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Sample records for cancer pilot study

  1. Spirituality and care of prostate cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Janice; Sydnor, Kim Dobson; Granot, Michal

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore the integration of spirituality into medical care for African-American men coping with prostate cancer. PROCEDURES: A total of 14 African-American prostate cancer patients completed a self-administered quantitative survey examining the dimension of spirituality as a resource for coping. FINDINGS: A high proportion of survivors reported a general religious orientation as expressed through church affiliation and frequent church attendance. A majority (67%) had spoken with their doctors about their spiritual and religious beliefs and more than half the physicians had solicited their patients' spiritual beliefs as part of their handling of prostate cancer. While one-third of the men reported their doctors had been in contact with their clergy, two-thirds would like their doctor and clergy to be in contact with one another. CONCLUSIONS: This is a pilot study that incorporated both qualitative and quantitative data collection but with the small sample, has limited generalizability. However, this work does suggest that integrating spirituality and religion into medical care may be beneficial to prostate cancer patients. Physicians and physician organizations should engage in future research in this area. PMID:14620707

  2. Cancer, Employment, and American Indians: A Participatory Action Research Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sharon R.; Finifrock, DeAnna; Marshall, Catherine A.; Jaakola, Julia; Setterquist, Janette; Burross, Heidi L.; Hodge, Felicia Schanche

    2011-01-01

    American Indian cancer survivors are an underserved and understudied group. In this pilot study we attempted to address, through participatory action research, missing information about those factors that serve to either facilitate employment or hinder it for adult cancer survivors. One task of the study was to develop and/or modify…

  3. NATO PILOT STUDY ON ADVANCED CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NCEA scientists are participating in a study of advanced cancer risk assessment methods, conducted under the auspices of NATO's Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society. The product will be a book of case studies that illustrate advanced cancer risk assessment methods, avail...

  4. PILOT STUDY OF AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION AND SURVIVAL FROM CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was concerned with investigating the potential influence exerted by ambient concentrations of particulate and sulfur dioxide air pollutants upon the length of survival for diagnosed cancer patients. Monitoring data from the National Aerometric Data Bank for particulates...

  5. Incidence of cancer among Nordic airline pilots over five decades: occupational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pukkala, Eero; Aspholm, Rafael; Auvinen, Anssi; Eliasch, Harald; Gundestrup, Maryanne; Haldorsen, Tor; Hammar, Niklas; Hrafnkelsson, Jón; Kyyrönen, Pentti; Linnersjö, Anette; Rafnsson, Vilhjálmur; Storm, Hans; Tveten, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence of cancer among male airline pilots in the Nordic countries, with special reference to risk related to cosmic radiation. Design Retrospective cohort study, with follow up of cancer incidence through the national cancer registries. Setting Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Participants 10 032 male airline pilots, with an average follow up of 17 years. Main outcome measures Standardised incidence ratios, with expected numbers based on national cancer incidence rates; dose-response analysis using Poisson regression. Results 466 cases of cancer were diagnosed compared with 456 expected. The only significantly increased standardised incidence ratios were for skin cancer: melanoma 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 3.0), non-melanoma 2.1 (1.7 to 2.8), basal cell carcinoma 2.5 (1.9 to 3.2). The relative risk of skin cancers increased with the estimated radiation dose. The relative risk of prostate cancer increased with increasing number of flight hours in long distance aircraft. Conclusions This study does not indicate a marked increase in cancer risk attributable to cosmic radiation, although some influence of cosmic radiation on skin cancer cannot be entirely excluded. The suggestion of an association between number of long distance flights (possibly related to circadian hormonal disturbances) and prostate cancer needs to be confirmed. What is already known on this topicAirline pilots are occupationally exposed to cosmic radiation and other potentially carcinogenic elementsIn the studies published so far, dose-response patterns have not been characterisedWhat this study addsNo marked risk of cancer attributable to cosmic radiation is observed in airline pilotsA threefold excess of skin cancers is seen among pilots with longer careers, but the influence of recreational exposure to ultraviolet light cannot be quantifiedA slight increase in risk of prostate cancer with increasing number of long haul flights suggests a need

  6. Pilot Study of a Clinical Pathway Implementation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uña, Esther; López-Lara, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a highly prevalent disease which needs a multidisciplinary approach to be treated. The absence of specific protocols implies a significant and unjustifiable variability among the different professionals involved in this disease. The purpose is to develop a clinical pathway based on the analysis process and aims to reduce this variability and to reduce unnecessary costs. Methods: We created a multidisciplinary team with contributors from every clinical area involved in the diagnosis and treatment in this disease. We held periodic meetings to agree on a protocol based on the best available clinical practice guidelines. Once we had agreed on the protocol, we implemented its use as a standard in our institution. Every patient older than 18 years who was diagnosed with rectal cancer was considered a candidate to be treated via the pathway. Results: We evaluated 48 patients during the course of this study. Every parameter measured was improved after the implementation of the pathway, except the proportion of patients with 12 nodes or more analysed. The perception that our patients had about this project was very good. Conclusions: Clinical pathways are needed to improve the quality of health care. This kind of project helps reduce hospital costs and optimizes the use of limited resources. On the other hand, unexplained variability is also reduced, with consequent benefits for the patients. PMID:21151842

  7. Laughter and Stress Relief in Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a therapeutic laughter program and the number of program sessions on anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted involving 31 patients who received four sessions of therapeutic laughter program comprised and 29 who were assigned to the no-program control group. Scores for anxiety, depression, and stress were measured using an 11-point numerical rating scale. While no change was detected in the control group, the program group reported reductions of 1.94, 1.84, and 2.06 points for anxiety, depression, and stress, respectively (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01). Scores decreased significantly after the first therapeutic laughter session (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01). As the therapeutic laughter program was effective after only a single session in reducing anxiety, depression, and stress in breast cancer patients, it could be recommended as a first-line complementary/alternative therapy. PMID:26064177

  8. Cosmic radiation and cancer mortality among airline pilots: results from a European cohort study (ESCAPE).

    PubMed

    Langner, I; Blettner, M; Gundestrup, M; Storm, H; Aspholm, R; Auvinen, A; Pukkala, E; Hammer, G P; Zeeb, H; Hrafnkelsson, J; Rafnsson, V; Tulinius, H; De Angelis, G; Verdecchia, A; Haldorsen, T; Tveten, U; Eliasch, H; Hammar, N; Linnersjö, A

    2004-02-01

    Cosmic radiation is an occupational risk factor for commercial aircrews. In this large European cohort study (ESCAPE) its association with cancer mortality was investigated on the basis of individual effective dose estimates for 19,184 male pilots. Mean annual doses were in the range of 2-5 mSv and cumulative lifetime doses did not exceed 80 mSv. All-cause and all-cancer mortality was low for all exposure categories. A significant negative risk trend for all-cause mortality was seen with increasing dose. Neither external and internal comparisons nor nested case-control analyses showed any substantially increased risks for cancer mortality due to ionizing radiation. However, the number of deaths for specific types of cancer was low and the confidence intervals of the risk estimates were rather wide. Difficulties in interpreting mortality risk estimates for time-dependent exposures are discussed. PMID:14648170

  9. Cohort study of Air Canada pilots: mortality, cancer incidence, and leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Band, P R; Le, N D; Fang, R; Deschamps, M; Coldman, A J; Gallagher, R P; Moody, J

    1996-01-15

    Despite the special working environment and exposures of airline pilots, data on risk of death and cancer incidence in this occupational group are limited. The authors investigated a cohort of 2,740 Air Canada pilots who contributed 62,449 person-years of observation. All male pilots employed for at least 1 year on and since January 1, 1950, were studied. The cutoff date for outcome information was December 31, 1992. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) were used to compare mortality rates and cancer incidence rates of the cohort with the respective Canadian population rates. Ninety percent confidence intervals of the SMR and SIR were calculated. Statistically significant decreased mortality was observed for all causes (SMR = 0.63, 90% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.70), for all cancers (SMR = 0.61, 90% CI 0.48-0.76), and for all noncancer diseases (SMR = 0.53, 90% CI 0.45-0.62). Mortality from aircraft accidents was significantly raised (SMR = 26.57, 90% CI 19.3-35.9). Significantly decreased cancer incidence was observed for all cancers (SIR = 0.71, 90% CI 0.61-0.82), rectal cancer (SIR = 0.42, 90% CI 0.14-0.96), lung cancer (SIR = 0.28, 90% CI 0.16-0.46), and bladder cancer (SIR = 0.36, 90% CI 0.12-0.82). Prostate cancer (SIR = 1.87, 90% CI 1.38-2.49) and acute myeloid leukemia (SIR = 4.72, 90% CI 2.05-9.31) were significantly increased. The preferred relative risk model for radiation-induced nonchronic lymphoid leukemia (Beir V report) was applied to the cohort by using published estimates of in-flight radiation exposures. The estimated relative risk ranged from 1.001 to 1.06 and did not differ significantly from the observed SIR (SIR = 1.88, 90% CI 0.80-3.53). However, the incidence rate of acute myeloid leukemia was significantly increased. Monitoring of in-flight radiation exposure and long-term follow-up of civil aviation crew members is needed to further assess cancer incidence and leukemia risk in this special

  10. Treatment of Lymphedema with Saam Acupuncture in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young Ju; Kwon, Hyo Jung; Park, Young Sun; Kwon, Oh Chang; Shin, Im Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphedema is a troublesome complication affecting quality of life (QoL) in many women after breast-cancer treatment. Recent studies have suggested that acupuncture can reduce symptoms of lymphedema in breast-cancer survivors. Objectives: This was a pilot study. It was designed to assess the feasibility and the safety of acupuncture with the Saam acupuncture method for treating lymphedema in Korean patients after surgical therapy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, single-arm, observational pilot study using before and after measurements. The study was conducted at the East-West Medical Center at the Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, in Daegu, Korea. The subjects were 9 patients with breast cancer who presented with lymphedema of the upper limb ipsilateral to surgery. Saam acupuncture was administered 3 times per week for 6 consecutive weeks, for 30±5 minutes at each session.The primary outcome measure was severity of lymphedema as assessed by stages of lymphedema, a visual analogue scale (VAS), and by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. The secondary outcome measure was QoL, which was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire using the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Results: Acupuncture reduced severity of lymphedema significantly, as assessed by the VAS (P<0.001) as well as by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. Four weeks after the final treatment, symptoms were not aggravated. SF-36 scores remained significant for health status at the end of treatment. Conclusions: The Saam acupuncture method appeared to provide reduction of lymphedema among women after they had undergone surgery for breast cancer. A randomized, controlled prospective study with a larger sample size is required to clarify the role of acupuncture for managing lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26155321

  11. Breast cancer education for Navajo women: a pilot study evaluating a culturally relevant video.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Priscilla R; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I; Baldwin, Julie A; Sandoval, Nellie; Robinson, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated a culturally specific video designed to teach Navajo women about breast cancer treatment options. Fourteen Navajo women diagnosed with breast cancer and 26 healthcare providers participated in a mixed-method evaluation that documented their perceptions immediately and 6 months after viewing the video. After initial viewing, women reported reduced anxiety about treatment and interest in support groups. Six months later, women said the video prompted them to seek more information from printed sources and their provider. Younger Navajo women who were 44 to 51 years old were more likely to attend support groups than women who were 55-67 years. Providers corroborated the positive effects of the video. The providers believed the video encouraged patients to seek information about breast cancer and to ask questions about treatment plans and side effects. A culturally relevant video for Navajo women can be an effective teaching tool and can enhance patient-provider communication. PMID:20111913

  12. Collagen content as a risk factor in breast cancer? A pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective pilot clinical study on time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was exploited to assess collagen as a breast-cancer risk factor on a total of 109 subjects (53 healthy and 56 with malignant lesions). An increased cancer occurrence is observed on the 15% subset of patients with higher age-matched collagen content. Further, a similar clustering based on the percentage breast density leads to a different set of patients, possibly indicating collagen as a new independent breast cancer risk factor. If confirmed statistically and on larger numbers, these results could have huge impact on personalized diagnostics, health care systems, as well as on basic research.

  13. A pilot case-cohort study of brain cancer in poultry and control workers.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, S; Felini, M J; Ndetan, H; Cardarelli, K; Jadhav, S; Faramawi, M; Johnson, E S

    2014-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory study to investigate which exposures (including poultry oncogenic viruses) are associated with brain cancer in poultry workers. A total of 46,819 workers in poultry and nonpoultry plants from the same union were initially followed for mortality. Brain cancer was observed to be in excess among poultry workers. Here we report on a pilot case-cohort study with cases consisting of 26 (55%) of the 47 brain cancer deaths recorded in the cohort, and controls consisting of a random sample of the cohort (n = 124). Exposure information was obtained from telephone interviews, and brain cancer mortality risk estimated by odds ratios. Increased risk of brain cancer was associated with killing chickens, odds ratio (OR) = 5.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-28.3); working in a shell-fish farm, OR = 13.0 (95% CI, 1.9-84.2); and eating uncooked fish, OR = 8.2 (95% CI, 1.8-37.0). Decreased risks were observed for chicken pox illness, OR = 0.2 (95% CI, 0.1-0.6), and measles vaccination, OR = 0.2 (95% CI, 0.1-0.6). Killing chickens, an activity associated with the highest occupational exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses, was associated with brain cancer mortality, as were occupational and dietary shellfish exposures. These findings are novel. PMID:24564367

  14. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  15. Breast cancer and personal environmental risk factors in Marin County - Pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, C.A.; Farren, G.; Baltzell, K.; Chew, T.; Clarkson, C.; Fleshman, R.; Leary, C.; Mizroch, M.; Orenstein, F.; Russell, M.L.; Souders-Mason, V.; Wrensch, M.

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, they used a community-based research approach. In the collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process.

  16. Restorative yoga for women with ovarian or breast cancer: findings from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Danhauer, Suzanne C; Tooze, Janet A; Farmer, Deborah F; Campbell, Cassie R; McQuellon, Richard P; Barrett, Rolland; Miller, Brigitte E

    2008-01-01

    Yoga has demonstrated benefit in healthy individuals and those with various health conditions. There are, however, few systematic studies to support the development of yoga interventions for cancer patients. Restorative yoga (RY) is a gentle type of yoga that has been described as "active relaxation." The specific aims of this pilot study were to determine the feasibility of implementing an RY intervention as a supportive therapy for women diagnosed with ovarian or breast cancer and to measure changes in self-reported fatigue, psychological distress and well-being, and quality of life. Fifty-one women with ovarian (n = 37) or breast cancer (n = 14) with a mean age of 58.9 years enrolled in this study; the majority (61%) were actively undergoing cancer treatment at the time of enrollment. All study participants participated in 10 weekly 75-minute RY classes that combined physical postures, breathing, and deep relaxation. Study participants completed questionnaires at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 2 months postintervention. Significant improvements were seen for depression, negative affect, state anxiety, mental health, and overall quality of life. Fatigue decreased between baseline and postintervention follow-up. Health-related quality of life improved between baseline and the 2-month follow-up. Qualitative feedback from participants was predominantly positive; relaxation and shared group experience were two common themes. PMID:18544284

  17. Reiki for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy in a Brazilian Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Pamela; da Motta, Pedro Mourão Roxo; da Silva, Luis G; Stephan, Celso; Lima, Carmen Silvia Passos; de Barros, Nelson Filice

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether individualized Reiki given to cancer patients at a Brazilian hospital improved symptoms and well-being. Data from 36 patients who received 5 Reiki sessions were collected using the MYMOP and were compared before and after their treatment and also with 14 patients who did not receive Reiki and who acted as a comparison group. Twenty-one patients reported feeling better, 12 felt worse, and 3 reported no change. Of the comparison group, 6 patients reported feeling better and 8 felt worse. The Reiki practice delivered as part of the integrative care in oncology did produce clinically significant effects, although not statistically significant results, for more than half of the patients undergoing cancer treatment. PMID:27078812

  18. Collagen I fiber density increases in lymph node positive breast cancers: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kakkad, Samata M.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Argani, Pedram; Sukumar, Saraswati; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Collagen I (Col1) fibers are a major structural component in the extracellular matrix of human breast cancers. In a preliminary pilot study, we explored the link between Col1 fiber density in primary human breast cancers and the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Col1 fibers were detected by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in primary human breast cancers from patients presenting with lymph node metastasis (LN+) versus those without lymph node metastasis (LN−). Col1 fiber density, which was quantified using our in-house SHG image analysis software, was significantly higher in the primary human breast cancers of LN+ (fiber volume=29.22%±4.72%, inter-fiber distance=2.25±0.45  μm) versus LN− (fiber volume=20.33%±5.56%, inter-fiber distance=2.88±1.07  μm) patients. Texture analysis by evaluating the co-occurrence matrix and the Fourier transform of the Col1 fibers proved to be significantly different for the parameters of co-relation and energy, as well as aspect ratio and eccentricity, for LN+ versus LN− cases. We also demonstrated that tissue fixation and paraffin embedding had negligible effect on SHG Col1 fiber detection and quantification. High Col1 fiber density in primary breast tumors is associated with breast cancer metastasis and may serve as an imaging biomarker of metastasis. PMID:23117811

  19. Physical activity and lung cancer among non-smokers: A pilot molecular epidemiologic study within EPIC

    PubMed Central

    RUNDLE, ANDREW; RICHIE, JOHN; STEINDORF, KAREN; PELUSO, MARCO; OVERVAD, KIM; RAASCHOU-NIELSEN, OLE; CLAVEL-CHAPELON, FRANCOISE; LINSEISEN, JACOB P.; BOEING, HEINER; TRICHOPOULOU, ANTONIA; PALLI, DOMENICO; KROGH, VITTORIO; TUMINO, ROSARIO; PANICO, SALVATORE; BUENO-DE-MESQUITA, HENDRIK B.; PEETERS, PETRA H.; LUND, EILIV; GONZALEZ, CARLOS A.; MARTINEZ, CARMEN; DORRONSORO, MIREN; BARRICARTE, AURELIO; TORMO, M. JOSE; QUIROS, JOSÈ R.; AGUDO, ANTONIO; BERGLUND, GORAN; JARVHOLM, BENGT; BINGHAM, SHEILA; KEY, TIMOTHY J.; GORMALLY, EMMANUELLE; SARACCI, RODOLFO; KAAKS, RUDOLF; RIBOLI, ELIO; VINEIS, PAOLO

    2013-01-01

    The association between physical activity, potential intermediate biomarkers and lung cancer risk was investigated in a study of 230 cases and 648 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition. Data on white blood cell aromatic-DNA adducts by 32P-postlabeling and glutathione (GSH) in red blood cells were available from a subset of cases and controls. Compared to the first quartile, the fourth quartile of recreational physical activity was associated with lower lung cancer risk [odds ratio=0.56 (0.35–0.90)], higher GSH levels [+1.87 micro mole GSH/gram haemoglobin, p=0.04] but not with the presence of high levels of adducts [odds ratio=1.05 (0.38–2.86)]. Despite being associated with recreational physical activity, in these small scale pilot analyses GSH levels were not associated with lung cancer risk, [odds ratio=0.95 (0.84 – 1.07) per unit increase in glutathione levels]. Household and occupational activity was not associated with lung cancer risk or biomarker levels. PMID:20050820

  20. A Pilot and Feasibility Study of Virtual Reality as a Distraction for Children with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, Jonathan; Zimand, Elana; Pickering, Melissa; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov; Hodges, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To pilot and test the feasibility of a novel technology to reduce anxiety and pain associated with an invasive medical procedure in children with cancer. Method: Children with cancer (ages 7-19) whose treatment protocols required access of their subcutaneous venous port device (port access) were randomly assigned to a virtual reality…

  1. Pilot Training Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, William E.

    The purpose of the Pilot Training Study is to produce tools with which to analyze the pilot training process of the Air Force in terms of the resources required to train pilots and the cost of pilot training. These tools allow examination of the training courses themselves, and also of the policy factors which drive the need for pilots. The tools…

  2. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  3. The value of prostate cancer support groups: a pilot study of primary physicians’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Canada, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common male cancer, and prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) have prevailed for more than 20 years providing support to men with PCa and their families. While the format, focus and benefits of attending PCSGs have been reported little is known about primary physicians’ (PPs) perceptions of these groups. This article describes Canadian primary physicians’ views about face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. Methods Canadian based primary physicians (n = 140) attending a 2012 Continuing Medical Education Conference participated in a pilot survey questionnaire study. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure primary physicians’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. Results Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Poor inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing and web-based PCSGs to increase engagement with potential attendees. Conclusions Findings suggest PPs highly valued the role and potential benefits of PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits amid the need to improve local and provincial marketing of PCSGs. The potential for web-based PCSGs to help in the support of PCa patients was also recognized. PMID:24673983

  4. Predictors of tolerance to chemotherapy in older cancer patients: a prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Extermann, M; Chen, H; Cantor, A B; Corcoran, M B; Meyer, J; Grendys, E; Cavanaugh, D; Antonek, S; Camarata, A; Haley, W E; Balducci, L

    2002-07-01

    Few data are available to help predict which older cancer patient is at risk of developing chemotherapy-related toxicity. This study was a pilot for a project designing a predictive risk score. Chemotherapy patients aged 70 years and older were prospectively enrolled. Chemotherapies were adjusted for their published toxicity. 60 patients were enrolled, 59 were evaluable. Mean dose-intensity was 90.3%, range 33.3-129.0%. 47% of the patients experienced grade 4 haematological and/or grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity. Published toxicity (MAX2), diastolic blood pressure, marrow invasion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were all associated with toxicity (P<0.1); Body Mass Index, previous chemotherapy, red blood cells, platelets, polymedication with dose-intensity; and polymedication with FACT-G change. After adjustment for the published toxicity, the variables retained their significance, except for LDH and polymedication (for dose-intensity). Although the size of this pilot study imposes a cautious interpretation, patient-related and chemotherapy-related variables correlated independently with toxicity. Designing a composite predictive score to use in assessing the toxicity of multiple chemotherapy regimens therefore appears to be a valid undertaking. PMID:12110492

  5. A Randomized Pilot Study of Atractylenolide I on Gastric Cancer Cachexia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhongwu; Dong, Lei; Wang, Rui; Qiu, Genquan

    2008-01-01

    We determined the therapeutic efficacy of atractylenolide I (ATR), extracted from largehead atractylodes rhizome, in managing gastric cancer cachexia (GCC), and interpreted its probable pharmacological mechanism via investigating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and proteolysis-inducing factor (PIF). This was a randomized but not-blinded pilot. The study group (n = 11) received 1.32 g per day of atractylenolide I (ATR) and the control group (n = 11) received 3.6 g per day of fish-oil-enriched nutritional supplementation (FOE) for 7 weeks. Conservative therapy was similar in both groups. Clinical [appetite, body weight, mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), Karnofsky performance status (KPS) status], biomarker (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and PIF) were evaluated in the basal state, at the third and seventh weeks. To analyze changes of cytokines, an immumohistochemistry technique was adopted. Base line characteristics were similar in both groups. Effects on MAMC and body weight increase, TNF-α increase and IL-1 decreases of serum level were significant in both groups (P < 0.05). ATR was significantly more effective than FOE in improving appetite and KPS status, and decreasing PIF positive rate (P < 0.05). Slight nausea (3/11) and dry mouth (1/11) were shown in intervention groups but did not interrupt treatment. These preliminary findings suggest that ATR might be beneficial in alleviating symptoms, in modulating cytokine and in inhibiting PIF proteolysis of gastric cancer cachexia. Further research using a randomized controlled design is necessary to confirm these pilot study findings. PMID:18830451

  6. Urinary Polyamines: A Pilot Study on Their Roles as Prostate Cancer Detection Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Tik-Hung; Chan, Chi-Fai; Chan, Wai-Lun; Chiu, Ka-Fung; Wong, Wing-Tak; Ng, Chi-Fai; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2016-01-01

    Current screening methods towards prostate cancer (PCa) are not without limitations. Research work has been on-going to assess if there are other better tests suitable for primary or secondary screening of PCa to supplement the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, which fails to work accurately in a grey zone of 4-10ng/ml. In this pilot study, the potential roles of urinary polyamines as prostate cancer biomarkers were evaluated. PCa, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and healthy controls (HC) showing PSA>4.0ng/ml were enrolled in the study. Their urine samples were obtained, and the urinary levels of putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) were determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve and Student's t-test were used to evaluate their diagnostic accuracies. Among the three biogenic polyamines, Spm had demonstrated a good diagnostic performance when comparing their levels in PCa patients with BPH patients (1.47 in PCa vs 5.87 in BPH; p<0.0001). Results are in accordance with transrectal ultrasound prostatic biopsy (TRUSPB) results, with an area under curve (AUC) value of 0.83±0.03. Therefore urinary Spm shows potential to serve as a novel PCa diagnostic biomarker, which in turn can help to address the limited sensitivity and specificity problem of serum PSA test. PMID:27598335

  7. DNA/RNA markers for colorectal cancer risk in preserved stool specimens: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ikuko; Badsha, Kawsar Z; Land, Susan; Nechvatal, Jordan M; Matherly, Larry H; Tarca, Adi L; Majumdar, Adhip P; Basson, Marc D; Ram, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Aims and background Exfoliated cells in human stool offer excellent opportunities to non-invasively detect molecular markers associated with colorectal tumorigenesis, and to evaluate the effects of exposures to exogenous and endogenous carcinogenic or chemopreventive substances. This pilot study investigated the feasibility of determining DNA methylation and RNA expression simultaneously in stool specimens treated with a single type of nucleic acid preservatives. Methods Stool specimens from 56 volunteers that were preserved up to a week with RNAlater were used in this study. Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine methylation at 27 CpG loci on the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) promoter. Taqman assay was used for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions to measure cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA expression. Subjects’ basic demographic and other selected risk factors for colorectal cancer were captured through questionnaires and correlated with the levels of these markers. Results Less than 10% of the samples failed in individual assays. Overall, 24.0% of the CpG loci on the ESR1 promoter were methylated. COX2 expression and alcohol use were positively correlated; an inverse association was present between EGFR expression and cigarette smoking; and subjects using anti-diabetic medication had higher ESR1 methylation. In addition, higher EGFR expression levels were marginally associated with history of polyps and family history of colorectal cancer. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that simultaneous analyses for DNA and RNA markers are feasible in stool samples treated with a single type of nucleotide preservatives. Among several associations observed, the association between EGFR expression and polyps deserves further investigation as a potential target for colorectal cancer screening. Larger studies are warranted to confirm some of our observations. PMID:20210241

  8. Screening for Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rhondali, Wadih; Chisholm, Gary B.; Filbet, Marilene; Kang, Duck-Hee; Hui, David; Cororve Fingeret, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Cancer and its treatment can significantly affect appearance and body integrity. A number of studies have explored the impact of cancer and its treatment on body image, primarily in head and neck and breast cancer. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the construct of body image dissatisfaction and its measurement using a single question in patients with advanced cancer. Methods Outpatients with advanced cancer were recruited (n=81). Assessments included Body Image Scale (BIS), Appearance Schema Inventory (ASI-R), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) with a total symptom distress score (TSDS) and two subscales scores (physical distress [PHS] and psychological distress [PSS]), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and one question assessing the overall appearance satisfaction from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ). We also asked patients to rate the body image changes importance compared with five symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, insomnia, lack of appetite). Results Forty-seven (58%) patients had a BIS score >10 (body image dissatisfaction) with a median of 11 (first–third quartiles, Q1–Q3; 5–16) and a median ASI-R of 3.1 (Q1–Q3; 2.8–3.5). Sensitivity and specificity of ≤3 for body image dissatisfaction in the single overall appearance question using the BIS as a standard was 0.70 and 0.71, respectively. BIS score was significantly correlated with ASI-R (r=0.248; p=0.025), age (r=−0.225; p=0.043), HADS-A (r=0.522, p<0.001), HADS-D (r=0.422, p<0.001), PSS score (r=0.371, p=0.001), PHS score (r=0.356, p=0.001), TSDS score (r=0.416, p<0.001), and the overall appearance question (MBSRQ; r=−0.449, p<0.001). Conclusion Body image dissatisfaction was frequent and associated with symptom burden. A single item ≤3 has a sensitivity of 70% for body image satisfaction screening. PMID:25188590

  9. Influence of arsenic exposure and smoking on lung cancer among smelter workers: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, I.; Welch, K.; Oh, M.; Bond, G.; Hurwitz, P.

    1981-01-01

    A pilot study of 300 smelter workers from the cohort reported by Lee and Fraumeni has been studied: 150 men from their heavy exposure group and 150 men from the rest of the cohort randomly selected. Usable smoking habits were obtained from 86% of the sample. Estimates of the total lifetime work exposure were made from available measurements. A very high risk of lung cancer (SMR 1429) was observed among the most heavily exposed workers. Excess risks, though still present, were much less in those with lower exposures. There was a lower proportion of nonsmokers among the heavily exposed arsenic workers than among the other workers. This suggests that there may be some interaction between smoking and arsenic exposure. Moreover, comparison of smoking habits reported by smelter workers suggested that, as a group, they smoked more heavily than average for the United States population. A small study of proxy smoking histories suggested that these were valid and unbiased. The work continues on an enlarged sample.

  10. Comparison of organochlorine chemical body burdens of female breast cancer cases with cancer free women in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil--Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, C.A.; Petreas, M.X.; Caleffi, M.; Barbosa, F.S.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    1999-12-01

    This pilot study collected preliminary data to examine known and suspected breast cancer risk factors among women living in rural and urban areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil by questionnaire. In addition, the body burden levels of a panel of organochlorines was measured in a small clinic-based prospective sample.

  11. A pilot study into the problematic use of opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David T; Allan, Laurie; Griffiths, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the use of strong opioid analgesic drugs for chronic non-cancer pain. Specialists have concluded that fears of problematic drug use are often unfounded. In contrast, others claim the existence of significant problems.'Problematic drug use' includes the following definitions; addiction, abuse, physiological dependence and tolerance.We present a case study and the results of a pilot, longitudinal, cohort study, via a pilot questionnaire, of 22 chronic pain clinic patients following a trial of opioid drugs. The results suggest that chronic non-cancer pain patients can be maintained on opioids with few problems, and likewise can withdraw with minimal adverse effects, other than a return of pain. PMID:11722834

  12. Next-generation personalised medicine for high-risk paediatric cancer patients - The INFORM pilot study.

    PubMed

    Worst, Barbara C; van Tilburg, Cornelis M; Balasubramanian, Gnana Prakash; Fiesel, Petra; Witt, Ruth; Freitag, Angelika; Boudalil, Miream; Previti, Christopher; Wolf, Stephan; Schmidt, Sabine; Chotewutmontri, Sasithorn; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Schlesner, Matthias; Hutter, Barbara; Taylor, Lenka; Borst, Tobias; Sutter, Christian; Bartram, Claus R; Milde, Till; Pfaff, Elke; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Stackelberg, Arend; Meisel, Roland; Borkhardt, Arndt; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Dirksen, Uta; Jürgens, Heribert; Kramm, Christof M; von Bueren, Andre O; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias; Burkhardt, Birgit; Wößmann, Wilhelm; Nathrath, Michaela; Bielack, Stefan S; Frühwald, Michael C; Fulda, Simone; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa; Schwab, Matthias; Tremmel, Roman; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Schulte, Johannes H; Brors, Benedikt; von Deimling, Andreas; Lichter, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Witt, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    The 'Individualized Therapy for Relapsed Malignancies in Childhood' (INFORM) precision medicine study is a nationwide German program for children with high-risk relapsed/refractory malignancies, which aims to identify therapeutic targets on an individualised basis. In a pilot phase, reported here, we developed the logistical and analytical pipelines necessary for rapid and comprehensive molecular profiling in a clinical setting. Fifty-seven patients from 20 centers were prospectively recruited. Malignancies investigated included sarcomas (n = 25), brain tumours (n = 23), and others (n = 9). Whole-exome, low-coverage whole-genome, and RNA sequencing were complemented with methylation and expression microarray analyses. Alterations were assessed for potential targetability according to a customised prioritisation algorithm and subsequently discussed in an interdisciplinary molecular tumour board. Next-generation sequencing data were generated for 52 patients, with the full analysis possible in 46 of 52. Turnaround time from sample receipt until first report averaged 28 d. Twenty-six patients (50%) harbored a potentially druggable alteration with a prioritisation score of 'intermediate' or higher (level 4 of 7). Common targets included receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, and cell cycle control. Ten patients received a targeted therapy based on these findings, with responses observed in some previously treatment-refractory tumours. Comparative primary relapse analysis revealed substantial tumour evolution as well as one case of unsuspected secondary malignancy, highlighting the importance of re-biopsy at relapse. This study demonstrates the feasibility of comprehensive, real-time molecular profiling for high-risk paediatric cancer patients. This extended proof-of-concept, with examples of treatment consequences, expands upon previous personalised oncology endeavors

  13. A Pilot Program in Collaboration with African American Churches Successfully Increases Awareness of the Importance of Cancer Research and Participation in Cancer Translational Research Studies among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Albertie, Monica; Lesperance, Mary; Weis, Jennifer A.; Coles, Alton; Smith, Nina; Mills, Lynette; Woodward, Timothy; Aspitia, Alvaro Moreno; Vishnu, Prakash; Willis, Floyd; Isley, Amber; Fonseca, Rafael; Vachon, Celine; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    African Americans are underrepresented in cancer research. We evaluate whether collaboration with African American churches can improve cancer awareness and increase participation in translational research protocols among African Americans. From February to April 2010, the Mayo Clinic partnered with African American Jacksonville churches to provide educational programs focused on cancer research and healthy behaviors. Education on multiple myeloma and on-site access to a translational cancer research pilot project evaluating the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathies and t(14,18) in African Americans was offered. Seventy-four percent, 236 out of 318 participants, returned the questionnaires. The majority of participants had never received information on multiple myeloma (67%), had never received clinical research study information (57%), and were enrolled in the translational research studies (55%). Partnerships with African American churches in community education projects that bring research to church venues are effective in improving cancer awareness and in increasing research participation among African Americans. PMID:22072126

  14. Pilot study evaluating broccoli sprouts in advanced pancreatic cancer (POUDER trial) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most aggressive malignancies with marked resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. PDA-cancer stem cells (CSCs) are not targeted by current therapies and may be a reason for poor prognosis. Studies indicate that diets rich in cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower offer cancer preventative and therapeutic benefits. Recent experimental studies have confirmed these findings and demonstrated that isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, and the polyphenol, quercetin, effectively reduced tumor growth and enhanced the sensitivity of the cancer cells to current chemotherapeutics. The aim of the present study is to test the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the application of freeze-dried broccoli sprouts in patients with advanced PDA. Methods and study design The study is designed as a prospective randomized, double-blinded pilot trial with a treatment and a placebo-controlled arm in a single center setting. A total number of forty patients (18 years or older) in two parallel groups with advanced, surgically non-resectable PDA under palliative chemotherapy are planned for recruitment. Patients in the treatment group will receive fifteen capsules of the study substance per day (90 mg of active sulforaphane) during the chemotherapy treatment course. Patients in the placebo group will receive the same capsule size and portion distribution with inactive substances (mainly methylcellulose). The follow-up duration is one year. Feasibility of the study substance, adverse effects, and patient compliance, as well as levels of serum tumor markers (CEA, CA 19-9), quality of life, and patient overall survival rates will be assessed at defined points of time. Discussion The POUDER trial is expected to transfer promising experimental and epidemiological data into a clinical pilot study to assess the effectiveness of broccoli sprout extracts in the treatment of advanced PDA. The study objectives will provide data on the

  15. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for lung cancer patients and their partners: Results of a mixed methods pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Melanie P. J.; Molema, Johan; Speckens, Anne E. M.; van der Drift, Miep A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer patients and partners show high rates of impaired quality of life and heightened distress levels. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction has proven to be effective in reducing psychological distress in cancer patients. However, studies barely included lung cancer patients. Aim: We examined whether Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction might be a feasible and effective intervention for patients with lung cancer and partners. Design: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction is a training in which mindfulness practices are combined with psycho-education to help participants cope with distress. In this mixed methods pilot study, questionnaires on psychological distress and quality of life were administered before, directly after and 3 months after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction training, in combination with semi-structured interviews. Setting/participants: Patients with lung cancer and partners were recruited at one tertiary care academic medical centre. A total of 19 lung cancer patients and 16 partners participated in the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction training. Results: Most patients were diagnosed with advanced stage lung cancer. Vast majority completed the training. Those receiving anti-cancer treatment did not miss more sessions than patients who were not currently treated. Patients and partners felt positive about participating in a peer group and with their partner. Among participants no significant changes were found in psychological distress. Caregiver burden in partners decreased significantly after following Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. The qualitative analysis showed that the training seemed to instigate a process of change in participants. Conclusion: The Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction training seemed to be feasible for patients with lung cancer and their partners. A randomized controlled trial is needed to examine the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in reducing psychological distress in lung cancer

  16. Pilot feasibility study of a telephone-based couples intervention for physical intimacy and sexual concerns in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Porter, Laura S; Somers, Tamara J; Keefe, Francis J

    2012-01-01

    No studies have tested interventions addressing the sexual concerns of colorectal cancer patients and their partners. The authors reported findings from a pilot feasibility study of a novel telephone-based intimacy enhancement protocol that addresses the intimacy and sexual concerns of couples facing colorectal cancer. On the basis of a flexible coping model, the intervention was designed to help couples make cognitive and behavioral shifts in their intimate relationships. Participants were 18 individuals (9 dyads) who completed the intervention and measures of feasibility (frequency, ease of use, helpfulness of skills, ratings of rapport), program evaluations, and measures of sexual and relationship functioning. Most participants reported that the intervention was "quite a bit" or "extremely" helpful and that they had used the skills taught within the past week. The skills most commonly practiced and perceived as most helpful tended to be behavioral (e.g., trying a new sexual activity). The authors found the largest effect sizes (≥.60) for sexual distress, sexual function (female), and sexual communication. Findings from this pilot study suggest that the intimacy enhancement protocol is feasible and holds promise for improving sexual and intimacy outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and their partners. The authors discuss the research and clinical implications. PMID:22900623

  17. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Progress report, September 25, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    This project involves two related activities directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first activity involves a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second activity is a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives are to facilitate the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases and to develop methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and to assess the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collects multiple biologic specimens.

  18. Pilot Study: Fluvoxamine Treatment for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. Method: The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with…

  19. Whole genome expression profiling in chewing-tobacco-associated oral cancers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sanjukta; Multani, Shaleen; Dabholkar, Jyoti; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2015-03-01

    The current study was undertaken with a view to identify differential biomarkers in chewing-tobacco-associated oral cancer tissues in patients of Indian ethnicity. The gene expression profile was analyzed in oral cancer tissues as compared to clinically normal oral buccal mucosa. We examined 30 oral cancer tissues and 27 normal oral tissues with 16 paired samples from contralateral site of the patient and 14 unpaired samples from different oral cancer patients, for whole genome expression using high-throughput IlluminaSentrix Human Ref-8 v2 Expression BeadChip array. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 425 differentially expressed genes with >1.5-fold expression in the oral cancer tissues as compared to normal tissues in the oral cancer patients. Overexpression of 255 genes and downregulation of 170 genes (p < 0.01) were observed. Further, a minimum twofold overexpression was observed in 32 genes and downregulation in 12 genes, in 30-83% of oral cancer patients. Biological pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome Pathway database revealed that the differentially regulated genes were associated with critical biological functions. The biological functions and representative deregulated genes include cell proliferation (AIM2, FAP, TNFSF13B, TMPRSS11A); signal transduction (FOLR2, MME, HTR3B); invasion and metastasis (SPP1, TNFAIP6, EPHB6); differentiation (CLEC4A, ELF5); angiogenesis (CXCL1); apoptosis (GLIPR1, WISP1, DAPL1); and immune responses (CD300A, IFIT2, TREM2); and metabolism (NNMT; ALDH3A1). Besides, several of the genes have been differentially expressed in human cancers including oral cancer. Our data indicated differentially expressed genes in oral cancer tissues and may identify prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers in oral cancers, postvalidation in larger numbers and varied population samples. PMID:25663065

  20. Response to "Secondary Exposure of Family Members to Cyclophosphamide After Chemotherapy of Outpatients With Cancer: A Pilot Study".

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Near panic around secondary exposure of staff and family members to chemotherapy products is being seen again in spite of the implementation of products and procedures that have been shown to decrease the incidence in these populations. Many erroneous statements surrounding the extent of inadvertent chemotherapy exposure can be found in patient education sheets, in American Cancer Society publications, and, of course, on the Internet.
 Therefore, it was with a sense of relief at finally finding a voice of reason that I turned to "Secondary Exposure of Family Members to Cyclophosphamide After Chemotherapy of Outpatients With Cancer: A Pilot Study."
 However, I was sadly disappointed for the following reasons.
. PMID:27105187

  1. Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy; Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian; Watson, Thomas J.; Feins, Richard H.; Johnstone, David W.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

  2. Protection from cancer and early diagnosis applications in Izmir, Turkey: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Ahsen; Atan, Senay Unsal; Tasci, Emel

    2006-01-01

    Research was planned as a descriptive and cross-sectional study in order to explore knowledge and practices of individuals residing in the Bornova District about protection from and early diagnosis of cancer. The individuals residing in the Bornova District in Izmir constituted the population of research. A total of 195 persons, who were selected by convenience sampling method, participated in the study. Results show that 89.2% of the individuals knew what cancer was, 50.3% were alcohol consumers, 45.6% knew the relationship between cancer and being overweight, and 41.5% were exercising regularly. Of the individuals enrolled, 75.4% knew that some ingredients in ready-made foods contain substances causing cancer, but only 10.8% paid attention to the ingredients while buying a food, and 26.7% did not pay any attention at all. Of the women, 53.9% knew how to do breast self-examination and 29.2% thought that to have pap smear performed regularly was essential for protection from cancer. Although 14.2% of the men knew how to do testis examination, 76.4% did not know the importance of testis examination. A statistically significant correlation was found between the research participants who knew what cancer was and those who knew the signs of cancer (chi2 = 8.077, SD = 1, P = .004 < .05). The levels of knowledge and practices related to protection from and early diagnosis of cancer among the individuals enrolled in the research were not sufficient. PMID:16783120

  3. Evaluation of a novel saliva‐based epidermal growth factor receptor mutation detection for lung cancer: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Dan; Liang, Hao; Wei, Fang; Akin, David; Feng, Ziding; Yan, QingXiang; Li, Yin; Zhen, Yan; Xu, Lin; Dong, Gaochao; Wan, Huajing; Dong, Jingsi; Qiu, Xiaoming; Qin, Changlong; Zhu, Daxing; Wang, Xi; Sun, Tong; Zhang, Wenbiao; Li, Canjun; Tang, Xiaojun; Qiao, Youlin

    2016-01-01

    Background This article describes a pilot study evaluating a novel liquid biopsy system for non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The electric field‐induced release and measurement (EFIRM) method utilizes an electrochemical biosensor for detecting oncogenic mutations in biofluids. Methods Saliva and plasma of 17 patients were collected from three cancer centers prior to and after surgical resection. The EFIRM method was then applied to the collected samples to assay for exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutations. EFIRM results were compared with cobas results of exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutation detection in cancer tissues. Results The EFIRM method was found to detect exon 19 deletion with an area under the curve (AUC) of 1.0 in both saliva and plasma samples in lung cancer patients. For L858R mutation detection, the AUC of saliva was 1.0, while the AUC of plasma was 0.98. Strong correlations were also found between presurgery and post‐surgery samples for both saliva (0.86 for exon 19 and 0.98 for L858R) and plasma (0.73 for exon 19 and 0.94 for L858R). Conclusion Our study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing EFIRM to rapidly, non‐invasively, and conveniently detect epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in the saliva of patients with NSCLC, with results corresponding perfectly with the results of cobas tissue genotyping. PMID:27385985

  4. Multimodal snapshot spectral imaging for oral cancer diagnostics: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bedard, Noah; Schwarz, Richard A.; Hu, Aaron; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Howe, Jana; Williams, Michelle D.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer. While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions. We describe a snapshot imaging spectrometer that combines the large field-of-view of widefield imaging with the diagnostic strength of spectroscopy. The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second. We report initial data from normal volunteers and oral cancer patients. PMID:23760882

  5. A pilot study on risk factors and p53 gene expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fredrikson, M; Axelson, O; Sun, X F; Arbman, G; Nilsson, E; Nordenskjöld, B; Sjödahl, R; Söderkvist, P

    1996-06-01

    Of 311 colorectal cancers diagnosed in 1984-86 in the county of Ostergotland, Sweden, 179 were included in a case-control study, and, of these, 70 were investigated using immunohistochemical staining for p53 gene mutations. Alcohol use as well as medication with hydralazine-containing antihypertensive drugs, but not heredity were associated with p53 staining. The study is offered to illustrate the possible value of investigating molecularly defined tumour subtypes in relation to specific risk factors. PMID:8645592

  6. Efficacy of IP6 + inositol in the treatment of breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: prospective, randomized, pilot clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prospective, randomized, pilot clinical study was conducted to evaluate the beneficial effects of inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) + Inositol in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant therapy. Patients and methods Patients with invasive ductal breast cancer where polychemotherapy was indicated were monitored in the period from 2005-2007. Fourteen patients in the same stage of ductal invasive breast cancer were involved in the study, divided in two randomized groups. One group was subjected to take IP6 + Inositol while the other group was taking placebo. In both groups of patients the same laboratory parameters were monitored. When the treatment was finished, all patients have filled questionnaires QLQ C30 and QLQ-BR23 to determine the quality of life. Results Patients receiving chemotherapy, along with IP6 + Inositol did not have cytopenia, drop in leukocyte and platelet counts. Red blood cell counts and tumor markers were unaltered in both groups. However, patients who took IP6 + Inositol had significantly better quality of life (p = 0.05) and functional status (p = 0.0003) and were able to perform their daily activities. Conclusion IP6 + Inositol as an adjunctive therapy is valuable help in ameliorating the side effects and preserving quality of life among the patients treated with chemotherapy. PMID:20152024

  7. How to select elderly colorectal cancer patients for surgery: a pilot study in an Italian academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Ugolini, Giampaolo; Pasini, Francesco; Ghignone, Federico; Zattoni, Davide; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Parlanti, Daniele; Montroni, Isacco

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cancer is one of the most common diagnoses in elderly patients. Of all types of abdominal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC) is undoubtedly the most frequent. Median age at diagnosis is approximately 70 years old worldwide. Due to the multiple comorbidities affecting elderly people, frailty evaluation is very important in order to avoid over- or under-treatment. This pilot study was designed to investigate the variables capable of predicting the long-term risk of mortality and living situation after surgery for CRC. Methods Patients with 70 years old and older undergoing elective surgery for CRC were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were preoperatively screened using 11 internationally-validated-frailty-assessment tests. The endpoints of the study were long-term mortality and living situation. The data were analyzed using univariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis to verify the predictive value of score indices in order to identify possible risk factors. Results Forty-six patients were studied. The median follow-up time after surgery was 4.6 years (range, 2.9-5.7 years) and no patients were lost to follow-up. The overall mortality rate was 39%. Four of the patients who survived (4/28, 14%) lost their functional autonomy. The preoperative impaired Timed Up and Go (TUG), Eastern Cooperative Group Performance Status (ECOG PS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES-13) scoring systems were significantly associated with increased long term mortality risk. Conclusion Simplified frailty-assessing tools should be routinely used in elderly cancer patients before treatment in order to stratify patient risk. The TUG, ECOG-PS, IADLs and VES-13 scoring systems are potentially able to predict long-term mortality and disability. Additional studies will be needed to confirm the preliminary data in order to improve management strategies for oncogeriatric surgical patients. PMID:26779367

  8. The Use of Molecular Breast Imaging to Assess Response in Women Undergoing Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Boughey, Judy C.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Chen, Beiyun; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Tortorelli, Cindy L.; Maxwell, Robert W.; Cha, Stephen S.; O’Connor, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report To report our findings from a prospective pilot study evaluating the accuracy of molecular breast imaging (MBI) in assessing tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for breast cancer. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who were scheduled to receive NT underwent MBI before beginning and after completing NT prior to surgery. MBI was performed using a dual-detector cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system mounted on a modified mammography gantry after patients had received an intravenous injection of 20 mCi of technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi. Tumor extent was measured on MBI, and tumor-to-background (T/B) ratios of radiotracer uptake were determined through region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Pathologic measurement of tumor size was used as a standard and compared to post-NT tumor size derived from MBI. Results Three patients in whom post-NT MBI could not be performed because of scheduling problems were excluded from analysis. Eighteen cancers were diagnosed in 17 patients. A correlation coefficient of r=0.681 (P=.002) was found between MBI and residual tumor size. The average T/B ratio on MBI decreased from a pretreatment value of 3.0 to a posttreatment value of 1.4. The relative decrease in T/B ratio did not appear to be predictive of response. Conclusions Measurements of tumor size by MBI and T/B ratios are limited in their predictive value regarding the pathologic extent of residual disease in women treated with NT for breast cancer. Alternate tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals should be evaluated to provide information to improve planning and monitoring of breast cancer treatment. PMID:22391702

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy based investigatory approach to discriminate breast cancer from normal: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Ray, Satadru; Mathew, Stanley; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-02-01

    In spite of many efforts for early detection of breast cancer, there is still lack of technology for immediate implementation. In the present study, the potential photoacoustic spectroscopy was evaluated in discriminating breast cancer from normal, involving blood serum samples seeking early detection. Three photoacoustic spectra in time domain were recorded from each of 20 normal and 20 malignant samples at 281nm pulsed laser excitations and a total of 120 spectra were generated. The time domain spectra were then Fast Fourier Transformed into frequency domain and 116.5625 - 206.875 kHz region was selected for further analysis using a combinational approach of wavelet, PCA and logistic regression. Initially, wavelet analysis was performed on the FFT data and seven features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each were extracted. PCA was then performed on the feature matrix (7x120) for discriminating malignant samples from the normal by plotting a decision boundary using logistic regression analysis. The unsupervised mode of classification used in the present study yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 100% in each respectively with a ROC - AUC value of 1. The results obtained have clearly demonstrated the capability of photoacoustic spectroscopy in discriminating cancer from the normal, suggesting its possible clinical implications.

