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Sample records for cancer subset enriched

  1. Characterization of a naturally occurring breast cancer subset enriched in EMT and stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, Bryan T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Ju-Seog; Fridlyand, Jane; Sahin, Aysegul; Agarwal, Roshan; Joy, Corwin; Liu, Wenbin; Stivers, David; Baggerly, Keith; Carey, Mark; Lluch, Ana; Monteagudo, Carlos; He, Xiaping; Weigman, Victor; Fan, Cheng; Palazzo, Juan; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Nolden, Laura K.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-05-19

    Metaplastic breast cancers (MBC) are aggressive, chemoresistant tumors characterized by lineage plasticity. To advance understanding of their pathogenesis and relatedness to other breast cancer subtypes, 28 MBCs were compared with common breast cancers using comparative genomic hybridization, transcriptional profiling, and reverse-phase protein arrays and by sequencing for common breast cancer mutations. MBCs showed unique DNA copy number aberrations compared with common breast cancers. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 9 of 19 MBCs (47.4%) versus 80 of 232 hormone receptor-positive cancers (34.5%; P = 0.32), 17 of 75 HER-2-positive samples (22.7%; P = 0.04), 20 of 240 basal-like cancers (8.3%; P < 0.0001), and 0 of 14 claudin-low tumors (P = 0.004). Of 7 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway phosphorylation sites, 6 were more highly phosphorylated in MBCs than in other breast tumor subtypes. The majority of MBCs displayed mRNA profiles different from those of the most common, including basal-like cancers. By transcriptional profiling, MBCs and the recently identified claudin-low breast cancer subset constitute related receptor-negative subgroups characterized by low expression of GATA3-regulated genes and of genes responsible for cell-cell adhesion with enrichment for markers linked to stem cell function and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In contrast to other breast cancers, claudin-low tumors and most MBCs showed a significant similarity to a 'tumorigenic' signature defined using CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup -} breast tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells. MBCs and claudin-low tumors are thus enriched in EMT and stem cell-like features, and may arise from an earlier, more chemoresistant breast epithelial precursor than basal-like or luminal cancers. PIK3CA mutations, EMT, and stem cell-like characteristics likely contribute to the poor outcomes of MBC and suggest novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Primary Human Leukocyte Subsets Differentially Express Vaccinia Virus Receptors Enriched in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Hu, Ningjie; Lan, Jie; Hu, Sishun

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VV) and canarypox virus (ALVAC), do not indiscriminately infect all cell types of the primary human leukocytes (PHLs) that they encounter but instead demonstrate an extremely strong bias toward infection of monocytes and monocyte lineage cells. We studied the specific molecular events that determine the VV tropism for major PHL subsets including monocytes, B cells, neutrophils, NK cells, and T cells. We found that VV exhibited an extremely strong bias of cell surface protein-dependent binding to monocytes, B cells, and activated T cells to a similar degree and to neutrophils to a much lesser extent. Resting T cells and resting NK cells exhibited only trace amounts of VV binding. Activated T cells, however, became permissive to VV binding, infection, and replication, while activated NK cells still resisted VV binding. VV binding strongly colocalized with lipid rafts on the surfaces of all VV binding-susceptible PHL subsets, even when lipid rafts were relocated to cell uropods upon cell polarization. Immunosera raised against detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from monocytes or activated T cells, but not resting T cells, effectively cross-blocked VV binding to and infection of PHL subsets. CD29 and CD98, two lipid raft-associated membrane proteins that had been found to be important for VV entry into HeLa cells, had no effect on VV binding to and infection of primary activated T cells. Our data indicate that PHL subsets express VV protein receptors enriched in lipid rafts and that receptors are cross-presented on all susceptible PHLs. PMID:23785200

  3. Bulk enrichment of transplantable hemopoietic stem cell subsets from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine spleen.

    PubMed

    Ploemacher, R E; Brons, R H; Leenen, P J

    1987-02-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with density flotation centrifugation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting on wheat-germ agglutinin-FITC(WGA)-binding cells within the light-scatter "blast window" were used consecutively to enrich pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) in bulk from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen. The medium-to-strong WGA + ve fraction contained 3.10(6) cells isolated from 3-4 X 10(9) spleen cells, with an average of 126% day-12 CFU-S and 65% day-8 CFU-S as calculated on the basis of their seeding fraction, suggesting that virtually all cells represented in vivo macroscopic colony formers. In view of the large differences reported elsewhere between stem cell subsets differing in reconstitutive capacity and secondary stem cell generation ability, we also studied various isolated cell fractions with respect to spleen colony formation, radioprotective ability, and spleen- and marrow- repopulating ability. Day-8 and day-12 CFU-S copurified when isolated by CCE. Cells from a fraction with high affinity for WGA were most highly enriched for their radioprotective ability (RPA) and their ability to repopulate the cellularity of the spleen and femur of irradiated recipients. This fraction contained virtually pure day-12 CFU-S. However, the ability to generate secondary day-12 CFU-S and CFU-GM in irradiated organs was enriched most in the medium WGA + ve cell fraction. MRA and SRA, according to the latter criteria, could therefore be partly separated from day-12 CFU-S and RPA on the basis of affinity for WGA. The data strongly suggest that at least part of all day-12 CFU-S have a high potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature progeny, but a relatively low self-renewal ability, and may therefore not be representative of the genuine stem cell. PMID:2880746

  4. Regulatory B cells are enriched within the IgM memory and transitional subsets in healthy donors but are deficient in chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Khoder, Ahmad; Sarvaria, Anushruti; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Chew, Claude; Sekine, Takuya; Cooper, Nichola; Mielke, Stephan; de Lavallade, Hugues; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Fernandez Curbelo, Irina; Liu, Enli; Muraro, Paolo A.; Alousi, Amin; Stringaris, Kate; Parmar, Simrit; Shah, Nina; Shaim, Hila; Yvon, Eric; Molldrem, Jeffrey; Rouce, Rayne; Champlin, Richard; McNiece, Ian; Mauri, Claudia; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    A subset of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in mice negatively regulate T-cell immune responses through the secretion of regulatory cytokines such as IL-10 and direct cell-cell contact and have been linked to experimental models of autoimmunity, inflammation, and cancer. However, the regulatory function of Bregs in human disease is much less clear. Here we demonstrate that B cells with immunoregulatory properties are enriched within both the CD19+IgM+CD27+ memory and CD19+CD24hiCD38hi transitional B-cell subsets in healthy human donors. Both subsets suppressed the proliferation and interferon-γ production of CD3/CD28-stimulated autologous CD4+ T cells in a dose-dependent manner, and both relied on IL-10 secretion as well as cell-cell contact, likely mediated through CD80 and CD86, to support their full suppressive function. Moreover, after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, Bregs from patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) were less frequent and less likely to produce IL-10 than were Bregs from healthy donors and patients without cGVHD. These findings suggest that Bregs may be involved in the pathogenesis of cGVHD and support future investigation of regulatory B cell–based therapy in the treatment of this disease. PMID:25051962

  5. T Helper Lymphocyte Subsets and Plasticity in Autoimmunity and Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    In response to cytokine signalling and other factors, CD4-positive T lymphocytes differentiate into distinct populations that are characterized by the production of certain cytokines and are controlled by different master transcription factors. The spectrum of such populations, which was initially limited to Th1 and Th2 subsets, is currently broadened to include Th17 and Treg subsets, as well as a number of less studied subtypes, such as Tfh, Th9, and Th22. Although these subsets appear to be relatively stable, certain plasticity exists that allows for transition between the subsets and formation of hybrid transition forms. This provides the immune system flexibility needed for adequate response to pathogens but, at the same time, can play a role in the pathogenic processes in cases of deregulation. In this review, we will discuss the properties of T lymphocyte subsets and their plasticity, as well as its implications for cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26583100

  6. Recurrent ESR1-CCDC170 rearrangements in an aggressive subset of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Tan, Ying; Cao, Xi-Xi; Kim, Jin-Ah; Wang, Xian; Chamness, Gary C.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Edwards, Dean P.; Contreras, Alejandro; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Chang, Eric C.; Schiff, Rachel; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic alterations leading to the more aggressive forms of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers are of critical significance in breast cancer management. Here we identify recurrent rearrangements between estrogen receptor gene ESR1 and its neighbor CCDC170, which are enriched in the more aggressive and endocrine-resistant luminal-B tumors, through large-scale analyses of breast cancer transcriptome and copy number alterations. Further screening of 200 ER+ breast cancers identifies eight ESR1-CCDC170 positive tumors. These fusions encode N-terminally truncated CCDC170 proteins (ΔCCDC170). When introduced into ER+ breast cancer cells, ΔCCDC170 leads to markedly increased cell motility and anchorage-independent growth, reduced endocrine sensitivity, and enhanced xenograft tumor formation. Mechanistic studies suggest that ΔCCDC170 engages Gab1 signalosome to potentiate growth factor signaling and enhance cell motility. Together, this study identifies neoplastic ESR1-CCDC170 fusions in a more aggressive subset of ER+ breast cancer, which suggests a new concept of ER pathobiology in breast cancer. PMID:25099679

  7. Optimal search-based gene subset selection for gene array cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiexun; Su, Hua; Chen, Hsinchun; Futscher, Bernard W

    2007-07-01

    High dimensionality has been a major problem for gene array-based cancer classification. It is critical to identify marker genes for cancer diagnoses. We developed a framework of gene selection methods based on previous studies. This paper focuses on optimal search-based subset selection methods because they evaluate the group performance of genes and help to pinpoint global optimal set of marker genes. Notably, this paper is the first to introduce tabu search (TS) to gene selection from high-dimensional gene array data. Our comparative study of gene selection methods demonstrated the effectiveness of optimal search-based gene subset selection to identify cancer marker genes. TS was shown to be a promising tool for gene subset selection. PMID:17674622

  8. Cancer associated fibroblasts have phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to the fibrocytes that represent a novel MDSC subset

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Gurcan; Kesikli, S Altug; Guc, Dicle

    2015-01-01

    Circulating fibrocytes were reported to represent a novel myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) subset and they were also proposed to be involved in the tumor immune escape. This novel fibrocyte subset had a surface phenotype resembling non-monocytic MDSCs (CD14−CD11chiCD123−) and exhibited immunomodulatory roles. Most effector functions of fibrocytes (circulating fibroblast-progenitors) are accomplished as tissue fibroblasts, likewise in the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, fibroblasts at tumor tissues should be evaluated whether they display similar molecular/gene expression patterns and functional roles to the blood-borne fibrocytes. A chemically induced rat breast carcinogenesis model was utilized to obtain cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs). CAFs and normal tissue fibroblasts (NFs) were isolated from cancerous and healthy breast tissues, respectively, using a previously described enzymatic protocol. Both CAFs and NFs were analyzed for cell surface phenotypes by flow cytometry and for gene expression profiles by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). PBMCs were cocultured with either NFs or CAFs and proliferations of PBMCs were assessed by CFSE assays. Morphological analyses were performed by immunocytochemistry stainings with vimentin. CAFs were spindle shaped cells unlike their blood-borne counterparts. They did not express CD80 and their MHC-II expression was lower than NFs. Although CAFs expressed the myeloid marker CD11b/c, its expression was lower than that on the circulating fibrocytes. CAFs did not express granulocytic/neutrophilic markers and they seemed to have developed in an environment containing THELPER2-like cytokines. They also showed immunosuppressive effects similar to their blood-borne counterparts. In summary, CAFs showed similar phenotypic and functional characteristics to the circulating fibrocytes that were reported to represent a unique MDSC subset. PMID:26405600

  9. The isolation and characterization of CTC subsets related to breast cancer dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Vishnoi, Monika; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Yin, Wei; T. Scamardo, Antonio; George, Goldy C.; Hong, David S.; Marchetti, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering CTCs phenotypes offer the promise to dissect their heterogeneity related to metastatic competence. CTC survival rates are highly variable and this can lead to many questions as yet unexplored properties of CTCs responsible for invasion and metastasis vs dormancy. We isolated CTC subsets from peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with or without breast cancer brain metastasis. CTC subsets were selected for EpCAM negativity but positivity for CD44+/CD24− stem cell signature; along with combinatorial expression of uPAR and int β1, two markers directly implicated in breast cancer dormancy mechanisms. CTC subsets were cultured in vitro generating 3D CTC tumorspheres which were interrogated for biomarker profiling and biological characteristics. We identified proliferative and invasive properties of 3D CTC tumorspheres distinctive upon uPAR/int β1 combinatorial expression. The molecular characterization of uPAR/int β1 CTC subsets may enhance abilities to prospectively identify patients who may be at high risk of developing BCBM. PMID:26631983

  10. Early-onset colorectal cancer: A separate subset of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silla, Irene Osorio; Rueda, Daniel; Rodríguez, Yolanda; García, Juan Luis; de la Cruz Vigo, Felipe; Perea, José

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a great impact on the world population. With increasing frequency, CRC is described according to the presenting phenotype, based on its molecular characteristics. Classification of CRC tumors according to their genetic and/or epigenetic alterations is not only important for establishing the molecular bases of the disease, but also for predicting patient outcomes and developing more individualized treatments. Early-onset CRC is a heterogeneous disease, with a strong familial component, although the disease is sporadic in an important proportion of cases. Different molecular alterations appear to contribute to the apparent heterogeneity of the early-onset population and subgroups can be distinguished with distinct histopathologic and familial characteristics. Moreover, compared with late-onset CRC, there are characteristics that suggest that early-onset CRC may have a different molecular basis. The purpose of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge about early-onset CRC with respect to clinicopathologic, familial and molecular features. Together, these features make it increasingly clear that this subset of CRC may be a separate disease, although it has much in common with late-onset CRC. PMID:25516639

  11. Skewing of the NK cell repertoire by MHC class I via quantitatively controlled enrichment and contraction of specific Ly49 subsets.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Petter; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter

    2012-03-01

    A major task for the immune system is to secure powerful immune reactions while preserving self-tolerance. This process is particularly challenging for NK cells, for which tolerizing inhibitory receptors for self-MHC class I is both cross-reactive and expressed in an overlapping fashion between NK cells. We show in this study that during an education process, self-MHC class I molecules enrich for potentially useful and contract potentially dangerous NK cell subsets. These processes were quantitatively controlled by the expression level of the educating MHC class I allele, correlated with susceptibility to IL-15 and sensitivity to apoptosis in relevant NK cell subsets, and were linked to their functional education. Controlling the size of NK cell subsets with unique compositions of inhibitory receptors may represent one mechanism by which self-MHC class I molecules generate a population of tolerant NK cells optimally suited for efficient missing self-recognition. PMID:22287714

  12. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  13. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  14. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher J; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W John; Garbis, Spiros D; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Gareth J

    2016-02-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  15. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  16. A unique subset of epithelial ovarian cancers with platinum sensitivity and PARP inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; O'Connor, Kevin W; Mouw, Kent W; Li, Adam Y; Matulonis, Ursula A; D'Andrea, Alan D; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A

    2015-02-15

    Platinum and PARP inhibitor (PARPi) sensitivity commonly coexist in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) due to the high prevalence of alterations in the homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway that confer sensitivity to both drugs. In this report, we describe a unique subset of EOC with alterations in another DNA repair pathway, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which may exhibit a discordance in sensitivities to these drugs. Specifically, 8% of high-grade serous EOC from The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset exhibited NER alterations, including nonsynonymous or splice site mutations and homozygous deletions of NER genes. Tumors with NER alterations were associated with improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), compared with patients without NER alterations or BRCA1/2 mutations. Furthermore, patients with tumors with NER alterations had similar OS and PFS as BRCA1/2-mutated patients, suggesting that NER pathway inactivation in EOC conferred enhanced platinum sensitivity, similar to BRCA1/2-mutated tumors. Moreover, two NER mutations (ERCC6-Q524* and ERCC4-A583T), identified in the two most platinum-sensitive tumors, were functionally associated with platinum sensitivity in vitro. Importantly, neither NER alteration affected HR or conferred sensitivity to PARPi or other double-strand break-inducing agents. Overall, our findings reveal a new mechanism of platinum sensitivity in EOC that, unlike defective HR, may lead to a discordance in sensitivity to platinum and PARPi, with potential implications for previously reported and ongoing PARPi trials in this disease. PMID:25634215

  17. Enrichment strategies in glycomics based lung cancer biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Nguyen, Uyen Thao; Stroble, Carol; Taylor, Sandra L.; Taguchi, Ayumu; Hanash, Samir M.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Miyamoto, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is a need to identify better glycan biomarkers for diagnosis, early detection and treatment monitoring in lung cancer using biofluids such as blood. Biofluids are complex mixtures of proteins dominated by a few high abundance proteins that may not have specificity for lung cancer. Therefore two methods for protein enrichment were evaluated; affinity capturing of IgG and enrichment of medium abundance proteins, thus allowing us to determine which method yields the best candidate glycan biomarkers for lung cancer. Experimental design N-glycans isolated from plasma samples from 20 cases of lung adenocarcinoma and 20 matched controls were analyzed using nLC-PGC-chip-TOF-MS. N-glycan profiles were obtained for five different fractions: total plasma, isolated IgG, IgG depleted plasma, and the bound and flow-through fractions of protein enrichment. Results Four glycans differed significantly (FDR<0.05) between cases and controls in whole unfractionated plasma, while four other glycans differed significantly by cancer status in the IgG fraction. No significant glycan differences were observed in the other fractions. Conclusions and clinical relevance These results confirm that the N-glycan profile in plasma of lung cancer patients is different from healthy controls and appears to be dominated by alterations in relatively abundant proteins. PMID:23640812

  18. CD38 expression labels an activated subset within chronic lymphocytic leukemia clones enriched in proliferating B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Temburni, Sonal; Calissano, Carlo; Yancopoulos, Sophia; Banapour, Taraneh; Sison, Cristina; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are thought to have diminished cell-cycling capacity, a view challenged by their phenotypic resemblance to activated human B lymphocytes. The present study addresses the cell-cycling status of CLL cells, focusing on those leukemic cells expressing CD38, a molecule involved in signaling and activation that also serves as a prognostic marker in this disease. CD38+ and CD38− members of individual CLL clones were analyzed for coexpression of molecules associated with cellular activation (CD27, CD62L, and CD69), cell-cycle entry (Ki-67), signaling (ZAP-70), and protection from apoptosis (telomerase and Bcl-2). Regardless of the size of the CD38+ fraction within a CLL clone, CD38+ subclones are markedly enriched for expression of Ki-67, ZAP-70, human telomerase reverse transcriptase, and telomerase activity. Although the percentage of cells (approximately 2%) entering the cell cycle as defined by Ki-67 expression is small, the absolute number within a clone can be sizeable and is contained primarily within the CD38+ fraction. Despite these activation/proliferation differences, both CD38+ and CD38− fractions have similar telomere lengths, suggesting that CD38 expression is dynamic and transient. These findings may help explain why high percentages of CD38+ cells within clones are associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:17684154

  19. Involvement of NRF2 Signaling in Doxorubicin Resistance of Cancer Stem Cell-Enriched Colonospheres.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, In-Geun; Kim, Geon; Choi, Bo-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subset of tumor cells, which are characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and environmental stress, and are known to cause tumor relapse after therapy. A number of molecular mechanisms underlie the chemoresistance of CSCs, including high expression levels of drug efflux transporters. We investigated the role of the antioxidant transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in chemoresistance development, using a CSC-enriched colonosphere system. HCT116 colonospheres were more resistant to doxorubicin-induced cell death and expressed higher levels of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) compared to HCT116 monolayers. Notably, levels of NRF2 and expression of its target genes were substantially elevated in colonospheres, and these increases were linked to doxorubicin resistance. When NRF2 expression was silenced in colonospheres, Pgp and BCRP expression was downregulated, and doxorubicin resistance was diminished. Collectively, these results indicate that NRF2 activation contributes to chemoresistance acquisition in CSC-enriched colonospheres through the upregulation of drug efflux transporters. PMID:27582554

  20. Involvement of NRF2 Signaling in Doxorubicin Resistance of Cancer Stem Cell-Enriched Colonospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, In-geun; Kim, Geon; Choi, Bo-hyun; Lee, Sang-hwan; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subset of tumor cells, which are characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and environmental stress, and are known to cause tumor relapse after therapy. A number of molecular mechanisms underlie the chemoresistance of CSCs, including high expression levels of drug efflux transporters. We investigated the role of the antioxidant transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in chemoresistance development, using a CSC-enriched colonosphere system. HCT116 colonospheres were more resistant to doxorubicin-induced cell death and expressed higher levels of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) compared to HCT116 monolayers. Notably, levels of NRF2 and expression of its target genes were substantially elevated in colonospheres, and these increases were linked to doxorubicin resistance. When NRF2 expression was silenced in colonospheres, Pgp and BCRP expression was downregulated, and doxorubicin resistance was diminished. Collectively, these results indicate that NRF2 activation contributes to chemoresistance acquisition in CSC-enriched colonospheres through the upregulation of drug efflux transporters. PMID:27582554

  1. Serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) drives proliferation and anoikis resistance in a subset of ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mehner, Christine; Oberg, Ann L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Nassar, Aziza; Hockla, Alexandra; Pendlebury, Devon; Cichon, Magdalena A.; Goergen, Krista M.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Keeney, Gary L.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Copland, John A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the most lethal tumor type among malignancies of the female reproductive system. Overall survival rates remain low. In this study, we identify the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) as a potential therapeutic target for a subset of ovarian cancers. We show that SPINK1 drives ovarian cancer cell proliferation through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, and that SPINK1 promotes resistance to anoikis through a distinct mechanism involving protease inhibition. In analyses of ovarian tumor specimens from a Mayo Clinic cohort of 490 patients, we further find that SPINK1 immunostaining represents an independent prognostic factor for poor survival, with the strongest association in patients with nonserous histological tumor subtypes (endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous). This study provides novel insight into the fundamental processes underlying ovarian cancer progression, and also suggests new avenues for development of molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26437224

  2. Combining FoxP3 and Helios with GARP/LAP markers can identify expanded Treg subsets in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Yazan S.; Ammori, Basil J.; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) comprise numerous heterogeneous subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional features. Identifying Treg markers is critical to investigate the role and clinical impact of various Treg subsets in pathological settings, and also for developing more effective immunotherapies. We have recently shown that non-activated FoxP3−Helios+ and activated FoxP3+/–Helios+ CD4+ T cells express GARP/LAP immunosuppressive markers in healthy donors. In this study we report similar observations in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LICRC). Comparing levels of different Treg subpopulations in cancer patients and controls, we report that in PC patients, and unlike LICRC patients, there was no increase in Treg levels as defined by FoxP3 and Helios. However, defining Tregs based on GARP/LAP expression showed that FoxP3−LAP+ Tregs in non-activated and activated settings, and FoxP3+Helios+GARP+LAP+ activated Tregs were significantly increased in both groups of patients, compared with controls. This work implies that a combination of Treg-specific markers could be used to more accurately determine expanded Treg subsets and to understand their contribution in cancer settings. Additionally, GARP−/+LAP+ CD4+ T cells made IL-10, and not IFN-γ, and levels of IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells were elevated in LICRC patients, especially with higher tumor staging. Taken together, our results indicate that investigations of Treg levels in different cancers should consider diverse Treg-related markers such as GARP, LAP, Helios, and others and not only FoxP3 as a sole Treg-specific marker. PMID:26885615

  3. ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH

    Cancer.gov

    ENRICH Forum: Ethical aNd Regulatory Issues in Cancer ResearcH, designed to stimulate dialogue on ethical and regulatory issues in cancer research and promote awareness of developing policies and best practices.

  4. In vitro Enrichment of Ovarian Cancer Tumor-initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that small subpopulations of tumor cells maintain a unique self-renewing and differentiation capacity and may be responsible for tumor initiation and/or relapse. Clarifying the mechanisms by which these tumor-initiating cells (TICs) support tumor formation and progression could lead to the development of clinically favorable therapies. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and highly recurrent disease. Recent studies suggest TICs may play an important role in disease biology. We have identified culture conditions that enrich for TICs from ovarian cancer cell lines. Growing either adherent cells or non-adherent ‘floater’ cells in a low attachment plate with serum free media in the presence of growth factors supports the propagation of ovarian cancer TICs with stem cell markers (CD133 and ALDH activity) and increased tumorigenicity without the need to physically separate the TICs from other cell types within the culture. Although the presence of floater cells is not common for all cell lines, this population of cells with innate low adherence may have high tumorigenic potential.Compared to adherent cells grown in the presence of serum, TICs readily form spheres, are significantly more tumorigenic in mice, and express putative stem cell markers. The conditions are easy to establish in a timely manner and can be used to study signaling pathways important for maintaining stem characteristics, and to identify drugs or combinations of drugs targeting TICs. The culture conditions described herein are applicable for a variety of ovarian cancer cells of epithelial origin and will be critical in providing new information about the role of TICs in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse. PMID:25742116

  5. Tumor endothelial markers define novel subsets of cancer-specific circulating endothelial cells associated with antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mehran, Reza; Nilsson, Monique; Khajavi, Mehrdad; Du, Zhiqiang; Cascone, Tina; Wu, Hua Kang; Cortes, Andrea; Xu, Li; Zurita, Amado; Schier, Robert; Riedel, Bernhard; El-Zein, Randa; Heymach, John V

    2014-05-15

    Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are derived from multiple sources, including bone marrow (circulating endothelial progenitors; CEP), and established vasculature (mature CEC). Although CECs have shown promise as a biomarker for patients with cancer, their utility has been limited, in part, by the lack of specificity for tumor vasculature and the different nonmalignant causes that can impact CEC. Tumor endothelial markers (TEM) are antigens enriched in tumor versus nonmalignant endothelia. We hypothesized that TEMs may be detectable on CEC and that these circulating TEM(+) endothelial cells (CTEC) may be a more specific marker for cancer and tumor response than standard CEC. We found that tumor-bearing mice had a relative increase in numbers of circulating CTEC, specifically with increased levels of TEM7 and TEM8 expression. Following treatment with various vascular-targeting agents, we observed a decrease in CTEC that correlated with the reductions in tumor growth. We extended these findings to human clinical samples and observed that CTECs were present in patients with esophageal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (N = 40), and their levels decreased after surgical resection. These results demonstrate that CTECs are detectable in preclinical cancer models and patients with cancer. Furthermore, they suggest that CTECs offer a novel cancer-associated marker that may be useful as a blood-based surrogate for assessing the presence of tumor vasculature and antiangiogenic drug activity. PMID:24626092

  6. Enrichment of selenium in allium vegetables for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Ip, C; Lisk, D J

    1994-09-01

    We previously reported that garlic cultivated with selenium fertilization is superior to regular garlic in mammary cancer prevention in the rat 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) model (Nutr. Cancer, 17, 279-286, 1992). A new crop of high-selenium garlic was harvested in 1992 and was used in a dose-response study to confirm the reproducibility of the product and the bioassay. Supplementation of 1 or 2 p.p.m. Se in the diet from the high-selenium garlic produced a 56% or 75% reduction respectively in the total tumor yield. Since both garlic and onion belong to the same allium family of vegetables, we were also interested in finding out whether our experience with garlic could be similarly applied to onion. A high-selenium onion crop was grown in the same season and location and with the same schedule of selenium fertilization. Two distinct differences were noted with the high-selenium onion regarding its capacity to accumulate selenium and its efficacy in cancer prevention. First, the selenium concentration in onion was considerably lower (28 p.p.m. Se dry wt) as compared to that found in garlic (110-150 p.p.m. Se). Second, given the same levels of selenium supplementation, the high-selenium onion was apparently not as powerful as the high-selenium garlic in mammary cancer inhibition. Thus different plants, even those of the same genus, may respond in their unique way to selenium fertilization and the biological benefits of selenium enrichment may vary depending on the species. Additional information from our study indicated that the high-selenium garlic/onion might provide an ideal system for delivering selenium-substituted analogs in a food form for cancer prevention: (i) they expressed a good range of anticancer activity and could be easily adapted for human consumption on a regular basis; (ii) their ingestion did not result in an excessive accumulation of tissue selenium, a concern that is associated with the standard selenium compounds such as selenite and

