; MacDonald, Glen C

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A Phase I dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the immunotoxin VB4-845 in patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) refractory to or intolerant of bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG). Secondary objectives included evaluation of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and efficacy of VB4-845. Patients and methods Sixty-four patients with Grade 2 or 3, stage Ta or T1 transitional cell carcinoma or in situ carcinoma, either refractory to or intolerant of BCG therapy, were enrolled. Treatment was administered in ascending dose cohorts ranging from 0.1 to 30.16 mg. After receiving weekly instillations of VB4-845 to the bladder via catheter for 6 consecutive weeks, patients were followed for 4–6 weeks post-therapy and assessed at week 12. Results An MTD was not determined, as a dose-limiting toxicity was not identified over the dose range tested. VB4-845 therapy was safe and well tolerated with most adverse events reported as mild; as a result, no patients were removed from the study in response to toxicity. By the end of the study, the majority of patients had developed antibodies to the exotoxin portion of VB4-845. A complete response was achieved in 39% of patients at the 12-week time point. Conclusions VB4-845 dosed on a weekly basis for 6 weeks was very well tolerated at all dose levels. Although an MTD was not determined at the doses administered, VB4-845 showed evidence of an antitumor effect that warrants further clinical investigation for the treatment of NMIBC in this patient population. PMID:21151619

  15. Phase I trial of the oral PARP inhibitor olaparib in combination with paclitaxel for first- or second-line treatment of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This Phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability and efficacy of olaparib, a potent oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC). Methods Eligible patients who had received ≤1 prior cytotoxic regimen for mTNBC were treated with olaparib 200 mg bid continuously plus weekly paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 for three weeks per four-week cycle. Dose modifications in a large proportion of patients due to neutropenia resulted in enrollment of a second cohort of patients who, if they experienced grade ≥2 neutropenia in cycle 1, received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, which was continued prophylactically in subsequent cycles. All patients had measurable disease; tumor responses were evaluated according to RECIST (version 1.0). Results Nineteen patients (cohort 1, n = 9; cohort 2, n = 10) received treatment; 15 had received prior taxane chemotherapy. The most frequent adverse events were diarrhea (n = 12, 63%), nausea (n = 11, 58%) and neutropenia (n = 11, 58%). Seven neutropenia events were reported in cohort 1 (four grade ≥3) and four in cohort 2 (two grade ≥3, including one event of febrile neutropenia). The median (range) dose intensity of paclitaxel was 57% (26 to 100%) in cohort 1 and 73% (29 to 100%) in cohort 2. Seven patients (37%) had a confirmed partial response; one patient remains on olaparib monotherapy without progression. Conclusions The combination of olaparib and weekly paclitaxel was complicated by a significant clinical interaction, with higher-than-expected rates of neutropenia despite secondary prophylaxis. Given the encouraging response rate, alternative scheduling and dosing strategies should be considered (funded by AstraZeneca; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00707707). PMID:24063698

  16. NRG ONCOLOGY/RTOG 0921: A PHASE II STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY (IMRT) WITH CONCURRENT CISPLATIN AND BEVACIZUMAB FOLLOWED BY CARBOPLATIN AND PACLITAXEL FOR PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Moughan, Jennifer; Miller, Brigitte E.; Xiao, Ying; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Bosch, Walter; Matulonis, Ursula; Horowitz, Neil; Mannel, Robert S.; Souhami, Luis; Erickson, Beth; Winter, Kathryn; Small, William; Gaffney, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess acute and late adverse events (AEs), overall survival (OS), pelvic failure (PF), regional failure, distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS) in a prospective phase II clinical trial of bevacizumab (Bev) and pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial-cancer patients. Materials/Methods Patients had a hysterectomy, lymph node removal, and ≥1 of the following high-risk factors: grade 3 carcinoma with >50% myometrial invasion; grade 2 or 3 disease with any cervical stromal invasion; or known extrauterine extension confined to the pelvis. Treatment included pelvic IMRT and concurrent cisplatin on days 1 and 29 of radiation and Bev (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15 and 29 of radiation) followed by adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was grade ≥3 AEs in the first 90 days. Results Thirty-four patients were accrued from November 2009 through December 2011, 30 of whom were eligible and received study treatment. Seven out of 30 patients (23.3%, 90% CI: 10.6%-36.0%) had grade ≥3 treatment-related non-hematologic toxicities within 90 days; an additional 6 patients had grade ≥3 toxicities between 90 and 365 days after treatment. Two-year OS was 96.7% and DFS was 79.1%. No patient developed a within-field PF and no patients with stage I-IIIA disease relapsed after a median follow-up of 26 months. Conclusion Postoperative Bev added to chemotherapy and pelvic IMRT is well tolerated and results in high overall survival rates at 2 years for patients with high-risk endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25847373

  17. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are a powerful prognostic marker in patients with triple-negative breast cancer enrolled in the IBCSG phase III randomized clinical trial 22-00.

    PubMed

    Pruneri, Giancarlo; Gray, Kathryn P; Vingiani, Andrea; Viale, Giuseppe; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Criscitiello, Carmen; Láng, István; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Gianni, Lorenzo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Kammler, Roswitha; Price, Karen N; Cancello, Giuseppe; Munzone, Elisabetta; Gelber, Richard D; Regan, Meredith M; Colleoni, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic and predictive value of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cohort of the phase III IBCSG trial 22-00, comparing low-dose oral 'metronomic' cyclophosphamide-methotrexate maintenance chemotherapy (CM-maintenance) to no-CM-maintenance in early breast cancer. TILs were evaluated in full-face hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained sections of tumor samples confirmed centrally as TNBC (< 1 % of ER and PgR immunoreactivity and absence of HER2 overexpression or amplification). Mononuclear cells were evaluated in the stromal area within the borders of the invasive tumor. The primary endpoint was breast cancer-free interval (BCFI). Cox proportional hazards regression model assessed the association of BCFI and secondary endpoints with TILs score. In the 647 tumor samples, the median percentage of TILs was 18 % (IQR = 8-40 %), with 18 % having TILs ≥ 50 % (lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer, LPBC). At a median follow-up of 6.9 years, TILs were associated with better prognosis. For every 10 % increase of TILs, BCFI risk reduction was 13 % (HR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.79-0.95,P = 0.003). DFS, DRFI, and OS risk reductions were 11 % (P = 0.005), 16 % (P = 0.003), and 17 % (P < 0.001), respectively. Multivariable analysis confirmed the independent prognostic value of TILs. No significant TILs-by-treatment interaction was observed (P = 0.39) for associations of TILs with BCFI, although patients with LPBC receiving CM-maintenance had a greater breast cancer risk reduction (HR 0.64,95 % CI 0.23-1.78) than those with non-LPBC (TILs < 50 %) (HR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.67-1.40). TILs score is a potent prognostic factor in patients with TNBC. Low-dose chemotherapy confers a greater (not statistically significant) clinical benefit in patients with LPBC. PMID:27372069

  18. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Seok Mo; Cho, Chi-Heum; Kim, Byoung Gie; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  19. Magnitude of the Benefit of Progression-Free Survival as a Potential Surrogate Marker in Phase 3 Trials Assessing Targeted Agents in Molecularly Selected Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kato, Yuka; Leighl, Natasha; Takigawa, Nagio; Gaafar, Rabab Mohamed; Kayatani, Hiroe; Hirata, Taizo; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Kubo, Toshio; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background In evaluation of the clinical benefit of a new targeted agent in a phase 3 trial enrolling molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), overall survival (OS) as an endpoint seems to be of limited use because of a high level of treatment crossover for ethical reasons. A more efficient and useful indicator for assessing efficacy is needed. Methods and Findings We identified 18 phase 3 trials in the literature investigating EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs) or ALK-TKIs, now approved for use to treat NSCLC, compared with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy (eight trials were performed in molecularly selected patients and ten using an “all-comer” design). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best threshold by which to divide the groups. Although trials enrolling molecularly selected patients and all-comer trials had similar OS-hazard ratios (OS-HRs) (0.99 vs. 1.04), the former exhibited greater progression-free survival-hazard ratios (PFS-HR) (mean, 0.40 vs. 1.01; P<0.01). A PFS-HR of 0.60 successfully distinguished between the two types of trials (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%). The odds ratio for overall response was higher in trials with molecularly selected patients than in all-comer trials (mean: 6.10 vs. 1.64; P<0.01). An odds ratio of 3.40 for response afforded a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 90%. Conclusion The notably enhanced PFS benefit was quite specific to trials with molecularly selected patients. A PFS-HR cutoff of ∼0.6 may help detect clinical benefit of molecular targeted agents in which OS is of limited use, although desired threshold might differ in an individual trial. PMID:25775395

  20. Sperm banking and the cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    The current concepts, recommendations, and principles of sperm banking as it pertains to the comprehensive care of young men of reproductive age with cancer are reviewed. Obstacles to sperm banking are addressed as well as future directions for fertility-preserving technologies. All cancer therapies—chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery—are potential threats to a man’s reproductive potential. In addition, cancer itself can impair spermatogenesis. Thus, sperm cryopreservation prior to initiating life-saving cancer treatment offers men and their families the best chance to father biologically related children and should be offered to all men with cancer before treatment. Better patient and provider education, as well as deliberate, coordinated strategies at comprehensive cancer care centers are necessary to make fertility preservation for male cancer patients a priority during pretreatment planning. PMID:21789080

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin to Preserve Gland Function after Radiotherapy in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Wittig, Andrea; Franke, Nora; Hoch, Stephan; Harnisch, Susanne; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Hoeffken, Helmut; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase I clinical trial investigates safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin (BoNT) to preserve gland function after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer were injected with BoNT into the submandibular glands prior to primary radiochemotherapy. Six patients received BoNT/A and 6 patients BoNT/A and B, half of each subgroup into their left and the other half into their right gland. As an internal control, sodium chloride was injected into the respective contralateral gland (placebo). For the evaluation of the salivary gland function, technetium pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy was performed before and after the end of radiotherapy. BoNT/A and B were well tolerated. Analysis of the scintigraphic data revealed no statistically significant difference between BoNT and placebo regarding the scintigraphic uptake difference (pBoNT/A = 0.84 and pBoNT/A-B = 0.56 for BoNT/A vs. placebo and BoNT/A-B vs. placebo, respectively). We also found no significant difference in treatment between BoNT and placebo in terms of salivary excretion fraction (pBoNT/A = 0.44; pBoNT/A-B = 0.44). This study demonstrates that BoNT can be safely combined with radiochemotherapy. Dosing and timing of BoNT injection should be further investigated for efficacy analysis. Trial Registration German Registry for Clinical Trails DRKS00004595 PMID:26991494

  2. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  3. Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing.