  10. Use of 99mTc-doxorubicin scintigraphy in females with breast cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, F I; Proença, F P P; Ferreira, C G; Ventilari, S C; Rosado de Castro, P H; Moreira, R D; Fonseca, L M B; Gutfilen, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Doxorubicin (Eurofarma, São Paulo, Brazil) is an antitumour agent widely used in the treatment of breast cancer and can be used for tumour tracking when labelled with a radionuclide. Here, we present the results obtained with technetium-99m (99mTc)-doxorubicin, using the direct method, to evaluate its uptake in breast cancer. Methods: Four females with confirmed breast carcinoma diagnosis and breast image reporting and data system Category 5 on mammography underwent whole-body and thorax single-photon emission CT/CT imaging 1 and 3 h after 99mTc-doxorubicin administration. Results: We observed increased uptake in breast carcinoma lesions and elimination via renal and hepatic pathways. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that 99mTc-doxorubicin may be a promising radiopharmaceutical for the evaluation of patients with breast cancer. Further studies are ongoing. Advances in knowledge: To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the use of a directly labelled doxorubicin tracer in humans. 99mTc-doxorubicin could provide information on the response of tumours to doxorubicin. PMID:26111270

  11. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  13. Chemotherapy Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Women with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Julie A.; Makarewicz, Jenna; Schaubhut, Geoffrey J.; Devins, Robert; Albert, Kimberly; Dittus, Kim; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improvements in long-term cancer survival. However, reports of cognitive impairment following treatment emphasize the importance of understanding the long-term effects of chemotherapy on brain functioning. Cognitive deficits found in chemotherapy patients suggest a change in brain functioning that affects specific cognitive domains such as attentional processing and executive functioning. This study examined the processes potentially underlying these changes in cognition by examining brain functional connectivity pre- and post-chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Functional connectivity examines the temporal correlation between spatially remote brain regions in an effort to understand how brain networks support specific cognitive functions. Nine women diagnosed with breast cancer completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session before chemotherapy, one month after, and one year after the completion of chemotherapy. Seed-based functional connectivity analyses were completed using seeds in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) to examine connectivity in the dorsal anterior attention network and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to examine connectivity in the default mode network. Results showed decreased functional connectivity one month after chemotherapy that partially returned to baseline at one year in the dorsal attention network. Decreased connectivity was seen in the default mode network at one month and one year following chemotherapy. In addition, increased subjective memory complaints were noted at one month and one year post-chemotherapy. These findings suggest a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functional connectivity that is potentially related to subjective cognitive assessment. PMID:23852814

  14. A Pilot Study of Self-Management-based Nutrition and Physical Activity Intervention in Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle; Zrim, Stephanie; Lawn, Sharon; Woodman, Richard; Leggett, Stephanie; Jones, Lynnette; Karapetis, Christos; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Sukumaran, Shawgi; Roy, Amitesh C; Koczwara, Bogda

    2016-07-01

    Exercise and a healthy diet are beneficial after cancer, but are not uniformly adopted by cancer survivors. This study reports on the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a self-management-based nutrition and exercise intervention for Australian cancer survivors. Adult survivors (n  =  25) during curative chemotherapy (stratum 1[S1]; n  =  11) or post-treatment (stratum 2 [S2]; n  =  14) were recruited prospectively from a single center. The Flinders Living Well Self-Management Program™ (FLW Program) was utilized to establish patient-led nutrition and exercise goals and develop a tailored 12-wk intervention plan. Fortnightly reviews occurred with assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 wk. A recruitment and retention rate of 38% and 84% were observed. Both strata maintained total skeletal muscle mass. Small reductions in body mass index, hip circumference, and percentage body fat, and small increases in hand grip strength and exercise capacity among subjects in both strata were observed. No significant differences were observed between strata; however, significant increases in exercise capacity and global health status for S2 were observed from baseline to 12 wk. FLW Program is a feasible mode of delivering nutrition and exercise intervention to cancer survivors and it appears that there are no barriers to implementing this program early during chemotherapy. Hence, the additive effect of gains achieved over a longer duration is promising and this should be explored in randomized controlled trials adequately powered to observe clinically and statistically significant improvements in relevant outcomes. PMID:27176450

  15. A Pilot Study Using Next-Generation Sequencing in Advanced Cancers: Feasibility and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Liang, Winnie S.; Demeure, Michael J.; Kiefer, Jeff A.; Hostetter, Galen; Izatt, Tyler; Sinari, Shripad; Christoforides, Alexis; Aldrich, Jessica; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Phillips, Lori; Benson, Hollie; Reiman, Rebecca; Baker, Angela; Marsh, Vickie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose New anticancer agents that target a single cell surface receptor, up-regulated or amplified gene product, or mutated gene, have met with some success in treating advanced cancers. However, patients' tumors still eventually progress on these therapies. If it were possible to identify a larger number of targetable vulnerabilities in an individual's tumor, multiple targets could be exploited with the use of specific therapeutic agents, thus possibly giving the patient viable therapeutic alternatives. Experimental Design In this exploratory study, we used next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS) including whole genome sequencing (WGS), and where feasible, whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) to identify genomic events and associated expression changes in advanced cancer patients. Results WGS on paired tumor and normal samples from nine advanced cancer patients and WTS on six of these patients' tumors was completed. One patient's treatment was based on targets and pathways identified by NGS and the patient had a short-lived PET/CT response with a significant reduction in his tumor-related pain. To design treatment plans based on information garnered from NGS, several challenges were encountered: NGS reporting delays, communication of results to out-of-state participants and their treating oncologists, and chain of custody handling for fresh biopsy samples for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) target validation. Conclusion While the initial effort was a slower process than anticipated due to a variety of issues, we demonstrate the feasibility of using NGS in advanced cancer patients so that treatments for patients with progressing tumors may be improved. PMID:24204627

  16. A pilot study evaluating genetic alterations that drive tobacco- and betel quid-associated oral cancer in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dhirendra Singh; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Verma, Anand; Devi, Thoudam Regina; Singh, L C; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Kataki, Amal Ch; Saxena, Sunita; Kapur, Sujala

    2014-09-01

    The susceptibility of an individual to oral cancer is mediated by genetic factors and carcinogen-exposure behaviors such as betel quid chewing, tobacco use, and alcohol consumption. This pilot study was aimed to identify the genetic alteration in 100 bp upstream and downstream flanking regions in addition to the exonic regions of 169 cancer-associated genes by using Next Generation sequencing with aim to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of tobacco- and betel quid-associated oral cancer of Northeast India. To understand the role of chemical compounds present in tobacco and betel quid associated with the progression of oral cancer, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion and deletion (Indels) found in this study were analyzed for their association with chemical compounds found in tobacco and betel quid using Comparative Toxogenomic Database. Genes (AR, BRCA1, IL8, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with arecoline which is the major component of areca nut. Genes (BARD1, BRCA2, CCND2, IGF1R, MSH6, and RASSF1) with novel deletion and genes (APC, BRMS1, CDK2AP1, CDKN2B, GAS1, IGF1R, and RB1) with novel insertion were found to be associated with aflatoxin B1 which is produced by fermented areca nut. Genes (ADH6, APC, AR, BARD1, BRMS1, CDKN1A, E2F1, FGFR4, FLNC, HRAS, IGF1R, IL12B, IL8, NBL1, STAT5B, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with aflatoxin B1. Genes (ATM, BRCA1, CDKN1A, EGFR, IL8, and TP53) with novel SNP were found to be associated with tobacco specific nitrosamines. PMID:24943687

  17. Inter-observer variability in the classification of ovarian cancer cell type using microscopy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Vang, Russell; Seidman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that different cell types of ovarian carcinoma have different molecular profiles, exhibit different behavior, and that patients could benefit from typespecific treatment. Different cell types display different histopathology features, and different criteria are used for each cell type classification. Inter-observer variability for the task of classifying ovarian cancer cell types is an under-examined area of research. This study served as a pilot study to quantify observer variability related to the classification of ovarian cancer cell types and to extract valuable data for designing a validation study of digital pathology (DP) for this task. Three observers with expertise in gynecologic pathology reviewed 114 cases of ovarian cancer with optical microscopy, with specific guidelines for classifications into distinct cell types. For 93 cases all 3 pathologists agreed on the same cell type, for 18 cases 2 out of 3 agreed, and for 3 cases there was no agreement. Across cell types with a minimum sample size of 10 cases, agreement between all three observers was {91.1%, 80.0%, 90.0%, 78.6%, 100.0%, 61.5%} for the high grade serous carcinoma, low grade serous carcinoma, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and carcinosarcoma cell types respectively. These results indicate that unanimous agreement varied over a fairly wide range. However, additional research is needed to determine the importance of these differences in comparison studies. These results will be used to aid in the design and sizing of such a study comparing optical and digital pathology. In addition, the results will help in understanding the potential role computer-aided diagnosis has in helping to improve the agreement of pathologists for this task.

  18. A Pilot Study on Tamoxifen Sexual Side Effects and Hand Preference in Male Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L; Popa, Florian; Bratucu, Eugen; Straja, Dan; Manea, Mirela; Georgescu, Simona R; Paunica, Stana; Bratucu, Mircea; Balalau, Cristian; Constantin, Vlad D

    2015-08-01

    Recent clinical and imaging studies suggest that sex hormones modulate sexuality according to a psychophysiologic process of lateralization of the brain, with androgens playing a greater role in sexual functioning of left hemibrain/right handedness and estrogens possibly for right hemibrain/left handedness. Based on this perspective, the current study attempted to specify the relationship between hand preference, estrogens, and sexual function in subjects with male breast cancer, taking into account the sexual side effects of tamoxifen as the agent for inhibiting estrogen action. Twenty-eight Romanian men-17 right-handed and 11 left-handed-undergoing treatment with tamoxifen for male breast cancer participated in this study. These men were assessed both prior to and during tamoxifen treatment using the International Index of Erectile Function, a standardized instrument used for the evaluation of various aspects of sexual functioning, including erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), and overall functioning (OF). A main effect for handedness was found on EF, OF, SD, and OS scales, with right-handed men showing higher functioning than left-handed men. Regarding interaction effects, the left-handed group of men showed greater decreased sexual functioning during tamoxifen (on three subscales: OF, SD, OS) compared to right-handed men. Further research should be conducted in order to support and refine this potential lateralized process of sexual neuromodulation within the brain. PMID:26108899

  19. Does famotidine enhance tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer? Results of a randomized prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parshad, Rajinder; Kapoor, Sorabh; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Kumar, Arvind; Chattopadhyaya, Tushar K

    2002-01-01

    Thirty patients with breast cancer were prospectively randomized into case and control groups receiving 40 mg famotidine preoperatively for 10-14 days and routine premedication, respectively. Surgical specimens were evaluated objectively for tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in the center and in the periphery of the tumor along with evaluation of metastatic lymph nodes for reactive changes. Ten famotidine-treated cases (67%) showed significant lymphocytic infiltration in the center compared to 4 controls (27%) (p = 0.03). Eleven cases (77%) had significant lymphocytic infiltration in the periphery (p = 0.03) compared to 5 controls (33%). Considering both sites, lymphocytic response was significant in 9 (60%) cases as opposed to only 3 (20%) controls (p = 0.03). This response did not correlate with the stage, grade of tumor or menopausal status of patients in either group. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of the cases showed significant reactive changes in the metastatic lymph nodes as compared to 22% in controls (p < 0.01). This study suggests that famotidine enhances tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer and might have potential as an immunomodulator. A larger confirmatory study is suggested. PMID:12234028

  20. Pilot study of bone mineral density in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headley, J. A.; Theriault, R. L.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.; Hortobagyi, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) in breast cancer patients previously treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Sixteen of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Chemotherapy drugs and dosages along with a history of risk factors for reduced bone density including activity level, tobacco and/or alcohol use, metabolic bone disease, family history, and hormone exposure were identified. Results showed that women who became permanently amenorrheic as a result of chemotherapy had BMD 14% lower than women who maintained menses after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-treated women who maintained ovarian function had normal BMD. This study suggests that women who have premature menopause as a result of chemotherapy for breast cancer are at increased risk of bone loss and may be at risk for early development of osteoporosis. Women who maintain menses do not appear to be at risk for accelerated trabecular bone loss.

  1. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) from Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    García-Contreras, Marta; Vera-Donoso, César David; Hernández-Andreu, José Miguel; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Oltra, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSCs) are an important source of cells for regenerative medicine. The therapeutic effect of culture-expanded adipose derived stem cells has been shown; however, optimal xeno-free culture conditions remain to be determined. Cancer patients, specifically those undergoing invasive surgery, constitute a subgroup of patients who could benefit from autologous stem cell transplantation. Although regenerative potential of their ADSCs could be affected by the disease and/or treatment, we are not aware of any study that has evaluated the therapeutic potential of ADSCs isolated from cancer patients in reference to that of ADSCs derived from healthy subjects. Here we report that ADSCs isolated from subabdominal adipose tissue of patients with urological neoplasms yielded similar growth kinetics, presented equivalent mesenchymal surface markers and showed similar differentiation potential into distinct mesodermal cell lineages: adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts than ADSCs isolated from adipose tissue of age-matched non-oncogenic participants, all under xeno-free growth culture conditions. Molecular karyotyping of patient expanded ADSCs genomes showed no disease-related alterations indicating their safety. In addition, vesicles <100 nm identified as exosomes (EXOs) which may be at least partly responsible for the attributed therapeutic paracrine effects of the ADSCs were effectively isolated from ADSCs and showed equivalent miRNA content regardless they were derived from cancer patients or non-oncogenic participants indicating that the repair capabilities of xeno-free expanded ADSCs are not compromised by patient condition and therefore their xeno-free culture expanded ADSCs should be suitable for autologous stem cell transplantation in a clinical setting. PMID:25412325

  3. Near-infrared fluorescence sentinel lymph node detection in gastric cancer: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Quirijn R J G; Boogerd, Leonora S F; de Steur, Wobbe O; Verbeek, Floris P R; Boonstra, Martin C; Handgraaf, Henricus J M; Frangioni, John V; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Hartgrink, Henk H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate feasibility and accuracy of near-infrared fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green: nanocolloid for sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in gastric cancer. METHODS: A prospective, single-institution, phase I feasibility trial was conducted. Patients suffering from gastric cancer and planned for gastrectomy were included. During surgery, a subserosal injection of 1.6 mL ICG:Nanocoll was administered around the tumor. NIR fluorescence imaging of the abdominal cavity was performed using the Mini-FLARE™ NIR fluorescence imaging system. Lymphatic pathways and SLNs were visualized. Of every detected SLN, the corresponding lymph node station, signal-to-background ratio and histopathological diagnosis was determined. Patients underwent standard-of-care gastrectomy. Detected SLNs outside the standard dissection planes were also resected and evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were enrolled. Four patients were excluded because distant metastases were found during surgery or due to technical failure of the injection. In 21 of the remaining 22 patients, at least 1 SLN was detected by NIR Fluorescence imaging (mean 3.1 SLNs; range 1-6). In 8 of the 21 patients, tumor-positive LNs were found. Overall accuracy of the technique was 90% (70%-99%; 95%CI), which decreased by higher pT-stage (100%, 100%, 100%, 90%, 0% for respectively Tx, T1, T2, T3, T4 tumors). All NIR-negative SLNs were completely effaced by tumor. Mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio of SLNs was 4.4 (range 1.4-19.8). In 8 of the 21 patients, SLNs outside the standard resection plane were identified, that contained malignant cells in 2 patients. CONCLUSION: This study shows successful use of ICG:Nanocoll as lymphatic tracer for SLN detection in gastric cancer. Moreover, tumor-containing LNs outside the standard dissection planes were identified. PMID:27053856

  4. Effect of Music Therapy on Pain and Anxiety Levels of Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Priyadharshini; Nair, Shoba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pain associated with cancer is highly detrimental to the quality of life of the affected individuals. It also contributes to the anxiety of the patient. There is a need for a nonpharmacological approach in addition to the pharmacological therapy for the management of the pain for a more holistic improvement in the individual. With this study, we wish to achieve this through music. Objective: To assess the effect of music therapy on pain scores and anxiety levels of cancer patients with pain. Study Design: In this quantitative study, a comparative study was done on fourteen cancer patients admitted for pain relief under the Department of Pain and Palliative Medicine, of a tertiary care hospital, having moderate to severe pain (numerical pain rating scale [NRS] – of 4 to 10). Subjects and Methods: Convenience sampling was used. Patients were allocated to test group or control group nonrandomly. The test group patients were subjected to music therapy for 20 min while the control group patients were kept occupied by talking to them for 20 min. The NRS scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional pain scores and the Hamilton anxiety rating scale was used to assess the pre- and post-interventional anxiety scores in the two groups. Statistics: Student's t-test was used for comparing the pre- and post-interventional data. Two sample t-test was used to compare the data obtained from the control and study groups. Results: Statistically significant reduction seen in the pain scores in the test group after music therapy (P = 0.003). No statistically significant reduction seen in the pain score in the control group (P = 0.356). There was a statistically significant reduction in the postintervention pain scores in the test group compared to the control group (P = 0.034). The reduction in anxiety levels in both groups after intervention was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to lower the pain score of a patient who

  5. A Chaplain-led Spiritual Life Review Pilot Study for Patients with Brain Cancers and Other Degenerative Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Euerle, Terin T.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Kwete, Gracia M.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study was designed to describe changes in spiritual well-being (SWB), spiritual coping, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with brain cancer or other neurodegenerative diseases participating in a chaplain-led spiritual life review interview and development of a spiritual legacy document (SLD). Methods: Eligible participants were enrolled and completed baseline questionnaires. They were interviewed by a board-certified chaplain about spiritual influences, beliefs, practices, values, and spiritual struggles. An SLD was prepared for each participant, and one month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Two cases are summarized, and spiritual development themes are illustrated within a spiritual development framework. Results: A total of 27 patients completed baseline questionnaires and the interview; 24 completed the SLD, and 15 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Increases in SWB, religious coping, and QOL were detected. The majority maintained the highest (best) scores of negative religious coping, demonstrating minimal spiritual struggle. Conclusions: Despite the challenges of brain cancers and other neurodegenerative diseases, participants demonstrated improvements in SWB, positive religious coping, and QOL. Patient comments indicate that benefit is related to the opportunity to reflect on and integrate spiritual experiences and to preserve them for others. Research with a larger, more diverse sample is needed, as well as clinical applications for those too vulnerable to participate in longitudinal follow-up. PMID:25973267

  6. Importance of sentinel lymph nodes in colorectal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Hande; Bostanci, Hasan; Mentes, B Bülent

    2007-01-01

    Accurate identification of lymph nodes involved in metastases is vitally important for predicting survival, and it facilitates decision making with regard to adjuvant therapy. The study described here, which was undertaken to evaluate the role of sentinel lymph node mapping in refining the staging of colorectal cancer, was performed prospectively in 19 patients with colorectal cancer who underwent surgery from January to July 2005. Sentinel lymph node sampling was performed during each operation with isosulfan blue dye. Additional immunohistochemical staining was performed only if the sentinel nodes were negative for metastasis. In 18 of 19 patients, at least 1 sentinel node was identified. In 5 of 18 patients, sentinel nodes were positive for metastasis, and in 3 of 5, the sentinel node was the only node containing metastasis that was detected by immunohistochemical staining. In 3 patients, metastases in nonsentinel lymph nodes were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining; these were determined to be false-negative results. Upstaging associated with sentinel lymph node mapping may reveal disease that might otherwise remain undetected by conventional methods. Patients who are upstaged may benefit from adjuvant therapies that have been shown to improve survival. PMID:17660167

  7. Plasma and urinary alkylresorcinol metabolites as potential biomarkers of breast cancer risk in Finnish women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Koskela, Anja; Samaletdin, Adile; Adlercreutz, Herman

    2010-01-01

    Alkylresorcinols (ARs) are shown to be good biomarkers of consumption of rye and whole-grain wheat products in man. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate AR metabolites as potential biomarkers of breast cancer (BC) risk in Finnish women since intake of cereal fiber and its components has been proposed to reduce this risk through an effect on the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens. This was a cross-sectional and observational pilot study. A total of 20 omnivores, 20 vegetarians, and 16 BC women (6-12 mo after operation) were investigated on 2 occasions 6 mo apart. Dietary intake (5-days record), plasma/urinary AR metabolites [3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-1-propanoic acid (DHPPA)] and plasma/urinary enterolactone were measured. The groups were compared using nonparametric tests. We observed that plasma DHBA (P = 0.007; P = 0.03), plasma DHPPA (P = 0.02; P = 0.01), urinary DHBA (P = 0.001; P = 0.003), urinary DHPPA (P = 0.001; P = 0.001), and cereal fiber intake (P = 0.007; P = 0.003) were significantly lower in the BC group compared to the vegetarian and omnivore groups, respectively. Based on measurements of AR metabolites in urine and in plasma, whole-grain rye and wheat cereal fiber intake is low in BC subjects. Thus, urinary and plasma AR metabolites may be used as potential biomarkers of BC risk in women. This novel approach will likely also facilitate studies of associations between rye and whole-grain wheat cereal fiber intake and other diseases. Our findings should, however, be confirmed with larger subject populations. PMID:20661824

  8. Cancer treatment, symptom monitoring, and self-care in adults: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phoebe Dauz; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Ducey, Kathleen; Badura, Jody; Boltz, Kristin D; Olberding, Karmen; Wingate, Anita; Williams, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted on self-reported symptoms and self-care by 37 adults receiving chemotherapy primarily for leukemia, lymphomas, or breast cancer or radiation therapy for head and neck or lung cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist and demographic and interview forms on self-care for identified symptoms were used. Severe symptoms on the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist subscales fatigue, eating, nausea, pain, numbness in fingers/toes, hair loss, and constipation were reported by patients on chemotherapy. Those on radiation therapy reported severe symptoms on the eating, fatigue, skin changes, oropharynx, and constipation subscales.Self-care strategies were in the following categories, using complementary medicine as framework: diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, use of nutritional supplements; modifications of food and of eating habits; naps, sleep, and rest); mind/body control (eg, relaxation methods, prayer, music, attending granddaughter's sports events); biologic treatments (vitamins); herbal treatments (green mint tea); and ethnomedicine (lime juice and garlic). The first category was predominantly used by patients in both treatment types. Medications were prescribed also to help control symptoms (eg, pain and nausea). Symptom monitoring and self-care for symptoms identified may be facilitated by the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist; based on reported symptom severity, care providers may prioritize interventions. A larger study needs to be done on (a) the use of the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist as a clinical tool to assess symptoms that oncology patients experience during therapy; (b) whether care providers, based on patient-reported symptom severity, can prioritize interventions--and how this influences the efficiency of care; (c) the self-care strategies used by patients on chemotherapy or radiation therapy or both; and (d) how useful these strategies are in alleviating symptoms. PMID:17006107

  9. High-intensity functional training improves functional movement and body composition among cancer survivors: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K M; Becker, C; Carlisle, T; Gilmore, K; Hauser, J; Frye, J; Harms, C A

    2015-11-01

    This pilot study investigated feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a high-intensity functional training (HIFT) group-exercise programme among adult cancer survivors within 5 years of last cancer treatment. Eight participants were assigned to a 5-week, 3 days/week HIFT intervention with four testing sessions and 12 workouts along with mobility and stretching exercises. Feasibility was assessed by initiation, adherence, and acceptability. Efficacy was determined by changes from baseline to post-test in health-related quality of life, body composition and functional movement. The recruitment rate was 80% and the adherence rate was 75%. Significant improvements were found for emotional functioning (P = 0.042) and body composition (lean mass +3.8 ± 2.1 kg, P = 0.008; fat mass -3.3 ± 1.0 kg, P = 0.001; body fat percentage -4.7 ± 1.2%, P < 0.001). Participants also significantly improved on five of seven functional movements: balance (P = 0.032), carrying a weighted object (P = 0.004), lower body strength and power (P = 0.009), aerobic capacity and endurance (P = 0.039), and perceived difficulty for flexibility (P = 0.012). Five weeks of HIFT training was well-received and feasible for most cancer survivors, and effective for improving emotional functioning, body composition and functional movement. PMID:26094701

  10. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tian; Zhou Jun; Yoshida, Emi J.; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Schiff, Peter B.; Wang, Tony J.C.; Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza; Zhang Pengpeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

  11. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  12. Mitochondrial copy number and risk of breast cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Platek, Mary; Mahasneh, Amjad; Ambrosone, Christine B; Zhao, Hua

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that the copy number of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) per cell reflects gene-environment interactions between unknown hereditary factors and exposures affecting levels of oxidative stress. However, whether copy number of mtDNA could be a risk predictor of oxidative stress-related human cancers, such as breast cancer, remains to be determined. To explore the role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer etiology, we analyzed mtDNA copy number in whole blood from 103 patients with breast cancer and 103 matched control subjects and examined in relation to endogenous antioxidants. Case patients with breast cancer had a statistically significantly higher mtDNA copy number than control subjects (median: 1.29 vs. 0.80, P<0.01). High mtDNA copy number (above the median in controls) was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of breast cancer, compared with low copy number (Odds ratio (OR)=4.67, 95% CI: 2.45-8.92), with a statistically significant dose-response relationship in trend analysis (P<0.01). Moreover, mtDNA copy number was significantly inversely associated with several important endogenous oxidants and antioxidants in blood in either the cases (total glutathione, CuZn-SOD activity and myeloperoxidase (MPO)) or the controls (catalase (CAT) activity). These results suggest the mtDNA copy number could be associated with risk of breast cancer, perhaps through an oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:19788937

  13. Nutritional Adequacy and Diet Quality in Colorectal Cancer Patients Postsurgery: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Alegria-Lertxundi, Iker; Alvarez, Maider; Rocandio, Ana M; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Arroyo-Izaga, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that an unhealthy diet is associated with a higher risk of tumor recurrence, metastasis, and death among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The aims of this study were to assess nutritional adequacy and diet quality in a group of CRC patients postsurgery and to identify possible associations between dietary and nutritional aspects and environmental factors and weight status. This was an observational study conducted on a random sample of 74 patients, aged 50-69 years. Dietary intake was evaluated utilizing a validated frequency questionnaire, and diet quality was evaluated utilizing the Healthy Eating Index for Spanish Diet and the MedDietScore. Data regarding socioeconomic, demographic, lifestyles, dietary supplements use, and body mass index were collected. Subjects followed a diet characterized by a low carbohydrate intake (94% of the cases), excessive protein (48%), high fat intake (67%), and some micronutrient deficiencies. The inadequacy of some nutrients was associated with male gender, overweight/obesity, smoking, and low educational level; and low adherence to the MedDiet was identified in those with a low educational level (adjusted odds ratio = 4.16, P < 0.05). Therefore, such patients should be an important target group when applying educational programs and giving individualized nutritional advice to improve their quality of life. PMID:27144653

  14. Symptom monitoring and dependent care during cancer treatment in children: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phoebe D; Schmideskamp, Jami; Ridder, E Lavonne; Williams, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    Symptom monitoring by parents/caregivers of children with cancer and what the caregiver and child did to help alleviate symptoms during chemotherapy were studied. The Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist (TRSC) child version was administered to parents/caregivers of 11 children and adolescents (mean age, 10.4 years; SD, 6.1 years; range, 2-18 years; 45% were boys). The Karnofsky scale was completed by clinicians to rate the child's functional status. The TRSC child version and functional status scores were inversely related. All children experienced nausea; the most frequent symptoms reported were in TRSC subscales: fatigue, nausea, eating, fever, oropharynx, pain, and hair loss. Care strategies that helped were distraction, massage, mouth rinses, and vitamins; some reported that their child received medications for pain, nausea, and vomiting. Using complementary medicine categories, the care strategies were diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, more high-fat, high-calorie foods; new foods; any food the child likes; and much sleep and rest); mind/body control (eg, play, video games, television, reading, activity puzzle, breathing exercises, relaxation methods, and prayer); manual healing method (massage and skin-to-skin contact); and biologic treatments (vitamins). The first 2 categories were the most used. Systematic assessment with a self-report checklist enables the provider to identify and prioritize (according to reported severity) those symptoms needing intervention. PMID:16783117

  15. Sublingual fentanyl citrate for cancer-related breakthrough pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    2001-07-01

    The effects of sublingual fentanyl citrate (SLFC) were assessed in 11 hospice inpatients with cancer-related breakthrough pain. Patients were asked to rate their pain, using a visual analogue scale, before SLFC, then after 3, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min. Six patients (55%) had reductions in pain scores at 10 min and nine patients (82%) at 15 min. Ratings for SLFC were very good (18%), good (36%), moderate (28%), and bad (18%). Compared to the usual breakthrough medication, SLFC was better (46%), the same (36%), or worse (18%). Advantages of SLFC included ease of use, quick onset of action and no associated drowsiness. No systemic adverse events were noted, but two patients reported dry mouth and two a bitter taste. Two patients found it difficult to retain the medication under the tongue. Seven patients (64%) said they would continue to use SLFC. Sublingual fentanyl citrate appears safe and well tolerated by these patients. Randomized placebo-controlled and dose ranging studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:12054149

  16. The Pilot Training Study: Advanced Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, P. J.

    An overview is presented of advanced pilot training and of the formal advanced pilot training program that constitutes the primary means of providing this training. Section I deals with the various phases of advanced pilot training that a pilot may encounter during his career; Section II deals with the types of aircraft that require some form of…

  17. Are Physicians Discussing Prostate Cancer Screening with Their Patients and Why or Why Not? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Samantha E.; Holmes, John H.; Shea, Judy A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer screening (PCS) is controversial. Ideally, patients should understand the risks and benefits of screening before undergoing PSA testing. This study assessed whether primary care physicians routinely discuss PCS and explored the barriers to and facilitators of these discussions. METHODS Qualitative pilot study involving in-depth, semistructured interviews with 18 purposively sampled, academic and community-based primary care physicians. Barriers and facilitators of PCS discussions were ascertained using both interviews and chart-stimulated recall—a technique utilizing patient charts to probe recall and provide context to physician decision-making during clinic encounters. Analysis was performed using consensus conferences based on grounded theory techniques. RESULTS All 18 participating physicians reported that they generally discussed PCS with patients, though 6 reported sometimes ordering PSA tests without discussion. A PCS discussion occurred in only 16 (36%) of the 44 patient–physician encounters when patients were due for PCS that also met criteria for chart-stimulated recall. Barriers to PCS discussion were patient comorbidity, limited education/health literacy, prior refusal of care, physician forgetfulness, acute-care visits, and lack of time. Facilitators of PCS discussion included patient-requested screening, highly educated patients, family history of prostate cancer, African-American race, visits for routine physicals, review of previous PSA results, extra time during encounters, and reminder systems. CONCLUSIONS PCS discussions sometimes do not occur. Important barriers to discussion are inadequate time for health maintenance, physician forgetfulness, and patient characteristics. Future research should explore using educational and decision support interventions to involve more patients in PCS decisions. PMID:17549576

  18. A pilot study of an exercise & cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynaecologic cancers. Faced with poor prognoses, stressful treatment effects and a high likelihood of recurrence, survivors must confront significant physical and psychological morbidities that negatively impact health-related quality of life. Frequently reported side effects include cancer-related fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and psychological distress. Exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy interventions have counteracted such adverse effects in other cancer populations. Objective To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a 24-week home-based exercise intervention, coordinated with 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy (two sessions per month), developed for two types of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer: 1) those undergoing primary treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy after primary surgery; 2) those on surveillance after completing treatment within the last 2 years. Methods Participants were recruited from the Gynaecologic Oncology Clinic. Eligible participants completed baseline assessments and were provided with home-based exercise equipment. Cognitive behavioral therapy was provided every other week for patients via telephone. Assessments were completed at baseline (T1), 3 months (T2) and 6 months (T3). Results 19 of the 46 eligible patients approached were enrolled, with 7 patients in the treatment group and 12 in the surveillance group. There was a significant within group increase in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months: F(2,16) = 5.531, p = 0.015, partial η2 = 0.409. Conclusion The combined 6-month exercise-cognitive behavioral therapy intervention was associated with significant increases in aerobic fitness in epithelial ovarian cancer patients assessed. These improvements were similar regardless of whether the patient was receiving chemotherapy or under surveillance. PMID:23557323

  19. Phase II Pilot Study of Vemurafenib in Patients With Metastatic BRAF-Mutated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kopetz, Scott; Desai, Jayesh; Chan, Emily; Hecht, Joel Randolph; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Maru, Dipen; Morris, Van; Janku, Filip; Dasari, Arvind; Chung, Woonbook; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Gibbs, Peter; James, Brian; Powis, Garth; Nolop, Keith B.; Bhattacharya, Suman; Saltz, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BRAF V600E mutation is seen in 5% to 8% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) and is associated with poor prognosis. Vemurafenib, an oral BRAF V600 inhibitor, has pronounced activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, but its activity in patients with BRAF V600E–positive metastatic CRC was unknown. Patients and Methods In this multi-institutional, open-label study, patients with metastatic CRC with BRAF V600 mutations were recruited to an expansion cohort at the previously determined maximum-tolerated dose of 960 mg orally twice a day. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled, of whom 20 had received at least one prior metastatic chemotherapy regimen. Grade 3 toxicities included keratoacanthomas, rash, fatigue, and arthralgia. Of the 21 patients treated, one patient had a confirmed partial response (5%; 95% CI, 1% to 24%) and seven other patients had stable disease by RECIST criteria. Median progression-free survival was 2.1 months. Patterns of concurrent mutations, microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylation status, PTEN loss, EGFR expression, and copy number alterations were not associated with clinical benefit. In contrast to prior expectations, concurrent KRAS and NRAS mutations were detected at low allele frequency in a subset of the patients' tumors (median, 0.21% allele frequency) and were apparent mechanisms of acquired resistance in vemurafenib-sensitive patient-derived xenograft models. Conclusion In marked contrast to the results seen in patients with BRAF V600E–mutant melanoma, single-agent vemurafenib did not show meaningful clinical activity in patients with BRAF V600E mutant CRC. Combination strategies are now under development and may be informed by the presence of intratumor heterogeneity of KRAS and NRAS mutations. PMID:26460303

  20. Engaging Traditional Medicine Providers in Colorectal Cancer Screening Education in a Chinese American Community: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Adam; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Le, Gem M.; Stewart, Susan; Gildengorin, Ginny; Wong, Ching; Chow, Elaine; Woo, Kent; Nguyen, Tung T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is effective in preventing colon cancer, it remains underused by Asian Americans. Because Chinese Americans often use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), we conducted a pilot study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of having TCM providers deliver education about CRC screening. Methods Four TCM providers (2 herbalists and 2 acupuncturists) were trained to deliver small-group educational sessions to promote CRC screening. Each provider recruited 15 participants aged 50 to 75. Participants completed a baseline survey on CRC-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and then attended one 2-hour educational session delivered by the providers in Cantonese or Mandarin. Three months later, participants completed a postintervention survey. Results Sixty participants were recruited from the San Francisco Chinatown neighborhood. The average age was 62.4 years. Most participants had limited English proficiency (96.7%), annual household income less than $20,000 per year (60%), and low educational attainment (65.1% < high school education). At postintervention (n = 57), significant increases were found in having heard of CRC (from 52.6% to 79.0%, P < .001) and colon polyps (from 64.9% to 84.2%, P < .001). Knowledge regarding screening frequency recommendations also increased significantly. The rate of ever having received any CRC screening test increased from 71.9% to 82.5% (P <.001). The rate of up-to-date screening increased from 70.2% to 79.0% (P = .04). Conclusion The findings suggest that TCM providers can be trained to deliver culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach on CRC screening within their community. Participants reached by TCM providers increased CRC knowledge and self-reported CRC screening. PMID:25496557

  1. Effect of bipolar androgen therapy for asymptomatic men with castration-resistant prostate cancer: Results from a pilot clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Wang, Hao; Ajiboye, A. Seun; Spitz, Avery; Cao, Haiyi; Luo, Jun; Haffner, Michael C.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Carducci, Michael A.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting androgen receptor (AR) axis signaling by disrupting androgen-AR interactions remains the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, all men develop resistance to primary castrating therapy and secondary androgen deprivation therapies (ADTs). Resistance develops in part because castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells adaptively up-regulate AR levels through overexpression, amplification, and expression of ligand-independent variants in response to chronic exposure to a low-testosterone environment. However, preclinical models suggest that AR overexpression represents a therapeutic liability that can be exploited via exposure to supraphysiologic testosterone to promote CRPC cell death. Preclinical data supported a pilot study in which 16 asymptomatic CRPC patients with low to moderate metastatic burden were treated with testosterone cypionate (400 mg intramuscular; day 1 of 28) and etoposide (100 mg oral daily; days 1 to 14 of 28). After three cycles, those with a declining prostate-specific antigen (PSA) continued on intermittent testosterone therapy monotherapy. Castrating therapy was continued to suppress endogenous testosterone production, allowing for rapid cycling from supraphysiologic to near-castrate serum testosterone levels, a strategy termed bipolar androgen therapy (BAT). BAT was well tolerated and resulted in high rates of PSA (7 of 14 evaluable patients) and radiographic responses (5 of 10 evaluable patients). Although all men showed eventual PSA progression, four men remained on BAT for ≥1 year. All patients (10 of 10) demonstrated PSA reductions upon receiving androgen-ablative therapies after BAT, suggesting that BAT may also restore sensitivity to ADTs. BAT shows promise as treatment for CRPC and should be further evaluated in larger trials. PMID:25568070

  2. Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Cancer: A Pilot Study on Experiences of Patients and Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiker, E. M. A.; Aaronson, N. K.; Menko, F. H.; Hahn, D. E. E.; van Asperen, C. J.; Rutgers, E. J. T.; ten Kate, L. P.; Leschot, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    Individuals who received genetic counseling for cancer (N=36) provided feedback on the quality of services and identified areas for improvement. Reasons for counseling and need for psychosocial support are also considered. Generally high levels of satisfaction with care provided were found. Four areas for improvement are identified and discussed.…

  3. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Smartphone Use for Cervical Cancer Screening in Low-Resource Countries: A Pilot Study Conducted in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Scaringella, Stefano; Undurraga-Malinverno, Manuela; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Ricard-Gauthier, Dominique; Matute, Juan Carlos; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Visual inspection of the cervix after application of 5% acetic acid (VIA) is a screening technique for cervical cancer used widely in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). To improve VIA screening performance, digital images after acid acetic application (D-VIA) are taken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a smartphone for on- and off-site D-VIA diagnosis. Materials and Methods Women aged 30–65 years, living in the city of Ambanja, Madagascar, were recruited through a cervical cancer screening campaign. Each performed a human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sample as a primary screen. Women testing positive for HPV were referred for VIA followed by D-VIA, cervical biopsy and endocervical curettage according to routine protocol. In addition, the same day, the D-VIA was emailed to a tertiary care center for immediate assessment. Results were scored as either D-VIA normal or D-VIA abnormal, requiring immediate therapy or referral to a tertiary center. Each of the three off-site physicians were blinded to the result reported by the one on-site physician and each gave their individual assessment followed by a consensus diagnosis. Statistical analyses were conducted using STATA software. Results Of the 332 women recruited, 137 (41.2%) were HPV-positive and recalled for VIA triage; compliance with this invitation was 69.3% (n = 95). Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was detected in 17.7% and 21.7% of digital images by on-site and off-site physicians, respectively. The on-site physician had a sensitivity of 66.7% (95%CI: 30.0–90.3) and a specificity of 85.7% (95%CI: 76.7–91.6); the off-site physician consensus sensitivity was 66.7% (95%CI: 30.0–90.3) with a specificity of 82.3% (95%CI: 72.4–89.1). Conclusion This pilot study supports the use of telemedicine for off-site diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, with diagnostic performance similar to those achieved on-site. Further studies need to determine if smartphones can improve

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  7. Incorporating patient preferences into drug development and regulatory decision making: Results from a quantitative pilot study with cancer patients, carers, and regulators.

    PubMed

    Postmus, D; Mavris, M; Hillege, H L; Salmonson, T; Ryll, B; Plate, A; Moulon, I; Eichler, H-G; Bere, N; Pignatti, F

    2016-05-01

    Currently, patient preference studies are not required to be included in marketing authorization applications to regulatory authorities, and the role and methodology for such studies have not been agreed upon. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) conducted a pilot study to gain experience on how the collection of individual preferences can inform the regulatory review. Using a short online questionnaire, ordinal statements regarding the desirability of different outcomes in the treatment of advanced cancer were elicited from 139 participants (98 regulators, 29 patient or carers, and 12 healthcare professionals). This was followed by face-to-face meetings to gather feedback and validate the individual responses. In this article we summarize the EMA pilot study and discuss the role of patient preference studies within the regulatory review. Based on the results, we conclude that our preference elicitation instrument was easy to implement and sufficiently precise to learn about the distribution of the participants' individual preferences. PMID:26715217

  8. Targeted Androgen Pathway Suppression in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Lange, Paul; Lin, Daniel W.; Taplin, Mary Ellen; Balk, Steven; Ellis, William; Kantoff, Philip; Marck, Brett; Tamae, Daniel; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Penning, Trevor; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Gulati, Roman; Montgomery, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ligand-mediated activation of the androgen receptor (AR) is critical for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and proliferation. The failure to completely ablate tissue androgens may limit suppression of PCa growth. We evaluated combinations of CYP17A and 5-α-reductase inhibitors for reducing prostate androgen levels, AR signaling, and PCa volumes. Patients and Methods Thirty-five men with intermediate/high-risk clinically localized PCa were randomly assigned to goserelin combined with dutasteride (ZD), bicalutamide and dutasteride (ZBD), or bicalutamide, dutasteride, and ketoconazole (ZBDK) for 3 months before prostatectomy. Controls included patients receiving combined androgen blockade with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and bicalutamide. The primary outcome measure was tissue dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentration. Results Prostate DHT levels were substantially lower in all experimental arms (0.02 to 0.04 ng/g v 0.92 ng/g in controls; P < .001). The ZBDK group demonstrated the greatest percentage decline in serum testosterone, androsterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (P < .05 for all). Staining for AR and the androgen-regulated genes prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 was strongly suppressed in benign glands and moderately in malignant glands (P < .05 for all). Two patients had pathologic complete response, and nine had ≤ 0.2 cm3 of residual tumor (defined as a near-complete response), with the largest numbers of complete and near-complete responses in the ZBDK group. Conclusion Addition of androgen synthesis inhibitors lowers prostate androgens below that achieved with standard therapy, but significant AR signaling remains. Tissue-based analysis of steroids and AR signaling is critical to informing the search for optimal local and systemic control of high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:24323034

  9. A pilot phase II Study of digoxin in patients with recurrent prostate cancer as evident by a rising PSA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianqing; Zhan, Tingting; Duffy, Danielle; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Kilpatrick, Deborah; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Chervoneva, Inna; Limentani, Kimberly; Kennedy, Brooke; Kessler, Sarah; Gomella, Leonard; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Carducci, Michael A.; Force, Thomas; Kelly, Wm. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Digoxin was found to inhibit prostate cancer (PCa) growth via the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis in a mouse model. We hypothesized that a therapeutic dose of digoxin could inhibit human PCa growth and disease progression. Methods An open label, single arm pilot study was performed. Patients (pts) with non-metastatic, biochemically relapsed PCa with prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) of 3–24 months and no hormonal therapy within the past 6 months were enrolled. All pts had testosterone > 50 ng/dL at baseline. Digoxin was taken daily with dose titration to achieve a target therapeutic level (0.8 – 2 ng/ml); patients had routine follow-up including cardiac monitoring with 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) and digoxin levels. The primary endpoint was the proportion of pts at 6 months post-treatment with a PSADT ≥ 200% from the baseline. HIF-1α downstream molecule vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in plasma. Results Sixteen pts were enrolled and 14 pts finished the planned 6 months of treatment. Twenty percent (3/15) of the pts had PSA decrease >25% from baseline with a medium duration of 14 months. At 6 months, 5 of 13 (38%) pts had PSADT ≥ 200% of the baseline PSADT and were continued on study for an additional 24 weeks of treatment. Two patients had durable PSA response for more than 1 year. Digoxin was well tolerated with possible relation of one grade 3 back pain. No patients had evidence of digoxin toxicity. The digoxin dose was lowered in 2 patients for significant ECGs changes (sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation), and there were probable digoxin-related ECG changes in 3 patients. Plasma VEGF was detected in 4 (25%) patients. Conclusions Digoxin was well tolerated and showed a prolongation of PSDAT in 38% of the patients. However, there was no significant difference comparing that of similar patients on placebo from historical data. Digoxin at the dose used in this study may have limited benefit for

  10. Benzalkonium bromide as a new potential instillation drug for bladder cancer: Hypothesis and pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xiaokun; Jiang, Hongyi; Lu, Qiong; Zhong, Zhaohui; Hou, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Summary Non-muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has a high rate of recurrence, necessitating use of a variety of adjuvant treatments. A single, immediate post-operative administration of chemotherapy is an important measure for reducing the rate of recurrences, but the overall effect is not satisfactory and the treatment is a burden to the patient. Hence, there is a need for a new, more effective and cheaper agent for adjuvant treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder carcinomas. Although cationic surfactants such as benzalkonium salts are used clinically and hygienically for the control of bacterial growth, there have been reports that cationic surfactants such as benzethonium chloride induce apoptosis in normal and in cancerous cells. We report our experience with benzalkonium bromide (BB) accidentally administered into a patient‘s bladder as saline. It caused severe hematuria and pain, but after a week of persistent administration in the bladder, the patient was cured, as supported by evidence from cystoscopy, indicating that BB destroys bladder mucosa and suggesting that BB maybe a novel agent for use in a single, immediate post-operative administration. We present preliminary data to support this hypothesis and provide discussion we hope will be useful as the foundation for further experiments. PMID:22129909

  11. Multicentric neoadjuvant pilot Phase II study of cetuximab combined with docetaxel in operable triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nabholtz, J M; Chalabi, N; Radosevic-Robin, N; Dauplat, M M; Mouret-Reynier, M A; Van Praagh, I; Servent, V; Jacquin, J P; Benmammar, K E; Kullab, S; Bahadoor, M R K; Kwiatkowski, F; Cayre, A; Abrial, C; Durando, X; Bignon, Y J; Chollet, P; Penault-Llorca, F

    2016-05-01

    Systemic therapy for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is mostly based upon chemotherapy. Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in around 50% of TNBC and may play a role in its pathogenesis. Consequently, we performed a multicentric pilot Phase II neoadjuvant trial of cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody) combined with docetaxel for patients with operable, Stage II-III TNBC. Therapy consisted of weekly cetuximab (first infusion: 400 mg/m(2), then 250 mg/m(2)) combined with six cycles of docetaxel (T: 100 mg/m(2)) q.3 weeks. Subsequently, all patients underwent surgery. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR) while clinical response, toxicity and ancillary studies were secondary endpoints. Paraffin-embedded and frozen tumor samples were systematically collected in order to identify predictive biomarkers of efficacy and resistance. From a total of 35 accrued patients, 25 were assessable for pathologic response. The pCR rate was 24% [95% CI: 7.3-40.7]. Complete clinical response rate (cCR) was observed in 22% of cases. Conservative surgery was performed in 75% of patients. Toxicity, mostly cutaneous and hematologic, was manageable. The pre-therapy ratio between CD8+ and FOXP3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes equal or higher than 2.75 was predictive of pCR: 43% versus 0%, p = 0.047. Cetuximab in combination with docetaxel displays a modest activity, but acceptable toxicity as neoadjuvant therapy of operable TNBC. Similarly to previous observations using panitumumab, another anti-EGFR antibody, the immune component of the tumor microenvironment may play an important role in predicting TNBC response to the neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:26649807

  12. Genetic risk of subsequent esophageal cancer in lymphoma and breast cancer long-term survival patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, E; Rumiato, E; Fassan, M; Rugge, M; Cagol, M; Marino, D; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Ruol, A; Gusella, M; Pasini, F; Amadori, A; Saggioro, D

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of a second primary esophageal carcinoma (EC) in long-term cancer survivors may represent a late effect of previous radio-chemotherapeutic treatment. To identify the genetic factors that could increase this risk, we analyzed nine variants within ERCC1, XPD, XRCC1 and XRCC3 DNA repair pathway genes, and GSTP1, TP53 and MDM2 genes in 61 patients who received radio-chemotherapy for a prior lymphoma or breast cancer; 29 of them had a second primary EC. This cohort consists of 22 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and 7 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC) patients. A validation cohort of 154 patients with sporadic EC was also included. The XPD Asp312Asn (rs1799793) was found to be associated with the risk of developing second primary ESCC (P=0.015). The resultant variant was also involved in the onset of sporadic ESCC (P=0.0018). To know in advance who among long-term cancer survivors have an increased risk of EC could lead to a more appropriate follow-up strategy. PMID:26054330

  13. A pilot study of ultrasound-guided electronic brachytherapy for skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongbok; Tiwari, Hina Arif; Witte, Russell; Stea, Baldassarre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has gained acceptance over the past 5 years for the treatment of non-melanomatous skin cancer (NMSC). Although the prescription depth and radial margins can be chosen using clinical judgment based on visual and biopsy-derived information, we sought a more objective modality of measurement for eBT planning by using ultrasound (US) to measure superficial (< 5 mm depth) lesions. Material and methods From December 2013 to April 2015, 19 patients with 23 pathologically proven NMSCs underwent a clinical examination and US evaluation of the lesions prior to initiating a course of eBT. Twenty lesions were basal cell carcinoma and 3 lesions were squamous cell carcinoma. The most common location was the nose (10 lesions). A 14 or 18 MHz US unit was used by an experienced radiologist to determine depth and lateral extension of lesions. The US-measured depth was then used to define prescription depth for eBT planning without an added margin. A margin of 7 mm was added radially to the US lateral extent measurements, and an appropriate cone applicator size was chosen to cover the target volume. Results The mean depth of the lesions was 2.1 mm with a range of 1-3.4 mm, and the mean largest diameter of the lesions was 8 mm with a range of 2.6-20 mm. Dose ranged from 32-50 Gy in 8-20 fractions with a median dose of 40 Gy in 10 fractions. All patients had a complete response and no failures have occurred with a median follow-up of 12 months (range of 6-22 months). Also, no prolonged skin toxicities have occurred. Conclusions A routinely available radiological US unit can objectively determine depth and lateral extension of NMSC lesions for more accurate eBT treatment planning, and should be considered in future eBT treatment guidelines. PMID:26622244

  14. 5-Fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in advanced colorectal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Bacoyiannis, C; Katsikas, M; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Daliani, D; Kosmidis, P

    1995-08-01

    The combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (FA) has demonstrated activity in colorectal cancer (CC). Cisplatin is reported to have synergistic activity with 5-FU. We examined the combination FA + 5-FU + cisplatin in patients who had previously received chemotherapy with FA + 5-FU and relapsed. Two months after the last dose of FA + 5-FU and documentation of relapse, patients continued with the regimen consisting of cisplatin 20 mg/m2 in 15 min i.v. infusion followed by FA 500 mg/m2 in 1 h i.v. infusion, in the middle of which 5-FU 500 mg/m2 i.v. bolus was administered, with adequate post-hydration. This was repeated weekly for 4 weeks followed by a 2 week rest, for a maximum of six cycles. A total of 30 patients with CC that had relapsed to the combination of FA + 5-FU were treated; 23 had previous surgery and none had radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in eight patients, metastases in the liver in 21, in lymph nodes in six, lung six and peritoneal metastases in seven. Seven patients responded partially. Toxicity requiring dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment included neutropenia 42% (grade 3:7%), mucositis 28% (grade 1:2), diarrhea 63% (Grade 3:10%), nausea-vomiting 55% (Grade 3:10%), increased creatinine value in three patients and peripheral neuropathy in two patients. We conclude that evaluation of this regimen shows substantial toxicity, with satisfactory response as a second line chemotherapy in these heavily pretreated patients. PMID:7579565

  15. Online Adaptive Radiotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Foroudi, Farshad; Wong, Jacky; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Haworth, Annette; Roxby, Paul; Thomas, Jessica; Herschtal, A.; Pham, Daniel; Williams, Scott; Tai, Keen Hun; Duchesne, Gillian

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the advantages and disadvantages of daily online adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (RT) compared with conventional RT for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with T2-T4 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated with daily online adaptive image-guided RT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). From day 1 daily soft tissue-based isocenter positioning was performed using CBCT images acquired before treatment. Using a composite of the initial planning CT and the first five daily CBCT scans, small, medium, and large adaptive plans were created. Each of these adaptive plans used a 0.5-cm clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume expansion. For Fractions 8-32, treatment involved daily soft tissue-based isocenter positioning and selection of suitable adaptive plan of the day. Treating radiation therapists completed a credentialing program, and one radiation oncologist performed all the contouring. Comparisons were made between adaptive and conventional treatment on the basis of CTV coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: All 27 patients completed treatment per protocol. Bladder volume decreased with time or fraction number (p < 0.0001). For the adaptive component (Fractions 8-32) the small, medium, large, and conventional plans were used in 9.8%, 49.2%, 39.5%, and 1.5% of fractions, respectively. For the adaptive strategy, 2.7% of occasions resulted in a CTV V95 <99%, compared with 4.8% of occasions for the conventional approach (p = 0.42). Mean volume of normal tissue receiving a dose >45 Gy was 29% (95% confidence interval, 24-35%) less with adaptive RT compared with conventional RT. The mean volume of normal tissue receiving >5 Gy was 15% (95% confidence interval, 11-18%) less with adaptive RT compared with conventional RT. Conclusions: Online adaptive radiotherapy is feasible in an academic radiotherapy center. The volume of normal tissue irradiated can be significantly

  16. A Pilot Study To Define Chemical Coping in Cancer Patients Using the Delphi Method

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: “Chemical coping” is a commonly used term in the pain and palliative care literature, but is heterogeneously defined. We conducted a Delphi survey among palliative care and pain specialists internationally to identify a consensus definition for “chemical coping with opioids” and warning signs for chemical coping. Methods: This Delphi survey consisted of two rounds on the following: (1) concepts and definition related to chemical coping, (2) warning signs for chemical coping, and (3) demographics. Consensus in this study was defined as agreement by a minimum of 70% of the experts. Results: Participating in the first round were 14/19 (74%) physicians; 12/14 (86%) participated in the second round. The international experts reached the following consensus definition for chemical coping with opioids (92% agreement): “The use of opioids to cope with emotional distress, characterized by inappropriate and/or excessive opioid use.” They also identified depression (consensus 93%); psychiatric disease (86%); a history of substance abuse (86%); a positive score for the Cut-down, Annoyed, Guilty, and Eye-opener (CAGE) alcoholism screening test (79%); a history of alcoholism (79%); and a history of smoking (71%) as important warning signs for chemical coping. Conclusion: Our expert panel reached a consensus definition for chemical coping and related warning signs, which may help clinicians and researchers to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse. PMID:25922879

  17. Quality of Life and Neutropenia in Patients with Early Stage Breast Cancer: A Randomized Pilot Study Comparing Additional Treatment with Mistletoe Extract to Chemotherapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Tröger, Wilfried; Jezdić, Svetlana; Ždrale, Zdravko; Tišma, Nevena; Hamre, Harald J.; Matijašević, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy for breast cancer often deteriorates quality of life, augments fatigue, and induces neutropenia. Mistletoe preparations are frequently used by cancer patients in Central Europe. Physicians have reported better quality of life in breast cancer patients additionally treated with mistletoe preparations during chemotherapy. Mistletoe preparations also have immunostimulant properties and might therefore have protective effects against chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective randomized open label pilot study with 95 patients randomized into three groups. Two groups received Iscador® M special (IMS) or a different mistletoe preparation, respectively, additionally to chemotherapy with six cycles of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and 5-fluoro-uracil (CAF). A control group received CAF with no additional therapy. Here we report the comparison IMS (n = 30) vs. control (n = 31). Quality of life including fatigue was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Neutropenia was defined as neutrophil counts <1,000/μl and assessed at baseline and one day before each CAF cycle. Results: In the descriptive analysis all 15 scores of the EORTC-QLQ-C30 showed better quality of life in the IMS group compared to the control group. In 12 scores the differences were significant (p < 0.02) and nine scores showed a clinically relevant and significant difference of at least 5 points. Neutropenia occurred in 3/30 IMS patients and in 8/31 control patients (p = 0.182). Conclusions: This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with IMS additionally to CAF. CAF-induced neutropenia showed a trend to lower frequency in the IMS group. PMID:21556248

  18. ‘Act on Oncology’ as a New Comprehensive Approach to Assess Prostate Cancer Centres – Method Description and Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Wieland; Hoellthaler, Josef; Magnani, Tiziana; Corrao, Vito; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary care of prostate cancer is increasingly offered in specialised cancer centres. It requires the optimisation of medical and operational processes and the integration of the different medical and non-medical stakeholders. Objective To develop a standardised operational process assessment tool basing on the capability maturity model integration (CMMI) able to implement multidisciplinary care and improve process quality and efficiency. Design, Setting, and Participants Information for model development was derived from medical experts, clinical guidelines, best practice elements of renowned cancer centres, and scientific literature. Data were organised in a hierarchically structured model, consisting of 5 categories, 30 key process areas, 172 requirements, and more than 1500 criteria. Compliance with requirements was assessed through structured on-site surveys covering all relevant clinical and management processes. Comparison with best practice standards allowed to recommend improvements. ‘Act On Oncology’(AoO) was applied in a pilot study on a prostate cancer unit in Europe. Results and Limitations Several best practice elements such as multidisciplinary clinics or advanced organisational measures for patient scheduling were observed. Substantial opportunities were found in other areas such as centre management and infrastructure. As first improvements the evaluated centre administration described and formalised the organisation of the prostate cancer unit with defined personnel assignments and clinical activities and a formal agreement is being worked on to have structured access to First-Aid Posts. Conclusions In the pilot study, the AoO approach was feasible to identify opportunities for process improvements. Measures were derived that might increase the operational process quality and efficiency. PMID:25192213

  19. Implementation and Benefits of Psychooncological Group Interventions in German Breast Centers: A Pilot Study on Supportive-Expressive Group Therapy for Women with Primary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Katrin; Scholl, Isabelle; Sillem, Martin; Hasenburg, Annette; Härter, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Psychosocial treatment is an integral component in today's comprehensive breast cancer care. The main goal of this study was to test the feasibility (benefits and acceptance) of supportive-expressive group psychotherapy (SEGT), a short-term breast cancer-specific group therapy developed and tested in Anglo-American countries, within breast centers in Germany. Patients and Methods The study was realized as a single-group pre-post design. Data were analyzed by combining quantitative and qualitative research methods. The sample consisted of 49 women with breast cancer stage 1 or 2 according to TNM classification (tumor, node, metastasis). Results The results indicate positive acceptance of the group intervention. Quality of life, tumor-related fatigue and coping strategies improved after SEGT. 1 year after the intervention, the patients report lasting positive results from the group intervention. Conclusions This pilot study illustrates the importance of psychooncological group interventions for breast cancer patients and indicates that this form of outpatient psychooncological care is feasible within the German health care system, and breast centers in particular. Effectiveness has to be investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:20847820

  20. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  1. Community-based participatory research to improve life quality and clinical outcomes of patients with breast cancer (DianaWeb in Umbria pilot study)

    PubMed Central

    Villarini, Milena; Lanari, Chiara; Nucci, Daniele; Gianfredi, Vincenza; Marzulli, Tiziana; Berrino, Franco; Borgo, Alessandra; Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Moretti, Massimo; Villarini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer in Europe and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has estimated over 460 000 incident cases per year. Survival among patients with BC has increased in the past decades and EUROCARE-5 has estimated a 5-year relative survival rate of 82% for patients diagnosed in 2000–2007. There is growing evidence that lifestyle (such as a diet based on Mediterranean principles associated with moderate physical activity) may influence prognosis of BC; however, this information is not currently available to patients and is not considered in oncology protocols. Only a few epidemiological studies have investigated the role of diet in BC recurrence and metastasis. Methods and analysis DianaWeb is a community-based participatory research dedicated to patients with BC and represents a collaborative effort between participants and research institutions to determine if specified changes in lifestyle would result in improved outcomes in terms of quality of life or survival. The aim of the study is to recruit a large number of participants, to monitor their lifestyle and health status over time, to provide them tips to encourage sustainable lifestyle changes, to analyse clinical outcomes as a function of baseline risk factors and subsequent changes, and to share with patients methodologies and results. DianaWeb uses a specific interactive website (http://www.dianaweb.org/) and, with very few exceptions, all communications will be made through the web. In this paper we describe the pilot study, namely DianaWeb in Umbria. Ethics and dissemination DianaWeb does not interfere with prescribed oncological treatments; rather, it recommends that participants should follow the received prescriptions. The results will be used to plan guidelines for nutrition and physical activity for patients with BC. The pilot study was approved by the ethics committee of the University of Perugia (reference number 2015-002), and is

  2. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study Assessing Feasibility and Impact of Yoga Practice on Quality of Life, Mood, and Perceived Stress in Women With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Daniela L; Jenkins, Sarah M; Huebner, Marianne; Borg, Beth A; Thomley, Barbara S; Cutshall, Susanne M; Singh, Ravinder; Kohli, Sadhna; Boughey, Judy C; Lemaine, Valerie; Solberg Nes, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Background: A breast cancer diagnosis can entail numerous physical and psychosocial challenges. Yoga practice (YP) may contribute to improved well-being for these patients. Primary Study Objective: Investigate feasibility and impact of YP on quality of life (QoL), mood, fatigue, and perceived stress immediately after breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: Thirty women were randomly assigned to a yoga group (YG) or control group (CG) immediately after cancer diagnosis. Setting: Pilot study conducted at an academic medical center breast clinic. Participant(s): Females (N = 30) who received a biopsy-proven breast cancer diagnosis without metastatic disease. Intervention (YG): One individual YP session at baseline, then 2 individual and 8 weekly group sessions followed by weekly gentle yoga at home (DVD). Questionnaires and saliva samples (ie, cortisol) completed at baseline and 12 weeks postdiagnosis. Results: Both groups reported significant improvements in QoL postintervention but with no significant difference between groups. Emotional well-being, mood-related tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, and confusion-bewilderment scores improved for both groups, and cortisol and cortisone levels decreased. Lumpectomies were prevalent with YG (67%) and CG (47%). YP was rated as “very effective,” providing relaxation (85%), stress relief (69%), and reduced muscle tension/general feeling of wellness (each 62%). Conclusion: Feasibility of YP immediately after breast cancer diagnosis was good. Improvement in emotional well-being, anxiety, depression, and levels of confusion was found in both groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining the impact of YP immediately after breast cancer diagnosis. Further research in this area is warranted.