  7. Reduction of the CD16−CD56bright NK Cell Subset Precedes NK Cell Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Shim, Doo Hee; Yang, Chang Mo; Lee, Saet-Byul; Kim, Shi Mun; Shin, Tae Young; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yoon, Ho Geun; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Jae Myun; Hong, Sung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural cytotoxicity, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells plays an important role in the inhibition and elimination of malignant tumor cells. To investigate the immunoregulatory role of NK cells and their potential as diagnostic markers, NK cell activity (NKA) was analyzed in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with particular focus on NK cell subset distribution. Methods Prospective data of NKA and NK cell subset distribution patterns were measured from 51 patients initially diagnosed with PCa and 54 healthy controls. NKA was represented by IFN-γ levels after stimulation of the peripheral blood with Promoca®. To determine the distribution of NK cell subsets, PBMCs were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Then, CD16+CD56dim and CD16−CD56bright cells gated on CD56+CD3− cells were analyzed using a flow-cytometer. Results NKA and the proportion of CD56bright cells were significantly lower in PCa patients compared to controls (430.9 pg/ml vs. 975.2 pg/ml and 2.3% vs. 3.8%, respectively; p<0.001). Both tended to gradually decrease according to cancer stage progression (p for trend = 0.001). A significantly higher CD56dim-to-CD56bright cell ratio was observed in PCa patients (41.8 vs. 30.3; p<0.001) along with a gradual increase according to cancer stage progression (p for trend = 0.001), implying a significant reduction of CD56bright cells in relation to the alteration of CD56dim cells. The sensitivity and the specificity of NKA regarding PCa detection were 72% and 74%, respectively (best cut-off value at 530.9 pg/ml, AUC = 0.786). Conclusions Reduction of CD56bright cells may precede NK cell dysfunction, leading to impaired cytotoxicity against PCa cells. These observations may explain one of the mechanisms behind NK cell dysfunction observed in PCa microenvironment and lend support to the development of future cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:24223759

  8. Upregulation of Glycans Containing 3’ Fucose in a Subset of Pancreatic Cancers Uncovered Using Fusion-Tagged Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir; Pal, Kuntal; Yadav, Jessica; Tang, Huiyuan; Partyka, Katie; Kletter, Doron; Hsueh, Peter; Ensink, Elliot; Birendra, KC; Hostetter, Galen; Xu, H. Eric; Bern, Marshall; Smith, David F.; Mehta, Anand S.; Brand, Randall; Melcher, Karsten; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    The fucose post-translational modification is frequently increased in pancreatic cancer, thus forming the basis for promising biomarkers, but a subset of pancreatic cancer patients does not elevate the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We hypothesized that such patients elevate glycan motifs with fucose in linkages and contexts different from the known fucose-containing biomarkers. We used a database of glycan array data to identify the lectins CCL2 to detect glycan motifs with fucose in a 3’ linkage; CGL2 for motifs with fucose in a 2’ linkage; and RSL for fucose in all linkages. We used several practical methods to test the lectins and determine the optimal mode of detection, and we then tested whether the lectins detected glycans in pancreatic cancer patients who did not elevate the sialyl-Lewis A glycan, which is upregulated in ~75% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Patients who did not upregulate sialyl-Lewis A, which contains fucose in a 4’ linkage, tended to upregulate fucose in a 3’ linkage, as detected by CCL2, but they did not upregulate total fucose or fucose in a 2’ linkage. CCL2 binding was high in cancerous epithelia from pancreatic tumors, including areas negative for sialyl-Lewis A and a related motif containing 3’ fucose, sialyl-Lewis X. Thus glycans containing 3’ fucose may complement sialyl-Lewis A to contribute to improved detection of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of panels of recombinant lectins may uncover details about glycosylation that could be important for characterizing and detecting cancer. PMID:25938165

  9. PD-L1 Expression Is Increased in a Subset of Basal Type Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hatem; Khalil, Farah; Antonia, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor cells express programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and is a key immune evasion mechanism. PD-L1 expression in multiple breast cancer cell lines was evaluated to identify intrinsic differences that affect their potential for immune evasion. Methods PD-L1 expression was analyzed in six breast cancer cell lines: AU565&MCF7 (luminal), BT20&HCC1143 (basal A), MDA231&HCC38 (basal B). Surface and intracellular PD-L1 expression +/− interferon γ for 48 hours was measured by flow cytometry. PD-L1 gene expression data for all breast cancer cell lines in the Comprehensive Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) was analyzed. Correlation between PD-L1 levels and clinicopathologic parameters was analyzed within Oncomine datasets. A tissue microarray containing 61 invasive breast cancer primary tumor cores was stained for PD-L1 expression and analyzed. Results Basal breast cancer cells constitutively express the highest levels of PD-L1. All cell lines increased PD-L1 expression with interferon γ, but basal B cells (MDA-231 and HCC38) demonstrated the largest increases. There were no differences in protein localization between cell lines. In the CCLE data, basal cell lines demonstrated higher mean PD-L1 expression compared to luminal cell lines. High PD-L1 expressing basal cell lines over-express genes involved in invasion, proliferation, and chemoresistance compared to low PD-L1 basal cell lines. High PD-L1 basal cell lines had lower expression of IRF2BP2 and higher STAT1 levels compared to low PD-L1 expressing cell lines. Within Oncomine datasets PDL1 mRNA levels were higher in basal type tumors. The TMA analysis demonstrated that lymph node positive cases had higher levels of PD-L1 protein expression compared to lymph node negative cases. Conclusions Basal type breast cancer (especially basal B) express greater levels of PD-L1 constitutively and with IFN γ. High PD-L1 basal cells over-express genes involved in invasion, motility, and chemoresistance. Targeting PD-L1

  10. Colorectal cancer risk genes are functionally enriched in regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Cao, Mingming; Han, Su; Yang, Youlin; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common complex disease caused by the combination of genetic variants and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed and reported some novel CRC susceptibility variants. However, the potential genetic mechanisms for newly identified CRC susceptibility variants are still unclear. Here, we selected 85 CRC susceptibility variants with suggestive association P < 1.00E-05 from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS catalog. To investigate the underlying genetic pathways where these newly identified CRC susceptibility genes are significantly enriched, we conducted a functional annotation. Using two kinds of SNP to gene mapping methods including the nearest upstream and downstream gene method and the ProxyGeneLD, we got 128 unique CRC susceptibility genes. We then conducted a pathway analysis in GO database using the corresponding 128 genes. We identified 44 GO categories, 17 of which are regulatory pathways. We believe that our results may provide further insight into the underlying genetic mechanisms for these newly identified CRC susceptibility variants. PMID:27146020

  11. DNA methylation outliers in normal breast tissue identify field defects that are enriched in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Gao, Yang; Jones, Allison; Ruebner, Matthias; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Wachter, David L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Widschwendter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying molecular alterations in normal tissue adjacent to cancer is important for understanding cancer aetiology and designing preventive measures. Here we analyse the DNA methylome of 569 breast tissue samples, including 50 from cancer-free women and 84 from matched normal cancer pairs. We use statistical algorithms for dissecting intra- and inter-sample cellular heterogeneity and demonstrate that normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer is characterized by tens to thousands of epigenetic alterations. We show that their genomic distribution is non-random, being strongly enriched for binding sites of transcription factors specifying chromatin architecture. We validate the field defects in an independent cohort and demonstrate that over 30% of the alterations exhibit increased enrichment within matched cancer samples. Breast cancers highly enriched for epigenetic field defects, exhibit adverse clinical outcome. Our data support a model where clonal epigenetic reprogramming towards reduced differentiation in normal tissue is an important step in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26823093

  12. Mcl-1 antagonism is a potential therapeutic strategy in a subset of solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Michele; Banfi, Patrizia; Gasparri, Fabio; Borzilleri, Robert; Carter, Percy; Cornelius, Lyndon; Gottardis, Marco; Lee, Ving; Mapelli, Claudio; Naglich, Joseph G; Tebben, Andrew; Vite, Gregory; Pastori, Wilma; Albanese, Clara; Corti, Emiliana; Ballinari, Dario; Galvani, Arturo

    2015-03-15

    Cancer cell survival is frequently dependent on the elevated levels of members of the Bcl-2 family of prosurvival proteins that bind to and inactivate BH3-domain pro-apoptotic cellular proteins. Small molecules that inhibit the protein-protein interactions between prosurvival and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members (so-called "BH3 mimetics") have a potential therapeutic value, as indicated by clinical findings obtained with ABT-263 (navitoclax), a Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist, and more recently with GDC-0199/ABT-199, a more selective antagonist of Bcl-2. Here, we report study results of the functional role of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1 against a panel of solid cancer cell lines representative of different tumor types. We observed silencing of Mcl-1 expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced viability and induced apoptosis in almost 30% of cell lines tested, including lung and breast adenocarcinoma, as well as glioblastoma derived lines. Most importantly, we provide a mechanistic basis for this sensitivity by showing antagonism of Mcl-1 function with specific BH3 peptides against isolated mitochondria induces Bak oligomerization and cytochrome c release, therefore demonstrating that mitochondria from Mcl-1-sensitive cells depend on Mcl-1 for their integrity and that antagonizing Mcl-1 function is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Thus, our results lend further support for considering Mcl-1 as a therapeutic target in a number of solid cancers and support the rationale for development of small molecule BH3-mimetics antagonists of this protein. PMID:25486070

  13. A Novel Subset of Human Tumors That Simultaneously Overexpress Multiple E2F-responsive Genes Found in Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shackney, Stanley E; Chowdhury, Salim Akhter; Schwartz, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Reasoning that overexpression of multiple E2F-responsive genes might be a useful marker for RB1 dysfunction, we compiled a list of E2F-responsive genes from the literature and evaluated their expression in publicly available gene expression microarray data of patients with breast cancer, serous ovarian cancer, and prostate cancer. In breast cancer, a group of tumors was identified, each of which simultaneously overexpressed multiple E2F-responsive genes. Seventy percent of these genes were concerned with cell cycle progression, DNA repair, or mitosis. These E2F-responsive gene overexpressing (ERGO) tumors frequently exhibited additional evidence of Rb/E2F axis dysfunction, were mostly triple negative, and preferentially overexpressed multiple basal cytokeratins, suggesting that they overlapped substantially with the basal-like tumor subset. ERGO tumors were also identified in serous ovarian cancer and prostate cancer. In these cancer types, there was no evidence for a tumor subset comparable to the breast cancer basal-like subset. A core group of about 30 E2F-responsive genes were overexpressed in all three cancer types. Thus, it appears that disorders of the Rb/E2F axis can arise at multiple organ sites and produce tumors that simultaneously overexpress multiple E2F-responsive genes. PMID:25392696

  14. LKB1/KRAS mutant lung cancers constitute a genetic subset of NSCLC with increased sensitivity to MAPK and mTOR signalling inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, C L; Choudhury, B; Davies, H; Edkins, S; Greenman, C; Haaften, G van; Mironenko, T; Santarius, T; Stevens, C; Stratton, M R; Futreal, P A

    2009-01-01

    LKB1/STK11 is a multitasking tumour suppressor kinase. Germline inactivating mutations of the gene are responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers hereditary cancer syndrome. It is also somatically inactivated in approximately 30% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we report that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLC cell lines are sensitive to the MEK inhibitor CI-1040 shown by a dose-dependent reduction in proliferation rate, whereas LKB1 and KRAS mutations alone do not confer similar sensitivity. We show that this subset of NSCLC is also sensitised to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, the data suggest that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLCs are a genetically and functionally distinct subset and further suggest that this subset of lung cancers might afford an opportunity for exploitation of anti-MAPK/mTOR-targeted therapies. PMID:19165201

  15. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  16. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  17. A subset of genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer also has prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Noci, S; Dugo, M; Bertola, F; Melotti, F; Vannelli, A; Dragani, T A; Galvan, A

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the possible influence of 86 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known to associate with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), on overall survival and time to recurrence (TTR) in 733 Italian CRC patients followed up for up to 84 months after surgery. In the Cox multivariate analysis, adjusted for gender, age, pathological stage and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes/no), the risk of death significantly increased by rare allele count (P<0.05) for rs1801133 (MTHFR), rs4939827 (SMAD7), rs2306283 (SLCO1B1) and rs12898159 (BMP4), whereas for rs736775 (GPX3) the opposite was observed. Two additional SNPs associated with TTR, namely rs16892766 (downstream of EIF3H) and rs10749971 (COLCA2). Our findings show that some genetic variants previously found to associate with CRC risk are also associated with survival after treatment. The identification of alleles defining subgroups of patients with worse clinical outcome may have application in developing pharmacogenetic strategies aimed at personalizing CRC treatment. PMID:25963333

  18. Epithelial mesenchymal-like transition occurs in a subset of cells in castration resistant prostate cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Haider, Maahum; Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa; Ericson, Nolan; True, Lawrence D; Lam, Hung-Ming; Brown, Lisha G; Ketchanji, Melanie; Nghiem, Belinda; Lakely, Bryce; Coleman, Roger; Montgomery, Bruce; Lange, Paul H; Roudier, Martine; Higano, Celestia S; Bielas, Jason H; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2016-03-01

    TGFβ is a known driver of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis. However, EMT has not been fully explored in clinical specimens of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastases. To assess EMT in CRPC, gene expression analysis was performed on 149 visceral and bone metastases from 62 CRPC patients and immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 185 CRPC bone and visceral metastases from 42 CRPC patients. In addition, to assess the potential of metastases to seed further metastases the mitochondrial genome was sequenced at different metastatic sites in one patient. TGFβ was increased in bone versus visceral metastases. While primarily cytoplasmic; nuclear and cytoplasmic Twist were significantly higher in bone than in visceral metastases. Slug and Zeb1 were unchanged, with the exception of nuclear Zeb1 being significantly higher in visceral metastases. Importantly, nuclear Twist, Slug, and Zeb1 were only present in a subset of epithelial cells that had an EMT-like phenotype. Underscoring the relevance of EMT-like cells, mitochondrial sequencing revealed that metastases could seed additional metastases in the same patient. In conclusion, while TGFβ expression and EMT-associated protein expression is present in a considerable number of CRPC visceral and bone metastases, nuclear Twist, Slug, and Zeb1 localization and an EMT-like phenotype (elongated nuclei and cytoplasmic compartment) was only present in a small subset of CRPC bone metastases. Mitochondrial sequencing from different metastases in a CRPC patient provided evidence for the seeding of metastases from previously established metastases, highlighting the biological relevance of EMT-like behavior in CRPC metastases. PMID:26667932

  19. Combined targeting of EGFR/HER promotes anti-tumor efficacy in subsets of KRAS mutant lung cancer resistant to single EGFR blockade

    PubMed Central

    Umelo, Ijeoma Adaku; De Wever, Olivier; Kronenberger, Peter; Van Deun, Jan; Noor, Alfiah; Singh, Kshitiz; Teugels, Erik; Chen, Gang; Bracke, Marc; De Grève, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is a frequently mutated oncogene in lung cancer and among the most refractory to EGFR targeted therapy. Recently, preclinical evidence in pancreatic cancer has demonstrated that mutant KRAS can be regulated by EGFR. However, the distinct correlation between the EGFR/HER family members and mutant KRAS has not been investigated. Here, we show that non-small cell lung cancer cell lines harboring differing isoforms of mutant KRAS, can be broadly divided into EGFR/HER dependent and EGFR/HER independent groups. Combined therapeutic targeting of EGFR, HER2 and HER3 in isoforms regulated by extracellular growth signals promotes in vitro and in vivo efficacy. We also provide evidence that depletion of EGFR via RNA interference specifically abolishes the EGFR/KRAS interaction in the dependent subset. Taken together, these findings suggest that upstream inhibition of the EGFR/HER receptors may be effective in treating a subset of KRAS mutant lung cancers. PMID:25992771

  20. Geminin Overexpression Promotes Imatinib Sensitive Breast Cancer: A Novel Treatment Approach for Aggressive Breast Cancers, Including a Subset of Triple Negative

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Zannel; Mullins, Nicole; Ellipeddi, Pavani; Lage, Janice M.; McKinney, Shawn; El-Etriby, Rana; Zhang, Xu; Isokpehi, Raphael; Hernandez, Brenda; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype that affects 10–25% mostly African American women. TNBC has the poorest prognosis of all subtypes with rapid progression leading to mortality in younger patients. So far, there is no targeted treatment for TNBC. To that end, here we show that c-Abl is one of several tyrosine kinases that phosphorylate and activate geminin’s ability to promote TNBC. Analysis of >800 breast tumor samples showed that geminin is overexpressed in ∼50% of all tumors. Although c-Abl is overexpressed in ∼90% of all tumors, it is only nuclear in geminin overexpressing tumors. In geminin-negative tumors, c-Abl is only cytoplasmic. Inhibiting c-Abl expression or activity (using imatinib or nilotinib) prevented geminin Y150 phosphorylation, inactivated the protein, and most importantly converted overexpressed geminin from an oncogene to an apoptosis inducer. In pre-clinical orthotopic breast tumor models, geminin-overexpressing cells developed aneuploid and invasive tumors, which were suppressed when c-Abl expression was blocked. Moreover, established geminin overexpressing orthotopic tumors regressed when treated with imatinib or nilotinib. Our studies support imatinib/nilotonib as a novel treatment option for patients with aggressive breast cancer (including a subset of TNBCs)-overexpressing geminin and nuclear c-Abl. PMID:24789045

  1. The Role of Biomaterials on Cancer Stem Cell Enrichment and Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordikhani, Faride; Kim, Yonghyun; Zustiak, Silviya P.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their role in cancer metastasis, tumorigenicity and resistance to therapy is slowly shifting the emphasis on the search for cancer cure: more evidence is surfacing that a successful therapy should be geared against this rare cancer cell population. Unfortunately, CSCs are difficult to culture in vitro which severely limits the progress of CSC research. This review gives a brief overview of CSCs and their microenvironment, with particular focus on studies that used in vitro biomaterial-based models and biomaterial/CSC interfaces for the enrichment of CSCs. Biomaterial properties relevant to CSC behaviors are also addressed. While the discussed research field is still in its infancy, it appears that in vitro cancer models that include a biomaterial can support CSC enrichment and this has proved indispensable to the study of their biology as well as the development of novel cancer therapies.

  2. Prolonged Drug Selection of Breast Cancer Cells and Enrichment of Cancer Stem Cell Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Anna Maria; Salcido, Crystal D.; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Wu, Chung-Pu; Fostel, Jennifer M.; Mumau, Melanie D.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Varticovski, Lyuba

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells are presumed to have virtually unlimited proliferative and self-renewal abilities and to be highly resistant to chemotherapy, a feature that is associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters. We investigated whether prolonged continuous selection of cells for drug resistance enriches cultures for cancer stem–like cells. Methods Cancer stem cells were defined as CD44+/CD24− cells that could self-renew (ie, generate cells with the tumorigenic CD44+/CD24− phenotype), differentiate, invade, and form tumors in vivo. We used doxorubicin-selected MCF-7/ADR cells, weakly tumorigenic parental MCF-7 cells, and MCF-7/MDR, an MCF-7 subline with forced expression of ABCB1 protein. Cells were examined for cell surface markers and side-population fractions by microarray and flow cytometry, with in vitro invasion assays, and for ability to form mammospheres. Xenograft tumors were generated in mice to examine tumorigenicity (n = 52). The mRNA expression of multidrug resistance genes was examined in putative cancer stem cells and pathway analysis of statistically significantly differentially expressed genes was performed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Pathway analysis showed that MCF-7/ADR cells express mRNAs from ABCB1 and other genes also found in breast cancer stem cells (eg, CD44, TGFB1, and SNAI1). MCF-7/ADR cells were highly invasive, formed mammospheres, and were tumorigenic in mice. In contrast to parental MCF-7 cells, more than 30% of MCF-7/ADR cells had a CD44+/CD24− phenotype, could self-renew, and differentiate (ie, produce CD44+/CD24− and CD44+/CD24+ cells) and overexpressed various multidrug resistance–linked genes (including ABCB1, CCNE1, and MMP9). MCF-7/ADR cells were statistically significantly more invasive in Matrigel than parental MCF-7 cells (MCF-7 cells = 0.82 cell per field and MCF-7/ADR = 7.51 cells per field, difference = 6.69 cells per field, 95% confidence interval = 4.82 to 8

  3. Paclitaxel and carboplatin in early phase studies: Roswell Park Cancer Institute experience in the subset of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Creaven, P J; Raghavan, D; Pendyala, L; Loewen, G; Kindler, H L; Berghorn, E J

    1997-08-01

    The combination of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) given by 3-hour infusion followed by carboplatin infused over 30 minutes has been evaluated in a series of phase I studies and is currently being explored in a phase II study in patients with limited- and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Pharmacokinetic measurements were performed at all dose levels in the phase I studies, in which the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in previously treated patients enabled more than twice the dose of paclitaxel to be given with low to moderate doses of carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the concentration-time curve of 4.0 mg x min x mL[-1]). Treatment-naive patients tolerated high paclitaxel doses (270 mg/m2) with carboplatin (dosed to a target area under the curve of 4.5 mg x min x mL[-1]) without granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support. Twenty-three patients (including previously treated and untreated) with non-small cell lung cancer were entered at a variety of paclitaxel doses in the phase I studies. At 100 to 205 mg/m2 paclitaxel, none of nine treated patients responded; at 230 to 290 mg/m2, four (29%) of 14 responded. In the phase II study of paclitaxel 250 mg/m2 in previously untreated patients with small cell lung cancer, two of five evaluable patients with extensive-stage disease have shown a partial response. In a preliminary analysis of the pharmacodynamics of paclitaxel in relation to neurotoxicity (dose limiting in two of three phase I studies), neurotoxicity correlated with the total dose of paclitaxel, the area under the curve, and the peak paclitaxel concentration, but not with the length of time plasma paclitaxel levels remained above 0.05 micromol/L. These correlations were not strong, however, and analysis of these data is ongoing. PMID:9331139

  4. High casein kinase 1 epsilon levels are correlated with better prognosis in subsets of patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Guerra, Jose Luis; Verdugo-Sivianes, Eva M.; Otero-Albiol, Daniel; Vieites, Begoña; Ortiz-Gordillo, Maria J.; De León, Jose M.; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-01-01

    Reliable biological markers that predict breast cancer (BC) outcomes after multidisciplinary therapy have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the association between casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) and the risk of recurrence in patients with BC. Using 168 available tumor samples from patients with BC treated with surgery +/− chemo(radio)therapy, we scored the CK1ε expression as high (≥1.5) or low (<1.5) using an immunohistochemical method. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to assess the risk of relapse, and Cox proportional hazards analyses were utilized to evaluate the effect of CK1ε expression on this risk. The median age at diagnosis was 60 years (range 35-96). A total of 58% of the patients underwent breast conservation surgery, while 42% underwent mastectomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy were administered in 101 (60%) and 137 cases (82%), respectively. Relapse was observed in 24 patients (14%). Multivariate analysis found high expression of CK1ε to be associated with a statistically significant higher disease-free survival (DFS) in BC patients with wild-type p53 (Hazard ratio [HR] = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.91; P = 0.018) or poor histological differentiation ([HR] = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.12-0.94; P = 0.039) or in those without adjuvant chemotherapy ([HR] = 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01-0.97; P = 0.006). Our data indicate that CK1ε expression is associated with DFS in BC patients with wild-type p53 or poor histological differentiation or in those without adjuvant chemotherapy and thus may serve as a predictor of recurrence in these subsets of patients. PMID:26327509

  5. ALCHEMIST: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trials

    Cancer.gov

    ALCHEMIST represents three integrated, precision medicine trials that are designed to identify people with early-stage lung cancer who have tumors that harbor certain uncommon genetic changes and evaluate whether drug treatments targeted against those mol

  6. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer. PMID:27374224

  7. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Colleen F.; Goodman, Irene F.

    This paper proposes the design and key methodological features of a longitudinal evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program (NCISEP). Goodman Research Group's (GRG) five-year longitudinal evaluation is designed as a randomized experiment with a control group and employs both quantitative and qualitative data collection…

  8. Identification and characterization of a tumor infiltrating CD56(+)/CD16 (-) NK cell subset with specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Timothy L; Burns, William; Riley, John; Morgan, Richard A; Davis, Jeremy L; Hanada, Kenichi; Quezado, Martha; Rosenberg, Steven A; Royal, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    In a recent clinical trial, a patient exhibited regression of several pancreatic cancer metastases following the administration of the immune modulator Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody). We sought to characterize the immune cells responsible for this regression. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL-2742) and an autologous tumor line (TC-2742) were expanded from a regressing metastatic lesion excised from this patient. Natural killer (NK) cells predominated in the TIL (92% CD56(+)) with few T cells (12% CD3(+)). A majority (88%) of the NK cells were CD56(bright)CD16(-). TIL-2742 secreted IFN-γ and GM-CSF following co-culture with TC-2742 and major histocompatibility complex mismatched pancreatic tumor lines. After sorting TIL-2742, the purified CD56(+)CD16(-)CD3(-) subset showed reactivity similar to TIL-2742 while the CD56(-)CD16(-)CD3(+) cells exhibited no tumor recognition. In co-culture assays, TIL-2742 and the NK subset expressed high reactivity to several pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and could lyse the autologous tumor as well as pancreas and prostate cancer lines. Reactivity was partially abrogated by blockade of TRAIL. We thus identified a unique subset of NK cells (CD56(bright)CD16(dim)) isolated from a regressing metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient responding to Ipilimumab. This represents the first report of CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells with apparent specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and associated with tumor regression following the treatment with an immune modulating agent. PMID:20734041

  9. CXCR3 expression defines a novel subset of innate CD8+ T cells that enhance immunity against bacterial infection and cancer upon stimulation with IL-15.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Terrazas, Cesar A; Varikuti, Sanjay; Kimble, Jennifer; Vadia, Stephen; Yu, Lianbo; Seveau, Stephanie; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2015-03-01

    Innate CD8(+) T cells are a heterogeneous population with developmental pathways distinct from conventional CD8(+) T cells. However, their biology, classification, and functions remain incompletely understood. We recently demonstrated the existence of a novel population of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3)-positive innate CD8(+) T cells. Here, we investigated the functional properties of this subset and identified effector molecules and pathways which mediate their function. Adoptive transfer of IL-15 activated CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T cells conferred increased protection against Listeria monocytogenes infection in susceptible IFN-γ(-/-) mice compared with similarly activated CXCR3(-) subset. This was associated with enhanced proliferation and IFN-γ production in CXCR3(+) cells. Further, CXCR3(+) innate cells showed enhanced cytotoxicity against a tumor cell line in vitro. In depth analysis of the CXCR3(+) subset showed increased gene expression of Ccl5, Klrc1, CtsW, GP49a, IL-2Rβ, Atp5e, and Ly6c but reduced IFN-γR2 and Art2b. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed an up-regulation of genes associated with T-cell activation, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and translational initiation in CXCR3(+) populations. Our results demonstrate that CXCR3 expression in innate CD8(+) T cells defines a subset with enhanced cytotoxic potential and protective antibacterial immune functions. Immunotherapeutic approaches against infectious disease and cancer could utilize CXCR3(+) innate CD8(+) T-cell populations as novel clinical intervention strategies. PMID:25466888

  10. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  11. Role of Anthocyanin-enriched Purple-fleshed Sweet Potato P40 in Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyoung; Xu, Jianteng; Kim, Jaeyong; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Su, Xiaoyu; Standard, Joseph; Carey, Edward; Griffin, Jason; Herndon, Betty; Katz, Benjamin; Tomich, John; Wang, Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Scope Anthocyanins, the natural pigments in plant foods, have been associated with cancer prevention. However, the content of anthocyanins in staple foods is typically low and the mechanisms by which they exert anti-cancer activity is not yet fully defined. Methods and results We selected an anthocyanin-enriched purple-fleshed sweet potato clone, P40, and investigated its potential anti-cancer effect in both in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. In addition to a high level of total phenolics and antioxidant capacity, P40 possesses a high content of anthocyanins at 7.5 mg/g dry matter. Treatment of human colonic SW480 cancer cells with P40 anthocyanin extracts at 0–40 μM of peonidin-3-glucoside equivalent resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell number due to cytostatic arrest of cell cycle at G1 phase but not cytotoxicity. Furthermore, dietary P40 at 10–30% significantly suppressed azoxymethane-induced formation of aberrant crypt foci in the colons of CF-1 mice in conjunction with, at least in part, a lesser proliferative PCNA and a greater apoptotic caspase-3 expression in the colon mucosal epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations, coupled with both in vitro and in vivo studies reported here, suggest anthocyanin-enriched sweet potato P40 may protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest, anti-proliferative and apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:23784800

  12. Urinary proteome alterations in HER2 enriched breast cancer revealed by multipronged quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Akshada; Dabhi, Raju; Taunk, Khushman; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; RoyChoudhury, Sourav; Adhav, Ragini; Seal, Shubhendu; Mane, Anupama; Bayatigeri, Santhakumari; Santra, Manas K; Chaudhury, Koel; Rapole, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women. Although biomarker discoveries through various proteomic approaches of tissue and serum samples have been studied in breast cancer, urinary proteome alterations in breast cancer are least studied. Urine being a noninvasive biofluid and a significant source of proteins, it has the potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer. This study used complementary quantitative gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches to find a panel of urinary protein markers that could discriminate HER2 enriched (HE) subtype breast cancer from the healthy controls. A total of 183 differentially expressed proteins were identified using three complementary approaches, namely 2D-DIGE, iTRAQ, and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectra. The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to various bioinformatics analyses for deciphering the biological context of these proteins using protein analysis through evolutionary relationships, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery, and STRING. Multivariate statistical analysis was undertaken to identify the set of most significant proteins, which could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. Immunoblotting and MRM-based validation in a separate cohort testified a panel of 21 proteins such as zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein, A2GL, retinol-binding protein 4, annexin A1, SAP3, SRC8, gelsolin, kininogen 1, CO9, clusterin, ceruloplasmin, and α1-antitrypsin could be a panel of candidate markers that could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. PMID:27324523

