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Sample records for cancer surgery methods

  1. Estimation Methods in a Magnetic Marking System for Cancer Surgery

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Estimation Methods in a Magnetic Marking System for Cancer Surgery Maia Werbos Introduction Current and convenience. To combat these, a device is being developed to use magnetic marking in surgery. In this system, a small permanent magnet is inserted into the affected region before surgery; during surgery, a device

  2. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for gallbladder cancer Surgery for gallbladder cancer There are 2 general types ... gallbladder: Potentially curative surgery Palliative surgery Potentially curative surgery is done when imaging tests or the results ...

  3. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer care team right away. Reconstructive or breast implant surgery After having a mastectomy (or certain breast- ... Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To ...

  4. Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Siew Yim; Musa, Aisya Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Context Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer amongst women but it has the highest survival rates amongst all cancer. Rehabilitation therapy of post-treatment effects from cancer and its treatment is needed to improve functioning and quality of life. This review investigated the range of methods for improving physical, psychosocial, occupational, and social wellbeing in women with breast cancer after receiving breast cancer surgery. Method A search for articles published in English between the years 2009 and 2014 was carried out using The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. Search terms included: ‘breast cancer’, ‘breast carcinoma’, ‘surgery’, ‘mastectomy’, ‘lumpectomy’, ‘breast conservation’, ‘axillary lymph node dissection’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘therapy’, ‘physiotherapy’, ‘occupational therapy’, ‘psychological’, ‘psychosocial’, ‘psychotherapy’, ‘exercise’, ‘physical activity’, ‘cognitive’, ‘occupational’, ‘alternative’, ‘complementary’, and ‘systematic review’. Study selection Systematic reviews on the effectiveness of rehabilitation methods in improving post-operative physical, and psychological outcomes for breast cancer were selected. Sixteen articles met all the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Data extraction Included review year, study aim, total number of participants included, and results. Data synthesis Evidence for exercise rehabilitation is predominantly in the improvement of shoulder mobility and limb strength. Inconclusive results exist for a range of rehabilitation methods (physical, psycho-education, nutritional, alternative-complementary methods) for addressing the domains of psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. Conclusion There is good evidence for narrowly-focused exercise rehabilitation in improving physical outcome particularly for shoulder mobility and lymphedema. There were inconclusive results for methods to improve psychosocial, cognitive, and occupational outcomes. There were no reviews on broader performance areas and lifestyle factors to enable effective living after treatment. The review suggests that comprehensiveness and effectiveness of post-operative breast cancer rehabilitation should consider patients’ self-management approaches towards lifestyle redesign, and incorporate health promotion aspects, in light of the fact that breast cancer is now taking the form of a chronic illness with longer survivorship years. PMID:25792854

  5. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC. PMID:26425265

  6. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15·2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US$6·2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery-eg, pathology and imaging-are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  7. A novel, validated method to quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following bilateral breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, C L; Specht, M C; Horick, N; Skolny, M N; Jammallo, L S; O'Toole, J; Taghian, A G

    2013-06-01

    We sought to develop a formula to quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) after bilateral breast surgery, which functions independently of the contralateral arm and accounts for fluctuations in patient weight. Perometer arm measurements from 265 unilateral breast surgery patients were analyzed. We assessed the relationship between change in patient weight and contralateral arm volume and developed a weight-adjusted volume change formula (WAC). The WAC formula and previously-established RVC formula were compared for classification of BCRL (> or = 10% volume increase) in unilateral breast surgery patients. We then evaluated BCRL incidence using the WAC formula in 225 bilateral mastectomy patients. Change in patient weight and contralateral arm volume demonstrated an approximately linear relationship. Weight-adjusted arm volume change (WAC) was therefore calculated as WAC = (A2*W1)/(W2*A1) - 1 where A1 is pre-operative and A2 is post-operative arm volume, and W1, W2 are the patient's corresponding weights. In the unilateral analysis, there was no significant difference in number of patients classified as having BCRL using the RVC and WAC formulas (p = 0.65). In bilateral mastectomy patients 11.1% (25/225) developed BCRL, defined as > or = 10% WAC. Independent risk factors for lymphedema included axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and higher pre-operative BMI (p<0.05). Use of this weight-adjusted arm volume change formula should be of value for quantification of BCRL after bilateral breast surgery. PMID:24354105

  8. Surgery for Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Radiation therapy for bile duct cancer Surgery for bile duct cancer There are 2 general ... also help plan the operation to remove it. Surgery for resectable cancers For resectable cancers, the type ...

  9. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of ... and/or a medical oncologist. Types of breast surgery Most men with breast cancer have some type ...

  10. Pancreatic cancer after remote peptic ulcer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tascilar, M; van Rees, B P; Sturm, P D J; Tytgat, G N J; Hruban, R H; Goodman, S N; Giardiello, F M; Offerhaus, G J A; Tersmette, A C

    2002-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcer surgery may carry an increased risk for pancreatic cancer development. Molecular analysis of K-ras codon 12, frequently mutated in conventional pancreatic cancers, might provide insight into the aetiological mechanisms. Methods: The relative risk of pancreatic cancer was computed by multivariate and person–year analysis in a cohort of 2633 patients who had undergone gastrectomy. Lung cancer risk was analysed as an indirect means of assessing smoking behaviour. K-ras codon 12 mutational analysis was performed on 15 postgastrectomy pancreatic cancers. Results: There was an overall increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma of 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 2.6) five to 59 years postoperatively, which gradually increased to 3.6 at 35 years or more after surgery (?2 test for trend, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that parameters other than postoperative interval did not influence the risk. Lung cancer risk was significantly increased after surgery, but no time trend was observed. The spectrum and prevalence of K-ras codon 12 mutations were comparable to conventional pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Remote partial gastrectomy is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Postgastrectomy and non-postgastrectomy pancreatic cancers may share similar aetiological factors, such as smoking. However, the neoplastic process in patients who have undergone gastrectomy appears to be accelerated by factors related to the surgery itself. PMID:11986336

  11. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testicular Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating Testicular Cancer TOPICS Document ...