    PubMed

    Suhami, Norhasmilia; Muhamad, Mazanah Bt; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2016-10-01

    Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients' healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The findings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing and (3) the perceived ineffectiveness and dissatisfaction with conventional treatments. Islamic healing will likely continue to be popular complementary cancer treatment in Malaysia as it is grounded in strong cultural and religious beliefs. PMID:26391242

  4. Psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Sedat

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients from a biopsychosocial approach. Pain in cancer patients is considered as a complex reaction causing severe suffering and involves many psychological aspects. It has many dimensions such as personality, affect, cognition and social relations. The pain experience may also be influenced by some psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and the meaning of pain. Therefore, a successful management of cancer pain requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since cancer pain is generally treated medically, the psychological impact of pain is often underestimated. However, cancer pain is usually related to high levels of psychological distress. Culture, as an important factor affecting cancer pain, will also be discussed during this review. It is crucial to understand cultural diversity in the treatment of cancer patients with pain. Research shows that a minority patients of various ethnicities have less control of their pain because of the miscommunication problem within the medical setting. By paying attention to patients' cultural diversities, problems such as miscommunication causing inadequate control of pain can be eliminated. In order to manage pain in cancer patients, cognitive-behavioral interventions may be integrated with pharmacotherapy. The main goal of these strategies is to provide a sense of control and better coping skills to deal with cancer. Patients' maladaptive thoughts or behaviors may cause physical and emotional stress. Main behavioral strategies include biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Cognitive strategies include guided imagery, distraction, thought monitoring and problem solving. By discussing all of these aspects of cancer pain, the multidimensional characteristic of pain and the relation between cancer pain and psychiatric factors will be clarified. PMID:20590361

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer treated with eribulin mesylate or capecitabine in an open-label randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Javier; Hudgens, Stacie; Twelves, Chris; Perez, Edith A; Awada, Ahmad; Yelle, Louise; McCutcheon, Susan; Kaufman, Peter A; Forsythe, Anna; Velikova, Galina

    2015-12-01

    The clinical benefit of eribulin versus capecitabine was evaluated using health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data from a phase 3 randomized trial in patients with pretreated advanced/metastatic breast cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). The study population has been described previously (Kaufman et al. in J Clin Oncol 33:594-601, 2015). Eligible patients received eribulin (1.4 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8) or capecitabine (1.25 g/m(2) orally twice daily on days 1-14) per 21-day cycles. HRQoL was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-life Questionnaire-Core 30 questions (QLQ-C30) and breast module-23 questions (QLQ-BR23), administered at baseline through 24 months, until disease progression or other antitumor treatment initiation. Minimally important difference (MID) and time to symptom worsening (TSW) were investigated. 1062 (96.4 %) Patients completed the EORTC questionnaire at baseline; overall, compliance was ≥80 %. Patients receiving capecitabine versus eribulin had significantly worse symptoms (higher scores) for nausea/vomiting (MID 8; P < 0.05) and diarrhea (MID 7; P < 0.05). Treatment with eribulin versus capecitabine, led to worse systemic therapy side-effects (dry mouth, different tastes, irritated eyes, feeling ill, hot flushes, headaches, and hair loss; MID 10; P < 0.01). Clinically meaningful worsening was observed for future perspective (MID 10; P < 0.05) with capecitabine and for systemic therapy side-effects scale (MID 10; P < 0.01) with eribulin. Patients receiving capecitabine experienced more-rapid deterioration in body image (by 2.9 months) and future perspective (by 1.4 months; P < 0.05) compared with those on eribulin; the opposite was observed for systemic side-effects where patients receiving eribulin experienced more-rapid deterioration than those receiving capecitabine (by 2 months; P < 0.05). Eribulin and capecitabine were found to have similar

  6. Cardiac Tolerability of Pertuzumab Plus Trastuzumab Plus Docetaxel in Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer in CLEOPATRA: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase III Study

    PubMed Central

    Ewer, Michael S.; Cortés, Javier; Amadori, Dino; Miles, David; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Benyunes, Mark C.; Ross, Graham; Baselga, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. We report cardiac tolerability of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel versus placebo plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel observed in the phase III study CLEOPATRA in patients with HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥50% and ECOG performance status of 0 or 1 were required for study entry. During the study, LVEF assessments took place every 9 weeks. Pertuzumab/placebo was given at 840 mg, then 420 mg q3w; trastuzumab was administered at 8 mg/kg, then 6 mg/kg q3w, and docetaxel was initiated at 75 mg/m2 q3w. Results. The incidence of cardiac adverse events (all grades) was 16.4% in the placebo arm and 14.5% in the pertuzumab arm, with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD, all grades) being the most frequently reported event (8.3% versus 4.4% in the placebo and pertuzumab arm). Declines in LVEF by ≥10% points from baseline and to <50% were reported in 6.6% and 3.8% of patients in the placebo and pertuzumab arm, respectively. Seventy-two percent (placebo arm) and 86.7% (pertuzumab arm) of those patients recovered to a value ≥50%. The incidence of symptomatic LVSD was low, occurring in 1.8% (n = 7) versus 1.0% (n = 4) of patients in the placebo and pertuzumab arm. In 8/11 patients, the symptomatic LVSD had resolved at data cutoff. Conclusion. The combination of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel did not increase the incidence of cardiac adverse events, including LVSD, compared with the control arm in HER2-positive MBC. The majority of cardiac adverse events were reversible. PMID:23475636

  7. Phase I study of simultaneous dose escalation and schedule acceleration of cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-etoposide using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor with or without antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzoni, A.; Pennucci, M. C.; Danova, M.; Viscoli, C.; Mariani, G. L.; Giorgi, G.; Venturini, M.; Mereu, C.; Scolaro, T.; Rosso, R.

    1996-01-01

    A phase I study was designed to assess whether dose intensity of an 'accelerated' cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-etoposide (CDE) regimen plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) could be increased further, in an outpatient setting, by escalating the dose of each single drug of the regimen. Patients with previously untreated small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) received escalating doses of cyclophosphamide (C) 1100-1300 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) on day 1, doxorubicin (D) 50-60 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1, etoposide (E) 110-130 mg m-2 i.v. on days 1, 2, 3 and every 14 days for at least three courses. Along with chemotherapy, G-CSF (filgastrim) 5 micrograms kg-1 from day 5 to day 11 was administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to all patients. Twenty-five patients were enrolled into the study. All patients at the first dose level (C 1100, D 50, E 110 x 3) completed three or more cycles at the dose and schedule planned by the protocol and no 'dose-limiting toxicity' (DLT) was seen. At the second dose level (C 1200, D 55, E 120 x 3) three out of five patients had a DLT consisting of 'granulocytopenic fever' (GCPF). Another six patients were treated at this dose level with the addition of ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice a day and only two patients had a DLT [one episode of documented oral candidiasis and one of 'fever of unknown origin' (FUO) with generalised mucositis]. Accrual of patients proceeded to the third dose level (C 1300, D 60, E 130 x 3) with the prophylactic use of ciprofloxacin. Four out of six patients experienced a DLT consisting of GCPF or documented non-bacterial infection. Accrual of patients at the third dose level was then resumed adding to ciprofloxacin anti-fungal prophylaxis (fluconazole 100 mg daily) and anti-viral prophylaxis (acyclovir 800 mg twice a day) from day 5 to 11. Out of five patients treated three experienced a DLT consisting of severe leucopenia and fever or infection. With a simultaneous dose escalation and schedule acceleration it is indeed

  8. Phase II trial of carboplatin, S-1, and gefitinib as first-line triplet chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Akihiro; Tamiya, Motohiro; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Saijo, Nobuhiko; Nakatani, Takeshi; Minomo, Shojiro; Tsuji, Taisuke; Takeuchi, Naoko; Omachi, Naoki; Kurata, Kanako; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Okishio, Kyoichi; Hirashima, Tomonori; Atagi, Shinji

    2015-03-01

    Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), is an effective treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with activating EGFR mutations. However, there have been little evidence-based studies of gefitinib in combination with platinum-doublet therapy in these patients. We performed a phase II trial to determine the efficacy and safety of triplet chemotherapy with gefitinib, carboplatin, and S-1 as a first-line treatment. This was a multicentre, single-arm, phase II trial of carboplatin, S-1, and gefitinib in advanced NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations. Patients received four courses of these drugs in 3-4 week cycles. In each cycle, carboplatin (area under curve = 5) was administered on day 1, S-1 (80 mg/m(2)) on days 1-14, and gefitinib (250 mg) every day. Subsequently, the same regimen without carboplatin was administered until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary endpoint, while response rate (RR), PFS, overall survival (OS), and safety were secondary endpoints. Thirty-five patients were enrolled into this study. The 1-year PFS was 74.3% and the overall RR was 85.7%. The median PFS for all patients was 17.6 months (95% confidence interval 15.5-∞), but the median OS was not reached, because 28 patients were still alive after a median follow-up time of 21.4 months. Haematological adverse events (grade 3 or higher) included neutropaenia (17.1%), thrombocytopenia (14.3%), and anaemia (5.7%), while non-haematological adverse events (grade 3 or higher) included elevated aminotransferase (20.0%), diarrhoea (14.3%), and febrile neutropaenia (2.9%). No interstitial lung disease or treatment-related deaths occurred. Combination chemotherapy with carboplatin, S-1, and gefitinib is efficacious and well tolerated as a first-line treatment in advanced NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations. PMID:25616723

  9. [Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Elderly Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yokode, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Age-specific analyses of mortality rates in Japan show that cancer was the leading cause of death for the age group 40-89 years in the year 2013. Although the crude mortality rate from cancer has recently increased, the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate has shown a decreasing trend. This suggests that the increases in the crude mortality rate may have been caused by the aging of the population. Cancer patients who are old present many comorbidities and newly diagnosed geriatric problems. Several tools provide determinants of survival in cancer patients who are old (including the comprehensive geriatric assessment [CGA]) in order to improve the quality of cancer care in this population. PMID:27539034

  10. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  11. Postoperative dose-dense sequential versus concomitant administration of epirubicin and paclitaxel in patients with node-positive breast cancer: 5-year results of the Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group HE 10/00 phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Dafni, Urania; Karina, Maria; Papadimitriou, Christos; Batistatou, Anna; Bobos, Mattheos; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Timotheadou, Eleni; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Christos; Markopoulos, Christos; Briasoulis, Evangelos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Samantas, Epaminontas; Kosmidis, Paris; Stathopoulos, George P; Karanikiotis, Charisios; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Fountzilas, George