  13. Effect of rosemary polyphenols on human colon cancer cells: transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Rocamora-Reverte, Lourdes; Gómez-Martínez, Angeles; Ferragut, José Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the effect of rosemary extracts rich on polyphenols obtained using pressurized fluids was investigated on the gene expression of human SW480 and HT29 colon cancer cells. The application of transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis was done via two computational approaches, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. These two approaches were used for functional enrichment analysis as a previous step for a reliable interpretation of the data obtained from microarray analysis. Reverse transcription quantitative-PCR was used to confirm relative changes in mRNA levels of selected genes from microarrays. The selection of genes was based on their expression change, adjusted p value, and known biological function. According to genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, rosemary polyphenols altered the expression of ~4 % of the genes covered by the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0ST chip in both colon cancer cells. However, only ~18 % of the differentially expressed genes were common to both cell lines, indicating markedly different expression profiles in response to the treatment. Differences in induction of G2/M arrest observed by rosemary polyphenols in the two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines suggest that the extract may be differentially effective against tumors with specific mutational pattern. From our results, it is also concluded that rosemary polyphenols induced a low degree of apoptosis indicating that other multiple signaling pathways may contribute to colon cancer cell death. PMID:22923011

  14. The association of clinical outcome and peripheral T-cell subsets in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving first-line FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mario; Formica, Vincenzo; Cereda, Vittore; Jochems, Caroline; Richards, Jacob; Grenga, Italia; Orlandi, Augusto; Ferroni, Patrizia; Guadagni, Fiorella; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The first-line standard of care for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is FOLFIRI (irinotecan, levo-leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)) plus bevacizumab. With the renewed interest in cancer immunotherapy with agents such as vaccines, checkpoint inhibitors and immune modulators, the possibility exists for the use of one or more of these immunotherapeutics in the first-line setting and thus in combination with the FOLFIRI and bevacizumab regimen. Studies were undertaken to study the effects of FOLFIRI and bevacizumab therapy on peripheral T-cell subsets, and to determine if there are any associations between these subsets and response to therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets of patients with mCRC (n = 23) were analyzed prior to and during therapy. While there were differences among patients, the majority of patients showed either a minimal change or an increase in CD4(+) T cell to regulatory T cell (Treg) ratios during therapy, as well as either minimal change or a decrease in Treg suppressive activity during therapy. There was also an association (p = 0.036) between a decrease in Treg frequency during FOLFIRI therapy and overall survival, and an association (p = 0.037) between the frequency of Tregs prior to therapy and progression-free survival. Responders to the chemotherapy by RECIST criteria also had a greater decrease in Tregs during therapy vs. pre-therapy (p = 0.0064) as compared to non-responders. While the number of mCRC patients undergoing chemotherapy in this study is relatively small, it provides the rationale for the use of immunotherapeutics in this first-line metastatic setting. PMID:27622042

  15. Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression defines a subset of locally advanced prostate cancer: potential opportunities for synergistic targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Udager, Aaron M.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Shi, Yang; Hicks, Jessica L.; Cao, Xuhong; Siddiqui, Javed; Jiang, Hui; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent ERG gene fusions, the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, drive overexpression of the nuclear transcription factor ERG and are early clonal events in prostate cancer progression. The nuclear transcription factor MYC is also frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer and may play a role in tumor initiation and/or progression. The relationship between nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression in prostate cancer, as well as the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis of ERG-positive/MYC high tumors, is not well understood. METHODS Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ERG and MYC was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs), and nuclear staining was scored semi-quantitatively (IHC product score range = 0–300). Correlation between nuclear ERG and MYC protein expression and association with clinicopathologic parameters and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy was assessed. RESULTS 29.1% of all tumor nodules showed concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression (i.e., ERG-positive/MYC high), including 35.0% of secondary nodules. Overall, there was weak positive correlation between ERG and MYC expression across all tumor nodules (rpb = 0.149, P = 0.045), although this correlation was strongest in secondary nodules (rpb = 0.520, P = 0.019). In radical prostatectomy specimens, ERG-positive/MYC high tumors were positively associated with the presence of extraprostatic extension (EPE), relative to all other ERG/MYC expression subgroups, however, there was no significant association between concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression and time to biochemical recurrence. CONCLUSIONS Concurrent nuclear ERG and MYC protein overexpression is common in prostate cancer and defines a subset of locally advanced tumors. Recent data indicates that BET bromodomain proteins regulate ERG gene fusion and MYC gene expression in prostate cancer, suggesting

  16. Stem Cells Antigen-1 Enriches for a Cancer Stem Cell-Like Subpopulation in Mouse Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Won; Park, Jung Min; Park, Dong Min; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong need to identify markers to enrich gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, CSC enrichment markers for mouse gastric cancers have not yet been determined. In our previous study, we generated primary mouse gastric cancer cell line NCC-S1 (S1) established from a Villin-cre;Smad4(F/F) ;Trp53(F/F) ;Cdh1(F/wt) mouse and its metastatic variant cell line NCC-S1M (S1M). Interestingly, S1M cells exhibited CSC-like features, such as increased tumorigenic potential and chemoresistance. By comparing gene expression profiles between S1 and S1M cells, we identified Stem Cells Antigen-1 (Sca-1) as a cell surface marker, which was mostly upregulated in S1M. Sca-1 was upregulated in tumorspheres from S1 cells or after cisplatin treatment in S1 cells. Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis showed that approximately 7% of cancer cells exhibited positivity for Sca-1 in primary mouse gastric cancer tissues. An in vivo-limiting dilution assay showed that Sca-1(high) mouse gastric cancer cells demonstrated increased tumorigenicity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. The Sca-1 expression was downregulated by TGF-β pathway activation and Wnt pathway inhibition in mouse gastric cancer cells. Sca-1(high) cells showed relatively low TGF-β reporter activity and high TCF/LEF1 reporter activity compared with Sca-1(negative) cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Sca-1 was a β-catenin/LEF1 target gene. Sca-1(high) allografts were more resistant to cisplatin/fluorouracil chemotherapy than Sca-1(negative) allografts, and overexpressed Bcl-xL. Eighty-five mouse genes overexpressed in Sca-1(high) S1 cells compared with Sca-1(negative) cells clustered 123 pretreatment gastric cancer patient samples according to survival following chemotherapy. Taken together, Sca-1 is a novel CSC enrichment marker that mediates TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse gastric cancer. Stem Cells 2016;34:1177-1187. PMID:26869189

  17. Strategies for Isolating and Enriching Cancer Stem Cells: Well Begun Is Half Done

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jiang-jie; Qiu, Wen; Xu, Sen-lin; Wang, Bin; Ye, Xian-zong; Ping, Yi-fang; Zhang, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) constitute a subpopulation of cancer cells that have the potential for self-renewal, multipotent differentiation, and tumorigenicity. Studies on CSC biology and CSC-targeted therapies depend on CSC isolation and/or enrichment methodologies. Scientists have conducted extensive research in this field since John Dick's group successfully isolated CSCs based on the expression of the CD34 and CD38 surface markers. Progress in CSC research has been greatly facilitated by the enrichment and isolation of these cells. In this review, we summarize the current strategies used in our and other laboratories for CSC isolation and enrichment, including methods based on stem cell surface markers, intracellular enzyme activity, the concentration of reactive oxygen species, the mitochondrial membrane potential, promoter-driven fluorescent protein expression, autofluorescence, suspension/adherent culture, cell division, the identification of side population cells, resistance to cytotoxic compounds or hypoxia, invasiveness/adhesion, immunoselection, and physical property. Although many challenges remain to be overcome, it is reasonable to believe that more reliable, efficient, and convenient methods will be developed in the near future. PMID:23540661

  18. Inactivation of BRCA2 in human cancer cells identifies a subset of tumors with enhanced sensitivity towards death receptormediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    De Toni, Enrico N.; Ziesch, Andreas; Rizzani, Antonia; Török, Helga-Paula; Hocke, Sandra; Lü, Shuai; Wang, Shao-Chun; Hucl, Tomas; Göke, Burkhard; Bruns, Christiane; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Purpose DNA repair defects due to detrimental BRCA2-mutations confer increased susceptibility towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL) agents and define patient subpopulations for individualized genotype-based cancer therapy. However, due to the side effects of these drugs, there is a need to identify additional agents, which could be used alone or in combination with ICL-agents. Therefore, we investigated whether BRCA2-mutations might also increase the sensitivity towards TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-R)-targeting compounds. Experimental design Two independent model systems were applied: a BRCA2 gene knockout and a BRCA2 gene complementation model. The effects of TRAIL-R-targeting compounds and ICL-agents on cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were compared in BRCA2-proficient versus-deficient cancer cells in vitro. In addition, the effects of the TRAIL-R2-targeting antibody LBY135 were assessed in vivo using a murine tumor xenograft model. Results BRCA2-deficient cancer cells displayed an increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-R-targeting agents. These effects exceeded and were mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established effects of ICL-agents. In vitro, ICL-agents expectedly induced an early cell cycle arrest followed by delayed apoptosis, whereas TRAIL-R-targeting compounds caused early apoptosis without prior cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment with LBY135 significantly reduced the tumor growth of BRCA2-deficient cancer cells in a xenograft model. Conclusions BRCA2 mutations strongly increase the in vitro- and in vivo-sensitivity of cancer cells towards TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis. This effect is mechanistically distinguishable from the well-established ICL-hypersensitivity of BRCA2-deficient cells. Our study thus defines a new genetic subpopulation of cancers susceptible towards TRAIL-R-targeting compounds, which could facilitate novel therapeutic approaches for patients with BRCA2-deficient tumors. PMID:26843614

  19. Enrichment and characterization of cancer stem cells from a human non-small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changhong; Setrerrahmane, Sarra; Xu, Hanmei

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cells from the same origin comprise different cell populations. Among them, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have higher tumorigenicity. It is necessary to enrich CSCs to determine an effective way to suppress and eliminate them. In the present study, using the non-adhesive culture system, tumor spheres were successfully generated from human A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line within 2 weeks. Compared to A549 adherent cells, sphere cells had a higher self-renewal ability and increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Sphere cells were more invasive and expressed stem cell markers including octamer‑binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) at high levels. CD133, a disputed marker of lung CSCs, was also upregulated. Tumor sphere cells showed higher tumorigenic ability in vivo, indicating that more CSCs were enriched in the sphere cells. More blood vessels were formed in the tumor generated by sphere cells suggesting the interaction between CSCs and blood vessel. A reliable model of enriching CSCs from the human A549 NSCLC cell line was established that was simple and cost-effective compared to other methods. PMID:26239272

  20. Cardamonin reduces chemotherapy-enriched breast cancer stem-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jia, Deyong; Tan, Yuan; Liu, Huijuan; Ooi, Sarah; Li, Li; Wright, Kathryn; Bennett, Steffany; Addison, Christina L; Wang, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    The failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy in breast cancers has been closely associated with the presence of drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Thus, screening for small molecules that selectively inhibit growth of CSCs may offer great promise for cancer control, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. In this report, we provide the first demonstration that cardamonin, a small molecule, selectively inhibits breast CSCs that have been enriched by chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, cardamonin also sufficiently prevents the enrichment of CSCs when simultaneously used with chemotherapeutic drugs. Specifically, cardamonin effectively abolishes chemotherapeutic drug-induced up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 and activation of NF-κB/IKBα and Stat3. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, co-administration of cardamonin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin significantly retards tumor growth and simultaneously decreases CSC pools in vivo. Since cardamonin has been found in some herbs, this work suggests a potential new approach for the effective treatment of breast CSCs by administration of cardamonin either concurrent with or after chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26506421

  1. Breast Cancer Stem Cell Culture and Enrichment Using Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Palomeras, Sònia; Rabionet, Marc; Ferrer, Inés; Sarrats, Ariadna; Garcia-Romeu, Maria Luisa; Puig, Teresa; Ciurana, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) population displays self-renewal capabilities, resistance to conventional therapies, and a tendency to post-treatment recurrence. Increasing knowledge about CSCs' phenotype and functions is needed to investigate new therapeutic strategies against the CSC population. Here, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), a biocompatible polymer free of toxic dye, has been used to fabricate scaffolds, solid structures suitable for 3D cancer cell culture. It has been reported that scaffold cell culture enhances the CSCs population. A RepRap BCN3D+ printer and 3 mm PCL wire were used to fabricate circular scaffolds. PCL design and fabrication parameters were first determined and then optimized considering several measurable variables of the resulting scaffolds. MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line was used to assess scaffolds adequacy for 3D cell culture. To evaluate CSC enrichment, the Mammosphere Forming Index (MFI) was performed in 2D and 3D MCF7 cultures. Results showed that the 60° scaffolds were more suitable for 3D culture than the 45° and 90° ones. Moreover, 3D culture experiments, in adherent and non-adherent conditions, showed a significant increase in MFI compared to 2D cultures (control). Thus, 3D cell culture with PCL scaffolds could be useful to improve cancer cell culture and enrich the CSCs population. PMID:27120585

  2. Cardamonin reduces chemotherapy-enriched breast cancer stem-like cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Deyong; Tan, Yuan; Liu, Huijuan; Ooi, Sarah; Li, Li; Wright, Kathryn; Bennett, Steffany; Addison, Christina L.; Wang, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    The failure of cytotoxic chemotherapy in breast cancers has been closely associated with the presence of drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Thus, screening for small molecules that selectively inhibit growth of CSCs may offer great promise for cancer control, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. In this report, we provide the first demonstration that cardamonin, a small molecule, selectively inhibits breast CSCs that have been enriched by chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, cardamonin also sufficiently prevents the enrichment of CSCs when simultaneously used with chemotherapeutic drugs. Specifically, cardamonin effectively abolishes chemotherapeutic drug-induced up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 and activation of NF-κB/IKBα and Stat3. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, co-administration of cardamonin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin significantly retards tumor growth and simultaneously decreases CSC pools in vivo. Since cardamonin has been found in some herbs, this work suggests a potential new approach for the effective treatment of breast CSCs by administration of cardamonin either concurrent with or after chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26506421

  3. Photoablative dilution with pre-enrichment for the clonal isolation of rare cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Leary, James F.

    2009-02-01

    The clonal isolation of rare cells, especially cancer and stem cells, in a population is important to cell biology. We have demonstrated that the Laser-Enabled Analysis and Processing (LEAP, Cyntellect Inc., San Diego, CA) instrument can be used to efficiently produce clones by photoablative dilution. The LEAP instrument performs automated fluorescence imaging and real-time image analysis to classify cells. The instrument also features a pulsed laser that gives it the ability to purify a sample by eliminating unwanted cells via laser ablation or UV-induced apoptosis. In photoablative dilution, rare cells are deposited into a multiwell plate at 10 cells per well. Then one cell is chosen to clone, and the other cells present in the well are eliminated by laser ablation. We have successfully used LEAP to produce single cell clones in 95% of wells (originally containing 5+/-2.1 cells/well). While photoablative dilution is a very effective way of producing clonal cultures, it has a fundamental limitation in the low number of cells that can be processed. This can be overcome by performing a pre-enrichment to increase the frequency of the rare cells to be cloned. Another enrichment strategy is flow cytometry based cell sorting. Flow sorting can provide greater than 104 fold enrichment and cells can be sorted directly into a multiwell plate. With pre-enrichment, photoablative dilution can be used to clonally isolate rare cells. This is especially important in cases where the total number of potentially rare cells recovered by first stage enrichment sorting is only 10-200 cells. Such a situation which would normally preclude second pass sorting for purity by the high-throughput first stage cell separation technology.

  4. Pure Apocrine Carcinomas Represent a Clinicopathologically Distinct Androgen Receptor-Positive Subset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mills, Anne M; E Gottlieb, Chelsea; M Wendroth, Scott; M Brenin, Christiana; Atkins, Kristen A

    2016-08-01

    Apocrine carcinomas comprise ∼1% of all breast cancers and are characterized by large cells bearing abundant eosinophilic granular cytoplasm, round nuclei, and prominent nucleoli. They are typically estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor/HER2 negative, making them unresponsive to typical hormonal or HER2-based chemotherapy. However, this subtype of triple-negative breast cancers expresses androgen receptor (AR), a feature not shared by most nonapocrine triple-negative cancers (NA-TNCs). AR therefore represents a potential diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for apocrine breast carcinoma. All pure apocrine carcinomas diagnosed during a 10-year period were reviewed, and clinicopathologic characteristics were compared with a control group of 26 NA-TNC cases. Twenty apocrine carcinomas were identified (∼0.8% of all breast cancers). The mean age at diagnosis was 69.3 years for apocrine carcinomas and 56.7 years for NA-TNC. All apocrine carcinomas and no NA-TNC were AR positive. The proportions of apocrine carcinoma grades varied, with G1 being seen in 15% of patients, G2 in 55%, and G3 in 30%. In contrast, 100% of NA-TNC cases were G3. The majority of apocrine carcinomas presented at low T stage (T1: 70%; T2: 20%; T3: 10%; T4: 0%), whereas NA-TNC cases more often presented at T2 or higher (T1: 46.2%; T2: 30.8%; T3: 11.5%; T4: 11.5%). Thirty percent of apocrine carcinomas and 30.8% of NA-TNCs had nodal metastases at presentation. Apocrine carcinomas had a favorable clinical prognosis, with 80% of patients showing no evidence of disease-related morbidity or mortality (mean follow-up: 45.2 mo). Pure apocrine carcinomas represent a clinicopathologically distinct subgroup of triple-negative breast cancer characterized by AR positivity. When compared with NA-TNC, apocrine carcinomas more often present in older women with lower grade and T stage, a group in which a more conservative treatment regimen is often desired. PMID:27259012

  5. An integrated microfluidic platform for negative selection and enrichment of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen-Yi; Tsai, Sung-Chi; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), tumor cells that disseminate from primary tumors to the bloodstream, have recently emerged as promising indicators for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the technical difficulties in isolating and detecting rare CTCs have limited the widespread applicability of this method to date. In this work, a new integrated microfluidic system integrating micromixers and micropumps capable of performing ‘negative selection and enrichment’ of CTCs was developed. By using anti-human CD45 antibodies-coated magnetic beads, leukocytes were effectively removed by applying an external magnetic force, leaving behind an enriched target cell population. The on-chip CTC recovery rate was experimentally found to be 70   ±   5% after a single round of negative selection and enrichment. Meanwhile, CD45 depletion efficiency was 83.99   ±   1.00% and could be improved to 99.84   ±   0.04% after three consecutive rounds of depletion. Notably, on-chip negative selection and enrichment was 58% faster and the repeated depletion could be processed automatically. These promising results suggested the developed microfluidic chip is potentiated for a standardized CTC isolation platform. Preliminary results of the current paper were presented at Micro TAS 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA, October 26-30, 2014.

  6. DDX3X promotes the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs and the potential roles they played in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; He, Yanong

    2016-01-01

    DDX3X, located on the X-chromosome, belongs to the DEAD-box RNA helicase family and acts as a key RNA-binding protein to exert its regulatory functions in various biological processes. In this paper, knock-down the expression of DDX3X can affect a subset of miRNA expression levels, especially for miR-1, miR-141, miR-145, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-34a. Through adopting the immunoprecipitation (IP), RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), dual luciferase reporter assays, we illustrate that DDX3X could interact with Drosha/DGCR8 complex, elevate the processing activity of Drosha/DGCR8 complex on pri-miRNAs, and increase mature miRNA expression levels. For the studies of potential roles and biological functions of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their downstream target genes in multiple cancers, we use the primary data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and several miRNA target prediction databases, to systematically analyze the expression levels of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs in almost 14 kinds of cancers versus normal tissues, and the essential biological functions for their putative downstream target genes. All these findings will provide us novel insights and directions for thoroughly exploring the regulatory mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis, and shed light on effectively searching the clinical significances and biological roles of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their target genes in cancer development. PMID:27586307

  7. DDX3X promotes the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs and the potential roles they played in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; He, Yanong

    2016-01-01

    DDX3X, located on the X-chromosome, belongs to the DEAD-box RNA helicase family and acts as a key RNA-binding protein to exert its regulatory functions in various biological processes. In this paper, knock-down the expression of DDX3X can affect a subset of miRNA expression levels, especially for miR-1, miR-141, miR-145, miR-19b, miR-20a and miR-34a. Through adopting the immunoprecipitation (IP), RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP), dual luciferase reporter assays, we illustrate that DDX3X could interact with Drosha/DGCR8 complex, elevate the processing activity of Drosha/DGCR8 complex on pri-miRNAs, and increase mature miRNA expression levels. For the studies of potential roles and biological functions of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their downstream target genes in multiple cancers, we use the primary data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and several miRNA target prediction databases, to systematically analyze the expression levels of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs in almost 14 kinds of cancers versus normal tissues, and the essential biological functions for their putative downstream target genes. All these findings will provide us novel insights and directions for thoroughly exploring the regulatory mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis, and shed light on effectively searching the clinical significances and biological roles of DDX3X-dependent miRNAs and their target genes in cancer development. PMID:27586307

  8. Enrichment of CD44 in basal-type breast cancer correlates with EMT, cancer stem cell gene profile, and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanxiao; Tian, Yijun; Yuan, Xun; Liu, Yu; Wu, Hua; Liu, Qian; Wu, Gen Sheng; Wu, Kongming

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that serves as the receptor for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronic acid. CD44 has been reported to play key roles in cell proliferation, motility, and survival, but its role in breast cancer remains controversial. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis. A total of 23 published Gene Expression Omnibus databases were included to evaluate the association between CD44 mRNA expression and clinicopathological characteristics or prognosis of the patients with breast cancer. Our analysis revealed that CD44 expression was associated with clinicopathological features, including the histological grade, estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status. Higher levels of CD44 expression were observed in the basal subtype of breast cancer both at the mRNA and protein levels (odds ratio [OR] =2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72–2.52; OR =2.11, 95% CI: 1.67–2.68). Patients with CD44 overexpression exhibited significantly worse overall survival (hazard ratio =1.27; 95% CI: 1.04–1.55). Whole gene profile analysis revealed that CD44 expression was enriched in basal-type breast cancer and correlated with epithelial–mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell gene profiles. In summary, our analyses indicated that CD44 potentially might be a prognostic marker for breast cancer and thus can serve as a therapeutic target for basal-type breast cancer. PMID:26855592

  9. Mammary cancer prevention by regular garlic and selenium-enriched garlic.

    PubMed

    Ip, C; Lisk, D J; Stoewsand, G S

    1992-01-01

    The anticarcinogenic activities of regular (soil-grown) garlic and selenium-enriched garlic (cultivated in the greenhouse) were evaluated using the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-(DMBA) induced mammary tumor model in rats. In Experiment 1, milled regular garlic powder was added to the basal AIN-76A diet at 20 g/kg. The results from different schedules of supplementation suggested that a continuous treatment, which started before DMBA and persisted for the entire duration of the study, was most effective in tumor suppression. In Experiment 2, selected allyl group-containing sulfides that are normal constituents of garlic extract were given by gavage in three single doses immediately before DMBA. Several structurally related compounds were found to be protective during the initiation phase in the mammary cancer model. Although the present study was not designed specifically to elucidate the structure-activity relationship with respect to sulfur chain length or alkyl versus alkenyl substitution, our data showed that diallyl disulfide was more active than diallyl sulfide or allyl methyl sulfide. In Experiment 3, the anticarcinogenic activity of selenium-enriched garlic (containing 150 ppm Se dry weight from growth in a selenium-fertilized medium) was compared with that of regular garlic as well as selenite. Animals given the selenium-enriched garlic (final concentration 3 ppm Se in the diet) developed the fewest mammary tumors. Tissue selenium levels, however, were lower in these animals than in those fed the same amount of selenium from selenite. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving cancer prevention with the use of a selenium-rich food system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1437646

  10. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  11. TP53 Pro72 Allele Is Enriched in Oral Tongue Cancer and Frequently Mutated in Esophageal Cancer in India

    PubMed Central

    Adduri, Raju S. R.; Katamoni, Rajender; Pandilla, Ramaswamy; Madana, Sandeep N.; Paripati, Arun Kumar; Kotapalli, Viswakalyan; Bashyam, Murali Dharan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The tumor suppressor p53 is known to be inactivated frequently in various cancers. In addition, germline polymorphisms in TP53 are known to affect protein function and influence risk of developing different types of cancers. In this study, we analyzed the association of TP53 Pro72Arg polymorphism with squamous cell carcinoma of oral tongue (SCCOT) and esophagus (ESCC) in India. Methods We assessed the distribution of TP53 Pro72Arg polymorphism in one hundred and fifteen and eighty two SCCOT and ESCC patients, respectively, with respect to one hundred and ten healthy controls from the same population. In addition, we analyzed association of the polymorphism with several clinico-pathological and molecular parameters. Results Pro72 allele was significantly enriched in SCCOT patients compared to the healthy control group but neither allele was enriched in ESCC. Interestingly, Pro72 allele was preferentially mutated in ESCC which was confirmed by analysis of samples heterozygous for Pro72Arg. Conclusions Our study revealed the association of Pro72 allele with SCCOT suggesting the effect of this polymorphism on SCCOT risk. Preferential mutation of Pro72 allele exclusively in ESCC indicates the need for further studies to understand the tissue specific effect of p53 polymorphism. PMID:25436609

  12. Enriched inhibition of cancer and stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulating niclocelles.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Jensen, Tor W; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-04-28

    We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation. PMID:25785368

  13. EGFR blockade enriches for lung cancer stem-like cells through Notch3-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arasada, Rajeswara Rao; Amann, Joseph M.; Rahman, Mohammad A; Huppert, Stacey S.; Carbone, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are the most common actionable genetic abnormalities yet discovered in lung cancer. However, targeting these mutations with kinase inhibitors is not curative in advanced disease and has yet to demonstrate an impact on potentially curable, early-stage disease, with some data suggesting adverse outcomes. Here, we report that treatment of EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines with erlotinib, while showing robust cell death, enriches the ALDH+ stem-like cells through EGFR-dependent activation of Notch3. Additionally, we demonstrate that erlotinib treatment increases the clonogenicity of lung cancer cells in a sphere-forming assay, suggesting increased stem-like cell potential. We demonstrate that inhibition of EGFR kinase activity leads to activation of Notch transcriptional targets in a gamma secretase inhibitor sensitive manner and causes Notch activation. leading to an increase in ALDH high+ cells. We also find a kinase-dependent physical association between the Notch3 and EGFR receptors and tyrosine phosphorylation of Notch3. This could explain the worsened survival observed in some studies of erlotinib treatment at early-stage disease, and suggests that specific dual targeting might overcome this adverse effect. PMID:25125655

  14. A VEGF-dependent gene signature enriched in mesenchymal ovarian cancer predicts patient prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Wang, Xiaojie; Shen, Boqiang; Jing, Ying; Li, Qing; Cai, Mei-Chun; Gu, Zhuowei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Jin; Li, Hongxia; Di, Wen; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported surrogate biomarkers of VEGF pathway activities with the potential to provide predictive information for anti-VEGF therapies. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate a new VEGF-dependent gene signature (VDGs) in relation to molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Using microarray profiling and cross-species analysis, we identified 140-gene mouse VDGs and corresponding 139-gene human VDGs, which displayed enrichment of vasculature and basement membrane genes. In patients who received bevacizumab therapy and showed partial response, the expressions of VDGs (summarized to yield VDGs scores) were markedly decreased in post-treatment biopsies compared with pre-treatment baselines. In contrast, VDGs scores were not significantly altered following bevacizumab treatment in patients with stable or progressive disease. Analysis of VDGs in ovarian cancer showed that VDGs as a prognostic signature was able to predict patient outcome. Correlation estimation of VDGs scores and molecular features revealed that VDGs was overrepresented in mesenchymal subtype and BRCA mutation carriers. These findings highlighted the prognostic role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer, and proposed a VEGF-dependent gene signature as a molecular basis for developing novel diagnostic strategies to aid patient selection for VEGF-targeted agents. PMID:27498762

  15. A VEGF-dependent gene signature enriched in mesenchymal ovarian cancer predicts patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xia; Wang, Xiaojie; Shen, Boqiang; Jing, Ying; Li, Qing; Cai, Mei-Chun; Gu, Zhuowei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Jin; Li, Hongxia; Di, Wen; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported surrogate biomarkers of VEGF pathway activities with the potential to provide predictive information for anti-VEGF therapies. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate a new VEGF-dependent gene signature (VDGs) in relation to molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Using microarray profiling and cross-species analysis, we identified 140-gene mouse VDGs and corresponding 139-gene human VDGs, which displayed enrichment of vasculature and basement membrane genes. In patients who received bevacizumab therapy and showed partial response, the expressions of VDGs (summarized to yield VDGs scores) were markedly decreased in post-treatment biopsies compared with pre-treatment baselines. In contrast, VDGs scores were not significantly altered following bevacizumab treatment in patients with stable or progressive disease. Analysis of VDGs in ovarian cancer showed that VDGs as a prognostic signature was able to predict patient outcome. Correlation estimation of VDGs scores and molecular features revealed that VDGs was overrepresented in mesenchymal subtype and BRCA mutation carriers. These findings highlighted the prognostic role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer, and proposed a VEGF-dependent gene signature as a molecular basis for developing novel diagnostic strategies to aid patient selection for VEGF-targeted agents. PMID:27498762

  16. Enriched inhibition of cancer and stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulating niclocelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Jensen, Tor W.; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-04-01

    We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation.We describe for the first time a therapeutic strategy to target stem-like cancer cells via STAT-3 modulation using a nanomedicine approach. Niclocelle, a niclosamide loaded rigid core mixed micelle, was synthesized from a self-assembled well-defined amphiphilic diblock copolymer and an FDA-approved signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3. Followed by a rigorous physico-chemical characterization, niclocelles were evaluated biologically for cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human melanoma (C32) and breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) cells. Niclocelles were found to selectively reduce the CD44+ stem cell population in C32 cells via STAT-3 modulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00403a

  17. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jhajaira M; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A; Gomez, Henry L; Vallejos, Carlos S; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A

    2016-04-12

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. "Immune system process", "immune response", "defense response", "cellular defense response" and "regulation of immune system process" were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome. PMID:26958810

  18. Repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Jhajaira M.; Prado, Alexandra; Cardenas, Nadezhda K.; Zaharia, Mayer; Dyer, Richard; Doimi, Franco; Bravo, Leny; Pinillos, Luis; Morante, Zaida; Aguilar, Alfredo; Mas, Luis A.; Gomez, Henry L.; Vallejos, Carlos S.; Rolfo, Christian; Pinto, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    There are different biological and clinical patterns of lung cancer between genders indicating intrinsic differences leading to increased sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced DNA damage, mutational patterns of KRAS and better clinical outcomes in women while differences between genders at gene-expression levels was not previously reported. Here we show an enrichment of immune genes in NSCLC in women compared to men. We found in a GSEA analysis (by biological processes annotated from Gene Ontology) of six public datasets a repeated observation of immune gene sets enrichment in women. “Immune system process”, “immune response”, “defense response”, “cellular defense response” and “regulation of immune system process” were the gene sets most over-represented while APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, LAT, CD1D and CCL5 represented the top-five core genes. Characterization of immune cell composition with the platform CIBERSORT showed no differences between genders; however, there were differences when tumor tissues were compared to normal tissues. Our results suggest different immune responses in NSCLC between genders that could be related with the different clinical outcome. PMID:26958810

  19. Evidence that the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colon cancers with a complementable defect in c-myc regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, M.D.; Scott, J.K.; Astrin, S.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas frequently express elevated levels of c-myc mRNA in the absence of a gross genetic change at the c-myc locus. To test the hypothesis that these tumors are defective in a gene function necessary for the regulation of c-myc expression, the authors fused an osteosarcoma cell line that exhibits normal c-myc regulation with two colon carcinoma cell lines that express deregulated levels of c-myc mRNA. Since rates of c-myc mRNA turnover in the colon carcinoma cells were found to be comparable to those in normal cells, increased message stability cannot account for the increased steady-state levels of transcripts. These finding suggest that loss of function of a trans-acting regulator is responsible for the deregulation of c-myc expression in a major fraction of colorectal carcinomas. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in tumor/normal tissue pairs from patients with primary colorectal lesions indicated that deregulation of c-myc expression in the tumors is correlated with frequent loss of alleles of syntenic markers on chromosome 5q. Chromosome 5q is the region known to contain the gene for familial adenomatous polyposis, an inherited predisposition to colon cancer. These findings, together with the arlier finding that the colonic distribution of tumors exhibiting deregulated c-myc expression is similar to that reported for familial polyposis, provide evidence that loss of function of the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colorectal cancers in which c-myc expression is deregulated.