  12. Improving the outcomes in gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tegels, Juul JW; De Maat, Michiel FG; Hulsewé, Karel WE; Hoofwijk, Anton GM; Stoot, Jan HMB

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant health problem worldwide and surgery is currently the only potentially curative treatment option. Gastric cancer surgery is generally considered to be high risk surgery and five-year survival rates are poor, therefore a continuous strive to improve outcomes for these patients is warranted. Fortunately, in the last decades several potential advances have been introduced that intervene at various stages of the treatment process. This review provides an overview of methods implemented in pre-, intra- and postoperative stage of gastric cancer surgery to improve outcome. Better preoperative risk assessment using comorbidity index (e.g., Charlson comorbidity index), assessment of nutritional status (e.g., short nutritional assessment questionnaire, nutritional risk screening - 2002) and frailty assessment (Groningen frailty indicator, Edmonton frail scale, Hopkins frailty) was introduced. Also preoperative optimization of patients using prehabilitation has future potential. Implementation of fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery programs is showing promising results, although future studies have to determine what the exact optimal strategy is. Introduction of laparoscopic surgery has shown improvement of results as well as optimization of lymph node dissection. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has not shown to be beneficial in peritoneal metastatic disease thus far. Advances in postoperative care include optimal timing of oral diet, which has been shown to reduce hospital stay. In general, hospital volume, i.e., centralization, and clinical audits might further improve the outcome in gastric cancer surgery. In conclusion, progress has been made in improving the surgical treatment of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer treatment is high risk surgery and many areas for future research remain. PMID:25320507

  13. Intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery: from current fluorescence molecular imaging methods to future multi-modality imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  14. Intraoperative Imaging-Guided Cancer Surgery: From Current Fluorescence Molecular Imaging Methods to Future Multi-Modality Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  15. Pancreatic Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helps keep the bile duct open and resists compression from the surrounding cancer. After several months, the ... like instruments. One of these has a small video camera on the end to let the surgeon ...

  16. Surgery for Pre-Cancers and Cancers of the Cervix

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Cervical Cancer » Overview Guide » Surgery for cancer of the cervix ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Cervical Cancer Overview + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating ...

  17. Chemo Before Surgery May Help Stomach Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy given before surgery for cancer of the lower esophagus and stomach increased the number of patients surviving for five years compared to surgery alone, according to findings presented at the 2007 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  18. Validation of colorectal cancer surgery data from administrative data sources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgery is the primary treatment for colorectal cancer for both curative and palliative intent. Availability of high quality surgery data is essential for assessing many aspects of the quality of colorectal cancer care. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of different administrative data sources in identifying surgery for colorectal cancer with respect to completeness and accuracy. Methods All residents in Alberta, Canada who were diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer in years 2000-2005 were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry and included in the study. Surgery data for these patients were obtained from the Cancer Registry (which collects the date of surgery for which the primary tumor was removed) and compared to surgery data obtained from two different administrative data sources: Physician Billing and Hospital Inpatient data. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and observed agreement were calculated compared to the Cancer Registry data. Results The Physician Billing data alone or combined with Hospital Inpatient data demonstrated equally high sensitivity (97% for both) and observed agreement with the Cancer Registry data (93% for both) for identifying surgeries. The Hospital Inpatient data, however, had the highest specificity (80%). The positive predictive value varied by disease stage and across data sources for stage IV (99% for stages I-III and 83-89% for stage IV), the specificity is better for colon cancer surgeries (72-85%) than for rectal cancer surgeries (60-73%); validation measures did not vary over time. Conclusion Physician Billing data identify the colorectal cancer surgery more completely than Hospital Inpatient data although both sources have a high level of completeness. PMID:22784239

  19. Surgery for Cancer of the Vulva (Vulvectomy)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Pelvic exenteration Surgery for cancer of the vulva (vulvectomy) Cancer of the vulva is sometimes treated by removing all or part of the vulva. This operation is called a vulvectomy . A partial ...

  20. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19th century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20th century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  1. Anesthetic Techniques and Cancer Recurrence after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    D'Arrigo, Maria G.; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients. PMID:24683330

  2. [Intrapericardial Vessel Management for Lung Cancer Surgery].

    PubMed

    Oka, Soichi; Matsumiya, Hiroki; Shinohara, Syuichi; Kuwata, Taiji; Takenaka, Masaru; Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Hirai, Ayako; Tashima, Yuko; Imanishi, Naoko; Nagata, Yoshika; Kuroda, Koji; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2015-09-01

    Intrapericardial vessel management is one of the necessary techniques for respiratory surgeons. We collected cases that had undergone intrapericardial vessel management for lung cancer, and herein discuss the practical performance and safety of this treatment method. We identified 23 (5.6%) of 413 patients who had undergone lung cancer surgery during the 30-month period from January 2011 to June 2013 at our institution. Twenty cases had large sized tumors near the hilum. Three cases demonstrated severe adhesion in the intrathoracic region due to a previous operation. The lung cancer staging was stage ?A in 1 case, stage ?B in 4 cases, stage ?B in 5 cases, stage ?A in 11 cases, stage ?B in 1 case, and stage ? in 1 case. We performed lobectomy in 11 cases, bilobectomy in 6 cases, and pneumonectomy in 6 cases. The average operation time was 366 minutes (137-965). Post operative complications were observed in five cases, including two cases of air-leakage and three cases of arrhythmia. All cases were able to walk on foot at discharge. It is important to clearly understand intrapericardial anatomy in order to carry out successful intrapericadial vessel management. PMID:26370042

  3. Prostate Cancer: Radical Prostatectomy (Surgery)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... has been replaced with robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy (RALP) The prostate is removed through ports in your belly using a robotic system. The system holds and guides the laparoscopic ...

  4. New Technologies in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thill, Marc; Baumann, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Since breast-conserving surgery has become the gold standard for early breast cancer, the development of less radical or less burdensome technologies has been pressed for in order to preserve the patient from unnecessary harm through the operative procedure. Different technical approaches are under evaluation, and some of them are already being used in the clinical setting. The aim of this article is to present a perspective on future breast cancer surgery by shedding light on the current innovative and new techniques. PMID:24647775

  5. MRIs Before Breast Cancer Surgery on the Rise

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154801.html MRIs Before Breast Cancer Surgery on the Rise: Study Use of imaging ... HealthDay News) -- The use of MRI scans before breast cancer surgery has risen eightfold over the past decade, ...