  3. The safety and efficacy of irreversible electroporation for the ablation of prostate cancer: a multicentre prospective human in vivo pilot study protocol

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, W; de Bruin, D M; Muller, B G; Varkarakis, I M; Karagiannis, A A; Zondervan, P J; Laguna Pes, M P; Veelo, D P; Savci Heijink, C D; Engelbrecht, M R W; Wijkstra, H; de Reijke, T M; de la Rosette, J J M C H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current surgical and ablative treatment options for prostate cancer have a relatively high incidence of side effects, which may diminish the quality of life. The side effects are a consequence of procedure-related damage of the blood vessels, bowel, urethra or neurovascular bundle. Ablation with irreversible electroporation (IRE) has shown to be effective in destroying tumour cells and harbours the advantage of sparing surrounding tissue and vital structures. The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy and to acquire data on patient experience of minimally invasive, transperineally image-guided IRE for the focal ablation of prostate cancer. Methods and analysis In this multicentre pilot study, 16 patients with prostate cancer who are scheduled for a radical prostatectomy will undergo an IRE procedure, approximately 30 days prior to the radical prostatectomy. Data as adverse events, side effects, functional outcomes, pain and quality of life will be collected and patients will be controlled at 1 and 2 weeks post-IRE, 1 day preprostatectomy and postprostatectomy. Prior to the IRE procedure and the radical prostatectomy, all patients will undergo a multiparametric MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the prostate. The efficacy of ablation will be determined by whole mount histopathological examination, which will be correlated with the imaging of the ablation zone. Ethics and dissemination The protocol is approved by the ethics committee at the coordinating centre (Academic Medical Center (AMC) Amsterdam) and by the local Institutional Review Board at the participating centres. Data will be presented at international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Conclusions This pilot study will determine the safety and efficacy of IRE in the prostate. It will show the radiological and histopathological effects of IRE ablations and it will provide data to construct an accurate treatment planning tool for IRE in prostate

  4. Investigation of the Association Between the Fecal Microbiota and Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women: a Population-Based Case-Control Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gieira; Hua, Xing; Xu, Xia; Yu, Guoqin; Flores, Roberto; Falk, Roni T.; Gail, Mitchell H.; Shi, Jianxin; Ravel, Jacques; Feigelson, Heather Spencer

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the gut microbiota differed in 48 postmenopausal breast cancer case patients, pretreatment, vs 48 control patients. Microbiota profiles in fecal DNA were determined by Illumina sequencing and taxonomy of 16S rRNA genes. Estrogens were quantified in urine. Case-control comparisons employed linear and unconditional logistic regression of microbiota α-diversity (PD_whole tree) and UniFrac analysis of β-diversity, with two-sided statistical tests. Total estrogens correlated with α-diversity in control patients (Spearman Rho = 0.37, P = .009) but not case patients (Spearman Rho = 0.04, P = .77). Compared with control patients, case patients had statistically significantly altered microbiota composition (β-diversity, P = .006) and lower α-diversity (P = .004). Adjusted for estrogens and other covariates, odds ratio of cancer was 0.50 (95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.85) per α-diversity tertile. Differences in specific taxa were not statistically significant when adjusted for multiple comparisons. This pilot study shows that postmenopausal women with breast cancer have altered composition and estrogen-independent low diversity of their gut microbiota. Whether these affect breast cancer risk and prognosis is unknown. PMID:26032724

  5. [Assessment of the concentrations of carbonylated proteins and carbonyl reductase enzyme in mexican women with breast cancer: A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Mondragón-Terán, Paul; Hernández-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ramírez-García, Sotero; Núñez-Ramos, Norma Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress could promote the development of cancer and implicate carbonylated proteins in the carcinogenic process. The goal of this study was to assess the concentrations of carbonylated proteins and carbonyl reductase enzyme in women with breast cancer and determine whether these markers were possible indicators of tissue damage caused by the disease. A total of 120 healthy women and 123 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer were included. The concentration of carbonylated proteins in plasma and the concentration of carbonyl reductase enzyme in leukocytes were determined using the ELISA assay. There was a 3.76-fold increase in the amount of carbonylated proteins in the plasma from the patient group compared with healthy control group (5±3.27 vs. 1.33±2.31 nmol carbonyls/mg protein; p<0.05). Additionally, a 60% increase in the carbonyl reductase enzyme was observed in the patient group compared with the healthy control group (3.27±0.124 vs. 2.04±0.11 ng/mg protein; p<0.05). A positive correlation (r=0.95; p<0.001) was found between both measurements. These results suggest the presence of tissue damage produced by cancer; therefore, these parameters could be used to indicate tissue damage in cancer patients. PMID:26927639

  6. Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Resistance Training on Stage I and II Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Dena; Erck, Elizabeth G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lack of physical activity has been noted in breast cancer survivors and been attributed to decreased physical function. Purpose: This study assessed the effects of a moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise program on body fat percentage, maximal oxygen consumption (VO[subscript 2] max), body mass index, and bone mineral density (BMD) of…

  7. Double-blind, randomized pilot study of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel in the prevention and treatment of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Sanchez, Rosa-Maria; Pachón-Ibáñez, Jerónimo; Marín-Conde, Fátima; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate, in an initial way, the effectiveness of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% versus placebo as a preventive and therapeutic intervention of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. Material and Methods In this pilot study, 7 patients (range of age: 18- 65), having histological documented diagnosis of squamous carcinoma on the head and neck region in stage III and IV, and receiving combined radiation treatment and chemotherapy (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43 of irradiation) were studied. Simultaneously, a topical application was performed with bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% in the study group, and the placebo gel for the control group in 5 applications per day, from the time of initiation of cancer treatment to 2 weeks after completion of chemo-radiotherapy treatment (11 weeks of follow-up). The gradation of mucositis, pain, analgesic consumption, infectious complications, and treatment tolerance was measured. Results After 7 patients completed the protocol, any differences were observed between groups in an interval analysis. Mucositis, pain, and tolerance was similar in both groups. Conclusions Our results must be interpreted with caution due to the reduced sample size, but the use of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% didn’t contribute clinical improvement to the oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Key words: Chlorhexidine, mucositis, head and neck cancer. PMID:25662553

  8. CRIB—the use of cardiac rehabilitation services to aid the recovery of patients with bowel cancer: a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) with embedded feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Julie; Adams, Richard; Campbell, Anna; Campbell, Sandra; Donaldson, Cam; Godwin, Jon; Haw, Sally; Kidd, Lisa; Lane, Chrissie; Leslie, Stephen J; Mason, Helen; Mutrie, Nanette; O'Carroll, Ronan; Taylor, Cara; Treweek, Shaun; Watson, Angus; Hubbard, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with colorectal cancer report ongoing physical and psychological impairments and a high proportion of these patients are overweight, insufficiently active and high-risk drinkers, putting them at risk of poor recovery and risk of recurrence and comorbidities. A challenge is implementing sustainable and effective rehabilitation as part of routine care for this group. Methods and analysis A two-arm pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) with embedded feasibility study undertaken as a phased programme of work. The intervention involves an existing cardiac rehabilitation programme for cardiac patients accepting colorectal cancer patient referrals. The intervention consists of supervised exercise sessions run by a cardiac physiotherapist and information sessions. Phase 1 will involve one research site enrolling 12 patients to assess intervention and study design processes. Semistructured interviews with patients with colorectal cancer and cardiac patients and clinicians will be used to gather data on acceptability of the intervention and study procedures. Phase 2 will involve three sites enrolling 66 patients with colorectal cancer randomised to control or intervention groups. Outcome measures will be taken preintervention and postintervention, for phases 1 and 2. The primary outcome is accelerometer measured physical activity; secondary outcomes are self-report physical activity, quality of life, anxiety, depression, symptoms including fatigue. The following variables will also be examined to determine if these factors influence adherence and outcomes: self-efficacy, risk perception and treatments. Ethics and dissemination Full ethical approval was granted by NRES Committees—North of Scotland (13/NS/0004; IRAS project ID: 121757) on 22 February 2013. The proposed work is novel in that it aims to test the feasibility and acceptability of using an evidence-based and theory driven existing cardiac rehabilitation service with patients with

  9. Using tablet-based technology in patient education about systemic therapy options for early-stage breast cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E.R.; Laing, K.; McCarthy, J.; McCrate, F.; Seal, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient education in early-stage breast cancer has been shown to improve patient well-being and quality of life, but it poses a challenge given the increasingly complex regimens and time constraints in clinical practice. Technology-aided teaching in the clinic could help to improve the understanding of adjuvant systemic therapy for patients. In this prospective pilot study, we used a clinician-administered, tablet-based teaching aid to teach patients with early-stage breast cancer about adjuvant systemic therapy. Methods Participation was offered to newly diagnosed patients with early-stage breast cancer presenting for their first medical oncology visit at a provincial cancer centre. Participants were shown a tablet-based presentation describing procedures, rationales, risks, and benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy as an adjunct to a discussion with the medical oncologist. After the clinic visit, participants completed a questionnaire measuring satisfaction with the visit and knowledge of the treatment plan discussed. Results The 25 patients recruited for the study had a mean age of 57 years. An offer of upfront chemotherapy alone was made to 12 participants (48%), chemotherapy with trastuzumab to 4 (16%), and hormonal therapy to 9 (36%). Correct answers to all questions related to treatment knowledge were given by 22 patients (88%). Satisfaction with the clinic visit was high (mean satisfaction score: 4.53 ± 0.1 of a possible 5). Conclusions We found that a tablet-based presentation about adjuvant systemic therapy was satisfactory to patients with early-stage breast cancer and that knowledge retention after the clinic visit was high. Tablet-based teaching could be a feasible and effective way of educating patients in the breast oncology clinic and warrants further investigation in randomized studies. PMID:26628877

  10. Designing a multifaceted survivorship care plan to meet the information and communication needs of breast cancer patients and their family physicians: results of a qualitative pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Following the completion of treatment and as they enter the follow-up phase, breast cancer patients (BCPs) often recount feeling ‘lost in transition’, and are left with many questions concerning how their ongoing care and monitoring for recurrence will be managed. Family physicians (FPs) also frequently report feeling ill-equipped to provide follow-up care to BCPs. In this three-phase qualitative pilot study we designed, implemented and evaluated a multi-faceted survivorship care plan (SCP) to address the information needs of BCPs at our facility and of their FPs. Methods In Phase 1 focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 35 participants from three stakeholder groups (BCPs, FPs and oncology specialist health care providers (OHCPs)), to identify specific information needs. An SCP was then designed based on these findings, consisting of both web-based and paper-based tools (Phase 2). For Phase 3, both sets of tools were subsequently evaluated via focus groups and interviews with 26 participants. Interviews and focus groups were audio taped, transcribed and content analysed for emergent themes and patterns. Results In Phase 1 patients commented that web-based, paper-based and human resources components were desirable in any SCP. Patients did not focus exclusively on the post-treatment period, but instead spoke of evolving needs throughout their cancer journey. FPs indicated that any tools to support them must distill important information in a user-friendly format. In Phase 2, a pilot SCP was subsequently designed, consisting of both web-based and paper-based materials tailored specifically to the needs of BCPs as well as FPs. During Phase 3 (evaluation) BCPs indicated that the SCP was effective at addressing many of their needs, and offered suggestions for future improvements. Both patients and FPs found the pilot SCP to be an improvement from the previous standard of care. Patients perceived the quality of the BCP-FP relationship as

  11. Utilization of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill in a Physical Activity Program with Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    FAIRMAN, CIARAN M.; KENDALL, KRISTINA L.; HARRIS, BRANDONN S.; CRANDALL, KENNETH J.; MCMILLAN, JIM

    2016-01-01

    Breast Cancer survivors can experience a myriad of physical and psychological benefits as a result of regular exercise. This study aimed to build on previous research using lower impact exercise programs by using an antigravity (Alter-G®) treadmill to administer cardiovascular training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness a physical activity program, including an Alter-G® treadmill, for improving physiological and psychosocial measures in female breast cancer survivors. A 14-week intervention using an AB-AB study design was employed. Six female breast cancer survivors were recruited to participate in the study. Participants attended three 60-minute sessions per week, consisting of a combination of muscular strength/endurance, and cardiovascular endurance exercises. Consistent with current literature and guidelines, exercise interventions were individualized and tailored to suit individuals. Data was collected and analyzed in 2013. Visual inspection of results found improvements in cardiovascular endurance and measures of body composition. Quality of life was maintained and in some cases, improved. Finally, no adverse effects were reported from the participants, and adherence to the program for those who completed the study was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the use of a physical activity program in combination with an Alter-G® treadmill may provide practical and meaningful improvements in measures of cardiovascular endurance and body composition. PMID:27293508

  12. Pilot study of a novel combination of two therapeutic vaccines in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Zaima Mazorra; Ramos, Tania Crombet

    2014-07-01

    Cancer vaccines contain tumor antigens in a pro-inflammatory context with the purpose to generate potent antitumor immune responses. However, tumor cells develop different immunosuppressive mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of an anticancer immune response. Therefore, therapeutic vaccine treatment alone is usually not sufficient to generate tumor regression or survival improvement, especially in the advanced disease scenario in which most clinical studies have been conducted. Combining cancer vaccines with different anticancer therapies such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other immunotherapeutic agents has had different levels of success. However, the combination of cancer vaccines with different mechanisms of action has not been explored in clinical trials. To address this issue, the current review summarizes the main clinical and immunological results obtained with two different therapeutic vaccines used in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients, inducing an immune response against epidermal growth factor (CIMAvax-EGF) and NGcGM3 ganglioside (racotumomab). We also discuss preliminary findings obtained in a trial of combination of these two vaccines and future challenges with these therapies. PMID:24777612

  13. MELBOURNE HIGH SCHOOL PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BESVINICK, SIDNEY L.; CRITTENDEN, JOHN

    TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE GRADUATES OF MELBOURNE HIGH SCHOOL, IN BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA, WERE SUFFICIENTLY DIFFERENT FROM GRADUATES OF ANOTHER HIGH SCHOOL IN THE SAME DISTRICT TO WARRANT FURTHER RESEARCH, A PILOT STUDY WAS CONDUCTED. MELBOURNE HAS RECEIVED ACCLAIM FOR ITS NONGRADED, CONTINUOUS PROGRESS, INNOVATIVE CURRICULUM AND FOR THE NUMEROUS…

  14. Rehabilitation Education: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kolk, Charles; Jaques, Marceline E.

    1972-01-01

    The presentation of undergraduate courses in rehabilitation could serve several purposes: (a) preparation for graduate level work; (b) training for support personnel; and (c) interdisciplinary education. This article describes a pilot study of a course in rehabilitation to investigate through pre- and post measures, attitude change, attainment of…

  15. Case management vocational rehabilitation for women with breast cancer after surgery: a feasibility study incorporating a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of methodologically robust vocational rehabilitation (VR) intervention trials. This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a VR trial of women with breast cancer to inform the development of a larger interventional study. Methods Women were recruited in Scotland and randomised to either a case management VR service or to usual care. Data were collected on eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates to assess trial feasibility, and interviews conducted to determine trial acceptability. Sick leave days (primary outcome) were self-reported via postal questionnaire every 4 weeks during the first 6 months post-surgery and at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were change in employment pattern, quality of life and fatigue. Results Of the 1,114 women assessed for eligibility, 163 (15%) were eligible. The main reason for ineligibility was age (>65 years, n = 637, 67%). Of those eligible, 111 (68%) received study information, of which 23 (21%) consented to participate in the study. Data for 18 (78%) women were analysed (intervention: n = 7; control: n = 11). Participants in the intervention group reported, on average, 53 fewer days of sick leave over the first 6 months post-surgery than those in the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.122; 95% confidence interval −15.8, 122.0). No statistically significant differences were found for secondary outcomes. Interviews with trial participants indicated that trial procedures, including recruitment, randomisation and research instruments, were acceptable. Conclusions Conducting a pragmatic trial of effectiveness of a VR intervention among cancer survivors is both feasible and acceptable, but more research about the exact components of a VR intervention and choice of outcomes to measure effectiveness is required. VR to assist breast cancer patients in the return to work process is an important component of cancer survivorship plans. Trial

  16. Kinesiology Taping reduces lymphedema of the upper extremity in women after breast cancer treatment: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rosseger, Agnieszka; Hanuszkiewicz, Justyna; Woźniewski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Secondary lymphedema affects approximately 40% of women treated for breast cancer and is recognized as a major problem associated with the therapy of malignant tumors. Consequently, new therapeutic methods are constantly being sought to effectively eliminate the condition. One of the new forms of edema management, especially in the initial stages of edematous development, is Kinesiology Taping (KT). Aim of the study The aim of the study was to assess the effects of KT applications on the extent of lymphedema of the upper extremity in women post cancer treatment. Material and methods The study group consisted of 28 women after axillary lymphadenectomy due to breast cancer. All the patients were diagnosed with grade I secondary lymphedema. Kinesiology Taping was applied to a total of 14 randomly selected women. The remaining 14 patients constituted a control group. The extent of lymphedema was measured using a centimeter tape and Limb Volumes Professional 5.0 software. Results A significant reduction in the extent of lymphedema (p = 0.0009) was achieved in the KT group between baseline and post-treatment assessments. No such reduction, however, was found in the control group (p = 0.36). Conclusions Kinesiology Taping applications are an effective method of early-stage edema management. Kinesiology Taping may be a safe new therapeutic option in patients who are contraindicated for the use of other methods. PMID:26327858

  17. A prospective pilot study on the incidence of post-operative lymphedema in women with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Elizabeth E.; Osborne, Janet L.; Schneider, Deborah K.; Bojar, Claudia J.; Uyar, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of lower-extremity lymphedema after surgical therapy including lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer patients using standardized leg measurements. Also, to determine additional risk factors for the development of lymphedema and to study the effect of lymphedema on one's quality of life. In this prospective cohort study, patients with the diagnosis of endometrial cancer who were to undergo definitive surgical management were evaluated pre-operatively and followed post-operatively over the course of two years. Standardized leg measurements were performed by the same individuals at six time-points. Subjects also completed a standardized quality-of-life survey at each time-point. The incidence of lymphedema in 39 women with endometrial cancer using a standardized leg measurement protocol was 12.8% with lymphedema defined as a 20% increase in post-operative leg measurements. There was no significant association between the development of lymphedema and the number of pelvic or para-aortic lymph nodes removed, medical comorbidities, or surgical approach (p > 0.05). Of the five patients who met criteria for lymphedema, only one had worsening quality-of-life concerns post-operatively on the FACT-En, version 4, survey. This is the first prospective study using standardized leg measurements to calculate the incidence of post-operative lymphedema in endometrial cancer. Medical comorbidities, surgical approach, number of lymph nodes removed, and location of lymph nodes removed did not appear to affect the development of lymphedema in this cohort. A prospective, multicenter trial is needed to confirm these findings and to further assess the impact of lymphedema on one's quality of life. PMID:26937484

  18. A prospective pilot study on the incidence of post-operative lymphedema in women with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Elizabeth E; Osborne, Janet L; Schneider, Deborah K; Bojar, Claudia J; Uyar, Denise S

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of lower-extremity lymphedema after surgical therapy including lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer patients using standardized leg measurements. Also, to determine additional risk factors for the development of lymphedema and to study the effect of lymphedema on one's quality of life. In this prospective cohort study, patients with the diagnosis of endometrial cancer who were to undergo definitive surgical management were evaluated pre-operatively and followed post-operatively over the course of two years. Standardized leg measurements were performed by the same individuals at six time-points. Subjects also completed a standardized quality-of-life survey at each time-point. The incidence of lymphedema in 39 women with endometrial cancer using a standardized leg measurement protocol was 12.8% with lymphedema defined as a 20% increase in post-operative leg measurements. There was no significant association between the development of lymphedema and the number of pelvic or para-aortic lymph nodes removed, medical comorbidities, or surgical approach (p > 0.05). Of the five patients who met criteria for lymphedema, only one had worsening quality-of-life concerns post-operatively on the FACT-En, version 4, survey. This is the first prospective study using standardized leg measurements to calculate the incidence of post-operative lymphedema in endometrial cancer. Medical comorbidities, surgical approach, number of lymph nodes removed, and location of lymph nodes removed did not appear to affect the development of lymphedema in this cohort. A prospective, multicenter trial is needed to confirm these findings and to further assess the impact of lymphedema on one's quality of life. PMID:26937484

  19. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
. PMID:25806886

  20. Massage therapy alone and in combination with meditation for breast cancer patients undergoing autologous tissue reconstruction: A randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dion, Liza J; Engen, Deborah J; Lemaine, Valerie; Lawson, Donna K; Brock, Charise G; Thomley, Barbara S; Cha, Stephen S; Sood, Amit; Bauer, Brent A; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L

    2016-05-01

    This study explored whether massage combined with meditation is more helpful than massage alone for women recovering from autologous tissue reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Forty patients were randomly assigned to either massage therapy or massage plus meditation on postoperative days 1 through 3. Outcome measures were 1) visual analog scale (VAS) scores for stress, anxiety, relaxation, insomnia, alertness, fatigue, tension, pain, mood, and energy, and 2) Perceived Stress Scale-14 scores. Nineteen patients in each group finished the study. Preintervention and postintervention mean total VAS scores improved significantly in both groups (P < .001), but no significant difference occurred between groups. PMID:25986296

  1. Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations in epithelial ovarian cancer in Indian population: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Rajaram, Shalini; Sharma, Tusha; Goel, Neerja; Agarwal, Sarla; Banerjee, Basu Dev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer as most patients have non-specific symptoms and usually present in advanced stage of the disease. It occurs due to certain genetic alterations and mutations namely founder mutations, 187delAG and 5385insC in BRCA1 and 6174delT in BRCA2 which are associated with specific family histories. These highly penetrant susceptibility genes responsible for approximately half of families containing 2 or more ovarian cancer cases account for less than 40% of the familial excess malignancy risk. The remaining risk may be due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which are single base change in a DNA sequence with usual alternatives of two possible nucleotides at a given position. Preliminary study involving 30 women with histologically proven epithelial ovarian cancer was conducted and their detailed genetic analysis was carried out. Regions of founder mutations on BRCA1 and BRCA2 were amplified and sequenced using primers designed based on 200 bp upstream and downstream regions of the mutation sites. Five sequence variants in BRCA1 were identified of which three novel sequence variants were found in 23 patients while in BRCA2, one novel sequence variant was found. The three founder mutations 187delAG, 5385insC in BRCA1 and 6174delT in BRCA2 were not seen in any of the subjects. PMID:24955283

  2. A pilot study to investigate if New Zealand men with prostate cancer benefit from a Mediterranean-style diet

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Karen S.; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Han, Dug Yeo; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and the third leading cause of mortality in New Zealand men, making it a significant health issue in this country. Global distribution patterns suggest that diet and lifestyle factors may be linked to the development and progression of this cancer. Twenty men with diagnosed prostate cancer adhered to a Mediterranean diet, with specific adaptations, for three months. Prostate-specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were evaluated at baseline and after three months of following the diet. Dietary data were collated from diet diaries and an adaptation of a validated Mediterranean diet questionnaire. A significant reduction in DNA damage compared to baseline was apparent, with particular benefit noted for overall adherence to the diet (p = 0.013), increased intake of folate (p = 0.023), vitamin C (p = 0.007), legumes (p = 0.004) and green tea (p = 0.002). Higher intakes of red meat and dairy products were inversely associated with DNA damage (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008 respectively). The results from this small feasibility study suggest that a high-antioxidant diet, modelled on Mediterranean traditions, may be of benefit for men with prostate cancer. Protection against DNA damage appears to be associated with the diet implemented, ostensibly due to reduction in reactive oxidant species. These findings warrant further exploration in a longer trial, with a larger cohort. PMID:26157638

  3. Serum Oxidative Stress Markers and Genotoxic Profile Induced by Chemotherapy in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Antonio Luiz Gomes; Paz, Marcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; da Silva, Laís Iasmin Soares; Carvalho, Simone da Costa e Silva; Sobral, André Luiz Pinho; Machado, Kátia da Conceição; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Satyal, Prabodh; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho Melo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative parameters of erythrocytes and genotoxicity in leukocytes of patients with breast cancer. Oxidative parameters were detected by spectrophotometry and genotoxic damage by single cell gel electrophoresis. Twenty-eight women with breast cancer were monitored before chemotherapy and after the second and fourth cycles of therapy with cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin. After the fourth cycle, increases (P < 0.05) in the reactive substances to thiobarbituric acid levels, nitrite content, and superoxide dismutase activity and high rates of DNA damage in leukocytes were observed when compared with healthy women group and baseline levels. Similarly, after the second cycle, the same parameters were increased (P < 0.05) when compared with baseline levels. Increase in catalase activity was detected only after the fourth cycle and reduced glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase activity were decreased in all cycles when compared with healthy women, as well as after the second and fourth chemotherapy cycles compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Patients with breast cancer presented an indicative of oxidative stress before, during, and after chemotherapy, as well as increased genotoxic damage in all stages of treatment, demonstrating the clinical applicability of this investigation. PMID:26576218

  4. Serum Oxidative Stress Markers and Genotoxic Profile Induced by Chemotherapy in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Paz, Marcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; da Silva, Laís Iasmin Soares; Carvalho, Simone da Costa e Silva; Sobral, André Luiz Pinho; Machado, Kátia da Conceição; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro; Satyal, Prabodh; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho Melo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidative parameters of erythrocytes and genotoxicity in leukocytes of patients with breast cancer. Oxidative parameters were detected by spectrophotometry and genotoxic damage by single cell gel electrophoresis. Twenty-eight women with breast cancer were monitored before chemotherapy and after the second and fourth cycles of therapy with cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin. After the fourth cycle, increases (P < 0.05) in the reactive substances to thiobarbituric acid levels, nitrite content, and superoxide dismutase activity and high rates of DNA damage in leukocytes were observed when compared with healthy women group and baseline levels. Similarly, after the second cycle, the same parameters were increased (P < 0.05) when compared with baseline levels. Increase in catalase activity was detected only after the fourth cycle and reduced glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase activity were decreased in all cycles when compared with healthy women, as well as after the second and fourth chemotherapy cycles compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Patients with breast cancer presented an indicative of oxidative stress before, during, and after chemotherapy, as well as increased genotoxic damage in all stages of treatment, demonstrating the clinical applicability of this investigation. PMID:26576218

  5. The effect of laughter therapy on radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer: a single-blind prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Shin, Sung Hee; Lee, Eunmi; Yun, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Background There have not yet been any published studies on the effects of laughter therapy on radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). We assessed the effectiveness of laughter therapy in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. Methods Thirty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Eighteen patients were assigned to the experimental group and the other 19 patients were assigned to the control group. The patients who were assigned to the experimental group received laughter therapy during RT. Laughter therapy was started at the onset of RT and was provided twice a week until completion of RT. The patients who were assigned to the control group only received RT without laughter therapy. The grade of radiation dermatitis was scored by a radiation oncologist who was blinded to subject assignment. The patients’ evaluation of pain within the RT field was also assessed. Results In the experimental group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, and 1 developed in five (33.3%), five (33.3%), and five patients (33.3%), respectively. In comparison, in the control group, radiation dermatitis of grade 3, 2, 1, and 0 developed in seven (36.8%), nine (47.4%), two (10.5%), and one patient (5.3%), respectively. The experimental group exhibited a lower incidence of grade 2 or worse radiation dermatitis than the control group (33.3% versus 47.4%). The mean maximal pain scores in the experimental and control group were 2.53 and 3.95, respectively. The experimental group complained of less severe pain than the control group during RT. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study show that laughter therapy can have a beneficial role in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large sample sizes are required. PMID:25395864

  6. Is referral of postsurgical colorectal cancer survivors to cardiac rehabilitation feasible and acceptable? A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Gill; Adams, Richard; Campbell, Anna; Kidd, Lisa; Leslie, Stephen J; Munro, Julie; Watson, Angus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) Assess whether cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a feasible and acceptable model of rehabilitation for postsurgical colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, (2) evaluate trial procedures. This article reports the results of the first objective. Design and setting A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study was conducted in 3 UK hospitals with CR facilities. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise trial parameters indicative of intervention feasibility and acceptability. Interviews and focus groups were conducted and data analysed thematically. Participants People with CRC were considered for inclusion in the trial if they were ≥18 years old, diagnosed with primary CRC and in the recovery period postsurgery (they could still be receiving adjuvant therapy). 31% (n=41) of all eligible CRC survivors consented to participate in the trial. 22 of these CRC survivors, and 8 people with cardiovascular disease (CVD), 5 CRC nurses and 6 CR clinicians participated in the qualitative study. Intervention Referral of postsurgical CRC survivors to weekly CR exercise classes and information sessions. Classes included CRC survivors and people with CVD. CR nurses and physiotherapists were given training about cancer and exercise. Results Barriers to CR were protracted recoveries from surgery, ongoing treatments and poor mobility. No adverse events were reported during the trial, suggesting that CR is safe. 62% of participants completed the intervention as per protocol and had high levels of attendance. 20 health professionals attended the cancer and exercise training course, rating it as excellent. Participants perceived that CR increased CRC survivors’ confidence and motivation to exercise, and offered peer support. CR professionals were concerned about CR capacity to accommodate cancer survivors and their ability to provide psychosocial support to this group of patients. Conclusions CR is feasible and acceptable for postsurgical

  7. Mature autologous dendritic cell vaccines in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a phase I pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall therapeutic outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poor. The dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has been developed as a new strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and immunologic responses in use in mature, antigen-pulsed autologous DC vaccine in NSCLC patients. Methods Five HLA-A2 patients with inoperable stage III or IV NSCLC were selected to receive two doses of 5 × 107 DC cells administered subcutaneous and intravenously two times at two week intervals. The immunologic response, safety and tolerability to the vaccine were evaluated by the lymphoproliferation assay and clinical and laboratorial evolution, respectively. Results The dose of the vaccine has shown to be safe and well tolerated. The lymphoproliferation assay showed an improvement in the specific immune response after the immunization, with a significant response after the second dose (p = 0.005). This response was not long lasting and a tendency to reduction two weeks after the second dose of the vaccine was observed. Two patients had a survival almost twice greater than the expected average and were the only ones that expressed HER-2 and CEA together. Conclusion Despite the small sample size, the results on the immune response, safety and tolerability, combined with the results of other studies, are encouraging to the conduction of a large clinical trial with multiples doses in patients with early lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN45563569 PMID:21682877

  8. A pilot, quasi-experimental, mixed methods investigation into the efficacy of a group psychotherapy intervention for caregivers of outpatients with cancer: the COPE study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Rathi; Tan, Joyce Yi Siang; Griva, Konstadina; Lim, Haikel Asyraf; Ng, Hui Ying; Chua, Joanne; Lim, Siew Eng; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the rising trend of cancer prevalence and increase in family caregiving, little attention has been paid to the efficacy of psychosocial interventions among Asian caregiver samples, particularly support groups, given the benefits that have been shown in studies on Western populations. This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot 4-week group psychotherapy for Singaporean family caregivers of patients receiving outpatient care. Methods and analysis Facilitated by a clinical psychologist, this intervention is primarily based on the brief integrative psychological therapy with a supportive-expressive intent. Participants will be recruited while they are accompanying their care recipients for outpatient consultations. Since this is a pilot study, a sample size of 120 participants is targeted on the basis of sample sizes of previous studies. The study adopts a quasi-experimental design, as participants are assigned the intervention or control arms based on their availability to attend the intervention. A mixed methods approach is used to evaluate the outcomes of the intervention. A self-administered battery of tests is completed at four time points: baseline, postintervention and follow-up at 1-month and 2-month postinterventions; semi-structured interviews are conducted at baseline and post-intervention. Primary outcomes are quality of life and anxious and depressive symptoms; secondary outcomes are stress and basic psychological needs. Analysis using analysis of covariance would be conducted to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study protocol has ethics approval from the National Healthcare Group Domain Specific Review Board (NHG DSRB Ref: 2013/00662). Written informed consent is obtained from every participant. Results will be disseminated through journals and conferences, and will be particularly relevant for clinicians intending to implement similar support groups to address the

  9. Exploring the feasibility and acceptability of couple-based psychosexual support following prostate cancer surgery: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who undergo surgery for prostate cancer frequently experience significant side-effects including urinary and sexual dysfunction. These difficulties can lead to anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life. Many partners also experience psychological distress. An additional impact can be on the couple relationship, with changes to intimacy, and unmet psychosexual supportive needs in relation to sexual recovery and rehabilitation. The aim of this exploratory randomised controlled trial pilot study is to determine the feasibility and acceptability of a novel family-relational-psychosexual intervention to support intimacy and reduce distress among couples following prostate cancer surgery and to estimate the efficacy of this intervention. Methods/Design The intervention will comprise six sessions of psychosexual and relationship support delivered by experienced couple-support practitioners. Specialist training in delivering the intervention will be provided to practitioners and they will be guided by a detailed treatment manual based on systemic principles. Sixty-eight couples will be randomised to receive either the intervention or standard care (comprising usual follow-up hospital appointments). A pre-test, post-test design will be used to test the feasibility of the intervention (baseline, end of intervention and six-month follow-up) and its acceptability to couples and healthcare professionals (qualitative interviews). Both individual and relational outcome measures will assess sexual functioning, anxiety and depression, couple relationship, use of health services and erectile dysfunction medication/technologies. An economic analysis will estimate population costs of the intervention, compared to usual care, using simple modelling to evaluate the affordability of the intervention. Discussion Given the increasing incidence and survival of post-operative men with prostate cancer, it is timely and appropriate to determine the feasibility of a

  10. Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlan David, Shannon; Salzillo, Sandra; Bowe, Patrick; Scuncio, Sandra; Malit, Bridget; Raker, Christina; Gass, Jennifer S; Granai, C O; Dizon, Don S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial comparing a drug with a complementary or alternative method (CAM). Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting Breast health centre of a tertiary care centre. Participants 15 women with a personal history of breast cancer or an increased risk of breast cancer who reported at least one daily hot flash. Interventions Gabapentin 900 mg daily in three divided doses (control) compared with standardised hypnotherapy. Participation lasted 8 weeks. Outcome measures The primary endpoints were the number of daily hot flashes and hot flash severity score (HFSS). The secondary endpoint was the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS). Results 27 women were randomised and 15 (56%) were considered evaluable for the primary endpoint (n=8 gabapentin, n=7 hypnotherapy). The median number of daily hot flashes at enrolment was 4.5 in the gabapentin arm and 5 in the hypnotherapy arm. HFSS scores were 7.5 in the gabapentin arm and 10 in the hypnotherapy arm. After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm. The median HFSS was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 85% in the hypnotherapy arm. HFRDIS scores improved by 51.6% in the gabapentin group and by 55.2% in the hypnotherapy group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Hypnotherapy and gabapentin demonstrate efficacy in improving hot flashes. A definitive trial evaluating traditional interventions against CAM methods is feasible, but not without challenges. Further studies aimed at defining evidence-based recommendations for CAM are necessary. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00711529). PMID:24022390

  11. A pilot study using the Chinese herbal paste Liu-He-Dan to manage radiodermatitis associated with breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J.; Fang, L.; Xie, H.; Yao, W.X.; Zhou, X.; Xiong, Z.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background During radiotherapy for breast cancer, patients are greatly affected by pain, infection, and delayed healing of wounds caused by radiodermatitis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the efficacy of Liu-He-Dan in treating radiodermatitis. Methods In 26 breast cancer patients who experienced moist decrustation while receiving radiotherapy, 5 g Liu-He-Dan was applied externally once daily after the wound surface had been cleaned and dried. The healing time was recorded, and a Kaplan–Meier survival curve was applied to analyze the treatment course. Meanwhile, a pain assessment using the Numeric Rating Scale (nrs) recorded the pain level experienced by patients after application of the Liu-He-Dan. Results After application of Liu-He-Dan, the average healing time for the surface of the moist decrustation wounds was 14.17 ± 2.03 days (range: 5–22 days). Inflammatory seepage decreased significantly and exudation almost disappeared in 3 days. The pain trend line indicated that the average nrs score declined with treatment in all patients. The average nrs scores at days 1, 4, and 7 were 6.13, 3.62, and 2.58 respectively. After 3 days of treatment, pain was remarkably alleviated in 80.76% of patients. After treatment for 1 week, the pain remission rate was 96.15%, without any obvious adverse reactions. Conclusions Liu-He-Dan was efficacious in treating radiation skin injury with little toxicity and few side effects; the economic efficiency of the treatment was also favourable. The Liu-He-Dan was generally well tolerated by patients. In future, randomized control trials will be established for further observation of the value of Liu-He-Dan in treating radiodermatitis in breast cancer. PMID:26715882

  12. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, A.; Moses, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station (ISS) and other space vehicles Caution & Warning (C&W) alerts are represented with various auditory tones that correspond to the type of event. This system relies on the crew's ability to remember what each tone represents in a high stress, high workload environment when responding to the alert. Furthermore, crew receive a year or more in advance of the mission that makes remembering the semantic meaning of the alerts more difficult. The current system works for missions conducted close to Earth where ground operators can assist as needed. On long duration missions, however, they will need to work off-nominal events autonomously. There is evidence that speech alarms may be easier and faster to recognize, especially during an off-nominal event. The Information Presentation Directed Research Project (FY07-FY09) funded by the Human Research Program included several studies investigating C&W alerts. The studies evaluated tone alerts currently in use with NASA flight deck displays along with candidate speech alerts. A follow-on study used four types of speech alerts to investigate how quickly various types of auditory alerts with and without a speech component - either at the beginning or at the end of the tone - can be identified. Even though crew were familiar with the tone alert from training or direct mission experience, alerts starting with a speech component were identified faster than alerts starting with a tone. The current study replicated the results from the previous study in a more rigorous experimental design to determine if the candidate speech alarms are ready for transition to operations or if more research is needed. Four types of alarms (caution, warning, fire, and depressurization) were presented to participants in both tone and speech formats in laboratory settings and later in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA). In the laboratory study, the alerts were presented by software and participants were

  13. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  14. A quantitative and qualitative pilot study of the perceived benefits of autogenic training for a group of people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Wright, S; Courtney, U; Crowther, D

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the application of autogenic training (AT), a technique of deep relaxation and self-hypnosis, in patients diagnosed with cancer,with the aim of increasing their coping ability, and reports the results of a questionnaire survey performed before and after an AT course. A reduction in arousal and anxiety can help individuals to perceive their environment as less hostile and threatening, with implications for improved perceived coping ability. Complementary therapies are considered useful in enhancing symptom relief, overall well-being and self-help when used as adjuvant therapies to allopathic medical interventions. The present study aimed to validate, in an Irish context, the effectiveness of AT as a complementary therapy for patients with cancer. Each participant completed a Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Profile of Mood States questionnaire before and after a 10-week AT course. The results indicated a significant reduction in anxiety and increase in 'fighting spirit' after compared with before training, with an improved sense of coping and improved sleep being apparent benefits of AT practice. PMID:12099948

  15. Gut microbial dysbiosis may predict diarrhea and fatigue in patients undergoing pelvic cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Ling, Zongxin; Yang, Zhixiang; Kiela, Pawel R; Wang, Tao; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Le; Geng, Fang; Shen, Mingqiang; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and diarrhea are the most frequent adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy, while their etiologies are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlations between fatigue, diarrhea, and alterations in gut microbiota induced by pelvic radiotherapy. During the 5-week treatment of pelvic radiotherapy in 11 cancer patients, the general fatigue score significantly increased and was more prominent in the patients with diarrhea. The fatigue score was closely correlated with the decrease of serum citrulline (an indicator of the functional enterocyte mass) and the increases of systemic inflammatory proteins, including haptoglobin, orosomuoid, α1-antitrypsin and TNF-α. Serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also elevated, especially in the patients with diarrhea indicating epithelial barrier breach and endotoxemia. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that microbial diversity, richness, and the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio were significantly altered prior to radiotherapy in patients who later developed diarrhea. Pelvic radiotherapy induced further changes in fecal microbial ecology, some of which were specific to the patients with or without diarrhea. Our results indicate that gut microbial dysbiosis prior to radiation therapy may be exploited to predict development of diarrhea and to guide preventive treatment options. Radiation-induced dysbiosis may contribute to pelvic radiation disease, including mucositis, diarrhea, systemic inflammatory response, and pelvic radiotherapy-associated fatigue in cancer patients. PMID:25955845

  16. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. OBJECTIVES The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. DESIGN Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. SETTING Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. INTERVENTIONS Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. RESULTS During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the

  17. Effects of qigong training on health-related quality of life, functioning, and cancer-related symptoms in survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Luk, W S; Chung, Louisa M Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Chung, Joanne W Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of Qigong intervention on quality of life (QOL), health-related functioning, and cancer-related symptoms in survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Twenty-five survivors of NPC were included in the experimental group (mean age ± SD: 55.4 ± 7.5 years) and 27 in the control group (mean age ± SD: 58.7 ± 9.5 years). The experimental group underwent a weekly 1.5-hour Qigong training program and an identical home program (three times/week) for six months. The control group received no training. Global health status/QOL, functioning, and cancer-related symptoms were assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires before training began, after three months of Qigong training, at the end of the six-month Qigong intervention (i.e., posttest), and six months posttest. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no statistically (P > 0.05) or clinically significant improvement in global health status/QOL, functioning, or symptoms in either group. The experimental group had 45.8% fewer sense-related (smell and taste) problems (P < 0.05) but 98.6% more speech-related problems (P < 0.05) than the control group after the Qigong intervention. Qigong training resulted in no apparent improvement in health-related QOL, functionality, or cancer-related symptoms in cancer-free survivors of NPC, except for a possible reduction in smell- and taste-related problems. PMID:24971148

  18. A Prospective Pilot Study of 89Zr-J591/Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Green, David A.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lyashchenko, Serge; Fareedy, Shoaib B.; Robinson, Brian D.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Jain, Manu; Lewis, Jason S.; Christos, Paul; Larson, Steven M.; Bander, Neil H.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this pilot study we explored the feasibility of 89Zr labeled J591 monoclonal antibody positron emission tomography of localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Before scheduled radical prostatectomy 11 patients were injected intravenously with 89Zr-J591, followed 6 days later by whole body positron emission tomography. Patients underwent surgery the day after imaging. Specimens were imaged by ex vivo micro positron emission tomography and a custom 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner coil. Positron emission tomography images and histopathology were correlated. Results Median patient age was 61 years (range 47 to 68), median prostate specific antigen was 5.2 ng/ml (range 3.5 to 12.0) and median biopsy Gleason score of the 11 index lesions was 7 (range 7 to 9). On histopathology 22 lesions were identified. Median lesion size was 5.5 mm (range 2 to 21) and median Gleason score after radical prostatectomy was 7 (range 6 to 9). Eight of 11 index lesions (72.7%) were identified by in vivo positron emission tomography. Lesion identification improved with increasing lesion size for in vivo and ex vivo positron emission tomography (each p <0.0001), and increasing Gleason score (p = 0.14 and 0.01, respectively). Standardized uptake values appeared to correlate with increased Gleason score but not significantly (p = 0.19). Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first report of 89Zr-J591/prostate specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography in localized prostate cancer cases. In this setting 89Zr-J591 bound to tumor foci in situ and positron emission tomography identified primarily Gleason score 7 or greater and larger tumors, likely corresponding to clinically significant disease warranting definitive therapy. A future, larger clinical validation trial is planned to better define the usefulness of 89Zr-J591 positron emission tomography for localized prostate cancer. PMID:24135437

  19. Secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and a novel statistical bioinformatic approach identifies a cancer-related profile in exhaled breath of breast cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Landoni, Elena; Miceli, Rosalba; Dibari, Vincenza F; Dugo, Matteo; Agresti, Roberto; Tagliabue, Elda; Cristoni, Simone; Orlandi, Rosaria

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis represents a new frontier in medical diagnosis and a powerful tool for cancer biomarker discovery due to the recent development of analytical platforms for the detection and identification of human exhaled volatile compounds. Statistical and bioinformatic tools may represent an effective complement to the technical and instrumental enhancements needed to fully exploit clinical applications of breath analysis. Our exploratory study in a cohort of 14 breast cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers used secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) to detect a cancer-related volatile profile. SESI-MS full-scan spectra were acquired in a range of 40-350 mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), converted to matrix data and analyzed using a procedure integrating data pre-processing for quality control, and a two-step class prediction based on machine-learning techniques, including a robust feature selection, and a classifier development with internal validation. MS spectra from exhaled breath showed an individual-specific breath profile and high reciprocal homogeneity among samples, with strong agreement among technical replicates, suggesting a robust responsiveness of SESI-MS. Supervised analysis of breath data identified a support vector machine (SVM) model including 8 features corresponding to m/z 106, 126, 147, 78, 148, 52, 128, 315 and able to discriminate exhaled breath from breast cancer patients from that of healthy individuals, with sensitivity and specificity above 0.9.Our data highlight the significance of SESI-MS as an analytical technique for clinical studies of breath analysis and provide evidence that our noninvasive strategy detects volatile signatures that may support existing technologies to diagnose breast cancer. PMID:26390050

  20. Assessing Heavy Metal and PCB Exposure from Tap Water by Measuring Levels in Plasma from Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients, a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zimeri, Anne Marie; Robb, Sara Wagner; Hassan, Sayed M.; Hire, Rupali R.; Davis, Melissa B.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BrCA) is the most common cancer affecting women around the world. However, it does not arise from the same causative agent among all women. Genetic markers have been associated with heritable or familial breast cancers, which may or may not be confounded by environmental factors, whereas sporadic breast cancer cases are more likely attributable to environmental exposures. Approximately 85% of women diagnosed with BrCA have no family history of the disease. Given this overwhelming bias, more plausible etiologic mechanisms should be investigated to accurately assess a woman’s risk of acquiring breast cancer. It is known that breast cancer risk is highly influenced by exogenous environmental cues altering cancer genes either by genotoxic mechanisms (DNA mutations) or otherwise. Risk assessment should comprehensively incorporate exposures to exogenous factors that are linked to a woman’s individual susceptibility. However, the exact role that some environmental agents (EA) play in tumor formation and/or cancer gene regulation is unclear. In this pilot project, we begin a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the intersection of environmental exposures, cancer gene response, and BrCA risk. Here, we present data that show environmental exposure to heavy metals and PCBs in drinking water, heavy metal presence in plasma of nine patients with sporadic BrCA, and Toxic Release Inventory and geological data for a metal of concern, uranium, in Northeast Georgia. PMID:26690196

  1. Assessing Heavy Metal and PCB Exposure from Tap Water by Measuring Levels in Plasma from Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients, a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Zimeri, Anne Marie; Robb, Sara Wagner; Hassan, Sayed M; Hire, Rupali R; Davis, Melissa B

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer (BrCA) is the most common cancer affecting women around the world. However, it does not arise from the same causative agent among all women. Genetic markers have been associated with heritable or familial breast cancers, which may or may not be confounded by environmental factors, whereas sporadic breast cancer cases are more likely attributable to environmental exposures. Approximately 85% of women diagnosed with BrCA have no family history of the disease. Given this overwhelming bias, more plausible etiologic mechanisms should be investigated to accurately assess a woman's risk of acquiring breast cancer. It is known that breast cancer risk is highly influenced by exogenous environmental cues altering cancer genes either by genotoxic mechanisms (DNA mutations) or otherwise. Risk assessment should comprehensively incorporate exposures to exogenous factors that are linked to a woman's individual susceptibility. However, the exact role that some environmental agents (EA) play in tumor formation and/or cancer gene regulation is unclear. In this pilot project, we begin a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the intersection of environmental exposures, cancer gene response, and BrCA risk. Here, we present data that show environmental exposure to heavy metals and PCBs in drinking water, heavy metal presence in plasma of nine patients with sporadic BrCA, and Toxic Release Inventory and geological data for a metal of concern, uranium, in Northeast Georgia. PMID:26690196

  2. Carbon nanotube assisted photothermal therapy of skin cancers: pilot proof-of-principle study in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Naiyan; Wang, Hequn; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Korbelik, Mladen; Zeng, Haishan

    2010-02-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are a new type of nanomaterial with strong optical absorption. SWNTs also have intense Raman signals that facilitate convenient monitoring of their location within tissue thereby enabling noninvasive pharmacokinetic study. We hypothesize that SWNTs can absorb 785-nm laser light and generate significant local hyperthermia to destroy cancer cells and eradicate tumors. In this study a 785-nm diode laser is used for both Raman excitation and photothermal therapy. SWNTs are made water-soluble by functionalizing with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and administrated by intratumoral injection. C3H/HeN mice were injected subcutaneously with 2 million mouse squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) cells to create the tumor model. We conducted experiments with 100 mice divided into 10 different groups: control, SWNT only, 100 mW/cm2 laser irradiation only, 200 mW/cm2 laser irradiation only, and 6 treatment groups with different drug and light dose combinations (SWNTs 0.1, 0.5. 1 mg/ml, laser 100 and 200 mW/cm2). The treatment time was 10 minutes. The temperatures of the tumors irradiated by laser were monitored by an IR thermometer. Mice survival was observed for 45 days. The study revealed that the temperature within the tumors increased in a light- and drug-dose dependent manner. The optimized light and drug dose combinations (1 mg/ml + 120 J/cm2) resulted in tumor temperature elevation of 18.5°C and successful eradication of the tumors. This light dose is moderate and is as low as 1/10 of other published studies using nanomaterials. The Raman spectroscopy measurements suggest that SWNTs persisted within the tumor tissue for months.