  20. Probabilistic Subset Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rajeev; Jedidi, Kamel

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce subset conjunction as a classification rule by which an acceptable alternative must satisfy some minimum number of criteria. The rule subsumes conjunctive and disjunctive decision strategies as special cases. Subset conjunction can be represented in a binary-response model, for example, in a logistic regression, using only…

  1. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  2. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J.; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  3. Model of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas reveals striking enrichment in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Wauthier, Eliane; Dinh, Timothy A; Selitsky, Sara R; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Carpino, Guido; Levine, Ronald; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Klimstra, David; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico; Carrasco, Nancy; Sethupathy, Praveen; Reid, Lola M

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of human fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas (hFL-HCCs), cancers occurring increasingly in children to young adults, is poorly understood. We present a transplantable tumour line, maintained in immune-compromised mice, and validate it as a bona fide model of hFL-HCCs by multiple methods. RNA-seq analysis confirms the presence of a fusion transcript (DNAJB1-PRKACA) characteristic of hFL-HCC tumours. The hFL-HCC tumour line is highly enriched for cancer stem cells as indicated by limited dilution tumourigenicity assays, spheroid formation and flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry on the hFL-HCC model, with parallel studies on 27 primary hFL-HCC tumours, provides robust evidence for expression of endodermal stem cell traits. Transcriptomic analyses of the tumour line and of multiple, normal hepatic lineage stages reveal a gene signature for hFL-HCCs closely resembling that of biliary tree stem cells--newly discovered precursors for liver and pancreas. This model offers unprecedented opportunities to investigate mechanisms underlying hFL-HCCs pathogenesis and potential therapies. PMID:26437858

  4. Model of fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas reveals striking enrichment in cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Wauthier, Eliane; Dinh, Timothy A.; Selitsky, Sara R.; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Carpino, Guido; Levine, Ronald; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Klimstra, David; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico; Carrasco, Nancy; Sethupathy, Praveen; Reid, Lola M.

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of human fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinomas (hFL-HCCs), cancers occurring increasingly in children to young adults, is poorly understood. We present a transplantable tumour line, maintained in immune-compromised mice, and validate it as a bona fide model of hFL-HCCs by multiple methods. RNA-seq analysis confirms the presence of a fusion transcript (DNAJB1-PRKACA) characteristic of hFL-HCC tumours. The hFL-HCC tumour line is highly enriched for cancer stem cells as indicated by limited dilution tumourigenicity assays, spheroid formation and flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry on the hFL-HCC model, with parallel studies on 27 primary hFL-HCC tumours, provides robust evidence for expression of endodermal stem cell traits. Transcriptomic analyses of the tumour line and of multiple, normal hepatic lineage stages reveal a gene signature for hFL-HCCs closely resembling that of biliary tree stem cells—newly discovered precursors for liver and pancreas. This model offers unprecedented opportunities to investigate mechanisms underlying hFL-HCCs pathogenesis and potential therapies. PMID:26437858

  5. EPA-enriched phospholipids ameliorate cancer-associated cachexia mainly via inhibiting lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2015-12-01

    Excessive loss of fat mass is considered as a key feature of body weight loss in cancer-associated cachexia (CAC). It affects the efficacy and tolerability of cancer therapy and reduces the quality and length of cancer patients' lives. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of EPA-enriched phospholipids (EPA-PL) derived from starfish Asterias amurensis on cachectic weight loss in mice bearing S180 ascitic tumor, and TNF-α-stimulated lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. Our findings revealed that oral administration of EPA-PL at 100 mg per kg body weight (BW) per day for 14 days prevented body weight loss in CAC mice by preserving the white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. We found that serum levels of nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 increased in CAC mice but decreased significantly after oral treatment of EPA-PL. In addition, EPA-PL treatment also suppressed the overexpression of several key lipolytic factors and raised the mRNA levels of some adipogenic factors in the WAT of CAC mice. Moreover, treatment of EPA-PL (200 and 400 μM) markedly inhibited TNF-α-stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes. Furthermore, the antilipolytic effects of EPA-PL were stimulated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) inhibitor PD 98059 and blocked via the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor compound C and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY 294002. Taken together, these data suggest that the dietary EPA-PL ameliorates CAC mainly via inhibiting lipolysis and at least in part for recovering the function of adipogenesis. PMID:26373883

  6. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  7. Human colon cancer stem cells are enriched by insulin-like growth factor-1 and are sensitive to figitumumab

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Lori S; Dolloff, Nathan G; Dicker, David T; Koumenis, Constantinos; Christensen, James G; Grimberg, Adda

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are recognized as contributors to cancer progression and therapeutic resistance in liquid and solid malignancies. We analyzed a panel of human colon cancer cell lines for CSC populations by side population and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. IGF-1 enriches these putative colon CSC populations in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Chemical inhibition of Akt depletes SP cells, and conversely, the overexpression of a constitutively active mutant version of Akt is sufficient to enrich CSC populations. CP-751,871, a fully human antibody with specificity to the IGF-1 receptor, is currently being tested in clinical trials for a variety of solid tumors. CP-751,871 reduces CSC populations in colon cancer cell lines in vitro and reduces tumor growth in vivo. We have identified a novel role for IGF-1 in the enrichment of chemoresistant CSC populations. Our results suggest that CP-751,871 has preferential activity against putative CSC populations and, therefore, may complement current standard chemotherapeutic regimens that target cycling cells. PMID:21720213

  8. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  9. The effect of an oral nutritional supplement enriched with fish oil on weight-loss in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Ross, J A; Voss, A C; Tisdale, M J; Fearon, K C

    1999-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that administration of oral eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) will stabilize weight in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if a combination of EPA with a conventional oral nutritional supplement could produce weight gain in these patients. Twenty patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were asked to consume two cans of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement per day in addition to their normal food intake. Each can contained 310 kcal, 16.1 g protein and 1.09 g EPA. Patients were assessed for weight, body composition, dietary intake, resting energy expenditure (REE) and performance status. Patients consumed a median of 1.9 cans day(-1). All patients were losing weight at baseline at a median rate of 2.9 kg month(-1). After administration of the fish oil-enriched supplement, patients had significant weight-gain at both 3 (median 1 kg, P= 0.024) and 7 weeks (median 2 kg, P = 0.033). Dietary intake increased significantly by almost 400 kcal day(-1) (P = 0.002). REE per kg body weight and per kg lean body mass fell significantly. Performance status and appetite were significantly improved at 3 weeks. In contrast to previous studies of oral conventional nutritional supplements in weight-losing cancer patients, this study suggests that an EPA-enriched supplement may reverse cachexia in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:10487616

  10. RSPO2 enriches LGR5+ spheroid colon cancer stem cells and promotes its metastasis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi; Han, Xiaoyan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) account for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer and promote its progression and metastasis. RSPO2, the agonist of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and serves as the growth factor of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), is considered playing an important role in CCSCs. However, the specific function of RSPO2 in CCSCs remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RSPO2 was highly expressed in CCSCs-enriched HCT116 spheroid cells. Elevates the concentration of RSPO2 in medium in favor of enriching the LGR5+ cells and increasing the LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells, meanwhile silencing of RSPO2 by small interfering RNA inhibits LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells. In addition, RSPO2 promotes spheres formation but has little effect on the proliferation of HCT116 spheroid cells in vitro. Moreover, RSPO2 also promotes the invasion of HCT116 spheroid cells through enhancing Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggests that RSPO2 is a potential growth factor for CCSCs, helps enriching the CCSCs by serum-free DMEM/F12 medium (SFM) culture and plays a vital role in the metastasis of colon cancer. PMID:27158331

  11. Side population in hepatocellular carcinoma HCCLM3 cells is enriched with stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHE; JIANG, JING-HANG; ZHANG, JUN; YANG, HAO-JIE; ZHONG, YAN-PING; SU, JIE; YANG, RI-RONG; LI, LE-QUN; XIANG, BANG-DE

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates that low-abundance cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor metastasis and recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Side population (SP) cells possess typical CSCs-like features, and are frequently considered as a special subpopulation in which CSCs are enriched and in studies may be considered as a substitute for CSCs. The aim of the present study was to examine the abundance of SP cells in human HCC cell lines with different metastatic potentials and compare their CSC-like, tumorigenic and invasive properties with those of the main population (MP) cells. An experimental system is described for identifying SP cells and analyzing their CSC-like properties. The relative abundance of SP cells correlated directly with the metastatic potential of the HCC cell line: HCCLM3, 16.3±2.2%; MHCC97-H, 8.4±0.7%; MHCC97-L, 4.7±0.5%; and Huh7, 1.0±0.3% (P<0.05). SP cells isolated from HCCLM3 cultures showed significantly higher proliferation rates and clonogenicity than the corresponding MP cells, in addition to higher migration and invasive abilities in vitro and greater tumorigenicity in mice. Expression levels of all CSC-associated genes tested, except EpCAM and Oct4, were significantly higher in SP cells. The findings revealed that the proportion of SP cells correlates with metastatic potential, and SP cells demonstrated the characteristics expected of CSCs, implicating them in HCC metastasis. Further studies on the identification and characterization of SP cells using clinical HCC specimens will contribute to the understanding of how SP cells are involved in these disease processes. PMID:27123080

  12. Germline Heterozygous Variants in SEC23B Are Associated with Cowden Syndrome and Enriched in Apparently Sporadic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Sankunny, Madhav; Liu, Zhigang; Wei, Wei; Mester, Jessica L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Zhang, Bin; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-predisposing genes associated with inherited cancer syndromes help explain mechanisms of sporadic carcinogenesis and often inform normal development. Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by high lifetime risks of epithelial cancers, such that ∼50% of affected individuals are wild-type for known cancer-predisposing genes. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of a multi-generation CS family affected by thyroid and other cancers, we identified a pathogenic missense heterozygous SEC23B variant (c.1781T>G [p.Val594Gly]) that segregates with the phenotype. We also found germline heterozygous SEC23B variants in 3/96 (3%) unrelated mutation-negative CS probands with thyroid cancer and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), representing apparently sporadic cancers. We note that the TCGA thyroid cancer dataset is enriched with unique germline deleterious SEC23B variants associated with a significantly younger age of onset. SEC23B encodes Sec23 homolog B (S. cerevisiae), a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), which transports proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, germline homozygous or compound-heterozygous SEC23B mutations cause an unrelated disorder, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, and SEC23B-deficient mice suffer from secretory organ degeneration due to ER-stress-associated apoptosis. By characterizing the p.Val594Gly variant in a normal thyroid cell line, we show that it is a functional alteration that results in ER-stress-mediated cell-colony formation and survival, growth, and invasion, which reflect aspects of a cancer phenotype. Our findings suggest a different role for SEC23B, whereby germline heterozygous variants associate with cancer predisposition potentially mediated by ER stress “addiction.” PMID:26522472

  13. Proposed Criteria for Assessing the Efficacy of Cancer Reduction by Plant Foods Enriched in Carotenoids, Glucosinolates, Polyphenols and Selenocompounds

    PubMed Central

    FINLEY, JOHN W.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The cancer-protective properties of vegetable consumption are most likely mediated through ‘bioactive compounds’ that induce a variety of physiologic functions including acting as direct or indirect antioxidants, regulating enzymes and controlling apoptosis and the cell cycle. The ‘functional food’ industry has produced and marketed foods enriched with bioactive compounds, but there are no universally accepted criteria for judging efficacy of the compounds or enriched foods. • Scope Carotenoids, glucosinolates, polyphenols and selenocompounds are families of bioactive compounds common to vegetables. Although numerous studies have investigated the agricultural and human health implications of enriching foods with one or more of these compounds, inadequate chemical identification of compounds, lack of relevant endpoints and inconsistencies in mechanistic hypotheses and experimental methodologies leave many critical gaps in our understanding of the benefits of such compounds. This review proposes a decision-making process for determining whether there is reasonable evidence of efficacy for the both the compound and the enriched food. These criteria have been used to judge the evidence of efficacy for cancer prevention by carotenoids, polyphenols, glucosinolates and selenocompounds. • Conclusions The evidence of efficacy is weak for carotenoids and polyphenols; the evidence is stronger for glucosinolates and lycopene, but production of enriched foods still is premature. Additionally there is unacceptable variability in the amount and chemical form of these compounds in plants. The evidence of efficacy for selenocompounds is strong, but the clinical study that is potentially the most convincing is still in progress; also the variability in amount and chemical form of Se in plants is a problem. These gaps in understanding bioactive compounds and their health benefits should not serve to reduce research interest but should, instead

  14. Solitary lymph node metastasis is a distinct subset of colon cancer associated with good survival: a retrospective study of surveillance, epidemiology, and end-results population-based data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colon cancer with lymph node metastases has been considered as advanced stage and to have poor survival. We postulated that patients with solitary lymph node metastasis are a distinct subset with better colon cancer-specific survival than those with multiple lymph node metastases. Methods In this retrospective study, we searched Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER) population-based data and identified 86,674 patients who had been diagnosed with colon cancer without distant metastases and with less than three metastatic nodes between 1991 and 2005. We divided lymph node status into three subgroups: pN0, pN1a, and pN1b and obtained 5-year colon cancer-specific survival for each pT stage. We used Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression models to assess correlations between risk factors and survival outcomes. Results Analysis of SEER data confirmed that patients with solitary lymph node metastases had better 5-year cancer-specific survival than pN1b according to both univariate and multivariate analysis. This finding was confirmed by further analyses in five pT subgroups. Cancer-specific survival of patients with pT1-2N1a was comparable to that of those with pIIA but higher than those with pIIB. In addition, survival of patients with pT3-4aN1a was better than those with pIIC. Conclusion Colon cancer patients with solitary lymph node metastasis are a distinct subset with a favorable prognosis; full consideration should be given to this in clinical practice. PMID:24885443

  15. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    Description:  Search and subset CERES Level 2 SSF and FLASHFlux data Customization Options Search and subset by date, time, and geolocation Subset by parameter and ... HDF and NetCDF Details:  CERES Search and Subset Tool Screenshot:  ...

  16. Proliferation and enrichment of CD133+ glioblastoma cancer stem cells on 3D chitosan-alginate scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Florczyk, Stephen J.; Leung, Matthew C.; Wang, Kui; Wu, Jennifer D.; Silber, John R.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates cancer stem cells (CSCs) as primary determinants of the clinical behavior of human cancers, representing an ideal target for next-generation anticancer therapies. However CSCs are difficult to propagate in vitro, severely limiting the study of CSC biology and drug development. Here we report that growing cells from glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines on three dimensional (3D) porous chitosan-alginate (CA) scaffolds dramatically promotes the proliferation and enrichment of cells possessing the hallmarks of CSCs. CA scaffold-grown cells were found more tumorigenic in nude mouse xenografts than cells grown from monolayers. Growing in CA scaffolds rapidly promoted expression of genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that has been implicated in the genesis of CSCs. Our results indicate that CA scaffolds have utility as a simple and inexpensive means to cultivate CSCs in vitro in support of studies to understand CSC biology and develop more effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25109438

  17. An enhancer from the 8q24 prostate cancer risk region is sufficient to direct reporter gene expression to a subset of prostate stem-like epithelial cells in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Man-Chun; Liao, Chun-Peng; Yan, Chunli; Jia, Li; Groshen, Susan; Frenkel, Baruch; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Maxson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Regions in the 8q24 gene desert contribute significantly to the risk of prostate cancer and other adult cancers. This region contains several DNA regions with enhancer activity in cultured cells. One such segment, histone acetylation peak 10 (AcP10), contains a risk single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that is significantly associated with the pathogenesis of colorectal, prostate and other cancers. The mechanism by which AcP10 influences cancer risk remains unknown. Here we show that AcP10 contains a sequence that is highly conserved across terrestrial vertebrates and is capable in transgenic mice of directing reporter gene expression to a subset of prostate lumenal epithelial cells. These cells include a small population of Nkx3.1-positive cells that persist even after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant Nkx3.1-positive (CARN) cells were shown by others to function both as stem cells and cells of origin of prostate cancer. Our results thus provide a mechanism by which AcP10 could influence prostate cancer risk. PMID:22279083

  18. Targeted Screening With Combined Age- and Morphology-Based Criteria Enriches Detection of Lynch Syndrome in Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Douglas I; Hecht, Jonathan L

    2016-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is associated with Lynch syndrome in 2% to 6% of cases. Adequate screening may prevent of a second cancer and incident cancers in family members via risk-reducing strategies. The goal of the study was to evaluate the detection rate of Lynch syndrome via a targeted screening approach. In 2009, we incorporated targeted Lynch syndrome screening via immunohistochemistry for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6, followed by MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, in select cases of endometrial carcinoma. Criteria for patient selection included (1) all patients <50 years; (2) patients of any age with tumors showing features of microsatellite instability (lower uterine segment-centered tumors, hard to classify carcinomas, increased peritumoral or tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and cases with synchronous ovarian carcinomas); (3) clinician's request based on family or personal history; and (4) ad hoc retrospective testing based on the established criteria on patients discovered on follow-up visits. By using a targeted screening approach in a 4.5-year period, approximately 2.1% of endometrial cancers (7 of 328) were potentially associated with Lynch syndrome. Therefore, targeted screening with combined age and morphology based criteria enriches detection of Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer. However, the detection rate is lower than the rates from published series that offer universal screening. PMID:26842347

  19. The Subset Sum game☆

    PubMed Central

    Darmann, Andreas; Nicosia, Gaia; Pferschy, Ulrich; Schauer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address a game theoretic variant of the Subset Sum problem, in which two decision makers (agents/players) compete for the usage of a common resource represented by a knapsack capacity. Each agent owns a set of integer weighted items and wants to maximize the total weight of its own items included in the knapsack. The solution is built as follows: Each agent, in turn, selects one of its items (not previously selected) and includes it in the knapsack if there is enough capacity. The process ends when the remaining capacity is too small for including any item left. We look at the problem from a single agent point of view and show that finding an optimal sequence of items to select is an NP-hard problem. Therefore we propose two natural heuristic strategies and analyze their worst-case performance when (1) the opponent is able to play optimally and (2) the opponent adopts a greedy strategy. From a centralized perspective we observe that some known results on the approximation of the classical Subset Sum can be effectively adapted to the multi-agent version of the problem. PMID:25844012

  20. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ...

  1. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    Description:  Search and subset MOPITT Version 5 & 6 Level 2 data Customization Options Search and subset MOPITT Version 5 and Version 6 Level 2 data Update the ... NetCDF3 and NetCDF4 Details:  MOPITT Search and Subset Tool Acronyms/Abbreviations:  MOPITT ...

  2. Distinct Splice Variants and Pathway Enrichment in the Cell Line Models of Aggressive Human Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Im, Hogune; Zhang, Emma (Yue); Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael; Hancock, William S.; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) of the Human Proteome Organization. The United States team of C-HPP is focused on characterizing the protein-coding genes in chromosome 17. Despite its small size, chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, it contains many cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, ERBB2 (Her2/neu), and TP53. The goal of this study was to examine the splice variants expressed in three ERBB2 expressed breast cancer cell line models of hormone receptor negative breast cancers by integrating RNA-Seq and proteomic mass spectrometry data. The cell-lines represent distinct phenotypic variations subtype: SKBR3 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ ER−/PR−; adenocarcinoma), SUM190 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ER−/PR−; inflammatory breast cancer) and SUM149 (ERBB2 (low expression) ER−/PR −; inflammatory breast cancer). We identified more than one splice variant for 1167 genes expressed in at least one of the three cancer cell lines. We found multiple variants of genes that are in the signaling pathways downstream of ERBB2 along with variants specific to one cancer cell line compared to the other two cancer cell lines and to normal mammary cells. The overall transcript profiles based on read counts indicated more similarities between SKBR3 and SUM190. The top-ranking Gene Ontology and BioCarta pathways for the cell-line specific variants pointed to distinct key mechanisms including: amino sugar metabolism, caspase activity, and endocytosis in SKBR3; different aspects of metabolism, especially of lipids in SUM190; cell- to-cell adhesion, integrin and ERK1/ERK2 signaling, and translational control in SUM149. The analyses indicated an enrichment in the electron transport chain processes in the ERBB2 over-expressed cell line models; and an association of nucleotide binding, RNA splicing and translation processes with the IBC models, SUM190 and SUM149. Detailed experimental studies on the distinct

  3. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA–RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA–miRNA and miRNA–miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA–RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  4. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material. PMID:26285800

  5. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  6. Isolation and enrichment of circulating biomarkers for cancer screening, detection, and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Junmoo; Gwak, Hogyeong; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2016-01-21

    Much research has been performed over the past several decades in an attempt to conquer cancer. Tissue biopsy is the conventional method for gathering biological materials to analyze cancer and has contributed greatly to the understanding of cancer. However, this method is limited because it is time-consuming (requires tissue sectioning, staining, and pathological analysis), costly, provides scarce starting materials for multiple tests, and is painful. A liquid biopsy, which analyzes cancer-derived materials from various body fluids using a minimally invasive procedure, is more practical for real-time monitoring of disease progression than tissue biopsy. Biomarkers analyzable through liquid biopsy include circulating tumor cells (CTCs), exosomes, circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), miRNA, and proteins. Research on CTCs has been actively conducted because CTCs provide information on the whole cell, unlike the other biomarkers mentioned above. However, owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs, CTC research faces many critical concerns. Although exosomes and cfDNA have some technical challenges, they are being highlighted as new target materials. That is because they also have genetic information on cancers. Even though the number of exosomes and cfDNA from early stage cancer patients are similar to healthy individuals, they are present in high concentrations after metastasis. In this article, we review several technologies for material analyses of cancer, discuss the critical concerns based on hands-on experience, and describe future directions for cancer screening, detection, and diagnostics. PMID:26588824

  7. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  8. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  9. A subset of cancer cell lines is acutely sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776 as monotherapy due to CDK2 activation in S phase

    PubMed Central

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Thompson, Ruth; Montano, Ryan; Eastman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage activates Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) to halt cell cycle progression thereby preventing further DNA replication and mitosis until the damage has been repaired. Consequently, Chk1 inhibitors have emerged as promising anticancer therapeutics in combination with DNA damaging drugs, but their single agent activity also provides a novel approach that may be particularly effective in a subset of patients. From analysis of a large panel of cell lines, we demonstrate that 15% are very sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor MK-8776. Upon inhibition of Chk1, sensitive cells rapidly accumulate DNA double-strand breaks in S phase in a CDK2- and cyclin A-dependent manner. In contrast, resistant cells can continue to grow for at least 7 days despite continued inhibition of Chk1. Resistance can be circumvented by inhibiting Wee1 kinase and thereby directly activating CDK2. Hence, sensitivity to Chk1 inhibition is regulated upstream of CDK2 and correlates with accumulation of CDC25A. We conclude that cells poorly tolerate CDK2 activity in S phase and that a major function of Chk1 is to ensure it remains inactive. Indeed, inhibitors of CDK1 and CDK2 arrest cells in G1 or G2, respectively, but do not prevent progression through S phase demonstrating that neither kinase is required for S phase progression. Inappropriate activation of CDK2 in S phase underlies the sensitivity of a subset of cell lines to Chk1 inhibitors, and this may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for appropriately stratified patients. PMID:26595527

  10. Enrichment of breast cancer stem-like cells by growth on electrospun polycaprolactone-chitosan nanofiber scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer; Niamat, Rohina A; Samuel, Shani; Eskridge, Chris; Kmiec, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    A small population of highly tumorigenic breast cancer cells has recently been identified. These cells, known as breast-cancer stem-like cells (BCSC), express markers similar to mammary stem cells, and are highly resistant to chemotherapy. Currently, study of BCSC is hampered by the inability to propagate these cells in tissue culture without inducing differentiation. Recently, it was reported that proliferation and differentiation can be modified by culturing cells on electrospun nanofibers. Here, we sought to characterize the chemoresistance and stem-like properties of breast cancer cell lines grown on nanofiber scaffolds. Cells cultured on three-dimensional templates of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)-chitosan nanofibers showed increases in mammary stem cell markers and in sphere-forming ability compared with cells cultured on polystyrene culture dishes. There was no increase in proliferation of stem cell populations, indicating that culture on nanofibers may inhibit differentiation of BCSC. The increase in stemness was accompanied by increases in resistance to docetaxel and doxorubicin. These data indicate that BCSC populations are enriched in cells cultured on electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone)-chitosan nanofibers, scaffolds that may provide a useful system to study BCSC and their response to anticancer drug treatment. PMID:24570583

  11. Subsets of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) inhibitors increase gap junctional intercellular communication in metastatic cancer cell lines independent of SUR expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a process whereby cells share molecules and nutrients with each other by physical contact through cell membrane pores. In tumor cells, GJIC is often altered, suggesting that this process may be important in the context of cancer. Certain ion chan...