    2012-04-01

    To explore the impact of dose intensity (DI) in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer, a randomized phase III trial was conducted comparing postoperative dose-dense sequential chemotherapy with epirubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF)in high-risk breast cancer patients. From Oct 2000 to June 2005, 1,121 node-positive patients were randomized to dose-dense sequential epirubicin 110 mg/m(2) and paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol Myers-Squibb, Princeton, NJ) 250 mg/m(2) (group A), or concurrent epirubicin 83 mg/m(2) and paclitaxel 187 mg/m(2) (group B), both followed by three cycles of "intensified" combination chemotherapy with CMF. By protocol design total cumulative dose and duration of treatment were identical in both groups. Dose intensity of epirubicin and paclitaxel was double in the dose-dense arm. Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was given with the dose-dense treatments. Disease-free survival (DFS) was the primary endpoint. At a median follow-up of 76 months, 253 patients (23%) had documented disease relapse (123 vs. 130 in groups A and B, respectively) and 208 deaths (101, group A and 107, group B) had been observed. The 5-year DFS rate of 74 and 74% and OS rate of 86 and 85% were observed for group A and group B, respectively. No differences were found in DFS or OS between the two treatment groups (P = 0.78 and P = 0.45 for DFS and OS, respectively). Safety analysis results showing that both regimens were well tolerated and safe have been previously published (Fountzilas et al. Ann Oncol 2008). No DFS or OS benefit from the dose-dense sequential epirubicin and paclitaxel was detected when compared to the concurrent administration of the same drugs. No additional safety issues were raised with long-term follow-up. PMID:22187126

  12. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients. PMID:18935760

  13. The concept of rehabilitation of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Body, J J; Lossignol, D; Ronson, A

    1997-07-01

    The scope of supportive care and cancer rehabilitation is very wide and heterogeneous. In this review we focus on nutritional aspects, sexual and gonadal function, psychological rehabilitation, treatment of cancer pain, and rehabilitation of patients with bone metastases. The anorexia-cachexia syndrome is a particularly frequent manifestation of cancer that profoundly affects body image and significantly impairs quality of life of cancer patients. However, enteral feeding through nasogastric tubes, gastrostomies, or jejunostomies is an efficient method for providing long-term enteral nutrition at home and for contributing to complete rehabilitation after cancer therapy. Recent effort has focused on nutritional pharmacology and on the optimalization of the use of appetite-stimulating drugs, such as progestational agents. The psychological components of cancer, anticancer therapy, and quality of life have now been widely recognized and studied. Effective pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions help patients and their family to better adjust to the chronic stress of cancer, but more specific determinants of psychological morbidity should be developed. In particular, the safe and efficient use of the most recent classes of antidepressants and anxiolytics should be urgently studied. More than 90% of cancer patients present one or more pain syndromes during their illness. The adequate use of drugs is the cornerstone of treatment. The development on new molecules and new routes of administration opens interesting perspectives for cancer pain control. Bone metastases are the source of considerable morbidity. Intravenous bisphosphonates have been successfully used for the treatment of the symptoms of metastatic bone disease, especially bone pain. Moreover, monthly pamidronate infusions in addition to chemotherapy reduce the mean skeletal morbidity rate by more than one third and contribute to the rehabilitation of cancer patients with bone metastases from breast

  14. Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND197: a phase II study of foretinib in patients with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rayson, Daniel; Lupichuk, Sasha; Potvin, Kylea; Dent, Susan; Shenkier, Tamara; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder; Ellard, Susan L; Prady, Catherine; Salim, Muhammad; Farmer, Patricia; Allo, Ghasson; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Allan, Alison; Ludkovski, Olga; Bonomi, Maria; Tu, Dongsheng; Hagerman, Linda; Goodwin, Rachel; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Bradbury, Penelope

    2016-05-01

    In murine models, overexpression of the MET receptor transgene induces tumors with human basal gene expression characteristics supporting MET inhibition as a treatment strategy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Foretinib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor of MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGF receptors with anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC and papillary renal cell cancer. Patients with centrally reviewed primary TNBC and 0-1 prior regimens for metastatic disease received daily foretinib 60 mg po in a 2-stage single-arm trial. Primary endpoints were objective response and early progression rates per RECIST 1.1. In stage 2, correlative studies of MET, PTEN, EGFR, and p53 on archival and fresh tumor specimens were performed along with enumeration of CTCs. 45 patients were enrolled with 37 patients having response evaluable and centrally confirmed primary TNBC (cTNBC). There were 2 partial responses (ITT 4.7 % response evaluable cTNBC 5.4 %) with a median duration of 4.4 months (range 3.7-5 m) and 15 patients had stable disease (ITT 33 %, response evaluable cTNBC 40.5 %) with a median duration of 5.4 months (range 2.3-9.7 m). The most common toxicities (all grades/grade 3) were nausea (64/4 %), fatigue (60/4 %), hypertension (58/49 %), and diarrhea (40/7 %). Six serious adverse events were considered possibly related to foretinib and 4 patients went off study due to adverse events. There was no correlation between MET positivity and response nor between response and PTEN, EGFR, p53, or MET expression in CTCs. Although CCTG IND 197 did not meet its primary endpoint, the observation of a clinical benefit rate of 46 % in this cTNBC population suggests that foretinib may have clinical activity as a single, non-cytotoxic agent in TNBC (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01147484). PMID:27116183

  15. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  16. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  17. Impact of denosumab on bone mass in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Glaberman, Ursa; Stopeck, Alison T

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapy-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is a form of secondary osteoporosis associated with systemic chemotherapy and hormonal ablation therapy. The monitoring and treatment of CTIBL is an important component of comprehensive cancer care, especially for patients with curable disease and long life expectancies. Whereas oral bisphosphonates remain the most commonly used therapeutic option for CTIBL, additional treatment options may be required for patients who do not respond adequately or are intolerant to bisphosphonates, have renal insufficiency, or are receiving treatment with nephrotoxic medications. For these patients, denosumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), offers an effective and well-tolerated alternative. Several recent randomized trials have examined the use of denosumab as treatment for CTIBL associated with hormone ablation therapy for breast and prostate cancer. Recent data suggest a possible role for RANKL inhibitors in both chemoprevention and the prevention of cancer recurrence through direct effects on breast tissue and breast cancer stem cells. The outcomes of several international Phase III clinical trials currently underway will help clarify the role of denosumab in patients undergoing cancer therapy. PMID:23861604

  18. Phase I trial to evaluate the tumor and normal tissue uptake, radiation dosimetry and safety of 111In-DTPA-human epidermal growth factor in patients with metastatic EGFR-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallis, Katherine A; Reilly, Raymond M; Scollard, Deborah; Merante, Pat; Brade, Anthony; Velauthapillai, Sobi; Caldwell, Curtis; Chan, Ida; Freeman, Marc; Lockwood, Gina; Miller, Naomi A; Cornelissen, Bart; Petronis, Jennifer; Sabate, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The safety, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of 111In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, were evaluated in a first-in-human trial. Dose escalation was performed in patients with EGFR-positive metastatic breast cancer who had received ≥2 prior courses of systemic treatment. 111In-DTPA-hEGF (0.25 mg) was administered once intravenously (i.v.). Blood was collected for biochemistry/hematology testing and pharmacokinetic and immunogenicity analyses at selected times post injection (p.i.). Whole body planar images were acquired at 1, 4-6, 24 and 72 h p.i. and SPECT images at 24 and/or 72 h p.i. Macrodosimetry (MIRD) for the whole body and organs was estimated using OLINDA. Correlative radiological imaging was obtained at baseline, 1 and 3 months and then 6 monthly. Toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE)v2.0. Sixteen patients, median age 47 yr (range, 35-59), received 111In-DTPA-hEGF as follows: 357-434 MBq (7), 754-805 MBq (3), 1,241-1,527 MBq (3) and 2,030-2,290 MBq (3). Fifteen were evaluable for toxicity. The commonest adverse events (AE) were flushing, chills, nausea, and vomiting occurring during or immediately p.i. One patient experienced Grade 3 thrombocytopenia (attributed to bone marrow infiltration by cancer). There were no other Grade 3 or 4 AEs. Maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Clear accumulation of radiopharmaceutical in at least one known site of disease was observed in 47% of patients. 111In-DTPA-hEGF was cleared biexponentially from the blood with α-phase T½ of 0.16 ± 0.03 h and β-phase T½ of 9.41 ± 1.93 h. 111In-DTPA-hEGF was not immunogenic. The mean radiation dose estimates in mGy/MBq for whole body, liver, kidneys, spleen and thyroid were 0.08, 0.86, 0.74, 0.37 and 0.30, respectively. No objective antitumor responses were observed at the doses studied. In summary, administered amounts of up to 2,290 MBq (0.25 mg) of 111In-DTPA-hEGF were well

  19. A Model for Counselling Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jevne, Ronna F.; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl L.; Williamson, F. Helen A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a model for counseling cancer patients that integrates the unique features of the cancer experience within a basic counseling framework. It combines a nine-step problem-solving approach with a biopsychosocial perspective, placing greater emphasis on the person than the problem. Utilizes innovative questioning techniques and strategies.…

  20. A phase II study of pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by maintenance pemetrexed as first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tsuneo; Abe, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Daga, Haruko; Takeda, Koji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    A phase I study recommended carboplatin (CBDCA, area under the curve = 5) plus pemetrexed (PEM, 500 mg/m(2)) for elderly patients (≥75-years old) with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PEM maintenance therapy was well tolerated. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this regimen in elderly patients with NSCLC. Four courses of CBDCA plus PEM, followed by PEM, were administered. The primary endpoint was the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary endpoints were OS, progression-free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), and safety. Thirty-four patients (median age, 77 years) were enrolled between June 2012 and May 2013. The median observation time was 22.7 months. The primary endpoint of the 1-year OS rate was 58.0 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 42.9-78.4 %), and RR and disease control rate were 41.2 and 85.3 %, respectively. Fourteen patients had partial responses, 15 had stable disease, 4 had disease progression, and 1 was not evaluated. The maintenance therapy rate was 58.8 %. The median PFS was 5.7 months (95 % CI 3.9-8.9 months), and median OS was 20.5 months (95 % CI 10.0-infinity months). Grade ≥3 hematological adverse events included leucopenia (23.5 % of patients), neutropenia (55.9 %), anemia (35.3 %), and thrombocytopenia (20.6 %). Grade ≥3 non-hematological adverse events included febrile neutropenia (8.8 %), elevated aminotransferases (5.9 %), infection (23.5 %), and anorexia/fatigue (5.9 %). Four patients had interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and one died due to ILD. CBDCA plus PEM, followed by PEM, was effective and reasonably tolerated in chemotherapy-naïve elderly patients with non-squamous NSCLC. Clinical Trial Registration This trial is registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (Trial Number UMIN 000004810). PMID:26603297