  6. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This clinical trial studies lymphedema after surgery in patients with endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, or vulvar cancer. Collecting information over time about how often lymphedema occurs in patients undergoing surgery and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, and vulvar cancer may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

  7. Cancer stem cells in surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’ANDREA, V.; GUARINO, S.; DI MATTEO, F.M.; SACCÀ, M. MAUGERI; DE MARIA, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) hypothesis is based on three fundamental ideas: 1) the similarities in the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal of normal stem cells and cancer cells; 2) the possibility that tumour cells might arise from normal stem cells; 3) the notion that tumours might contain ‘cancer stem cells’ - rare cells with indefinite proliferative potential that drive the formation and growth of tumours. The roles for cancer stem cells have been demonstrated for some cancers, such as cancers of the hematopoietic system, breast, brain, prostate, pancreas and liver. The attractive idea about cancer stem cell hypothesis is that it could partially explain the concept of minimal residual disease. After surgical macroscopically zero residual (R0) resections, even the persistence of one single cell nestling in one of the so called “CSCs niches” could give rise to distant relapse. Furthermore the metastatic cells can remain in a “dormant status” and give rise to disease after long period of apparent disease free. These cells in many cases have acquired resistance traits to chemo and radiotherapy making adjuvant treatment vain. Clarifying the role of the cancer stem cells and their implications in the oncogenesis will play an important role in the management of cancer patient by identifying new prospective for drugs and specific markers to prevent and monitoring relapse and metastasis. The identification of the niche where the CSCs reside in a dormant status might represent a valid instrument to follow-up patients also after having obtained a R0 surgical resection. What we believe is that if new diagnostic instruments were developed specifically to identify the localization and status of activity of the CSCs during tumor dormancy, this would lead to impressive improvement in the early detection and management of relapse and metastasis. PMID:25644725

  8. [Radioimmunoguided surgery in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Murawa, Dawid; Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Nowakowski, Wojciech; Murawa, Pawe?

    2002-10-01

    Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) is a technique that enables to determine the extent of a primary, as well as of a recurrent tumour and its local and distant spread. Before the surgery the patient is administered with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies targeted against the tumour-associated antigen. The radiotracer and, in consequence, the tumour cells localisation is detected intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma detecting probe. Local assessment of tumour, regional lymph nodes or other organs (particularly liver), may allow a more complete surgical clearance of carcinoma lesions. This article presents the idea of RIGS technique (use of monoclonal antibodies, isotopes, and gamma detecting probe) and the results of worldwide clinical investigations conducted during the last years. PMID:12557446

  9. Surgery for pancreatic cancer - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2014: 481-487. Jensen EH, Borja-Cacho D, ...

  10. Role of primary surgery in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Münstedt, Karsten; Franke, Folker E

    2004-01-01

    Background Major issues in surgery for advanced ovarian cancer remain unresolved. Existing treatment guidelines are supported by a few published reports and fewer prospective randomized clinical trials. Methods We reviewed published reports on primary surgical treatment, surgical expertise, inadequate primary surgery/quality assurance, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, interval debulking, and surgical prognostic factors in advanced ovarian cancer to help resolve outstanding issues. Results The aim of primary surgery is a well-planned and complete intervention with optimal staging and surgery. Surgical debulking is worthwhile as there are further effective treatments available to control unresectable residual disease. Patients of gynecologic oncology specialist surgeons have better survival rates. This may reflect a working 'culture' rather than better technical skills. One major problem though, is that despite pleas to restrict surgery to experienced surgeons, specialist centers are often left to cope with the results of inadequate primary surgical resections. Patients with primary chemotherapy or those who have had suboptimal debulking may benefit from interval debulking. A proposal for a better classification of residual tumor is given. Conclusions Optimal surgical interventions have definite role to play in advanced ovarian cancers. Improvements in surgical treatment in the general population will probably improve patients' survival when coupled with improvements in current chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:15461788

  11. Robotic Surgery for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ambrogi, Marcello C; Fanucchi, Olivia; Melfi, Franco; Mussi, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade the role of minimally invasive surgery has been increased, especially with the introduction of the robotic system in the surgical field. The most important advantages of robotic system are represented by the wristed instrumentation and the depth perception, which can overcome the limitation of traditional thoracoscopy. However, some data still exist in literature with regard to robotic lobectomy. The majority of papers are focused on its safety and feasibility, but further studies with long follow-ups are necessary in order to assess the oncologic outcomes. We reviewed the literature on robotic lobectomy, with the main aim to better define the role of robotic system in the clinical practice. PMID:25207216

  12. Surgery Choices for Women With DCIS or Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Women diagnosed with DCIS or breast cancer may face a decision about which surgery to have. The choices of breast-sparing surgery, mastectomy, or mastectomy with reconstruction are explained and compared.

  13. www.yalecancercenter.org Robotic Surgery for Lung Cancer

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Robotic Surgery for Lung Cancer Guest Expert: Anthony Kim, MD Assistant and an expert in the use of radiation to treat lung cancers and cutaneous lymphomas. If you would like to join for a conversation about robotic surgery for lung cancer. Here is Francine Foss. Foss Let's start off by talking

  14. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  15. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present. PMID:25206260

  16. [Robotic surgery -- the modern surgical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ferenc János; Alexander, de la Taille

    2014-09-01

    Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery replaces many open surgery procedures in urology due to its advantages concerning post-operative morbidity. However, the technical challenges and need of learning have limited the application of this method to the work of highly qualified surgeons. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has offered important technical advantages compared to the laparoscopic surgical procedure. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy became a largely accepted procedure. It has paved the way for urologists to start other, more complex operations, decreasing this way the operative morbidity. The purpose of this article is to overview the history of robotic surgery, its current and future states in the treatment of the cancer. We present our robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and the results. PMID:25260081

  17. Thyroid cancer incidence in simultaneous thyroidectomy with parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Emirikçi, Selman; Özç?nar, Beyza; Öner, Gizem; Omarov, Nail; A?cao?lu, Orhan; Soyta?, Yi?it; Aksakal, Nihat; Yanar, Fatih; Barbaros, Umut; Erbil, Ye?im