  12. Expression profile analysis of long noncoding RNA in HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer by next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Lyu, Shixu; Dong, Siyang; Liu, Yehuan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Ouchen

    2016-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-enriched subtype breast cancer is associated with a more aggressive phenotype and shorter survival time. Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) have essential roles in tumorigenesis and occupy a central place in cancer progression. Notably, few studies have focused on the dysregulation of LncRNAs in the HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer. In this study, we analyzed the expression profile of LncRNAs and mRNAs in this particular subtype of breast cancer. Methods Seven pairs of HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer and normal tissue were sequenced. We screened out differently expressed genes and measured the correlation of the expression levels of dysregulated LncRNAs and HER-2 by Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis. Gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis were used to understand the biological roles of these differently expressed genes. Pathway act network and coexpression network were constructed. Results More than 1,300 LncRNAs and 2,800 mRNAs, which were significantly differently expressed, were identified. Among these LncRNAs, AFAP1-AS1 was the most dysregulated LncRNA, while ORM2 was the most dysregulated mRNA. LOC100288637 had the highest positive correlation coefficient of 0.93 with HER-2, while RPL13P5 had the highest negative correlation coefficient of −0.87. The pathway act network showed that MAPK signaling pathway, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, metabolic pathways, cell cycle, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton were highly related with HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer. Coexpression network recognized LINC00636, LINC01405, ADARB2-AS1, ST8SIA6-AS1, LINC00511, and DPP10-AS1 as core genes. Conclusion These results analyze the functions of LncRNAs and provide useful information for exploring candidate therapeutic targets and new molecular biomarkers for HER-2-enriched subtype breast cancer. PMID:26929647

  13. Ontological Enrichment of the Genes-to-Systems Breast Cancer Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Federica; Mosca, Ettore; Merelli, Ivan; Calabria, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta; Milanesi, Luciano

    Breast cancer research need the development of specific and suitable tools to appropriately manage biomolecular knowledge. The presented work deals with the integrative storage of breast cancer related biological data, in order to promote a system biology approach to this network disease. To increase data standardization and resource integration, annotations maintained in Genes-to-Systems Breast Cancer (G2SBC) database are associated to ontological terms, which provide a hierarchical structure to organize data enabling more effective queries, statistical analysis and semantic web searching. Exploited ontologies, which cover all levels of the molecular environment, from genes to systems, are among the most known and widely used bioinformatics resources. In G2SBC database ontology terms both provide a semantic layer to improve data storage, accessibility and analysis and represent a user friendly instrument to identify relations among biological components.

  14. Increased CD4 and CD8-positive T cell infiltrate signifies good prognosis in a subset of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hirofumi; Thike, Aye Aye; Li, Huihua; Yeong, Joe; Koo, Si-Lin; Dent, Rebecca Alexandra; Tan, Puay Hoon; Iqbal, Jabed

    2016-04-01

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) signify immune response to tumour in a variety of cancers including breast cancer. However, earlier studies examining the clinical significance of TILs in breast cancers have generated mixed results. There are only a few that address the relationship between TILs and clinical outcomes in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of TILs that express CD4 + and CD8 + , in TNBC. Immunohistochemical staining of CD4 and CD8 was performed on tissue microarrays of 164 cases of TNBC. TILs were counted separately as intratumoral when within the cancer cell nests (iTILs) and as stromal when within cancer stroma (sTILs). High CD8 + iTILs and sTILs, and CD4 + iTILs correlated with histologic grade. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, a significantly better survival rate was observed in high CD8 + iTIL (disease-free survival, DFS: P = 0.004, overall survival, OS: P = 0.02) and both high CD4 + iTILs (DFS: P = 0.025, OS: P = 0.023) and sTILs (DFS: P = 0.01, OS: P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, CD8 + iTILs (DFS: P = 0.0095), CD4 + sTILs (DFS: P = 0.0084; OS: P = 0.0118), and CD4 (high) CD8 (high) CD8 iTILs (DFS: P = 0.0121; OS: P = 0.0329) and sTILs (DFS: P = 0.0295) showed significantly better survival outcomes. These results suggest that high levels of both CD8 + iTILs and CD4 + sTILs as well as CD4 (high) CD8 (high) iTILs and sTILs are independent prognostic factors in TNBC. PMID:26960711

  15. MRP1 and glucosylceramide are coordinately over expressed and enriched in rafts during multidrug resistance acquisition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Klappe, Karin; Hinrichs, John W J; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Sietsma, Hannie; Kok, Jan Willem

    2004-07-01

    Previously we have described a novel multidrug-resistant cell line, HT29(col), which displayed over expression of the multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and an altered sphingolipid composition, including enhanced levels of glucosylceramide (GlcCer; Kok JW, Veldman RJ, Klappe K, Koning H, Filipeanu C, Muller M. Int J Cancer 2000;87:172-8). In our study, long-term screening revealed that, during colchicine-induced acquisition of multidrug resistance in a new HT29(col) cell line, increases in GlcCer occurred concomitantly with upregulation of MRP1 expression. Both MRP1 and GlcCer were found enriched in Lubrol-insoluble membrane domains. The expression of MRP1 and GlcCer were tightly correlated, as indicated also by a reversal of both at the later stage of colchicine consolidation. Resistance to colchicine was determined by MRP1, while glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) did not contribute: 1). Resistance was fully inhibited by MK571. 2). GCS expression and activity were not upregulated in HT29(col) cells. 3). Inhibition of GCS did not affect MRP1-mediated efflux function or sensitivity to colchicine. Instead, overall sphingolipid metabolism was upregulated through an increased rate of ceramide biosynthesis. In conclusion, upregulation of MRP1 occurs in concert with upregulation of GlcCer during multidrug-resistance acquisition, and both are enriched in rafts. The increased GlcCer pool does not directly modulate MRP1 function and cell survival. PMID:15122583

  16. Niche Mimicking for Selection and Enrichment of Liver Cancer Stem Cells by Hyaluronic Acid-Based Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Chuang, Chun-Chieh; Wu, Yu-Chieh

    2015-10-14

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumor cells that exhibit capacities for self-renewal, tumor initiation, disease relapse or metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the major obstacle associated with the use of CSCs is the difficulty in their isolation and enrichment. According to recent studies, CSCs share similar properties with normal stem cells, and it has been observed that hyaluronan (HA) plays a key factor in CSCs niches and that HA-mediated CD44 interaction promotes tumor progression. Therefore, HA-based multilayer films were used to fabricate sequential surface properties variation and to mimic CSC niches. A quartz crystal microbalance was used to investigate the layer-by-layer adsorption of PAH/HA multilayer films. Colony formation was observed on a series of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAH/HA multilayer films, and cytotoxicity and cell viability were evaluated by MTT, LDH and live/dead assay. It was observed that the cells isolated from (PAH/HA)3 displayed the best colony formation ability and that the expression of CD133/CD44 double positive cells was up-regulated to approximately 70% after 7 days of culture. Furthermore, the cells isolated from (PAH/HA)3 displayed higher chemo-resistance than the control group. The stem-cell-related genes expression of selected cells from (PAH/HA)3 after 7 days of culture was significantly different from that of the control group. In conclusion, this study provides a label-free selection and enrichment system that could serve as a new strategy for the future development of CSC selection and drug evaluation in cancer therapy. PMID:26379083

  17. RICTOR amplification defines a novel subset of lung cancer patients who may benefit from treatment with mTOR1/2 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Haiying; Zou, Yiyu; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Wang, Kai; Liu, Xuewen; Halmos, Balazs; Ali, Siraj M; Liu, Huijie; Verma, Amit; Montagna, Cristina; Chachoua, Abraham; Goel, Sanjay; Schwartz, Edward L.; Zhu, Changcheng; Shan, Jidong; Yu, Yiting; Gritsman, Kira; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Hawryluk, Matthew; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Piperdi, Bilal; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We identified amplification of RICTOR, a key component of the mTORC2, as the sole actionable genomic alteration in an 18-year-old never smoker with lung adenocarcinoma. It occurs in 13% of lung cancers (1016 cases) in TCGA and at a similar frequency in an independent cohort of 1,070 patients identified by genomic profiling. In the latter series, 11% of cases harbored RICTOR amplification as the only relevant genomic alteration. Its oncogenic roles were suggested by decreased lung cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo with RICTOR ablation, and the transforming capacity of RICTOR in a Ba/F3-cell system. The mTOR1/2 inhibitors were significantly more active against RICTOR-amplified lung cancer cells as compared to other agents targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, an association between RICTOR amplification and sensitivities to mTOR1/2 inhibitors was observed. The index patient has been treated with mTOR1/2 inhibitors that led to tumor stabilization for over 18 months. PMID:26370156

  18. Induction of apoptosis by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil in human breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induction of apoptosis is one of the mechanisms of chemotherapeutic agents against breast cancer. In addition, recent studies have shown that diets containing polyphenolic components possess anticancer activities either in vitro or in vivo by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. T...

  19. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, Mª José; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S.; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a “stemness and metastatic” signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  20. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, M Josés; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a "stemness and metastatic" signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  1. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... 6 data is now available in both HDF5 and netCDF4 formats Login is no longer required to search and subset, only when placing an order ... 6 data is now available in both HDF5 and netCDF4 formats Login is no longer required to search and subset, only when placing an order ...

  2. Method for Recovery and Immunoaffinity Enrichment of Membrane Proteins Illustrated with Metastatic Ovarian Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luke V.; Likhte, Varsha; Wright, William H.; Chu, Frances; Cambron, Emma; Baldwin-Burnett, Anne; Krakow, Jessica; Smejkal, Gary B.

    2012-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins play key biological roles in cell signaling, transport, and pathogen invasion. However, quantitative clinical assays for this critical class of proteins remain elusive and are generally limited to serum-soluble extracellular fragments. Furthermore, classic proteomic approaches to membrane protein analysis typically involve proteolytic digestion of the soluble pieces, resulting in separation of intra- and extracellular segments and significant informational loss. In this paper, we describe the development of a new method for the quantitative extraction of intact integral membrane proteins (including GPCRs) from solid metastatic ovarian tumors using pressure cycling technology in combination with a new (ProteoSolve-TD) buffer system. This new extraction buffer is compatible with immunoaffinity methods (e.g., ELISA and immunoaffinity chromatography), as well as conventional proteomic techniques (e.g., 2D gels, western blots). We demonstrate near quantitative recovery of membrane proteins EDG2, EDG4, FASLG, KDR, and LAMP-3 by western blots. We have also adapted commercial ELISAs for serum-soluble membrane protein fragments (e.g., sVEGFR2) to measure the tissue titers of their transmembrane progenitors. Finally, we demonstrate the compatibility of the new buffers with immunoaffinity enrichment/mass spectrometric characterization of tissue proteins. PMID:22919487

  3. A modified method by differential adhesion for enrichment of bladder cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-tong; Pang, Shi-yu; Luo, Yang; Chen, Wei; Bao, Ji-ming; Tan, Wan-long

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In a previous study the vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in a mouse model. However, a small portion of tumors regrew because the vaccine could not eliminate bladder cancer stem cells (CSCs). In this study, we showed a modified method for the isolation of bladder CSCs using a combination of differential adhesion method and serum-free culture medium (SFM) method. Materials and Methods: Trypsin-resistant cells and trypsin-sensitive cells were isolated from MB49, EJ and 5637 cells by a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. The CSCs characterizations of trypsin-resistant cells were verified by the flow cytometry, the western blotting, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the resistance to chemotherapy assay, the transwell assay, and the tumor xenograft formation assay. Results: Trypsin-resistant cells were isolated and identified in CSCs characters, with high expression of CSCs markers, higher resistance to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenicity in vivo. Conclusion: Trypsin-resistant cells displayed specific CSCs properties. Our study showed trypsin-resistant cells were isolated successfully with a modified method using a combination of differential adhesion method and SFM method. PMID:27564296

  4. MiRNA Transcriptome Profiling of Spheroid-Enriched Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Human Breast MCF-7 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Lily; Ho, Wan Yong; Ali, Norlaily Mohd; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ky, Huynh; Chan, Kok Gan; Yin, Wai Fong; Satharasinghe, Dilan Amila; Liew, Woan Charn; Tan, Sheau Wei; Ong, Han Kiat; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide as most patients often suffer cancer relapse. The reason is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent studies revealed that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) are closely linked to breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. However, no specific study has comprehensively characterised the CSC characteristic and miRNA transcriptome in spheroid-enriched breast cells. This study described the generation of spheroid MCF-7 cell in serum-free condition and the comprehensive characterisation for their CSC properties. Subsequently, miRNA expression differences between the spheroid-enriched CSC cells and their parental cells were evaluated using next generation sequencing (NGS). Our results showed that the MCF-7 spheroid cells were enriched with CSCs properties, indicated by the ability to self-renew, increased expression of CSCs markers, and increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Additionally, spheroid-enriched CSCs possessed greater cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and wound healing ability. A total of 134 significantly (p<0.05) differentially expressed miRNAs were identified between spheroids and parental cells using miRNA-NGS. MiRNA-NGS analysis revealed 25 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated miRNAs which includes some miRNAs previously reported in the regulation of breast CSCs. A number of miRNAs (miR-4492, miR-4532, miR-381, miR-4508, miR-4448, miR-1296, and miR-365a) which have not been previously reported in breast cancer were found to show potential association with breast cancer chemoresistance and self-renewal capability. The gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the predicted genes were enriched in the regulation of metabolic processes, gene expression, DNA binding, and hormone receptor binding. The corresponding pathway analyses inferred from the GO results were closely related to the function of signalling pathway, self

  5. MiRNA Transcriptome Profiling of Spheroid-Enriched Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Human Breast MCF-7 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Boo, Lily; Ho, Wan Yong; Ali, Norlaily Mohd; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ky, Huynh; Chan, Kok Gan; Yin, Wai Fong; Satharasinghe, Dilan Amila; Liew, Woan Charn; Tan, Sheau Wei; Ong, Han Kiat; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide as most patients often suffer cancer relapse. The reason is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent studies revealed that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) are closely linked to breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. However, no specific study has comprehensively characterised the CSC characteristic and miRNA transcriptome in spheroid-enriched breast cells. This study described the generation of spheroid MCF-7 cell in serum-free condition and the comprehensive characterisation for their CSC properties. Subsequently, miRNA expression differences between the spheroid-enriched CSC cells and their parental cells were evaluated using next generation sequencing (NGS). Our results showed that the MCF-7 spheroid cells were enriched with CSCs properties, indicated by the ability to self-renew, increased expression of CSCs markers, and increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Additionally, spheroid-enriched CSCs possessed greater cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and wound healing ability. A total of 134 significantly (p<0.05) differentially expressed miRNAs were identified between spheroids and parental cells using miRNA-NGS. MiRNA-NGS analysis revealed 25 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated miRNAs which includes some miRNAs previously reported in the regulation of breast CSCs. A number of miRNAs (miR-4492, miR-4532, miR-381, miR-4508, miR-4448, miR-1296, and miR-365a) which have not been previously reported in breast cancer were found to show potential association with breast cancer chemoresistance and self-renewal capability. The gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the predicted genes were enriched in the regulation of metabolic processes, gene expression, DNA binding, and hormone receptor binding. The corresponding pathway analyses inferred from the GO results were closely related to the function of signalling pathway, self

  6. Feasibility and safety of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for early hypopharyngeal cancer: a subset analysis of the Hamburg University TORS-trial.

    PubMed

    Lörincz, Balazs B; Busch, Chia-Jung; Möckelmann, Nikolaus; Knecht, Rainald

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 5 years, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has become well established as one of the standard treatment options for T1 and T2 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Besides this main indication, TORS can provide with improved access to other subsites of the upper aerodigestive tract as well, such as the supraglottic larynx and the hypopharynx, with superior visibility and maneuverability to that of transoral laser microsurgery (TOLM). Since September 2011, over one hundred TORS procedures have been performed at our institution, predominantly for oropharyngeal cancer. As part of our first 50 transoral robotic cases making up our initial TORS-trial, five patients underwent TORS for early hypopharyngeal carcinoma. The present case series evaluates its feasibility, safety and the completeness of resection in this well-defined subgroup of patients. Main outcome measures were completeness of resection, the presence or lack of postoperative bleeding, number of days intubated, rate of elective tracheotomy, duration of intensive care and/or intermediate care, speech and swallowing function, and duration of nasogastric and/or gastrostomy tube dependency. All patients have been free of recurrence to date. One patient died of other disease. Four patients are alive and free of tumour, three of them did not need adjuvant therapy. Transoral robotic surgery with appropriate neck dissection is a valid primary treatment option for select early hypopharyngeal carcinoma, especially in cases that did not require adjuvant treatment. In contrast to TOLM, TORS allows a multi-planar en bloc resection in the hypopharynx which makes histopathological evaluation more reliable. In addition to this, its faster learning curve makes the results less dependent on the individual surgeons' capabilities. PMID:25217079

  7. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  8. Identification of Distinct Breast Cancer Stem Cell Populations Based on Single-Cell Analyses of Functionally Enriched Stem and Progenitor Pools

    PubMed Central

    Akrap, Nina; Andersson, Daniel; Bom, Eva; Gregersson, Pernilla; Ståhlberg, Anders; Landberg, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Summary The identification of breast cancer cell subpopulations featuring truly malignant stem cell qualities is a challenge due to the complexity of the disease and lack of general markers. By combining extensive single-cell gene expression profiling with three functional strategies for cancer stem cell enrichment including anchorage-independent culture, hypoxia, and analyses of low-proliferative, label-retaining cells derived from mammospheres, we identified distinct stem cell clusters in breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER)α+ tumors featured a clear hierarchical organization with switch-like and gradual transitions between different clusters, illustrating how breast cancer cells transfer between discrete differentiation states in a sequential manner. ERα− breast cancer showed less prominent clustering but shared a quiescent cancer stem cell pool with ERα+ cancer. The cellular organization model was supported by single-cell data from primary tumors. The findings allow us to understand the organization of breast cancers at the single-cell level, thereby permitting better identification and targeting of cancer stem cells. PMID:26771357

  9. Heterogeneous detection of circulating tumor cells in patients with colorectal cancer by immunomagnetic enrichment using different EpCAM-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTC) and disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are thought to be responsible for metastasis, so the detection of CTC may serve as individual prognostic factor in patients suffering from colorectal cancer. Therefore, a series of immunomagnetic enrichment methods for CTC have been developed using a variety of monoclonal antibodies against the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM). However, it remains unclear whether all commercially available EpCAM antibodies show the same sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it remains unclear which method of sample preparation and cell extraction is most suitable for immunomagnetic enrichment and detection of CTC. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the detection of CTC by a cytokeratin 20 reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (CK20 RT-PCR) may be influenced by the use of various Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antibodies for immunomagnetic isolation of CTC. Results Using both EpCAM antibodies (mAb BerEP4 and mAb KS1/4) for immunomagnetic enrichment in blood samples of 39 patients with colorectal cancer we found heterogenous results in each patient with regard to tumor cell detection. In the tumor cell spiking experiments with whole blood samples the sensitivity of the CK 20 RT-PCR assay was higher using immunomagnetic beads coated with mAb KS1/4 compared to precoated mAb BerEP4 Dynabeads. Extraction of MNC fraction with Ficoll gradient centrifugation prior to immunomagnetic enrichment resulted in a higher sensitivity of the CK 20 RT-PCR assay. Conclusions We concluded that isolation and detection of CTC with immunomagnetic enrichment methods is critically dependent on the used EpCAM clone. Further studies with a larger number of patients should clarify if the enrichment protocol influences the prognostic value of the tumor cell detection protocol. PMID:20426872

  10. Cordycepin-enriched Cordyceps militaris induces immunomodulation and tumor growth delay in mouse-derived breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min-Ho; Lee, Chang-Min; Lee, Sang-Wha; Seo, Su-Yeong; Seo, Min-Jeong; Kang, Byoung-Won; Jeong, Yong-Kee; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Yang, Kwang-Mo; Jo, Wol-Soon

    2013-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) and its main functional component, cordycepin, has been shown to possess a number of pharmacological activities including immunological stimulation and antitumor effects. However, the pharmacological mechanisms of C. militaris on tumor immunity underlying its antitumor effect have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of C. militaris on FM3A tumor-bearing C3H/He mice, comparing wild-type C. militaris and cordycepin-enriched C. militaris (JLM 0636). The concentration of cordycepin produced by crossbred JLM 0636 was 7.42 mg/g dry weight, which was 7-fold higher than that of wild-type C. militaris. Dietary administration of C. militaris revealed retardation of tumor growth as well as elongation of survival rates of tumor-bearing mice. This effect was more pronounced in JLM 0636. There was a cordycepin-dependent decrease in IL-2 and TGF-β secretion and an increase in IL-4 secretion without changes in the proliferative responses of concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, which suggested that C. militaris feeding might induce changes in the subpopulations of tumor-derived T lymphocytes. CD4+CD25+ cell population was significantly reduced in the total splenocytes from JLM 0636-administered mice, while CD4+ T cell population remained unchanged. FoxP3+-expressing Treg cells among CD4+CD25+ population showed a similar pattern. On the contrary, CD8+ T cells as well as the IFN-γ expressing CD8+ T cells from tumor-bearing mice were significantly upregulated by the administration of JLM 0636. These results demonstrated the suppressive role of JLM 0636 on the function of Treg cells contributing to tumor specific IFN-γ-expressing CD8+ T cell responses in tumor-bearing mice, which explained the underlying mechanism of the antitumor immunity of cordycepin. Therefore, cordycepin-enriched C. militaris is a promising candidate for an adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23921598

  11. New TES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    New TES Search and Subset Application Search & Subset Application Wednesday, September 19, 2012 The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the ...

  12. Stearidonic acid-enriched flax oil reduces the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Subedi, K; Yu, H-M; Newell, M; Weselake, R J; Meesapyodsuk, D; Qiu, X; Shah, S; Field, C J

    2015-01-01

    The 20 and 22 carbon n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) inhibit the growth of tumors in vitro and in animal models, but less is known about the 18 carbon n-3, stearidonic acid (SDA). This study aimed to establish and determine a mechanism for the anti-cancer activity of SDA-enriched oil (SO). SO (26 % of lipid) was produced by genetically engineering flax and used to treat human tumorigenic (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and non-tumorigenic (MCF-12A) breast cells. Nu/nu mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumor were fed SO (SDA, 4 % of fat). Cell/tumor growth, phospholipid (PL) composition, apoptosis, CD95, and pro-apoptotic molecules were determined in SO-treated cells/tumors. Compared to a control lipid mixture, SO reduced (p < 0.05) the number of tumorigenic, but not MCF-12A cells, and resulted in higher concentration of most of the n-3 fatty acids in PL of all cells (p < 0.05). However, docosapentaenoic acid increased only in tumorigenic cells (p < 0.05). SO diet decreased tumor growth and resulted in more n-3 LCPUFA, including DPA and less arachidonic acid (AA) levels in major tumor PL (p < 0.05). Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells/tumors with SO resulted in more apoptotic cells (in tumors) and in vivo and in vitro, more CD95+ positive cells and a higher expression of apoptotic molecules caspase-10, Bad, or Bid (p < 0.05). Supplementing SO alters total PL and PL classes by increasing membrane content of n-3 LCPUFA and lowering AA (in vivo), which is associated with increased CD95-mediated apoptosis, thereby suggesting a possible mechanism for reduce tumor survival. PMID:25417173

  13. Enrichment of the Cancer Stem Phenotype in Sphere Cultures of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Occurs through Activation of Developmental Pathways Mediated by the Transcriptional Regulator ΔNp63α

    PubMed Central

    Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSC) drive prostate cancer tumor survival and metastasis. Nevertheless, the development of specific therapies against CSCs is hindered by the scarcity of these cells in prostate tissues. Suspension culture systems have been reported to enrich CSCs in primary cultures and cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been fully explored. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a prostasphere assay for the enrichment of CD133+ CSCs in four commercial PCa cell lines: 22Rv1, DU145, LNCaP, and PC3. Overexpression of CD133, as determined by flow cytometric analysis, correlated with an increased clonogenic, chemoresistant, and invasive potential in vitro. This phenotype is concordant to that of CSCs in vivo. Gene expression profiling was then carried out using the Cancer Reference panel and the nCounter system from NanoString Technologies. This analysis revealed several upregulated transcripts that can be further explored as potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets. Furthermore, functional annotation analysis suggests that ΔNp63α modulates the activation of developmental pathways responsible for the increased stem identity of cells growing in suspension cultures. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that profiling the genetic mechanisms involved in CSC enrichment will help us to better understand the molecular pathways that underlie CSC pathophysiology. This platform can be readily adapted to enrich and assay actual patient samples, in order to design patient-specific therapies that are aimed particularly against CSCs. PMID:26110651

  14. Lower bounds for identifying subset members with subset queries

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.

    1994-04-01

    An instance of a group testing problem is a set of objects {Omicron}and an unknown subset P of {Omicron}.The task is to determine P by using queries of the type ``does P intersect ``Q``, where Q is a subset of {Omicron}. This problem occurs in areas such as fault detection, multiaccess communications, optimal search, blood testing and chromosome mapping. Consider the two stage algorithm for solving a group testing problem where in the first stage, a predetermined set of queries, are asked in parallel, and in the second stage, P is determined by testing individual objects. Let n = {vert_bar}{Omicron}{vert_bar}. Suppose that P is generated by independently adding each {chi} {element_of}{Omicron} to P with probability p/n. Let q{sub 1} (q{sub 2}) be the number of queries asked in the first (second) stage of this algorithm. We show that if q{sub 1} = o(log(n) log(n)/log log(n)), then Exp(q{sub 2}) = n{sup l{minus}0(1)}, while there exist algorithms with q{sub 1} = O(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) and Exp(q{sub 2}) = o(l). The proof involves a relaxation technique which can be used with arbitrary distributions. The best previously known bound is q{sub 1} + Exp(q{sub 2}) = {Omega}(p log(n)). For general group testing algorithms, our results imply that if the average number of queries over the course of n{sup {gamma}} ({gamma} > 0) independent experiments is O n{sup l{minus}{element_of}}, then with high probability {Omega}(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) non-singleton subsets are queried. This settles a conjecture of Bill Bruno and David Torney and has important consequences for the use of group testing in screening DNA libraries and other applications where its is more cost effective to use non-adaptive algorithms and/or expensive to prepare a subset Q for its first test.

  15. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M‑1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy.