  1. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  2. Randomized, Phase III Trial of First-Line Figitumumab in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Versus Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Alone in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Corey J.; Novello, Silvia; Park, Keunchil; Krzakowski, Maciej; Karp, Daniel D.; Mok, Tony; Benner, Rebecca J.; Scranton, Judith R.; Olszanski, Anthony J.; Jassem, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Figitumumab (CP-751,871), a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody, inhibits the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). Our multicenter, randomized, phase III study compared figitumumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as first-line treatment in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV or recurrent NSCLC disease with nonadenocarcinoma histology received open-label figitumumab (20 mg/kg) plus paclitaxel (200 mg/m2) and carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6 mg · min/mL) or paclitaxel and carboplatin alone once every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Of 681 randomly assigned patients, 671 received treatment. The study was closed early by an independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee because of futility and an increased incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and treatment-related deaths with figitumumab. Median OS was 8.6 months for figitumumab plus chemotherapy and 9.8 months for chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.40; P = .06); median progression-free survival was 4.7 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4) and 4.6 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4), respectively (HR, 1.10; P = .27); the objective response rates were 33% and 35%, respectively. The respective rates of all-causality SAEs were 66% and 51%; P < .01). Treatment-related grade 5 adverse events were also more common with figitumumab (5% v 1%; P < .01). Conclusion Adding figitumumab to standard chemotherapy failed to increase OS in patients with advanced nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC. Further clinical development of figitumumab is not being pursued. PMID:24888810

  3. [Nutrition management of the cancer patients: modern view on problem].

    PubMed

    Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Plotnikova, O A; Voznyĭ, E K

    2008-01-01

    In the review the current state of nutrition for patients with cancers is given. The role of nutrition in cancer etiology and prevention of cancers are discussed. Main principles of diet constriction in cancers are expounded. PMID:18669325

  4. Understanding male cancer patients' barriers to participating in cancer rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Handberg, C; Lomborg, K; Nielsen, C V; Oliffe, J L; Midtgaard, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to describe male cancer survivors' barriers towards participation in cancer rehabilitation as a means to guiding future targeted men's cancer rehabilitation. Symbolic Interactionism along with the interpretive descriptive methodology guided the study of 35 male cancer survivors representing seven cancer types. Data were generated through a 5-month fieldwork study comprising participant observations, semi-structured individual interviews and informal conversations. The analyses revealed two overarching findings shedding light on male cancer survivors' barriers to rehabilitation: 'Fear of losing control' and 'Striving for normality'. While 'Fear of losing control' signified what the men believed rehabilitation would invoke: 'Reduced manliness', 'Sympathy and dependency' and 'Confrontation with death', 'Striving for normality' was based on what the men believed rehabilitation would hinder: 'Autonomy and purpose', 'Solidarity and fellowship' and 'Forget and move on'. This study of male cancer survivors' and cancer rehabilitation documents how masculine ideals may constitute barriers for participation in rehabilitation and provides insights about why men are underrepresented in rehabilitation. The findings can guide practice to develop research-based rehabilitation approaches focused on preserving control and normality. Further empirical evidence is needed to: (1) explore the conduct of health professionals' towards male cancer patients and (2) address gender inequalities in cancer rehabilitation. PMID:26223855

  5. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors. PMID:26614861

  6. Wound Healing in PatientsWith Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Wyatt G.; Naidu, Deepak K.; Wheeler, Chad K.; Barkoe, David; Mentis, Marni; Salas, R. Emerick; Smith, David J.; Robson, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of patients with cancer has advanced into a complex, multimodal approach incorporating surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Managing wounds in this population is complicated by tumor biology, the patient's disease state, and additional comorbidities, some of which may be iatrogenic. Radiation therapy, frequently employed for local-regional control of disease following surgical resection, has quantifiable negative healing effects due to local tissue fibrosis and vascular effects. Chemotherapeutic agents, either administered alone or as combination therapy with surgery and radiation, may have detrimental effects on the rapidly dividing tissues of healing wounds. Overall nutritional status, often diminished in patients with cancer, is an important aspect to the ability of patients to heal after surgical procedures and/or treatment regimens. Methods: An extensive literature search was performed to gather pertinent information on the topic of wound healing in patients with cancer. The effects that surgical procedures, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and nutritional deficits play in wound healing in these patients were reviewed and collated. Results: The current knowledge and treatment of these aspects of wound healing in cancer patients are discussed, and observations and recommendations for optimal wound healing results are considered. Conclusion: Although wound healing may proceed in a relatively unimpeded manner for many patients with cancer, there is a potential for wound failure due to the nature and effects of the oncologic disease process and its treatments. PMID:18264518

  7. An open-label phase 2 trial of dabrafenib plus trametinib in patients with previously treated BRAF V600E–mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Planchard, David; Besse, Benjamin; Groen, Harry J M; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Quoix, Elisabeth; Baik, Christina S; Barlesi, Fabrice; Kim, Tae Min; Mazieres, Julien; Novello, Silvia; Rigas, James R; Upalawanna, Allison; D’Amelio, Anthony M; Zhang, Pingkuan; Mookerjee, Bijoyesh; Johnson, Bruce E

    2016-01-01

    Background BRAF mutations act as an oncogenic driver via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). BRAF inhibition has demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with BRAF V600E (Val600Glu)–mutant NSCLC. Dual MAPK pathway inhibition with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC may improve efficacy over BRAF-inhibitor monotherapy based on observations in BRAF V600–mutant melanoma. Methods In this phase 2, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label study of patients with pretreated metastatic BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC, antitumor activity and safety of oral dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily) plus oral trametinib (2 mg once daily) were evaluated. Adult patients (≥ 18 years) with documented progression following at least one prior platinum-based chemotherapy and no more than three prior systemic anticancer therapies were enrolled. Patients with prior BRAF or MEK inhibitor treatment were ineligible. Patients with brain metastases were permitted to enroll only if the lesions were asymptomatic, untreated (or stable > 3 weeks after local therapy if treated), and measured < 1 cm. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed overall response, which was assessed by intention-to-treat in the protocol-defined population (≥ second-line); safety was also assessed in this population. The study is ongoing but no longer recruiting patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01336634. Findings Fifty-seven patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy for metastatic BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC were enrolled. The investigator-assessed overall response was 63·2% (36 of 57; 95% CI 49·3–75·6). Serious adverse events were reported in 32 (56%) of 57 patients and included pyrexia (16%; 9 of 57), anemia (5%; 3 of 57), confusional state (4%; 2 of 57), decreased appetite (4%; 2 of 57), hemoptysis (4%; 2 of 57), hypercalcemia (4%; 2 of 57), nausea (4%; 2 of 57), and cutaneous squamous cell

  8. EGFR biomarkers predict benefit from vandetanib in combination with docetaxel in a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heymach, J. V.; Lockwood, S. J.; Herbst, R. S.; Johnson, B. E.; Ryan, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ZODIAC was a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that evaluated the addition of vandetanib to docetaxel. The study showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate, but not in overall survival for unselected patients. This study evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation, copy number gain, and protein expression, and KRAS gene mutation, in pretreatment tumor samples as potential biomarkers predicting benefit from vandetanib as second-line treatment of NSCLC. Patients and methods After progression following first-line chemotherapy, 1391 patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIB/IV) NSCLC were randomized 1 : 1 to receive vandetanib (100 mg/day) plus docetaxel (75 mg/m2 every 21 days) or placebo plus docetaxel in the ZODIAC study. Archival tumor samples (n = 570) were collected from consenting patients (n = 958) for predefined, prospective biomarker analyses. Results Of evaluable samples, 14% were EGFR mutation positive, 35% were EGFR FISH positive, 88% were EGFR protein expression positive, and 13% were KRAS mutation positive. Compared with the overall study population, in which progression-free survival (PFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.79] but not OS (HR = 0.91) were significantly improved with vandetanib, there was greater relative clinical benefit for patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors [PFS HR 0.51, confidence interval (CI) 0.25–1.06 and OS HR 0.46, CI 0.14–1.57] and EGFR FISH-positive tumors (PFS HR 0.61, CI 0.39–0.94 and OS HR 0.48, CI 0.28–0.84). Similarly, patients with EGFR mutation or FISH-positive tumor samples who received vandetanib had an increased chance of objective tumor response (odds ratios 3.34, CI 0.8–13.89, and 3.90, CI 1.02–14.82, respectively). There did not appear to be benefit for vandetanib in patients with KRAS mutation-positive tumors. Conclusions

  9. Dose-dense sequential adjuvant chemotherapy followed, as indicated, by trastuzumab for one year in patients with early breast cancer: first report at 5-year median follow-up of a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group randomized phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dose-dense sequential chemotherapy including anthracyclines and taxanes has been established in the adjuvant setting of high-risk operable breast cancer. However, the preferable taxane and optimal schedule of administration in a dose-dense regimen have not been defined yet. Methods From July 2005 to November 2008, 1001 patients (990 eligible) were randomized to receive, every 2 weeks, 3 cycles of epirubicin 110 mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of paclitaxel 200 mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of intensified CMF (Arm A; 333 patients), or 3 cycles of epirubicin followed by 3 cycles of CMF, as in Arm A, followed 3 weeks later by 9 weekly cycles of docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (Arm B; 331), or 9 weekly cycles of paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 (Arm C; 326). Trastuzumab was administered for one year to HER2-positive patients post-radiation. Results At a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 86%, 90% and 88%, for Arms A, B and C, respectively, while the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96% in all arms. No differences were found in DFS or OS between the combined B and C Arms versus Arm A (DFS: HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.59-1.11, P = 0.20; OS: HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.55-1.30, P = 0.43). Among the 255 patients who received trastuzumab, 189 patients (74%) completed 1 year of treatment uneventfully. In all arms, the most frequently reported severe adverse events were neutropenia (30% vs. 27% vs. 26%) and leucopenia (12% vs. 13% vs. 12%), while febrile neutropenia occurred in fifty-one patients (6% vs. 4% vs. 5%). Patients in Arm A experienced more often severe pain (P = 0.002), neurological complications (P = 0.004) and allergic reactions (P = 0.004), while patients in Arm B suffered more often from severe skin reactions (P = 0.020). Conclusions No significant differences in survival between the regimens were found in the present phase III trial. Taxane scheduling influenced the type of severe toxicities. HER2

  10. Resilience Among Patients Across the Cancer Continuum: Diverse Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C.; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera; Reding, Kerryn W.; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Rosenberg, Abby R.