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is often seen in conjunction with an underlying thyroid disorder. Imaging methods that are used to localize the parathyroid adenoma also detect associated thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to detect the rate of thyroid cancer identified while performing parathyroidectomy and thyroidectomy in patients with PHPT. Material and Methods: Files of all patients who were operated for PHPT and who underwent simultaneous thyroidectomy were analyzed. Data regarding parathyroid pathology, surgical procedures, indications of thyroid surgery, and pathology results were retrospectively recorded. The indications for thyroid surgery included presence of suspicious thyroid nodules in ultrasonography, increase in size of thyroid nodules in follow-up ultrasound, or presence of suspicious thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) findings. Rates of thyroid cancer detection were investigated according to definite pathology reports. Results: Eighty-three patients who underwent parathyroidectomy with a diagnosis of PHPT with concurrent thyroidectomy in Department of General Surgery, ?stanbul University ?stanbul Faculty of Medicine were included in the study. Eighteen patients were male (22%) and 65 were female (78%). The median age was 53 (18–70) years. The primary indication for parathyroidectomy was primary hyperparathyroidism in all patients. The thyroid procedures applied in addition to parathyroidectomy were lobectomy + isthmusectomy in 29 patients (35%), bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy in 20 patients (24%), bilateral total thyroidectomy in 23 patients (28%), and total thyroidectomy on one side and near total thyroidectomy to the other side in 11 patients (13%). The only indication for thyroidectomy was the presence of thyroid nodules until 2000 (20 patients, 24%). Indications in the remaining 63 patients included the presence of multiple nodules that cannot be followed up by ultrasonography in 25 patients (30%), presence of a suspicious nodule on ultrasonography in 33 patients (40%), growth in nodule size in 2 patients (2%), and detection of suspicious findings on FNAB in 3 patients (4%). Five patients (6%) were diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer, four of whom were micropapillary cancer. Conclusion: Imaging methods performed to localize the pathological parathyroid gland for a diagnosis of PHPT are useful in estimating other accompanying pathologies. Presence of thyroid nodules should be evaluated before all parathyroid procedures, and if the nodule has an indication for surgery, thyroid surgery should be considered at the same operation with parathyroid surgery. PMID:26668529

  18. High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit from Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155646.html High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit From Surgery Study showed procedure ... effective treatment option for people with early stage lung cancer, even those traditionally considered "high-risk," a new ...

  19. Breast Cancer Screening Methods

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... medlineplus/videos/news/Screening_Methods_123015.html Breast Cancer Screening Methods HealthDay News Video - December 31, 2015 ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Screening Methods For closed captioning, click the CC ...

  20. Outcomes for Organ-Preserving Surgery for Penile Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scarberry, Kyle; Angermeier, Kenneth W; Montague, Drogo; Campbell, Steven; Wood, Hadley M

    2015-01-01

    Aim Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis (PC) has traditionally been treated with partial penectomy with a 2-cm margin. More conservative resection margins have been reported to have no effect on oncologic control, but there is no consensus in the literature regarding functional outcomes after organ-preserving surgery for PC. Methods Six patients meeting inclusion criteria were retrospectively identified to have received organ-sparing surgery for PC at the Cleveland Clinic from 2003 to 2012. Patient’s sexual and urinary quality of life was assessed retrospectively using the International Index of Erectile Function and the patient-reported outcome measure for urethral stricture surgery. Results Three patients (50%) report normal erections but describe intercourse as not very enjoyable and report being dissatisfied with their sex life. The remaining 50% consistently report no sexual activity and denied feeling sexual desire. All report only mild urinary symptoms, including decreased stream (18%) and feelings of incomplete voiding (67%). Eighty-three percent of patients report their sexual symptoms do not interfere with their daily lives. One hundred percent report being satisfied with their procedure. Conclusion Our study is the first to use standardized, validated questionnaires to evaluate sexual and urinary function in a North American penile cancer patient population. We report excellent overall urinary function and quality of life following penile-sparing surgery for PC, and our results depict more realistic sexual outcomes than those reported in studies using non-blinded and non-validated methods. PMID:26185670

  1. Leakage after Surgery for Rectum Cancer: Inconsistency in Reporting to the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group

    PubMed Central

    Borly, L.; Ellebæk, M. B.; Qvist, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Anastomotic leakage accounts for up to 1/3 of all fatalities after rectal cancer surgery. Evidence suggests that anastomotic leakage has a negative prognostic impact on local cancer recurrence and long-term cancer specific survival. The reported leakage rate in 2011 in Denmark varied from 7 to 45 percent. The objective was to clarify if the reporting of anastomotic leakage to the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group was rigorous and unequivocal. Methods. An Internet-based questionnaire was e-mailed to all Danish surgical departments, who reported to Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) in 2011. There were 23 questions. Four core questions were whether pelvic collection, fecal appearance in a pelvic drain, rectovaginal fistula, and “watchfull” waiting patients were reported as anastomotic leakage. Results. Fourteen out of 17 departments, who in 2011 according to DDCG performed rectal cancer surgery, answered the questionnaire. This gave a response rate of 82%. In three of four core questions there was disagreement in what should be reported as anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. The reporting of anastomotic leakage to the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group was not rigorous and unequivocal. The reported anastomotic leakage rate in Danish Colorectal Cancer Group should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26636130

  2. Penile Rehabilitation after Pelvic Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is the most common complication after pelvic radical surgery. Rehabilitation programs are increasingly being used in clinical practice but there is no high level of evidence supporting its efficacy. The principle of early penile rehabilitation stems from animal studies showing early histological and molecular changes associated with penile corporal hypoxia after cavernous nerve injury. The concept of early penile rehabilitation was developed in late nineties with a subsequent number of clinical studies supporting early pharmacologic penile rehabilitation. These studies included all available phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and intraurethral use of prostaglandin E1 and to lesser extent vacuum erectile devices. However, these studies are of small number, difficult to interpret, and often with no control group. Furthermore, no studies have proven an in vivo derangement of endothelial or smooth muscle cell metabolism secondary to a prolonged flaccid state. The purpose of the present report is a synthetic overview of the literature in order to analyze the concept and the rationale of rehabilitation program of erectile dysfunction following radical pelvic surgery and the evidence of such programs in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on penile rehabilitation programs after radical cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and rectal cancer treatment. Future perspectives are also analyzed. PMID:25785286