  3. PROSPECTIV—a pilot trial of a nurse-led psychoeducational intervention delivered in primary care to prostate cancer survivors: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Eila; Rose, Peter; Frith, Emma; Hamdy, Freddie; Neal, David; Kastner, Christof; Russell, Simon; Walter, Fiona M; Faithfull, Sara; Wolstenholme, Jane; Perera, Rafael; Weller, David; Campbell, Christine; Wilkinson, Clare; Neal, Richard; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Butcher, Hugh; Matthews, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer survivors can experience physical, sexual, psychological and emotional problems, and there is evidence that current follow-up practices fail to meet these men's needs. Studies show that secondary and primary care physicians see a greater role for primary care in delivering follow-up, and that primary care-led follow-up is acceptable to men with prostate cancer. Methods and analysis A two-phase study with target population being men who are 9–24 months from diagnosis. Phase 1 questionnaire aims to recruit 300 men and measure prostate-related quality of life and unmet needs. Men experiencing problems with urinary, bowel, sexual or hormonal function will be eligible for phase 2, a pilot trial of a primary care nurse-led psychoeducational intervention. Consenting eligible participants will be randomised either to intervention plus usual care, or usual care alone (40 men in each arm). The intervention, based on a self-management approach, underpinned by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, will provide advice and support tailored to these men's needs and address any problems they are experiencing. Telephone follow-up will take place at 6 months. Study outcomes will be measured by a questionnaire at 7 months. Phase 1 will allow us to estimate the prevalence of urinary, sexual, bowel and hormone-related problems in prostate cancer survivors and the level of unmet needs. ‘Usual care’ will also be documented. Phase 2 will provide information on recruitment and retention, acceptability of the intervention/outcome measures, effect sizes of the intervention and cost-effectiveness data, which is required to inform development of a larger, phase 3 randomised controlled trial. The main outcome of interest is change in prostate-cancer-related quality of life. Methodological issues will also be addressed. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been gained (Oxford REC A 12/SC/0500). Findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals

  4. A Multicenter Pilot Study Examining the Role of Circulating Tumor Cells as a Blood-Based Tumor Marker in Patients with Extensive Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao H.; Wick, Jo A.; Sittampalam, Gurusingham Sitta; Nirmalanandhan, Victor Sanjit; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Neupane, Prakash C.; Williamson, Stephen K.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmitt, Sarah; Smart, Nora J.; Spencer, Sarah; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), a variant of lung cancer marked by early metastases, accounts for 13% of all lung cancers diagnosed in US. Despite high response rates to treatment, it is an aggressive disease with a median survival of 9–11 months for patients with extensive stage (EX-SCLC). Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a novel laboratory technique currently in use to determine response to therapy and to predict prognosis in breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We initiated a pilot study to analyze the role of CTCs as a biomarker of response and relapse in patients with EX-SCLC. Methods: We collected blood samples from chemotherapy naïve patients with EX-SCLC prior to initiation of therapy, after completion of systemic therapy, and follow-up every 6–8 weeks and at relapse. The number of CTCs was determined using the cell search system in a central laboratory. The study was conducted in four different sites, and it was reviewed and approved by respective research review committees and IRBs. Results: We enrolled 26 patients with EX-SCLC, 1 was excluded due to ineligibility, all were treated with platinum and etoposide. We observed partial response in 16 patients, stable disease in 3 patients, 1 patient with disease progression, and 6 patients were not assessed (5 deceased, 1 not available). The overall median number of CTCs in 24 patients measured at baseline and post-tx was 75 (range 0–3430) and 2 (range 0–526), respectively. A significant reduction in CTCs from baseline to post-treatment was identified for 15 subjects; the median reduction was 97.4% (range −100 to +100%, p < 0.001). Higher baseline CTCs and percentage change in post-treatment CTCs were associated with decreased survival. Conclusion: We demonstrated that it is feasible to detect CTCs in EX-SCLC. If validated in other prospective studies, CTCs could be a useful biomarker in the management of EX-SCLC by predicting patients’ clinical responses to

  5. ColonCancerCheck Primary Care Invitation Pilot project

    PubMed Central

    Tinmouth, Jill; Ritvo, Paul; McGregor, S. Elizabeth; Patel, Jigisha; Guglietti, Crissa; Levitt, Cheryl A.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Rabeneck, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the perceptions of those who received invitations to the ColonCancerCheck Primary Care Invitation Pilot (the Pilot) about the mailed invitation, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in general, and their specific screening experiences. Design Qualitative study with 6 focus group sessions, each 1.5 hours in length. Setting Hamilton, Ont; Ottawa, Ont; and Thunder Bay, Ont. Participants Screening-eligible adults, aged 50 years and older, who received a Pilot invitation for CRC screening. Methods The focus groups were conducted by a trained moderator and were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analyzed using grounded-theory techniques facilitated by the use of electronic software. Main findings Key themes related to the invitation letter, the role of the family physician, direct mailing of the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) kit, and alternate CRC screening promotion strategies were identified. Specifically, participants suggested the letter content should use stronger, more powerful language to capture the reader’s attention. The importance of the family physician was endorsed, although participants favoured clarification of the physician and program roles in the actual mailed invitation. Participants expressed support for directly mailing FOBT kits to individuals, particularly those with successful previous test completion, and for communication of both negative and positive screening results. Conclusion This study yielded a number of important findings including strategies to optimize letter content, support for directly mailed FOBT kits, and strategies to report results that might be highly relevant to other health programs where population-based CRC screening is being considered. PMID:24336559

  6. Bacterial profile and bone healing in rats receiving cancer therapeutic doses of bisphosphonates and corticosteroids: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Z; do Nascimento, C; El-Hakim, M; Henderson, J E; de Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2016-09-01

    The microbial aetiology of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) remains undefined. This study investigated the oral microbiota and socket healing after zoledronic acid (ZA) and dexamethasone (DX) administration. Fourteen rats assigned randomly to experimental (n=8) and control (n=6) groups were injected with ZA+DX or saline, respectively, for 3 weeks prior to and 9 weeks after the extraction of left first upper and lower molars. Whole genomic DNA probes of 38 bacterial species and five Candida species were hybridized to DNA extracted from biofilm samples on exposed bone and adjacent teeth. Only experimental rats exhibited exposed bone at euthanasia. All BRONJ-like lesions were colonized by Staphylococcus pasteuri, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Streptococcus mitis. A significant correlation was observed between the mean proportions of species colonizing BRONJ-like lesions and the teeth of experimental rats (r=0.818, P<0.001). Significant differences were seen in several species colonizing the teeth of control rats compared to experimental rats (P<0.05). Micro-computed tomography analyses revealed higher residual bone in mandibular (P=0.001) and maxillary (P=0.108) tooth sockets of experimental rats. BRONJ-like lesions were colonized mainly by non-pathogenic bacteria. ZA+DX administered to rats at doses equivalent to those given to cancer patients resulted in changes to the oral biofilm and impaired bone healing following tooth extraction. PMID:26780925

  7. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with pancreatic cancer: A pilot study in a North China Population

    PubMed Central

    LI, LEI; WU, BO; YANG, LIBO; YIN, GUANCHENG; WEI, WEI; SUI, SHUJING; LIU, JIYONG

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC). We investigated the association of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the VDR gene with PC in age- and gender-matched patients and controls. PC (n=91) and healthy control (n=80) samples were genotyped for the FokI (rs2228570) and BsmI (rs1544410) polymorphisms using the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Chi-square analysis was used to test for the overall association of VDR genotype with disease. There was a significant difference in the frequency of genotype FF between the PC patients and controls (Ptrend=0.009); however, the difference in frequency of genotype BB between the two groups was not significant (Ptrend=0.082). The difference between FF and Ff/ff frequency was significant (P=0.002). The two high-risk genotypes were ffbb and Ffbb, with an 11.66- and 6.42-fold increased risk of PC, respectively. VDR gene polymorphisms were important for the development of PC in this study population; however, further exploration of these findings and their implications are required. PMID:23761840

  8. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  9. Urine Cell-Free DNA Integrity as a Marker for Early Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Valentina; Calistri, Daniele; Salvi, Samanta; Gunelli, Roberta; Carretta, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Silvestrini, Rosella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA has been recognized as an accurate marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer, whereas the role of urine cell-free DNA (UCF DNA) has never been evaluated in this setting. It is known that normal apoptotic cells produce highly fragmented DNA while cancer cells release longer DNA. We thus verified the potential role of UCF DNA integrity for early prostate cancer diagnosis. UCF DNA was isolated from 29 prostate cancer patients and 25 healthy volunteers. Sequences longer than 250 bp (c-Myc, BCAS1, and HER2) were quantified by real-time PCR to verify UCF DNA integrity. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.7959 (95% CI 0.6729–0.9188). At the best cut-off value of 0.04 ng/μL, UCF DNA integrity analysis showed a sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI 0.62–0.90) and a specificity of 0.84 (95% CI 0.65–0.94). These preliminary findings indicate that UCF DNA integrity could be a promising noninvasive marker for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer and pave the way for further research into this area. PMID:23509700

  10. A Pilot Study Using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a Clinical Care Tool to Identify Lower Extremity Lymphedema in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Raviv, Leigh; Appollo, Kathleen; Baser, Raymond E.; Iasonos, Alexia; Barakat, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a symptom scale for lymphedema of the lower extremity (LLE). Methods Twenty-eight gynecologic cancer survivors with documented LLE and 30 without a history or presence of lymphedema completed the GCLQ and provided feedback about their satisfaction with and feasibility of using the GCLQ at their oncology follow-ups. The study survey took approximately 5–10 minutes to complete, and it was easily understood by the majority of the sample. Results Participants had a mean age of 59.6 years (range, 28–80 years). Twenty-eight women (48%) had LLE and 30 (52%) had no history or presence of LLE (confirmed by limb volume [LV] measurements at assessment). Type of cancer history included: endometrial, 38 (66%); cervical, 13 (22%); and vulvar, 7 (12%). GCLQ scores differed significantly by lymphedema diagnosis; LLE patients had higher scores (P<0.01). The large area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–1.000) suggests that the GCLQ can distinguish between patients with and without LLE. Although all 28 (100%) of the LLE patients were aware of their LLE diagnosis, only 23 (82%) underwent treatment. The GCLQ was easily understood by most (55/58, 95%); and overall, patients showed a high willingness (56/58, 96%) to complete the questionnaire at future appointments. Twenty-five (88%) of the LLE patients found the GCLQ to be helpful in identifying symptoms of lymphedema. Conclusions The GCLQ effectively distinguished between gynecologic cancer survivors with and those without LLE, with good sensitivity and specificity. The patients, particularly those with LLE, showed high confidence in the GCLQ’s ability to detect LLE symptoms. PMID:20163847

  11. Feasibility of self-sampling and human papillomavirus testing for cervical cancer screening in First Nation women from Northwest Ontario, Canada: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Helle; Severini, Alberto; Weaver, Bruce; Escott, Nicholas; Bell, Crystal; Crawford, Sandra; Bannon, Diane; Paavola, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence of cervical cancer is up to sixfold higher among First Nation women in Canada than in the general population. This is probably due to lower participation rates in cervical cancer prevention programmes. Objective To raise screening participation in this underserved population by launching an alternative approach to (Pap)anicolaou testing in a clinic—namely, vaginal self-sampling followed by human papillomavirus (HPV) diagnostics. Methods Good relationships were established with a First Nation community of the Northern Superior region in Northwest Ontario, and then 49 community women, aged 25–59, were recruited, who provided a vaginal self-sample and answered a questionnaire. Frequency distributions and cross-tabulations were used to summarise the data. Associations between categorical variables were assessed using the χ2 test of association, or the Goodman–Kruskal γ if both variables had ordered categories. Self-collected samples were tested for integrity and HPV using optimised molecular biological methods. Results The majority of participants (87.2%) were amenable to future HPV screening by self-sampling. This finding was independent of age, educational level and a previous history of abnormal Pap tests. Interestingly, the preferred way to learn about sexual health remained through interaction with healthcare professionals. As defined by the presence of a housekeeping gene, self-sample integrity was high (96%). Using polymerase chain reaction-based Luminex typing, the overall HPV positivity was 28.6% (ie, with either a low- or high-risk type) and 16.3% were infected with a high-risk type such as HPV16. Conclusion In this pilot study of First Nation women, self-sampling and HPV testing was well received and self-sample quality was excellent. A larger survey to be conducted in other Northern Superior communities in Northwest Ontario will determine whether this approach could become a viable screening strategy for First Nation women

  12. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  13. A Hybrid Approach Using Case-Based Reasoning and Rule-Based Reasoning to Support Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Renata M; Bezerra, João; Perkusich, Mirko; Almeida, Hyggo; Siebra, Clauirton

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in applying information technology to support the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In this paper, we present a hybrid approach using case-based reasoning (CBR) and rule-based reasoning (RBR) to support cancer diagnosis. We used symptoms, signs, and personal information from patients as inputs to our model. To form specialized diagnoses, we used rules to define the input factors' importance according to the patient's characteristics. The model's output presents the probability of the patient having a type of cancer. To carry out this research, we had the approval of the ethics committee at Napoleão Laureano Hospital, in João Pessoa, Brazil. To define our model's cases, we collected real patient data at Napoleão Laureano Hospital. To define our model's rules and weights, we researched specialized literature and interviewed health professional. To validate our model, we used K-fold cross validation with the data collected at Napoleão Laureano Hospital. The results showed that our approach is an effective CBR system to diagnose cancer. PMID:26262174

  14. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  15. Will More Diversified Staffs Diversify Newspaper Content? A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; and Others

    A pilot study asked 94 students enrolled in introductory newswriting classes at three separate universities to evaluate 18 news stories. About half the stories concerned topics that proponents of multiculturalism have suggested would receive more emphasis if newspapers employed more women and minorities: topics such as breast cancer, divorce,…

  16. Proliferation PET image to characterize pathological spatial features in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Ting; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Zhen-Hua; Gao, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Bai-Jiang; Fu, Zheng; Mu, Dian-Bin; Yu, Jin-Ming; Meng, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: 18F-FLT-PET imaging was proposed as a tool for measuring in vivo tumor cell proliferation and detecting sub-volumes to propose escalation in radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to validate whether high FLT uptake areas in 18F-FLT PET/CT are coincident with tumor cell proliferation distribution indicated by Ki-67 staining in non-small cell lung cancer, thus provide theoretical support for the application of dose painting guided by 18F-FLT PET/CT. Materials and methods: Twelve treatment naive patients with biopsy proven NSCLC underwent 18F-FLT PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 4-7 μm sections at approximately 4-mm intervals. The best slice was sort out to complete Ki-67 staining. Maximum Ki-67 labelling Index and SUVmax of the corresponding PET image was calculated. The correlation between Ki-67 Labelling Index and SUVmax of FLT was determined using Spearman Correlation analysis. High uptake areas and high proliferating areas were delineated on the two images, respectively, and their location was compared. Results: The maximal SUV was 3.26 ± 0.97 (1.96-5.05), maximal Ki-67 labeling index was 49% ± 27.56% (5%-90%). Statistical analysis didn’t reveal a significant correlation between them (r = -0.157, P = 0.627, > 0.05). 9 patients can contour high proliferating area on Ki-67 staining slice, and eight can contour the high uptake areas. In 4 patients, we can observe a generally close distribution of high uptake areas and high proliferating areas, in one patient, both the uptake level and proliferation status was low, while the others didn’t not find a significant co-localization. Conclusion: Noninvasive 18F-FLT PET assessing the proliferative status may be a valuable aid to guide dose painting in NSCLC, but it needs to be confirmed further. PMID:26309653

  17. Intimacy-Enhancing Psychological Intervention for Men Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer and Their Partners: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Manne, S. L.; Kissane, D. W.; Nelson, C. J.; Mulhall, J. P.; Winkel, G.; Zaider, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Few couple-focused interventions have been developed to improve distress and relationship outcomes among men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Aims We examined the effects of a five session Intimacy-Enhancing Therapy (IET) versus Usual Care (UC) on the psychological and relationship functioning of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and their partners. Pre-intervention levels of psychological and relationship functioning were evaluated as moderators of intervention effects. Methods Seventy one survivors and their partners completed a baseline survey and were subsequently randomly assigned to receive five sessions of IET or Usual Care (no treatment). Eight weeks after the baseline assessment, a follow-up survey was administered to survivor and partner. Main outcome measures Distress, well-being, relationship satisfaction, relationship intimacy, and communication were investigated as the main outcomes.. Results IET effects were largely moderated by pre-intervention psychosocial and relationship factors. Those survivors who had higher levels of cancer concerns at pre-treatment had significantly reduced concerns following IET. Similar moderating effects for pre-intervention levels were reported for the effects of IET on self-disclosure, perceived partner disclosure, and perceived partner responsiveness. Among partners beginning the intervention with higher cancer-specific distress, lower marital satisfaction, lower intimacy, and poorer communication, IET improved these outcomes. Conclusions IET had a marginally significant main effect upon survivor well-being but was effective among couples with fewer personal and relationship resources. Subsequent research is needed to replicate these findings with a larger sample and a longer follow-up. PMID:21210958

  18. Perfusion CT estimates photosensitizer uptake and biodistribution in a rabbit orthotopic pancreas cancer model: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Stewart, Errol E.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was hypothesized that perfusion computed tomography (CT) blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and vascular permeability surface-area (PS) product parameters would be predictive of therapeutic anti-cancer agent uptake in pancreatic cancer, facilitating image-guided interpretation of human treatments. The hypothesis was tested in an orthotopic rabbit model of pancreatic cancer, by establishing the model, imaging with endoscopic ultrasound and contrast CT, and spatially comparing the perfusion maps to the ex vivo uptake values of injected photosensitizer, vertepofin. Materials and Methods Nine New Zealand White rabbits underwent direct pancreas implantation of VX2 tumors and CT perfusion or endoscopic ultrasound was performed 10 days post-implantation. Verteporfin was injected during CT imaging and tissue was removed 1 h post-injection for frozen tissue fluorescence scanning. Region-of-interest comparisons of CT data with ex vivo fluorescence and histopathological staining were performed. Results DCE-CT showed enhanced BF, BV, and PS in the tumor rim, and decreased BF, BV and PS in the tumor core. Significant correlations were found between ex vivo verteporfin concentration and each of BF, BV, and PS. Conclusions The efficacy of verteporfin delivery in tumors is estimated by perfusion CT, providing a non-invasive method of mapping photosensitizer dose. PMID:25683500

  19. Allogeneic cell-mediated immunotherapy for breast cancer after autologous stem cell transplantation: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Or, R; Ackerstein, A; Nagler, A; Kapelushnik, J; Naparstek, E; Samuel, S; Amar, A; Bruatbar, C; Slavin, S

    1998-03-01

    Allogeneic cell therapy (allo-CT) is emerging as an effective treatment for patients relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), indicating that tumor cells resisting chemoradiotherapy may still respond to immunocompetent allogeneic lymphocytes. We investigated possible graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in six patients with metastatic breast cancer that would be comparable to the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) phenomenon occurring after allogeneic BMT in hematologic malignancies. The patients were cytoreduced with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), and were treated ambulatory with allo-CT consisting of adoptive transfer of HLA-matched donor peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) activated in vivo with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). If no graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed, allo-CT was augmented with infusion of donor PBL, preactivated in vitro with rIL-2. Treatment was well tolerated, with low therapy-related toxicity in all patients. Two patients developed signs and symptoms compatible with GVHD grade I-II, one of whom shows no evidence of disease at more than 34 months out. In the remaining patients, progression-free survival following allo-CT ranged between 7 and 13 months. Allogeneic cell-mediated, cytokine-activated immunotherapy might be utilized for induction of GVT in metastatic breast cancer. A search for techniques to boost chimerism without severe GVHD is indicated. PMID:9557210

  20. Semi-automatic identification of punching areas for tissue microarray building: the tubular breast cancer pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tissue MicroArray technology aims to perform immunohistochemical staining on hundreds of different tissue samples simultaneously. It allows faster analysis, considerably reducing costs incurred in staining. A time consuming phase of the methodology is the selection of tissue areas within paraffin blocks: no utilities have been developed for the identification of areas to be punched from the donor block and assembled in the recipient block. Results The presented work supports, in the specific case of a primary subtype of breast cancer (tubular breast cancer), the semi-automatic discrimination and localization between normal and pathological regions within the tissues. The diagnosis is performed by analysing specific morphological features of the sample such as the absence of a double layer of cells around the lumen and the decay of a regular glands-and-lobules structure. These features are analysed using an algorithm which performs the extraction of morphological parameters from images and compares them to experimentally validated threshold values. Results are satisfactory since in most of the cases the automatic diagnosis matches the response of the pathologists. In particular, on a total of 1296 sub-images showing normal and pathological areas of breast specimens, algorithm accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are respectively 89%, 84% and 94%. Conclusions The proposed work is a first attempt to demonstrate that automation in the Tissue MicroArray field is feasible and it can represent an important tool for scientists to cope with this high-throughput technique. PMID:21087464

  1. Could machine learning improve the prediction of pelvic nodal status of prostate cancer patients? Preliminary results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    De Bari, B; Vallati, M; Gatta, R; Simeone, C; Girelli, G; Ricardi, U; Meattini, I; Gabriele, P; Bellavita, R; Krengli, M; Cafaro, I; Cagna, E; Bunkheila, F; Borghesi, S; Signor, M; Di Marco, A; Bertoni, F; Stefanacci, M; Pasinetti, N; Buglione, M; Magrini, S M

    2015-07-01

    We tested and compared performances of Roach formula, Partin tables and of three Machine Learning (ML) based algorithms based on decision trees in identifying N+ prostate cancer (PC). 1,555 cN0 and 50 cN+ PC were analyzed. Results were also verified on an independent population of 204 operated cN0 patients, with a known pN status (187 pN0, 17 pN1 patients). ML performed better, also when tested on the surgical population, with accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity ranging between 48-86%, 35-91%, and 17-79%, respectively. ML potentially allows better prediction of the nodal status of PC, potentially allowing a better tailoring of pelvic irradiation. PMID:25950849

  2. Preoperative concurrent radiation therapy and cisplatinum continuous infusion in IIIa (N2) non small cell lung cancer. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Maggi, G; Casadio, C; Cianci, R; Oliaro, A; Molinatti, M; Bretti, S; Clerico, M; Boidi-Trotti, A; Rovea, P

    1994-08-01

    From April 1991 to September 1993, 18 patients affected by a presumed operable IIIa (N2) non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with histologically confirmed bulky mediastinal metastases, received preoperative concurrent radiation therapy and continuous infusion of cisplatinum (CDDP). The radiotherapy consisted of 2 Gy given 5 days a week for a total dose of 50 Gy; CDDP was administered by means of a central catheter and a portable pump at the daily dose of 6 mg/m2 given on the same days as the radiation therapy (total dose: 150 mg/m2). Two weeks after the end of the treatment, the patients were reevaluated: 5 patients had either local or distant disease progression, the other 13 were submitted to thoracotomy: 12 received a complete resection and 1 patient underwent only a mediastinal lymphadenectomy, because pneumonectomy was impossible due to lack of respiratory function. No histological evidence of cancer cells was observed in the specimens of 6 patients (33%). Radiological response rate was 61% (11/18); resection rate was 66% (12/18) and complete resection rate was 61% (11/18). There was one postoperative death (5%). The 3 year actuarial survival rate is 63.6% for the patients who received a resection with a median survival time of 18 months. All non operated patients died within one year. Combined preoperative treatment was well tolerated. Better results were achieved in patients with squamous cell carcinoma who had a complete resection following a total tumor sterilization with radio-chemotherapy. PMID:7929550

  3. A pilot study of MVP (mitomycin-C, vinblastine and cisplatin) chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hickish, T. F.; Smith, I. E.; Nicolson, M. C.; Ashley, S.; Priest, K.; Spencer, L.; Norman, A.; Middleton, G.; O'Brien, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    MVP chemotherapy (mitomycin C 8 mg m(-2), courses 1, 2, 4 and 6, vinblastine 6 mg m(-2), cisplatin 50 mg m(-2)) is an active low-toxicity regimen in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Based on the single-agent activity of these agents in SCLC, we have conducted a phase II trial of MVP in SCLC. Fifty chemo-naive patients with SCLC were entered in this trial. There were 33 men and 17 women with median age 66 years (range 46-83 years); 18 patients had limited disease (LD) and 32 extensive disease (ED). WHO performance status (PS) was: three patients PS 0, 33 patients PS 1, ten patients PS 2, four patients PS 3. A maximum of six cycles was given in responding patients. On completion of chemotherapy, patients with LD obtaining complete response (CR)/good partial response (PR) received thoracic irradiation and those obtaining CR were offered entry into the ongoing MRC Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Trial. The overall response was 79% with 17% CR and 62% PR. For LD patients, 38% obtained CR but for ED only one patient achieved CR. Median response duration for LD patients was 8 months and for ED patients 5 months. Median survival was 10 months for LD patients and 6 months for ED patients. There was complete resolution of symptoms in 24%, partial improvement in 68%, no change in 2% and progressive symptoms in 6%. As regards toxicity, 24% developed WHO grade 3/4 neutropenia, 16% grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and 6% significant hair loss. Two patients died during the first week of treatment with neutropenic infection. Quality of life using the EORTC questionnaire (QLC-C30) with lung cancer module demonstrated significant improvements from baseline levels in emotional and cognitive functioning, global QOL, of pain, dyspnoea and cough. MVP, an effective palliative regimen for NSCLC, is also active against SCLC with low toxicity and merits comparison with more toxic conventional schedules. PMID:9667676

  4. A prospective pilot study of analysis of surgical margins of breast cancers using high-resolution sonography.

    PubMed

    Scaranelo, Anabel M; Moshonov, Hadas; Escallon, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of high-resolution specimen sonography (SS) to determine the precise location of the targeted lesion in relation to the six surgical margins; the specimen digital radiography isocenter and the correlation with the rate of re-excision and residual tumour. Freshly excised surgical specimens were scanned by a breast radiologist using a high-frequency linear transducer in a cohort of 25 consecutive women undergoing breast conservation. Sonographic measurements of radial distances from all six margins (superior, inferior, lateral, medial, anterior and posterior) were obtained. Sonographic positive margin status was defined as targeted mass identified <5 mm from the tissue edge. The paired t test was used for statistical comparisons between sonographic and pathological measurements. The median cancer size was 15 mm (range 3.80-42 mm; 95 % CI 9.8-18) on sonography and 16 mm (range 2-60 mm; 95 % CI 15-20) on surgical pathology. SS showed 100 % sensitivity and 59 % specificity in the evaluation of surgical pathology margins. 20 % (5 of 25) patients had positive margins where 60 % were in situ carcinoma. The likelihood of carcinoma at the initial surgical margins was significantly higher in dense breasts (3/6 = 50 % vs 1/17 = 5.8 %; p = 0.04). The deviation of the isocenter of the specimens was found not significant. SS is a valuable tool for identify the cancer within the specimen, and better asses the margins. It is of significant importance in patients with dense breasts where specimen radiography is of limited value. PMID:27026943

  5. Pilot study of multiple-fraction daily radiotherapy alternating with chemotherapy in patients with stage IV non-oat cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, G.; Righini, R.; Nervi, C.; Guerra, A.; Tirindelli, D.; Hopkins, H.; Looney, W.

    1985-01-01

    From March 1982, 31 patients with stage IV non-oat cell lung cancer have been treated. Radiotherapy was given as three 2.00-Gy fractions on Days 1 and 2, 8 and 9, 22 and 23, and 29 and 30, for a total dose of 48 Gy over a 30-32-day treatment period. A three-drug combination of cyclophosphamide (400 mg/m2), doxorubicin (17 mg/m2), and methotrexate (15 mg/m2) was given on Days 3 and 24 and repeated thereafter every 21 days. Three of 31 evaluable patients (10%) achieved objective complete response and 18 of 31 (58%) achieved partial response (ie, regression of 50%-90%), while no change or disease progression was observed in ten of 31 (32%). The overall response rate in our study was 68%, which is a response much higher than other results in extensive disease. However, controlled trials will be necessary to definitively establish the superiority of this regimen to conventional trials. There was a significant shift of performance status towards higher values after treatment: 12 of the 27 patients classified in the 70-80 Karnofsky category before treatment moved to the higher category, 13 remained in the same status, and only two shifted to the worst category, indicating that the treatment had been effective in giving patients a better quality of life during their survival. The median survival was 35 weeks for the entire group of patients and 44 and 15 weeks for the responders and nonresponders, respectively. One of the primary findings of this pilot study was the ability to give one course of 12 Gy of radiation as multiple fractions per day during each of the first 2 weeks of treatment alternated with one course of chemotherapy, with most patients having very mild or no side effects.

  6. Increased metabolic activity detected by FLIM in human breast cancer cells with desmoplastic reaction: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natal, Rodrigo de Andrade; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bondarik, Caroline; Mendonça, Guilherme R.; Derchain, Sophie F.; Lima, Carmen P.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Sarian, Luís. O.; Vassallo, José

    2015-07-01

    Introduction: In breast cancer (BC), desmoplastic reaction, assembled primarily by fibroblasts, is associated with unfavorable prognosis, but the reason of this fact remains still unclear. In this context, nonlinear optics microscopy, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), has provided advancement in cellular metabolism research. In this paper, our purpose is to differentiate BC cells metabolism with or without contact to desmoplastic reaction. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples were used at different points of hematoxylin stained sections. Methodology: Sections from 14 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma were analyzed with FLIM methodology to NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime on a Confocal Upright LSM780 NLO device (Carl Zeiss AG, Germany). Quantification of the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence intensity was evaluated by SPC Image software (Becker &Hickl) and ImageJ (NIH), respectively. Optical redox ratio was calculated by dividing the FAD fluorescence intensity by NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity. Data value for FLIM measurements and fluorescence intensities were calculated using Wilcoxon test; p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BC cells in contact with desmoplastic reaction presented a significantly lower NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, optical redox ratio was also lower in these tumor cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that contact of BC cells with desmoplastic reaction increase their metabolic activity, which might explain the adverse prognosis of cases associated with higher peritumoral desmoplastic reaction.

  7. Opioids for cancer breakthrough pain: a pilot study reporting patient assessment of time to meaningful pain relief.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2008-05-01

    Breakthrough pain is a common and distinct component of cancer pain that is usually managed with normal release opioids (also known as rescue medication) either before or soon after its onset. A prospective survey of hospice inpatients with breakthrough pain was undertaken to characterize their pain and then compare the time to onset of pain relief of their rescue medication. Patients presented with, on average, 1.7 different types of breakthrough pains (range, 1-4). The average number of breakthrough pains was four per day (range, 1-8), and the average duration of breakthrough pain was 35 minutes (range, 15-60); most occurred suddenly and unpredictably. Patients used morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, methadone, or oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate as rescue medication and the average time to meaningful pain relief following their administration was 31 minutes (range, 5-75). No difference was found between morphine, oxycodone, and hydromorphone. Methadone appeared to work faster than morphine (P<0.01) but no faster than oxycodone or hydromorphone, whereas oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate worked faster than morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, and methadone (P<0.001). PMID:18258412

  8. Parent-directed intervention for children with cancer-related neurobehavioral late effects: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunita K; Ross, Paula; Cuevas, Michelle; Turk, Anne; Kim, Heeyoung; Lo, Tracy T Y; Wong, Lennie F; Bhatia, Smita

    2014-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To evaluate feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an intervention directed at parents of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) with neurobehavioral late effects to improve targeted parenting skills, and thus to indirectly benefit the child's educational functioning.  METHODS : 44 CCSs and their parents were randomized. Intervention-arm parents participated in eight individual training sessions augmented by a 3-month telephone support period. Pre- and postparent measures and child performance on Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II and School Motivation and Learning Strategies Inventory assessed intervention effects.  RESULTS : 90% of intervention parents completed the program with high adherence/perceived benefit. Between-group effect sizes ranged from d = 0.77 to d = 1.45 for parent knowledge, efficacy, frequency of pro-learning behaviors, and d = 0.21 to d = 0.76 for child academic scores. Parental time spent in intervention activities was associated with academic change.  CONCLUSIONS : A parent-directed intervention to indirectly promote academic functioning in CCSs appears feasible and effective in improving targeted parenting outcomes and for selected child academic outcomes. PMID:24966398

  9. Parent-Directed Intervention for Children With Cancer-Related Neurobehavioral Late Effects: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Paula; Cuevas, Michelle; Turk, Anne; Kim, Heeyoung; Lo, Tracy T. Y.; Wong, Lennie F.; Bhatia, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an intervention directed at parents of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) with neurobehavioral late effects to improve targeted parenting skills, and thus to indirectly benefit the child’s educational functioning. Methods 44 CCSs and their parents were randomized. Intervention-arm parents participated in eight individual training sessions augmented by a 3-month telephone support period. Pre- and postparent measures and child performance on Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II and School Motivation and Learning Strategies Inventory assessed intervention effects. Results 90% of intervention parents completed the program with high adherence/perceived benefit. Between-group effect sizes ranged from d = 0.77 to d = 1.45 for parent knowledge, efficacy, frequency of pro-learning behaviors, and d = 0.21 to d = 0.76 for child academic scores. Parental time spent in intervention activities was associated with academic change. Conclusions A parent-directed intervention to indirectly promote academic functioning in CCSs appears feasible and effective in improving targeted parenting outcomes and for selected child academic outcomes. PMID:24966398

  10. Identification of familial colorectal cancer and hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes through the Dutch population-screening program: results ofa pilot study

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Sanne J. H.; Leicher, Laura W.; Hennink, Simone D.; Ghorbanoghli, Zeinab; Breg, Simone A. C.; Morreau, Hans; Nielsen, Maartje; Hardwick, James C. H.; Roukema, Jan A.; Langers, Alexandra M. J.; Cappel, Walter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: In 2014, a population-screening program using immuno-faecal occult blood testing (I-FOBT) has started in the Netherlands. The aims of this study were to evaluate the proportion of individuals in the Dutch screening program with a positive I-FOBT that fulfill the criteria for familial colorectal cancer (FCC) and to evaluate the proportion of participants that needs genetic counseling or colonoscopic surveillance. Material and methods: This retrospective observational study was performed in two large hospitals. Individuals aged between 55 and 75 years with a positive I-FOBT that underwent colonoscopy were included. A detailed family history was obtained in all individuals. Results: A total of 657 individuals with a positive I-FOBT test underwent colonoscopy. A total of 120 (18.3%) participants were found to have a positive family history for CRC, 20 (3.0%) fulfilled the FCC criteria, 4 (0.6%) the Bethesda guidelines and 1 (0.2%) participant the Amsterdam criteria. Multiple adenomas (>10) were found in 21 (3.2%) participants. No cases of serrated polyposis were identified. Based on these criteria and guidelines, a total of 35 (5.3%) required referral to the clinical geneticist and the relatives of 20 (3.0%) participants should be referred for surveillance colonoscopy. Conclusion: Obtaining a detailed family history at the time of intake of participants with a positive I-FOBT in the Dutch surveillance program increased the identification of participants with familial CRC. PMID:27310819

  11. Phospholipid makeup of the breast adipose tissue is impacted by obesity and mammary cancer in the mouse: Results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Michael; Perez, Osvaldo; Martinez, Mitchell; Santander, Ana M; Mendez, Armando J; Nadji, Mehrdad; Nayer, Ali; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Torroella-Kouri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, an established risk factor for breast cancer (BC), is associated with systemic inflammation. The breast contains adipose tissue (bAT), yet whether it plays a role in BC progression in obese females is being intensively studied. There is scarce knowledge on the lipid composition of bAT in health and disease. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to determine whether obesity and BC are associated with inflammatory changes in bAT 2) to analyze for the first time the lipid profile of bAT in obese and lean mammary tumor-bearing and normal mice. Syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the mammary fat pad of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. BATs were analyzed four weeks after tumor cell inoculation by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry. Phospholipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ Quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing precursor ion scan or neutral ion loss scan employing appropriate class specific lipid standards in a two step quantification process. Four main classes of phospholipids were analyzed: phosphatidylcholines phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols. Our results showed that bAT in obese (normal and tumor-bearing) mice contained hypertrophic adipocytes compared with their corresponding samples in lean mice; higher numbers of macrophages and crown-like structures were observed in obese tumor bearers compared to obese normal mice. BAT from normal obese mice revealed higher concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamines. Furthermore, bAT from tumor-bearing mice expressed higher phosphatidylcholines than that from non-tumor bearing mice, suggesting the presence of the tumor is associated with phosphatidylcholines. Conversion of phosphatidylethanolamines to phosphatidylcholines will be investigated in E0771 cells. Additional studies are projected to investigate macrophage activation by these specific classes of phospholipids

  12. Pilot study of a specific dietary supplement in tumor-bearing mice and in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, A S; Yeh, H C; Wang, L H; Huang, Y P; Maeda, H; Pivazyan, A; Hsu, C; Lewis, E R; Bruckner, H W; Fasy, T M

    2001-01-01

    Previously, a specific dietary supplement, selected vegetables (SV), was found to be associated with prolonged survival of stage III and IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. In this study, several anticancer components in SV were measured; the anticancer activity of SV was assessed using a lung tumor model, line 1 in BALB/c mice. SV was also used in conjunction with conventional therapies by stage IIIB and IV NSCLC patients whose survival and clinical responses were evaluated. A daily portion (283 g) of SV was found to contain 63 mg of inositol hexaphosphate, 4.4 mg of daidzein, 2.6 mg of genistein, and 16 mg of coumestrol. Mouse food containing 5% SV (wt/wt) was associated with a 53-74% inhibition of tumor growth rate. Fourteen of the 18 patients who ingested SV daily for 2-46 months were included in the analyses; none showed evidence of toxicity. The first lead case remained tumor free for > 133 months; the second case showed complete regression of multiple brain lesions after using SV and radiotherapy. The median survival time of the remaining 12 patients was 33.5 months, and one-year survival was > 70%. The median survival time of the 16 "intent-to-treat" patients (including ineligible patients) was 20 months, and one-year survival was 55%. The Karnofsky performance status of eligible patients was 55 +/- 13 at entry but improved to 92 +/- 9 after use of SV for five months or longer (p < 0.01). Five patients had stable lesions for 30, 30, 20, 12, and 2 months; two of them, whose primary tumor was resected, used SV alone and demonstrated an objective response of their metastatic tumors. In addition to the two lead cases, eight patients had no new metastases after using SV. Three patients had complete regression of brain metastases after using radiotherapy and SV. In this study, daily ingestion of SV was associated with objective responses, prolonged survival, and attenuation of the normal pattern of progression of stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. A large

  13. Prospective Pilot Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy With Docetaxel and Cisplatin After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyun Chan; Lee, Seok Ho; Lee, Yuna; Park, Se Hoon Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Seon Tae

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: With the improvement concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in the management of patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), distant failures have become a more relevant problem in terms of survival. The primary objective of this Phase II study is to assess the feasibility of docetaxel and cisplatin consolidation after primary CCRT for patients with HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregionally advanced HNSCC received chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin, 100 mg/m{sup 2}, on Days 1, 22, and 43. Concurrent radiotherapy to the primary tumor and neck was given in a daily dose of 2 Gy to a total dose of 70-70.2 Gy over 7 weeks. After completion of CCRT, patients without evidence of disease progression received an additional four cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, and cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks. Results: Of 33 patients, 27 (81%) completed CCRT. After CCRT, three complete and 19 partial responses were recorded, giving an overall response rate of 67%. Of 19 patients who went to the consolidation phase, only 4 (21%) received all four cycles of docetaxel and cisplatin. Causes of failure of consolidation chemotherapy were toxicity in 11 patients, including three treatment-related deaths, and progression in 4 patients. Three patients died of sepsis during the consolidation phase. Median survival was 11 months for all patients and 8 months for those treated with consolidation chemotherapy. Conclusion: The poor compliance and high incidence of severe toxicities prompted no further evaluation of this consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT.

  14. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  15. Cancer incidence among male military and civil pilots and flight attendants: an analysis on published data.

    PubMed

    Buja, Alessandra; Lange, John H; Perissinotto, Egle; Rausa, Giuseppe; Grigoletto, Francesco; Canova, Cristina; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2005-11-01

    Flight personnel are exposed to cosmic ionizing radiation, chemicals (fuel, jet engine exhausts, cabin air pollutants), electromagnetic fields from cockpit instruments, and disrupted sleep patterns. Only recently has cancer risk among these workers been investigated. With the aim of increasing the precision of risk estimates of cancer incidence, follow-up studies reporting a standardized incidence ratio for cancer among male flight attendants, civil and military pilots were obtained from online databases and analysed. A meta-analysis was performed by applying a random effect model, obtaining a meta-standardized incidence ratio (SIR), and 95% confidence interval (CI). In male cabin attendants, and civil and military pilots, meta-SIRs were 3.42 (CI = 1.94-6.06), 2.18 (1.69-2.80), 1.43 (1.09-1.87) for melanoma; and 7.46 (3.52-15.89), 1.88 (1.23-2.88), 1.80 (1.25-2.58) for other skin cancer, respectively. These tumors share as risk factors, ionizing radiation, recreational sun exposure and socioeconomic status. The meta-SIRs are not adjusted for confounding; the magnitude of risk for melanoma decreased when we corrected for socioeconomic status. In civil pilots, meta-SIR was 1.47 (1.06-2.05) for prostate cancer. Age (civil pilots are older than military pilots and cabin attendants) and disrupted sleep pattern (entailing hyposecretion of melatonin, which has been reported to suppress proliferative effects of androgen on prostate cancer cells) might be involved. In male cabin attendants, meta-SIR was 21.5 (2.25-205.8) for Kaposi's sarcoma and 2.49 (1.03-6.03) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. AIDS, which was the most frequent single cause of death in this occupational category, likely explains the excess of the latter two tumors. PMID:16463960

  16. Patterns in Womanpower: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansl, Eva vB.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a pilot study conducted 25 years ago assessing challenges facing women who want to combine career, marriage, and family responsibilities. Study obtained case histories of 100 trained women whose study and/or work experience had been deflected by family responsibilities. Found a high quality of educated womanpower was latent. (Author/KS)

  17. Impact of Elimination or Reduction of Dietary Animal Proteins on Cancer Progression and Survival: Protocol of an Online Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Catany Ritter, Anna; Egger, Annarita Sabrina; Machacek, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Current evidence suggests that the incidence of cancer is low in vegan populations, and experimental studies have revealed a significant role of dietary proteins in cancer development and progression. However, little data currently exists regarding the effect of a plant-based diet on the progression of diagnosed cancer. Objective The main objective of this study is to determine if a reduction or total elimination of animal protein from the diet can positively influence the outcome of an existing cancer and, in addition to standard oncological therapies, increase remission rates. Methods The primary aim of this online study is to test the effect on remission rates in cancer patients (primary outcome) with distinct self-selected dietary patterns (omnivore, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, vegan), and allow for an estimation of the effect size. Secondary outcomes are tumor behavior, relapse-free interval, therapies, therapy tolerability and side-effects, comorbidities, medication, quality of life, acceptance, and feasibility of the selected diet. Safety concerns exist for vegan diets (especially in cancer patients) and the study will carefully monitor for deterioration of health, tumor progression, or malnutrition. Furthermore, the study will evaluate the online portal as a study platform (technical and safety aspects, and sequence of displayed questionnaires) as well as the validity of self-reported and online-generated data. Results The study was performed between April, 2015 and June, 2016, and a preliminary evaluation of safety aspects was undertaken after June, 2016. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated when the final patients complete the study in December, 2016. Conclusions This study will reveal information about the effects of dietary patterns on cancer disease and progression. The methodology of the study addresses several aspects and limitations of nutrition studies in cancer patients, such as precision of nutrition data, acceptance criteria

  18. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  19. Microbial process translation--laboratory to pilot plant at the Frederick Cancer Research Center.

    PubMed

    Langlykke, A F

    1978-01-01

    In summary, operations in the FCRC pilot plant have included training an operating staff, operability trials, equipment modification and repair, and supplementation of the original equipment to gain greater versatility. In addition to effort spent on proving and improving the capacity of the pilot plant, development studies and production operations involving translation of laboratory operations to pilot level or volume have included: 1. Development of a production process for interferon as described above. As a by-product of the interferon program, samples of cell culture have been studied in the Basic Research Division of FCRC for the production of lymphokines. 2. Production of starting materials (cell paste) for carboxypeptidase G1, using three different organisms, and production of refined material from the FCRC 252 organism as described herein. 3. Production of large quantities of crude phenylalanine ammonia lyase in the form of cell paste for Prof. Creed Abell at the University of Texas, Medical Branch, at Galveston,. 4. Production of a crude staphylococcal nuclease for the program of Dr. David Sachs, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. 5. Developmental studies and limited production of a crude cysteine desulfhydrase according to the protocols of Dr. J. Uren, Sidney Farber Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts. 6. Preliminary production studies on the agent produced by Culture FCRC 14, discovered in the CFL search program. 7. Developmental fermentation studies on the antitumor antibiotic, piperazinedione 593A [6], in preparation for production of quantities of this antibiotic to support clinical studies under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute. PMID:705017

  20. Conducting a pilot study: case study of a novice researcher.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Pilot studies play a vital role in health research, but are often misused, mistreated and misrepresented. A well-conducted pilot study with clear aims and objectives within a formal framework ensures methodological rigour, can lead to higher-quality research and scientifically valid work that is publishable and can benefit patients and health service delivery. A pilot study contributes valuable information to assist researchers in the conduct of their study. Conducting a pilot study provides the researcher with the opportunity to develop and enhance the skills necessary before commencing the larger study. By conducting a pilot the researcher obtains preliminary data, can evaluate their data-analysis method and clarify the financial and human resources required. This article presents an overview of pilot studies, why they are conducted, what to consider when reporting pilot studies and the authors' experience of conducting a pilot study. To conduct a successful study, researchers need to develop their skills, choose the right methods and carefully plan for all aspects of the process. PMID:26618678

  1. Association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism with Lipid Peroxidation in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Chandra Shekhar; Datta, Sudip Kumar; Singh, Satyender; Ahmed, Rafat S.; Goel, Sanjay; Gupta, Sanjay; Mustafa, Md.; Grover, Rajesh Kumar; Banerjee, Basu Dev

    2011-01-01

    Association of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1 and T1 deletions with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer is well reported. These enzymes metabolize numerous toxins thus protecting from oxidative injury. Oxidative stress has been associated with development of BPH and prostate cancer. The present study was designed to analyze role of GST deletions in development of oxidative stress in these subjects. GSTs are responsible for metabolism of toxins present in tobacco therefore effect of tobacco usage in study groups was also studied. Three groups of subjects: BPH (57 patients), prostate cancer (53 patients) and controls (46 subjects) were recruited. Genotyping was done using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as marker of oxidative stress were estimated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in plasma. Based on genotyping, subjects were categorized into: GSTM1+/GSTT1+, GSTM1-/GSTT1+, GSTM1+/GSTT1- and GSTM1-/GSTT1-. Significantly higher plasma MDA levels were noticed in GSTM1-/GSTT1- as compared to GSTM1+/GSTT1+ in all study groups. Double deletion (GSTM1-/GSTT1-) is associated with higher oxidative stress which might play a role in the pathogenesis of BPH and prostate cancer. However, other markers of oxidative stress should be analyzed before any firm conclusion. PMID:21694442

  2. NEW IMMIGRANT SURVEY: A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principal aim of this work is to provide accurate data about immigrants and their families, including children, with regard to their economic, social, and political adaptation to the United States. This pilot study of a substantial sample of foreign-born respondents is expect...

  3. Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgon, J. R.

    A New Zealand pilot study examined Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) scores compared to PAT: Reading Comprehension scores and compared with teacher ratings. TORCH is a reading test package published in 1987 by the Australian Council for Educational Research. It consists of 14 untimed passages intended to assess the extent to which readers in…

  4. Handwashing Programme in Kindergarten: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, W. H.; Suen, L. K. P.; Kwok, Y. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured programme on handwashing which has taken into account of the developmental stage of children. Design/methodology/approach: This is a pilot study using a structured handwashing programme as intervention. The intervention group (n=15) receives the structured…

  5. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  6. The SunWise Policy Intervention for School-Based Sun Protection: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Karen M.; Geller, Alan C.; Viswanath, Vish; Rutsch, Linda; Zwirn, Jodie; Gorham, Sue; Puleo, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Skin cancer is highly preventable, but clearly there is a critical need to focus on better ways to disseminate information about known skin cancer prevention. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) SunWise Program is one channel for reaching children, teachers, and school nurses. In a pilot study designed to increase adoption of…

  7. Psychiatrically hospitalized college students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosecan, A S; Goldberg, R L; Wise, T N

    1992-07-01

    This pilot study presents data on an underreported group: college students who require psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study is too small to sustain broad generalizations, the authors found indications of significant correlations between students' hospitalization and the academic cycle, substance abuse, and distance from home. It is hoped that other institutions will undertake similar studies of this group of students to provide a broader body of data from which to draw inferences regarding prevention, intervention, and psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:1506564

  8. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly

  9. BIOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT STUDY PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  10. Simultaneous radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy in advanced cancer of the head and neck. A pilot study at Tygerberg Hospital, Parowvallei, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Mills, E.E.; Van der Merwe, A.M.; Rubin, P.; Lush, C.M.

    1987-10-01

    Fifty patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck were treated in a nonrandomized pilot study utilizing simultaneous cisplatin and radiotherapy. Treatment was delivered in two segments. The initial partial course (PC) consisted of 75-100 mg/m/sup 2/ of cisplatin and concomitant radiotherapy to 20.00 Gy in 1 week, with 4-week split. Patients who tolerated therapy and experienced at least a partial response (PR) went on to complete the full course of therapy (FC), with the second phase consisting of 120 mg/m/sup 2/ of cisplatin and 38.40 Gy of radiation. Total cisplatin delivered ranged between 195 and 220 mg/m/sup 2/, and the total radiation dose was 58.40 Gy. Of 38 evaluable patients, 31 (82%) had at least a partial response (PR). However, at time of analysis 20 months after study, 27 (71%) patients were alive with disease or dead. Mean disease-free survival (DFS) for patients receiving FC therapy (10.05 months) was greater than that for patients who received only PC therapy (2.65 months), but the difference in overall survival (OS) was not statistically significant (11.95 FC versus 10.29 PC). Response rates and the minimal toxicity are within the range of other reported studies. Randomized studies should seek optimal time-dose schedule and establish advantages in terms of crude survival and disease-free survival.

  11. Image processing of angiograms: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L. E.; Evans, R. A.; Roehm, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The technology transfer application this report describes is the result of a pilot study of image-processing methods applied to the image enhancement, coding, and analysis of arteriograms. Angiography is a subspecialty of radiology that employs the introduction of media with high X-ray absorption into arteries in order to study vessel pathology as well as to infer disease of the organs supplied by the vessel in question.

  12. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Widlak, Piotr; Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika; Polanska, Joanna; Marczak, Łukasz; Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  13. Assessing the Early Response of Advanced Cervical Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Using Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Chun; Hu, Dao-Yu; Hu, Xue-Mei; Shen, Ya-Qi; Meng, Xiao-Yan; Tang, Hao; Li, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model has shown promising results for providing both diffusion and perfusion information in cervical cancer; however, its use to predict and monitor the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in cervical cancer is relatively rare. The study aimed to evaluate the use of DWI with IVIM and monoexponential models to predict and monitor the efficacy of NACT in cervical cancer. Methods: Forty-two patients with primary cervical cancer underwent magnetic resonance exams at 3 time points (pre-NACT, 3 weeks after the first NACT cycle, and 3 weeks after the second NACT cycle). The response to treatment was determined according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors 3 weeks after the second NACT treatment, and the subjects were classified as two groups: responders and nonresponders groups. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion-related pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) values were determined. The differences in IVIM-derived variables and ADC between the different groups at the different time points were calculated using an independent samples t-test. Results: The D and ADC values were all significantly higher for the responders than for the nonresponders at all 3 time points, but no significant differences were observed in the D* and f values. An analysis of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that a D value threshold <0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s and an ADC threshold <1.11 × 10−3 mm2/s could differentiate responders from nonresponders at pre-NACT time point, yielding area under the curve (AUC) of which were 0.771 and 0.806, respectively. The ROC indicated that the AUCs of D and ADC at the 3 weeks after the first NACT cycle and 3 weeks after the second NACT cycle were 0.823, 0.763, and 0.787, 0.794, respectively. The AUC values of D and ADC at these 3 time points were not

  14. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Providing a web-based digital information management system of information for scientists and the public, including a system that supports the work of those officials who must make decisions that affect the state of the bay. The Tampa Bay Study is in its sixth year and will continue through September 2007. This paper presents a non-inclusive summary of key findings associated with the six primary project components listed above. Component 4 (above) is described in detail in the following chapter 13. More information on the Tampa Bay Study is available from our on-line digital information system for the Tampa Bay Study at http://gulfsci.usgs.gov.