    2014-01-01

    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients’ lives. Much of the literature has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. The current review describes the ways in which elements of resilience have been defined and studied at each phase of the cancer continuum. Extensive literature searches were conducted to find studies assessing resilience during one or more stages of the adult cancer continuum. For all phases of the cancer continuum, resilience descriptions included preexisting or baseline characteristics, such as demographics and personal attributes (e.g., optimism, social support), mechanisms of adaptation, such as coping and medical experiences (e.g., positive provider communication), as well as psychosocial outcomes, such as growth and quality of life. Promoting resilience is a critical element of patient psychosocial care. Nurses may enable resilience by recognizing and promoting certain baseline characteristics and optimizing mechanisms of adaptation. PMID:24476731

  11. Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) Peptide Activated Natural Killer (NK) Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) after Radiochemotherapy (RCTx) – From Preclinical Studies to a Clinical Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Hanno M.; Ahrens, Norbert; Blankenstein, Christiane; Duell, Thomas; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Günther, Christine; Gunther, Sophie; Habl, Gregor; Hautmann, Hubert; Hautmann, Matthias; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Molls, Michael; Offner, Robert; Rödel, Claus; Rödel, Franz; Schütz, Martin; Combs, Stephanie E.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells. An unusual cell surface localization could be demonstrated on a large variety of solid tumors including lung, colorectal, breast, squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, prostate and pancreatic carcinomas, glioblastomas, sarcomas and hematological malignancies, but not on corresponding normal tissues. A membrane (m)Hsp70-positive phenotype can be determined either directly on single cell suspensions of tumor biopsies by flow cytometry using cmHsp70.1 monoclonal antibody or indirectly in the serum of patients using a novel lipHsp70 ELISA. A mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype has been associated with highly aggressive tumors, causing invasion and metastases and resistance to cell death. However, natural killer (NK), but not T cells were found to kill mHsp70-positive tumor cells after activation with a naturally occurring Hsp70 peptide (TKD) plus low dose IL-2 (TKD/IL-2). Safety and tolerability of ex vivo TKD/IL-2 stimulated, autologous NK cells has been demonstrated in patients with metastasized colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase I clinical trial. Based on promising clinical results of the previous study, a phase II randomized clinical study was initiated in 2014. The primary objective of this multicenter proof-of-concept trial is to examine whether an adjuvant treatment of NSCLC patients after platinum-based radiochemotherapy (RCTx) with TKD/IL-2 activated, autologous NK cells is clinically effective. As a mHsp70-positive tumor phenotype is associated with poor clinical outcome only mHsp70-positive tumor patients will be recruited into the trial. The primary endpoint of this study will be the comparison of the progression-free survival of patients treated with ex vivo activated NK cells compared to patients who were treated with RCTx alone. As secondary endpoints overall survival, toxicity, quality-of-life, and biological responses will be determined in both

  12. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  13. The elderly cancer patient: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Colussi, A M; Mazzer, L; Candotto, D; De Biasi, M; De Lorenzi, L; Pin, I; Pusiol, N; Romanin, C; Zamattio, V

    2001-09-01

    Since cancer incidence tends to increase with age, health professionals will encounter ever-greater numbers of older people with cancer. Elderly cancer patients present complex problems that need comprehensive physical and psychosocial support. In order to give specialised care to this segment of the population, a multidisciplinary approach must be used; only in this way can an individualised treatment program be provided. Oncology nurses are an important component of this team and can contribute significantly to the panorama of needs of this segment of the population, which include the prevention and early detection of cancer, the use of state-of-the-art treatments, patient education, care during and after hospitalisation and quality of life (QOL) issues. In this way, the older person with cancer can be treated in an optimal manner and survival can hopefully be improved in a meaningful way. PMID:11500265

  14. Weekly paclitaxel with trastuzumab and pertuzumab in patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer: overall survival and updated progression-free survival results from a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Smyth, L M; Iyengar, N M; Chen, M F; Popper, S M; Patil, S; Wasserheit-Lieblich, C; Argolo, D F; Singh, J C; Chandarlapaty, S; Sugarman, S M; Comen, E A; Drullinsky, P R; Traina, T A; Troso-Sandoval, T; Baselga, J; Norton, L; Hudis, C A; Dang, C T

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported progression-free survival (PFS) results on a phase II trial of weekly paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated in the first- and second-line setting. Here, we report results for overall survival (OS) and updated PFS after an additional year of follow-up. Patients with HER2-positive MBC with 0-1 prior treatment were eligible. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)) weekly, and trastuzumab (loading dose 8 mg/kg → 6 mg/kg) and pertuzumab (loading dose 840 mg → 420 mg) every 3 weeks, all given intravenously. Primary endpoint was 6-month PFS. Secondary endpoints included median PFS, 6-month and median OS. Evaluable patients received at least one full dose of treatment. From January 2011 to December 2013, 69 patients were enrolled: 51 (74 %) and 18 (26 %) treated in first- and second-line metastatic settings, respectively. As of July 1, 2015, the median follow-up was 33 months (range 3-49 months; 67 patients were evaluable for efficacy). The median OS was 44 months (95 % CI 37.5-NR) overall and 44 months (95 % CI 38.3-NR) and 37.5 months (95 % CI 30.3-NR) for patients with 0 and 1 prior metastatic treatment, respectively; 6-month OS was 98 % (95 % CI 90-1). The 6-month PFS was 86 % (95 % CI 75-93) overall and 89 % (95 % CI 76-95) and 78 % (95 % CI 51-91) for patients with 0 and 1 prior therapy, respectively; and median PFS was 21.4 months (95 % CI 14.1-NR) overall and 25.7 months (95 % CI 14.1-NR) and 16.9 months (95 % CI 8.5-NR) for patients with 0-1 prior treatment, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated. Updated analysis demonstrates that weekly paclitaxel, when added to trastuzumab and pertuzumab, is associated with a favorable OS and PFS and offers an alternative to docetaxel-based therapy. http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT0127604. PMID:27306421

  15. Fertility preservation in female cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung-Hoon; Jeon, Gyun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    With improved survival rates among cancer patients, fertility preservation is now being recognized as an issue of great importance. There are currently several methods of fertility preservation available in female cancer patients and the options and techniques via assisted reproduction and cryopreservation are increasing, but some are still experimental and continues to be evaluated. The established means of preserving fertility include embryo cryopreservation, gonadal shielding during radiation therapy, ovarian transposition, conservative gynecologic surgery such as radical trachelectomy, donor embryos/oocytes, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The experimental methods include oocyte cryopreservation, ovarian cryopreservation and transplantation, in vitro maturation, and ovarian suppression. With advances in methods for the preservation of fertility, providing information about risk of infertility and possible options of fertility preservation to all young patients with cancer, and discussing future fertility with them should be also considered as one of the important parts of consultation at the time of cancer diagnosis. PMID:22462006

  16. Indicators of distress in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chirico, Andrea; Lucidi, Fabio; Mallia, Luca; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Merluzzi, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of cancer can present individuals with a multitude of stressors at various points in that trajectory. Psychosocial distress may appear early in the diagnostic process and have negative effects on compliance with treatment and subsequent quality of life. Purpose. The aim of the study was to determine early-phase predictors of distress before any medical treatment. Method. Consistent with the goals of the study, 123 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (20 to 74 years old) completed multiple indicators of knowledge about breast cancer management and treatment, attitudes toward cancer, social support, coping efficacy, and distress. Results. SEM analysis confirmed the hypothesized model. Age was negatively associated with the patient's knowledge (β = - 0.22), which, in turn, was positively associated with both attitudes toward breast cancer (β = 0.39) and coping self-efficacy (β = 0.36). Self-efficacy was then directly related to psychological distress (β = - 0.68). Conclusions. These findings establish indicators of distress in patients early in the cancer trajectory. From a practical perspective, our results have implications for screening for distress and for the development of early interventions that may be followed by healthcare professionals to reduce psychological distress. PMID:26244115

  17. Programming cancer through phase-functionalized silicon based biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Applications of biomaterials in cancer therapy has been limited to drug delivery systems and markers in radiation therapy. In this article, we introduce the concept of phase-functionalization of silicon to preferentially select cancer cell populations for survival in a catalyst and additive free approach. Silicon is phase-functionalized by the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses, resulting in the formation of rare phases of SiO2 in conjunction with differing silicon crystal lattices. The degree of phase-functionalization is programmed to dictate the degree of repulsion of cancer cells. Unstable phases of silicon oxides are synthesized during phase-functionalization and remain stable at ambient conditions. This change in phase of silicon as well as formation of oxides contributes to changes in surface chemistry as well as surface energy. These material properties elicit in precise control of migration, cytoskeleton shape, direction and population. To the best of our knowledge, phase-functionalized silicon without any changes in topology or additive layers and its applications in cancer therapy has not been reported before. This unique programmable phase-functionalized silicon has the potential to change current trends in cancer research and generate focus on biomaterials as cancer repelling or potentially cancer killing surfaces. PMID:26043430

  18. Cost of care for cancer patients in England: evidence from population-based patient-level data

    PubMed Central

    Laudicella, Mauro; Walsh, Brendan; Burns, Elaine; Smith, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health systems are facing the challenge of providing care to an increasing population of patients with cancer. However, evidence on costs is limited due to the lack of large longitudinal databases. Methods: We matched cost of care data to population-based, patient-level data on cancer patients in England. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all patients age 18 and over with a diagnosis of colorectal (275 985 patients), breast (359 771), prostate (286 426) and lung cancer (283 940) in England between 2001 and 2010. Incidence costs, prevalence costs, and phase of care costs were estimated separately for patients age 18–64 and ⩾65. Costs of care were compared by patients staging, before and after diagnosis, and with a comparison population without cancer. Results: Incidence costs in the first year of diagnosis are noticeably higher in patients age 18–64 than age ⩾65 across all examined cancers. A lower stage diagnosis is associated with larger cost savings for colorectal and breast cancer in both age groups. The additional costs of care because of the main four cancers amounts to £1.5 billion in 2010, namely 3.0% of the total cost of hospital care. Conclusions: Population-based, patient-level data can be used to provide new evidence on the cost of cancer in England. Early diagnosis and cancer prevention have scope for achieving large cost savings for the health system. PMID:27070711

  19. Quicker cancer care: reshaping patient pathways.

    PubMed

    Towler, Lucy

    2009-07-01

    A new pathway has been devised for patients with ovarian cancer who attend a day-care unit for chemotherapy. This pathway, which is provided by nurses and doctors, has reduced patients' waiting time for treatment. Its implementation shows, therefore, that good clinical leadership can effect positive change. PMID:19639906