  3. Penile rehabilitation after pelvic cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is the most common complication after pelvic radical surgery. Rehabilitation programs are increasingly being used in clinical practice but there is no high level of evidence supporting its efficacy. The principle of early penile rehabilitation stems from animal studies showing early histological and molecular changes associated with penile corporal hypoxia after cavernous nerve injury. The concept of early penile rehabilitation was developed in late nineties with a subsequent number of clinical studies supporting early pharmacologic penile rehabilitation. These studies included all available phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and intraurethral use of prostaglandin E1 and to lesser extent vacuum erectile devices. However, these studies are of small number, difficult to interpret, and often with no control group. Furthermore, no studies have proven an in vivo derangement of endothelial or smooth muscle cell metabolism secondary to a prolonged flaccid state. The purpose of the present report is a synthetic overview of the literature in order to analyze the concept and the rationale of rehabilitation program of erectile dysfunction following radical pelvic surgery and the evidence of such programs in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on penile rehabilitation programs after radical cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and rectal cancer treatment. Future perspectives are also analyzed. PMID:25785286

  4. Factors Associated With Fatigue After Surgery in Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Francis; Bonnetain, Franck; Velten, Michel; Conroy, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in patients with cancer. However, the precise determinants of fatigue are still unknown. This study was conducted to investigate factors correlated with cancer-related fatigue before surgery and just before subsequent adjuvant therapy. Methods. Patients completed the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 30-item quality-of-life questionnaire before and after surgery, the Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Life Orientation Test before surgery, and the State Anxiety Inventory before the start of adjuvant therapy. Multiple regression analysis of determinants of change in MFI-20 total score after surgery was conducted. Results. A series of 466 eligible patients with stage I–III breast cancer with planned surgery were recruited. An increase in MFI-20 total score after surgery was significantly correlated with higher preoperative fatigue and lower role functioning before surgery; a decrease in role functioning, physical functioning, and cognitive functioning after surgery; an increase in insomnia after surgery; and a higher state anxiety after surgery. Disease stage, lymph node metastases, surgical procedure, and demographic characteristics (e.g., age, marital status, having children, educational level) were not correlated with fatigue in multivariate analysis. Conclusion. These results suggest that worsening fatigue after surgery for breast cancer is associated with a decrease in physical functioning and an increase in psychological distress rather than with the cancer characteristics. Therefore, screening measures should be implemented at the time of diagnosis—before starting treatment—to identify psychologically vulnerable patients and to offer them professional support. PMID:23404818

  5. Why are older women not having surgery for breast cancer? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sowerbutts, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Jane; Todd, Chris; Lavelle, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for breast cancer. However, there is evidence that older women are not receiving this treatment. This study explores reasons why older women are not having surgery. Methods Twenty eight in-depth interviews were conducted with women over 70 years old with operable breast cancer receiving primary endocrine therapy (PET) as their primary treatment. The interviews focused on their perceptions of why they were being treated with PET rather than surgery. Transcripts were analysed using the Framework method. Results Based on reasons for PET, patients were divided into three groups: ‘Patient Declined’, ‘Patient Considered’ or ‘Surgeon Decided’. The first group ‘Patient Declined’ absolutely ruled out surgery to treat their breast cancer. These patients were not interested in maximising their survival and rejected surgery citing their age or concerns about impact of treatment on their level of functioning. The second group ‘Patient Considered’ considered surgery but chose to have PET most specifying if PET failed then they could have the operation. Patients viewed this as offering them two options of treatment. The third group ‘Surgeon Decided’ was started by the surgeon on PET. These patients had comorbidities and in most cases the surgeon asserted that the comorbidities were incompatible with surgery. Conclusions Older women represent a diverse group and have multifaceted reasons for foregoing surgery. Discussions about breast cancer treatment should be patient centred and adapted to differing patient priorities. © 2015 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25645068

  6. How Has the Robot Contributed to Colon Cancer Surgery?

    PubMed

    Isik, Ozgen; Gorgun, Emre

    2015-12-01

    Robotic surgery is an emerging field in colorectal surgery and may overcome the limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as rigid instrumentation, poor ergonomics, and assistant-dependent camera movements and retraction. In addition, robotic-assisted colectomy appears to offer comparable outcomes to laparoscopic colectomy with limited long-term outcomes data. Prolonged operating time, increased costs and learning curve are the major drawbacks of robotic colectomy for colon cancer. Although new robotic platforms promise improved ingenuity through developing technology, the role of the robot in colon cancer surgery is still unclear. PMID:26648792

  7. Current status of function-preserving surgery for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takuro; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-12-14

    Recent advances in diagnostic techniques have allowed the diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC) at an early stage. Due to the low incidence of lymph node metastasis and favorable prognosis in early GC, function-preserving surgery which improves postoperative quality of life may be possible. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is one such function-preserving procedure, which is expected to offer advantages with regards to dumping syndrome, bile reflux gastritis, and the frequency of flatus, although PPG may induce delayed gastric emptying. Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is another function-preserving procedure, which is thought to be advantageous in terms of decreased duodenogastric reflux and good food reservoir function in the remnant stomach, although the incidence of heartburn or gastric fullness associated with this procedure is high. However, these disadvantages may be overcome by the reconstruction method used. The other important problem after PG is remnant GC, which was reported to occur in approximately 5% of patients. Therefore, the reconstruction technique used with PG should facilitate postoperative endoscopic examinations for early detection and treatment of remnant gastric carcinoma. Oncologic safety seems to be assured in both procedures, if the preoperative diagnosis is accurate. Patient selection should be carefully considered. Although many retrospective studies have demonstrated the utility of function-preserving surgery, no consensus on whether to adopt function-preserving surgery as the standard of care has been reached. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate survival and postoperative quality of life associated with function-preserving surgery. PMID:25516640