  16. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 10(6) M(-1)). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy. PMID:27150264

  17. eEF1A1 binds and enriches protoporphyrin IX in cancer cells in 5-aminolevulinic acid based photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhichao; Cui, Xiaojun; Wei, Dan; Liu, Wei; Li, Buhong; He, Hao; Ye, Huamao; Zhu, Naishuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which is endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its derivatives, is a promising modality for the treatment of both pre-malignant and malignant lesions. However, the mechanisms of how ALA-induced PpIX selectively accumulated in the tumors are not fully elucidated. Here we discovered that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1) interacted with PpIX (with an affinity constant of 2.96 × 106 M−1). Microscopy imaging showed that ALA-induced PpIX was co-localized with eEF1A1 in cancer cells. eEF1A1 was found to enrich ALA-induced PpIX in cells by competitively blocking the downstream bioavailability of PpIX. Taken together, our study discovered eEF1A1 as a novel photosensitizer binding protein, which may play an essential role in the enrichment of ALA-induced PpIX in cancer cells during PDT. These suggested eEF1A1 as a molecular marker to predict the selectivity and efficiency of 5-ALA based PDT in cancer therapy. PMID:27150264

  18. Integrative ChIP-seq/Microarray Analysis Identifies a CTNNB1 Target Signature Enriched in Intestinal Stem Cells and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuhide; Biesinger, Jacob; Salmans, Michael L.; Roberts, Brian S.; Arthur, William T.; Cleary, Michele; Andersen, Bogi; Xie, Xiaohui; Dai, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Background Deregulation of canonical Wnt/CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) pathway is one of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Mutations in APC or CTNNB1 are highly frequent in colon cancer and cause aberrant stabilization of CTNNB1, which activates the transcription of Wnt target genes by binding to chromatin via the TCF/LEF transcription factors. Here we report an integrative analysis of genome-wide chromatin occupancy of CTNNB1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) and gene expression profiling by microarray analysis upon RNAi-mediated knockdown of CTNNB1 in colon cancer cells. Results We observed 3629 CTNNB1 binding peaks across the genome and a significant correlation between CTNNB1 binding and knockdown-induced gene expression change. Our integrative analysis led to the discovery of a direct Wnt target signature composed of 162 genes. Gene ontology analysis of this signature revealed a significant enrichment of Wnt pathway genes, suggesting multiple feedback regulations of the pathway. We provide evidence that this gene signature partially overlaps with the Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell signature, and is significantly enriched in normal intestinal stem cells as well as in clinical colorectal cancer samples. Interestingly, while the expression of the CTNNB1 target gene set does not correlate with survival, elevated expression of negative feedback regulators within the signature predicts better prognosis. Conclusion Our data provide a genome-wide view of chromatin occupancy and gene regulation of Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling in colon cancer cells. PMID:24651522

  19. Domino: Extracting, Comparing, and Manipulating Subsets across Multiple Tabular Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Gratzl, Samuel; Gehlenborg, Nils; Lex, Alexander; Pfister, Hanspeter; Streit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Answering questions about complex issues often requires analysts to take into account information contained in multiple interconnected datasets. A common strategy in analyzing and visualizing large and heterogeneous data is dividing it into meaningful subsets. Interesting subsets can then be selected and the associated data and the relationships between the subsets visualized. However, neither the extraction and manipulation nor the comparison of subsets is well supported by state-of-the-art techniques. In this paper we present Domino, a novel multiform visualization technique for effectively representing subsets and the relationships between them. By providing comprehensive tools to arrange, combine, and extract subsets, Domino allows users to create both common visualization techniques and advanced visualizations tailored to specific use cases. In addition to the novel technique, we present an implementation that enables analysts to manage the wide range of options that our approach offers. Innovative interactive features such as placeholders and live previews support rapid creation of complex analysis setups. We introduce the technique and the implementation using a simple example and demonstrate scalability and effectiveness in a use case from the field of cancer genomics. PMID:26356916

  20. SOX2 expression is an early event in a murine model of EGFR mutant lung cancer and promotes proliferation of a subset of EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Irem; Kawabata, Shigeru; Bergbower, Emily; Gills, Joell J.; Ekmekci, Abdullah; Wilson, Willie; Rudin, Charles M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary and acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer occurs primarily through secondary mutations in EGFR or Met amplification. Drug resistance can also be mediated by expression of pluripotency transcription factors, such as OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that decrease terminal differentiation. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of SOX2 in model systems of EGFR mutant tumors. Materials and Methods Immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry was used to assess expression of pluripotency transcription factors in lungs of transgenic mice or in human NSCLC cell lines. Expression of SOX2 was reduced by shRNA knockdown, and response to erlotinib and cellular proliferation were assessed. Results and Conclusion Induction of mutant EGFR in transgenic CCSP-rtTA/TetO-EGFRL858R/T790M mice correlated with increased OCT4 and SOX2 expression in lung tissue prior to tumor development. Established lung tumors retained SOX2 expression. To assess a role for SOX2 in tumorigenesis, a panel of NSCLC cell lines with activating EGFR mutations was assessed for SOX2 expression. Two of six cell lines with mutant EGFR showed detectable SOX2 levels, suggesting SOX2 expression did not correlate with EGFR mutation status. To assess the role of SOX2 in these cell lines, HCC827 and H1975 cells were infected with lentivirus containing SOX2 shRNA. Knockdown of SOX2 decreased proliferation in both cell lines and increased sensitivity to erlotinib in HCC827 cells. Because constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is associated with EGFR TKI resistance, cells were treated with PI3K/AKT inhibitors and expression of SOX2 was examined. PI3K/Akt inhibitors decreased SOX2 expression in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest targeting SOX2 may provide therapeutic benefit in the subset of EGFR-mutant tumors with high constitutive levels of SOX2, and that until more direct means of inhibiting SOX2 are developed, PI3K/Akt inhibitors might be useful to inhibit SOX2

  1. Label-free selection and enrichment of liver cancer stem cells by surface niches build up with polyelectrolyte multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Chang, Jen-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that a small population of cancer cells exhibits stem cell properties and are referred to as cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs). The selection and identification of cancer stem cells through methods require well-defined biomarkers and immunolabeling procedures are complicated and often unreliable. Herein, we fabricated a series of microenviroment by using polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) nanofilms to program and mimic hepatocellular carcinoma CSCs niches for CSCs selection with a label-free method. When cultured on PEM substrates, human cancer cell lines-Huh7 cells grew into individual round colonies and these cells displayed high marker expression of CSCs. Especially, these selected cells demonstrated significant chemo-resistant property in comparison with normal population. Therefore, we believed that niches selection and colony formation method may provide a new strategy on CSCs selection and drug evaluation for cancer therapy. PMID:25461919

  2. Comprehensive Proteomic Study of the Antiproliferative Activity of a Polyphenol-Enriched Rosemary Extract on Colon Cancer Cells Using Nanoliquid Chromatography-Orbitrap MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alberto; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Bergquist, Jonas; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a proteomics strategy based on nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) using an Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer together with stable isotope dimethyl labeling (DML) is applied to quantitatively examine relative changes in the protein fraction of HT-29 human colon cancer cells treated with different concentrations of a polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract over the time. The major objective of this study was to gain insights into the antiproliferative mechanisms induced by rosemary polyphenols. Using this methodology, 1909 and 698 proteins were identified and quantified in cell extracts. The polyphenol-enriched rosemary extract treatment changed the expression of several proteins in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Most of the altered proteins are implicated in the activation of Nrf2 transcription factor and the unfolded protein response. In conclusion, rosemary polyphenols induced proteomic changes that were related to the attenuation of aggresome formation and activation of autophagy to alleviate cellular stress. PMID:27103343

  3. In vitro antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity on cancer cell lines of a cardanol and a cardol enriched from Thai Apis mellifera propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Propolis is a complex resinous honeybee product. It is reported to display diverse bioactivities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties, which are mainly due to phenolic compounds, and especially flavonoids. The diversity of bioactive compounds depends on the geography and climate, since these factors affect the floral diversity. Here, Apis mellifera propolis from Nan province, Thailand, was evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. Methods Propolis was sequentially extracted with methanol, dichloromethane and hexane and the cytotoxic activity of each crude extract was assayed for antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity in vitro against five human cell lines derived from duet carcinoma (BT474), undifferentiated lung (Chaco), liver hepatoblastoma (Hep-G2), gastric carcinoma (KATO-III) and colon adenocarcinoma (SW620) cancers. The human foreskin fibroblast cell line (Hs27) was used as a non-transformed control. Those crude extracts that displayed antiproliferative/cytotoxic activity were then further fractionated by column chromatography using TLC-pattern and MTT-cytotoxicity bioassay guided selection of the fractions. The chemical structure of each enriched bioactive compound was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Results The crude hexane and dichloromethane extracts of propolis displayed antiproliferative/cytotoxic activities with IC50 values across the five cancer cell lines ranging from 41.3 to 52.4 μg/ml and from 43.8 to 53.5 μg/ml, respectively. Two main bioactive components were isolated, one cardanol and one cardol, with broadly similar in vitro antiproliferation/cytotoxicity IC50 values across the five cancer cell lines and the control Hs27 cell line, ranging from 10.8 to 29.3 μg/ml for the cardanol and < 3.13 to 5.97 μg/ml (6.82 - 13.0 μM) for the cardol. Moreover, both compounds induced cytotoxicity and cell death without DNA fragmentation in the cancer cells, but only an

  4. Modulation of multidrug resistance gene expression in human breast cancer cells by (-)-gossypol-enriched cottonseed oil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance 1 gene, acts as an efflux pump and prevents sufficient intracellular accumulation of several anticancer agents. Thus, it plays a major role in multidrug cancer resistance. Using the non-radioactive cell proliferation MTS assay, none of three ...

  5. Molecular Pathways: Targeting DNA Repair Pathway Defects Enriched in Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Niall M; Clarkson, Michael J; Stuchbery, Ryan; Hovens, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of a pristine genome, free from errors, is necessary to prevent cellular transformation and degeneration. When errors in DNA are detected, DNA damage repair (DDR) genes and their regulators are activated to effect repair. When these DDR pathways are themselves mutated or aberrantly downregulated, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders can ensue. Multiple lines of evidence now indicate, however, that defects in key regulators of DNA repair pathways are highly enriched in human metastasis specimens and hence may be a key step in the acquisition of metastasis and the ability of localized disease to disseminate. Some of the key regulators of checkpoints in the DNA damage response are the TP53 protein and the PARP enzyme family. Targeting of these pathways, especially through PARP inhibition, is now being exploited therapeutically to effect significant clinical responses in subsets of individuals, particularly in patients with ovarian cancer or prostate cancer, including cancers with a marked metastatic burden. Targeting DNA repair-deficient tumors with drugs that take advantage of the fundamental differences between normal repair-proficient cells and repair-deficient tumors offers new avenues for treating advanced disease in the future. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3132-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27169997

  6. Job Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Rick

    1970-01-01

    Job enrichment means giving people more decision-making power, more responsibility, more grasp of the totality of the job, and a sense of their own importance in the company. This article presents evidence of the successful working of this approach (Donnelly Mirrors), and the lack of success with an opposing approach (General Motors). (NL)

  7. Lung cancer diagnosed in the young is associated with enrichment for targetable genomic alterations and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, Adrian G.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Heng, Jennifer; Mach, Stacy; Jänne, Pasi A.; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance NSCLC in the young is a rare entity and the genomics and clinical characteristics of this disease are poorly understood. In contrast, young age at diagnosis has been demonstrated to define unique disease biology in other cancers. Here we report on the association of young age with targetable genomic alterations and prognosis in a large cohort of NSCLC patients. Objective To determine the relationship between young age at diagnosis and both the presence of a potentially targetable genomic alteration as well as prognosis and natural history. Design All patients with NSCLC genotyped at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2002–2014 were identified. Tumor genotype, patient characteristics and clinical outcomes were collected. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between age and mutation status. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were fitted for survival analysis. Setting A National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated comprehensive cancer center. Participants All patients with NSCLC seen at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2002–2014 who underwent tumor genotyping. Main Outcome Measure The frequency of targetable genomic alterations by defined age categories as well as the association of these age groups with survival. Results 2237 patients with NSCLC were studied. EGFR (p=0.02) and ALK (P<0.01) were associated with younger age, and a similar trend existed for HER2 (p=0.15) and ROS1 (p=0.1) but not BRAF V600E (p=0.43). Amongst patients tested for all 5 targetable genomic alterations, younger age was associated with an increased frequency of a targetable genotype (p<0.01). Those diagnosed at age 50 or younger have a 59% increased likelihood of harboring a targetable genotype. While presence of a potentially targetable genomic alteration treated with a targeted agent was associated with improved survival, the youngest and oldest age groupings had similarly poor outcomes even when a targetable genotype was

  8. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  9. Biologically distinct subsets of nevi.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tova; Marino, Maria L; Raciti, Patricia; Jain, Manu; Busam, Klaus J; Marchetti, Michael A; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2016-08-01

    Melanocytic nevi (MN) encompass a range of benign tumors with varying microscopic and macroscopic features. Their development is a multifactorial process under genetic and environmental influences. The clinical importance of MN lies in distinguishing them from melanoma and in recognizing their associations with melanoma risk and cancer syndromes. Historically, the distinction between the different types of MN, as well as between MN and melanoma, was based on clinical history, gross morphology, and histopathological features. While histopathology with clinical correlation remains the gold standard for differentiating and diagnosing melanocytic lesions, in some cases, this may not be possible. The use of dermoscopy has allowed for the assessment of subsurface skin structures and has contributed to the clinical evaluation and classification of MN. Genetic profiling, while still in its early stages, has the greatest potential to refine the classification of MN by clarifying their developmental processes, biological behaviors, and relationships to melanoma. Here we review the most salient clinical, dermoscopic, histopathological, and genetic features of different MN subgroups. PMID:27119653

  10. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific? - A miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Dahmke, Indra N.; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  11. What makes a blood cell based miRNA expression pattern disease specific?--a miRNome analysis of blood cell subsets in lung cancer patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Dahmke, Indra N; Galata, Valentina; Huwer, Hanno; Stehle, Ingo; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2014-10-15

    There is evidence of blood-borne miRNA signatures for various human diseases. To dissect the origin of disease-specific miRNA expression in human blood, we separately analyzed the miRNome of different immune cell subtypes, each in lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Each immune cell type revealed a specific miRNA expression pattern also dependinging on the cell origin, line of defense, and function. The overall expression pattern of each leukocyte subtype showed great similarities between patients and controls. However, for each cell subtype we identified miRNAs that were deregulated in lung cancer patients including hsa-miR-21, a well-known oncomiR associated with poor lung cancer prognosis that was up-regulated in all leukocyte subtype comparisons of cancer versus controls. While the miRNome of cells of the adaptive immune system allowed only a weak separation between patients and controls, cells of the innate immune system allowed perfect or nearly perfect classification. Leukocytes of lung cancer patients show a cancer-specific miRNA expression profile. Our data also show that cancer specific miRNA expression pattern of whole blood samples are not determined by a single cell type. The data indicate that additional blood components, like erythrocytes, platelets, or exosomes might contribute to the disease specificity of a miRNA signature. PMID:25344866

  12. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  13. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  14. New MOPITT Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-09-11

    New MOPITT Search and Subset Application New Subsetter for Level 2 Version 5 data Wednesday, September 11, 2013 The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration ...

  15. Flavonoid-enriched apple fraction AF4 induces cell cycle arrest, DNA topoisomerase II inhibition, and apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Apples are a major source of dietary phytochemicals such as flavonoids in the Western diet. Here we report anticancer properties and possible mechanism of action of apple flavonoid-enriched fraction (AF4) isolated from the peels of Northern Spy apples in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HepG2. Treatment with AF4 induced cell growth inhibition in HepG2 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. Concentration of 50 μg/ml (50 μg total monomeric polyphenols/ml) AF4 was sufficient to induce a significant reduction in cell viability within 6 h of treatment (92%, P < 0.05) but had very low toxicity (minimum 4% to maximum 16%) on primary liver and lung cells, which was significantly lower than currently prescribed chemotherapy drug Sorafenib (minimum 29% to maximum 49%, P < 0.05). AF4 induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells within 6 h of treatment via activation of caspase-3. Cell cycle analysis via flow-cytometer showed that AF4 induced G2/M phase arrest. Further, results showed that AF4 acts as a strong DNA topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor, which may be a plausible reason to drive the cells to apoptosis. Overall, our data suggests that AF4 possesses a significantly stronger antiproliferative and specific action than Sorafenib in vitro and is a potential natural chemotherapy agent for treatment of liver cancer. PMID:25256427

  16. Consumption of soy isoflavone enriched bread in men with prostate cancer is associated with reduced proinflammatory cytokines and immunosuppressive cells.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, Gregory B; Reville, Patrick K; Mace, Thomas A; Young, Gregory S; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer; Vodovotz, Yael; Ameen, Zeenath; Grainger, Elizabeth; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-11-01

    We hypothesized that soy phytochemicals may have immunomodulatory properties that may affect prostate carcinogenesis and progression. A randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 32 patients with prostate cancer with asymptomatic biochemical recurrence but no measurable disease on standard staging studies. Patients were randomized to two slices of soy bread (34 mg isoflavones/slice) or soy bread containing almond powder daily as a source of β-glucosidase. Flow cytometry and bioplex assays were used to measure cytokines or immune cell phenotype in blood at baseline (day 0) and following intervention (day 56). Adequate blood samples were available at enrollment and day 56 and evaluated. Multiple plasma cytokines and chemokines were significantly decreased on day 56 versus baseline. Subgroup analysis indicated reduced TH1 (P = 0.028) and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-associated cytokines (P = 0.035). TH2 and TH17 cytokines were not significantly altered. Phenotypic analysis revealed no change in CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells but showed increased CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells (P = 0.038). The percentage of cells with a T regulatory cell phenotype (CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)) was significantly decreased after 56 days of soy bread (P = 0.0136). Significantly decreased monocytic (CD33(+)HLADR(neg)CD14(+)) MDSC were observed in patients consuming soy bread (P = 0.0056). These data suggest that soy bread modulates systemic soluble and cellular biomarkers consistent with limiting inflammation and suppression of MDSCs. Additional studies to elucidate impact on the carcinogenic process or as a complement to immune-based therapy are required. PMID:26276751

  17. Plasticity of human CD4 T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4(+) T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4(+) regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4(+) helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4(+) T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  18. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  19. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  20. Ordered subsets algorithms for transmission tomography.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, H; Fessler, J A

    1999-11-01

    The ordered subsets EM (OSEM) algorithm has enjoyed considerable interest for emission image reconstruction due to its acceleration of the original EM algorithm and ease of programming. The transmission EM reconstruction algorithm converges very slowly and is not used in practice. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous update algorithm called separable paraboloidal surrogates (SPS) that converges much faster than the transmission EM algorithm. Furthermore, unlike the 'convex algorithm' for transmission tomography, the proposed algorithm is monotonic even with nonzero background counts. We demonstrate that the ordered subsets principle can also be applied to the new SPS algorithm for transmission tomography to accelerate 'convergence', albeit with similar sacrifice of global convergence properties as for OSEM. We implemented and evaluated this ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm. The results indicate that the OSTR algorithm speeds up the increase in the objective function by roughly the number of subsets in the early iterates when compared to the ordinary SPS algorithm. We compute mean square errors and segmentation errors for different methods and show that OSTR is superior to OSEM applied to the logarithm of the transmission data. However, penalized-likelihood reconstructions yield the best quality images among all other methods tested. PMID:10588288

  1. Is there a subset of patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina who are not candidates for interstitial brachytherapy that can be treated with multichannel vaginal brachytherapy using graphic optimization?

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Kevin C.; Matloubieh, Ahmad; Mazloom, Ali; Gray, Alexander; Sidhu, Ravinder; Barrette, Lucille; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate recurrent vaginal cancer treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) using graphic optimization in patients not amenable to surgery and interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT). Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with recurrent cancer in the vagina that were deemed not to be good candidates for ISBT implant because of medical reasons. All patients received computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) based evaluation in addition to a detailed clinical examination, and were noted to have recurrent nodules in the vagina with size ranging from 10-25 mm. Four of the 5 patients had recurrent disease in the vaginal apex, whereas one patient had recurrence in the lateral vaginal wall. Subsequently, all patients were treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by multichannel vaginal cylinder (MVC)-based VBT using graphic optimization for shaping the isodose to improve the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage, as well as to spare the organs at risk (OAR). The dose to the bladder and rectum with regard to 0.1 cc, 1 cc, and 2 cc were recorded. Results Median age of the patients was 78 years (range 58-86 years). Thickness of the lesions before VBT ranged from 6-15 mm. All patients were followed up with MRI at 3 months. All patients but one demonstrated complete clinical/ radiological response of the tumor. No patient had any grade III/IV toxicity at 24 months. Conclusions MVC-based VBT using graphic optimization is safe and yields favorable results if used judiciously. PMID:26034494

  2. Heteroclitic XBP1 peptides evoke tumor-specific memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Samur, Mehmet; Munshi, Aditya; Hideshima, Teru; Keskin, Derin; Kimmelman, Alec; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-01-01

    XBP1 is a critical transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which increases tumor cell survival under prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hypoxic conditions.This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of heteroclitic XBP1 unspliced (US)184–192 (YISPWILAV) and heteroclictic XBP1 spliced (SP)367–375 (YLFPQLISV) HLA-A2 peptides, and to characterize the specific activities of XBP1 peptides-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (XBP1-CTL) against breast cancer, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer cells.The XBP1-CTL had upregulated expression of critical T cell markers and displayed HLA-A2-restricted and antigen-specific activities against breast cancer, colon cancer and pancreatic cancer cells. XBP1-CTL were enriched withCD45RO+ memory CTL, which showed high expression of critical T cell markers (CD28, ICOS, CD69, CD40L), cell proliferation and antitumor activities as compared to CD45RO− non-memory CTL. The effector memory (EM: CD45RO+CCR7−) subset had the highest level of cell proliferation while the central memory (CM: CD45RO+CCR7+) subset demonstrated enhanced functional activities (CD107a degranulation, IFNγ/IL-2 production) upon recognition of the respective tumor cells. Furthermore, both the EM and CM XBP1-CTL subsets expressed high levels of Th1 transcription regulators Tbet and Eomes. The highest frequencies of IFNγ or granzyme B producing cells were detected within CM XBP1-CTL subset that were either Tbet+ or Eomes+ in responding to the tumor cells.These results demonstrate the immunotherapeutic potential of a cocktail of immunogenic HLA-A2 specific heteroclitic XBP1 US184–192 and heteroclictic XBP1 SP367–375 peptides to induce CD3+CD8+ CTL enriched for CM and EM cells with specific antitumor activities against a variety of solid tumors. PMID:25941601

  3. Systematic Pathway Enrichment Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study on Breast Cancer Survival Reveals an Influence of Genes Involved in Cell Adhesion and Calcium Signaling on the Patients’ Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Woltmann, Andrea; Chen, Bowang; Lascorz, Jesús; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E.; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) may help to understand the effects of genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. However, they give only a focused view, which cannot capture the tremendous complexity of this disease. Therefore, we investigated data from a previously conducted GWAS on BC survival for enriched pathways by different enrichment analysis tools using the two main annotation databases Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The goal was to identify the functional categories (GO terms and KEGG pathways) that are consistently overrepresented in a statistically significant way in the list of genes generated from the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. The SNPs with allelic p-value cut-offs 0.005 and 0.01 were annotated to the genes by excluding or including a 20 kb up-and down-stream sequence of the genes and analyzed by six different tools. We identified eleven consistently enriched categories, the most significant ones relating to cell adhesion and calcium ion binding. Moreover, we investigated the similarity between our GWAS and the enrichment analyses of twelve published gene expression signatures for breast cancer prognosis. Five of them were commonly used and commercially available, five were based on different aspects of metastasis formation and two were developed from meta-analyses of published prognostic signatures. This comparison revealed similarities between our GWAS data and the general and the specific brain metastasis gene signatures as well as the Oncotype DX signature. As metastasis formation is a strong indicator of a patient’s prognosis, this result reflects the survival aspect of the conducted GWAS and supports cell adhesion and calcium signaling as important pathways in cancer progression. PMID:24886783

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Low- vs. High-Density Neutrophils in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Jitka Y; Voels, Sandra; Granot, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation and serve as the first line of defense against microbial infections. Traditionally, neutrophils were viewed as a homogeneous population of myeloid cells. However, in recent years accumulating evidence has suggested that neutrophils are heterogeneous and that distinct neutrophil subsets may play very different roles. Here, we describe the methodology for isolation of high- and low-density neutrophils from the murine and human circulation using a density gradient and antibody based enrichment. We further describe the methodology for functional characterization of these different neutrophil subsets in the context of cancer. PMID:27581022

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer ... have any symptoms. In certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, symptoms often do not start until the disease ...

  6. Lymphocytes subsets reference values in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Bucciol, G; Pantano, G; Putti, M C; Sanzari, M C; Basso, G; Plebani, M

    2015-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of blood lymphocyte subsets and activation markers is a basic tool in the diagnostic process of primary immunodeficiency diseases, its use becoming more and more widespread as the knowledge about these illnesses increases. However, the availability of reliable reference values, which need to be age-matched for the pediatric population, is a pre-requisite for the reliable interpretation of immunophenotyping data. Aim of this study is to analyze the lymphocyte subsets and activation markers distribution in children aged 0-18 years referring to the University Hospital of Padova and to create age-matched reference values expressed by percentiles, thus providing a valuable guideline for the interpretation of the immunophenotype. PMID:25132325

  7. Juvenile psittacine environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth; Rupley, Agnes E

    2015-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is of great import to the emotional, intellectual, and physical development of the juvenile psittacine and their success in the human home environment. Five major types of enrichment include social, occupational, physical, sensory, and nutritional. Occupational enrichment includes exercise and psychological enrichment. Physical enrichment includes the cage and accessories and the external home environment. Sensory enrichment may be visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or taste oriented. Nutritional enrichment includes variations in appearance, type, and frequency of diet, and treats, novelty, and foraging. Two phases of the preadult period deserve special enrichment considerations: the development of autonomy and puberty. PMID:25902270

  8. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  9. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  10. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  11. Interacting gene selection via cooperative game analysis for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Dong, Junyu; Xu, Mantao; Wang, Shengke; Xie, Cui

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technologies offer practical diagnostic tools for cancer detection. One great challenge is to identify salient genes from the high dimensionality of microarray data that can directly contribute to the symptom of cancer. Interactions among genes have been recognized to be fundamentally important for understanding biological function. This paper proposes an interacting gene selection method for cancer classification by identifying useful interacting genes. The method firstly evaluates the interactivity degree of each gene according to the intricate interrelation among genes by cooperative game analysis. Then genes are selected in a forward way by considering both interactivity and relevance characters. Experimental comparisons are carried out on four publicly available microarray data sets with three outstanding gene selection methods. Moreover a gene set enrichment analysis is also performed on the selected gene subset. The results show that the proposed method achieves better classification performance and enrichment score than other gene selection methods. PMID:25227093

  12. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α− mDCs preferentially prime CD4+ T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of vaccines against

  13. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α(+) mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α(-) mDCs preferentially prime CD4(+) T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3(+) mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α(+) mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8(+) T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of

  14. Toward a refined definition of monocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Hofer, Thomas P J

    2013-01-01

    In a nomenclature proposal published in 2010 monocytes were subdivided into classical and non-classical cells and in addition an intermediate monocyte subset was proposed. Over the last couple of years many studies have analyzed these intermediate cells, their characteristics have been described, and their expansion has been documented in many clinical settings. While these cells appear to be in transition from classical to non-classical monocytes and hence may not form a distinct cell population in a strict sense, their separate analysis and enumeration is warranted in health and disease. PMID:23382732

  15. Adoptive Therapy with Chimeric Antigen Receptor Modified T Cells of Defined Subset Composition

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Berger, Carolina; Liu, Lingfeng (Steven); Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Salter, Alex; Hudecek, Michael; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to engineer T cells to recognize tumor cells through genetic modification with a synthetic chimeric antigen receptor has ushered in a new era in cancer immunotherapy. The most advanced clinical applications are in in targeting CD19 on B cell malignancies. The clinical trials of CD19 CAR therapy have thus far not attempted to select defined subsets prior to transduction or imposed uniformity of the CD4 and CD8 cell composition of the cell products. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to utilizing adoptive therapy with genetically modified T cells of defined subset and phenotypic composition. PMID:24667960

  16. Fc Receptor-like 5 Expression Distinguishes Two Distinct Subsets of Human Circulating Tissue-like Memory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huifang; Borrego, Francisco; Nagata, Satoshi; Tolnay, Mate

    2016-05-15

    Fc receptor-like (FCRL) 5 is a novel IgG binding protein expressed on B cells, with the capacity to regulate Ag receptor signaling. We assessed FCRL5 expression on circulating B cells from healthy donors and found that FCRL5(+) cells are most enriched among atypical CD21(-/lo)/CD27(-) tissue-like memory (TLM) B cells, which are abnormally expanded in several autoimmune and infectious diseases. Using multicolor flow cytometry, FCRL5(+) TLM cells were found to express more CD11c and several inhibitory receptors than did the FCRL5(-) TLM subset. The homing receptor profiles of the two TLM subsets shared features consistent with migration away from lymphoid tissues, but they also displayed distinct differences. Analysis of IgH V regions in single cells indicated that although both subsets are diverse, the FCRL5(+) subset accumulated significantly more somatic mutations. Furthermore, the FCRL5(+) subset had more switched isotype expression and more extensive proliferative history. Microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the two TLM subsets possess distinct gene expression profiles, characterized by markedly different CD11c, SOX5, T-bet, and RTN4R expression, as well as differences in expression of inhibitory receptors. Functional analysis revealed that the FCRL5(+) TLM subset responds poorly to multiple stimuli compared with the FCRL5(-) subset, as reflected by reduced calcium mobilization and blunted cell proliferation. We propose that the FCRL5(+) TLM subset, but not the FCRL5(-) TLM subset, underwent Ag-driven development and is severely dysfunctional. The present study elucidates the heterogeneity of TLM B cells and provides the basis to dissect their roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious diseases. PMID:27076679

  17. Beyond Job Enrichment to Employment Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werther, William B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Employment enrichment views the total work environment confronting employees as a system consisting of two overlapping areas: worker-job and worker-organization subsystems. Job enrichment has improved the worker-job subsystem. The focus of this article is on methods of improving the worker-organization relationship. (Author/JB)

  18. Protective and pathogenic functions of macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-11-01

    Macrophages are strategically located throughout the body tissues, where they ingest and process foreign materials, dead cells and debris and recruit additional macrophages in response to inflammatory signals. They are highly heterogeneous cells that can rapidly change their function in response to local microenvironmental signals. In this Review, we discuss the four stages of orderly inflammation mediated by macrophages: recruitment to tissues; differentiation and activation in situ; conversion to suppressive cells; and restoration of tissue homeostasis. We also discuss the protective and pathogenic functions of the various macrophage subsets in antimicrobial defence, antitumour immune responses, metabolism and obesity, allergy and asthma, tumorigenesis, autoimmunity, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and wound healing. Finally, we briefly discuss the characterization of macrophage heterogeneity in humans. PMID:21997792