  20. 23. Pain in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Kris C P; Besse, Kees; Wagemans, Michel; Zuurmond, Wouter; Giezeman, Maurice J M M; Lataster, Arno; Mekhail, Nagy; Burton, Allen W; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Pain in patients with cancer can be refractory to pharmacological treatment or intolerable side effects of pharmacological treatment may seriously disturb patients' quality of life. Specific interventional pain management techniques can be an effective alternative for those patients. The appropriate application of these interventional techniques provides better pain control, allows the reduction of analgesics and hence improves quality of life. Until recently, the majority of these techniques are considered to be a fourth consecutive step following the World Health Organization's pain treatment ladder. However, in cancer patients, earlier application of interventional pain management techniques can be recommended even before considering the use of strong opioids. Epidural and intrathecal medication administration allow the reduction of the daily oral or transdermal opioid dose, while maintaining or even improving the pain relief and reducing the side effects. Cervical cordotomy may be considered for patients suffering with unilateral pain at the level below the dermatome C5. This technique should only be applied in patients with a life expectancy of less than 1 year. Plexus coeliacus block or nervus splanchnicus block are recommended for the management of upper abdominal pain due to cancer. Pelvic pain due to cancer can be managed with plexus hypogastricus block and the saddle or lower end block may be a last resort for patients suffering with perineal pain. Back pain due to vertebral compression fractures with or without pathological tumor invasion may be managed with percutaneous vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. All these interventional techniques should be a part of multidisciplinary patient program. PMID:21679293

  1. Study Design and Rationale for the Phase 3 Clinical Development Program of Enobosarm, a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, for the Prevention and Treatment of Muscle Wasting in Cancer Patients (POWER Trials).

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey; Prado, Carla M M; Johnston, Mary Ann; Gralla, Richard J; Taylor, Ryan P; Hancock, Michael L; Dalton, James T

    2016-06-01

    Muscle wasting in cancer is a common and often occult condition that can occur prior to overt signs of weight loss and before a clinical diagnosis of cachexia can be made. Muscle wasting in cancer is an important and independent predictor of progressive functional impairment, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality. Although several therapeutic agents are currently in development for the treatment of muscle wasting or cachexia in cancer, the majority of these agents do not directly inhibit muscle loss. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have the potential to increase lean body mass (LBM) and hence muscle mass, without the untoward side effects seen with traditional anabolic agents. Enobosarm, a nonsteroidal SARM, is an agent in clinical development for prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with cancer (POWER 1 and 2 trials). The POWER trials are two identically designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, and multinational phase 3 trials to assess the efficacy of enobosarm for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in subjects initiating first-line chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess enobosarm's effect on both prevention and treatment of muscle wasting, no minimum weight loss is required. These pivotal trials have pioneered the methodological and regulatory fields exploring a therapeutic agent for cancer-associated muscle wasting, a process hereby described. In each POWER trial, subjects will receive placebo (n = 150) or enobosarm 3 mg (n = 150) orally once daily for 147 days. Physical function, assessed as stair climb power (SCP), and LBM, assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), are the co-primary efficacy endpoints in both trials assessed at day 84. Based on extensive feedback from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the co-primary endpoints will be analyzed as a responder analysis. To be considered a physical function responder, a

  2. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Methods Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. Conclusions The 3-week course of

  3. A randomized controlled Phase III trial comparing 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil (2-weekly DCF) with cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) in patients with metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer: rationale, design and methods of Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1314 (MIRACLE study).

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Tsushima, Takahiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Kii, Takayuki; Shibuya, Yuichi; Chin, Keisho; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ken; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy with cisplatin plus fluorouracil is the current standard treatment for metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer. We have developed a 2-weekly docetaxel combined with CF regimen and conducted a Phase I/II trial for metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer (JCOG0807). Promising efficacy and safety were shown in JCOG0807, and we have commenced a Phase III trial in September 2014 to confirm the superiority of 2-weekly DCF to CF for patients with metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer. A total of 240 patients will be accrued from 41 Japanese institutions over a period of 4 years. The primary end point is overall survival. The secondary end points are progression-free survival, response rate and proportion of adverse events. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000015107 (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm). PMID:25646357

  4. Fertility preservation for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Ozgur; Oktay, Kutluk

    2009-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm in women and accounts for 26% (182,460) of all new cancer cases among women. With the use of screening mammography and advancement in other diagnostic modalities, many cases of breast cancer now can be diagnosed and treated at early stages of the disease. Unfortunately, adjuvant chemotherapy regimens commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer may cause premature ovarian failure due to their cytotoxic effects on the germ cells in the ovary. Therefore preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors at reproductive age has become an important quality of life issue. Fertility preservation is a recently emerged field of reproductive medicine that may help protect the reproductive capability of the cancer survivors and allow them to have children in the future. Embryo freezing is the most established fertility preservation strategy. But conventional ovarian stimulation protocols are contraindicated in breast cancer patients because of the rise of estrogen and its metabolites to supraphysiological levels. Recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide a safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen levels comparable with those achieved in the natural cycle. Oocyte freezing can be considered in single women and in those who do not wish donor sperm. Ovarian tissue freezing could also be an option in breast cancer patients who do not wish or have a time for an in vitro fertilization cycle, which requires 10 to 14 days of ovarian stimulation. PMID:19806518

  5. Pembrolizumab for HIV-Positive Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase I clinical trial, HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy who have cancer that has recurred after or has not responded to previous treatment will receive the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab.

  6. Depression and Resilience in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Stefanovski, Petar; Smichkoska, Snezhana; Raleva, Marija; Dejanova, Beti

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A significant number of breast cancer patients, during their life with the diagnosis, experience emotional distress in the form of depression and anxiety. Psychological resilience is the ability of a person to protect his/her mental health when faced with adverse circumstances such as the cancer diagnosis. This study aims to assess the resilience in breast cancer patients and to explore whether depression affects the resilience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred eighteen (218) women, treated for early breast cancer responded to Connor - Davidson Resilience Scale and Hospital Depression and Anxiety Scale, in order to assess the level of psychological resilience and the level of depression. RESULTS: There is a significant negative correlation between depression and resilience in our sample (r = - 0.562, p < 0.001). Individuals with higher levels of depression have lower levels of psychological resilience. There is no statistically significant correlation between the ages of the participants; time passed since diagnosis, cancer stage and resilience levels. CONCLUSION: This study shows that patients who are less depressed have higher levels of resilience and that psychological resilience may independently contribute to lower levels of depression among breast cancer patients. The level of psychological resilience may be a protective factor for depression and psychological distress.

  7. Treatment Modification in Young Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Anton; Salterberg, Annette; Untch, Michael; Liedtke, Cornelia; Stickeler, Elmar; Papathemelis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients not older than 40 years are referred to as young patients. These women benefit from chemo-, endocrine and anti-HER2 therapy to a similar degree as older women. Surgery and radiation therapy also follow the same recommendations. This manuscript deals with the following topics that need special consideration in young women: endocrine therapy and ovarian suppression; fertility protection and family planning; and genetic counselling. There is an on-going debate on whether tamoxifen is sufficient as an endocrine treatment in young patients with endocrine-responsive tumours or whether suppression of ovarian function in combination with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor should be preferred. Recent data suggest a benefit from ovarian suppression plus exemestane in women of 35 years or younger with high-risk breast cancer. However, increased side effects bear the risk of lesser compliance, which eventually results in higher mortality. Child bearing is nowadays frequently postponed to the 4th decade of life, thereby increasing the number of women who have not yet finished their reproductive desires when diagnosed with breast cancer. These patients are in urgent need of counselling for fertility protection. Breast cancer diagnosis at young age is an indication for a possible mutation in breast cancer susceptibility genes. This has an impact on the cancer risk of the whole family, especially the offspring. Drugs that are specifically targeted to cancer cells with genetic alterations that impair DNA repair are already entering the arsenal of oncologists. PMID:27031253

  8. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  9. Understanding Disease-Drug Interactions in Cancer Patients: Implications for Dosing Within the Therapeutic Window.

    PubMed

    Coutant, D E; Kulanthaivel, P; Turner, P K; Bell, R L; Baldwin, J; Wijayawardana, S R; Pitou, C; Hall, S D

    2015-07-01

    The human inflammatory response can result in the alteration of drug clearance through effects on metabolizing enzymes or transporters. In this article we briefly review the theory of how cancer can lead to indirect changes in drug metabolism, review acute phase proteins and cytokines as markers of changes in cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in cancer patients, and provide clinical case examples of how the inflammation in advanced cancer patients can lead to altered CYP-mediated drug clearance. PMID:25808023

  10. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  11. Counseling cancer patients about herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Boon, H S

    1999-10-01

    More than half of all cancer patients now use some form of complementary/alternative medicine, yet the majority of these patients do not disclose this use to their physicians. Health care practitioners need to educate themselves about the complementary/alternative medicine products their patients are using. Eight herbal products (astragalus, essiac, Asian ginseng, Siberian ginseng, green tea, garlic, Hoxsey formula and iscador) commonly used by cancer patients are reviewed here and a list of recommended reference texts is provided. In addition, health care providers are encouraged to initiate discussions about complementary/alternative products and therapies with their patients so that they may help them make safe and informed decisions about these products. Not knowing what patients are taking is definitely a less desirable option. PMID:14528703

  12. Can exercise ameliorate treatment toxicity during the initial phase of testosterone deprivation in prostate cancer patients? Is this more effective than delayed rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been substantial increase in use of androgen deprivation therapy as adjuvant management of prostate cancer. However, this leads to a range of musculoskeletal toxicities including reduced bone mass and increased skeletal fractures compounded with rapid metabolic alterations, including increased body fat, reduced lean mass, insulin resistance and negative lipoprotein profile, increased incidence of cardiovascular and metabolic morbidity, greater distress and reduced quality of life. Numerous research studies have demonstrated certain exercise prescriptions to be effective at preventing or even reversing these treatment toxicities. However, all interventions to date have been of rehabilitative intent being implemented after a minimum of 3 months since initiation of androgen deprivation, by which time considerable physical and psychological health problems have manifested. The pressing question is whether it is more efficacious to commence exercise therapy at the same time as initiating androgen deprivation, so treatment induced adverse effects can be immediately attenuated or indeed prevented. Methods/design We are proposing a multi-site randomized controlled trial with partial crossover to examine the effects of timing of exercise implementation (immediate or delayed) on preserving long-term skeletal health, reversing short- and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, and supporting mental health in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. 124 men who are about to initiate androgen deprivation for prostate cancer will be randomized to immediate or delayed groups. Immediate will commence a 6-month exercise program within 7–10 days of their first dose. Delayed will receive usual care for 6 months and then commence the exercise program for 6 months (partial cross-over). Immediate will be free to adopt the lifestyle of their choosing following the initial 6-month intervention. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will