  8. Current status of function-preserving surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takuro; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic techniques have allowed the diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC) at an early stage. Due to the low incidence of lymph node metastasis and favorable prognosis in early GC, function-preserving surgery which improves postoperative quality of life may be possible. Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is one such function-preserving procedure, which is expected to offer advantages with regards to dumping syndrome, bile reflux gastritis, and the frequency of flatus, although PPG may induce delayed gastric emptying. Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is another function-preserving procedure, which is thought to be advantageous in terms of decreased duodenogastric reflux and good food reservoir function in the remnant stomach, although the incidence of heartburn or gastric fullness associated with this procedure is high. However, these disadvantages may be overcome by the reconstruction method used. The other important problem after PG is remnant GC, which was reported to occur in approximately 5% of patients. Therefore, the reconstruction technique used with PG should facilitate postoperative endoscopic examinations for early detection and treatment of remnant gastric carcinoma. Oncologic safety seems to be assured in both procedures, if the preoperative diagnosis is accurate. Patient selection should be carefully considered. Although many retrospective studies have demonstrated the utility of function-preserving surgery, no consensus on whether to adopt function-preserving surgery as the standard of care has been reached. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate survival and postoperative quality of life associated with function-preserving surgery. PMID:25516640

  9. Laparoscopic surgery inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shouguo; Qin, Jie; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Hong; Meng, Qiu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Huaying

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The present study is to investigate the effect of laparoscopic surgery on the proliferation and metastasis of cervical cancer cells. Methods: A total of 40 patients with phase I squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were enrolled in the study, and divided evenly into laparoscopic surgery group and laparotomy group. In addition, another 20 patients with benign uterine lesions received laparoscopic panhysterectomy using celoscopes and were enrolled as control group. Cell apoptotic rates were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of N-myc, Fas, metastasis-associated gene 1, and nm23-H1 genes in tissues were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Cervical cancer cell apoptosis was promoted by laparoscopic surgery, but not affected by laparotomy. The expression of apoptosis suppressor gene N-myc in cervical cancer cells was reduced by laparoscopic surgery, but not affected by laparotomy. In addition, the expression of apoptosis promoting gene Fas in cervical cancer cells was enhanced by laparoscopic surgery, but not affected by laparotomy. Similarly, the expression of metastasis promoting gene MTA1 in cervical cancer cells was lowered by laparoscopic surgery, but not affected by laparotomy. Moreover, the expression of metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 in cervical cancer cells was increased by laparoscopic surgery, but not affected by laparotomy. Of note, laparoscopic panhysterectomy had no effect on the apoptosis or the expression of N-myc, Fas, MTA1 and nm23-H1 genes in normal cervical cells. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery is a safe treatment method for cervical cancer. It inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells, but has no such effects on normal cells. PMID:26629182

  10. Less-Invasive Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Invasive Surgery May Not Be Best Option for Rectal Cancer Two studies found standard surgery was slightly more ... not match standard surgery for the treatment of rectal cancer, new research indicates. The finding is based on ...

  11. Most of World's People Lack Access to Safe Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154862.html Most of World's People Lack Access to Safe Cancer Surgery: Report ... by the commission, contributed by some of the world's leading experts in the field, leaves no doubt ...

  12. [Locoregional surgery for stage IV breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lotersztajn, N; Héquet, D; Mosbah, R; Rouzier, R

    2015-04-01

    Three to 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancers have stage IV disease. Overall survival was improved during the last few years (16-45 months). The treatment of stage IV breast cancer has traditionally been palliative with surgical resection reserved for symptomatic wound complications. Since 2000, several retrospective studies have compared surgery versus no local therapy in women presenting with stage IV breast cancer with an intact primary tumor. All showed a survival advantage for the surgical cohort. However, these studies are limited by the fact that it is not possible to control for biases that led to surgical resection of the primary tumor. Several prospective randomized trials have been undertaken. We have partial results for two of them and they show no survival differences between patients who benefit from local surgery and patients who did not have surgery. However, breast surgery is at low risk of complication, if not considering psychological aspect of mastectomy, and can be proposed to patients with no progression after first chemotherapy. Conservative management can be an option, but surgery must be optimal with negative margins. No benefit of axillary surgery has been shown but this treatment can lead to complications and impact quality of life of patients. Therefore, axillary node resection is not recommended for stage IV breast cancer. Finally, radiotherapy can be an alternative option of local therapy associated or no to surgery in stage IV breast cancer. PMID:25819388

  13. Fluorescent imaging of cancerous tissues for targeted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lihong; Shen, Baozhong; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    To maximize tumor excision and minimize collateral damage is the primary goal of cancer surgery. Emerging molecular imaging techniques have to “image-guided surgery” developing into “molecular imaging-guided surgery”, which is termed “targeted surgery” in this review. Consequently, the precision of surgery can be advanced from tissue-scale to molecule-scale, enabling “targeted surgery” to be a component of “targeted therapy”. Evidence from numerous experimental and clinical studies has demonstrated significant benefits of fluorescent imaging in targeted surgery with preoperative molecular diagnostic screening. Fluorescent imaging can help to improve intraoperative staging and enable more radical cytoreduction, detect obscure tumor lesions in special organs, highlight tumor margins, better map lymph node metastases, and identify important normal structures intraoperatively. Though limited tissue penetration of fluorescent imaging and tumor heterogeneity are two major hurdles for current targeted surgery, multimodality imaging and multiplex imaging may provide potential solutions to overcome these issues, respectively. Moreover, though many fluorescent imaging techniques and probes have been investigated, targeted surgery remains at a proof-of-principle stage. The impact of fluorescent imaging on cancer surgery will likely be realized through persistent interdisciplinary amalgamation of research in diverse fields. PMID:25064553

  14. The role of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, M; Sinove, Y; DePypere, H; Van Den Broucke, R; Vakaet, L; Cocquyt, V; Villeirs, G; Lambein, C; Van Maele, G

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the objectives of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer management. Indications and advantages are summarised. Some surgical techniques are described. The authors report their own experience with oncoplastic surgery (26 patients who had immediate breast reconstruction after tumorectomy, and 126 patients who had lumpectomy alone. Oncoplastic surgery was characterised by a wider excision, with negative margins in all cases. In isolated breast conservative tumorectomy, 20% of the margins were positive, requiring re-excision or radical mastectomy. Oncoplastic surgery is preferred especially in younger patients with smaller breasts, since it is less cosmetically mutulating and allows complete tumor resection with save margins. PMID:19241915

  15. Image-guided cancer surgery using near-infrared fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Hutteman, Merlijn; van der Vorst, Joost R.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Frangioni, John V.