  15. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  16. Evaluation of the Utility of a Transition Workbook in Preparing Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors for Transition to Adult Services: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bashore, Lisa; Bender, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Transition to adult care for adolescent and young adult survivors is challenging and is inclusive of several factors like knowledge and developmental, emotional, and social status of survivors and parents. This pilot study addressed the feasibility of a transition workbook, a method of preparing adolescent and young adults to transition to adult care. Using a mixed methods design, investigators also measured transition worry and readiness in 30 survivors. Support was provided throughout a 6-month period as survivors and parents completed the workbook. The workbook included sections about the treatment history of survivors, when and who to call for worrisome symptoms, prescriptions and insurance, educational goals for health practices and how to get there, and independent living. Twenty survivors completed the study and reported greater worry about leaving pediatric oncology but indicated the need to make changes to transition to adult care. Ambiguity and intimidation about transitioning to adult providers and comfort in pediatric setting were themes expressed by survivors. Results indicate the need for adult/pediatric collaborative transition programs using various standardized methods of addressing transition readiness and evaluation. PMID:26206471

  17. Opposing effects of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk for breast cancer in western Indian women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Joshi, N N; Bhat, S; Hake, S; Kale, M; Kannan, S

    2014-06-01

    In an earlier study, the genotypes associated with higher level of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were found to reduce the risk for breast cancer in western Indian women. This observation implied that gene polymorphisms affecting the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may influence the risk for breast cancer in this population. Hence, we performed genotyping for three more functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for variations in the levels of cytokines associated with inflammation. To that effect, polymorphisms in genes coding for IL-4 (IL-4 C-590T; rs2243250), IFN-γ (IFN-G A + 874T; rs2430561) and MCP-1 (MCP-1 A-2578G; rs1024611) were examined in premenopausal, healthy women (N = 239) and patients with breast cancer (N = 182) from western India. In carriers of the IL-4*590T allele, a reduced risk for the disease (dominant model; OR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.37-0.98) was seen similar to that seen in TGF-B1*10C carriers. An opposite trend was observed with respect to the alleles associated with higher expression of MCP-1 or IFN-γ. In individuals positive for three or more alleles associated with higher levels of either pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, an additive effect on the modulation of risk for the disease was evident (for TGF-B1 & IL-4, OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.87; for IFN-G & MCP-1, OR = 2.29, 95% CI 0.95-5.51). In the context of contrasting observations in other populations, these results indicate a significant contribution of anti-inflammatory genotypes in the modulation of risk for breast cancer in western Indian women. PMID:24164868

  18. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  19. The Efficacy and Safety of Jaungo, a Traditional Medicinal Ointment, in Preventing Radiation Dermatitis in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Prospective, Single-Blinded, Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Lee, Jee Young; Yoon, Seong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Jaungo in preventing radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer. Methods. Thirty patients were prospectively enrolled and randomly assigned to receive Jaungo or general supportive skin care. Radiation dermatitis and pain were examined at daily intervals from the start of radiotherapy until 4 weeks after its completion. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints were time to onset of radiation dermatitis, duration of radiation dermatitis, and maximum pain score. Results. Jaungo reduced the incidence of grade ≥2 (46.7% versus 78.6%) and grade 3 radiation dermatitis (20.0% versus 50.0%) in comparison with general supportive skin care. Jaungo also delayed the onset of grade 2 dermatitis (35 days versus 30 days). In terms of time to onset of grade 3 dermatitis, duration of dermatitis, and maximum pain score, Jaungo showed results comparable to those achieved with general supportive skin care. No patients experienced adverse effects caused by Jaungo administration. Conclusions. Jaungo minimized radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer without causing adverse effects. Further randomized studies with a larger sample size are required to assess clinical use of Jaungo. PMID:27066103

  20. Relationship between exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy: a pilot study1

    PubMed Central

    Crowgey, Theresa; Peters, Katherine B.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Lane, Amy; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; West, Miranda J.; Williams, Christina L.; Jones, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients. Thirty-seven breast cancer patients following completion of chemotherapy (median 16 months) and 14 controls were studied. Cognitive function was assessed using the Central Nervous System (CNS) Vital Signs software (CNS Vital Signs, LLC, Morrisville, N.C., USA), a computerized test battery consisting of 9 cognitive subtests. Exercise behavior was evaluated using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, and CRF was assessed via a cardiopulmonary exercise test to assess peak oxygen consumption. Patients’ mean total exercise was 184 ± 141 min·week−1 compared with 442 ± 315 min·week−1 in controls (p < 0.001). Significantly fewer patients (32%) were meeting exercise guidelines (i.e., ≥150 min of moderate-intensity or vigorous exercise per week) compared with 57% of controls (p = 0.014). Patients’ peak oxygen consumption averaged 23.5 ± 6.3 mL·kg−1·min−1 compared with 30.6 ± 7.0 mL·kg−1·min−1 in controls (p < 0.01). Scores on the cognitive subdomains were generally lower in patients compared with controls, although only the difference in verbal memory was significant (unadjusted p = 0.041). In patients, weak to moderate correlations were indicated between exercise, peak oxygen consumption, and the majority of cognitive subdomain scores; however, there was a significant positive correlation between exercise and visual memory (r = 0.47, p = 0.004). In conclusion, breast cancer patients following the completion of primary adjuvant chemotherapy exhibit, in general, worse cognitive performance than healthy women from the general population, and such performance may be related to their level of exercise behavior. PMID:24869976

  1. Relationship between exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Crowgey, Theresa; Peters, Katherine B; Hornsby, Whitney E; Lane, Amy; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E; West, Miranda J; Williams, Christina L; Jones, Lee W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported exercise behavior, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and cognitive function in early breast cancer patients. Thirty-seven breast cancer patients following completion of chemotherapy (median 16 months) and 14 controls were studied. Cognitive function was assessed using the Central Nervous System (CNS) Vital Signs software (CNS Vital Signs, LLC, Morrisville, N.C., USA), a computerized test battery consisting of 9 cognitive subtests. Exercise behavior was evaluated using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, and CRF was assessed via a cardiopulmonary exercise test to assess peak oxygen consumption. Patients' mean total exercise was 184 ± 141 min·week(-1) compared with 442 ± 315 min·week(-1) in controls (p < 0.001). Significantly fewer patients (32%) were meeting exercise guidelines (i.e., ≥150 min of moderate-intensity or vigorous exercise per week) compared with 57% of controls (p = 0.014). Patients' peak oxygen consumption averaged 23.5 ± 6.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) compared with 30.6 ± 7.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) in controls (p < 0.01). Scores on the cognitive subdomains were generally lower in patients compared with controls, although only the difference in verbal memory was significant (unadjusted p = 0.041). In patients, weak to moderate correlations were indicated between exercise, peak oxygen consumption, and the majority of cognitive subdomain scores; however, there was a significant positive correlation between exercise and visual memory (r = 0.47, p = 0.004). In conclusion, breast cancer patients following the completion of primary adjuvant chemotherapy exhibit, in general, worse cognitive performance than healthy women from the general population, and such performance may be related to their level of exercise behavior. PMID:24869976

  2. Pre-Study Walkthrough with a Commercial Pilot for a Preliminary Single Pilot Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor-Dreher, Ryan; Roberts, Z.; Ziccardi, J.; Vu, K-P. L.; Strybel, T.; Koteskey, Robert William; Lachter, Joel B.; Vi Dao, Quang; Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, V.

    2013-01-01

    The number of crew members in commercial flights has decreased to two members, down from the five-member crew required 50 years ago. One question of interest is whether the crew should be reduced to one pilot. In order to determine the critical factors involved in safely transitioning to a single pilot, research must examine whether any performance deficits arise with the loss of a crew member. With a concrete understanding of the cognitive and behavioral role of a co-pilot, aeronautical technologies and procedures can be developed that make up for the removal of the second aircrew member. The current project describes a pre-study walkthrough process that can be used to help in the development of scenarios for testing future concepts and technologies for single pilot operations. Qualitative information regarding the tasks performed by the pilots can be extracted with this technique and adapted for future investigations of single pilot operations.

  3. Molecular and Clinical Responses in a Pilot Study of Gefitinib With Paclitaxel and Radiation in Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint T.; Citrin, Deborah; Gius, David; Colevas, A. Dimetrios; Harold, Nancy A.; Rudy, Susan; Nottingham, Liesl; Muir, Christine; Chen, Zhong; Singh, Anurag K.; Dancey, Janet; Morris, John C.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) stimulates tumor cell proliferation, inhibits apoptosis, and increases chemotherapy and radiation resistance. We examined the toxicity, safety and the effects on EGFR signaling in tumor biopsy samples from patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with the EGFR signaling inhibitor gefitinib (GEF) combined with weekly intravenous paclitaxel (PAC) and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This was a pilot Phase I dose-escalation study. Eligibility included Stage III to IVB HNSCC, age >=18 years, no prior RT or chemotherapy, adequate organ function, and informed consent. Endpoints included determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and analysis of treatment effect on EGFR signaling, tumor cell proliferation, and apoptosis in biopsy samples. Results: Ten patients were treated. The MTD of this combination was GEF 250 mg/d with PAC 36 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly x 6 with concurrent RT. Grade 3/4 toxicities included prolonged (>8 weeks) stomatitis (7 patients), infection (2 patients), and interstitial pneumonitis (1 patient). There were five complete responses (CR) and two partial responses (PR). Of 7 patients undergoing serial biopsies, only 1 patient demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated EGFR, decreased downstream signaling, and reduced cellular proliferation after initiating GEF. Conclusions: Inhibition of EGFR by GEF was observed in only one of seven tumors studied. The addition of GEF to PAC and RT did not appear to improve the response of locally advanced HNSCC compared with our prior experience with PAC and RT alone. This treatment appeared to delay recovery from stomatitis.

  4. Probing the Process of Information Source Selection Using Palm Pilots: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik

    2002-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using PDAs (personal digital assistants or palm pilots) as a data collection device in studying information seeking behaviors of undergraduate students. Discusses results that shows heavy use of Internet search engines and that most information searches do not extend beyond the first…

  5. Cosmic radiation and mortality from cancer among male German airline pilots: extended cohort follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Gaël Paul; Blettner, Maria; Langner, Ingo; Zeeb, Hajo

    2012-06-01

    Commercial airline pilots are exposed to cosmic radiation and other specific occupational factors, potentially leading to increased cancer mortality. This was analysed in a cohort of 6,000 German cockpit crew members. A mortality follow-up for the years 1960-2004 was performed and occupational and dosimetry data were collected for this period. 405 deaths, including 127 cancer deaths, occurred in the cohort. The mortality from all causes and all cancers was significantly lower than in the German population. Total mortality decreased with increasing radiation doses (rate ratio (RR) per 10 mSv: 0.85, 95 % CI: 0.79, 0.93), contrasting with a non-significant increase of cancer mortality (RR per 10 mSv: 1.05, 95 % CI: 0.91, 1.20), which was restricted to the group of cancers not categorized as radiogenic in categorical analyses. While the total and cancer mortality of cockpit crew is low, a positive trend of all cancer with radiation dose is observed. Incomplete adjustment for age, other exposures correlated with duration of employment and a healthy worker survivor effect may contribute to this finding. More information is expected from a pooled analysis of updated international aircrew studies. PMID:22678613

  6. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A pilot study of a spaceborne sidelooking radar is summarized. The results of the system trade studies are given along with the electrical parameters for the proposed subsystems. The mechanical aspects, packaging, thermal control and dynamics of the proposed design are presented. Details of the data processor are given. A system is described that allows the data from a pass over the U. S. to be in hard copy form within two hours. Also included are the proposed schedule, work breakdown structure, and cost estimate.

  7. Dimensional versus categorical use of the PHQ-9 depression scale among persons with non-small-cell lung cancer: a pilot study including quality-of-life comparisons.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kriscinda A; Steiner, Amy R; Lysaker, Paul H; Estes, Deborah D; Hanna, Nasser H

    2010-01-01

    The debate over the relative usefulness of categorical (yes/no) versus dimensional (continuous scales) assessments for determining mental illness has been running strong for nearly a half century. In order to address the utility of each of these assessment methods within the cancer population, in the present study, the dimensional and categorical scoring systems of the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression were compared among patients (n = 14) in the pretreatment stages for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Also included in the study was an additional dimensional measure of depression, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). As predicted, dimensional assessments resulted in higher estimates of depression than did the categorical assessment. As predicted, the dimensional depression assessments, including the PHQ-9 and the BDI-II, which showed depression prevalence rates of 43% and 36%, respectively, produced higher estimates of depression than did the categorical system of the PHQ-9, whose use did not result in any patients being diagnosed with major depression or other depression. Also, as predicted, in terms of quality of life, patients found to be depressed by both the BDI-II and the dimensional PHQ-9 reported significantly worse physical, functional, and emotional well-being than did their nondepressed counterparts. Study findings suggest a need for further investigation into the possibility that patients who score highly on the dimensional scoring system of the PHQ-9 but at values below threshold on the more commonly accepted categorical scoring system of the same measure would benefit from consideration for psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:21086881

  8. Topical application of a sandal wood oil and turmeric based cream prevents radiodermatitis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Palatty, P L; Azmidah, A; Rao, S; Jayachander, D; Thilakchand, K R; Rai, M P; Haniadka, R; Simon, P; Ravi, R; Jimmy, R; D'souza, P F; Fayad, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study objective was to assess the effectiveness of a turmeric- and sandal wood oil-containing cream [Vicco® turmeric cream (VTC); Vicco Laboratories, Parel, India] on radiodermatitis in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 50 patients with head and neck cancer requiring >60 Gy of curative radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy were enrolled in the study. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups of 25 patients. Group 1 was assigned to a topical application of Johnson's® baby oil (Johnson & Johnson Ltd, Baddi, India) and Group 2 for VTC. Prophylactic application of the cream was initiated on Day 1 and continued every day until 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Both agents were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field five times a day, and the acute skin reactions were assessed twice weekly in accordance with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scores by an investigator who was unaware of the details. Results: The incidence of radiodermatitis increased with the exposure to radiation and was the highest in both groups at Week 7. However, a significant reduction in grades of dermatitis were seen in cohorts applying VTC at all time points, including 2 weeks post radiotherapy (p < 0.015 to p < 0.001). The occurrence of Grade 3 dermatitis was lower in the cohorts using VTC and was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Additionally, follow-up observations 2 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy also showed a reduced degree of radiodermatitis in cohorts applying VTC, which was significant (p = 0.015). Conclusion: VTC is shown to be effective in preventing radiodermatitis and needs to be validated in larger double-blind trials. Advances in knowledge: For the first time, this study shows that the turmeric- and sandal oil-based cream was effective in preventing radiation-induced dermatitis. PMID:24694358

  9. NORTHWEST ORGEON PILOT STUDY AREA (USA): THE USE OF LANDSCAPE SCIENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northwest Oregon Pilot Study Area encompasses approximately 59,167 km2 and varies in elevation from sea level to 3,200 m. Annual precipitation varies with elevation and meridian and ranges from 25 - 460cm. The study area comprises a mixture of federal, state, and privately ow...

  10. PILOT STUDY - USES OF MEDICARE MORBIDITY DATA IN HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is a pilot investigation of the practicability of utilizing Social Security Administration (SSA) Medicare morbidity data to supplement mortality data in cancer and other environmentally-related studies. For this study non-confidential data on 1.2 million hospitalizat...

  11. Phase I pilot study of Wilms tumor gene 1 peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayanagi, Shuhei; Kitago, Minoru; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Fujita, Tomonobu; Higuchi, Hajime; Taguchi, Junichi; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Itano, Osamu; Aiura, Koichi; Hamamoto, Yasuo; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Okamoto, Masato; Sunamura, Makoto; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of and immune response to Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) peptide-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination combined with gemcitabine (DCGEM) as a first-line therapy among patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Ten HLA-A*2402 patients were treated with WT1 peptide-pulsed DC vaccination (1 × 10(7) cells) on days 8 and 22 and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) ) on days 1, 8 and 15. Induction of a WT1-specific immune response was evaluated using the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test, interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot and HLA tetramer assays, along with assays for various immunological factors. DCGEM was well-tolerated, and the relative dose intensity of gemcitabine was 87%. Disease control associated with a low neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio was observed in all three patients with DTH positivity; it was also correlated with a low percentage of granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells in the pretreatment peripheral blood (P = 0.017). Patients with liver metastases and high levels of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein and interleukin-8 (IL-8) showed poor survival even though a WT1-specific immune response was induced in them. WT1 peptide-pulsed DCGEM is feasible and effective for inducing anti-tumor T-cell responses. Our results support future investigations for pancreatic cancer patients with non-liver metastases and favorable immunological conditions. This trial was registered with the University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ number: UMIN-000004855). PMID:25614082

  12. A Piloted Simulation Study of Wake Turbulence on Final Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1998-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been conducted in a research simulator to provide a means to estimate the effects of different levels of wake turbulence on final approach. A worst-case methodology was used to ensure conservative estimates. Fourteen airline pilots voluntarily participated in the study and flew almost 1000 approaches. The pilots rated the subjective severity of the disturbances using a special rating scale developed for this study. Several objective measures of the airplane/pilot response to the simulated wake turbulence were also made. All the data showed a large amount of variation between pilots and to a lesser extent for a given pilot. Therefore, the data were presented at 50, 70, 90 percentile levels as a function of vortex strength. The data allow estimates of the vortex strength for a given subjective or objective response and vice versa. The results of this study appear to be more conservative than the results of previous studies.

  13. An assessment of the safety, efficacy, and acceptability of intranasal fentanyl citrate in the management of cancer-related breakthrough pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    2000-10-01

    The effects of intranasal fentanyl citrate (INFC) were assessed in 12 hospice inpatients with cancer-related breakthrough pain. Patients received 20 microg of fentanyl citrate and were asked to rate their pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS) before INFC, then after 3, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes. Eight patients (66%) had reductions in pain scores, four within 5 minutes and seven within 10 minutes of taking INFC. Ratings for INFC were very good (5 = 42%), good (3 = 25%), moderate (1 = 8%), and bad (3 = 25%). In comparison to oral morphine, INFC was better (6 = 50%), the same (3 = 25%), or worse (3 = 25%). Nine patients (75%) said they would continue to use INFC. Of the three patients who did not experience a positive result, two were taking relatively higher baseline opioid doses and one was found to have a fracture. No systemic adverse events were noted; two patients reported nasal itching or discomfort on first use that disappeared with repeated use. Intranasal fentanyl citrate appears safe and well tolerated by these patients. Randomized placebo-controlled and dose-ranging studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:11027906

  14. Improving Understanding about Tanning Behaviors in College Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Basch, Charles E.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Melanoma is the second most common cancer diagnosed among 15- to 29-year-olds. This pilot study assessed behaviors, barriers, and beliefs relevant to sun exposure and protective behaviors. Participants: The sample comprised 153 undergraduate students at a large state university in western New York. Methods: Participants completed an…

  15. Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jinming; Li Xinke; Xing Ligang; Mu Dianbin; Fu Zheng; Sun Xiaorong; Sun Xiangyu; Yang Guoren; Zhang Baijiang; Sun Xindong; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on {sup 18}F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV{sub path}) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-mum sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV{sub path} determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV{sub PET}, was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV{sub PET} was the same as the GTV{sub path}. Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% +- 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 +- 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% +- 11% and 3.0 +- 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV{sub path} and tumor diameter (p < 0.05), but the optimal absolute SUV had no significant correlation with GTV{sub path} or tumor diameter (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV{sub path} as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

  16. Thermoacoustic CT of the breast: pilot study observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Robert A.; Kiser, William L., Jr.; Romilly, A. P.; Scmidt, Phyllis

    2001-06-01

    In order to assess the potential clinical utility of using thermoacoustic computer tomography (TCT) to image the breast, we conducted a retrospective pilot study of 78 patients. We recruited patients in three age groups (<40,40-50,>50 years). The study population was further segregated into normal and suspicious based on the results of the previous x-ray mammography and ultrasound. Image quality was evaluated qualitatively by consensus of two trained mammographers using a 4-point scale. The appearance of normal anatomy, cysts, benign disease and cancer was noted. Patients were also asked to rate the comfort of the TCT exam and to indicate a personal preference for x-ray mammography or TCT. Analysis of the data indicated that TCT image quality was dependent upon both patient age and breast density, improving with both increasing breast density and decreasing patient age. Fibrocystic disease was well seen, cysts appearing as areas of low RF absorption. Fibroadenomas did not demonstrate contrast enhancement with the exception of one patient with associated atypical hyperplasia. Cancer displayed higher RF absorption than surrounding tissues in 4/7 patients in whom cancer was confirmed, including one patient with a 7-mm ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

  17. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  18. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk. PMID:24760534

  19. Piloted studies of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision display parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several studies conducted at Langley Research Center over the past few years. The purposes of these studies were to investigate parameters of pictorial displays and imaging sensors that affect pilot approach and landing performance. Pictorial displays have demonstrated exceptional tracking performance and improved the pilots' spatial awareness. Stereopsis cueing improved pilot flight performance and reduced pilot stress. Sensor image parameters such as increased field-of-view. faster image update rate, and aiding symbology improved flare initiation. Finer image resolution and magnification improved attitude control performance parameters.

  20. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  1. Causes of Mortality Among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The mortality rates (per 100,000) were as follows: total accidental injuries, 10.80; suicide, 6.17; cancer, 1.94; and homicide, 0.53. Within the accident and injury category, alcohol-related vehicular deaths (per 100,000) were 3.37 and alcohol-related nontraffic injuries were 1.49. Men had significantly higher rates of suicide (10.46) than women (2.34). Suggestions for future research and implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26322333

  2. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODS DEVELOPMENT PILOTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are needed to link exposure with health effects. EPA began methods development pilot studies in 2000 to address general questions about exposures and outcome measures. Selected pilot studies are highlighted in this poster. The “Literature Re...

  3. Human Papillomavirus-mediated cervical cancer awareness and Gardasil vaccination: a pilot survey among North Indian women.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saumya; Chandravati

    2013-10-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide, including Indian women. Cervical cancer control and prevention strategies are being adopted in developing nations to reduce the increasing burden of HPV infection in the vaccine era. The present study, therefore, aimed to evaluate cervical cancer awareness and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination in North Indian women. A pilot survey was conducted among 103 women of North Indian ethnicity residing in Lucknow/adjoining areas in state of Uttar Pradesh, during routine screening/clinic visits from June 2012 to December 2012. The study subjects were interviewed in either Hindi or English; subsequently the awareness of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination was assessed in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response". The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Written informed consent was taken from the participants. Overall, the response of participants (n = 103) in our single-centre survey-based pilot study was well-defined. The response regarding HPV-mediated cervical cancer awareness in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response" among the study subjects was 43.7, 44.7 and 11.6 %, respectively. Furthermore, in response to knowledge of HPV vaccine Gardasil, out of 103 subjects, 28.1 % answered "yes" while 37.9 and 34.0 % stated "no" and "no response", respectively. Our pilot survey may help in assessing knowledge of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and Gardasil vaccination awareness in women, and accordingly develop cost-effective cervical cancer control and prevention/public health counseling sessions in a clinical setting. PMID:23653161

  4. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  5. Hypofractionated Boost to the Dominant Tumor Region With Intensity Modulated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Sequential Dose Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond; Molla, Meritxell; Rouzaud, Michel; Hidalgo, Alberto; Toscas, Jose Ignacio; Lozano, Joan; Sanz, Sergi B.Sc.; Ares, Carmen; Jorcano, Sandra; Linero, Dolors; Escude, Lluis

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, tolerability, and preliminary outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated according to a hypofractionated dose escalation protocol to boost the dominant tumor-bearing region of the prostate. Methods and Materials: After conventional fractionated external radiotherapy to 64 to 64.4Gy, 50 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost under stereotactic conditions to a reduced prostate volume to the dominant tumor region. A rectal balloon inflated with 60cc of air was used for internal organ immobilization. Five, 8, and 8 patients were sequentially treated with two fractions of 5, 6, or 7Gy, respectively (normalized total dose in 2Gy/fraction [NTD{sub 2Gy}] < 100Gy, low-dose group), whereas 29 patients received two fractions of 8Gy each (NTD{sub 2Gy} > 100Gy, high-dose group). Androgen deprivation was given to 33 patients. Acute and late toxicities were assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scoring system. Results: Two patients presented with Grade 3 acute urinary toxicity. The 5-year probabilities of {>=}Grade 2 late urinary and late low gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity-free survival were 82.2% {+-} 7.4% and 72.2% {+-} 7.6%, respectively. The incidence and severity of acute or late toxicities were not correlated with low- vs. high-dose groups, pelvic irradiation, age, or treatment with or without androgen deprivation. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (b-DFS) and disease-specific survival were 98% {+-} 1.9% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost dose escalation under stereotactic conditions was feasible, and showed excellent outcomes with acceptable long-term toxicity. This approach may well be considered an alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

  6. Twice-Weekly Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer With Low-Risk Nodal Involvement: Toxicity and Outcome From a Dose Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Jorcano, Sandra; Rouzaud, Michel; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe; Toscas, Jose Ignacio; Casanova, Nathalie; Wang, Hui; Escude, Lluis; Molla, Meritxell; Linero, Dolors; Weber, Damien C.; Miralbell, Raymond

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and preliminary outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer treated with twice-weekly hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 82 prostate cancer patients with a nodal involvement risk {<=}20% (Roach index) have been treated to the prostate with or without seminal vesicles with 56 Gy (4 Gy/fraction twice weekly) and an overall treatment time of 6.5 weeks. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading system. Median follow-up was 48 months (range, 9-67 months). Results: All patients completed the treatment without interruptions. No patient presented with Grade {>=}3 acute GU or GI toxicity. Of the patients, 4% presented with Grade 2 GU or GI persistent acute toxicity 6 weeks after treatment completion. The estimated 4-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity-free survival were 94.2% {+-} 2.9% and 96.1% {+-} 2.2%, respectively. One patient presented with Grade 3 GI and another patient with Grade 4 GU late toxicity, which were transitory in both cases. The 4-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival was 91.3% {+-} 5.9%, 76.4% {+-} 8.8%, and 77.5% {+-} 8.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Conclusions: In patients with localized prostate cancer, acute and late toxicity were minimal after dose-escalation administering twice-weekly 4 Gy to a total dose of 56 Gy, with IMRT. Further prospective trials are warranted to further assess the best fractionation schemes for these patients.

  7. Hypericum for fatigue - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Dixon, M; Ernst, E

    1998-12-01

    Fatigue is a common reason for consulting a doctor but there is no definitive treatment. Hypericum perforatum has been shown to reduce symptoms of fatigue in depressed patients. It therefore may have potential value as a remedy for fatigue of unexplained origin. This pilot study aimed to investigate the effect of Hypericum on fatigue in a small group of patients in order to formulate a hypothesis upon which a randomized controlled trial could be subsequently based. The study protocol followed an uncontrolled, open design. Twenty patients consulting their doctors complaining of fatigue were treated with Hypericum extract (3×1 tablet daily) for six weeks. Compared to baseline values, perceived fatigue was significantly lower after 2 weeks of treatment and reduced significantly further after 6 weeks. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were also reduced. Baseline scores suggested that nearly half the sample may have been depressed at the start of the trial which was possibly related to fatigue. These results suggest there is scope for conducting a randomized placebo-controlled trial to investigate the specific effect of Hypericum on fatigue and that the study design must take account of the role of depression in fatigue. PMID:23196027

  8. [Mobbing in nursing. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Fornés Vives, Joana; Reinés Femenia, Joan; Sureda García, Catalina

    2004-09-01

    While planning to help shed light on the phenomenon of mobbing in the work place and to develop an instrument by which to measure it, the authors carried out a pilot study in which 160 persons from varying professional classes and autonomous communities in Spain participated, 65 of whom were nurses whose ages lie between 20 and 48 years, with a medium age of 33.98. By means of a factorial analysis, the authors discovered that the most common mobbing practices are grouped in a set of eight factors; these eight factors cover 74.17% of all the various factors. The two most significant factors refer to behaviors which can be considered to be personal humiliation and professional discredit. The most common mobbing practice, according to the overall findings of this study group, consists in providing contradictory information to the victim (19.4% once or more times per week), while in nursing, this practice consists of exposing the victim to criticism by the group (50%). PMID:15526573

  9. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  10. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  11. Imaging Cellular Proliferation During Chemo-Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study of Serial {sup 18}F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, Sarah; Hicks, Rodney J.; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Walter, Tania; Binns, David; Mac Manus, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluoro-L-thymidine ({sup 18}F-FLT) can monitor changes in cellular proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radical chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT). Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective pilot study, 5 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent serial {sup 18}F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment. Baseline {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT scans were compared with routine staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two on-treatment {sup 18}F-FLT scans were performed for each patient on Days 2, 8, 15 or 29, providing a range of time points for response assessment. Results: In all 5 patients, baseline lesional uptake of {sup 18}F-FLT on PET/CT corresponded to staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in tumor was observed on five of nine (55%) on-treatment scans, on Days 2, 8 and 29, but not Day 15. A 'flare' of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in the primary tumor of one case was observed after 2 Gy of radiation (1.22 x baseline). The remaining eight on-treatment scans demonstrated a mean reduction in {sup 18}F-FLT tumor uptake of 0.58 x baseline. A marked reduction of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow was observed for all cases. This reduction was observed even after only 2 Gy, and all patients demonstrated a complete absence of proliferating marrow after 10 Gy. Conclusions: This proof of concept study indicates that {sup 18}F-FLT uptake can monitor the distinctive biologic responses of epithelial cancers and highly radiosensitive normal tissue changes during radical chemo-RT. Further studies of {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT imaging during therapy may suggest that this tracer is useful in developing response-adapted RT for NSCLC.

  12. Uranium-contaminated soil pilot treatment study

    SciTech Connect

    Turney, W.R.J.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Michelotti, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot treatment study is proving to be effective for the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil from a site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by use of a two-step, zero-discharge, 100% recycle system. Candidate uranium-contaminated soils were characterized for uranium content, uranium speciation, organic content, size fractionization, and pH. Geochemical computer codes were used to forecast possible uranium leach scenarios. Uranium contamination was not homogenous throughout the soil. In the first step, following excavation, the soil was sorted by use of the ThemoNuclean Services segmented gate system. Following the sorting, uranium-contaminated soil was remediated in a containerized vat leach process by use of sodium-bicarbonate leach solution. Leach solution containing uranium-carbonate complexes is to be treated by use of ion-exchange media and then recycled. Following the treatment process the ion exchange media will be disposed of in an approved low-level radioactive landfill. It is anticipated that treated soils will meet Department of Energy site closure guidelines, and will be given {open_quotes}no further action{close_quotes} status. Treated soils are to be returned to the excavation site. A volume reduction of contaminated soils will successfully be achieved by the treatment process. Cost of the treatment (per cubic meter) is comparable or less than other current popular methods of uranium-contamination remediation.

  13. Pilot study on interfractional and intrafractional movements using surface infrared markers and EPID for patients with rectal cancer treated in the prone position

    PubMed Central

    Eom, K-Y; Kim, K; Chang, J H; Koo, T R; Park, J I; Park, Y-G; Ye, S-J; Ha, S W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate interfractional and intrafractional movement of patients with rectal cancer during radiotherapy with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and surface infrared (IR) markers. Methods: 20 patients undergoing radiotherapy for rectal cancer with body mass index ranging from 18.5 to 30 were enrolled. Patients were placed in the prone position on a couch with a leg pillow. Three IR markers were put on the surface of each patient and traced by two stereo cameras during radiotherapy on a twice-weekly basis. Interfractional isocentre movement was obtained with EPID images on a weekly basis. Movement of the IR markers was analysed in correlation with the isocentre movement obtained from the EPID images. Results: The maximum right-to-left (R-L) movement of the laterally located markers in the horizontal isocentre plane was correlated with isocentre translocation with statistical significance (p = 0.018 and 0.015, respectively). Movement of the surface markers was cyclical. For centrally located markers, the 95% confidence intervals for the average amplitude in the R-L, cranial-to-caudal (C-C) and anterior-to-posterior (A-P) directions were 0.86, 2.25 and 3.48 mm, respectively. In 10 patients, intrafractional movement exceeding 5 mm in at least one direction was observed. Time-dependent systematic movement of surface markers during treatment, which consisted of continuous movement towards the cranial direction and a sail back motion in the A-P direction, was also observed. Conclusion: Intrafractional movement of surface markers has both cyclic components and time-dependent systematic components. Marker deviations exceeding 5 mm were mainly seen in the A-P direction. Pre- or post-treatment EPID images may not provide adequate information regarding intrafractional movement because of systematic movement in the A-P direction during radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: This work uncovered a sail back motion of patients in the A-P direction during

  14. Optical detection of breast cancer: a pilot clinical trial at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuefeng; Mao, Jian M.; Zhu, Wen; Bush, Robin; Kopans, Daniel B.; Moore, Richard H.; Chorlton, Maryann

    2003-06-01

    X-ray mammography has been the major imaging modality in breast cancer detection for years, despite its high false diagnosis rate for malignant tumors and harmful radiation. In the last decade, optical imaging has been emerging as a promising method for breast cancer detection. Using near infrared (NIR) light ranging from 690 nm to 900 nm, an optical device can measure functional properties of breast tissue, such as total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (SO2). Cancers tend to have higher levels of HbT because of their greater vascularization, and lower SO2 because of greater oxygen consumption, than normal tissue. Thus the NIR technology could be useful in breast cancer detection. In addition, optical detection is totally noninvasive and safe, and can be low cost. Photonify Technologies Inc. has developed an optical device for real-time two-dimensional mapping of HbT and SO2 in breast tissue. The device has been tested in a pilot clinical study for a group of 50 patients at the Department of Radiology of the Masachusetts General Hospital at Harvard Medical School. Preliminary results suggest that contrast-normalized standard deviations in HbT and SO2 might be good indicators for breast cancer detection. A patient may have a higher risk to have cancer in a breast portion where the normalized standard deviation in either HbT or SO2 is greater than 0.3. We demonstrate 92% diagnostic sensitivity and 66% specificity in detecting ductal carcinoma, either invasive or in situ. The device may potentially be used as an adjunctive tool with mammography to reduce unnecessary biopsies.

  15. Coal log pipeline pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Lenau, C.W.; Burkett, W.

    2000-07-01

    After 8 years of extensive R and D in the new technology of coal log pipeline (CLP), a pilot plant is being built to demonstrate and test a complete CLP system for coal transportation. The system consists of a coal log fabrication plant, a 3,000-ft-length, 6-inch-diameter underground pipeline loop to transport 5.4-inch diameter coal logs, a log injection/ejection system, a pump bypass, a reservoir that serves as both the intake and the outlet of the CLP systems, an instrumentation system that includes pressure transducers, coal log sensors, and flowmeters, and an automatic control system that includes PLCs and a central computer. The pilot plant is to be completed in May of Year 2000. Upon completion of construction, the pilot plant will be used for running various types of coal, testing the degradation rate of drag reduction in CLP using Polyox (polyethylene oxide), testing the reliability of a special coal log sensor invented at the University of Missouri, testing the reliability and the efficiency of the pump-bypass system for pumping coal log trains through the pipe, and testing various hardware components and software for operating the pilot plant. Data collected from the tests will be used for designing future commercial systems of CLP. The pilot plant experiments are to be completed in two years. Then, the technology of CLP will be ready for commercial use.

  16. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  17. Acupuncture for dyspnea in advanced cancer: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial [ISRCTN89462491

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Feinstein, Marc B; Deng, Gary E; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2005-01-01

    Background Dyspnea, or shortness of breath, is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer. Pharmacologic management is of proven benefit, but it does not help all patients. Preliminary data suggest that acupuncture can relieve dyspnea in a variety of populations, including cancer patients. We conducted a pilot study (ISRCTN89462491) preparatory to a fully powered randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether acupuncture reduces dyspnea in patients with lung or breast cancer. Methods The study sample was comprised of forty-seven patients with lung or breast cancer presenting with dyspnea. Patients receiving symptomatic treatments were not excluded as long as no changes in management were planned during the trial. Patients were randomized to receive a single session of true or placebo acupuncture in addition to their existing dyspnea treatments. Semi-permanent acupuncture "studs" were then inserted: patients applied pressure to these studs twice a day to provide ongoing stimulation to acupuncture points. The subjective sensation of dyspnea was assessed with a 0 – 10 numerical rating scale immediately before and after acupuncture treatment and daily for a week thereafter. Results All but two of 47 randomized patients provided follow-up data. Dyspnea scores were slightly higher for patients receiving true versus placebo acupuncture, for both the period immediately following acupuncture treatment and for the daily one week follow-up (differences between means of 0.34, 95% C.I. -0.33, 1.02 and 0.56, 95% C.I. -0.39, 1.51). The 95% confidence interval excludes the prespecified minimum clinically significant difference of a 20% greater improvement in dyspnea for patients receiving acupuncture. Conclusion The acupuncture technique used in this trial is unlikely to have effects on dyspnea importantly larger than placebo for patients with advanced cancer. PMID:16109163

  18. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  19. Folates in lettuce: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Madelene; Jägerstad, Margaretha; Frølich, Wenche

    2007-01-01

    Background Leafy vegetables are good sources of folates and food shops nowadays offer an increasing number of lettuce varieties. Objective To obtain data on the folate content and forms in common lettuce varieties and spinach sold in the Nordic countries, and to investigate effects of different storage conditions and preparations in the consumer's home or at lunchtime restaurants. Design Folate was analysed in eight different lettuce varieties and spinach using a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method and the detected forms of folates were confirmed by a mass spectrometric detector [liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS)] following heat extraction, deconjugation with rat serum and purification by solid-phase extraction. Results Folate content, expressed in folic acid equivalents, in the lettuce samples varied six-fold, from 30 to 198 µg 100 g−1 on a fresh weight basis. The folate content was decreased by 14% after storage at 4°C for 8 days and by 2–40% after storage at 22°C for 2–4 h, depending on whether samples were stored as whole leaves, or small torn or cut pieces. LC-MS confirmed the identity of the folate forms: H4folate, 5-CH3-H4folate, 5-HCO-H4folate and 10-HCO-H4folate. Conclusion The considerable variation in folate content between varieties of lettuce in this pilot study, with one variety reaching the level found in spinach, indicates the potential to increase folate intake considerably by choosing folate-rich varieties of lettuce and storing at low temperatures.

  20. Cancers Selected for Study - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas researchers are mapping the genetic changes in 33 cancers. Find out which cancers have been selected for study, the criteria for selection and the scientific questions being asked about each cancer.

  1. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SOIL STABILIZATION PILOT STUDY, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY AND HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a project plan for a pilot study at the United Chrome NPL site, Corvallis, Oregon and includes the health and safety and quality assurance/quality control plans. The plan reports results of a bench-scale study of the treatment process as iieasured by the ...

  2. The Process of Oncology Nurse Practitioner Patient Navigation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Oncology nurse practitioner (ONP) patient navigators may improve clinical outcomes. However, no standard measures of the process of oncology patient navigation or of related clinical outcomes exist, and research in this area is limited. The exploratory pilot study detailed in this article used grounded theory and interviews with three ONPs to define the processes employed by ONP patient navigators in caring for patients with cancer.
. PMID:26991716

  3. Protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of an online intervention for post-treatment cancer survivors with persistent fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Teresa; Walsh, Jane C; Groarke, AnnMarie; Moss-Morris, Rona; McGuire, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many post-treatment cancer survivors experience persistent fatigue that can disrupt attempts to resume normal everyday activities after treatment. Theoretical models that aim to explain contributory factors that initiate and sustain fatigue symptoms, or that influence the efficacy of interventions for cancer-related fatigue (CrF) require testing. Adjustment to fatigue is likely to be influenced by coping behaviours that are guided by the representations of the symptom. Objectives This paper describes the protocol for a pilot trial of a systematically and theoretically designed online intervention to enable self-management of CrF after cancer treatment. Methods and analysis This 2-armed randomised controlled pilot trial will study the feasibility and potential effectiveness of an online intervention. Participants will be allocated to either the online intervention (REFRESH (Recovery from Cancer-Related Fatigue)), or a leaflet comparator. Participants 80 post-treatment cancer survivors will be recruited for the study. Interventions An 8-week online intervention based on cognitive–behavioural therapy. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in fatigue as measured by the Piper Fatigue Scale (revised). Quality of life will be measured using the Quality of Life in Adult Survivors of Cancer Scale. Outcome measures will be collected at baseline, and at completion of intervention. Results The feasibility of trial procedures will be tested, as well as the effect of the intervention on the outcomes. Conclusions This study may lead to the development of a supportive resource to target representations and coping strategies of cancer survivors with CrF post-treatment. Setting Recruitment from general public in Ireland. Ethics and dissemination This trial was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at National University of Ireland Galway in January 2013. Trial results will be communicated in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial

  4. Pilot-testing a cancer education curriculum for grades K-6.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, D J; Bases, H; Quackenbush, M; Mayne, S; Morra, M; Cicchetti, D

    2001-02-01

    Risk behaviors established during childhood including tobacco use, sunning, and eating habits contribute to most adult cancers. This project pilot-tested a developmentally appropriate cancer prevention curriculum for grades K-6, using a treatment group only design with pretesting and posttesting using a standardized, semistructured interview and involving 67 students (77% of eligible students) attending mixed grade classes. A seven-unit curriculum based on cognitive development, social cognitive, and social influence theories was taught by classroom teachers. Students showed a significant (p < .0001) gain in conceptual understanding for causality and prevention of cancer; the gain for causality of cancer was comparable to the baseline difference between kindergarten and the highest (5-6) grade. Significant gains in factual knowledge and decreases in misconceptions about casual contact also were documented. A developmentally based elementary school cancer prevention curriculum can enhance young children's conceptual understanding and factual knowledge of common contributors to adult cancers. PMID:11247381

  5. Recommendations for planning pilot studies in clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Moore, Charity G; Carter, Rickey E; Nietert, Paul J; Stewart, Paul W

    2011-10-01

    Advances in clinical and translation science are facilitated by building on prior knowledge gained through experimentation and observation. In the context of drug development, preclinical studies are followed by a progression of phase I through phase IV clinical trials. At each step, the study design and statistical strategies are framed around research questions that are prerequisites for the next phase. In other types of biomedical research, pilot studies are used for gathering preliminary support for the next research step. However, the phrase "pilot study" is liberally applied to projects with little or no funding, characteristic of studies with poorly developed research proposals, and usually conducted with no detailed thought of the subsequent study. In this article, we present a rigorous definition of a pilot study, offer recommendations for the design, analysis and sample size justification of pilot studies in clinical and translational research, and emphasize the important role that well-designed pilot studies play in the advancement of science and scientific careers. PMID:22029804

  6. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. PMID:25533732

  7. Piloted simulation study of two tilt-wing control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1994-01-01

    A two-phase piloted simulation study was conducted to investigate alternative wing and flap controls for tilt-wing aircraft. The initial phase of the study compared the flying qualities of both a conventional (programmed) flap and an innovative geared flap. The second phase of the study introduced an alternate method of pilot control for the geared flap and further studied the flying qualities of the programmed flap, and two geared flap configurations. In general, the pilot rating showed little variation between the programmed flap and the geared flap control concepts. Some differences between the two concepts were noticed and are discussed in this paper. The addition of pitch attitude stabilization in the second phase of the study greatly enhanced the aircraft flying qualities. This paper describes the simulated tilt-wing aircraft and the flap control concepts and presents the results of both phases of the simulation study.

  8. THE EFFECT OF THERMAL ENVIRONMENT ON LEARNING, A PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PECCOLO, CHARLES

    THIS IS A REPORT OF A FIRST PILOT STUDY WHICH PRECEDES A SERIES OF STUDIES BEING CONDUCTED BY THE IOWA CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND LENNOX INDUSTRIES INC., MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA. IT IS A DIGEST OF A THESIS BY DR. CHARLES PECCOLO WHO SERVED AS RESEARCHER ON THIS FIRST STUDY. THE STUDY AIMED AT MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL…

  9. STATISTICAL COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF TWO INDOOR AIR PILOT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to compare the results between two previous indoor air PAH monitoring studies conducted by EPA in 1984 and 1987. Both of the previous studies were pilot studies involving ambient and indoor air monitoring at a small number of residences in Columbus...

  10. Pilot Biofeedback Training in the Cognitive Awareness Training Study (CATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenking, M.

    2000-01-01

    One of the ongoing problems that pilots face today is a diminished state of awareness such as boredom, sleepiness, or fatigue during cruise conditions that could result in various pilot errors. This study utilized a cognitive training exercise to sharpen the pilot's awareness during simulated flight thereby providing them with a means to overcome these diminished states of awareness. This study utilizes psychophysiological methods in an attempt to assess a pilot's state of awareness more directly. In turn, the pilots will be able to train themselves to recognize these states of awareness and be more mentally sharp during mundane tasks such as those experienced in cruise conditions. The use of these measurement tools may be beneficial for researchers working within the NASA Aviation Safety Program. This paper will provide the reader with some background information concerning the motivation for the study, a brief description of the experimental setup and design matrix, the dependent and independent variables that were employed, and some preliminary findings based on some of the subjective and objective data that was collected. These preliminary findings are of part of an ongoing study being conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

  11. Pilot initiative in India to explore the gonadal function and fertility outcomes of a cohort of childhood cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Puneet Rana; Misra, Ruchira; Mehrotra, Sumit; Mittal, Charu; Sharma, Sonal; Bagai, Poonam; Arora, Ramandeep Singh

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Steady improvement in childhood cancer outcomes has led to a growing number of survivors, many of who develop long-term sequelae. There is limited data about these sequelae (including those related to fertility) on childhood cancer survivors from India. AIMS: We undertook a prospective pilot study on childhood cancer survivors from India to assess their gonadal function and fertility. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A pediatric oncologist and a reproductive medicine specialist assessed 21 childhood cancer survivors. The risk of infertility was established using disease and treatment variables. Current status of puberty, sexuality, and fertility were assessed using clinical and biochemical parameters. Outcomes were correlated with risk group of infertility. Information was also ascertained on counseling with regards to risk of infertility. RESULTS: The cohort included 21 survivors (71% males) with a median age of 18 years who were off treatment for a median age of 7 years. Ten (48%) survivors were at low risk for infertility, 9 (43%) at medium risk and 2 (9%) at high risk. Gonadal dysfunction was seen in 3 (14%) survivors: 0/10 (0%) low risk, 1/9 (11%) medium risk, and 2/2 (100%) high risk. None of the survivors, who are at high risk or medium risk of infertility, received any counseling before treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective pilot study of a cohort of childhood cancer survivors from India demonstrates a deficiency in the information provided and counseling of patients/families at the time of diagnosis with regards to the risk of infertility. Fertility outcomes of childhood cancer survivors were congruent with recognized risk groups for infertility. Future action points have been identified. PMID:27382233

  12. Automatic Generation of Test Oracles - From Pilot Studies to Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Smith, Ben

    1998-01-01

    There is a trend towards the increased use of automation in V&V. Automation can yield savings in time and effort. For critical systems, where thorough V&V is required, these savings can be substantial. We describe a progression from pilot studies to development and use of V&V automation. We used pilot studies to ascertain opportunities for, and suitability of, automating various analyses whose results would contribute to V&V. These studies culminated in the development of an automatic generator of automated test oracles. This was then applied and extended in the course of testing an Al planning system that is a key component of an autonomous spacecraft.

  13. 78 FR 52548 - The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study... Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study, 0925-0593, Expiration 8/31/2014--Revision, Eunice Kennedy Shriver... activities for the NCS Vanguard Study and receive a renewal of the Vanguard Study clearance. The NCS...

  14. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  15. CHESS (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System): an interactive computer system for women with breast cancer piloted with an underserved population.

    PubMed

    McTavish, F M; Gustafson, D H; Owens, B H; Hawkins, R P; Pingree, S; Wise, M; Taylor, J O; Apantaku, F M

    1995-07-01

    The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) is an interactive computer system containing information, social support, and problem-solving tools. It was developed with intensive input from potential users through needs-assessment surveys and field testing. CHESS had previously been used by women in the middle and upper socioeconomic classes with high school and college education. This article reports on the results of a pilot study involving eight African-American women with breast cancer from impoverished neighborhoods in Chicago. CHESS was very well received; was extensively used; and produced feelings of acceptance, motivation, understanding, and relief. PMID:10143478

  16. CHESS: An interactive computer system for women with breast cancer piloted with an under-served population.

    PubMed

    McTavish, F M; Gustafson, D H; Owens, B H; Wise, M; Taylor, J O; Apantaku, F M; Berhe, H; Thorson, B

    1994-01-01

    The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) is an interactive computer system containing information, social support and problem solving tools. It was developed with intensive input from potential users through needs-assessment surveys and field testing. CHESS had previously been used by women in the middle and upper socio-economic classes with high school and college education. This article reports on the results of a pilot study involving eight African-American women with breast cancer from impoverished neighborhoods in the city of Chicago. CHESS was very well received, extensively used and produced feelings of acceptance, motivation, understanding and relief. PMID:7949998

  17. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) The design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms and the current state-of-the-art understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. (2) Assimilation of laboratory core flood and rock consumption data. Use of this data in 1-D and 2-D limited area simulations, and a 3-D model of the entire pilot project. (3) Simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2-D area of the field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long term consumption functions and two relative permeability adjustment mechanisms. (4) Scale up of 2-D simulation results, and their use in a 271 acre 1.097 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 2/), 7 layered 3-D model of the pilot. (5) Comparison of 3-D simulator results with initial field alkaline flood performance. (6) Recommended additional application of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods. 10 refs.

  18. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Becnel, Lauren B.; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Kovar, Christie L.; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html). PMID:26882539

  19. An open access pilot freely sharing cancer genomic data from participants in Texas.

    PubMed

    Becnel, Lauren B; Pereira, Stacey; Drummond, Jennifer A; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R; Kovar, Christie L; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Hu, Jianhong; Muzny, Donna; McGuire, Amy L; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data sharing in cancer has been restricted to aggregate or controlled-access initiatives to protect the privacy of research participants. By limiting access to these data, it has been argued that the autonomy of individuals who decide to participate in data sharing efforts has been superseded and the utility of the data as research and educational tools reduced. In a pilot Open Access (OA) project from the CPRIT-funded Texas Cancer Research Biobank, many Texas cancer patients were willing to openly share genomic data from tumor and normal matched pair specimens. For the first time, genetic data from 7 human cancer cases with matched normal are freely available without requirement for data use agreements nor any major restriction except that end users cannot attempt to re-identify the participants (http://txcrb.org/open.html). PMID:26882539

  20. Piloting cross-boundary training to develop cancer care nursing.

    PubMed

    Lawther, Christine; Taylor, Sue; Bell, Ann; White, Helen

    Flexible approaches to lifelong learning have the potential to increase motivation and influence recruitment and retention. This paper explores how the introduction of a collaborative rotational placement programme between the NHS and the voluntary sector helped qualified staff to develop their practice in caring for patients with cancer from diagnosis through to bereavement. Staff experienced an increase in their personal motivation, confidence and enthusiasm. PMID:14768152

  1. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  2. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  3. Community College Administrators and Faculty Scholarship: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshood, Nabil

    1995-01-01

    Describes a pilot study examining the attitudes of presidents and chief academic officers at the 19 New Jersey community colleges toward faculty scholarship. Indicates that although 81% of respondents were willing to offer more incentives for scholarship, 87% were unwilling to reduce teaching loads and 77% were unwilling to require scholarship.…

  4. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  5. Causes of Mortality among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The…

  6. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS & PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Led by the United States, represented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the Pilot Study on Clean Products and Processes was instituted to create an international forum where current trends, developments, and expert...

  7. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  8. Outcome evaluation of a pilot study using "nudges"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every school day, over 31 million U.S. children eat school lunches. Unfortunately, students often do not choose the healthy options in the school cafeteria. This paper describes outcome results of a pilot study using "nudges" to improve elementary school students' fruits and vegetables selections. A...

  9. Results of the "In Control: No Alcohol!" Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mares, Suzanne H. W.; van der Vorst, Haske; Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E. E.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50% of Dutch 12-year olds already started drinking. Since it is known that delaying the onset of alcohol use results in a lower risk of alcohol-related problems, the recently developed "In control: No alcohol!" prevention program is targeted at elementary school children and their mothers. In this pilot study, the success of program…

  10. PILOT STUDY OF FLUORIDE AND ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot plant studies were conducted on the removal of fluoride and arsenic from potable water using activated alumina as the adsorbent. The tests were run using water from the community of Why, Arizona, that contained 3 mg/L fluoride and 0.15 mg/L arsenic. The experimental data sh...

  11. Initial Scale Development: Sample Size for Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Brooks, Gordon P.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies are often recommended by scholars and consultants to address a variety of issues, including preliminary scale or instrument development. Specific concerns such as item difficulty, item discrimination, internal consistency, response rates, and parameter estimation in general are all relevant. Unfortunately, there is little discussion…

  12. [Treatment of spasticity with a transcutaneous neurostimulator. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, R; Jordt, M; Hansen, E

    1995-04-24

    In this pilot study the neurostimulator KDC 5000 is used with efficacy on seven out of 11 patients with spastic palsy, and treatment was given without any side-effects. No other treatment has sufficiently helped these patients, and we therefore conclude that such treatment with a neuro-stimulator could be beneficial for selected patients with spastic palsy of extremities. PMID:7762102

  13. CSO DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY: SPRING CREEK CSO STORAGE FACILITY UPGRADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research summary presents the results of a pilot-scale disinfection study performed for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under a contract to Camp Dresser & McKee of Woodbury, New York. The main ob...

  14. RESEARCH PLAN FOR PILOT STUDIES OF THE BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a research plan for an assessment of risks to biodiversity. he plan describes the theoretical basis of the research approach and the data and methods to be used in the assessment. nitial research activities are formulated as a set of pilot studies that will e...

  15. Achieving Competence: Army-VOTEC School Partnership Pilot Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Mary W.

    To reduce Army training costs, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) investigated use of training at civilian secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical (VOTEC) institutions as an alternative to initial job training in Army service schools. Three models were used in the pilot study: the preservice training model in which…

  16. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  17. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  18. Job Rotation at Cardiff University Library Service: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earney, Sally; Martins, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents case study research of a job rotation pilot involving six library assistants in Cardiff University Library Service (ULS). Firstly, it investigates whether job rotation improves motivation and secondly, whether there is an improvement in skills, both technical and "soft". Following a review of the literature, semi-structured…

  19. Assessing Student Engagement: HSSSE Pilot Study with Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    NAIS and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation recently launched a three-year pilot study on the use of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) among independent schools. HSSSE, administered by Indiana University, is a survey designed to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of high school students about their work. This…

  20. Minesweeper and Hypothetical Thinking Action Research & Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research project and Pilot Study was designed and implemented to improve students' hypothetical thinking abilities by exploring the possibility that learning and playing the computer game Minesweeper may inherently help improve hypothetical thinking. One objective was to use educational tools to make it easier for students to learn the…

  1. The CITRA Pilot Studies Program: Mentoring Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Wethington, Elaine; Breckman, Risa; Meador, Rhoda; Reid, M. Carrington; Sabir, Myra; Lachs, Mark; Pillemer, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We developed an innovative pilot studies program to foster partnerships between university researchers and agencies serving older people in New York City. The development of researchers willing to collaborate with frontline service agencies and service agencies ready to partner with researchers is critical for translating scientific research into evidence-based practice that benefits community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods We adapted the traditional academic pilot studies model to include key features of community-based participatory research. Results In partnership with a network of 265 senior centers and service agencies, we built a multistep program to recruit and educate scientific investigators and agencies in the principles of community-based research and to fund research partnerships that fulfilled essential elements of research translation from university to community: scientific rigor, sensitivity to community needs, and applicability to frontline practice. We also developed an educational and monitoring infrastructure to support projects. Implications Pilot studies programs developing community-based participatory research require an infrastructure that can supplement individual pilot investigator efforts with centralized resources to ensure proper implementation and dissemination of the research. The financial and time investment required to maintain programs such as those at the Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging, or CITRA, may be a barrier to establishing similar programs. PMID:18192638

  2. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  3. Dissolution Studies With Pilot Plant and Actual INTEC Calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Garn, Troy Gerry

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/ Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive A1(NO3)3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt. % of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt. % dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt. % dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  4. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated {gt}95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  5. Southeastern Cancer Study Group: breast cancer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.V.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Moore, M.