  13. Propofol extravasation in a breast cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, E J M; Baars, J W; Schutte, P F E; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2008-12-01

    A breast cancer patient experienced an accidental propofol extravasation in the dorsum of her hand during a Port-A-Cath replacement. She had heavy pain which was treated with analgesics. The patient's hand was cooled and kept in an upright position. Three days later the patient received her last AC (adriamycin/cyclophosphamide) course without complications. Propofol extravasation did not result in tissue necrosis in this case. AC chemotherapy could be administered safely 3 days after propofol extravasation. PMID:18753182

  14. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  15. SOLTI NeoPARP: a phase II randomized study of two schedules of iniparib plus paclitaxel versus paclitaxel alone as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Bermejo, Begoña; Villanueva, Cristian; Delaloge, Suzette; Morales, Serafín; Balmaña, Judith; Amillano, Kepa; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Casas, Ana; Manso, Luis; Roché, Henri; Gonzalez-Santiago, Santiago; Gavilá, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Di Cosimo, Serena; Harbeck, Nadia; Charpentier, Eric; Garcia-Ribas, Ignacio; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Aura, Claudia; Baselga, Jose

    2015-11-01

    Iniparib is an investigational agent with antitumor activity of controversial mechanism of action. Two previous trials in advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin showed some evidence of efficacy that was not confirmed. This phase II randomized neoadjuvant study was designed to explore its activity and tolerability with weekly paclitaxel (PTX) as neoadjuvant treatment in TNBC patients. 141 patients with Stage II-IIIA TNBC were randomly assigned to receive PTX (80 mg/m(2), d1; n = 47) alone or in combination with iniparib, either once-weekly (PWI) (11.2 mg/kg, d1; n = 46) or twice-weekly (PTI) (5.6 mg/kg, d1, 4; n = 48) for 12 weeks. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) in the breast. pCR rate was similar among the three arms (21, 22, and 19 % for PTX, PWI, and PTI, respectively). Secondary efficacy endpoints were comparable: pCR in breast and axilla (21, 17, and 19 %); best overall response in the breast (60, 61, and 63 %); and breast conservation rate (53, 54, and 50 %). Slightly more patients in the PTI arm presented grade 3/4 neutropenia (4, 0, and 10 %). Grade 1/2 (28, 22, and 29 %), but no grade 3/4 neuropathy, was observed. There were no differences in serious adverse events and treatment-emergent adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation among the three arms. Addition of iniparib to weekly PTX did not add relevant antitumor activity or toxicity. These results do not support further evaluation of the combination of iniparib at these doses plus paclitaxel in early TNBC. PMID:26536871

  16. Comparison of EP2006, a filgrastim biosimilar, to the reference: a phase III, randomized, double-blind clinical study in the prevention of severe neutropenia in patients with breast cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, K.; Semiglazov, V.; Krasnozhon, D.; Davidenko, I.; Nelyubina, L.; Nakov, R.; Stiegler, G.; Singh, P.; Schwebig, A.; Kramer, S.; Harbeck, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biosimilars of filgrastim are in widespread clinical use in Europe. This phase III study compares biosimilar filgrastim (EP2006), with the US-licensed reference product, Neupogen®, in breast cancer patients receiving (neo)adjuvant myelosuppressive chemotherapy (TAC). Patients and methods A total of 218 patients receiving 5 µg/kg/day filgrastim over six chemotherapy cycles were randomized 1:1:1:1 into four arms. Two arms received only one product (nonalternating), biosimilar or reference, and two arms (alternating) received alternating treatments during each cycle (biosimilar then reference or vice versa). The primary end point was duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) during cycle 1. Results The baseline characteristics were balanced between the four treatment arms. Noninferiority of biosimilar versus the reference was demonstrated: DSN (days) in cycle 1 was 1.17 ± 1.11 (biosimilar, N = 101) and 1.20 ± 1.02 (reference, N = 103), 97.5% confidence interval lower boundary for the difference was −0.26 days (above the predefined limit of −1 day). No clinically meaningful differences were observed regarding any other efficacy parameter: incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN); hospitalization due to FN; incidence of infections; depth and time of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir and time to ANC recovery during cycle 1 and across all cycles. The pattern and frequency of adverse events were similar across all treatments. Conclusion This study demonstrates that biosimilar and the reference filgrastim are similar with no clinically meaningful differences regarding efficacy and safety in prevention of severe neutropenia. Biosimilar filgrastim could represent an important alternative to the reference product, potentially benefiting public health by increasing access to filgrastim treatment. Study number NCT01519700. PMID:26122726

  17. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Cho, Kwan Ho; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Hyae Young; Yoon, Sung Jin B.S.; Lee, Jin Soo . E-mail: jslee@ncc.re.kr

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: For locoregionally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become a standard therapy. We conducted a Phase II trial to examine the efficacy and toxicity of adding gemcitabine and vinorelbine induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included inoperable clinical Stage III NSCLC without pleural effusion, ECOG performance status 0-1, and weight loss {<=}5%. Induction chemotherapy consisted of three cycles of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} and vinorelbine 30 mg/m{sup 2}, each given i.v. on Days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks. During once-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, total 63 Gy), two cycles of oral etoposide (100 mg on Days 1-5 and 8-12) plus cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8) were given concurrently 4 weeks apart. Results: Between April 2002 and November 2003, 42 patients were enrolled and 40 were included in response and toxicity evaluation. The median age was 59 years and 13 patients had IIIA and 27 had IIIB; 24 had squamous ca, 12 had adenocarcinoma, and 4 had others. Objective tumor responses were obtained in 29 patients (72.5%), including 18 (45.0%) after induction chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 23.8 months, the median survival time and progression-free survival was 23.2 months and 10.9 months, respectively, with 2-year survival rate of 43.9%. For the patients with supraclavicular nodal involvement, the median survival time was 11.8 months with 2-year survival rate of 16.7%, whereas the corresponding figures were 27.8 months and 52.0%, respectively, for those without supraclavicular nodal involvement. Toxicity of induction chemotherapy was mild and well tolerated. However, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was associated with G3/4 hematologic toxicity in 75.7%, G3 esophagitis in 24.2%, and two treatment-related deaths. There were nonlife-threatening late toxicities in additional 6 patients. Conclusions

  18. Indicators of distress in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lucidi, Fabio; Mallia, Luca; D’Aiuto, Massimiliano; Merluzzi, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of cancer can present individuals with a multitude of stressors at various points in that trajectory. Psychosocial distress may appear early in the diagnostic process and have negative effects on compliance with treatment and subsequent quality of life. Purpose. The aim of the study was to determine early-phase predictors of distress before any medical treatment. Method. Consistent with the goals of the study, 123 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (20 to 74 years old) completed multiple indicators of knowledge about breast cancer management and treatment, attitudes toward cancer, social support, coping efficacy, and distress. Results. SEM analysis confirmed the hypothesized model. Age was negatively associated with the patient’s knowledge (β = − 0.22), which, in turn, was positively associated with both attitudes toward breast cancer (β = 0.39) and coping self-efficacy (β = 0.36). Self-efficacy was then directly related to psychological distress (β = − 0.68). Conclusions. These findings establish indicators of distress in patients early in the cancer trajectory. From a practical perspective, our results have implications for screening for distress and for the development of early interventions that may be followed by healthcare professionals to reduce psychological distress. PMID:26244115

  19. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  20. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biomarker evaluation of transforming growth factor-β receptor I kinase inhibitor, galunisertib, in phase 1 study in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodón, Jordi; Carducci, Michael; Sepulveda-Sánchez, Juan M; Azaro, Analía; Calvo, Emiliano; Seoane, Joan; Braña, Irene; Sicart, Elisabet; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Cleverly, Ann; Pillay, N Sokalingum; Desaiah, Durisala; Estrem, Shawn T; Paz-Ares, Luis; Holdhoff, Matthias; Blakeley, Jaishri; Lahn, Michael M; Baselga, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumors, including malignant glioma. Small molecule inhibitors (SMI) blocking TGF-β signaling reverse EMT and arrest tumor progression. Several SMIs were developed, but currently only LY2157299 monohydrate (galunisertib) was advanced to clinical investigation. Design The first-in-human dose study had three parts (Part A, dose escalation, n = 39; Part B, safety combination with lomustine, n = 26; Part C, relative bioavailability study, n = 14). Results A preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model predicted a therapeutic window up to 300 mg/day and was confirmed in Part A after continuous PK/PD. PK was not affected by co-medications such as enzyme-inducing anti-epileptic drugs or proton pump inhibitors. Changes in pSMAD2 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were associated with exposure indicating target-related pharmacological activity of galunisertib. Twelve (12/79; 15%) patients with refractory/relapsed malignant glioma had durable stable disease (SD) for 6 or more cycles, partial responses (PR), or complete responses (CR). These patients with clinical benefit had high plasma baseline levels of MDC/CCL22 and low protein expression of pSMAD2 in their tumors. Of the 5 patients with IDH1/2 mutation, 4 patients had a clinical benefit as defined by CR/PR and SD ≥6 cycles. Galunisertib had a favorable toxicity profile and no cardiac adverse events. Conclusion Based on the PK, PD, and biomarker evaluations, the intermittent administration of galunisertib at 300 mg/day is safe for future clinical investigation. PMID:25529192

  1. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  2. Neuropathic pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Allen, R R

    1998-11-01

    Cancer presents itself in numerous ways, adding to the complexity of any pain syndrome with which it is associated. Neuropathic pain, unlike many other pain syndromes, is difficult to treat even in the absence of cancer. The combination results in a heterogeneous group of patients with a complex set of symptoms. This makes the assessment of pain, classification of syndromes, and clinical study a challenge. If the disease is nonprogressive, general principles of care are essentially the same as in those without cancer. In patients with progressive disease and more refractory painful conditions, spinal anesthetic and neurosurgical therapies must often be considered. Under such circumstances, caregivers are forced to carefully balance uncertain benefits and risks, often without the luxury of time. More careful observation and controlled trials in these patients help facilitate this challenging process. PMID:9767067

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  4. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  5. A randomised, phase II study of nintedanib or sunitinib in previously untreated patients with advanced renal cell cancer: 3-year results