    2013-01-01

    Paradigm shifts in surgery arise when surgeons are empowered to perform surgery faster, better, and/or less expensively. Optical imaging that exploits invisible near-infrared fluorescent light has the potential to improve cancer surgery outcomes while minimizing anesthesia time and lowering healthcare costs. Because of this, the last few years have witnessed an explosion of proof-of-concept clinical trials in the field. In this review, we introduce the concept of near-infrared fluorescence imaging for cancer surgery, review the clinical trial literature to date, outline the key issues pertaining to imaging system and contrast agent optimization, discuss limitations and leverage, and provide a framework for making the technology available for the routine care of cancer patients in the near future. PMID:23881033

  16. A Clinical Outcome-Based Prospective Study on Venous Thromboembolism After Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bolis, Giorgio; Capussotti, Lorenzo; Scarpa, Roberto Mario; Tonelli, Francesco; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Moia, Marco; Parazzini, Fabio; Rossi, Romina; Sonaglia, Francesco; Valarani, Bettina; Bianchini, Carlo; Gussoni, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The epidemiology of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after cancer surgery is based on clinical trials on VTE prophylaxis that used venography to screen deep vein thrombosis (DVT). However, the clinical relevance of asymptomatic venography-detected DVT is unclear, and the population of these clinical trials is not necessarily representative of the overall cancer surgery population. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of clinically overt VTE in a wide spectrum of consecutive patients undergoing surgery for cancer and to identify risk factors for VTE. Methods: @RISTOS was a prospective observational study in patients undergoing general, urologic, or gynecologic surgery. Patients were assessed for clinically overt VTE occurring up to 30 ± 5 days after surgery or more if the hospital stay was longer than 35 days. All outcome events were evaluated by an independent Adjudication Committee. Results: A total of 2373 patients were included in the study: 1238 (52%) undergoing general, 685 (29%) urologic, and 450 (19%) gynecologic surgery. In-hospital prophylaxis was given in 81.6% and postdischarge prophylaxis in 30.7% of the patients. Fifty patients (2.1%) were adjudicated as affected by clinically overt VTE (DVT, 0.42%; nonfatal pulmonary embolism, 0.88%; death 0.80%). The incidence of VTE was 2.83% in general surgery, 2.0% in gynecologic surgery, and 0.87% in urologic surgery. Forty percent of the events occurred later than 21 days from surgery. The overall death rate was 1.72%; in 46.3% of the cases, death was caused by VTE. In a multivariable analysis, 5 risk factors were identified: age above 60 years (2.63, 95% confidence interval, 1.21–5.71), previous VTE (5.98, 2.13–16.80), advanced cancer (2.68, 1.37–5.24), anesthesia lasting more than 2 hours (4.50, 1.06–19.04), and bed rest longer than 3 days (4.37, 2.45–7.78). Conclusions: VTE remains a common complication of cancer surgery, with a remarkable proportion of events occurring late after surgery. In patients undergoing cancer surgery, VTE is the most common cause of death at 30 days after surgery. PMID:16371741

  17. Impact of Prior Abdominal Surgery on Rates of Conversion to Open Surgery and Short-Term Outcomes after Laparoscopic Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ik Yong; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Young Wan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of prior abdominal surgery (PAS) on rates of conversion to open surgery and short-term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery for colon and rectal cancers. Methods We compared three groups as follows: colon cancer patients with no PAS (n = 272), major PAS (n = 24), and minor PAS (n = 33), and rectal cancer patients with no PAS (n = 282), major PAS (n=16), and minor PAS (n = 26). Results In patients with colon and rectal cancers, the rate of conversion to open surgery was significantly higher in the major PAS group (25% and 25%) compared with the no PAS group (8.1% and 8.9%), while the conversion rate was similar between the no PAS and minor PAS groups (15.2% and 15.4%). The 30-day complication rate did not differ among the three groups (28.7% and 29.1% in the no PAS group, 29.2% and 25% in the major PAS group, and 27.3% and 26.9% in the minor PAS group). The mean operative time did not differ among the three groups (188 min and 227 min in the no PAS group, 191 min and 210 min in the major PAS group, and 192 min and 248 min in the minor PAS group). The rate of conversion to open surgery was significantly higher in patients with prior gastrectomy or colectomy compared with the no PAS group, while the conversion rate was similar between the no PAS group and patients with prior radical hysterectomy in patients with colon and rectal cancers. Conclusions Our results suggest that colorectal cancer patients with minor PAS or patients with prior radical hysterectomy can be effectively managed with a laparoscopic approach. In addition, laparoscopy can be selected as the primary surgical approach even in patients with major PAS (prior gastrectomy or colectomy) given the assumption of a higher conversion rate. PMID:26207637

  18. Different methods for target volume delineation of glandular breast tissue following breast-conserving surgery in breast cancer: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    XU, MIN; LI, JIANBIN; LIU, SHANSHAN; WANG, SUZHEN; WANG, WEI; LI, FENGXIANG; LIU, TONGHAI; YU, JINMING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate an optimal and feasible method for delineating the target volume of glandular breast tissue following breast-conserving surgery. A total of 15 patients who underwent radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery were recruited into the study. Clinical target volume was delineated by the following three methods based on computed tomography (CT): Anatomical landmarks (CTVan), breast palpation (CTVpa) and CT scan images (CTVgl). The target volume, degree of inclusion (DI) and conformal index (CI) defined by these methods were compared. The difference was significant between CTVan and CTVgl, and CTVpa and CTVgl (P<0.0001). The CI between CTVan and CTVpa was 0.644±0.122, significantly higher than that between CTVan and CTVgl (0.264±0.108; P<0.0001) or between CTVpa and CTVgl (0.328±0.115; P<0.0001). The DI of CTVpa in CTVan was 0.890±0.08 and the opposite was 0.709±0.144, while that of DI of CTVgl in CTVan or CTVpa was 0.994±0.005 and 0.989±0.008, respectively. The boundary difference between CTVan and CTVpa was 3.35±7.23, 5.57±13.37, 1.75±11.62 and 11.25±4.07 mm for the medial, lateral, cephalic and caudal boundaries, respectively. A significant difference was observed in the target volume of the breast defined by the three methods. The target volume defined by CTVgl was significantly smaller than that identified by the other two methods. Overall, the combination of palpation marks and anatomical landmarks to define the contouring scope of the breast was indicated to be a relatively rational method for delineating the target volume of the breast.