  19. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-08-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In the context of this dichotomy, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the spatiotemporal physiology of macrophage subsets and microglia in the healthy and diseased CNS, and elaborate on factors regulating their behavior. In addition, the impact of macrophages present in lymphoid organs on CNS pathologies is defined. The prime focus of this review is on multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, and CNS repair, and in which microglia and macrophages have been extensively scrutinized. On one hand, microglia and macrophages promote neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative events in MS by releasing inflammatory mediators and stimulating leukocyte activity and infiltration into the CNS. On the other hand, microglia and macrophages assist in CNS repair through the production of neurotrophic factors and clearance of inhibitory myelin debris. Finally, we define how microglia and macrophage physiology can be harnessed for new therapeutics aimed at suppressing neuroinflammatory and cytodegenerative events, as well as promoting CNS repair. We conclude that microglia and macrophages are highly dynamic cells displaying disease stage and location-specific fates in neurological disorders. Changing the physiology of divergent phagocyte subsets at particular disease stages holds promise for future therapeutics for CNS pathologies. PMID:24952885

  20. Hierarchical modeling for rare event detection and cell subset alignment across flow cytometry samples.

    PubMed

    Cron, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Frelinger, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Singh, Satwinder K; Britten, Cedrik M; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; West, Mike; Chan, Cliburn

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is the prototypical assay for multi-parameter single cell analysis, and is essential in vaccine and biomarker research for the enumeration of antigen-specific lymphocytes that are often found in extremely low frequencies (0.1% or less). Standard analysis of flow cytometry data relies on visual identification of cell subsets by experts, a process that is subjective and often difficult to reproduce. An alternative and more objective approach is the use of statistical models to identify cell subsets of interest in an automated fashion. Two specific challenges for automated analysis are to detect extremely low frequency event subsets without biasing the estimate by pre-processing enrichment, and the ability to align cell subsets across multiple data samples for comparative analysis. In this manuscript, we develop hierarchical modeling extensions to the Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM) approach we have previously described for cell subset identification, and show that the hierarchical DPGMM (HDPGMM) naturally generates an aligned data model that captures both commonalities and variations across multiple samples. HDPGMM also increases the sensitivity to extremely low frequency events by sharing information across multiple samples analyzed simultaneously. We validate the accuracy and reproducibility of HDPGMM estimates of antigen-specific T cells on clinically relevant reference peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples with known frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. These cell samples take advantage of retrovirally TCR-transduced T cells spiked into autologous PBMC samples to give a defined number of antigen-specific T cells detectable by HLA-peptide multimer binding. We provide open source software that can take advantage of both multiple processors and GPU-acceleration to perform the numerically-demanding computations. We show that hierarchical modeling is a useful probabilistic approach that can provide a consistent labeling

  1. CD133 is a temporary marker of cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer, but not in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Duan; Chen, Yi-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current investigations in the field of cancer research have intensively focused on the 'cancer stem cell' or 'tumor-initiating cell'. While CD133 was initially considered as a stem cell marker only in the hematopoietic system and the nervous system, the membrane antigen also identifies tumorigenic cells in certain solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the human lung cancer cell lines A549, H157, H226, Calu-1, H292 and H446. The results of real-time PCR analysis after chemotherapy drug selection and the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that CD133 only functioned as a marker in the small cell lung cancer line H446. The sorted CD133+ subset presented stem cell-like features, including self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenic capacity in subsequent assays. Furthermore, a proportion of the CD133+ cells had a tendency to remain stable, which may explain the controversies arising from previous studies. Therefore, the CD133+ subset should provide an enriched source of tumor-initiating cells among H446 cells. Moreover, the antigen could be used as an investigative marker of the tumorigenic process and an effective treatment for small cell lung cancer. PMID:21174061

  2. Derived enriched uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-12-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

  3. Somatic human ZBTB7A zinc finger mutations promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-S; Liu, Z; Gerarduzzi, C; Choi, D E; Ganapathy, S; Pandolfi, P P; Yuan, Z-M

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that ZBTB7A is a bona fide transcription repressor of key glycolytic genes and its downregulation in human cancer contributes to tumor metabolism. As reduced expression of ZBTB7A is found only in a subset of human cancers, we explored alternative mechanisms of its inactivation by mining human cancer genome databases. We discovered recurrent somatic mutations of ZBTB7A in multiple types of human cancers with a marked enrichment of mutations within the zinc finger domain. Functional characterization of the mutants demonstrated that mutations within the zinc finger region of ZBTB7A invariably resulted in loss of function. As a consequence, the glycolytic genes were markedly upregulated in cancer cells harboring ZBTB7A zinc finger mutation, leading to increased glycolysis and proliferation. Our study uncovers the loss-of-function mutation in ZBTB7A as a novel mechanism causing elevated glycolysis in human cancer, which carries important therapeutic implication. PMID:26455326

  4. Increased B Regulatory Phenotype in Non-Metastatic Lymph Nodes of Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, F; Razmkhah, M; Hosseini, A; Bagheri, M; Safaei, A; Talei, A-R; Ghaderi, A

    2016-03-01

    Tumour-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) are centre in orchestrating the immune responses against cancer. The cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations change in the process of cancer progression and lymph node involvement. B lymphocyte subsets and their function in breast cancer-draining lymph nodes have not been well elucidated. Here, we studied the influence of tumour metastasis on the frequencies of different B cell subsets including naïve and memory B cells as well as those which are known to be enriched in the regulatory pool in TDLNs of 30 patients with breast cancer. Lymphocytes were obtained from a fresh piece of each lymph node and stained for CD19 and other B cell-associated markers and subjected to flow cytometry. Our investigation revealed that metastatic TDLN showed a significant decrease in active, memory and class-switched B cells while the frequencies of B cells with regulatory phenotypes were not changed. However, CD27(hi) CD25(+) and CD1d(hi) CD5(+) B regulatory subsets significantly increased in non-metastatic lymph nodes (nMLNs) of node-positive patients compared with node-negative patients. Our data provided evidence that in breast cancer, metastasis of tumour to axillary lymph nodes altered B cell populations in favour of resting, inactive and unswitched phenotypes. We assume that the lymphatic involvement may cause an increase in a subset of regulatory B cells in non-metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:26708831

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  6. Characterization of microfluidic shear-dependent epithelial cell adhesion molecule immunocapture and enrichment of pancreatic cancer cells from blood cells with dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Smith, James P.; Saha, Trisha N.; Rhim, Andrew D.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Current microfluidic techniques for isolating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood are limited by low capture purity, and dielectrophoresis (DEP) has the potential to complement existing immunocapture techniques to improve capture performance. We present a hybrid DEP and immunocapture Hele-Shaw flow cell to characterize DEP's effects on immunocapture of pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, PANC-1, and BxPC-3) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with an anti-EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) antibody. By carefully specifying the applied electric field frequency, we demonstrate that pancreatic cancer cells are attracted to immunocapture surfaces by positive DEP whereas PBMCs are repelled by negative DEP. Using an exponential capture model to interpret our capture data, we show that immunocapture performance is dependent on the applied DEP force sign and magnitude, cell surface EpCAM expression level, and shear stress experienced by cells flowing in the capture device. Our work suggests that DEP can not only repel contaminating blood cells but also enhance capture of cancer cell populations that are less likely to be captured by traditional immunocapture methods. This combination of DEP and immunocapture techniques to potentially increase CTC capture purity can facilitate subsequent biological analyses of captured CTCs and research on cancer metastasis and drug therapies. PMID:25379092

  7. The role of complement in dendritic cell (DC) control of T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Levis, William R; Martiniuk, Frank

    2010-11-01

    This section of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) is dedicated to Dendreon's Provenge (Sipuleucel-T), the first therapeutic DC vaccine proven effective and approved by the United States (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced cancer. This editorial will discuss three articles in this issue, their relationship to Provenge and the recent TH17-Treg subsets that are regulated by CD46. PMID:21061758

  8. KLF8 and FAK cooperatively enrich the active MMP14 on the cell surface required for the metastatic progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Heng; Hu, Liu; Yu, Lin; Wang, Xianhui; Urvalek, Alison M.; Li, Tianshu; Shen, Chao; Mukherjee, Debarati; Lahiri, Satadru K.; Wason, Melissa S.; Zhao, Jihe

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) regulates critical gene transcription associated with cancer. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unidentified. We have recently demonstrated that KLF8 expression enhances the activity but not expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), the target substrate of MMP14. Here, we report a novel KLF8 to MMP14 signaling that promotes human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Using cell lines for inducible expression and knockdown of KLF8, we demonstrate that KLF8 promotes MMP14 expression at the transcriptional level. Knocking down KLF8 expression inhibited the breast cancer cell invasion both in vitro and in vivo as well as the lung metastasis in mice, which could be rescued by ectopic expression of MMP14. Promoter reporter assays and oligonucleotide and chromatin immunoprecipitations determined that KLF8 activates the human MMP14 gene promoter by both directly acting on the promoter and indirectly via promoting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, the expression of T cell factor-1 (TCF1) and subsequent activation of the promoter by the β-catenin/TCF1 complex. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using pharmacological inhibitor, RNA interference or knockout showed that the cell surface presentation of active MMP14 downstream of KLF8 depends upon FAK expression and activity. Taken together, this work identified novel signaling mechanisms by which KLF8 and FAK work together to promote the extracellular activity of MMP14 critical for breast cancer metastasis. PMID:23812425

  9. "Cancer Cell Biology:" A Student-Centered Instructional Module Exploring the Use of Multimedia to Enrich Interactive, Constructivist Learning of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockholt, Susanne M.; West, J. Paige; Bollenbacher, Walter E.

    2003-01-01

    Multimedia has the potential of providing bioscience education novel learning environments and pedagogy applications to foster student interest, involve students in the research process, advance critical thinking/problem-solving skills, and develop conceptual understanding of biological topics. "Cancer Cell Biology," an interactive, multimedia,…

  10. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  11. Subnuclear Proteomics in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; de Wit, Meike; Mongera, Sandra; Carvalho, Beatriz; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in nuclear phenotype and chromosome structure are key features of cancer cells. Investigation of the protein determinants of nuclear subfractions in cancer may yield molecular insights into aberrant chromosome function and chromatin organization and in addition may yield biomarkers for early cancer detection. Here we evaluate a proteomics work flow for profiling protein constituents in subnuclear domains in colorectal cancer tissues and apply this work flow to a comparative analysis of the nuclear matrix fraction in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissue samples. First, we established the reproducibility of the entire work flow. In a reproducibility analysis of three nuclear matrix fractions independently isolated from the same colon tumor homogenate, 889 of 1,047 proteins (85%) were reproducibly identified at high confidence (minimally two peptides per protein at 99% confidence interval at the protein level) with an average coefficient of variance for the number of normalized spectral counts per protein of 30%. This indicates a good reproducibility of the entire work flow from biochemical isolation to nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Second, using spectral counting combined with statistics, we identified proteins that are significantly enriched in the nuclear matrix fraction relative to two earlier fractions (the chromatin-binding and intermediate filament fractions) isolated from six colorectal tissue samples. The total data set contained 2,059 non-redundant proteins. Gene ontology mining and protein network analysis of nuclear matrix-enriched proteins revealed enrichment for proteins implicated in “RNA processing” and “mRNA metabolic process.” Finally, an explorative comparison of the nuclear matrix proteome in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues revealed many proteins previously implicated in oncogenesis as well as new candidates. A subset of these differentially expressed proteins also exhibited a corresponding change at the mRNA level

  12. Enrichment through Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Claire S.

    The CREST (Creative Resources Enriching Student Talents) Project, an enrichment approach for elementary gifted, talented, and creative students, is described. The project is explained to incorporate an interdisciplinary approach to instruction in art and science using resources within the community. Chapter 1 outlines the project philosophy,…

  13. Deep sequencing of RNA from three different extracellular vesicle (EV) subtypes released from the human LIM1863 colon cancer cell line uncovers distinct miRNA-enrichment signatures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Greening, David W; He, Weifeng; Rai, Alin; Zhang, Wenwei; Simpson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Secreted microRNAs (miRNAs) enclosed within extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a pivotal role in intercellular communication by regulating recipient cell gene expression and affecting target cell function. Here, we report the isolation of three distinct EV subtypes from the human colon carcinoma cell line LIM1863--shed microvesicles (sMVs) and two exosome populations (immunoaffinity isolated A33-exosomes and EpCAM-exosomes). Deep sequencing of miRNA libraries prepared from parental LIM1863 cells/derived EV subtype RNA yielded 254 miRNA identifications, of which 63 are selectively enriched in the EVs--miR-19a/b-3p, miR-378a/c/d, and miR-577 and members of the let-7 and miR-8 families being the most prominent. Let-7a-3p*, let-7f-1-3p*, miR-451a, miR-574-5p*, miR-4454 and miR-7641 are common to all EV subtypes, and 6 miRNAs (miR-320a/b/c/d, miR-221-3p, and miR-200c-3p) discern LIM1863 exosomes from sMVs; miR-98-5p was selectively represented only in sMVs. Notably, A33-Exos contained the largest number (32) of exclusively-enriched miRNAs; 14 of these miRNAs have not been reported in the context of CRC tissue/biofluid analyses and warrant further examination as potential diagnostic markers of CRC. Surprisingly, miRNA passenger strands (star miRNAs) for miR-3613-3p*, -362-3p*, -625-3p*, -6842-3p* were the dominant strand in A33-Exos, the converse to that observed in parental cells. This finding suggests miRNA biogenesis may be interlinked with endosomal/exosomal processing. PMID:25330373

  14. Consumption of prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose in combination with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis has minor effects on selected immune parameters in polypectomised and colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Roller, Monika; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, Kevin; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Watzl, Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    Probiotics (PRO) modulate immunity in humans, while the effect of prebiotics (PRE) and synbiotics (SYN) on the human immune system are not well studied yet. The objective of this study was to investigate whether daily intake of a SYN modulates immune functions. In a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, thirty-four colon cancer patients who had undergone 'curative resection' and forty polypectomised patients participated. Subjects of the SYN group daily received encapsulated bacteria (1 x 10(10) colony-forming units of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and 1 x 10(10) colony-forming units of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12)) and 10 g of inulin enriched with oligofructose. Controls received encapsulated maltodextrin and 10 g of maltodextrin. Prior to intervention (T1), and 6 (T2) and 12 weeks after the start of the intervention (T3), phagocytic and respiratory burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes, lytic activity of natural killer cells and production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and IL-12, as well as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were measured. In faeces, the concentrations of transforming growth factor-beta1 and prostaglandin E2 were measured. IL-2 secretion by activated PBMC from the polyp group increased significantly between T1 or T2 and T3 (P < 0.05). In the cancer group, SYN treatment resulted in an increased capacity of PBMC to produce IFN-gamma at T3 (P < 0.05). Other immunity-related parameters were not affected by SYN treatment, neither in the cancer nor in the polyp group. In conclusion, supplementation with this SYN has minor stimulatory effects on the systemic immune system of the two study groups. Further studies in humans should aim to focus on the gut-associated immune system. PMID:17349080

  15. Silibinin strongly inhibits the growth kinetics of colon cancer stem cell-enriched spheroids by modulating interleukin 4/6-mediated survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Involvement of cancer stem cells (CSC) in initiation, progression, relapse, and therapy-resistance of colorectal cancer (CRC) warrants search for small molecules as ‘adjunct-therapy’ to target both colon CSC and bulk tumor population. Herein, we assessed the potential of silibinin to eradicate colon CSC together with associated molecular mechanisms. In studies examining how silibinin modulates dynamics of CSC spheroids in terms of its effect on kinetics of CSC spheroids generated in presence of mitogenic and interleukin (IL)-mediated signaling which provides an autocrine/paracrine amplification loop in CRC, silibinin strongly decreased colon CSC pool together with cell survival of bulk tumor cells. Silibinin effect on colon CSC was mediated via blocking of pro-tumorigenic signaling, notably IL-4/-6 signaling that affects CSC population. These silibinin effects were associated with decreased mRNA and protein levels of various CSC-associated transcription factors, signaling molecules and markers. Furthermore, 2D and 3D differentiation assays indicated formation of more differentiated clones by silibinin. These results highlight silibinin potential to interfere with kinetics of CSC pool by shifting CSC cell division to asymmetric type via targeting various signals associated with the survival and multiplication of colon CSC pool. Together, our findings further support clinical usefulness of silibinin in CRC intervention and therapy. PMID:24970802

  16. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged. PMID:24310697

  17. Mortality among uranium enrichment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Bloom, T.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted on workers at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility in Pike County, Ohio, in response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Local 3-689 for information on long-term health effects. Primary hazards included inhalation exposure to uranyl fluoride containing uranium-235 and uranium-234, technetium-99 compounds, and hydrogen-fluoride. Uranium-238 presented a nephrotoxic hazard. Statistically significant mortality deficits based on U.S. death rates were found for all causes, accidents, violence, and diseases of nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Standardized mortality rates were 85 and 54 for all malignant neoplasms and for other genitourinary diseases, respectively. Deaths from stomach cancer and lymphatic/hematopoietic cancers were insignificantly increased. A subcohort selected for greatest potential uranium exposure has reduced deaths from these malignancies. Insignificantly increased stomach cancer mortality was found after 15 years employment and after 15 years latency. Routine urinalysis data suggested low internal uranium exposures.

  18. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  19. Ineffective oesophageal motility: Manometric subsets exhibit different symptom profiles

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Horst Gunter; Hansen, Ross David; Malcolm, Allison; Kellow, John Edward

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the demographic and clinical features of different manometric subsets of ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM; defined as ≥ 30% wet swallows with distal contractile amplitude < 30 mmHg), and to determine whether the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux differs between IOM subsets. METHODS: Clinical characteristics of manometric subsets were determined in 100 IOM patients (73 female, median age 58 years) and compared to those of 100 age-and gender-matched patient controls with oesophageal symptoms, but normal manometry. Supine oesophageal manometry was performed with an eight-channel DentSleeve water-perfused catheter, and an ambulatory pH study assessed gastro-oesophageal reflux. RESULTS: Patients in the IOM subset featuring a majority of low-amplitude simultaneous contractions (LASC) experienced less heartburn (prevalence 26%), but more dysphagia (57%) than those in the IOM subset featuring low-amplitude propagated contractions (LAP; heartburn 70%, dysphagia 24%; both P ≤ 0.01). LASC patients also experienced less heartburn and more dysphagia than patient controls (heartburn 68%, dysphagia 11%; both P < 0.001). The prevalence of heartburn and dysphagia in IOM patients featuring a majority of non-transmitted sequences (NT) was 54% (P = 0.04 vs LASC) and 36% (P < 0.01 vs controls), respectively. No differences in age and gender distribution, chest pain prevalence, acid exposure time (AET) and symptom/reflux association existed between IOM subsets, or between subsets and controls. CONCLUSION: IOM patients with LASC exhibit a different symptom profile to those with LAP, but do not differ in gastro-oesophageal reflux prevalence. These findings raise the possibility of different pathophysiological mechanisms in IOM subsets, which warrants further investigation. PMID:18595138

  20. Genomic amplification of 9p24.1 targeting JAK2, PD-L1, and PD-L2 is enriched in high-risk triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Michael T.; Anderson, Karen S.; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Andreozzi, Mariacarla; Cunliffe, Heather E.; Klassen, Christine L.; Dueck, Amylou C.; McCullough, Ann E.; Reddy, Srikanth K.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Northfelt, Donald W.; Pockaj, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    We used DNA content flow cytometry followed by oligonucleotide array based comparative genomic hybridization to survey the genomes of 326 tumors, including 41 untreated surgically resected triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). A high level (log2ratio ≥1) 9p24 amplicon was found in TNBC (12/41), glioblastomas (2/44), and colon carcinomas (2/68). The shortest region of overlap for the amplicon targets 9p24.1 and includes the loci for PD-L1, PD-L2, and JAK2 (PDJ amplicon). In contrast this amplicon was absent in ER+ (0/8) and HER2+ (0/15) breast tumors, and in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (0/150). The PDJ amplicon in TNBCs was correlated with clinical outcomes in group comparisons by two-sample t-tests for continuous variables and chi-squared tests for categorical variables. TNBC patients with the PDJ amplicon had a worse outcome with worse disease-free and overall survival. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that the PDJ amplicon in TNBC is associated with elevated expression of JAK2 and of the PD-1 ligands. These initial findings demonstrate that the PDJ amplicon is enriched in TNBC, targets signaling pathways that activate the PD-1 mediated immune checkpoint, and identifies patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:26317899

  1. Genomic amplification of 9p24.1 targeting JAK2, PD-L1, and PD-L2 is enriched in high-risk triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Michael T; Anderson, Karen S; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Andreozzi, Mariacarla; Cunliffe, Heather E; Klassen, Christine L; Dueck, Amylou C; McCullough, Ann E; Reddy, Srikanth K; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Northfelt, Donald W; Pockaj, Barbara A

    2015-09-22

    We used DNA content flow cytometry followed by oligonucleotide array based comparative genomic hybridization to survey the genomes of 326 tumors, including 41 untreated surgically resected triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). A high level (log2ratio ≥ 1) 9p24 amplicon was found in TNBC (12/41), glioblastomas (2/44), and colon carcinomas (2/68). The shortest region of overlap for the amplicon targets 9p24.1 and includes the loci for PD-L1, PD-L2, and JAK2 (PDJ amplicon). In contrast this amplicon was absent in ER+ (0/8) and HER2+ (0/15) breast tumors, and in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (0/150). The PDJ amplicon in TNBCs was correlated with clinical outcomes in group comparisons by two-sample t-tests for continuous variables and chi-squared tests for categorical variables. TNBC patients with the PDJ amplicon had a worse outcome with worse disease-free and overall survival. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that the PDJ amplicon in TNBC is associated with elevated expression of JAK2 and of the PD-1 ligands. These initial findings demonstrate that the PDJ amplicon is enriched in TNBC, targets signaling pathways that activate the PD-1 mediated immune checkpoint, and identifies patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:26317899

  2. A Computational Approach to Identifying Gene-microRNA Modules in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the initiation and progression of various cancers by regulating genes. Regulatory interactions between genes and miRNAs are complex, as multiple miRNAs can regulate multiple genes. In addtion, these interactions vary from patient to patient and even among patients with the same cancer type, as cancer development is a heterogeneous process. These relationships are more complicated because transcription factors and other regulatory molecules can also regulate miRNAs and genes. Hence, it is important to identify the complex relationships between genes and miRNAs in cancer. In this study, we propose a computational approach to constructing modules that represent these relationships by integrating the expression data of genes and miRNAs with gene-gene interaction data. First, we used a biclustering algorithm to construct modules consisting of a subset of genes and a subset of samples to incorporate the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Second, we combined gene-gene interactions to include genes that play important roles in cancer-related pathways. Then, we selected miRNAs that are closely associated with genes in the modules based on a Gaussian Bayesian network and Bayesian Information Criteria. When we applied our approach to ovarian cancer and glioblastoma (GBM) data sets, 33 and 54 modules were constructed, respectively. In these modules, 91% and 94% of ovarian cancer and GBM modules, respectively, were explained either by direct regulation between genes and miRNAs or by indirect relationships via transcription factors. In addition, 48.4% and 74.0% of modules from ovarian cancer and GBM, respectively, were enriched with cancer-related pathways, and 51.7% and 71.7% of miRNAs in modules were ovarian cancer-related miRNAs and GBM-related miRNAs, respectively. Finally, we extensively analyzed significant modules and showed that most genes in these modules were related to ovarian cancer and GBM. PMID:25611546

  3. A computational approach to identifying gene-microRNA modules in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the initiation and progression of various cancers by regulating genes. Regulatory interactions between genes and miRNAs are complex, as multiple miRNAs can regulate multiple genes. In addtion, these interactions vary from patient to patient and even among patients with the same cancer type, as cancer development is a heterogeneous process. These relationships are more complicated because transcription factors and other regulatory molecules can also regulate miRNAs and genes. Hence, it is important to identify the complex relationships between genes and miRNAs in cancer. In this study, we propose a computational approach to constructing modules that represent these relationships by integrating the expression data of genes and miRNAs with gene-gene interaction data. First, we used a biclustering algorithm to construct modules consisting of a subset of genes and a subset of samples to incorporate the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Second, we combined gene-gene interactions to include genes that play important roles in cancer-related pathways. Then, we selected miRNAs that are closely associated with genes in the modules based on a Gaussian Bayesian network and Bayesian Information Criteria. When we applied our approach to ovarian cancer and glioblastoma (GBM) data sets, 33 and 54 modules were constructed, respectively. In these modules, 91% and 94% of ovarian cancer and GBM modules, respectively, were explained either by direct regulation between genes and miRNAs or by indirect relationships via transcription factors. In addition, 48.4% and 74.0% of modules from ovarian cancer and GBM, respectively, were enriched with cancer-related pathways, and 51.7% and 71.7% of miRNAs in modules were ovarian cancer-related miRNAs and GBM-related miRNAs, respectively. Finally, we extensively analyzed significant modules and showed that most genes in these modules were related to ovarian cancer and GBM. PMID:25611546

  4. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  5. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-betloEomeshi natural killer cells residing in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Kerstin A.; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J.; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R.; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56brightCD16−CD57−), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6− fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bethiEomeslo(CXCR6−) and T-betloEomeshi(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bethiEomeslo, suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6− peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-betloEomeshi NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  6. Enhancing OPeNDAP for Multi-Source Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulker, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly two decades, web services built on OPeNDAP methods have increased the practicality of accessing scientific data from multiple, disparate sources. Data accessible via the Data Access Protocol (DAP) now include public holdings at NOAA, NASA, and many other organizations whose disciplinary foci are diverse. Central to the DAP's utility is its domain-neutral data model, which includes simple mechanisms for retrieving user-specified subsets of the source data. Though DAP allows whole-dataset retrievals in principle, network limitations and other constraints often make subsetting essential. DAP subsetting is particularly efficient where data are organized as multidimensional arrays, common for many kinds of satellite imagery and model outputs. The current version (DAP2) lets users define which array elements are returned by specifying their indices, skipping some (decimation) and/or limiting their ranges. This permits, e.g., rapid selection of a 2-D slice from a dataset organized as a 4-D hypercube, whose axes might correspond to three dimensions of space and one of time. Despite its power, DAP2 subsetting has significant limitations in cases where the subset of interest is not nicely defined by lines or hyperplanes that parallel the axes of the source array. Though DAP2 servers can allow specification of subset boundaries by coordinate values, rather than indices, the resulting subsets nonetheless must take the form of subarrays whose shapes are tightly linked to those of the source arrays. Ways to overcome these limitations are being considered in a project dubbed OPULS (OPeNDAP-Unidata Linked Servers), funded by NOAA. Project goals include DAP4 (the DAP2 successor) and a new, experimental form of subsetting. The latter addresses the case where the source data and the desired subset are irregular meshes (AKA UGRIDS or unstructured grids), whose shapes are defined polygonally. Though the experiment is a special case, where client and server both are aware of

  7. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-09

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  8. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  9. Unique Eomes+ NK Cell Subsets Are Present in Uterus and Decidua During Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Chiossone, Laura; Croxatto, Daniele; Loiacono, Fabrizio; Martini, Stefania; Ferrero, Simone; Walzer, Thierry; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Decidual and uterine natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to contribute to the successful pregnancy both in humans and mice. NK cells represent “cytotoxic” group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and are distinct from the recently described “helper” ILC1. Here, we show that both in humans and mice the majority of group 1 ILC in endometrium/uterus and decidua express Eomesodermin (Eomes), thus suggesting that they are developmentally related to conventional NK cells. However, they differ from peripheral NK cells. In humans, Eomes+ decidual NK (dNK) cells express CD49a and other markers of tissue residency, including CD103, integrin β7, CD9, and CD69. The expression of CD103 allows the identification of different subsets of IFNγ-producing Eomes+ NK cells. We show that TGFβ can sustain/induce CD103 and CD9 expression in dNK cells and decidual CD34-derived NK cells, indicating that the decidual microenvironment can instruct the phenotype of Eomes+ NK cells. In murine decidua and uterus, Eomes+ cells include CD49a−CD49b+ conventional NK cells and CD49a+ cells. Notably, Eomes+CD49a+ cells are absent in spleen and liver. Decidual and uterine Eomes+CD49a+ cells can be dissected in two peculiar cell subsets according to CD49b expression. CD49a+CD49b− and CD49a+CD49b+ cells are enriched in immature CD11blowCD27high cells, while CD49a−CD49b+ cells contain higher percentages of mature CD11bhighCD27low cells, both in uterus and decidua. Moreover, Eomes+CD49a+CD49b− cells decrease during gestation, thus suggesting that this peculiar subset may be required in early pregnancy rather than on later phases. Conversely, a minor Eomes−CD49a+ ILC1 population present in decidua and uterus increases during pregnancy. CD49b−Eomes± cells produce mainly TNF, while CD49a−CD49b+ conventional NK cells and CD49a+CD49b+ cells produce both IFNγ and TNF. Thus, human and murine decidua contains unique subsets of group 1 ILCs, including Eomes+ and Eomes− cells, with