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, T; Loembé, A-B; Shparyk, Y; MacLeod, N; Jones, R J; Mazurkiewicz, M; Temple, G; Dressler, H; Bondarenko, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This exploratory study evaluated the safety/efficacy of nintedanib or sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Ninety-six patients were randomised (2:1) to either nintedanib (200 mg twice daily) or sunitinib (50 mg kg−1 once daily (4 weeks on treatment; 2 weeks off)). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) at 9 months. P-values reported are descriptive only; the study was not powered for such comparisons. Results: Progression-free survival at 9 months was comparable between nintedanib and sunitinib (43.1% vs 45.2%, respectively; P=0.85). Median PFS was 8.4 months in each group (hazard ratio (HR), 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70–1.80; P=0.64). Median overall survival was 20.4 and 21.2 months for nintedanib and sunitinib, respectively (HR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.54–1.56; P=0.76). Overall incidence of any grade adverse events (AEs) was comparable (90.6% vs 93.8%); AEs grade ⩾3 were lower with nintedanib than sunitinib (48.4% vs 59.4%). Nintedanib was associated with lower incidences of some AEs typical of antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs): hypertension, hypothyroidism, hand–foot syndrome, cardiac disorders and haematological abnormalities. Conclusions: In patients with advanced RCC, nintedanib has promising efficacy and similar tolerability to sunitinib, and a manageable safety profile with fewer TKI-associated AEs. PMID:26448178

  6. Gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, levofolinate, 5-fluorouracil, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-2 (GOLFIG) versus FOLFOX chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: the GOLFIG-2 multicentric open-label randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Correale, Pierpaolo; Botta, Cirino; Rotundo, Maria S; Guglielmo, Annamaria; Conca, Raffaele; Licchetta, Antonella; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Bestoso, Elena; Ciliberto, Domenico; Cusi, Maria G; Fioravanti, Antonella; Guidelli, Giacomo M; Bianco, Maria T; Misso, Gabriella; Martino, Elodia; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Mini, Enrico; Mantovani, Giovanni; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Pirtoli, Luigi; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2014-01-01

    The GOLFIG-2 phase III trial was designed to compare the immunobiological activity and antitumor efficacy of GOLFIG chemoimmunotherapy regimen with standard FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy in frontline treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. This trial was conceived on the basis of previous evidence of antitumor and immunomodulating activity of the GOLFIG regimen in mCRC. GOLFIG-2 is a multicentric open/label phase III trial (EUDRACT: 2005-003458-81). Chemo-naive mCRC patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive biweekly standard FOLFOX-4 or GOLFIG [gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2), day 1); oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2), day 2); levofolinate (100 mg/m(2), days 1-2), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (400 mg/m(2) in bolus followed by 24 h infusion at 800 mg/m(2),days 1-2), sc. GM-CSF (100 μg, days 3-7); sc. aldesleukin (0·5 MIU bi-daily, days 8-14 and 17-30)] treatments. The study underwent early termination because of poor recruitment in the control arm. After a median follow-up of 43.83 months, GOLFIG regimen showed superiority over FOLFOX in terms of progression-free survival [median 9·23 (95% confidence interval (CI), 6·9-11.5) vs. median 5.70 (95% CI, 3.38-8.02) months; hazard ratio (HR): 0.52 (95% CI, 0.35-0.77), P=0·002] and response rate [66.1% (95% CI, 0.41-0.73) vs. 37·0% (95% CI, 0.28-0.59), P=0.002], with a trend to longer survival [median 21.63 (95% CI, 18.09-25.18) vs. 14.57 mo (95% CI, 9.07-20.07); HR: 0·79 (95% CI, 0.52-1.21); P=0.28]. Patients in the experimental arm showed higher incidence of non-neutropenic fever (18.5%), autoimmunity signs (18.5%), an increase in the number of monocytes, eosinophils, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and a decrease in immunoregulatory (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)) T cells. Taken together, these findings provide proof-of-principle that GOLFIG chemoimmunotherapy may represent a novel reliable option for first-line treatment of mCRC. PMID:24316553

  7. Fertility counseling of young breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Anserini, Paola; Levaggi, Alessia; Poggio, Francesca; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 6% of women with breast cancer are diagnosed before the age of 40. Young age is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and most young breast cancer patients receive systemic treatment with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or both. The loss or impairment of fertility is a potential side effect of antineoplastic treatments. Due to the rising trend to delaying pregnancy in life, an increasing proportion of young cancer patients who are yet to have a pregnancy will face the problem of iatrogenic menopause in the future. The incidence of anticancer-treatment-related ovarian failure depends on the type of chemotherapy regimen administered, the use of tamoxifen and the age of patients. It rises with increasing age, in the range of 22-61% and 61-97% in women aged <40 years and >40 years respectively. Although there is a clear trend to increasing incidence of ovarian failure with the rise in aging, there may be a small proportion of patients who became amenorrhoeic despite the very young age, thus indicating that also individual factors still unknown may affect the probability of treatment-related ovarian failure. A prompt referral of patients to reproductive counseling and a multidisciplinary team including Oncology and Reproductive Units are essential to face the management of fertility issues in cancer patients. Fertility counseling should include a detailed description of all the available techniques to preserve fertility. The main available fertility preservation techniques, standard and experimental, for young breast cancer patients include: temporary ovarian suppression during chemotherapy with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, embryo cryopreservation, cryopreservation of oocytes and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Research efforts are still necessary to improve the efficacy and safety of the available fertility preservation strategies as well as an efficient collaboration between oncologists and gynecologists is necessary to improve

  8. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:26202137

  9. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients. PMID:26573424

  10. Physicians’ influence on breast cancer patient compliance

    PubMed Central

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates. PMID:24454275

  11. Survival of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer: comparison of HNPCC and colorectal cancer in FAP patients with sporadic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertario, L; Russo, A; Sala, P; Eboli, M; Radice, P; Presciuttini, S; Andreola, S; Rodriguez-Bigas, M A; Pizzetti, P; Spinelli, P

    1999-01-18

    Conflicting data exist on the prognosis of hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC patients, in particular, are often reported to have a better survival. We examined 2,340 colorectal-cancer patients treated in our Institution: 144 HNPCC patients (Amsterdam Criteria), 161 FAP patients and 2,035 patients with sporadic cancer. Data on hereditary-cancer patients treated between 1980 and 1995 was collected in a registry. The 2,035 sporadic colorectal-cancer patients (controls) included all new cases treated in the Department of Gastrointestinal-Tract Surgery during the same period. Observed survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cumulative survival probability was estimated at 5 years within each group and stratified by various clinical and pathological variables. The age distribution at diagnosis of sporadic patients was significantly higher than that of FAP and HNPCC patients (median 60 years vs. 43 and 49 years; p < 0.0001). In the HNPCC group, 40% had a right cancer location, vs. 14% in the FAP group and 13% in the sporadic-cancer group. In the sporadic group, 51% were early-stage cancers (Dukes A or B) vs. 48.4% and 52.1% in the FAP and HNPCC groups respectively. In the HNPCC, FAP and sporadic-cancer groups, the 5-year cumulative survival rate was 56.9%, 54.4% and 50.6% respectively. Survival analysis by the Cox proportional-hazards method revealed no substantial survival advantage for HNPCC and FAP patients compared with the sporadic group, after adjustment for age, gender, stage and tumor location. The hazard ratio for HNPCC was 1.01 (95% CI 0.72-1.39) and 1.27 (95% CI 0.95-1.7) for FAP patients compared with the sporadic-colorectal-cancer group. PMID:9935197

  12. Comparative efficacy and safety of first-line treatments in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer: a network meta-analysis based on phase 3 RCTs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tieshi; Yang, Rong; Ji, Changwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Xu, Linfeng; Liu, Guangxiang; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-03-29

    It is impossible to conduct head-to-head trials of all the therapies to determine optimal treatment in the rapidly advancing era of therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). In this network meta-analysis,we aimed to compare efficacy and safety of first-line treatments for mRCC. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and unpublished studies were also sought through "clinicaltrials.gov" from their inception through January 31, 2016. A database search identified 1253 articles, with 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria. A total of 7597 patients in twelve different treatment arms were assessed. Network meta-analysis showed sunitinib had a significantly longer PFS than IFN-α (SMD=-5.68; 95%CI: -10.76,-0.86; P<0.001) and placebo (SMD=-6.71; 95%CI: -12.65,-0.79; P<0.001), meanwhile, pazopanib had a significantly longer PFS compared with placebo (SMD=5.13; 95%CI: 0.43, 10.09; P<0.001). The cumulative ranking probability curve indicated that sunitinib had the highest probability of being the best treatment modality in terms of PFS and it also had the highest probability of being the safest drugs as the first-line treatment when it came to SAE. Thus, sunitinib might be the best choice of first-line treatment for patients with mRCC because it has the most favorable balance between efficacy and safety. PMID:26908455

  13. Comparative efficacy and safety of first-line treatments in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer: a network meta-analysis based on phase 3 RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tieshi; Yang, Rong; Ji, Changwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Xu, Linfeng; Liu, Guangxiang; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-01-01

    It is impossible to conduct head-to-head trials of all the therapies to determine optimal treatment in the rapidly advancing era of therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). In this network meta-analysis,we aimed to compare efficacy and safety of first-line treatments for mRCC. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and unpublished studies were also sought through “clinicaltrials.gov” from their inception through January 31, 2016. A database search identified 1253 articles, with 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria. A total of 7597 patients in twelve different treatment arms were assessed. Network meta-analysis showed sunitinib had a significantly longer PFS than IFN-α (SMD=−5.68; 95%CI: −10.76,−0.86; P<0.001) and placebo (SMD=−6.71; 95%CI: −12.65,−0.79; P<0.001), meanwhile, pazopanib had a significantly longer PFS compared with placebo (SMD=5.13; 95%CI: 0.43, 10.09; P<0.001). The cumulative ranking probability curve indicated that sunitinib had the highest probability of being the best treatment modality in terms of PFS and it also had the highest probability of being the safest drugs as the first-line treatment when it came to SAE. Thus, sunitinib might be the best choice of first-line treatment for patients with mRCC because it has the most favorable balance between efficacy and safety. PMID:26908455

  14. Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, ... the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies air pollution as a cancer-causing agent. "This study, along ...

  15. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies ... certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ...

  16. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 14 of these patients dies. What Is an Infection? You get an infection when germs enter your ... the flu. How Does the Body Normally Fight Infections? The immune system helps your body protect itself ...

  17. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; McGowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Radiation treatment for cancer requires patients to receive frequent administrations and attend the treatment facility on a daily basis for several weeks. Travelling for radiation treatment has the potential to add to the distress an individual may be feeling. This study utilized in-depth interviews to capture 118 patients' perspectives about travelling for cancer treatment. Four themes emerged during the analysis of the data: (1) waiting was the most difficult part of the experience; (2) the i