    1983-12-01

    During the past 10 years, the Southeastern Cancer Study Group (SECSG) has been engaged in one major adjuvant study and three major advanced disease studies for patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast. The adjuvant study is demonstrating that six months of adjuvant CMF is the therapeutic equivalent of 12 months and that post-operative irradiation is of no added therapeutic benefit. In patients with advanced disease, a low dose 5 drug combination of CMFVP induces more objective responses than single agent 5FU, but improves survival only for those patients with liver metastases when compared to the sequential use of the same 5 single agents. The three drug combination, CAF, utilizing doxorubicin, induces more objective responses than low dose CMFVP, but it does not improve overall survival. The addition of a phase active combination, CAMELEON, (i.e., sequentially alternating therapy) of CAF has not improved the duration of disease control and survival for patients with liver metastases, lymphangitic and nodular lung metastases compared to CAF. Aggressive combination chemotherapeutic approaches to patients with advanced disease provide better and longer disease and tumor control but only marginal improvements in overall survival. Adding additional agents to a maximally tolerable regimen has not improved the therapeutic outcome.

  6. Estimation of thyroglobulin in lymph node aspirates: Pilot experience from a tertiary referral cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Subramanian; Chauhan, Subhra; Naveen; Latha, B. S.; Raju, Nalini; Chandrasekhar, Naveen Hedne; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Manjunath, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Assessment of cervical lymph node involvement in patients with thyroid cancer either during preoperative surgical mapping or detection of recurrences during follow-up is a crucial step in the management of differentiated thyroid cancers (DTCs). In most patients, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) confirms the presence of metastasis in lymph node. However, in cases of paucicellular lymph node aspirate or discordant sonogram and cytology results, thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement in the lymph node aspirate (FNA-Tg) is useful and a value >1 ng/ml is considered consistent with metastatic disease. Context: The addition of FNAC to the US improves the specificity, but 5–10% are nondiagnostic and 6–8% rate of false-negative results. Several studies have reported that the detection of Tg in FNA-needle washes improves the evaluation of suspicious lymph nodes in patients with DTC.Data from Indian centers on FNA-Tg are limited. Aims: We piloted the utility of FNA-Tg in patients with sonographically suspicious cervical lymph node enlargement in the setting of suspicious thyroid nodule or in the follow-up of thyroid cancer. Settings and Design: Prospective data collection. Results: We measured Tg in 13 lymph node aspirates (12 patients, 10 females) among whom 4 patients had a total thyroidectomy and 1 had a hemithyroidectomy. Eight of the 13 lymph node aspirates had FNA-Tg values >150 ng/ml, all of them had unequivocal malignant cytology and four among them had proven metastatic DTC on surgical pathology. The median FNA-Tg of the patients with malignant cytology was 7550 ng/ml with a range of 162–30,000 ng/ml. Among the remaining 5 lymph node aspirate, 2 lymph nodes showed cytological features suggestive of reactive lymphadenitis (FNA-Tg <0.2 ng/ml) and were not operated, 1 had a high-grade malignancy consistent with anaplastic thyroid cancer (FNA-Tg <0.2 ng/ml), and 2 had nondiagnostic cytology (one had non-caseating granuloma on surgical pathology [FNA-Tg 1

  7. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print. PMID:27209871

  8. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  9. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy hyperthermia (HIPEC) for peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian cancer origin by fluid and CO2 recirculation using the closed abdomen technique (PRS-1.0 Combat): A clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Susana; Villarejo-Campos, Pedro; Padilla-Valverde, David; Amo-Salas, Mariano; Martín-Fernández, Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Background This paper reports a study of 21 patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC by means of PRS-1.0 Combat®, a new model for closed abdomen HIPEC aimed at improving fluid distribution with assistance from a CO2 recirculation system. This new technology has been previously shown to be successful in an experimental study (pig model) performed by our group, and has been approved for use in our hospital. Methods Twenty-one patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian cancer origin were included in the study. Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC were performed by a closed abdomen fluid and CO2 recirculation technique using the PRS-1.0 Combat(®) model. We analysed the intraoperative safety tolerance and post-operative morbidity and mortality during the first 30 days. Results Between November 2011 and March 2014 21 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage II-IV, were included in the study. During the procedure there were no significant haemodynamic or analytical disturbances. Complication rates were 38.1% and 57.14% for grade III/IV and minor (grade I/II) complications, respectively. Post-operative mortality was 4.76% (one patient). Complete cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy improved overall survival and disease-free survival in women with advanced ovarian cancer. The association of intra-abdominal hyperthermia with chemotherapy (HIPEC) increased the therapeutic benefit. Conclusions This study has shown that closed abdomen intraperitoneal chemohyperthermia by a fluid and CO2 recirculation system (PRS-1.0 Combat(®)) can be a safe and feasible model for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian cancer origin. PMID:27056558

  10. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  11. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  12. Spinal patterns as predictors of personality profiles: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koren, T; Rosenwinkel, E

    1992-01-01

    The present pilot study is part of an ongoing effort to further the investigation of the relationship between spinal patterns and personality. The present pilot study seeks to identify likely spinal patterns of certain personality profiles and asks whether changing posture can affect personality, and/or can emotional states alter posture? Forty patients of a private chiropractic practice participated in the study. Four radiographs (x-rays) of each subject were taken and each subject completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Measurements obtained from the radiographs and the MMPI data were used to derive general linear models of the predictability of the MMPI in terms of the spinal/postural measures. Several models were highly significant and preliminary support for the authors' hypothesis that spinal patterns are likely to be predictive of personality profiles is suggested. Support for previous research is offered and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1428613

  13. Support for Students Exposed to Trauma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaycox, Lisa H.; Langley, Audra K.; Stein, Bradley D.; Wong, Marleen; Sharma, Priya; Scott, Molly; Schonlau, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of trauma exposure among students, the need for intervention programs is clear. Delivery of such programs in the school setting eliminates key barriers to access, but there are few programs that demonstrate efficacy in this setting. Programs to date have been designed for delivery by clinicians, who are a scarce resource in many schools. This study describes preliminary feasibility and acceptability data from a pilot study of a new program, Support for Students Exposed to Trauma, adapted from the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) program. Because of its “pilot” nature, all results from the study should be viewed as preliminary. Results show that the program can be implemented successfully by teachers and school counselors, with good satisfaction among students and parents. Pilot data show small reductions in symptoms among the students in the SSET program, suggesting that this program shows promise that warrants a full evaluation of effectiveness. PMID:20811511

  14. Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Mission: Human Research Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B. (Editor); Walker, Karen R. (Editor); Hargens, Alan (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Life Sciences, Microgravity Science and Spacelab Mission contains a number of human experiments directed toward identifying the functional, metabolic and neurological characteristics of muscle weakness and atrophy during space flight. To ensure the successful completion of the flight experiments, a ground-based pilot study, designed to mimic the flight protocols as closely as possible, was carried out in the head-down tilt bed rest model. This report records the rationales, procedures, preliminary results and estimated value of the pilot study, the first of its kind, for 12 of the 13 planned experiments in human research. The bed rest study was conducted in the Human Research Facility at Ames Research Center from July 11 - August 28, 1995. Eight healthy male volunteers performed the experiments before, during and after 17 days bed rest. The immediate purposes of this simulation were to integrate the experiments, provide data in a large enough sample for publication of results, enable investigators to review individual experiments in the framework of a multi-disciplinary study and relay the experience of the pilot study to the mission specialists prior to launch.

  15. The H-ATLAS 1000 lens survey: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, Robert; Coppin, Kristen; Serjeant, Stephen; Verma, Aprajita; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Negrello, Mattia; Dye, Simon; Ivison, Rob; Riechers, Dominik; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Michalowski, Michal; Van Der Werf, Paul; Bremer, Malcolm; Clements, Dave; Lapi, Andrea; Temi, Pasquale; Baker, Andrew; Omont, Alain; De Zotti, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Strong gravitational lensing is one of the very few probes capable of mapping galactic dark matter distributions. Lensing provides independent cosmological parameter estimates and enables the study of galaxy populations that are otherwise too faint for detailed study. We pioneered a major new strong gravitational lens selection method via submm-wave surveys (Negrello et al. 2010 Science). When combined with near-IR surveys we can now generate the first ever 1000-lens survey. We request a pilot foreground lens redshift survey for 50 lenses. This pilot alone increases the number of confirmed submm-selected lens systems at z > 0.5 by x5, placing our new lensing discoveries on a par with SLACS (but at much higher lens redshifts), and distinguishing between NFW and SIS models of the foreground population. Combining this data with ongoing mm-wave source redshifts, we will constrain Omega_Lambda to around +/-0.01.

  16. A pilot study of energy efficient air cleaning for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara A.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Katsapov, Gregory Y.; Fisk, William J.

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory pilot study has been undertaken with the material that showed the most promise (high capacity and low pressure drop) based on the literature review and associated calculations. The best-performing air cleaner was a commercially available pleated filter that contained a thin layer of small activated carbon particles between two sheets of non-woven fibrous webbing. We will refer to this unit as the ''ozone filter'' although it is marketed for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile passenger compartments. This pilot study strongly suggests that ozone air cleaning can be practical in commercial air handling systems; however, further tests are needed to assess air cleaner performance under a wider range of conditions.

  17. Risk factors for hidradenitis suppurativa: a pilot study*

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Juliano Vilaverde; Bombonatto, Giovana; Martin, Manoela; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2012-01-01

    The hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease whose etiology is not fully understood. We conducted a pilot case-control study matched by sex and age with other dermatological patients to analyze possible risk factors associated with this disease. We included 15 cases and 45 controls, 67% were women. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis identified significant association with smoking, higher body mass index and family history. The use of hormonal contraceptives was less frequent in women with hidradenitis. PMID:23197222

  18. Patient education and migraine: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Centonze, V; Polito, B M; Cassiano, M A; Albano, M G; Ricchetti, G; Bassi, A; Causarano, V; Dalfino, L; Albano, O

    1998-01-01

    Our study examines the effectiveness of an educational approach to migraine patients. A course in migraine education was set up for 30 patients suffering from this disease; meetings were structured taking into consideration specific educational aims, with parameters evaluated before the course, at the end of the course and at a 3-month follow-up. The results, particularly the increase in the migraineurs' knowledge of their disease and the decrease in the use of symptomatic drugs, suggest the effectiveness of the course. Furthermore, our study suggests that there is a need to build educational processes into therapeutic protocols, as they enable patients to manage their chronic diseases more correctly. PMID:9626596

  19. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  20. THE NORTH CAROLINA HERALD PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory



    The sampling design for the National Children's Study (NCS) calls for a population-based, multi-stage, clustered household sampling approach. The full sample is designed to be representative of both urban and rural births in the United States, 2007-2011. While other sur...

  1. A Pilot Study of Hungarian Discourse Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Der, Csilla Ilona; Marko, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first attempt at detecting formal and positional characteristics of single-word simple discourse markers in a spontaneous speech sample of Hungarian. In the first part of the research, theoretical claims made in the relevant literature were tested. The data did not confirm or only partially confirmed the claims that Hungarian…

  2. DISCOVER in Lebanon: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance-based assessment, in identifying gifted students in Lebanon. DISCOVER is grounded in Gardner's MI theory and consists of tasks involving problem-solving and creative abilities. The sample consisted of 49 middle-class 5-th graders, with a mean age of 10.2…

  3. The SunWise Policy intervention for school-based sun protection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Karen M; Geller, Alan C; Viswanath, Vish; Rutsch, Linda; Zwirn, Jodie; Gorham, Sue; Puleo, Elaine

    2008-08-01

    Skin cancer is highly preventable, but clearly there is a critical need to focus on better ways to disseminate information about known skin cancer prevention. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) SunWise Program is one channel for reaching children, teachers, and school nurses. In a pilot study designed to increase adoption of school-based sun protection policies, 28 schools were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Control, which included the EPA's original SunWise curriculum toolkit; SunWise Policy, which included a revised toolkit emphasizing policy; and SunWise Policy plus Technical Assistance, which included the policy toolkit and 3 technical assistance phone calls. The enhanced SunWise Policy plus Technical Assistance intervention led to more new sun protection policies. Use of study interventions for improving sun protection practices such as policy toolkits or brief counseling can be easily interwoven into school hours by school nurses and other health educators. PMID:18757354

  4. Commercial conspiracy theories: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed many people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as) wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs. The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed. Limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:23818886

  5. Commercial conspiracy theories: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed many people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as) wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs. The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed. Limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:23818886

  6. Cavity wounds management: a multicentre pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Facy, Olivier; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Ribemont, Annie-Claude; Sigal, Michele-Lea; Couffinhal, Jean-Claude; Trial, Chloe; Tacca, Olivier; Bohbot, Serge

    The objective of this study was to assess acceptability (based on pain at removal), efficacy and tolerance of an absorbent and cohesive rope(UrgoClean Rope, Laboratoires Urgo) in the local management of deep cavity wounds. This study was a prospective, multicentre (13), non comparative clinical study. Patients presenting with an acute or chronic non-infected cavity wound were followed up for four weeks and assessed weekly with a physical examination, in addition to volumetric,planimetric and photographic evaluations. Pain at removal was the primary criterion, assessed on a Visual Analogic Scale. The percentage of the wound surface area reduction and volumetric reduction were considered as secondary efficacy criteria. Forty three patients were included in this study. After one week of treatment dressing removal was painless and continued to be so throughout the period of the trial(four weeks). Median surface area at baseline was 7.74 cm2 and was reduced by 54.5% at week 4 (relative area reduction). Median wound volumetric value was noted 12 ml at baseline and was reduced by 72.7% by the end of treatment. The cohesiveness of the new rope was considered very good by health professionals. No residue was observed on the wound bed during the dressing change with the new rope. There were no adverse events related to the tested rope, during this trial.Pain-free removal associated with good efficacy and tolerance were observed with this new cohesive rope in the healing process of deep cavity wounds and could represent a therapeutic alternative to the usual ropes used in such indications. PMID:24180023

  7. Simultaneous determination of the novel thiosemicarbazone anti-cancer agent, Bp4eT, and its main phase I metabolites in plasma: application to a pilot pharmacokinetic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Stariat, Ján; Suprunová, Vlasta; Roh, Jaroslav; Šesták, Vít; Eisner, Tomáš; Filipský, Tomáš; Mladěnka, Přemysl; Nobilis, Milan; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Klimeš, Jiří; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R; Kovaříková, Petra

    2014-05-01

    Novel thiosemicarbazone metal chelators are extensively studied anti-cancer agents with marked and selective activity against a wide variety of cancer cells, as well as human tumor xenografts in mice. This study describes the first validated LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT) and its main metabolites (E/Z isomers of the semicarbazone structure, M1-E and M1-Z, and the amidrazone metabolite, M2) in plasma. Separation was achieved using a C18 column with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mixture as the mobile phase. Plasma samples were treated using solid-phase extraction on 96-well plates. This method was validated over the concentration range of 0.18-2.80 μM for Bp4eT, 0.02-0.37 μM for both M1-E and M1-Z, and 0.10-1.60 μM for M2. This methodology was applied to the analysis of samples from in vivo experiments, allowing for the concentration-time profile to be simultaneously assessed for the parent drug and its metabolites. The current study addresses the lack of knowledge regarding the quantitative analysis of thiosemicarbazone anti-cancer drugs and their metabolites in plasma and provides the first pharmacokinetic data on a lead compound of this class. PMID:24254882

  8. Development and pilot of an advance care planning website for women with ovarian cancer: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Petzel, Sue V.; Cragg, Julie; McClellan, Molly; Chan, Daniel; Dickson, Elizabeth; Jacko, Julie A.; Sainfort, François; Geller, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few available tools facilitate cancer patients and physicians' discussions of quality of life and end-of-life. Our objective was to develop a web-based tool to promote advance care planning for women with ovarian cancer. Methods Women with ovarian cancer, their families, clinicians and researchers met to identify ways to improve cancer care. A prototype website was created to address advance care planning, focusing on advance healthcare directives (AHD) and palliative care consultation. Patients were recruited from a gynecologic oncology clinic for a pilot randomized controlled trial. Primary outcomes included completion of an AHD and palliative care consultation. Results At study completion, 53 women with ovarian cancer were enrolled and 35 completed the study. The mean age at enrollment was 57.9 ± 9.5 years; most were newly diagnosed or at first recurrence. There were no statistical differences in completion of AHD (p = 0.220) or palliative care consultation (p = 0.440) between intervention and control groups. However, women in the intervention group showed evidence of moving toward decision making regarding AHD and palliative care and lower decisional conflict. Women assigned to the intervention, compared to control website, were highly satisfied with the amount (p = 0.054) and quality (p = 0.119) of information and when they accessed the website, used it longer (p = 0.049). Overall website use was lower than expected, resulting from several patient-related and design barriers. Conclusions A website providing information and decisional support for women with ovarian cancer is feasible. Increasing frequency of website use requires future research. PMID:23988413

  9. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  10. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  11. Piloted Simulation Study of Rudder Pedal Force/Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted in 2006 to determine optimum rudder pedal force/feel characteristics for transport aircraft. As part of this research, an evaluation of four metrics for assessing rudder pedal characteristics previously presented in the literature was conducted. This evaluation was based upon the numerical handling qualities ratings assigned to a variety of pedal force/feel systems used in the simulation study. It is shown that, with the inclusion of a fifth metric, most of the rudder pedal force/feel system designs that were rated poorly by the evaluation pilots could be identified. It is suggested that these metrics form the basis of a certification requirement for transport aircraft.

  12. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  13. Pilot study of MK-462 in migraine.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R; Claghorn, J; Sramek, J J; Block, G; Panebianco, D; Cheng, H; Olah, T V; Reines, S A

    1996-04-01

    MK-462 is a potent, selective 5HT1D receptor agonist which may be useful in treating acute migraine. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study to assess the preliminary efficacy and safety of oral doses of MK-462 20 mg (n = 8) and 40 mg (n = 36) vs placebo (n = 21), administered to 65 male and post-menopausal female migraine patients aged 22-51 with moderate or severe migraine headache. Headache severity and functional disability were measured at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 h post-dose. The 20 mg dose was well tolerated and 4/8 patients obtained relief in headache severity at the 2 h time point. The 40 mg dose was well tolerated and was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to placebo at the 1.5 and 2 h time points (with 27/36 or 75% obtaining relief at 2 h compared to 7/21 or 33% for placebo). Adverse events occurred in 50% of patients on 20 mg MK-462, 72% of those on 40 mg MK-462, and in 52% of placebo-treated subjects. The most common adverse events associated with MK-462 were drowsiness (20 mg 12%; 40 mg 44%; placebo 24%), dry mouth (40 mg 36%; placebo 19%), and lightheadedness/dizziness (40 mg 17%; placebo 10%). Based on these preliminary results, MK-462 appears worthy of continued study for the treatment of acute migraine. PMID:8665577

  14. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Valente, Denis Souto; Silveira Eifler, Luciano; Carvalho, Lauro Aita; Filho, Gustavo Azambuja Pereira; Ribeiro, Vinicius Weissheimer; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions. PMID:26609429

  15. SERDP munition disposal source characterization pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Couch, R.G.; Fried, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting studies to develop and implement technologies for the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal of obsolete munitions and propellants which are stored at various locations across the country. One proposed disposal technique is the open-air burning or detonation (OB/OD) of this material. Although OB/OD is viewed as an efficient and cost-effective method for reducing the inventory of unwanted munitions and propellants, questions regarding its safety and environmental impacts must be addressed. Since very large amounts of munitions and propellants must be consumed inexpensively in relatively short time periods and with the very restrictive Federal and State regulations on environmental issues, it is clear that traditional OB/OD procedures will not be acceptable and that it is necessary to develop modified or advanced OB/OD technology. The effectiveness and environmental impact of the OB/OD technology must be verified by experimental data and with validated numerical models for acceptance by Federal and State regulators. Specifically, technology must be developed and tested that minimizes toxic bum and detonation products the noise (peak pressure) and destructive effect (impulse) of the explosive blast generation and travel distance of shrapnel, and entrainment of dust. Three explosion attenuation scenarios are analyzed: Contained water, aqueous foams, and wet sand.

  16. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Denis Souto; Silveira Eifler, Luciano; Carvalho, Lauro Aita; Filho, Gustavo Azambuja Pereira; Ribeiro, Vinicius Weissheimer; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions. PMID:26609429

  17. Pilot study of an assessment tool for measuring head and neck lymphoedema.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Jodie; Purcell, Amanda; Fleming, Jennifer; McCann, Andrew; Porceddu, Sandro

    2014-04-01

    Head and neck lymphoedema (HNL) is a persistent symptom for many patients following head and neck cancer treatment. There is limited research into the benefits of lymphoedema treatment with this population. This pilot study (n=8) employs the Assessment of Lymphoedema of Head and Neck (ALOHA) system to evaluate treatment changes in this clinical population. The ALOHA assessment combines the use of the Princess Alexandra Hospital tape measurement system and the use of Tissue Dielectric Constant (MoistureMeterD) to measure HNL. Baseline measures were taken at the start of treatment and were repeated when the participants had reduced one level on the MD Anderson Cancer Centre HNL rating scale. The MoistureMeterD and three of the four tape measurement points showed a statistically significant change over time. This indicates the ALOHA system was useful in objectively detecting changes associated with clinical improvements. PMID:24704756

  18. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms, along with the current understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. Assimilation of laboratory coreflood and rock consumption data, and their use in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) limited area simulations and in three-dimensional (3D) models of the entire pilot project are given. This paper also reports simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2D area of a field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long-term consumption functions, and two relative-permeability adjustment mechanisms. The scale-up of 2D simulation results and their use in a 271-acre (1096.7-ha), seven-layered, 3D model of the pilot are also discussed and 3D simulator results are compared with initial field alkaline flood performance. Finally, recommended additional applications of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods are discussed.

  19. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  20. A randomised pilot Phase II study of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) or epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) given 2 weekly with pegfilgrastim (accelerated) vs 3 weekly (standard) for women with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R L; Walsh, G; Ashley, S; Chua, S; Agarwal, R; O'Brien, M; Johnston, S; Smith, I E

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated (dose-dense) chemotherapy, in which the frequency of administration is increased without changing total dose or duration, may increase the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. We performed a randomised Phase II study to assess the safety and relative toxicity of AC (doxorubicin; cyclophosphamide) vs E(epirubicin)C given by conventional or accelerated schedules as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer. Furthermore, the relative toxicity of doxorubicin and epirubicin remains uncertain. Patients were randomised to one of four arms; four courses of standard 3 weekly cyclophosphamide 600 mg m−2 in combination with doxorubicin 60 mg m−2 (AC) vs epirubicin 90 mg m−2 (EC) 3 weekly vs the same regimens administered every 2 weeks with pegfilgrastim (G-CSF). A total of 126 patients were treated, 42 with standard AC, 42 with accelerated AC, 19 with standard EC and 23 with accelerated EC. Significantly more grade 3/4 day one neutropenia was seen with standard (6/61, 10%) compared to accelerated (0/65,) regimens (P=0.01). A trend towards more neutropenic sepsis was seen in the combined standard and accelerated AC arms (12/84, 14%) compared to the combined EC arms (1/42, 2%), P=0.06. Falls in left ventricular ejection fraction were not increased with accelerated treatment. Accelerated AC and EC with pegfilgrastim are safe and feasible regimens in the treatment of early breast cancer with less neutropenia than conventional 3 weekly schedules. PMID:19165198

  1. Evaluating a Community-Partnered Cancer Clinical Trials Pilot Intervention with African American Communities

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Odulana, Adebowale A.; Isler, Malika Roman; Richmond, Alan; Long, Debra G.; Robinson, William S.; Taylor, Yhenneko J.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cancer Clinical Trial (CCT) accrual and retention rates remain disproportionately low among African Americans. Awareness and access to trials are crucial facilitators of trial participation. Strategies developed within a community-based participatory framework (CBPR) are potential solutions to increase awareness and access to CCTs. In this study, we describe the pilot phase of three innovative community-centered modules to improve basic CCT knowledge, awareness of locations to access CCT information, and opportunities to participate in CCTs. Design Four community organizations completed Community Bridges to CCTs training-of-the trainer and recruited adult African American volunteers to participate in one of three CCT education modules: a workshop about CCTs; a role-play describing one person's experience with CCTs; or a call and response session reviewing myths and facts about CCTs. Pre- and post-test surveys were collected and analyzed using McNemar agreement statistic to evaluate changes in knowledge and attitudes regarding trials. Results Trainers enrolled 125 participants in the Call and Response (n=22), Role-play (n=60), and Workshop (n=43) modules. Module participants were mostly African American, female, and mean age of 53 years. Comparison of pre and post-test responses demonstrates favorable changes in awareness of CCTs and where to access to CCTs across the sample. Analysis by module type indicates significant increases for participants in the Call and Response (p < 0.01) and Role-Play modules (p < 0.001), but not the Workshop module. Conclusion Despite measures taken to increase the participation and retention rate of African Americans in clinical trials, little advancement has been made. Developing tailored community education modules on CCTs within the CBPR framework is a promising innovation to increase knowledge about CCTs and favorable attitudes about participation that are known precursors to trial enrollment. PMID:25564207

  2. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  3. Early and Intensive Dietary Counseling in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving (Chemo)Radiotherapy-A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Nicole; Isenring, Elisabeth; Gough, Karla; Wheeler, Greg; Wirth, Andrew; Campbell, Belinda A; Krishnasamy, Meinir

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in patients undergoing (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer. This pilot study tested the feasibility and acceptability of delivering an intensive nutrition intervention for lung cancer patients receiving RT. Twenty-four patients with lung cancer were randomized to receive the intervention which employed a care pathway to guide intensive dietary counseling from pretreatment until 6-wk posttreatment or usual care. Nutritional, fatigue, and functional outcomes were assessed using valid and reliable questionnaires before randomization, at the start and end of RT and 1- and 3-mo post-RT. Consent rate was 57% with an overall attrition of 37%. Subject compliance with the completion of study questionnaires was 100%. A clinically important mean difference indicated greater overall satisfaction with nutritional care in the intervention group (5.00, interquartile range [IQR] 4.50-5.00; 4.00, IQR 4.00-4.00). Clinically important differences favoring the intervention were observed for weight (3.0 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.8, 6.8), fat-free mass (0.6 kg; 95% CI -2.1, 3.3), physical well-being (2.1; 95% CI -2.3, 6.5), and functional well-being (5.1; 95% CI 1.6, 8.6), but all 95% CIs were wide and most included zero. Recruitment feasibility and acceptability of the intervention were demonstrated, which suggest larger trials using an intensive nutrition intervention would be achievable. PMID:27348253

  4. Baclofen-assisted detoxification from opiates. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krystal, J H; McDougle, C J; Kosten, T R; Price, L H; Aghajanian, G K; Charney, D S

    1992-01-01

    In an open label pilot study, five opiate-dependent patients underwent baclofen-assisted opiate detoxification after abrupt discontinuation of methadone. Patients received baclofen in oral doses up to 80 mg/day, and all patients subjectively reported some reduction in discomfort. However, 3 of 5 (60%) patients could not complete detoxification with baclofen, primarily because of insufficient suppression of vomiting, myalgias, and headache. These patients successfully completed their detoxification with clonidine. These findings suggest that, in the dose range studied, baclofen is of limited use as a primary treatment for opiate dependence, although adjunctive roles for this medication in detoxification should be explored. PMID:1324986

  5. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Commercial Diet and Exercise Weight Loss Program in Minority Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather A.; Crew, Katherine D.; Mata, Jennie M.; McKinley, Paula S.; Rundle, Andrew G.; Zhang, Wenfei; Liao, Yuyan; Tsai, Wei Y.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with poorer breast cancer outcomes and losing weight postdiagnosis may improve survival. As Hispanic and black women have poorer breast cancer prognosis than non-Hispanic whites diagnosed at similar age and stage, and have higher rates of obesity, effective weight loss strategies are needed. We piloted a randomized, waitlist-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects and feasibility of the commercial Curves weight loss program among Hispanic, African American and Afro-Caribbean breast cancer survivors. Design and Methods Women with stage 0– IIIa breast cancer ≥6 months posttreatment, sedentary, and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 were randomized to the immediate arm (IA): 6 months of the Curves program followed by 6 months of observation; or the waitlist control arm (WCA): 6 months of observation followed by 6 months of the Curves program. The Curves program uses a 30-min exercise circuit and a high-vegetable/low-fat/calorie-restricted diet. Results A total of 42 women enrolled (79% Hispanic, 21% black), mean age 51 (range 32–69) and mean BMI 33.2(±5.9) kg/m2; 91% were retained at month 12. At month 6, women in the IA lost an average 3.3% (±3.5%) of body weight (range: 1.7% gain to 10.6% loss), as compared with 1.8% (±2.9%) weight loss in the WCA (P = 0.04). At month 12, on average women in the IA regained some but not all of the weight lost during the first 6 months (P = 0.02). Conclusions Minority breast cancer survivors were recruited and retained in a weight loss study. Six months of the Curves program resulted in moderate weight loss, but weight loss was not maintained postintervention. Future interventions should identify methods to increase uptake and maintenance of weight loss behaviors. PMID:23505170

  6. Congestive Heart Failure home monitoring pilot study in urban Denver.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Saba; Li, Xin; Semenov, Nikolay; Apodaca-Madrid, Jesús; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Newman, Kimberly E; Long, Carlin S; Neuman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    With a growing number of low-income patients developing Congestive Heart Failure in urban Denver, accessible and affordable solutions are needed to provide home management options. A multidisciplinary team evaluated currently available options for telemonitoring and developed a solution for an initial pilot study. This system is currently used in the Denver Metro area (Colorado) for 44 CHF patients. Preliminary results show this approach is effective and has reduced the patients' average length of stay at the hospital compared to historical data and control patients who do not use a remote monitoring system. PMID:22255008

  7. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting. PMID:27209870

  8. Research plan for pilot studies of the biodiversity research consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; White, D.; Preston, E.M.; Master, L.L.; Loveland, T.R.

    1993-06-03

    This report presents a research plan for an assessment of risks to biodiversity. The plan describes the theoretical basis of the research approach and the data and methods to be used in the assessment. Initial research activities are formulated as a set of pilot studies that will examine nine research questions concerning the assumptions, data, and methods of the approach. A collection of government, academic, and nongovernmental organizations, called the Biodiversity Research Consortium, has developed this research approach and prepared the plan. Authors of the plan represent current members of the Consortium.

  9. Development and pilot evaluation of Native CREST-a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training program for Navajo undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christine A; Bauer, Mark C; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Garrison, Edward R; Patten, Christi A; Petersen, Wesley O; Bowman, Clarissa N; Vierkant, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates' interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing, and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience and Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program providing mentorship in a Mayo Clinic basic science or behavioral cancer research lab for Navajo undergraduate students. Seven Native American undergraduate students (five females, two males) were enrolled during the summers of 2008-2011. Students reported the program influenced their career goals and was valuable to their education and development. These efforts may increase the number of Native American career scientists developing and implementing cancer research, which will ultimately benefit the health of Native American people. PMID:23001889

  10. Development and Pilot Evaluation of Native CREST – a Cancer Research Experience and Student Training Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christine A.; Bauer, Mark C.; Horazdovsky, Bruce F.; Garrison, Edward R.; Patten, Christi A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and Diné College received funding for a 4-year collaborative P20 planning grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2006. The goal of the partnership was to increase Navajo undergraduates’ interest in and commitment to biomedical coursework and careers, especially in cancer research. This paper describes the development, pilot testing and evaluation of Native CREST (Cancer Research Experience & Student Training), a 10-week cancer research training program providing mentorship in a Mayo Clinic basic science or behavioral cancer research lab for Navajo undergraduate students. Seven Native American undergraduate students (5 females, 2 males) were enrolled during the summers of 2008 - 2011. Students reported the program influenced their career goals and was valuable to their education and development. These efforts may increase the number of Native American career scientists developing and implementing cancer research, which will ultimately benefit the health of Native American people. PMID:23001889

  11. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics. PMID:26594860

  12. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Iragüen, D; Urcelay, S; San Martín, B

    2011-04-01

    Iragüen, D., Urcelay, S., San Martín, B. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.34, 108-115. In Chile, there is no present government policy to survey and analyse adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the field of veterinary medicine. The intent of this study is to assess, for the first time, ADR frequency in treated animals. To this purpose, a 6-month period pilot study based on WHO recommendations was conducted to monitor ADRs in cats and dogs for frequently used drugs and common labelled signs. Of a total of 149 detected ADRs, 29 (6 in cats and 23 in dogs) were notified by means of ADR report forms, while the rest was identified after reviewing patient clinical records, thus evidencing strong under-reporting problems. More than 70% of ADRs were related to antimicrobials, vaccines and tranquilizers. In dogs, there was a significant effect on ADRs' presentation when acepromazine, amoxicillin, carprofen, ivermectin, sextuple vaccine (polyvalent vaccine that confers immunity against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, Leptospira canicola, L. icterohemmoragiae, canine adenovirus type 2 and canine parainfluenza virus) and phytomenadione (subcutaneous injection) were administered. In the case of cats, a significant influence on ADRs was detected when acepromazine, amoxicillin or vitamin K was administered. Present results suggest the need for a pharmacovigilance programme in veterinary medicine for timely ADR-presenting drug detection and drug safety improvement. PMID:21395600

  13. Pilot Study of Enhanced Minor Planet Detection Using NEOWISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukrov, Greta; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Wright, E. L.; Nugent, C.; Stevenson, R.; Clyne, E.; Masci, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The solar system science component of NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), known as NEOWISE, extracted detections of more than 158,000 asteroids and comets, including 34,000 new discoveries. These objects were detected through a search algorithm that actively rejected inertially fixed sources such as stars and galaxies and selected candidate moving objects through the construction of position-time pairs known as tracklets. A minimum of five detections were required in order to construct a tracklet; this system enabled the discovery of new minor planets as well as detection of previously known objects. However, many more asteroids are potentially recoverable in the NEOWISE data, such as objects that failed to appear in five or more images. Stacking of objects with well-known ephemerides at the observational epoch has allowed for the recovery of many objects that fell below the single-frame detection threshold. Additional objects were recovered by searching the NEOWISE source lists for objects that appeared fewer than five times in single frames. We present the results of a pilot study that has allowed for the recovery of minor planets from the NEOWISE data using both techniques, resulting in the derivation of diameters and albedos for the sample. This pilot study will be extended to the entire catalog of known minor planets by the NEOWISE project in the near future.

  14. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  15. Traffic scenario generation technique for piloted simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies of cockpit traffic display concepts require the development of representative traffic scenarios. With the exception of specific aircraft interaction issues, most research questions can be addressed using traffic scenarios consisting of prerecorded aircraft movements merged together to form a desired traffic pattern. Prerecorded traffic scenarios have distinct research advantages, allowing control of traffic encounters with repeatability of scenarios between different test subjects. A technique is described for generation of prerecorded jet transport traffic scenarios suitable for use in piloted simulation studies. Individual flight profiles for the aircraft in the scenario are created interactively with a computer program designed specifically for this purpose. The profiles are then time-correlated and merged into a complete scenario. This technique was used to create traffic scenarios for the Denver, Colorado area with operations centered at Stapleton International Airport. Traffic scenarios for other areas may also be created using this technique, with appropriate modifications made to the navigation fix locations contained in the flight profile generation program.

  16. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial. PMID:20145447

  17. Quality assurance project plan: 1991 EMAP wetlands southeastern pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.M.; Lee, J.M.; Turner, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    The goal of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program - Wetlands (EMAP-Wetlands) Southeastern Pilot Study is to develop field indicators of salt marsh condition. These indicators are of four general types: (1) vegetation; (2) hydrology; (3) soil parameters; and (4) soil constituents. Field measurements and samples will be collected during late summer/early fall in 1991 and will be analyzed to identify which indicators and measurements best delineate salt marsh in good condition from that in impaired condition. Thus the project will involve field work, laboratory analysis, and data analysis. Results from this project will be used to establish criteria and parameters for long-term monitoring and assessment of salt marshes, particularly those parameters that may serve as indicators of healthy salt marsh and deteriorated salt marsh. Since EMAP-Wetlands-Southeastern is a pilot study, the measurement criteria will be evaluated as one of the project goals. Of concern will be how well the standardized sampling methods performed in actual field conditions, and which of these methods can be used to assess and characterize salt marshes.

  18. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities. PMID:26561889

  19. A piloted simulation study of data link ATC message exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1989-01-01

    Data link Air Traffic Control (ATC) and Air Traffic Service (ATS) message and data exchange offers the potential benefits of increased flight safety and efficiency by reducing communication errors and allowing more information to be transferred between aircraft and ground facilities. Digital communication also presents an opportunity to relieve the overloading of ATC radio frequencies which hampers message exchange during peak traffic hours in many busy terminal areas. A piloted simulation study to develop pilot factor guidelines and assess potential flight crew benefits and liabilities from using data link ATC message exchange was completed. The data link ATC message exchange concept, implemented on an existing navigation computer Control Display Unit (CDU) required maintaining a voice radio telephone link with an appropriate ATC facility. Flight crew comments, scanning behavior, and measurements of time spent in ATC communication activities for data link ATC message exchange were compared to similar measures for simulated conventional voice radio operations. The results show crew preference for the quieter flight deck environment and a perception of lower communication workload.

  20. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudloo, Mehran; Abolhassani, Farid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin

    2016-07-01

    The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family's health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors. PMID:27424015

  1. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakre, Tushar P.; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Methods: Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Results: Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Conclusions: Students were not

  2. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls. PMID:27332171

  3. Pilot study of "miracle fruit" to improve food palatability for patients receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Marlene K; Satiroff, Bernadette A

    2012-10-01

    Taste changes in patients undergoing chemotherapy are common and can be of long duration, are associated with poor nutrition, and can reduce quality of life. A pilot study of the fruit Synsepalum dulcificum-known as "miracle fruit"-as a novel supportive intervention was conducted with eight patients with cancer who were being treated with chemotherapy and reporting taste changes. Miraculin, a naturally occurring protein in miracle fruit, has the unusual ability to transduce a sweet signal in an acidic environment, profoundly changing food taste profiles for a short duration, masking unpleasant tastes, and increasing the palatability of certain foods. This pilot study was designed to determine whether consumption of the Miracle Fruit™ supplement would improve chemotherapy-associated taste changes, thereby improving the taste of food and ultimately leading to better nutrition. Four of the participants were given a two-week supply of the supplement and the other four were given a two-week supply of a placebo. After two weeks, the supplement group received a two-week supply of the placebo and the placebo group received a two-week supply of the supplement. Participants recorded food and drink intake in daily food dairies and rated taste changes with each food as better, worse, or no change. All study participants reported positive taste changes with the supplement. PMID:23022943

  4. Educating low-SES and LEP survivors about breast cancer research: pilot test of the Health Research Engagement Intervention.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Alyssa; Burke, Nancy J; Cohen, Elly; Caprio, Maria; Joseph, Galen

    2014-12-01

    The Health Research Engagement Intervention (HREI) aims to reduce information and access disparities for breast cancer research opportunities among low-socioeconomic status (SES) and limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer survivors by providing neutral, non-trial-specific information about health research via a trusted patient navigator. Qualitative methods in the context of a community-based participatory research design were used to iteratively design the HREI in collaboration with community-based care navigators from a trusted community organization, Shanti Project, and to locate appropriate research studies in collaboration with a web-based trial-matching service, BreastCancerTrials.org (BCT). Navigators were first trained in clinical trials and health research and then to deliver the HREI, providing feedback that was incorporated into both the HREI design and BCT's interface. Our intervention pilot with low SES and LEP survivors (n = 12) demonstrated interest in learning about "health research." All 12 participants opted to obtain more information when offered the opportunity. Post-intervention questionnaires showed that three of 11 (27 %) participants independently pursued additional information about research opportunities either online or by phone in the week following the intervention. Post-intervention navigator questionnaires indicated that navigators could confidently and efficiently deliver the intervention. LEP patients who pursued information independently faced language barriers. The HREI is a promising and potentially scalable intervention to increase access to neutral information about breast cancer research opportunities for low-SES and LEP individuals. However, in order for it to be effective, systems barriers to participation such as language accessibility at sources of health research information must be addressed. PMID:24744119

  5. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels in computed tomography for paediatric patients in Sudan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    Paediatric patients are recognised to be at higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer than adults. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the radiation doses to paediatric patients during computed tomography (CT) procedures in order to propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). A total of 296 patients (aged 6-10 y) were investigated in 8 hospitals equipped with 64-, 16- and dual-slice CT machines. The mean dose length product values were 772, 446 and 178 mGy cm for head, abdomen and chest, respectively. Imaging protocols were not adapted to the patient's weight in certain CT machines. The results confirmed that paediatric patients are exposed to an unnecessary radiation dose. The established DRLs were higher than those available in other countries. This study showed the need for harmonisation of the practice in CT departments and radiation dose optimisation. PMID:25836694

  6. Peripheral blood biomarkers of solid tumor angiogenesis in dogs: a polychromatic flow cytometry pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bentley, R Timothy; Mund, Julie A; Pollok, Karen E; Childress, Michael O; Case, Jamie

    2013-05-01

    A subset of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells of bone marrow origin is elevated in humans with solid cancers before treatment and declines with therapy. This biomarker of angiogenesis is not specific to tumor type and has great potential in the objective assessment of treatment response in clinical trials. This pilot study was designed to develop a biomarker of neoangiogenesis in dogs for the diagnosis of cancer, the measurement of treatment response, and the provision of objective data in clinical trials. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to quantify two subsets of circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in dogs with spontaneous solid tumors before (n = 8) and after (n = 3) treatment, and normal controls (n = 6). Pro-angiogenic peripheral blood cells of bone marrow origin were detected in all eight cases and the six normal controls; however, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, an apparent decline in pro-angiogenic cells was observed after treatment. Bone marrow derived hematopoietic cells appear to contribute to tumor angiogenesis in dogs, as has been previously reported in humans. While the methodology for pro-angiogenic cell quantification in a small number of dogs in the current study did not result in a significant difference from normal controls, an optimized canine polychromatic flow cytometry protocol holds great promise in the development of a canine cancer model and for the objective measurements of treatment response in clinical trials. PMID:23063489

  7. Pilot study on agricultural pesticide poisoning in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Mustapha; Ouedraogo, Richard; Ilboudo, Sylvain; Guissou, Pierre I.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic data related to agricultural pesticide poisoning cases in Burkina Faso were collected. The study was carried out using retrospective (from January 2002 to June 2010) surveys conducted among farmers and healthcare centers. One hundred and fifty-three (153) pest control products were recorded during the survey and 56 active ingredients were identified. Out of the 153 pest control products, 49 (i.e. 32%) were authorized for sale in Burkina Faso. The main risk factors are socio-demographic characteristics of farmers, their low education level, and some attitudes and practices on using agricultural pesticides. Pesticide poisonings are relatively frequent and their management was not always efficacious. Actions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning as a global public health problem and to improve management of pesticide poisoning. To this purpose, advanced investigations should be carried out over a longer period of time to complement the present pilot study. PMID:24678256

  8. Musical Stimulation in the Developmentally Delayed Child: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nanelle Lavina; Molnar, Eva T.; Knasel, Anne L.

    1987-01-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2468780

  9. Magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves in dogs: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Soens, Iris Van; Polis, Ingeborgh E; Nijs, Jozef X; Struys, Michel M; Bhatti, Sofie F; Ham, Luc M Van

    2008-11-01

    A model for magnetic stimulation of the radial and sciatic nerves in dogs was evaluated. Onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes of magnetic and electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve were compared, and the effect of the direction of the current in the magnetic coil on onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitude of the magnetic motor evoked potential was studied in both nerves. The results demonstrate that magnetic stimulation is a feasible method for stimulating the radial and sciatic nerves in dogs. No significant differences were observed in onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes during magnetic and electrical stimulation, indicating conformity between the techniques. Orthodromic or antidromic magnetic nerve stimulation resulted in no significant differences. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of magnetic stimulation of nerves in dogs. PMID:17869140

  10. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  11. The Pilot Training Study: A Cost-Estimating Model for Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, S. L.

    A means for estimating the resource requirements and attendant costs of any configuration of the undergraduate pilot training system (UPT) is described by inputs that are supplied by the user of the model. The inputs consist of data such as UPT graduate requirements, course syllabus requirements, instructor-student ratios, administrative and…

  12. Pilot study of irreversible electroporation for intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Robertson, John; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2009-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to treat cancer using intense but short electric pulses. This technique is unique because of its non-thermal mechanism of tissue ablation. Furthermore it can be predicted with numerical models and can be confirmed with ultrasound and MRI. We present some preliminary results on the safety of using irreversible electroporation for canine brain surgery. We also present the electric field (460 V/cm - 560 V/cm) necessary for focal ablation of canine brain tissue and provide some guidelines for treatment planning and execution. This preliminary study is the first step towards using irreversible electroporation as a brain cancer treatment. PMID:19964170

  13. A pilot study for human tumor/DNA banking: returned more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Cavuşoğlu, A Celebiler; Saydam, S; Alakavuklar, M; Canda, T; Sevinç, A; Kiliç, Y; Harmancioğlu, O; Koçdor, M A; Kinay, M; Alanyali, H; Görken, I; Balci, P; Demirkan, B; Sakizli, M; Güner, G

    2008-01-01

    A pilot study was performed for setting up the Dokuz Eylül University Breast Tumor DNA Bank (DEUBTB) to facilitate the sharing of tumor DNA/RNA samples and related data from cases collected by collaborators specializing in the breast cancer diseases between 2004 and 2006. The pilot study aimed to provide answers for certain questions on: (1) ethical concerns (informing the volunteer for donating specimen, anonymizing the sample information, procedure on sample request), (2) obtaining and processing samples (technical issues, flowchart), (3) storing samples and their products (storing forms and conditions), (4) clinical database (which clinical data to store), (5) management organization (quality and quantity of personnel, flowchart for management relations), (6) financial issues (establishment and maintenance costs). When the bank had 64 samples, even though it is quite ready to supply samples for a research project, it revealed many questions on details that may be answered in more than one way, pointing that all biobanks need to be controlled by a higher degree of management party which develops and offers quality standards for these establishments. PMID:18392956

  14. 76 FR 12367 - Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study AGENCY... visibility benefits are required because the studies conducted in the 1970s and 1980s do not reflect current... Control Number 1024-0255). The purpose of this IC is to conduct a pilot study to test the...

  15. International Youth Foundation Program Identification System. Pilot Study One: Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss (William L.) and Associates, Ltd., Alexandria, VA.

    An evaluation of Round One of a pilot study of a system for identifying effective youth organizations around the world is presented in this report. The report begins with a page of general observations about the successes and shortcomings of the pilot study, indicating that in general the study accomplished its objectives but that a need for…

  16. Study to determine the IFR operational profile and problems of the general aviation single pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    General aviation single pilot operating under instrument flight rules (GA SPIFR) was studied. The objectives of the study were to (1) develop a GA SPIFR operational profile, (2) identify problems experienced by the GA SPIFR pilot, and (3) identify research tasks which have the potential for eliminating or reducing the severity of the problems. To obtain the information necessary to accomplish these objectives, a mail questionnaire survey of instrument rated pilots was conducted. The general aviation IFR single pilot operational profile and selected data analysis examples are presented.

  17. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  18. Mirtazapine in amphetamine detoxification: a placebo-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos I; Saguansiritham, Rapeepun

    2005-09-01

    The present study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of mirtazapine in amphetamine detoxification in a 14-day randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial in a Thai population. Subjects retained at a Specialized Probation Center, Department of Probation, Ministry of Justice, Thailand (n=20), who met DSM-IV criteria for amphetamine dependence and the inclusion criteria of the study, were randomized for either mirtazapine treatment or placebo. Efficacy was assessed by the Amphetamine Withdrawal Questionnaire (AWQ) for amphetamine withdrawal symptoms and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression rating scale (MADRS) for depression. Mirtazapine safety was assessed by interview during each follow-up period on days 3 and 14 after treatment. Nine subjects were randomized to the mirtazapine group and 11 to the placebo group. Among the initial 20 subjects, 16 (seven in the mirtazapine and nine in the placebo group) completed the study. There were significant improvements in the total AWQ score changes in the mirtazapine group versus placebo both at days 3 (P<0.005) and 14 (P<0.030). Significant improvements in favour of mirtazapine were also seen in the hyperarousal and the anxiety subscale score changes at days 3 (P<0.029) and 14 (P<0.018), respectively. No significant differences were seen (P>0.05) in the MADRS scores changes within or between the groups. Mild adverse events, such as headache, sedation, nausea and vomiting, were reported. In conclusion, despite its small sample size, this randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial lends support to the hypothesis that mirtazapine may be an option in the meager armamentarium of amphetamine detoxification treatment. PMID:16096515

  19. Social Media in Adolescent Health Literacy Education: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Carrie KW; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda SS

    2015-01-01

    Background While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual’s approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. Objective The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents’ oral health literacy (OHL) education. Methods A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. Results No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants’ sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further

  20. Study Skills Analysis: A Pilot Study Linking a Success and Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urciuoli, Jannette Alejandra; Bluestone, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    This study explored a concept that learning study skills in the context of the content area under study may transfer across courses, multiplying the benefits towards academic success. Methods that have been reported to influence academic growth at the community college level include success courses and applied study skills. In this pilot project…

  1. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  2. Transitional care for seriously mentally ill persons: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rose, Linda E; Gerson, Linda; Carbo, Cynthia

    2007-12-01

    This article reports the results of a pilot study of a nurse-based in-home transitional care intervention for seriously mentally ill persons. The goals of the intervention were to address the lack of continuity of care in existing programs and to meet the immediate postdischarge needs of severely mentally ill persons. This article focuses primarily on the applicability and feasibility of the intervention for this population, given the challenges of engaging seriously mentally ill patients in a community-based protocol and the complexity of their illnesses. Factors that are important to community adjustment postdischarge were identified: caregiver concerns and health status impeding illness management, lack of structure/involvement in daily activities, structural and functional factors affecting adherence, and presence of symptoms after discharge. Use of an advanced practice nurse to provide transitional care can offer an alternative to patients who might otherwise be left poorly treated or untreated in the community setting. PMID:18037440

  3. Biofilm's Role in Chronic Cholesteatomatous Otitis Media: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jacopo; Calò, Lea; Giuliani, Monica; Sergi, Bruno; Lucidi, Daniela; Meucci, Duino; Bassotti, Ezio; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2016-05-01

    Cholesteatoma is a destructive lesion involving the temporal bone, which may induce severe complications due to its expansion and erosion of adjacent structures. Bacterial biofilm plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many otolaryngologic inflammatory/infectious chronic diseases. In this pilot study, we investigated, by means of cultural examination and with scanning electron microscope, the presence of bacterial biofilm in a series of samples from the epitympanic and mastoid region in patients affected by cholesteatoma and from the promontory region in patients with healthy mucosa who were undergoing to stapes surgery. The preliminary data support the association between biofilm and cholesteatoma (81.3% of the cases) and allow us to hypothesize that keratinized matrix of cholesteatoma may represent the ideal substrate for biofilm colonization and survival; this finding is consistent with the clinical course of aural cholesteatoma, characterized by recurrent exacerbations and recalcitrant course. PMID:26932953

  4. Shared Decision Making for Routine Infant Circumcision: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Teri M.; Beal, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is important that expectant parents receive accurate information about the benefits and risks of circumcision as well as the benefits and risks of having an intact foreskin when making a decision about routine infant circumcision (RIC). A pilot study was conducted using the shared decision making (SDM) conceptual model to guide expectant parents through a 3-phase decision-making program about RIC as part of their childbirth education class. The participants showed a high level of preparedness following each of the 3 phases. Preparedness score were highest for those who decided to keep their expected sons’ penises natural. This SDM program was an effective way of guiding expectant parents through the decision-making process for RIC. PMID:26834440

  5. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in anorexia nervosa: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van den Eynde, F; Guillaume, S; Broadbent, H; Campbell, I C; Schmidt, U

    2013-02-01

    The search for new treatments to improve outcome in people with anorexia nervosa continues. This pilot study investigated whether one session of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces eating disorder related symptoms following exposure to visual and real food stimuli. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Ten right-handed people with anorexia nervosa underwent one session of rTMS. Subjective experiences related to the eating disorder (e.g. urge to restrict, feeling full etc.) were assessed before and after rTMS. Non-parametric repeated measures tests were used. rTMS was safe and well-tolerated, and resulted in reduced levels of feeling full, feeling fat and feeling anxious. Thus, rTMS may reduce core symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Future research should establish the therapeutic potential of rTMS in anorexia nervosa. PMID:21880470

  6. Familial Paraphilia: A Pilot Study with the Construction of Genograms

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M. W.; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors. PMID:23738209

  7. Impact of nutrition messages on children's food choice: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Katie; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2006-03-01

    This pilot study tested the influence of nutrition message framing on snack choice among kindergarteners. Three classrooms were randomly assigned to watch one of the following 60s videos: (a) a gain-framed nutrition message (i.e. the positive benefits of eating apples) (n=14); (b) a loss-framed message (i.e. the negative consequences of not eating apples) (n=18); or (c) a control scene (children playing a game) (n=18). Following this, the children were offered a choice between animal crackers and an apple for their snack. Among the children who saw one of the nutrition message videos, 56% chose apples rather than animal crackers; in the control condition only 33% chose apples. This difference was statistically significant (chi2=7.56, p<0.01). These results suggest that videos containing nutritional messages may have a positive influence on children's short-term food choices. PMID:16442667

  8. Do antidepressants cause folic acid depletion? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, K.A.; Jamjoom, S.; Donaldson, D.; Dickerson, J.W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of tricyclic antidepressants is common; folic acid depletion is a potential consequence adversely affecting the mental state. In a pilot study prior to research in the community, serum and red cell folate and serum vitamin B 12 levels were measured in the following elderly psychiatric inpatients: 14 controls (patients not receiving any drugs with known antifolate activity), 11 receiving tricyclic antidepressants, 13 receiving antipsychotics (phenothiazines) and four receiving an anticonvulsant (carbamazepine). Patients on prolonged treatment with carbamazepine or phenothiazine drugs had lower concentrations of folate in serum and erythrocytes compared with controls; the decrease was statistically significant for the effect of phenothiazines on serum folate levels. Tricyclic antidepressants, which are in widespread use in the community, did not cause folate depletion during the first two years of treatment. PMID:3204543

  9. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  10. A Pilot Study of Website Information Regarding Aromatase Inhibitors: Dietary Supplement Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Cara L.; Hsieh, Angela A.; Sweet, Erin S.; Tippens, Kimberly M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Patients who have hormone receptor–positive breast cancer and who are taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs) should understand the benefits and risks of concomitant dietary supplement (DS) use. The International Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) encourages patients to discuss DS use with their health care practitioners. The objective was to conduct a pilot study rating Internet websites from the perspective of health care practitioners for information about AI–DS interactions. Design Five (5) Internet websites suggested by SIO were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument rating tool. The available AI–DS information on these websites was rated by 4 evaluators: 2 naturopathic doctors, 1 oncology pharmacy resident, and a pharmacy student. Results The overall rankings ranged from 1.6 to 3.9, with considerable variability in the type of information available from the websites. The interevaluator rankings of the websites ranged from 0.44 to 0.89. The evaluators consistently found the most reliable, unbiased, and comprehensive information on AI–DS interactions at the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center websites. However, more than one database was needed for provision of optimal patient information on AI–DS interactions. Conclusions In order to effectively advise patients regarding AI–DS interactions, more than one website should be evaluated to assess the potential efficacy and safety of DS in women whose breast cancer is being treated with an AI. PMID:22087614

  11. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  12. Serendipitous results of a pilot study: precaution indicated.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, S B; Proskin, H M

    1995-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to estimate sample size for a clinical trial in a F area. In 1992, 98 children 14 years of age living in Fall River, MA were examined for dental caries: Fall River was fluoridated in 1973. Residence histories showed that 74% lived there from birth (B), 12% were residents from kindergarten or 1st grade (K1) and 14% moved into the community at a later time (LT). Findings on caries prevalence showed an inverse relation between DMFS and initial age of residence; mean DMFS was 3.00 for Group B, 5.33 for Group K1 and 6.93 for Group LT. A one-way ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p=0.05). Because residence from birth or from early life can be considered a proxy for systemic fluoride exposure, and because controversy currently surrounds the issue of topical versus systemic benefits in explaining the mechanism of action of fluoride, the results appeared to have importance. However, internal analyses of the data comparing surface-specific (pit and fissure) results among the groups for early erupting teeth with varying systemic exposure to fluoridated water and for late erupting teeth, all with appreciable systemic exposure, showed comparable relative differences in DMFS scores. Lack of internal validity, therefore, discounted a conclusion from overall results of the role of systemic fluorides in providing decay preventive benefits. If there is any conclusion that can be drawn it is that serendipitous escapades with data from a pilot study, if not rigorously analyzed and cautiously interpreted, tend to further muddy the waters (fluoridated in this case) on controversial issues and should best be avoided. PMID:8694985

  13. Pilot study of a compassion meditation intervention in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Heather L; Darnall, Beth D; Seppala, Emma M; Doty, James R; Hah, Jennifer M; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of anger as an important predictor of chronic pain outcomes suggests that treatments that target anger may be particularly useful within the context of chronic pain. Eastern traditions prescribe compassion cultivation to treat persistent anger. Compassion cultivation has been shown to influence emotional processing and reduce negativity bias in the contexts of emotional and physical discomfort, thus suggesting it may be beneficial as a dual treatment for pain and anger. Our objective was to conduct a pilot study of a 9-week group compassion cultivation intervention in chronic pain to examine its effect on pain severity, anger, pain acceptance and pain-related interference. We also aimed to describe observer ratings provided by patients’ significant others and secondary effects of the intervention. Methods Pilot clinical trial with repeated measures design that included a within-subjects wait-list control period. Twelve chronic pain patients completed the intervention (F= 10). Data were collected from patients at enrollment, treatment baseline and post-treatment; participant significant others contributed data at the enrollment and post-treatment time points. Results In this predominantly female sample, patients had significantly reduced pain severity and anger and increased pain acceptance at post-treatment compared to treatment baseline. Significant other qualitative data corroborated patient reports for reductions in pain severity and anger. Conclusions Compassion meditation may be a useful adjunctive treatment for reducing pain severity and anger, and for increasing chronic pain acceptance. Patient reported reductions in anger were corroborated by their significant others. The significant other corroborations offer a novel contribution to the literature and highlight the observable emotional and behavioral changes in the patient participants that occurred following the compassion intervention. Future studies may further examine how

  14. Magnetotelluric pilot study in the Rio Grande Rift, southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    A magnetotelluric (MT) pilot study consisting of approximately 25 stations distributed in and around the Rio Grande Rift of the southwest United States was carried out in the summer of 2012. Both broadband (100 Hz to 1000 s) and long-period (up to 10 000 s) MT data were collected across two profiles that run perpendicular to the rift axis near Denver, Colorado and Taos, New Mexico, respectively. Time-domain EM data was also collected at each site to account for galvanic distortion in the near-surface. The tectonic forces and rheologic properties behind the initiation and propagation of the rift are poorly understood. Surface mapping of volcanism, normal faulting and sedimentary basins reveals a narrow band of crustal deformation confined to a region in close proximity to the rift axis while geophysical results suggest that deformation is distributed across a much broader and deeper region of the lithosphere. In particular, seismic tomography shows low seismic wave speeds into the lower crust and upper mantle. The magnetotelluric technique is a well-proven passive electromagnetic method that allows for the detection of apparent resistivity at a wide range of depth scales. Complimenting the seismic results with MT data will provide important new information on the geologic and geophysical properties that control the rifting process in this low-strain rate environment. Properties to which the MT method is particular sensitive include temperature, fluid content, and mineral alteration. Preliminary results from this most recent survey are encouraging, showing good data quality up to 10 000 s. In an important precursor to full 2D modeling, the magnetotelluric phase tensor has been used to assess the dimensionality of the electrical resistivity structure at depth. This pilot study provides proof of concept for a much larger magnetotelluric experiment planned to take place in the Rio Grande Rift in 2013.