  10. T-cell Subsets in Peripheral Blood and Tumors of Patients Treated With Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Taipale; Ilkka, Liikanen; Juuso, Juhila; Aila, Karioja-Kallio; Minna, Oksanen; Riku, Turkki; Nina, Linder; Johan, Lundin; Ari, Ristimäki; Anna, Kanerva; Anniina, Koski; Timo, Joensuu; Markus, Vähä-Koskela; Akseli, Hemminki

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the antitumor immune response is decisive when developing new immunotherapies for cancer. Oncolytic adenoviruses cause a potent immunogenic stimulus and arming them with costimulatory molecules reshapes the immune response further. We evaluated peripheral blood T-cell subsets of 50 patients with refractory solid tumors undergoing treatment with oncolytic adenovirus. These data were compared to changes in antiviral and antitumor T cells, treatment efficacy, overall survival, and T-cell subsets in pre- and post-treatment tumor biopsies. Treatment caused a significant (P < 0.0001) shift in T-cell subsets in blood, characterized by a proportional increase of CD8+ cells, and decrease of CD4+ cells. Concomitant treatment with cyclophosphamide and temozolomide resulted in less CD4+ decrease (P = 0.041) than cyclophosphamide only. Interestingly, we saw a correlation between T-cell changes in peripheral blood and the tumor site. This correlation was positive for CD8+ and inverse for CD4+ cells. These findings give insight to the interconnections between peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) populations regarding oncolytic virotherapy. In particular, our data suggest that induction of T-cell response is not sufficient for clinical response in the context of immunosuppressive tumors, and that peripheral blood T cells have a complicated and potentially misleading relationship with TILs. PMID:25655312

  11. Immunomagnetic separation can enrich fixed solid tumors for epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yaremko, M. L.; Kelemen, P. R.; Kutza, C.; Barker, D.; Westbrook, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Immunomagnetic separation is a highly specific technique for the enrichment or isolation of cells from a variety of fresh tissues and microorganisms or molecules from suspensions. Because new techniques for molecular analysis of solid tumors are now applicable to fixed tissue but sometimes require or benefit from enrichment for tumor cells, we tested the efficacy of immunomagnetic separation for enriching fixed solid tumors for malignant epithelial cells. We applied it to two different tumors and fixation methods to separate neoplastic from non-neoplastic cells in primary colorectal cancers and metastatic breast cancers, and were able to enrich to a high degree of purity. Immunomagnetic separation was effective in unembedded fixed tissue as well as fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. The magnetically separated cells were amenable to fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction amplification of their DNA with minimal additional manipulation. The high degree of enrichment achieved before amplification contributed to interpretation of loss of heterozygosity in metastatic breast cancers, and simplified fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis because only neoplastic cells were hybridized and counted. Immunomagnetic separation is effective for the enrichment of fixed solid tumors, can be performed with widely available commercial antibodies, and requires little specialized instrumentation. It can contribute to interpretation of results in situations where enrichment by other methods is difficult or not possible. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8546231

  12. Peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Covas, M I; Esquerda, A; García-Rico, A; Mahy, N

    1992-01-01

    Interest in T-lymphocyte subsets has arisen because of their involvement in the autoimmune process. Contradictory results have been published in the literature about the number of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune diseases. In order to investigate the number and distribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease, the levels of total T-lymphocytes (CD3), T-helper (CD4) and T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) lymphocytes were determined in 44 patients with Graves' disease (1), multinodular goiter (2) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3). All patients had high levels of antithyroglobulin and thyroid antiperoxidase (antimicrosomal) antibodies. The T subset levels were related to the functional thyroid status, measured as serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH). Our data show the existence of a strong influence of functional status on CD3, CD4 and CD8 levels, as reflected in the significant correlations obtained with FT4 (negative) and TSH (positive). A significant decrease in all populations was observed in Graves' disease hyperthyroid patients. A decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio in Hashimoto's thyroiditis hypothyroid patients was observed, in contrast to an increase in the ratio in autoimmune hyperthyroid patients. This points to the CD4/CD8 ratio as a differential characteristic between the two autoimmune (hypothyroid and hyperthyroid) entities, independent of free thyroxine levels. No significant correlation was found between antithyroid antibody levels and peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets or serum levels of FT4 and TSH. PMID:1342892

  13. Functional and Phenotypic Plasticity of CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Tiffany; Landas, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity of CD4+ T cells allows individuals to respond to environmental stimuli in a context-dependent manner. A balance of CD4+ T cell subsets is critical to mount responses against pathogen challenges to prevent inappropriate activation, to maintain tolerance, and to participate in antitumor immune responses. Specification of subsets is a process beginning in intrathymic development and continuing within the circulation. It is highly flexible to adapt to differences in nutrient availability and the tissue microenvironment. CD4+ T cell subsets have significant cross talk, with the ability to “dedifferentiate” given appropriate environmental signals. This ability is dependent on the metabolic status of the cell, with mTOR acting as the rheostat. Autoimmune and antitumor immune responses are regulated by the balance between regulatory T cells and Th17 cells. When a homeostatic balance of subsets is not maintained, immunopathology can result. CD4+ T cells carry complex roles within tumor microenvironments, with context-dependent immune responses influenced by oncogenic drivers and the presence of inflammation. Here, we examine the signals involved in CD4+ T cell specification towards each subset, interconnectedness of cytokine networks, impact of mTOR signaling, and cellular metabolism in lineage specification and provide a supplement describing techniques to study these processes. PMID:26583116

  14. Subsetting and Formatting Landsat-7 LOR ETM+ and Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Processing System (LPS) processes Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) instrument data into large, contiguous segments called "subintervals" and stores them in Level OR (LOR) data files. The LPS processed subinterval products must be subsetted and reformatted before the Level I processing systems can ingest them. The initial full subintervals produced by the LPS are stored mainly in HDF Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS) format which is an extension to the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). The final LOR products are stored in native HDF format. Primarily the EOS Core System (ECS) and alternately the DAAC Emergency System (DES) subset the subinterval data for the operational Landsat-7 data processing systems. The HDF and HDF-EOS application programming interfaces (APIs) can be used for extensive data subsetting and data reorganization. A stand-alone subsetter tool has been developed which is based on some of the DES code. This tool makes use of the HDF and HDFEOS APIs to perform Landsat-7 LOR product subsetting and demonstrates how HDF and HDFEOS can be used for creating various configurations of full LOR products. How these APIs can be used to efficiently subset, format, and organize Landsat-7 LOR data as demonstrated by the subsetter tool and the DES is discussed.

  15. Job Enrichment in Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourman, Louis S.; Jones, Jo

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 10 participants in Ohio State University's job enrichment program for midcareer extension agents found that 5 returned to their same jobs after the experience but only 2 felt challenged/renewed. Part-time participation while working made it difficult to balance responsibilities. More information and a structured orientation were…

  16. Designing job enrichment projects.

    PubMed

    Clakeley, G L

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a management strategy for a job satisfaction program utilized in a large occupational therapy department. The goal of the program is to retain satisfied, productive employees and reduce attrition of therapists and assistants. The use of job enrichment projects for occupational therapy assistants will be presented with brief descriptions of two projects. PMID:23944880

  17. Enrichments in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Paul W.

    1969-01-01

    Emphasizes the need for enrichment materials in addition to laboratory and textbook work, particularly for interested and able students. Discusses the use of filmstrips, loop films, Innovations to Inquiry, BSCS pamphlets, newspapers, magazines and scientific periodicals, television, field trips, library resources, and programed units. (EB)

  18. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  19. Science Student Enrichment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This document was developed with the intention of increasing California public school students' awareness of and participation in science-related enrichment activities. Some of the activities are intended for participation by individuals, while others are meant for teams of students. These annual events are listed in chronological order for a…

  20. Enriching Number Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring number systems of other cultures can be an enjoyable learning experience that enriches students' knowledge of numbers and number systems in important ways. It helps students deepen mental computation fluency, knowledge of place value, and equivalent representations for numbers. This article describes how the author designed her…

  1. NKT cell subsets as key participants in liver physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Keya; Marrero, Idania; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that generally recognize lipid antigens and are enriched in microvascular compartments of the liver. NKT cells can be activated by self- or microbial-lipid antigens and by signaling through toll-like receptors. Following activation, NKT cells rapidly secrete pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and thereby determine the milieu for subsequent immunity or tolerance. It is becoming clear that two different subsets of NKT cells—type I and type II—have different modes of antigen recognition and have opposing roles in inflammatory liver diseases. Here we focus mainly on the roles of both NKT cell subsets in the maintenance of immune tolerance and inflammatory diseases in liver. Furthermore, how the differential activation of type I and type II NKT cells influences other innate cells and adaptive immune cells to result in important consequences for tissue integrity is discussed. It is crucial that better reagents, including CD1d tetramers, be used in clinical studies to define the roles of NKT cells in liver diseases in patients. PMID:26972772

  2. Multi-lingual search engine to access PubMed monolingual subsets: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Darmoni, Stéfan J; Soualmia, Lina F; Griffon, Nicolas; Grosjean, Julien; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Kergourlay, Ivan; Dahamna, Badisse

    2013-01-01

    PubMed contains many articles in languages other than English but it is difficult to find them using the English version of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Thesaurus. The aim of this work is to propose a tool allowing access to a PubMed subset in one language, and to evaluate its performance. Translations of MeSH were enriched and gathered in the information system. PubMed subsets in main European languages were also added in our database, using a dedicated parser. The CISMeF generic semantic search engine was evaluated on the response time for simple queries. MeSH descriptors are currently available in 11 languages in the information system. All the 654,000 PubMed citations in French were integrated into CISMeF database. None of the response times exceed the threshold defined for usability (2 seconds). It is now possible to freely access biomedical literature in French using a tool in French; health professionals and lay people with a low English language may find it useful. It will be expended to several European languages: German, Spanish, Norwegian and Portuguese. PMID:23920740

  3. Subset-sum phase transitions and data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhav, Neri

    2011-09-01

    We propose a rigorous analysis approach for the subset-sum problem in the context of lossless data compression, where the phase transition of the subset-sum problem is directly related to the passage between ambiguous and non-ambiguous decompression, for a compression scheme that is based on specifying the sequence composition. The proposed analysis lends itself to straightforward extensions in several directions of interest, including non-binary alphabets, incorporation of side information at the decoder (Slepian-Wolf coding), and coding schemes based on multiple subset sums. It is also demonstrated that the proposed technique can be used to analyze the critical behavior in a more involved situation where the sequence composition is not specified by the encoder.

  4. Direct immunomagnetic quantification of lymphocyte subsets in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Brinchmann, J E; Vartdal, F; Gaudernack, G; Markussen, G; Funderud, S; Ugelstad, J; Thorsby, E

    1988-01-01

    A method is described where superparamagnetic polymer microspheres coated with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) are used for the direct and fast quantification of the absolute number of cells of various lymphocyte subsets in blood. Blood samples were incubated with microspheres coated with a subset specific MoAb. Using a magnet the microsphere-rosetted cells were isolated and washed. Following lysis of the cell walls to detach the microspheres, the cell nuclei were stained with acridine orange and counted in a haemocytometer using an immunofluorescence microscope. With MoAb specific for CD2, CD4, CD8 and CD19, reproducible absolute counts of the corresponding lymphocyte subsets were obtained which correlated closely with those obtained by an indirect quantification method. PMID:3349645

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  6. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  7. Enrichment Strategies in Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive study of the phosphoproteome is heavily dependent on appropriate enrichment strategies that are most often, but not exclusively, carried out on the peptide level. In this chapter, I give an overview of the most widely used techniques. In addition to dedicated antibodies, phosphopeptides are enriched by their selective interaction with metals in the form of chelated metal ions or metal oxides. The negative charge of the phosphate group is also exploited in a variety of chromatographic fractionation methods that include different types of ion exchange chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and electrostatic repulsion HILIC (ERLIC) chromatography. Selected examples from the literature will demonstrate how a combination of these techniques with current high-performance mass spectrometry enables the identification of thousands of phosphorylation sites from various sample types. PMID:26584921

  8. Feature Subset Selection, Class Separability, and Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-01-21

    The performance of classification algorithms in machine learning is affected by the features used to describe the labeled examples presented to the inducers. Therefore, the problem of feature subset selection has received considerable attention. Genetic approaches to this problem usually follow the wrapper approach: treat the inducer as a black box that is used to evaluate candidate feature subsets. The evaluations might take a considerable time and the traditional approach might be unpractical for large data sets. This paper describes a hybrid of a simple genetic algorithm and a method based on class separability applied to the selection of feature subsets for classification problems. The proposed hybrid was compared against each of its components and two other feature selection wrappers that are used widely. The objective of this paper is to determine if the proposed hybrid presents advantages over the other methods in terms of accuracy or speed in this problem. The experiments used a Naive Bayes classifier and public-domain and artificial data sets. The experiments suggest that the hybrid usually finds compact feature subsets that give the most accurate results, while beating the execution time of the other wrappers.

  9. A SOAP Web Service for accessing MODIS land product subsets

    SciTech Connect

    SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B; Pan, Jerry Yun; Wilson, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing data from satellites have provided valuable information on the state of the earth for several decades. Since March 2000, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites have been providing estimates of several land parameters useful in understanding earth system processes at global, continental, and regional scales. However, the HDF-EOS file format, specialized software needed to process the HDF-EOS files, data volume, and the high spatial and temporal resolution of MODIS data make it difficult for users wanting to extract small but valuable amounts of information from the MODIS record. To overcome this usability issue, the NASA-funded Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a Web service that provides subsets of MODIS land products using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The ORNL DAAC MODIS subsetting Web service is a unique way of serving satellite data that exploits a fairly established and popular Internet protocol to allow users access to massive amounts of remote sensing data. The Web service provides MODIS land product subsets up to 201 x 201 km in a non-proprietary comma delimited text file format. Users can programmatically query the Web service to extract MODIS land parameters for real time data integration into models, decision support tools or connect to workflow software. Information regarding the MODIS SOAP subsetting Web service is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://daac.ornl.gov/modiswebservice.

  10. SAGE II v6.20 Binary File Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... files. The tool is written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The subset may be specified by latitude and longitude regions ...

  11. Histone Deacetylation Critically Determines T-cell Subset Radiosensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jason L.; Sukhina, Alona S.; Seed, Thomas M.; Manley, Nancy R.; Sempowski, Gregory A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Smithey, Megan J.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are sensitive to ionizing radiation and naïve lymphocytes are more radiosensitive than their memory counterparts. Less is known about radiosensitivity of memory cell subsets. We examined the radiosensitivity of naïve (TN), effector memory (TEM), and central memory (TCM) T cell subsets in C57BL/6 mice, and found TEM to be more resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis than either TN or TCM. Surprisingly, we found no correlation between the extent of radiation-induced apoptosis in T cell subsets and : (i) levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members; or (ii) the H2-AX content and maximal γH2-AX fold change. Rather, TEM cell survival correlated with higher levels of immediate γH2-AX marking, immediate break binding and genome-wide open chromatin structure. T cells were able to mark DNA damage seemingly instantly (30 s), even if kept on ice. Relaxing chromatin with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid following radiation or etoposide treatment, improved the survival of TCM and TN cells up to levels seen in the resistant TEM cells, but did not improve survival from caspase-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that an open genome-wide chromatin state is the key determinant of efficient immediate repair of DNA damage in T cells, explaining the observed T cell subset radiosensitivity differences. PMID:24990082

  12. Pathogenic Th cell subsets in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Jin; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

      CD4(+) T cells play central roles to appropriate protection against pathogens. While, they can also be pathogenic driving inflammatory diseases. Besides the classical model of differentiation of T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cells, various CD4(+) T cell subsets, including Th17, Th9, T follicular helper (Tfh) and T regulatory (Treg) cells, have been recognized recently. In this review, we will focus on how these various CD4(+) T cell subsets contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. We will also discuss various unique subpopulations of T helper cells that have been identified. Recent advancement of the basic immunological research revealed that T helper cells are plastic than we imagined. So, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of the plasticity and heterogeneity of T helper cell subsets. These latest finding regarding T helper cell subsets has pushed us to reconsider the etiology of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases beyond the model based on the conventional Th1/Th2 balance. Toward this end, we put forward another model, "the pathogenic Th population disease induction model", as a possible mechanism for the induction and/or persistence of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:27212597

  13. Codes With Parity Conditions on Subsets of Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E.; Reichstein, Z.

    1986-01-01

    New theorems aid search for efficient code alphabets. Paper discusses theory of finding largest binary codes 2k bits in length, in which all words differ from each other in at least d places and in which words truncated by ignoring certain subsets of bit positions belong to shorter linear codes.

  14. Ordering Elements and Subsets: Examples for Student Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellinger, Keith E.

    2004-01-01

    Teaching the art of counting can be quite difficult. Many undergraduate students have difficulty separating the ideas of permutation, combination, repetition, etc. This article develops some examples to help explain some of the underlying theory while looking carefully at the selection of various subsets of objects from a larger collection. The…

  15. Clustering, Seriation, and Subset Extraction of Confusion Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The study of confusion data is a well established practice in psychology. Although many types of analytical approaches for confusion data are available, among the most common methods are the extraction of 1 or more subsets of stimuli, the partitioning of the complete stimulus set into distinct groups, and the ordering of the stimulus set. Although…

  16. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  17. Studies on human blood lymphocytes with iC3b (type 3) complement receptors. II. Characterization of subsets which regulate pokeweed mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Abo, W; Gray, J D; Bakke, A C; Horwitz, D A

    1987-01-01

    Human blood lymphocytes that express Type 3 complement receptors (CR3) can be divided into a major subset with high density Fc receptors for IgG (FcR) identified with the monoclonal antibody Leu 11 and two minor subsets which display either CD8 (Leu 2) or CD4 (Leu 3) markers. We isolated CR3+ lymphocyte subsets and examined them for regulatory effects on pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated cells. The FCR CR3+ cell suppressed PWM-induced proliferation and Ig production. Pretreatment of these lymphocytes with immune complexes was required to suppress proliferation, but not IgG production. The CR3+ Leu 2+ FCR- subset also had suppressive activity, but this effect was not observed unless the CR3+ Leu 3+ enriched subset was removed. In fact, the CR3+ Leu 3+ enriched subset enhanced IgG synthesis. Brief exposure of CR3+ lymphocytes to recombinant interleukin 2, recombinant alpha-interferon, but not gamma-interferon, markedly enhanced the inhibitory effect. Time course studies and a comparison of inhibition of Ig synthesis with natural killer cell activity suggested that CR3+ lymphocytes act shortly after lymphocytes are exposed to PWM and that Ig production was regulated by suppression rather than cytotoxicity. These CR3+ lymphocyte subsets may have broad antigen non-specific effects on immunoglobulin synthesis. PMID:2955973

  18. Quantitative reconstruction of leukocyte subsets using DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lineage-specific DNA methylation patterns distinguish normal human leukocyte subsets and can be used to detect and quantify these subsets in peripheral blood. We have developed an approach that uses DNA methylation to simultaneously quantify multiple leukocyte subsets, enabling investigation of immune modulations in virtually any blood sample including archived samples previously precluded from such analysis. Here we assess the performance characteristics and validity of this approach. Results Using Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 and VeraCode GoldenGate Methylation Assay microarrays, we measure DNA methylation in leukocyte subsets purified from human whole blood and identify cell lineage-specific DNA methylation signatures that distinguish human T cells, B cells, NK cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and neutrophils. We employ a bioinformatics-based approach to quantify these cell types in complex mixtures, including whole blood, using DNA methylation at as few as 20 CpG loci. A reconstruction experiment confirms that the approach could accurately measure the composition of mixtures of human blood leukocyte subsets. Applying the DNA methylation-based approach to quantify the cellular components of human whole blood, we verify its accuracy by direct comparison to gold standard immune quantification methods that utilize physical, optical and proteomic characteristics of the cells. We also demonstrate that the approach is not affected by storage of blood samples, even under conditions prohibiting the use of gold standard methods. Conclusions Cell mixture distributions within peripheral blood can be assessed accurately and reliably using DNA methylation. Thus, precise immune cell differential estimates can be reconstructed using only DNA rather than whole cells. PMID:24598480

  19. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  20. Cellular heterogeneity profiling by hyaluronan probes reveals an invasive but slow-growing breast tumor subset

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Kwon, Daniel H.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Tolg, Cornelia; Leong, Hon S.; Lewis, John D.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity confounds cancer diagnosis and the outcome of therapy, necessitating analysis of tumor cell subsets within the tumor mass. Elevated expression of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors, receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM)/HA-mediated motility receptor and cluster designation 44 (CD44), in breast tumors correlates with poor outcome. We hypothesized that a probe for detecting HA–HA receptor interactions may reveal breast cancer (BCa) cell heterogeneity relevant to tumor progression. A fluorescent HA (F-HA) probe containing a mixture of polymer sizes typical of tumor microenvironments (10–480 kDa), multiplexed profiling, and flow cytometry were used to monitor HA binding to BCa cell lines of different molecular subtypes. Formulae were developed to quantify binding heterogeneity and to measure invasion in vivo. Two subsets exhibiting differential binding (HA−/low vs. HAhigh) were isolated and characterized for morphology, growth, and invasion in culture and as xenografts in vivo. F-HA–binding amounts and degree of heterogeneity varied with BCa subtype, were highest in the malignant basal-like cell lines, and decreased upon reversion to a nonmalignant phenotype. Binding amounts correlated with CD44 and RHAMM displayed but binding heterogeneity appeared to arise from a differential ability of HA receptor-positive subpopulations to interact with F-HA. HAhigh subpopulations exhibited significantly higher local invasion and lung micrometastases but, unexpectedly, lower proliferation than either unsorted parental cells or the HA−/low subpopulation. Querying F-HA binding to aggressive tumor cells reveals a previously undetected form of heterogeneity that predicts invasive/metastatic behavior and that may aid both early identification of cancer patients susceptible to metastasis, and detection/therapy of invasive BCa subpopulations. PMID:24733940

  1. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  2. A reassessment of IgM memory subsets in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors we performed high-throughput V-h sequencing of human B-cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD+CD27+ (“MZ”), IgD−CD27+(“memory”, including IgM (“IgM-only”), IgG and IgA) and IgD−CD27− cells (“double-negative”, including IgM, IgG and IgA). 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for Vh-gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and Vh/Jh usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin, for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency, and lower Vh4 and higher Jh6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (between MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The “IgM-only” subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27+ switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells, and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  3. Clogging the enrichment bypass

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The issue that has come to be known as the bypass is the latest dispute in the continuing saga of uranium trade between the United States and the Commonwealth of Indepenent States. Bypass deals now being conducted by US utilities have drawn heavy criticism from the US Department of Commerce but are perfectly legal under the terms of the Suspension Agreements. Urged on by the United States Enrichment Corporation, the US DOC intends to stop, or at least severely restrict, bypass deals. Using a recent agreement with Kazakhstan as a case study, this article reviews the implications of such bypass deals.

  4. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. PMID:24891218

  5. Immune checkpoint blockade reveals the stimulatory capacity of tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells in late-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Harris, Jaryse C; Jha, Vibha; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2016-08-01

    Although immune infiltrates in ovarian cancer are associated with improved survival, the ovarian tumor environment has been characterized as immunosuppressive, due in part to functional shifts among dendritic cells with disease progression. We hypothesized that flux in dendritic cell subpopulations with cancer progression were responsible for observed differences in antitumor immune responses in early and late-stage disease. Here we identify three dendritic cell subsets with disparate functions in the ovarian tumor environment. CD11c+CD11b(-)CD103(+) dendritic cells are absent in the peritoneal cavity of healthy mice but comprise up to 40% of dendritic cells in tumor-bearing mice and retain T cell stimulatory capacity in advanced disease. Among CD11c+CD11b+ cells, Lair-1 expression distinguishes stimulatory and immunoregulatory DC subsets, which are also enriched in the tumor environment. Notably, PD-L1 is expressed by Lair-1(hi) immunoregulatory dendritic cells, and may contribute to local tumor antigen-specific T cell dysfunction. Using an adoptive transfer model, we find that PD-1 blockade enables tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells to promote disease clearance. These data demonstrate that antitumor immune capacity is maintained among local dendritic cell subpopulations in the tumor environment with cancer progression. Similar dendritic cell subsets are present in malignant ascites from women with ovarian cancer, supporting the translational relevance of these results. PMID:27622059

  6. A short and valid measure of work-family enrichment.

    PubMed

    Kacmar, K Michele; Crawford, Wayne S; Carlson, Dawn S; Ferguson, Merideth; Whitten, Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    The stream of research concerning work-family enrichment has generated a significant body of research because it plays an important role in occupational health (Masuda, McNall, Allen, & Nicklin, 2012). work-family enrichment has been defined as "the extent to which experiences in one role improve the quality of life in the other role" (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006, p. 73). Within work-family enrichment, there are two directions: work to family and family to work. Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, and Grzywacz (2006) developed an 18-item scale to measure this construct. Although the scale has been shown to be both reliable and valid, it also requires work-family researchers to include a proportionally large number of items to capture this construct in a study. The goal of the current study was to isolate a subset of the items in this measure that produces results similar to the full version thereby providing a more streamlined scale for researchers. Using a five-sample study that follows the scale reduction procedures offered by Stanton, Sinar, Balzer, and Smith (2002), we provide evidence that scales containing only three items for each direction of enrichment produce results equivalent to the full scale with respect to reliability and discriminant, convergent, and predictive validity. Reducing the original scale by two thirds, without losing explanatory power, allows scholars to measure enrichment in the work and family domains more efficiently, which should help minimize survey time, lower refusal rates, and generate less missing data. PMID:24447219

  7. Design of a verifiable subset for HAL/S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.; Good, D. I.; Tripathi, A. R.; Young, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt to evaluate the applicability of program verification techniques to the existing programming language, HAL/S is discussed. HAL/S is a general purpose high level language designed to accommodate the software needs of the NASA Space Shuttle project. A diversity of features for scientific computing, concurrent and real-time programming, and error handling are discussed. The criteria by which features were evaluated for inclusion into the verifiable subset are described. Individual features of HAL/S with respect to these criteria are examined and justification for the omission of various features from the subset is provided. Conclusions drawn from the research are presented along with recommendations made for the use of HAL/S with respect to the area of program verification.

  8. Auditing Complex Concepts in Overlapping Subsets of SNOMED

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wei, Duo; Xu, Junchuan; Elhanan, Gai; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Chen, Yan; Spackman, Kent A.; Hripcsak, George

    2008-01-01

    Limited resources and the sheer volume of concepts make auditing a large terminology, such as SNOMED CT, a daunting task. It is essential to devise techniques that can aid an auditor by automatically identifying concepts that deserve attention. A methodology for this purpose based on a previously introduced abstraction network (called the p-area taxonomy) for a SNOMED CT hierarchy is presented. The methodology algorithmically gathers concepts appearing in certain overlapping subsets, defined exclusively with respect to the p-area taxonomy, for review. The results of applying the methodology to SNOMED’s Specimen hierarchy are presented. These results are compared against a control sample composed of concepts residing in subsets without the overlaps. With the use of the double bootstrap, the concept group produced by our methodology is shown to yield a statistically significant higher proportion of error discoveries. PMID:18998838

  9. Variable selection with stepwise and best subset approaches

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While purposeful selection is performed partly by software and partly by hand, the stepwise and best subset approaches are automatically performed by software. Two R functions stepAIC() and bestglm() are well designed for stepwise and best subset regression, respectively. The stepAIC() function begins with a full or null model, and methods for stepwise regression can be specified in the direction argument with character values “forward”, “backward” and “both”. The bestglm() function begins with a data frame containing explanatory variables and response variables. The response variable should be in the last column. Varieties of goodness-of-fit criteria can be specified in the IC argument. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) usually results in more parsimonious model than the Akaike information criterion. PMID:27162786

  10. Robust enumeration of cell subsets from tissue expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron M.; Liu, Chih Long; Green, Michael R.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Feng, Weiguo; Xu, Yue; Hoang, Chuong D.; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce CIBERSORT, a method for characterizing cell composition of complex tissues from their gene expression profiles. When applied to enumeration of hematopoietic subsets in RNA mixtures from fresh, frozen, and fixed tissues, including solid tumors, CIBERSORT outperformed other methods with respect to noise, unknown mixture content, and closely related cell types. CIBERSORT should enable large-scale analysis of RNA mixtures for cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets (http://cibersort.stanford.edu). PMID:25822800