  15. Systematic Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Mediastinal Staging Versus Positron Emission Tomography for Comprehensive Mediastinal Staging in NSCLC Before Radical Radiotherapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, Daniel P; Siva, Shankar; Leong, Tracy L; Rose, Morgan; Herath, Dishan; Antippa, Phillip; Ball, David L; Irving, Louis B

    2016-02-01

    Despite known limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiation treatment fields are generally based on PET-identified disease extent. However, no studies have examined the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT on a per-node basis in patients being considered for curative-intent radiotherapy in NSCLC.In a prospective trial, patients with NSCLC being considered for definitive thoracic radiotherapy (± systemic chemotherapy) underwent minimally invasive systematic mediastinal evaluation with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) following noninvasive staging with integrated PET-CT.Thirty patients underwent EBUS-TBNA, with TBNA performed from a mean 2.5 lymph node (LN) stations per patient (median 3, range 1-5). Discordant findings between PET-CT and EBUS-TBNA were observed in 10 patients (33%, 95% CI 19%-51%). PET-occult LN metastases were demonstrated by EBUS in 4 patients, whereas a lesser extent of mediastinal involvement, compared with FDG-PET, was demonstrated by EBUS in 6 patients, including 2 patients downstaged from cN3 to pN2. LNs upstaged by EBUS were significantly smaller than nodes downstaged by EBUS, 7.5 mm (range 7-9) versus 12 mm (range 6-21), P = 0.005.A significant proportion of patients considered for definitive radiotherapy (+/-chemotherapy) undergoing systematic mediastinal evaluation with EBUS-TBNA in this study have an extent of mediastinal NSCLC involvement discordant with that indicated by PET-CT. Systematic EBUS-TBNA may aid in defining the extent of mediastinal involvement in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Systematic EBUS-TBNA has the potential to contribute significantly to radiotherapy planning and delivery, by either identifying occult nodal metastases, or demonstrating FDG-avid LNs to be disease-free. PMID:26937894

  16. Center for interdisciplinary remotely-piloted aircraft studies (CIRPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bluth, R.T.; Durkee, P.A.; Seinfield, J.H.; Flagen, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    A remotely-piloted aircraft research facility is described that will provide new capabilities for atmospheric and oceanographic measurements. The aircraft can fly up to 24 hours over remote ocean regions, at low altitude, and in various other challenging mission scenarios. The aircraft will fly research missions at speeds of 40 m/s and provide high spatial resolution measurements. Whether flying with an onboard pilot or in remote-pilot mode, data will be transmitted in real-time to a ground station for analysis and decision making purposes. The facility will expand the opportunities for universities to participate in field measurement programs. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. What to Consider Before Beginning Graduate Education: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Imus, F Scott; Burns, Shari

    2015-10-01

    The literature supports a general theme that college students lack metacognitive awareness about learning, which leads to poor examination performance and ultimately high attrition rates. However, the literature emphasizes that when college students receive instruction about learning, examination performance goes up and attrition goes down. This pilot study focused on a specific subset of learners: graduate students in a nurse anesthesia program. Given new evidence-based wellness approaches to learning, the nurse anesthesia program conducted a descriptive study aimed at exploring student perceptions. The study goals were to provide students with evidence-based information about wellness factors that influence learning. The book The New Science of Learning by Doyle and Zakrajsek (Stylus Publishing, 2013) was used to provide students with neuroscience evidence about learning that might assist their transition to graduate school. The book was mailed to 34 student registered nurse anesthetists before matriculation. An 8-item Likert-style online survey evaluated the students' perceptions of the book along with identifying any changes the students made in anticipation of starting the rigorous nurse anesthesia program. The study demonstrated that student registered nurse anesthetists could benefit from instruction about wellness approaches that enhance learning before matriculation. Additionally, the study provided the framework for future research. PMID:26638456

  18. Quantification of human intestinal gene expression profiles using exfoliated colonocytes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Laurie A; Lupton, Joanne R; Miskovsky, Emil; Fields, Alan P; Chapkin, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    Early detection of colon cancer can result in a high cure rate; therefore, an accurate screening method is imperative. Adoption of non-invasive testing designed to reduce anxiety over colorectal cancer screening and improve early detection is highly desirable. Therefore, we have developed a novel non-invasive methodology utilizing exfoliated colonocytes in order to quantify colonic messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Previously we have demonstrated in the rat that intact eukaryotic mRNA can be isolated due to the presence of exfoliated colonocytes in the faecal stream. To assess use of this methodology in humans, this pilot study evaluated exfoliated colonocyte mRNA expression of 11 putative biomarkers using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in seven normal subjects, four subjects with inflammation, and 10 tumour-bearing subjects presenting for colonoscopy. Expression of the biomarkers was evaluated following normalization to TATA box binding protein mRNA levels. Tumour-bearing subjects diagnosed with adenoma had elevated levels of cyclin Dl (p = 0.041). In addition, subjects displaying inflammation of the colon exhibited higher mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (p = 0.007). These data suggest that mRNA isolated from exfoliated colonocytes could be used to detect early stages of colon cancer, and possibly chronic inflammation. To broaden the utility of non-invasive marker analysis, additional studies are needed to generate a multi-target assay panel of diagnostic markers. This will allow for the development of robust classifiers that can determine critical gene sets for the diagnosis and prediction of colon cancer in animal models and humans. PMID:12519636

  19. Mental Health Services in Pilot Study Areas: Report on a European Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) conducted a study to collect data on mental health resources of pilot areas within several European countries. This report presents data from the study and provides a detailed and reliable description of the development of mental health services within the WHO European Region. Part I of the report describes the…

  20. Student Perceptions of International Education and Study Abroad: A Pilot Study at York University, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trilokekar, Roopa Desai; Rasmi, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    International student mobility has been identified as a key strategy for the internationalization of higher education. Although an institutional priority, Canada has among the lowest levels of international student mobility, with only 2% of full-time university students participating in study-abroad programs. This pilot study, conducted at a large…

  1. [Testicular germ cell tumours and early exposures to pesticides: The TESTEPERA pilot study].

    PubMed

    Béranger, Rémi; Blain, Jeffrey; Baudinet, Cédric; Faure, Elodie; Fléchon, Aude; Boyle, Helen; Chasles, Virginie; Charbotel, Barbara; Schüz, Joachim; Fervers, Béatrice

    2014-03-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) represent the most frequent cancer in men aged between 15 and 45 years. Current hypotheses are focusing on environmental exposures occurring during prenatal periods. However, very few studies have explored intra-uterine environmental exposure related to TGCT. TESTEPERA is a pilot case-control study aiming to determine the effectiveness of different recruitment approaches in the French context and to verify our ability to collect relevant data on their prenatal periods. Between 2011 and 2012, 150 male subjects were contacted in the Rhône-Alpes region (58 cases from a cancer center and 92 controls from a regional maternity). Participation rate varied from 33% for cases diagnosed in 2008 vs 68% for cases diagnosed in 2010. Participation rate of controls varied depending on modalities of contact (13% for face-to-face recruitment; 0% for contact by phone only; 50% for face-to-face contact with phone reminder). Data collection allowed precise job identification and geolocation of subjects' addresses. Precision of geolocation was dependent upon the level of urbanization (p < 0.001) but not on the time period (p = 0.52). Our results support the feasibility of a case-control study focusing on the relation between TGCT and environmental pesticide exposures during early and later life. PMID:24691186

  2. Dexamethasone Suppression FDG PET/CT for Differentiating between True- and False-Positive Pulmonary and Mediastinal Lymph Node Metastases in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study of FDG PET/CT after Oral Administration of Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Nakajo, Masayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Jinguji, Megumi; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Higashi, Michiyo; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Masami; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To examine whether dexamethasone suppression can reduce fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in false-positive (FP) findings in pulmonary and mediastinal lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods Institutional ethics review board approved this prospective study with written informed consent. The study population was composed of 17 patients with NSCLC who underwent both baseline and dexamethasone suppression (24 hours after oral administration of 8 mg dexamethasone) FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography and surgery. FDG uptake was evaluated by using a five-point visual scoring system (negative findings, score of 0-1; positive findings, score of 2-4) and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed-rank, Kruskal-Wallis, or Spearman rank correlation tests were used as necessary for statistical evaluations. Results In 17 primary lesions, no significant difference was noted in visual score between baseline (mean, 3.4 ± 1.2) and dexamethasone suppression scans (mean, 3.3 ± 1.2; P = .16), although SUVmax was significantly lower on dexamethasone suppression scans (mean, 7.1 ± 5.2) than on baseline scans (mean, 8.6 ± 6.6; P = .005). In eight nodes with true-positive (TP) findings, there were no significant differences in visual score (mean for both, 3.8 ± 0.5) and SUVmax (mean, 5.3 ± 2.3 vs 5.5 ± 2.5, respectively; P = .81) between baseline and dexamethasone suppression scans. In 19 nodes with FP findings at baseline, dexamethasone suppression resulted in significantly lowered visual score (mean, 3.4 ± 0.6 vs 2.4 ± 0.8, respectively; P < .001) and SUVmax (mean, 3.5 ± 0.8 vs 2.7 ± 0.7, respectively; P < .001), and four nodes with FP findings were rated as true-negative findings on dexamethasone suppression scans, which resulted in a significant difference in SUVmax between nodal lesions with TP and FP findings (P = .014). Conclusion Oral dexamethasone has the potential

  3. 77 FR 13343 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... November 10, 2011 (76 FR 70150), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance entitled... Pilot Program (76 FR 70152, November 10, 2011) intended to collect ] information and experience on the... Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program. This program allowed...

  4. Corrosion coupon studies at coal liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Fossil Energy Materials Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have supplied corrosion coupons to coal-liquefaction pilot plants for exposure in selected vessels. These vessels were chosen on the basis of previous corrosion experience, anticipated corrosion behavior (especially important when operating conditions were changed), accessibility, and availability. Alloys exposed were selected to give a series with a corrosion resistance ranging from less than to greater than that thought to be needed for each application. Corrosion rates calculated from weight changes of the exposed coupons provide information useful in selecting materials for coal-liquefaction plants. The results presented are from coupons exposed in the Wilsonville, Alabama, and Fort Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal pilot plants; the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, H-Coal Pilot Plant; and the Baytown, Texas, Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant.

  5. UK Lung Cancer RCT Pilot Screening Trial: baseline findings from the screening arm provide evidence for the potential implementation of lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Field, J K; Duffy, S W; Baldwin, D R; Whynes, D K; Devaraj, A; Brain, K E; Eisen, T; Gosney, J; Green, B A; Holemans, J A; Kavanagh, T; Kerr, K M; Ledson, M; Lifford, K J; McRonald, F E; Nair, A; Page, R D; Parmar, M K B; Rassl, D M; Rintoul, R C; Screaton, N J; Wald, N J; Weller, D; Williamson, P R; Yadegarfar, G; Hansell, D M

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer screening using low-dose CT (LDCT) was shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% in the National Lung Screening Trial. Methods The pilot UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) is a randomised controlled trial of LDCT screening for lung cancer versus usual care. A population-based questionnaire was used to identify high-risk individuals. CT screen-detected nodules were managed by a pre-specified protocol. Cost effectiveness was modelled with reference to the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial mortality reduction. Results 247 354 individuals aged 50–75 years were approached; 30.7% expressed an interest, 8729 (11.5%) were eligible and 4055 were randomised, 2028 into the CT arm (1994 underwent a CT). Forty-two participants (2.1%) had confirmed lung cancer, 34 (1.7%) at baseline and 8 (0.4%) at the 12-month scan. 28/42 (66.7%) had stage I disease, 36/42 (85.7%) had stage I or II disease. 35/42 (83.3%) had surgical resection. 536 subjects had nodules greater than 50 mm3 or 5 mm diameter and 41/536 were found to have lung cancer. One further cancer was detected by follow-up of nodules between 15 and 50 mm3 at 12 months. The baseline estimate for the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of once-only CT screening, under the UKLS protocol, was £8466 per quality adjusted life year gained (CI £5542 to £12 569). Conclusions The UKLS pilot trial demonstrated that it is possible to detect lung cancer at an early stage and deliver potentially curative treatment in over 80% of cases. Health economic analysis suggests that the intervention would be cost effective—this needs to be confirmed using data on observed lung cancer mortality reduction. Trial registration ISRCTN 78513845. PMID:26645413

  6. 78 FR 76629 - The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study; Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study... instruments must be requested in writing. Proposed Collection: The National Children's Study, Vanguard (Pilot) Study, 0925-0593, Expiration 8/31/2014--Revision, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of...

  7. Study of the use of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter on pilot control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a filter on the pilot's control output could improve the performance of the pilot-aircraft system. What is needed is a filter with a sharp high frequency cut-off, no resonance peak, and a minimum of lag at low frequencies. The present investigation studies the usefulness of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter in performing the needed function. The nonlinear filter is compared with a linear, first order filter, and no filter. An analytical study using pilot models and a simulation study using experienced test pilots was performed. The results showed that the nonlinear filter does promote quick, steady maneuvering. It is shown that the nonlinear filter attenuates the high frequency remnant and adds less phase lag to the low frequency signal than does the linear filter. It is also shown that the rate limit in the nonlinear filter can be set to be too restrictive, causing an unstable pilot-aircraft system response.

  8. NASA study of an automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A Pilot Advisory System (PAS) concept for high-density uncontrolled airports is discussed where the general aviation pilots will be provided with automatic audio voice airport and air traffic advisories within two minute intervals and with mid-air collision warnings whenever such situations arise. Free of manual inputs, the PAS includes the options of fixed-base operator runway select, automatic restart and self-test, and remote inquiry of system status and messages.

  9. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. Methods in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. Results total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. Conclusion the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods. PMID:26605187

  10. Endothelin-1 levels in scleroderma patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Javor, Sanja; Laborai, Erika; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent endogenous vasoconstrictor, which mediates vascular wall cells proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation through two types of ET-1 receptors (ET-A and ET-B). In our retrospective study the serum levels of ET-1 in 18 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with and without digital ulcers (DUs) were assessed to observe possible correlation between the levels of ET-1, the evolution of SSc, and the therapy with an ET-1 antagonist (bosentan). In all our patients, the levels of ET-1 were found higher than normal range and correlate with the severity of the disease. Furthermore we also observed that in patients without DUs the levels of ET-1 were higher and did not correlate with new DUs development. In conclusion, the levels of ET-1 in our studied patients do not correlate with the possible development of DUs. The reduction of ET-1 levels in DUs patients in therapy with bosentan confirms the efficacy of this molecule both for treatment and prevention of digital ulcers. The inhibition of ET-A receptor by its antagonist may activate the opposite ET-B receptors, with well-known function ET-1 degradation and reducing of ET-1 serum level as confirmed in our pilot study. PMID:23984086

  11. Effects of a ketogenic diet on the quality of life in 16 patients with advanced cancer: A pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor patients exhibit an increased peripheral demand of fatty acids and protein. Contrarily, tumors utilize glucose as their main source of energy supply. Thus, a diet supplying the cancer patient with sufficient fat and protein for his demands while restricting the carbohydrates (CHO) tumors thrive on, could be a helpful strategy in improving the patients' situation. A ketogenic diet (KD) fulfills these requirements. Therefore, we performed a pilot study to investigate the feasibility of a KD and its influence on the quality of life of patients with advanced metastatic tumors. Methods Sixteen patients with advanced metastatic tumors and no conventional therapeutic options participated in the study. The patients were instructed to follow a KD (less than 70 g CHO per day) with normal groceries and were provided with a supply of food additives to mix a protein/fat shake to simplify the 3-month intervention period. Quality of life [assessed by EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 2)], serum and general health parameters were determined at baseline, after every two weeks of follow-up, or after drop out. The effect of dietary change on metabolism was monitored daily by measuring urinary ketone bodies. Results One patient did not tolerate the diet and dropped out within 3 days. Among those who tolerated the diet, two patients died early, one stopped after 2 weeks due to personal reasons, one felt unable to stick to the diet after 4 weeks, one stopped after 6 and two stopped after 7 and 8 weeks due to progress of the disease, one had to discontinue after 6 weeks to resume chemotherapy and five completed the 3 month intervention period. These five and the one who resumed chemotherapy after 6 weeks report an improved emotional functioning and less insomnia, while several other parameters of quality of life remained stable or worsened, reflecting their very advanced disease. Except for temporary constipation and fatigue, we found no severe adverse side effects, especially no

  12. Development and pilot evaluation of a cancer-focused summer research education program for [corrected] Navajo undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Edward R; Bauer, Mark C; Hosley, Brenda L; Patten, Christi A; Hughes, Christine A; Trapp, Mary A; Petersen, Wesley O; Austin-Garrison, Martha A; Bowman, Clarissa N; Vierkant, Robert A

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the development and pilot testing of a 10-week cancer research education program for Navajo undergraduate students. The program was piloted at Diné College with 22 undergraduates (7 men, 15 women) in 2007 and 2008. Students completed a pre-post program survey assessing attitudes, opinions, and knowledge about research and about cancer. The program was found to be culturally acceptable and resulted in statistically significant changes in some of the attitudes and opinions about research and cancer. Combining all 13 knowledge items, there was a significant (p = 0.002) change in the mean total correct percent from baseline [70.3 (SD = 15.9)] to post-program [82.1 (SD = 13.1)]. The curriculum was adapted for a new cancer prevention and control course now offered at Diné College, enhancing sustainability. Ultimately, these efforts may serve to build capacity in communities by developing a cadre of future Native American scientists to develop and implement cancer research. PMID:20411446

  13. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Cancer-Focused Summer Research Education Program for Navajo Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Edward R.; Bauer, Mark C.; Hosley, Brenda L.; Patten, Christi A.; Hughes, Christine A.; Trapp, Mary A.; Petersen, Wesley O.; Austin-Garrison, Martha A.; Bowman, Clarissa N.; Vierkant, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development and pilot testing of a 10-week cancer research education program for Navajo undergraduate students. The program was piloted at Diné College with 22 undergraduates (7 men, 15 women) in 2007 and 2008. Students completed a pre–post program survey assessing attitudes, opinions, and knowledge about research and about cancer. The program was found to be culturally acceptable and resulted in statistically significant changes in some of the attitudes and opinions about research and cancer. Combining all 13 knowledge items, there was a significant (p=0.002) change in the mean total correct percent from baseline [70.3 (SD=15.9)] to post-program [82.1 (SD=13.1)]. The curriculum was adapted for a new cancer prevention and control course now offered at Diné College, enhancing sustainability. Ultimately, these efforts may serve to build capacity in communities by developing a cadre of future Native American scientists to develop and implement cancer research. PMID:20411446

  14. Acupuncture and burning mouth syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Tarozzi, Marco; Varoni, Elena; Franchini, Roberto; Carrassi, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition most common in middle-aged and elderly women, with prevalence rates in the general population ranging from 0.5% to 5%. Defined by the International Headache Society as "an intraoral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found," BMS is considered a form of neuropathic pain. The management of BMS remains unsatisfactory. In this pilot study, we investigated the use of acupuncture in a small group of BMS patients. The study group, after 4 refusals, was composed of 10 BMS patients (9 females and 1 male; mean age, 65.2 years; range, from 48 to 80 years; mean duration of BMS, 2.6 years; SD ± 0.8 years). Oral pain/burning sensation (primary outcome) was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Health-related quality of life (secondary outcome) was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Acupuncture treatment lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 20 sessions. Patients reported a mean reduction in pain of 0.99 points on the VAS (max 2.1-min 0.1), which, although slight, was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test P < 0.009). No significant improvement in the overall score for quality of life was observed, although subjects receiving acupuncture treatment seemed better able cope with their oral symptoms. PMID:23336607

  15. A Pilot Study of Neurofeedback for Chronic PTSD.

    PubMed

    Gapen, Mark; van der Kolk, Bessel A; Hamlin, Ed; Hirshberg, Laurence; Suvak, Michael; Spinazzola, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    EEG Biofeedback (also known as neurofeedback) has been in use as a clinical intervention for well over 30 years; however, it has made very little impact on clinical care. One reason for this has been the difficulty in designing research to measure clinical change in the real world. While substantial evidence exists for its efficacy in treating attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, relatively little evidence exists for its utility in other disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study represents a "proof-of-concept" pilot for the use of neurofeedback with multiply-traumatized individuals with treatment-resistant PTSD. Participants completed 40 sessions of neurofeedback training two times per week with sensors randomly assigned (by the study coordinator, who was not blind to condition) to sensor placements of either T4-P4 or T3-T4. We found that neurofeedback significantly reduced PTSD symptoms (Davidson Trauma Scale scores averaged 69.14 at baseline to 49.26 at termination), and preceded gains in affect regulation (Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities-Affect Dysregulation scores averaged 23.63 at baseline to 17.20 at termination). We discuss a roadmap for future research. PMID:26782083

  16. Cognitive behavior therapy for night eating syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kelly C; Lundgren, Jennifer D; Moore, Reneé H; O'Reardon, John P; Stunkard, Albert J

    2010-01-01

    Because no studies of psychotherapy treatments for night eating syndrome (NES) have been published, we conducted a pilot study of a 10-session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for NES. Twenty-five patients (19 female, 6 male) were screened and comprehensively assessed before being enrolled. At each visit, patients completed the Night Eating Symptom Scale (NESS), were weighed, and number of awakenings and the number of nocturnal ingestions and daily caloric intake were calculated from weekly food and sleep records. Mixed model regression analyses [of the data] showed significant decreases in caloric intake after dinner (35.0% to 24.9%); number of nocturnal ingestions (8.7 to 2.6 per week); weight (82.5 to 79.4 kg); and NESS score (28.7 to 16.3; all p values <0.0001). Number of awakenings per week, depressed mood, and quality of life also improved significantly (p values <.02). This first clinical trial of CBT for NES shows significant improvements in the core aspects of NES and weight reduction, suggesting the need for a controlled treatment trial. PMID:20405767

  17. Mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gygax, Marine Jequier; Schneider, Patrick; Newman, Christopher John

    2011-05-01

    Mirror therapy, which provides the visual illusion of a functional paretic limb by using the mirror reflection of the non-paretic arm, is used in the rehabilitation of hemiparesis after stroke in adults. We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia by performing a pilot crossover study in ten participants (aged 6-14 y; five males, five females; Manual Ability Classification System levels: one at level I, two at level II, four at level III, three at level IV) randomly assigned to 15 minutes of daily bimanual training with and without a mirror for 3 weeks. Assessments of maximal grasp and pinch strengths, and upper limb function measured by the Shriner's Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation were performed at weeks 0 (baseline), 3, 6 (intervention), and 9 (wash-out). Testing of grasp strength behind the mirror improved performance by 15% (p=0.004). Training with the mirror significantly improved grasp strength (with mirror +20.4%, p=0.033; without +5.9%, p>0.1) and upper limb dynamic position (with mirror +4.6%, p=0.044; without +1.2%, p>0.1), while training without a mirror significantly improved pinch strength (with mirror +6.9%, p>0.1; without +21.9%, p=0.026). This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of mirror therapy in children with hemiplegia and that it may improve strength and dynamic function of the paretic arm. PMID:21410693

  18. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders. PMID:10474669

  19. Sleep characteristics of individuals with chronic stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughmi, Mayis; Al-Sharman, Alham; Stevens, Suzanne; Siengsukon, Catherine F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in sleep characteristics in individuals with chronic stroke are not well described, particularly compared with healthy individuals. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was to explore the sleep characteristics in individuals with chronic stroke compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Sixteen individuals with chronic stroke and ten age- and sex-matched controls underwent two nights of polysomnographic recording. The sleep characteristics of interest included total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and percent time, as well as time in minutes spent in stages N1, N2, and N3 and stage R sleep. The individuals with chronic stroke spent less percent time in stage N3 compared with controls (P=0.048). No significant differences in the other sleep characteristics were found between the stroke and control groups. Individuals with chronic stroke present with altered stage N3 sleep compared with healthy controls. These alterations in stage N3 sleep might be a sign of neuronal dysfunction and may impact recovery following stroke. A larger scale study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26543384

  20. Impact of healing touch on pediatric oncology outpatients: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; Fletcher, Nancy B; Hamilton, Craig A; McLean, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Healing Touch (HT) is a biofield therapy used to enhance well-being. We conducted a pilot study to assess its effects in pediatric oncology patients. We enrolled patients in the continuation or consolidation phase of therapy. Patients or their parent completed simple visual analogue scales (VASs; 0-10) for relaxation, vitality, overall well-being, stress, anxiety, and depression before and after a 20-minute period of rest and a standardized HT treatment. Patients' heart rates were monitored and later analyzed for heart rate variability (HRV) characteristics. Of the nine patients, all completed VASs and six had usable HRV data. The average age was 9 years. VAS scores for stress decreased significantly more for HT treatment than for rest (HT: 4.4-1.7; rest: 2.3-2.3; p = .03). The HRV characteristic of total power was significantly lower during HT than for rest (HT 599 +/- 221; rest: 857 +/- 155; p = .048), and sympathetic activity was somewhat but not significantly lower (HT: 312 +/- 158; rest: 555 +/- 193; p = .06). HT is associated with lowered stress and changes in HRV. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these effects in larger samples and to explore the impact on additional clinically relevant measures. PMID:19476730

  1. Patterns of federal Internet offenders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ann W; Carretta, Carrie M; Burgess, Allen G

    2012-09-01

    Internet-facilitated sexual offending is receiving increased forensic and clinical attention. Two issues confront this field. First, studies are equivocal as to whether (or not) the possession of Internet pornography can escalate to contact sexual offenses against a child, and second, federal judges have been questioning the length of sentences for users only of child pornography. The findings of this pilot study of 101 federal Internet offenders revealed over half of the men at the time of arrest were employed, educated, were in (or had been in) a relationship, had children, and did not have a prior criminal offense, suggesting a changing profile of a convicted sex offender. Forensic and psychiatric nurses who evaluate users of child pornography contraband need to be knowledgeable of Internet file transfer technology and the various types of contraband viewed specifically for the age of the preferred child, extreme acts to the child (e.g., bondage, S&M), and whether the user prefers images of adults with children or images of children only. PMID:22925126

  2. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; Miller, Jason; Arcori, Leann; Lumeng, Julie C.; Han-Markey, Theresa; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD). Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M). Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders. PMID:26404363

  3. Daily personal exposure to black carbon: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ryan D.; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous personal monitoring is the benchmark for air pollution exposure assessment. Black carbon (BC) is a strong marker of primary combustion like vehicle and biomass emissions. There have been few studies that quantified daily personal BC exposure and the contribution that different microenvironments make to it. In this pilot study, we used a portable aethalometer to measure BC concentrations in an individual's breathing zone at 30-s intervals while he performed his usual daily activities. We used a GPS and time-activity diary to track where he spent his time. We performed twenty 24-h measurements, and observed an arithmetic mean daily exposure concentration of 603 ng/m3. We estimated that changing commute modes from bus to train reduced the 24-h mean BC exposure concentration by 29%. Switching from open windows to closed windows and recirculated air in a car led to a reduction of 32%. Living in a home without a wood-fired heater caused a reduction of 50% compared with a wood-heated home. Our preliminary findings highlight the potential utility of simple approaches to reduce a person's daily BC exposure.

  4. Leading teams during simulated pediatric emergencies: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Coolen, Ester H; Draaisma, Jos M; den Hamer, Sabien; Loeffen, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leadership has been identified as a key variable for the functioning of teams and as one of the main reasons for success or failure of team-based work systems. Pediatricians often function as team leaders in the resuscitation of a critically ill child. However, pediatric residents often report having little opportunity to perform in the role of team leader during residency. In order to gain more insight into leadership skills and behaviors, we classified leadership styles of pediatric residents during simulated emergencies. Methods We conducted a prospective quantitative study to investigate leadership styles used by pediatric residents during simulated emergencies with clinical deterioration of a child at a pediatric ward. Using videotaped scenarios of 48 simulated critical events among 12 residents, we were able to classify verbal and nonverbal communication into different leadership styles according to the situational leadership theory. Results The coaching style (mean 54.5%, SD 7.8) is the most frequently applied by residents, followed by the directing style (mean 35.6%, SD 4.1). This pattern conforms to the task- and role-related requirements in our scenarios and it also conforms to the concept of situational leadership. We did not find any significant differences in leadership style according to the postgraduate year or scenario content. Conclusion The model used in this pilot study helps us to gain a better understanding of the development of effective leadership behavior and supports the applicability of situational leadership theory in training leadership skills during residency. PMID:25610010

  5. Daily personal exposure to black carbon: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ryan D.; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous personal monitoring is the benchmark for air pollution exposure assessment. Black carbon (BC) is a strong marker of primary combustion like vehicle and biomass emissions. There have been few studies that quantified daily personal BC exposure and the contribution that different microenvironments make to it. In this pilot study, we used a portable aethalometer to measure BC concentrations in an individual's breathing zone at 30-s intervals while he performed his usual daily activities. We used a GPS and time-activity diary to track where he spent his time. We performed twenty 24-h measurements, and observed an arithmetic mean daily exposure concentration of 603 ng/m3. We estimated that changing commute modes from bus to train reduced the 24-h mean BC exposure concentration by 29%. Switching from open windows to closed windows and recirculated air in a car led to a reduction of 32%. Living in a home without a wood-fired heater caused a reduction of 50% compared with a wood-heated home. Our preliminary findings highlight the potential utility of simple approaches to reduce a person's daily BC exposure.

  6. SEATTLE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CORROSION CONTROL STUDY. VOLUME 2. TOLT RIVER WATER PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    For 6 months, the Seattle Water Department conducted a corrosion treatment pilot plant study, obtaining data on the treatment of Tolt River water with lime/sodium carbonate, lime/sodium bicarbonate, and lime/bicarbonate/silicate. Continuous-flow pipe coupon tests were conducted t...

  7. Oral mucosal immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Suurna, Maria V.; Rochlin, Kate; Bremberg, Maria G.; Tropper, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sublingual mucosa has been used for many years to apply allergenic extracts for the purpose of specific immunotherapy (IT). Although sublingual IT (SLIT) is both safe and efficacious, the density of antigen-presenting cells is higher in other regions of the oral cavity and vestibule, which make them a potentially desirable target for IT. Objective: To present the concept of oral mucosal IT (OMIT) and to provide pilot data for this extended application of SLIT. Methods: An open-label, 12-month, prospective study was undertaken as a preliminary step before a full-scale clinical investigation. Twenty-four individuals with allergic rhinitis received IT by applying allergenic extracts daily to either the oral vestibule plus oral cavity mucosa by using a glycerin-based toothpaste or to the sublingual mucosa by using 50% glycerin liquid drops. Adverse events, adherence rates, total combined scores, rhinoconjunctivitis quality-of-life questionnaire scores, changes in skin reactivity, and changes in serum antibody levels were measured for each participant. Results: No severe adverse events occurred in either group. The adherence rate was 80% for the OMIT group and 62% for the SLIT group (p = 0.61). Decreased total combined scores were demonstrated for both the OMIT group (15.6%) and the SLIT group (22.3%), although this decrease did not reach statistical significance in either group. Both groups achieved a meaningful clinical improvement of at least 0.5 points on rhinoconjunctivitis quality-of-life questionnaire. A statistically significant rise in specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) was seen in both groups over the first 6 months of treatment. Conclusion: OMIT and SLIT demonstrated similar safety profiles and adherence rates. Measurements of clinical efficacy improved for both groups, but only changes in IgG4 achieved statistical significance. These pilot data provide enough evidence to proceed with a full-scale investigation to explore the role of OMIT in

  8. Additional Therapy with a Mistletoe Product during Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients Improves Quality of Life: An Open Randomized Clinical Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Tröger, Wilfried; Zdrale, Zdravko; Tišma, Nevena; Matijašević, Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience a loss of quality of life. Moreover chemotherapy may induce neutropenia. Patients report a better quality of life when additionally treated with mistletoe products during chemotherapy. Methods. In this prospective randomized open-label pilot study 95 patients were randomized into three groups. All patients were treated with an adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary objective of the study was quality of life, the secondary objective was neutropenia. Here we report the comparison of HxA (n = 34) versus untreated control (n = 31). Results. In the explorative analysis ten of 15 scores of the EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a better quality of life in the HxA group compared to the control group (P < 0.001 to P = 0.038 in Dunnett-T3 test). The difference was clinically relevant (difference of at least 5 points, range 5.4-12.2) in eight of the ten scores. Neutropenia occurred in 7/34 HxA patients and in 8/31 control patients (P = 0.628). Conclusions. This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with HxA additionally to CAF. Although the open design may be a limitation, the findings show the feasibility of a confirmatory study using the methods described here. PMID:24701238

  9. Additional Therapy with a Mistletoe Product during Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients Improves Quality of Life: An Open Randomized Clinical Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tröger, Wilfried; Ždrale, Zdravko; Tišma, Nevena; Matijašević, Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy often experience a loss of quality of life. Moreover chemotherapy may induce neutropenia. Patients report a better quality of life when additionally treated with mistletoe products during chemotherapy. Methods. In this prospective randomized open-label pilot study 95 patients were randomized into three groups. All patients were treated with an adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary objective of the study was quality of life, the secondary objective was neutropenia. Here we report the comparison of HxA (n = 34) versus untreated control (n = 31). Results. In the explorative analysis ten of 15 scores of the EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a better quality of life in the HxA group compared to the control group (P < 0.001 to P = 0.038 in Dunnett-T3 test). The difference was clinically relevant (difference of at least 5 points, range 5.4–12.2) in eight of the ten scores. Neutropenia occurred in 7/34 HxA patients and in 8/31 control patients (P = 0.628). Conclusions. This pilot study showed an improvement of quality of life by treating breast cancer patients with HxA additionally to CAF. Although the open design may be a limitation, the findings show the feasibility of a confirmatory study using the methods described here. PMID:24701238

  10. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May; Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Surface scanning of the face of a suspect is presented as a way to better match the facial features with those of a perpetrator from CCTV footage. We performed a simple pilot study where we obtained facial surface scans of volunteers and then in blind trials tried to match these scans with 2D photographs of the faces of the volunteers. Fifteen male volunteers were surface scanned using a Polhemus FastSCAN Cobra Handheld Laser Scanner. Three photographs were taken of each volunteer's face in full frontal, profile and from above at an angle of 45 degrees and also 45 degrees laterally. Via special software (MIMICS and Photoshop) the surface scans were matched with the photographs in blind trials. The matches were graded as: a good fit; possible fit; and no fit. All the surface scans and photos were matched correctly, although one surface scan could be matched with two angled photographs, meaning that the discriminatory value was 86.7%. We also tested the surface scanner in terms of reliability in establishing point measures on skulls, and compared with physical measurements performed by calipers. The variation was on average 1 mm for five cranial measures. We suggest how surface scanning might be applied in forensic facial identification. PMID:19507073

  11. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Colin; Zakaria, Amer; Pistorius, Stephen; LoVetri, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI). T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer's forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm's peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure. PMID:24023539

  12. Adjustable recessions in horizontal comitant strabismus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Siddharth; Singh, Vinita; Singh, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the surgical outcome of adjustable with the conventional recession in patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative nonrandomized interventional pilot study was performed on patients with horizontal comitant strabismus. Fifty-four patients (27 in each group) were allocated into 2 groups to undergo either adjustable suture (AS) recession or non-AS (NAS) recession along with conventional resection. The patients were followed up for 6 months. A successful outcome was defined as deviation ±10 prism diopters at 6 months. The results were statistically analyzed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and Student's t-test. Results: A successful outcome was found in 24 (88.8%) patients in AS and 17 (62.9%) in NAS group (P = 0.02). The postoperative adjustment was done in 13 (48.1%) patients in AS group. There was one complication (tenon's cyst) in AS group. Conclusion: AS recession may be considered in all cooperative patients undergoing strabismus surgery for comitant deviations. PMID:26458480

  13. A pilot study of a digital drainage system in pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Georgia; Draper, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years there has been increasing usage of digital systems within cardiothoracic surgery to quantify air leaks and aid in clinical decision-making regarding the removal of chest drains postoperatively. The literature suggests improved agreement on timing of removal of chest drains and a reduced length of stay of patients. It could be that such devices could be useful tools for the clinician managing cases of pneumothorax. Methods This pilot study recruited adults admitted under the medical team with a pneumothorax requiring a chest drain. Participants had the underwater seal device changed for a digital device (Thopaz) which allowed continuous monitoring of the air leak. Drains were removed when either there was no ongoing air leak and the lung had expanded, or surgery was deemed necessary. Results Thirteen patients with pneumothorax (four primary, nine secondary) used the device during their admission including one patient treated in the community (the device has internal suction). Data were used to aid the clinician in management of the pneumothorax including the timing of surgery/ removal of drain and commencement of suction. Discussion Digital devices appear to be safe and effective and may prove to be a useful tool in the management of pneumothorax. PMID:25478182

  14. Postnatal Foot Length to Determine Gestational Age: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wyk, Lizelle Van; Smith, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Gestational age is a critical factor in the management, decision-making, prognostication and follow-up of newborn infants. It is also essential for research and epidemiology. In the absence of an early assessment of fetal gestation by abdominal ultrasound, many neonatal units in developing countries determine gestational age by neonatal scores and last menstrual period-both of which are highly inaccurate. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether postnatal foot length measurement could accurately determine gestational age in a specified South African hospitalized neonatal population. Foot length was measured with a plastic Verniere's caliper. Foot length was shown to correlate well with gestational age (r = 0.919,p < 0.001). Intra-observer and inter-observer variability of foot length measurements was low. Foot length can therefore be used with high accuracy to determine the gestational age in a population where there is poor access to or utilization of antenatal sonar. PMID:26758249

  15. Fathers and breast feeding: a pilot observational study.

    PubMed

    Voss, S; Finnis, L; Manners, J

    1993-08-01

    A small pilot survey (n = 113) by questionnaire of the fathers of a sample of children under one year of age was undertaken in order to investigate the involvement of fathers with infant feeding and their attitudes to the method of feeding adopted. The response rate was 72% overall and 79% when the partners of 'single parent' mothers were excluded. Nearly 30% of respondents had not discussed the method of feeding with anyone, but over 60% had discussed it with their partner. 64% of fathers sometimes helped with feeding their child and 17% said that they always helped. The majority of fathers did not mind their partner breast feeding in front of friends or relatives but 42% did not like them feeding in front of strangers and over half did not like them breast feeding in a public place. From this study, based on relatively small numbers, we conclude that fathers may feel left out of infant feeding. They should be given more opportunity to become involved from an early stage and take part in the decision about the method of infant feeding to be adopted. PMID:8410907

  16. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  17. Metastability in plyometric training on unstable surfaces: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past, plyometric training (PT) has been predominantly performed on stable surfaces. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine effects of a 7-week lower body PT on stable vs. unstable surfaces. This type of exercise condition may be denoted as metastable equilibrium. Methods Thirty-three physically active male sport science students (age: 24.1 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to a PT group (n = 13) exercising on stable (STAB) and a PT group (n = 20) on unstable surfaces (INST). Both groups trained countermovement jumps, drop jumps, and practiced a hurdle jump course. In addition, high bar squats were performed. Physical fitness tests on stable surfaces (hexagonal obstacle test, countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, left-right hop, dynamic and static balance tests, and leg extension strength) were used to examine the training effects. Results Significant main effects of time (ANOVA) were found for the countermovement jump, hurdle drop jump, hexagonal test, dynamic balance, and leg extension strength. A significant interaction of time and training mode was detected for the countermovement jump in favor of the INST group. No significant improvements were evident for either group in the left-right hop and in the static balance test. Conclusions These results show that lower body PT on unstable surfaces is a safe and efficient way to improve physical performance on stable surfaces. PMID:25089202

  18. How big should the pilot study for my cluster randomised trial be?

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Costelloe, Ceire E; Kahan, Brennan C; Lancaster, Gillian A; Kerry, Sally M

    2016-06-01

    There is currently a lot of interest in pilot studies conducted in preparation for randomised controlled trials. This paper focuses on sample size requirements for external pilot studies for cluster randomised trials. We consider how large an external pilot study needs to be to assess key parameters for input to the main trial sample size calculation when the primary outcome is continuous, and to estimate rates, for example recruitment rates, with reasonable precision. We used simulation to provide the distribution of the expected number of clusters for the main trial under different assumptions about the natural cluster size, intra-cluster correlation, eventual cluster size in the main trial, and various decisions made at the piloting stage. We chose intra-cluster correlation values and pilot study size to reflect those commonly reported in the literature. Our results show that estimates of sample size required for the main trial are likely to be biased downwards and very imprecise unless the pilot study includes large numbers of clusters and individual participants. We conclude that pilot studies will usually be too small to estimate parameters required for estimating a sample size for a main cluster randomised trial (e.g. the intra-cluster correlation coefficient) with sufficient precision and too small to provide reliable estimates of rates for process measures such as recruitment or follow-up rates. PMID:26071431

  19. A pilot randomised controlled trial of personalised care after treatment for prostate cancer (TOPCAT-P): nurse-led holistic-needs assessment and individualised psychoeducational intervention: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Stanciu, Marian Andrei; Morris, Caroline; Makin, Matt; Watson, Eila; Bulger, Jenna; Evans, Richard; Hiscock, Julia; Hoare, Zoë; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Neal, Richard David; Wilkinson, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer is common and the incidence is increasing, but more men are living longer after diagnosis, and die with their disease rather than of it. Nonetheless, specific and substantial physical, sexual, emotional and mental health problems often lead to a poor quality of life. Urology services increasingly struggle to cope with the demands of follow-up care, and primary care is likely to play the central role in long-term follow-up. The present phase II trial will evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a nurse-led, person-centred psychoeducational intervention, delivered in community or primary care settings. Methods and analysis Prostate cancer survivors diagnosed in the past 9–48 months and currently biochemically stable will be identified from hospital records by their treating clinician. Eligible men would have either completed radical treatment, or would be followed up with prostate specific antigen monitoring and symptom reporting. We will recruit 120 patients who will be randomised to receive either an augmented form of usual care, or an additional nurse-led intervention for a period of 36 weeks. Following the health policy in Wales, the intervention is offered by a key worker, is promoting prudent healthcare and is using a holistic needs assessment. Outcome measures will assess physical symptoms, psychological well-being, confidence in managing own health and quality of life. Healthcare service use will be measured over 36 weeks. Feedback interviews with patients and clinicians will further inform the acceptability of the intervention. Recruitment, attrition, questionnaire completion rates and outcome measures variability will be assessed, and results will inform the design of a future phase III trial and accompanying economic evaluation. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was granted by Bangor University and North Wales REC (13/WA/0291). Results will be reported in peer-reviewed publications, at scientific

  20. The Effect of Grape Seed Extract on Estrogen Levels of Postmenopausal Women - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L.; Bauer, Brent A.; Loehrer, Laura L.; Cha, Stephen S.; Suman, Vera J.; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Olson, Janet E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The roll of estrogens in the pathogenesis of breast cancer is well documented and has lead to the development of Selective Estrogene Receptor Modulators and Aromatase Inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However these agents are associated with significant side effects and are therefore not well accepted by healthy women who are at high risk for breast cancer. There has been some evidence from in vitro and in vivo animal studies that grapes have an aromatase inhibiting effect resulting in a decrease in estrogen synthesis and increase in androstenedione and testosterone. Method We conducted a randomized, double-blind, dose finding early phase trial. Eligible partici-pants were randomly assigned to one of 4 doses of grape seed extract (200, 400, 600, or 800 mg) to be taken daily for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the change of plasma hormone levels (estrogen conjugates from baseline to 12 weeks after treatment with grape seed extract). Results Forty-six women were enrolled, 39 (84.8%) completed the study. In this pilot study grape-seed extract given in daily doses of 200, 400, 600 or 800 mg for 12 weeks to postmenopausal women did not decrease plasma estrogens (estrone, estradiol, estrone sulfate) and did not increase precursors of androgens (testosterone and androstenedione). There were large variations in pre- and posttreatment estrone, estradiol and estrone sulfate and androgen precursors. Conclusion Future research should carefully consider BMI and changes in BMI as well as higher dosing of grape seed extract in their design. PMID:24670122

  1. EMAP WESTERN UNITED STATES LANDSCAPE CHARACTERIZATION NORTHWEST OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA DATA AND PRODUCT BROWSER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is conducting a pilot study in the western United States. This study will advance the science of ecological monitoring and demonstrate techniques for regional-scale assessme...

  2. EMAP WESTERN UNITED STATES LANDSCAPE CHARACTERIZATION SOUTHERN ROCKIES PILOT STUDY AREA DATA AND PRODUCT BROWSER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is conducting a pilot study in the western United States. This study will advance the science of ecological monitoring and demonstrate techniques for regional-scale assessme...

  3. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  4. A Pilot Study of Omalizumab in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, Denise; Enav, Benjamin; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Hider, Pamela; Kim-Chang, Julie; Noonan, Laura; Taber, Tabitha; Kaushal, Suhasini; Limgala, Renuka; Brown, Margaret; Gupta, Raavi; Balba, Nader; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Khojah, Amer; Alpan, Oral

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract are an emerging subset of immune pathologies within the spectrum of allergic inflammation. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), once considered a rare disease, is increasing in incidence, with a rate of over 1 in 10,000 in the US, for unknown reasons. The clinical management of EoE is challenging, thus there is an urgent need for understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of this eosinophilic disease to develop better therapeutic approaches. In this open label, single arm, unblinded study, we evaluated the effects of an anti-IgE treatment, omalizumab, on local inflammation in the esophagus and clinical correlates in patients with EoE. Omalizumab was administered for 12 weeks to 15 subjects with long standing EoE. There were no serious side effects from the treatment. Esophageal tissue inflammation was assessed both before and after therapy. After 3 months on omalizumab, although tissue Immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels were significantly reduced in all but two of the subjects, we found that full remission of EoE, which is defined as histologic and clinical improvement only in 33% of the patients. The decrease in tryptase-positive cells and eosinophils correlated significantly with the clinical outcome as measured by improvement in endoscopy and symptom scores, respectively. Omalizumab-induced remission of EoE was limited to subjects with low peripheral blood absolute eosinophil counts. These findings demonstrate that in a subset of EoE patients, IgE plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease and that anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab may result in disease remission. Since this study is open label there is the potential for bias, hence the need for a larger double blind placebo controlled study. The data presented in this pilot study provides a foundation for proper patient selection to maximize clinical efficacy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01040598 PMID:25789989

  5. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment: the Seaside, Oregon Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Geist, E. L.; Synolakis, C.; Titov, V. V.

    2004-12-01

    A pilot study of Seaside, Oregon is underway, to develop methodologies for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments that can be incorporated into Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) developed by FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Current NFIP guidelines for tsunami hazard assessment rely on the science, technology and methodologies developed in the 1970s; although generally regarded as groundbreaking and state-of-the-art for its time, this approach is now superseded by modern methods that reflect substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades. In particular, post-1990 technical advances include: improvements in tsunami source specification; improved tsunami inundation models; better computational grids by virtue of improved bathymetric and topographic databases; a larger database of long-term paleoseismic and paleotsunami records and short-term, historical earthquake and tsunami records that can be exploited to develop improved probabilistic methodologies; better understanding of earthquake recurrence and probability models. The NOAA-led U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), in partnership with FEMA, USGS, NSF and Emergency Management and Geotechnical agencies of the five Pacific States, incorporates these advances into site-specific tsunami hazard assessments for coastal communities in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington. NTHMP hazard assessment efforts currently focus on developing deterministic, "credible worst-case" scenarios that provide valuable guidance for hazard mitigation and emergency management. The NFIP focus, on the other hand, is on actuarial needs that require probabilistic hazard assessments such as those that characterize 100- and 500-year flooding events. There are clearly overlaps in NFIP and NTHMP objectives. NTHMP worst-case scenario assessments that include an estimated probability of occurrence could benefit the NFIP; NFIP probabilistic assessments of 100- and 500-yr

  6. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Lancaster, Gillian A; Campbell, Michael J; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms 'pilot' and 'feasibility' in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms 'feasibility' or 'pilot' as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term 'feasibility' in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention. PMID:26978655

  7. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  8. UV disinfection pilot plant study at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.; Beavers, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    An ultraviolet light disinfection system pilot plant was operated at the Savannah River Site Central Shops sanitary wastewater treatment package plant July 14, 1992 through August 13, 1992. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of ultraviolet light disinfection on the effluent from the small package-type wastewater treatment plants currently used on-site. This pilot plant consisted of a rack of UV lights suspended in a stainless steel channel through which a sidestream of effluent from the treatment plant clarifier was pumped. Fecal coliform analyses were performed on the influent to and effluent from the pilot unit to verify the disinfection process. UV disinfection was highly effective in reducing fecal coliform colonies within NPDES permit limitations even under process upset conditions. The average fecal coliform reduction exceeded 99.7% using ultraviolet light disinfection under normal operating conditions at the package treatment plants.

  9. An experimental study of human pilot's scanning behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Osawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    The scanning behavior and the control behavior of the pilot who manually controls the two-variable system, which is the most basic one of multi-variable systems are investigated. Two control tasks which simulate the actual airplane attitude and airspeed control were set up. In order to simulate the change of the situation where the pilot is placed, such as changes of flight phase, mission and others, the subject was requested to vary the weightings, as his control strategy, upon each task. Changes of human control dynamics and his canning properties caused by the modification of the situation were investigated. By making use of the experimental results, the optimal model of the control behavior and the scanning behavior of the pilot in the two-variable system is proposed from the standpoint of making the performance index minimal.

  10. Intramedullary cement osteosynthesis (IMCO): a pilot study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Mirzasadeghi, Alireza; Narayanan, Sri Subanesh; Ng, Min Hwei; Sanaei, Reza; Cheng, Chen Hui; Bajuri, Mohd Yazid; Shukur, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The application of bone substitutes and cements has a long standing history in augmenting fractures as a complement to routine fracture fixation techniques. Nevertheless, such use is almost always in conjunction with definite means of fracture fixation such as intramedullary pins or bone plates. The idea of using biomaterials as the primary fixation bears the possibility of simultaneous fixation and bone enhancement. Intramedullary recruitment of bone cements is suggested in this study to achieve this goal. However, as the method needs primary testings in animal models before human implementation, and since the degree of ambulation is not predictable in animals, this pilot study only evaluates the outcomes regarding the feasibility and safety of this method in the presence of primary bone fixators. A number of two sheep were used in this study. Tibial transverse osteotomies were performed in both animals followed by external skeletal fixation. The medullary canals, which have already been prepared by removing the marrow through proximal and distal drill holes, were then injected with calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The outcomes were evaluated postoperatively by standard survey radiographs, morphology, histology and biomechanical testings. Healing processes appeared uncomplicated until week four where one bone fracture recurred due to external fixator failure. The results showed 56% and 48% cortical thickening, compared to the opposite site, in the fracture site and proximal and distal diaphyses respectively. This bone augmentative effect resulted in 264% increase in bending strength of the fracture site and 148% increase of the same value in the adjacent areas of diaphyses. In conclusion, IMCO, using CPC in tibia of sheep, is safe and biocompatible with bone physiology and healing. It possibly can carry the osteopromotive effect of the CPCs to provide a sustained source of bone augmentation throughout the diaphysis. Although the results must be considered

  11. Multiparametric [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose/ [18F]Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/ Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer for the Non-Invasive Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, Piotr; Baltzer, Pascal; Polanec, Stephan H.; Sturdza, Alina; Georg, Dietmar; Helbich, Thomas H.; Karanikas, Georgios; Grimm, Christoph; Polterauer, Stephan; Poetter, Richard; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Georg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate fused multiparametric positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MP PET/MRI) at 3T in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, using high-resolution T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and the radiotracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and [18F]fluoromisonidazol ([18F]FMISO) for the non-invasive detection of tumor heterogeneity for an improved planning of chemo-radiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced cervix were enrolled in this IRB approved and were examined with fused MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI and in eleven patients complete data sets were acquired. MP PET/MRI was assessed for tumor volume, enhancement (EH)-kinetics, diffusivity, and [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO-avidity. Descriptive statistics and voxel-by-voxel analysis of MRI and PET parameters were performed. Correlations were assessed using multiple correlation analysis. Results All tumors displayed imaging parameters concordant with cervix cancer, i.e. type II/III EH-kinetics, restricted diffusivity (median ADC 0.80x10-3mm2/sec), [18F]FDG- (median SUVmax16.2) and [18F]FMISO-avidity (median SUVmax3.1). In all patients, [18F]FMISO PET identified the hypoxic tumor subvolume, which was independent of tumor volume. A voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed only weak correlations between the MRI and PET parameters (0.05–0.22), indicating that each individual parameter yields independent information and the presence of tumor heterogeneity. Conclusion MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI in patients with cervical cancer facilitates the acquisition of independent predictive and prognostic imaging parameters. MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI enables insights into tumor biology on multiple levels and provides information on tumor heterogeneity, which has the potential to improve the planning of CRT. PMID:27167829

  12. Dyadic Psychosocial Intervention for Advanced Lung Cancer Patients and their Family Caregivers: Results of a Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Hoda; Smith, Cardinale B.; Goldstein, Nathan E.; Gomez, Jorge; Redd, William H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advanced lung cancer (LC) patients and their families report low self-efficacy for self-care/caregiving and high rates of distress, yet few programs exist to address their supportive care needs during treatment. OBJECTIVE This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a 6-session telephone-based dyadic psychosocial intervention that we developed for advanced LC patients and their caregivers. The program is grounded by Self-determination Theory (SDT), which emphasizes the importance of competence (self-efficacy), autonomy (sense of choice/volition), and relatedness (sense of belonging/connection) for psychological functioning. Primary outcomes were psychological functioning (depression/anxiety) and caregiver burden. Secondary outcomes were the SDT constructs of competence, autonomy, and relatedness. METHODS Thirty-nine advanced LC patients who were within one month of treatment initiation (baseline) and their caregivers (51% spouses/partners) completed surveys and were randomized to the intervention or usual medical care. Eight weeks post-baseline, they completed follow-up surveys. RESULTS Solid recruitment (60%) and low attrition rates demonstrated feasibility. Strong program evaluations (X̄=8.6 out of 10) and homework completion rates (88%) supported acceptability. Participants receiving intervention evidenced significant (p<.0001) improvements in depression, anxiety, and caregiver burden relative to usual medical care. Large effect sizes (d>1.2) favoring the intervention were also found for patient and caregiver competence and relatedness, and for caregiver autonomous motivation for providing care. CONCLUSION These findings support intervention feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy. By empowering families with skills to coordinate care and meet the challenges of LC together, this intervention holds great promise for improving palliative/supportive care services in cancer. PMID:25209975

  13. Targeted Ovarian Cancer Education for Hispanic Women: A Pilot Program in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Yarian, Ranay; Salmon, Kristine; Niven, Christine; Singh, Diljeet

    2016-06-01

    In disadvantaged populations, including Hispanics, there is a deficit in understanding of cancer risk factors, symptoms, prevention, and treatment. The objective of this study was to assess ovarian cancer knowledge in a population of Hispanic women in Arizona, identify deficiencies, and to evaluate the utility of an educational program developed specifically for this community's needs. A de novo questionnaire about ovarian cancer was distributed to Hispanic women enrolled in family literacy programs at Mesa Public Schools. Following this assessment, a video educational program was developed, with emphasis on areas of greatest knowledge deficits, and post-intervention assessment administered. Chi square, Wilcoxon rank sum, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for analysis. 167 questionnaires were completed in the pretest group and 102 in the post-intervention group. Between groups, there were no differences in age (p = 0.49), education (p = 0.68), or annual income (p = 0.26). In the pretest group, 45 % of questions were answered correctly versus 84 % in the post-test group (p < 0.01). 24.2 % of the initial respondents correctly identified ovarian cancer symptoms versus 85.6 of post-test respondents (p < 0.01). With the program, there was an increase in the number of correct post-test responses for each question and symptom (p < 0.01), except those about hereditary risk of ovarian cancer (p = 0.62) and pelvic anatomy (p = 0.16). Following identification of an ovarian cancer knowledge deficit in this cohort of Hispanic women, an educational tool targeting specific deficiencies successfully increased cancer knowledge and awareness of symptoms. Similar efforts in this and other minority populations should be continued. PMID:26684739

  14. Development and pilot study findings of the Delta Garden Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to explore how school–based gardening programs can affect health and related behaviors and to assess how such programs can be sustainable over time and replicated to more settings. Across the world, there has been a recent revitalization and reinvention of gardening eff...

  15. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PILOT STUDY. PHASE II. APPLICABILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (NATO-CCMS) Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Study Group prepared status reports on 12 FGD processes. Results of this work are summarized in NATO Report No. 95 titled 'Flue Gas Desulfurization Pilo...

  16. Less invasive beractant administration in preterm infants: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sánchez-Luna, Manuel; Zeballos-Sarrato, Susana; González-Pacheco, Noelia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to assess the efficacy and feasibility of a new, less invasive surfactant administration technique for beractant replacement using a specifically designed cannula in preterm infants born at <32 weeks of gestation and to compare short- and long-term outcomes between this approach and standard treatment, consisting of intubation, administration of surfactant and early extubation to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. METHOD: This was a single-center, prospective, open-label, non-randomized, controlled pilot study with an experimental cohort of 30 patients treated with less invasive surfactant administration and a retrospective control group comprising the 30 patients most recently treated with the standard approach. Beractant (4 ml/kg) was administered as an exogenous surfactant in both groups if patients on nasal continuous positive airway pressure during the first three days of life were in need of more than 30% FiO2. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02611284. RESULTS: In the group with less invasive surfactant administration, beractant was successfully administered in all patients. Thirteen patients (43.3%) in the group with less invasive surfactant administration required invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 1 hour during the first 3 days of life, compared with 22 (73%) in the control group (p<0.036). The rate of requiring invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours was similar between the infants in the two groups (46% vs. 40%, respectively). There were no differences in other outcomes. CONCLUSION: The administration of beractant (4 ml/kg) using a less invasive surfactant administration technique with a specifically designed cannula for administration is feasible. Moreover, early invasive mechanical ventilation exposure is significantly reduced by this method compared with the strategy involving intubation, surfactant administration and early extubation. PMID:27074172

  17. Changing mothers' perception of infant emotion: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, R; Shepherd, C; Pearson, R.M.; Button, K. S; Munafò, M. R; Evans, J; Penton-Voak, I.S.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) techniques, which experimentally retrain abnormal processing of affective stimuli, are becoming established for various psychiatric disorders. Such techniques have not yet been applied to maternal processing of infant emotion, which is affected by various psychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods In a pilot study, mothers of children under 3 years old (n = 32) were recruited and randomly allocated to one of three training exercises, aiming either to increase or decrease their threshold of perceiving distress in a morphed continuum of 15 infant facial images. Differences between pre- and post-training threshold were analysed between and within subjects. Results Compared to baseline thresholds, the threshold for perceiving infant distress decreased in the lowered threshold group (mean difference -1.7 frames, 95% confidence intervals (CI) -3.1 to -0.3 p=0.02), increased in the raised threshold group (1.3 frames, 95% CI 0.6 to 2.1 p<0.01), and was unchanged in the control group (0.1 frames, 95% CI -0.8 to 1.1 p=0.80). Between group differences were similarly robust in regression models, and were not attenuated by potential confounders. Conclusions The findings suggest that it is possible to change the threshold at which mothers perceive ambiguous infant faces as distressed, either to increase or decrease sensitivity to distress. This small study was intended to provide proof of concept (i.e., that it is possible to alter a mother’s perception of infant distress.) Questions remain as to whether the effects persist beyond the immediate experimental session, have an impact on maternal behaviour, and could be used in clinical samples to improve maternal sensitivity and child outcomes. PMID:26260038

  18. Feasibility of the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Demographic ageing will lead to increasing pressure on visual rehabilitation services, which need to be efficiently organised in the near future. The Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI) was developed to assess the rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons. This pilot study tests the feasibility of the D-AI using a computer-assisted telephone interview. Methods In addition to the regular intake, the first version of the D-AI was assessed in 20 patients. Subsequently, patients and intake assessors were asked to fill in an evaluation form. Based on these evaluations, a new version of the D-AI was developed. Results Mean administration time of the D-AI was 88.8 (± 41.0) minutes. Overall, patients and assessors were positive about the D-AI assessment. However, professionals and 60% of the patients found the administration time to be too long. All included items were considered relevant and only minor adjustments were recommended. Conclusion The systematic character of the revised D-AI will prevent topics from being overlooked and indicate which needs have the highest priority from a patient-centred perspective. Moreover, ongoing assessment of the D-AI will enhance evaluation of the rehabilitation process. To decrease administration time, in the revised D-AI only the top priority goals will be fully assessed. Using the D-AI, a rehabilitation plan based on individual needs can be developed for each patient. Moreover, it enables better evaluation of the effects of rehabilitation. A larger validation study is planned. PMID:21110871

  19. A pilot randomized controlled trial of the feasibility of a self-directed coping skills intervention for couples facing prostate cancer: Rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although it is known both patients’ and partners’ reactions to a prostate cancer diagnosis include fear, uncertainty, anxiety and depression with patients’ partners’ reactions mutually determining how they cope with and adjust to the illness, few psychosocial interventions target couples. Those that are available tend to be led by highly trained professionals, limiting their accessibility and long-term sustainability. In addition, it is recognised that patients who might benefit from conventional face-to-face psychosocial interventions do not access these, either by preference or because of geographical or mobility barriers. Self-directed interventions can overcome some of these limitations and have been shown to contribute to patient well-being. This study will examine the feasibility of a self-directed, coping skills intervention for couples affected by cancer, called Coping-Together, and begin to explore its potential impact on couples’ illness adjustment. The pilot version of Coping-Together includes a series of four booklets, a DVD, and a relaxation audio CD. Methods/design In this double-blind, two-group, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 70 couples will be recruited within 4 months of a prostate cancer diagnosis through urology private practices and randomized to: 1) Coping-Together or 2) a minimal ethical care condition. Minimal ethical care condition couples will be mailed information booklets available at the Cancer Council New South Wales and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline. The primary outcome (anxiety) and additional secondary outcomes (distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy, and dyadic and individual coping) will be assessed at baseline (before receiving study material) and 2 months post-baseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Discussion As partners’ distress rates exceed not only population norms, but also those

  20. Pilot study of extremely low frequency magnetic fields emitted by transformers in dwellings. Social aspects.

    PubMed

    Zaryabova, Victoria; Shalamanova, Tsvetelina; Israel, Michel

    2013-06-01

    in the International study TRANSEXPO. The pilot work has been completed in five countries (Finland, Hungary, Israel, Switzerland and Bulgaria). In 2008, Bulgaria through the National Centre of Public Health Protection joined with pilot study in TRANSEXPO Project. At this first stage of the project our investigation was directed to performing measurements in dwellings with built-in transformer stations, collecting data of population and cancer registry and choosing the epidemiology design feasible for continuing the project. Taking into account the available sources of information in Bulgaria (different registers of the population) needed for epidemiological approach, it was found that the most appropriate epidemiology design would be the nested case-control study. Control group could be collected in accordance with the international requirements for such epidemiological studies. This approach could be modified in the course of the further study in order to ensure achievement of the purposes of the main international requirements of the study. PMID:23675624

  1. Family Planning for Inner-City Adolescent Males: Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Janet; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a pilot family planning program in an inner-city pediatric practice. Male adolescents were more likely to accept contraceptives if the provider first raised the topic of birth control to them. Identified a desire for anonymity/confidentiality and embarrassment or discomfort as the key reasons for not seeking contraceptives. Emphasizes…

  2. Curriculum Improvement for Pueblo Indian Students: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakes, Judith A.; And Others

    A curriculum pilot project was initiated for purposes of helping the Acoma and Laguna Pueblo Tribes (2 of 19 Pueblo Tribes located in New Mexico) to improve the education of their children. A majority of these students were bilingual and the overall educational program did not seem to meet their particular learning needs, resulting in poor…

  3. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed objective of the NATO/CCMS Pilot on clean products and processes is to facilitate further gains in pollution prevention, waste minimization, and design for the environment. It is anticipated that the free exchange of knowledge, experience, data, and models will fost...

  4. STUDENT IDENTIFICATION WITH COLUMBUS COLLEGE--A PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOYEL, I.S.

    A SPECIALLY CONSTRUCTED 21-ITEM SENTENCE COMPLETION INSTRUMENT WAS ADMINISTERED TO 20 STUDENTS IN A "FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION" COURSE AT COLUMBUS COLLEGE, GEORGIA, AS A PILOT ATTEMPT TO OBTAIN A MEASURE OF STUDENT IDENTIFICATION WITH THE COLLEGE. SCORING CONSISTED OF RATING EACH COMPLETION AS A POSITIVE, NEUTRAL, OR NEGATIVE ATTITUDINAL…

  5. Virtual Service, Real Data: Results of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibbee, Jo; Ward, David; Ma, Wei

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reference and undergraduate libraries to test the feasibility of offering real-time online reference service via their Web site. Discusses software selection, policies and procedures, promotion and marketing, user interface, training and staffing, data collection, and…

  6. Appreciative Inquiry: A Pilot Study of School Counselor Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rolla E.; Emil, Serap

    2010-01-01

    Counselor education programs are influenced by humanistic philosophy, including the strengths-based perspective. This article describes how appreciative inquiry, a strengths-based approach to systems change, informed the development of a pilot survey used to assess graduate perceptions of a school counselor education program. (Contains 1 table.)

  7. Research Note-Testing for Gerontological Competencies: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Colleen; Curl, Angela L.; Woodbury, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the pilot delivery of an evaluation method to gauge student learning of gerontological competencies. Using a pretest and posttest design, data were collected on 46 students over 3 classes. Results indicated significant improvement in how students rated or perceived their competencies skill level between pretest and posttest…

  8. 77 FR 74668 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is extending the expiration date of compliance policy guide (CPG) Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs'' to December 31,...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: EMAP ARID COLORADO PLATEAU PILOT STUDY - 1992 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1992 Colorado Plateau Indicator Pilot Study, the first field activity for the EMAP-Arid group, is designed to evaluate several indicators of arid ecosystem condition for continued development and implementation for monitoring. his Implementation Plan describes the conceptual ...

  10. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  11. Unveiling the Truth about Nurses' Personal Preparedness for Disaster Response: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Nash, Tracy Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses are essential caregivers in disaster response, many are not prepared personally to report to the workplace during disaster situations. An online disaster preparedness education intervention to support personal readiness is described in this pilot study. PMID:26863707

  12. Experiences with a new nonbiodegradable hydrogel (Aquamid): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Cássia Novaes, Wilse; Berg, Agnes

    2003-01-01

    Aquamid represents a new generation of soft-tissue fillers thanks to the lack of particles and a very high concentration of water. Aquamid is the result of a new, patented production method called "In line Cross-Linking Technology" (ILX Technology). The Aquamid gel contains 2.5% polyacrylamide (PAAG) and 97.5% water. It is homogenous, perfectly stable and nonbiodegradable and has optimum viscosity and elasticity. Aquamid has been authorized for sale in Europe since March 2001 as a new medical device (CE-mark 0543). This pilot study presents our experiences with Aquamid based on 59 subjects treated with 77 doses mainly used for aesthetic correction but even on medical indication. Lip augmentation was the most frequent procedure (72%), dominated by the age groups from 20 to 25 and from 50 to 60 years. Cheekbone enlargement was carried out in 13% of the cases. The rest concerned augmentation of deep naso-labial fold, glabella, and chin with 5% representation of each. The patient satisfaction was almost 100% with the aesthetic results and either short time or long time side effect reported during a follow-up period of 9 months (range: 2 to 16 months). Aquamid is easy to use without any pretest. Considering its long-lasting effect and the need for sterile conditions with use, only qualified and experienced staff, preferably physicians, should administrate the gel. Adequate indication, correct handling, and thoughtful following of the recommendations/cautions are of vital importance. Given that, aquamid seems to be a promising long-lasting soft tissue filler. PMID:14612994

  13. Novel nanostructured scaffold for osteochondral regeneration: pilot study in horses.

    PubMed

    Kon, E; Mutini, A; Arcangeli, E; Delcogliano, M; Filardo, G; Nicoli Aldini, N; Pressato, D; Quarto, R; Zaffagnini, S; Marcacci, M

    2010-06-01

    The present in vivo preliminary experiment is aimed at testing mechanical and biological behaviour of a new nano-structured composite multilayer biomimetic scaffold for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects. The three-dimensional biomimetic scaffold (Fin-Ceramica Faenza S.p.A., Faenza-Italy) was obtained by nucleating collagen fibrils with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, in two configurations, bi- and tri-layered, to reproduce, respectively, chondral and osteochondral anatomy. Chondral defects (lateral condyle) and deep osteochondral defects (medial condyle) were made in the distal epiphysis of the third metacarpal bone of both forelimbs of two adult horses and treated respectively with the chondral and osteochondral grafts. Both animals were euthanised six months follow up. The images obtained at the second look arthroscopy evaluation, performed two months after surgery, demonstrated good filling of the chondral and osteo-chondral defects without any inflammatory reaction around and inside the lesions. At the histological analysis the growth of trabecular bone in the osteochondral lesion was evident. Only in one case, the whole thickness of the osteochondral lesion was filled by fibrocartilaginous tissue. The formation of a tidemark line was evident at the interface with the newly formed bone. Newly formed fibrocartilaginous tissue was present in the area of the chondral defect. Initial alignment of the collagen fibres was recognisable with polarised light in both groups. The results of the present pilot study showed that this novel osteochondral and chondral scaffold may act as a suitable matrix to facilitate orderly regeneration of bone and hyaline-like cartilage. PMID:20049745

  14. Open-label pilot study of modafinil for methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Janette; Mancino, Michael J; Feldman, Zachary; Chopra, Mohit P; Gentry, W Brooks; Cargile, Christopher; Oliveto, Alison

    2009-10-01

    Methamphetamine has become a major public health issue globally, particularly in the United States. Despite this, no effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse has been developed to date. This 6-week, open-label pilot clinical trial examined the safety and tolerability of modafinil up to 400 mg/d in 8 methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Subjects were inducted onto modafinil at 400 mg/d for more than 3 days and remained on 400 mg/d for 4.5 weeks. Participants received weekly blister packs and underwent weekly individual cognitive behavioral therapy. Adjunctive contingency management procedures were used to enhance retention. Vital signs and supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly, and self-reported drug use and Hamilton anxiety and depression ratings were completed once weekly. Eight subjects (50% female, 100% white, aged 35-52 years) were enrolled. Four completed the 6-week study, 3 completed a portion, and 1 withdrew consent before completing intake. Results showed that systolic blood pressure (t = 1.09, P = 0.28), diastolic blood pressure, (t = 1.18, P = 0.24), and heart rate (t = 1.55, P = 0.13) did not change over time. Scores on the modafinil side effects checklist (t = -2.63, P = 0.01), Hamilton anxiety scale (t = -2.50, P = 0.018), and Hamilton depression scale (t = -3.25, P = 0.003) all decreased over time. The proportion of urine positive for amphetamines did not change over time (t = -0.52, P = 0.61), whereas self-reported methamphetamine use did (t = -2.86, P < 0.005). These results suggest that modafinil at 400 mg/d is safe and tolerable for methamphetamine-dependent individuals. PMID:19745650

  15. Circadian Rhythms in Acute Intermittent Porphyria—a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Larion, Sebastian; Caballes, F. Ryan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Rossman, Whitney Ellefson; Parsons, Judy; Steuerwald, Nury; Li, Ting; Maddukuri, Vinaya; Groseclose, Gale; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disorder of heme synthesis wherein a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen [PBG] deaminase [PBGD], with other factors may give rise to biochemical and clinical manifestations of disease. The biochemical hallmarks of active AIP are relative hepatic heme deficiency and uncontrolled up-regulation of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid [ALA] synthase-1 [ALAS1] with overproduction of ALA and PBG. The treatment of choice is intravenous heme, which restores the deficient regulatory heme pool of the liver and represses ALAS1. Recently, heme has been shown to influence circadian rhythms by controlling their negative feedback loops. We evaluated whether subjects with AIP exhibited an altered circadian profile. Over a 21 h period, we measured levels of serum cortisol, melatonin, ALA, PBG, and mRNA levels [in peripheral blood mononuclear cells] of selected clock-controlled genes and genes involved in heme synthesis in 10 Caucasian [European-American] women who were either post-menopausal or had been receiving female hormone therapy, 6 of whom have AIP and 4 do not and are considered controls. Four AIP subjects with biochemical activity exhibited higher levels of PBG and lower levels and dampened oscillation of serum cortisol, and a trend for lower levels of serum melatonin, than controls or AIP subjects without biochemical activity. Levels of clock-controlled gene mRNAs showed significant increases over baseline in all subjects at 5 am and 11 pm, whereas mRNA levels of ALAS1, ALAS2, and PBGD were increased only at 11 pm in subjects with active AIP. This pilot study provides evidence for disturbances of circadian markers in women with active AIP that may trigger or sustain some common clinical features of AIP. PMID:23650938

  16. Yoga management of breast cancer-related lymphoedema: a randomised controlled pilot-trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary arm lymphoedema continues to affect at least 20% of women after treatment for breast cancer requiring lifelong professional treatment and self-management. The holistic practice of yoga may offer benefits as an adjunct self-management option. The aim of this small pilot trial was to gain preliminary data to determine the effect of yoga on women with stage one breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL). This paper reports the results for the primary and secondary outcomes. Methods Participants were randomised, after baseline testing, to receive either an 8-week yoga intervention (n = 15), consisting of a weekly 90-minute teacher-led class and a 40-minute daily session delivered by DVD, or to a usual care wait-listed control group (n = 13). Primary outcome measures were: arm volume of lymphoedema measured by circumference and extra-cellular fluid measured by bioimpedance spectroscopy. Secondary outcome measures were: tissue induration measured by tonometry; levels of sensations, pain, fatigue, and their limiting effects all measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) and quality of life based on the Lymphoedema Quality of Life Tool (LYMQOL). Measurements were conducted at baseline, week 8 (post-intervention) and week 12 (four weeks after cessation of the intervention). Results At week 8, the intervention group had a greater decrease in tissue induration of the affected upper arm compared to the control group (p = 0.050), as well as a greater reduction in the symptom sub-scale for QOL (p = 0.038). There was no difference in arm volume of lymphoedema or extra-cellular fluid between groups at week 8; however, at week 12, arm volume increased more for the intervention group than the control group (p = 0.032). Conclusions An 8-week yoga intervention reduced tissue induration of the affected upper arm and decreased the QOL sub-scale of symptoms. Arm volume of lymphoedema and extra-cellular fluid did not increase. These benefits did not

  17. Final results of a phase I/II pilot study of capecitabine with or without vinorelbine after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel in high-risk early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The integration of the non-cross-resistant chemotherapeutic agents capecitabine and vinorelbine into an intensified dose-dense sequential anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimen in high-risk early breast cancer (EBC) could improve efficacy, but this combination was not examined in this context so far. Methods Patients with stage II/IIIA EBC (four or more positive lymph nodes) received post-operative intensified dose-dense sequential epirubicin (150 mg/m² every 2 weeks) and paclitaxel (225 mg/m² every 2 weeks) with filgrastim and darbepoetin alfa, followed by capecitabine alone (dose levels 1 and 3) or with vinorelbine (dose levels 2 and 4). Capecitabine was given on days 1-14 every 21 days at 1000 or 1250 mg/m2 twice daily (dose levels 1/2 and 3/4, respectively). Vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 was given on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day course (dose levels 2 and 4). Results Fifty-one patients were treated. There was one dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at dose level 1. At dose level 2 (capecitabine and vinorelbine), five of 10 patients experienced DLTs. Therefore evaluation of vinorelbine was abandoned and dose level 3 (capecitabine monotherapy) was expanded. Hand-foot syndrome and diarrhoea were dose limiting with capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 twice daily. At 35.2 months' median follow-up, the estimated 3-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were 82% and 91%, respectively. Conclusions Administration of capecitabine monotherapy after sequential dose-dense epirubicin and paclitaxel is feasible in node-positive EBC, while the combination of capecitabine and vinorelbine as used here caused more DLTs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN38983527. PMID:20712886

  18. Using Smartphones to Monitor Bipolar Disorder Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kindermann, Sally; Maier, Andreas; Kerl, Christopher; Moock, Jörn; Barbian, Guido; Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Relapse prevention in bipolar disorder can be improved by monitoring symptoms in patients' daily life. Smartphone apps are easy-to-use, low-cost tools that can be used to assess this information. To date, few studies have examined the usefulness of smartphone data for monitoring symptoms in bipolar disorder. Objective We present results from a pilot test of a smartphone-based monitoring system, Social Information Monitoring for Patients with Bipolar Affective Disorder (SIMBA), that tracked daily mood, physical activity, and social communication in 13 patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether smartphone measurements predicted clinical symptoms levels and clinical symptom change. The hypotheses that smartphone measurements are (1) negatively related to clinical depressive symptoms and (2) positively related to clinical manic symptoms were tested. Methods Clinical rating scales were administered to assess clinical depressive and manic symptoms. Patients used a smartphone with the monitoring app for up to 12 months. Random-coefficient multilevel models were computed to analyze the relationship between smartphone data and externally rated manic and depressive symptoms. Overall clinical symptom levels and clinical symptom changes were predicted by separating between-patient and within-patient effects. Using established clinical thresholds from the literature, marginal effect plots displayed clinical relevance of smartphone data. Results Overall symptom levels and change in clinical symptoms were related to smartphone measures. Higher overall levels of clinical depressive symptoms were predicted by lower self-reported mood measured by the smartphone (beta=-.56, P<.001). An increase in clinical depressive symptoms was predicted by a decline in social communication (ie, outgoing text messages: beta=-.28, P<.001) and a decline in physical activity as measured by the smartphone (ie, cell tower movements: beta=-.11, P=.03). Higher overall

  19. Bilingual Text4Walking Food Service Employee Intervention Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Diana; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis; Sandi, Giselle; Moss, Angela; Ocampo, Edith V

    2016-01-01

    Background Half of all adults in the United States do not meet the level of recommended aerobic physical activity. Physical activity interventions are now being conducted in the workplace. Accessible technology, in the form of widespread usage of cell phones and text messaging, is available for promoting physical activity. Objective The purposes of this study, which was conducted in the workplace, were to determine (1) the feasibility of implementing a bilingual 12-week Text4Walking intervention and (2) the effect of the Text4Walking intervention on change in physical activity and health status in a food service employee population. Methods Before conducting the study reported here, the Text4Walking research team developed a database of motivational physical activity text messages in English. Because Hispanic or Latino adults compose one-quarter of all adults employed in the food service industry, the Text4Walking team translated the physical activity text messages into Spanish. This pilot study was guided by the Physical Activity Health Promotion Framework and used a 1-group 12-week pre- and posttest design with food service employees who self-reported as being sedentary. The aim of the study was to increase the number of daily steps over the baseline by 3000 steps. Three physical activity text messages were delivered weekly. In addition, participants received 3 motivational calls during the study. Results SPSS version 19.0 and R 3.0 were used to perform the data analysis. There were 33 employees who participated in the study (57.6% female), with a mean age of 43.7 years (SD 8.4). The study included 11 Hispanic or Latino participants, 8 of whom requested that the study be delivered in Spanish. There was a 100% retention rate in the study. At baseline, the participants walked 102 (SD 138) minutes/day (per self-report). This rate increased significantly (P=.008) to 182 (SD 219) minutes/day over the course of the study. The participants had a baseline mean of 10

  20. Seattle distribution system corrosion control study. Volume 2. Tolt River water pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, C.E.; Hoyt, B.P.

    1984-03-01

    For 6 months, the Seattle Water Department conducted a corrosion treatment pilot plant study, obtaining data on the treatment of Tolt River water with lime/sodium carbonate, lime/sodium bicarbonate, and lime/bicarbonate/silicate. Continuous-flow pipe coupon tests were conducted to determine corrosion rates, penetration rates, and corrosion types for copper, galvanized steel and black steel pipes. Metal leaching tests were conducted using small diameter pipes. Research showed that using lime plus sodium carbonate, lime plus sodium bicarbonate, and lime plus bicarbonate plus silicate will significantly reduce corrosion in home plumbing systems. Based on this pilot study, lime plus sodium carbonate treatment is recommended for the Cedar River water supply at an average dosage of 1.7 mg/L CaO. This dose should achieve an average distribution system pH of 7.9 and an alkalinity of 18 mg/l CaCO3.

  1. HIV prevention among psychiatric inpatients: a pilot risk reduction study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, I; Cournos, F; Empfield, M; Agosin, B; Floyd, P

    1992-01-01

    An HIV prevention program was piloted on an acute inpatient admission ward. Patients who volunteered to participate had significantly higher rates of histories of substance use than non-participants, suggesting that patients participated based on rational concerns about past HIV risk behavior. The program consisted of 75 minute sessions once a week for seven weeks and was co-led by an HIV counselor and the ward's social worker. Each session focused on a specific topic and included a short presentation of informational material, viewing of an educational videotape, a discussion, and role play and other educational games. In spite of a wide range in functioning among the participants, discussion was lively and participation was good. The pilot program demonstrates that chronic mentally ill patients can engage in, and benefit from, risk reduction programs and that frank and explicit discussion of sexual issues is well tolerated. Recommendations for improvement in the program are discussed. PMID:1488461

  2. Children's nurses' experiences of a revalidation pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sian; Middleton, Carolyn; Llewellyn, Denise; Ryley, Nicola

    2016-04-11

    All UK nurses and midwives will need to follow the revalidation process to renew their registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and demonstrate that they practise safely and effectively. The system is designed to help nurses and midwives develop professionally throughout their careers, as well as ensuring public confidence in the professions. Aneurin Bevan University Health Board (ABUHB) in South Wales was one of 19 NMC revalidation pilot sites. This involved nurses and midwives, who were due to complete their self-declaration between January 1 and September 30 2015, testing the revalidation processes. The aim of the article is to describe the experience of three paediatric nurses who participated in the pilot. PMID:27063050

  3. Pilot crossover trial of Reiki versus rest for treating cancer-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kathy L; Carlson, Linda E; Olson, Karin

    2007-03-01

    Fatigue is an extremely common side effect experienced during cancer treatment and recovery. Limited research has investigated strategies stemming from complementary and alternative medicine to reduce cancer-related fatigue. This research examined the effects of Reiki, a type of energy touch therapy, on fatigue, pain, anxiety, and overall quality of life. This study was a counterbalanced crossover trial of 2 conditions: (1) in the Reiki condition, participants received Reiki for 5 consecutive daily sessions, followed by a 1-week washout monitoring period of no treatments, then 2 additional Reiki sessions, and finally 2 weeks of no treatments, and (2) in the rest condition, participants rested for approximately 1 hour each day for 5 consecutive days, followed by a 1-week washout monitoring period of no scheduled resting and an additional week of no treatments. In both conditions, participants completed questionnaires investigating cancer-related fatigue (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Fatigue subscale [FACT-F]) and overall quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, General Version [FACT-G]) before and after all Reiki or resting sessions. They also completed a visual analog scale (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System [ESAS]) assessing daily tiredness, pain, and anxiety before and after each session of Reiki or rest. Sixteen patients (13 women) participated in the trial: 8 were randomized to each order of conditions (Reiki then rest; rest then Reiki). They were screened for fatigue on the ESAS tiredness item, and those scoring greater than 3 on the 0 to 10 scale were eligible for the study. They were diagnosed with a variety of cancers, most commonly colorectal (62.5%) cancer, and had a median age of 59 years. Fatigue on the FACT-F decreased within the Reiki condition (P=.05) over the course of all 7 treatments. In addition, participants in the Reiki condition experienced significant improvements in quality of life (FACT-G) compared to those in

  4. Treatment of Palmar Plantar Erythrodysesthesia (PPE) with Topical Sildenafil: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Kellen L.; Rushing, Christel; Honeycutt, Wanda; Latta, Kenneth; Howard, Leigh; Arrowood, Christy A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hurwitz, Herbert I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Palmar-plantar erythrodysethesia (PPE) is a common chemotherapy and anti-VEGF multi-kinase inhibitor class-related toxicity that often results in debilitating skin changes and often limits the use of active anti-cancer regimens. Mechanistic and anecdotal clinical evidence suggested that topical application of sildenafil cream may help reduce the severity of PPE. Therefore, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of topical sildenafil cream for the treatment of PPE. Methods Eligible subjects were required to have grade 1–3 PPE associated with either capecitabine or sunitinib. Subjects were randomized to receive 1% topical sildenafil cream to the left extremities or right extremities and placebo cream on the opposite extremity. 0.5 mL of cream was applied to each affected hand/foot two times per day. The primary endpoint was improvement in PPE grading at any point on study. Clinical assessments were evaluated by NCI-CTC 4.0 grading and patient self-reported pain. Results Ten subjects were enrolled; 9 were evaluable for safety and efficacy. Five of nine subjects reported some improvement in foot pain and 3 of 8 subjects for hand pain improvement. One of these subjects noted specific improvement in tactile function. No treatment-related toxicities were observed. Conclusions In this limited, single center study, topical cream containing 1% sildenafil is feasible to administer, is well-tolerated, and may mitigate PPE-related symptoms due to anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Further validation is necessary. PMID:25341548

  5. Pilot In-Trail Procedure Validation Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussink, Frank J. L.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Chamberlain, James P.; Chartrand, Ryan; Jones, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop experiment was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to investigate the viability of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) concept from a flight crew perspective, by placing participating airline pilots in a simulated oceanic flight environment. The test subject pilots used new onboard avionics equipment that provided improved information about nearby traffic and enabled them, when specific criteria were met, to request an ITP flight level change referencing one or two nearby aircraft that might otherwise block the flight level change. The subject pilots subjective assessments of ITP validity and acceptability were measured via questionnaires and discussions, and their objective performance in appropriately selecting, requesting, and performing ITP flight level changes was evaluated for each simulated flight scenario. Objective performance and subjective workload assessment data from the experiment s test conditions were analyzed for statistical and operational significance and are reported in the paper. Based on these results, suggestions are made to further improve the ITP.

  6. Mortality among British Columbia pilots.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, D A; Band, P R; Threlfall, W J; Gallagher, R P

    1991-04-01

    We studied the mortality experience of all pilots who died in the province of British Columbia between 1950 and 1984, using proportional mortality ratios (PMR) and proportional cancer mortality ratios (PCMR). There were 341 deaths during that time in males whose usual occupation was listed as pilot. The PMR for aircraft accidents was significantly elevated (PMR = 3196, 95% C.I. 2810, 3634), and the PMR for atherosclerotic heart disease was significantly depressed (PMR = 47, 95% C.I. 30, 70). Although based on small numbers of deaths, and not statistically significant, elevated PCMRs were seen for cancers of the colon, brain, and nervous system, as well as for Hodgkin's disease. These findings suggest the need for further epidemiologic studies of commercial airline pilots. PMID:2031640

  7. Clinicopathologic study in uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Vandenput, I

    2011-01-01

    Patients with primary advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer are relatively uncommon and deserve better treatment options. Current treatment options are surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapy. Since the outcome is still poor, there is a need to improve our knowledge on molecular markers in order to personalize treatment. In addition, we need to continue the search for new treatment strategies with a better balance between efficacy and toxicity. In this doctoral thesis, we documented that among molecular and histological markers, blood vessel space involvement and chemotherapy induced regressive changes are new prognostic markers in endometrial cancer. We demonstrated that the tumour biology changes during tumour evolution. The optimal moment to decide on tumour biology is therefore the recurrent setting. A biopsy of the recurrent tumour is the best guarantee to characterize the tumour correctly. Furthermore, this study showed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking is a valuable treatment option for endometrial cancer with transperitoneal spread since optimal cytoreduction was achieved in 78% with a low morbidity. Future studies should look into new biomarkers that predict antitumoral activity and should search for mutations in endometrial cancer and analyse which mutation is sensitive for therapy. PMID:24753865

  8. Cardiometabolic Risk among African-American Women: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Susan J.; Oster, Robert A.; Floyd, Natalie A.; Ovalle, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the associations of the Homeostatic Model of Assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-ir), acanthosis nigricans, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with two of the commonly used definitions of the metabolic syndrome (Adult Treatment Panel III {ATP III} and International Diabetes Federation {IDF}) among reproductive age healthy free living African-American women. Methods A pilot study with a cross-sectional design examined 33 African-American women aged 20 to 46 (mean 31.24, +/- 7.25), for the presence of metabolic syndrome determined by ATP III and IDF criteria, insulin resistance (HOMA-ir and/or acanthosis nigricans), degree of inflammation (hs-CRP) and presence of dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1). Results HOMA-ir identified insulin resistance in 27 (81.8%) of the women, whereas the presence of acanthosis nigricans indicated that 16 (48 %) of these women manifested insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome was found in 7 women (21.2 %) by ATP III or 9 (27.3 %) by IDF criteria. Bivariate correlations showed associations between HOMA-ir and waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), acanthosis nigricans, the ATP III and IDF definitions for metabolic syndrome. PAI-1 was significantly correlated with waist circumference, BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-ir, and ATP III. Both HOMA-ir and PAI-1 were significantly and negatively correlated with HDL-C. hs-CRP was significantly correlated with BMI and 2-hour post glucose. Conclusion Both dysfibrinolysis (PAI-1 levels) and insulin resistance (HOMA-ir) when individually regressed on the ATP III definition of metabolic syndrome explained 32 % and 29% of the respective variance. The addition of HOMA-ir measurement may significantly improve early recognition of cardiometabolic risk among reproductive age African-American women who have not yet met the criteria for the ATP III or IDF definitions of the metabolic syndrome. Likewise, acanthosis nigricans is potentially a

  9. Coal resources available for development; a methodology and pilot study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, Jane R.; Carter, M. Devereux; Cobb, James C.

    1990-01-01

    Coal accounts for a major portion of our Nation's energy supply in projections for the future. A demonstrated reserve base of more than 475 billion short tons, as the Department of Energy currently estimates, indicates that, on the basis of today's rate of consumption, the United States has enough coal to meet projected energy needs for almost 200 years. However, the traditional procedures used for estimating the demonstrated reserve base do not account for many environmental and technological restrictions placed on coal mining. A new methodology has been developed to determine the quantity of coal that might actually be available for mining under current and foreseeable conditions. This methodology is unique in its approach, because it applies restrictions to the coal resource before it is mined. Previous methodologies incorporated restrictions into the recovery factor (a percentage), which was then globally applied to the reserve (minable coal) tonnage to derive a recoverable coal tonnage. None of the previous methodologies define the restrictions and their area and amount of impact specifically. Because these restrictions and their impacts are defined in this new methodology, it is possible to achieve more accurate and specific assessments of available resources. This methodology has been tested in a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Kentucky Geological Survey on the Matewan 7.5-minute quadrangle in eastern Kentucky. Pertinent geologic, mining, land-use, and technological data were collected, assimilated, and plotted. The National Coal Resources Data System was used as the repository for data, and its geographic information system software was applied to these data to eliminate restricted coal and quantify that which is available for mining. This methodology does not consider recovery factors or the economic factors that would be considered by a company before mining. Results of the pilot study indicate that, of the estimated

  10. [Functional Neuroimaging Pilot Study of Borderline Personality Disorder in Adolescents].

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Amélie; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Labelle, Réal; Luck, David

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is being increasingly recognized by clinicians working with adolescents, and the reliability and validity of the diagnosis have been established in the adolescent population. Adolescence is known to be a period of high risk for BPD development as most patients identify the onset of their symptoms to be in the adolescent period. As with other mental health disorders, personality disorder, are thought to result from the interaction between biological and environmental factors. Functional neuroimaging studies are reporting an increasing amount of data on abnormal neuronal functions in BPD adult patients. However, no functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in adolescents with BPD.Objectives This pilot project aims to evaluate the feasibility of a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study coupled with clinical and psychological measures in adolescent girls with a diagnosis of BPD. It also aims to identify neuronal regions of interest (ROI) for the study of BPD in adolescent girls.Method Six female adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for BPD and 6 female adolescents without psychiatric disorder were recruited. Both groups were evaluated for BPD symptoms, depressive symptoms, impulsivity, affective lability, and other potential psychiatric comorbidities. We used fMRI to compare patterns of regional brain activation between these two groups as they viewed 20 positive, 20 negative and 20 neutral emotion-inducing pictures, which were presented in random order.Results Participants were recruited over a period of 22 months. The protocol was well tolerated by participants. Mean age of the BPD group and control group was 15.8 ± 0.9 years-old and 15.5 ± 1.2 years-old respectively. Psychiatric comorbidity and use of medication was common among participants in the BPD group. This group showed higher impulsivity and affective lability scores. For the fMRI task, BPD patients demonstrated greater differences in activation

  11. Candidate gene polymorphisms and risk of psoriasis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    VILLARREAL-MARTÍNEZ, ALEJANDRA; GALLARDO-BLANCO, HUGO; CERDA-FLORES, RICARDO; TORRES-MUÑOZ, IRIS; GÓMEZ-FLORES, MINERVA; SALAS-ALANÍS, JULIO; OCAMPO-CANDIANI, JORGE; MARTÍNEZ-GARZA, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    6125829 (allele G: OR 1.98). Fisher's exact test detected statistical significance; however, following false discovery rate and Bonferroni correction, this association was no longer significant (threshold for genome-wide significance, P<1.56×10−3). SNPs that were associated with an increased risk of psoriasis in the present study have previously been associated with psoriasis in European, American, and Asian populations. In order to establish genome-wide significance, future studies must analyze a greater sample size. To the best of our knowledge, the present pilot study is the first to investigate the association between these 32 SNPs and psoriasis in a Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:27073425

  12. Pediatric Cardiac Shear Wave Elastography for Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Stiffness: A Pilot Study in Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Bi, Xiaojun; Mellema, Daniel C; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W; Pellikka, Patricia A; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2016-08-01

    The long-term goal of this study is to assess chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity for pediatric cancer patients using cardiac ultrasound shear wave (SW) elastography. This pilot study aimed to systematically investigate the feasibility of using cardiac SW elastography in children and provide myocardial stiffness control data for cancer patients. Twenty healthy volunteers (ages 5-18) were recruited. A novel cardiac SW elastography sequence with pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and time-aligned sequential tracking was developed for this study. Cardiac SW elastography produces and detects transient SWs propagating in the myocardium in late-diastole, which can be used to quantify myocardial stiffness. The parasternal long-axis (L-A) and short-axis (S-A) views of the interventricular septum (IVS) were feasible for pediatric cardiac SW elastography. The L-A and S-A views of the basal and mid IVS provided better success rates than those of the apical IVS. Success rates decreased with increased body mass index (BMI), but did not differ with age or gender. Two-dimensional SW speed measurements were 1.26, 1.22, 1.71 and 1.67 m/s for L-A base, L-A mid, S-A base and S-A mid IVS, respectively. All S-A SW speed values were significantly higher (p < 0.01) than L-A values due to myocardial anisotropy. No SW speed difference was observed for different ages and genders. This pilot study demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using cardiac SW elastography to measure quantitative myocardial stiffness in children, and established control SW speed values for using SW elastography to assess chemo-induced cardiotoxicity for pediatric cancer patients. The results showed that the myocardial anisotropy needs to be accounted for when comparing SW speed from different imaging axes. PMID:27140522

  13. ASPREE Cancer Endpoints Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The ASPREE Cancer Endpoint Study (ACES), an ancillary study of the ASPirin in the Prevention of Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Study, will allow for the examination of the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (100 mg) compared to placebo, on specific DNA biomarkers and selected specific incident and recurrent cancer and metastases. The establishment of this ACES biobank will allow for the exploration of DNA-related molecular mechanisms of aspirin's protective effect against cancer, cancer associated mortality and metastases, using blood or saliva DNA specimens, urine, and tumor tissue. |

  14. The UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial: a pilot randomised controlled trial of low-dose computed tomography screening for the early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Field, John K; Duffy, Stephen W; Baldwin, David R; Brain, Kate E; Devaraj, Anand; Eisen, Tim; Green, Beverley A; Holemans, John A; Kavanagh, Terry; Kerr, Keith M; Ledson, Martin; Lifford, Kate J; McRonald, Fiona E; Nair, Arjun; Page, Richard D; Parmar, Mahesh Kb; Rintoul, Robert C; Screaton, Nicholas; Wald, Nicholas J; Weller, David; Whynes, David K; Williamson, Paula R; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Hansell, David M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lung cancer kills more people than any other cancer in the UK (5-year survival < 13%). Early diagnosis can save lives. The USA-based National Lung Cancer Screening Trial reported a 20% relative reduction in lung cancer mortality and 6.7% all-cause mortality in low-dose computed tomography (LDCT)-screened subjects. OBJECTIVES To (1) analyse LDCT lung cancer screening in a high-risk UK population, determine optimum recruitment, screening, reading and care pathway strategies; and (2) assess the psychological consequences and the health-economic implications of screening. DESIGN A pilot randomised controlled trial comparing intervention with usual care. A population-based risk questionnaire identified individuals who were at high risk of developing lung cancer (≥ 5% over 5 years). SETTING Thoracic centres with expertise in lung cancer imaging, respiratory medicine, pathology and surgery: Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital, Merseyside, and Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 50-75 years, at high risk of lung cancer, in the primary care trusts adjacent to the centres. INTERVENTIONS A thoracic LDCT scan. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans as per protocol. Referral to multidisciplinary team clinics was determined by nodule size criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Population-based recruitment based on risk stratification; management of the trial through web-based database; optimal characteristics of CT scan readers (radiologists vs. radiographers); characterisation of CT-detected nodules utilising volumetric analysis; prevalence of lung cancer at baseline; sociodemographic factors affecting participation; psychosocial measures (cancer distress, anxiety, depression, decision satisfaction); and cost-effectiveness modelling. RESULTS A total of 247,354 individuals were approached to take part in the trial; 30.7% responded positively to the screening invitation. Recruitment of participants resulted in 2028 in the CT arm and 2027 in

  15. Pilot study to evaluate ecological momentary assessment of tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Henry, James A.; Galvez, Gino; Turbin, Mitchel B.; Thielman, Emily J.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Istvan, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Because audiometric evaluation, symptom histories, questionnaires, and similar standard assessment tools may not adequately sample the effects of chronic tinnitus on day-to-day activities, there is a need for alternative methodological approaches to study the impact of tinnitus on day-to-day life. An innovative methodological approach that has shown great promise in the study of chronic health problems characterized by reported temporal and/or situational variability in symptoms and distress is known as ecological momentary assessment (EMA). EMA involves the real time measurement of states, situational factors, and symptoms by individuals as they go about their day-to-day activities. The objective of this pilot investigation was to explore the feasibility of using EMA methods to examine within- and between-day effects of tinnitus. Design This study was conducted in three phases: (1) design and development of an EMA methodology that could be used to assess effects of tinnitus; (2) refinement of the methodology through the use of two focus groups; and (3) field-test the methodology with individuals who experienced bothersome tinnitus. For Phase 3, each of the 24 participants wore, throughout their waking hours for two weeks, a personal digital assistant that produced alerts four times a day. The alerts prompted participants to respond to 19 questions, including nine relating to situational and mood factors, and 10 comprising the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory - Screening version (THI-S). To evaluate for potential reactive effects of performing the EMA protocol, each participant completed the paper-and-pencil version of the full 25-item THI before and after the 2-week EMA period. Results Participants responded to the alerts with a 90% compliance rate, providing a total of 1210 completed surveys. At the time of their response, participants indicated they were in their house or apartment (67.7%), alone (50.2%), happy (50%), and calm (54.5%). Across most

  16. Pilot Interactions in an Over-Constrained Conflict Scenario as Studied in a Piloted Simulation of Autonomous Aircraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Barhydt, Richard; Barmore, Bryan; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2003-01-01

    Feasibility and safety of autonomous aircraft operations were studied in a multi-piloted simulation of overconstrained traffic conflicts to determine the need for, and utility of, priority flight rules to maintain safety in this extraordinary and potentially hazardous situation. An overconstrained traffic conflict is one in which the separation assurance objective is incompatible with other objectives. In addition, a proposed scheme for implementing priority flight rules by staggering the alerting time between the two aircraft in conflict was tested for effectiveness. The feasibility study was conducted through a simulation in the Air Traffic Operations Laboratory at the NASA Langley Research Center. This research activity is a continuation of the Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management feasibility analysis reported in the 4th USA/Europe Air Traffic Management R&D Seminar in December 2001 (paper #48). The over-constrained conflict scenario studied here consisted of two piloted aircraft that were assigned an identical en-route waypoint arrival time and altitude crossing restriction. The simulation results indicated that the pilots safely resolved the conflict without the need for a priority flight rule system. Occurrences of unnecessary maneuvering near the common waypoint were traced to false conflict alerts, generated as the result of including waypoint constraint information in the broadcast data link message issued from each aircraft. This result suggests that, in the conservative interests of safety, broadcast intent information should be based on the commanded trajectory and not on the Flight Management System flight plan, to which the aircraft may not actually adhere. The use of priority flight rules had no effect on the percentage of the aircraft population meeting completely predictable which aircraft in a given pair would meet the constraints and which aircraft would make the first maneuver to yield right-of-way. Therefore, the proposed scheme for

  17. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined. PMID:20482843

  18. Fatigue, Mood, and Sleep, During Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy: A Pilot Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather; Barata, Anna; Wenham, Robert; Jacobsen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to compare longitudinal changes in fatigue, depressive symptoms, sleep, and activity in women (n = 10) undergoing intraperitoneal (IP) versus intravenous (IV) chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Fatigue and depressive symptoms were assessed via self –report and sleep and activity via wrist actigraphy in the week before and the week after the first infusion. Both groups demonstrated increases in fatigue and depressive symptoms, declines in sleep, reduced daytime activity, and decreased rhythmicity of sleep/activity patterns (p<.05). Effect sizes for within-group comparisons tended to be higher in the IP group (ds = −.15 to −8.03) than the IV group (ds = .12 to 1.40). Between-group comparisons revealed that IP patients demonstrated trends towards more severe symptoms post-chemotherapy in nearly all outcomes (p<.10). These results suggest that IP patients experience large increases in fatigue, depressive symptoms, and alterations in sleep and activity relative to IV patients. PMID:25374652

  19. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Sandra M.; Lancaster, Gillian A.; Campbell, Michael J.; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L.; Bond, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of pilot and feasibility studies. However, some Delphi survey respondents and the majority of open meeting attendees disagreed with the idea of mutually exclusive definitions. Their viewpoint was supported by definitions outside the health research context, the use of the terms ‘pilot’ and ‘feasibility’ in the literature, and participants at the international consensus meeting. In our framework, pilot studies are a subset of feasibility studies, rather than the two being mutually exclusive. A feasibility study asks whether something can be done, should we proceed with it, and if so, how. A pilot study asks the same questions but also has a specific design feature: in a pilot study a future study, or part of a future study, is conducted on a smaller scale. We suggest that to facilitate their identification, these studies should be clearly identified using the terms ‘feasibility’ or ‘pilot’ as appropriate. This should include feasibility studies that are largely qualitative; we found these difficult to identify in electronic searches because researchers rarely used the term ‘feasibility’ in the title or abstract of such studies. Investigators should also report appropriate objectives and methods related to feasibility; and give clear confirmation that their study is in preparation for a future randomised controlled trial designed to assess the effect of an intervention. PMID:26978655