  19. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  20. Value of intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring in papillary thyroid cancer surgery: can it be used to guide the choice of operation methods?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiafeng; Gu, Jialei; Han, Qianbo; Wang, Wendong; Shang, Jinbiao

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the diagnostic value of decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH) in hypoparathyroidism after unilateral operation. Methods: A study was conducted on patients with PTC undergoing total or near-total thyroidectomy plus central neck dissection (CND). Results: Postoperative hypocalcemia was found in 42 patients (51.2%). For patients undergoing bilateral CND, those whose tumor invasion proceeded beyond the thyroid capsule have a higher rate of postoperative hypoparathyroidism (P<0.05). PTH level of hypoparathyroidism patients was lower than that of non-hypoparathyroidism patients from surgery to 6 months later (P<0.05). When unilateral thyroidectomy and central region dissection were completed, PTH level decreased by 47.06% in hypoparathyroidism patients, which was significantly higher than non-hypoparathyroidism patients (28.35%) (P<0.001). PTH level (AUC 0.806) and its decreasing degree (AUC 0.736) played predicting roles in assessing postoperative hypoparathyroidism (P<0.001). Conclusions: For PTC surgery, PTH level and its decreasing degree played predicting roles in assessing postoperative hypoparathyroidism. PMID:26221329

  1. The Role of Palliative Surgery in Gynecologic Cancer Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Joanie Mayer

    2013-01-01

    The decision to undergo major palliative surgery in end-stage gynecologic cancer is made when severe disease symptoms significantly hinder quality of life. Malignant bowel obstruction, unremitting pelvic pain, fistula formation, tumor necrosis, pelvic sepsis, and chronic hemorrhage are among the reasons patients undergo palliative surgeries. This review discusses and summarizes the literature on surgical management of malignant bowel obstruction and palliative pelvic exenteration in gynecologic oncology. PMID:23299775

  2. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  3. The evolution of cancer surgery and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wyld, Lynda; Audisio, Riccardo A; Poston, Graeme J

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is the oldest oncological discipline, dating back thousands of years. Prior to the advent of anaesthesia and antisepsis 150 years ago, only the brave, desperate, or ill-advised patient underwent surgery because cure rates were low, and morbidity and mortality high. However, since then, cancer surgery has flourished, driven by relentless technical innovation and research. Historically, the mantra of the cancer surgeon was that increasingly radical surgery would enhance cure rates. The past 50 years have seen a paradigm shift, with the realization that multimodal therapy, technological advances, and minimally invasive techniques can reduce the need for, or the detrimental effects of, radical surgery. Preservation of form, function, and quality of life, without compromising survival, is the new mantra. Today's surgeons, no longer the uneducated technicians of history, are highly trained medical professionals and together with oncologists, radiologists, scientists, anaesthetists and nurses, have made cancer surgeries routine, safe, and highly effective. This article will review the major advances that have underpinned this evolution. PMID:25384943

  4. Laparoscopic gastric surgery for cancer: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Isla, Alberto Martinez

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer poses a significant public health problem, especially in the Far East, due to its high incidence in these areas. Surgical treatment and guidelines have been markedly different in the West, but nowadays this debate is apparently coming to an end. Laparoscopic surgery has been employed in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer for two decades now, but with controversies about the extent of resection and lymphadenectomy. Despite these difficulties, the apparent advantages of the laparoscopic approach helped its implementation in early stage and distal gastric cancer, with an increase on the uptake for distal gastrectomy for more advanced disease and total gastrectomy. Nevertheless, there is no conclusive evidence about the laparoscopic approach yet. In this review article we present and analyse the current status of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:25339815

  5. Colonic Stent as Bridge to Surgery in Patients with Obstructive Left-Sided Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Murat; Kapan, Selin; Kocatas?, Ali; Temizgönül, Baha; Alis, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the optimal time interval between endoscopic stenting and subsequent surgery in patients with obstructive left-sided colon cancer. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent endoscopic colonic stenting for obstructive left-sided colon cancer between January 2009 and January 2012. Patients who had successful endoscopic intervention as a bridge to surgery were included in the study. Other variables studied were the duration between endoscopic stenting and surgery, the reobstruction rate, the stoma creation rate, the anastomotic leak rate, and the in-hospital mortality rate. Results: The medical records of 53 patients who underwent endoscopic stenting for obstructive left-sided colon cancer were reviewed, and 43 were included in the study. The median duration between endoscopic stenting and surgery was 7 days (range, 5–33). Conclusion: A median duration of 7 to 9 days after endoscopic stenting in patients with obstructive left-sided colon cancer is enough time to subsequently perform a safe surgical procedure. Extending this duration may expose the patient to the risk of reobstruction and emergency surgery. PMID:25408602

  6. Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Fact Sheet

    Cancer.gov

    A fact sheet that describes mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, two prophylactic surgeries that may be performed to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at very high risk; the situations in which they may be considered; and nonsurgical options.

  7. Combination of surgery and radiation in the treatment of cancer. A review

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, D.A.; Thrall, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Although radiation and surgery have been combined for the treatment of cancer in humans and animals since the 1920s, little has been written about the methods of combining radiation and surgery and the efficacy of this combination for the treatment of animal tumors. This article reviews the rationale for combining radiation and surgery for the treatment of cancer and the ways in which these two modalities can be combined with emphasis placed on the advantages and disadvantages of preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy. The role of preoperative and postoperative irradiation for the treatment of various animal tumors is discussed. Directions for future clinical trials are pointed out. Finally, the importance of surgeons and radiation oncologists communicating with each other and participating in cooperative treatment methods is stressed. 36 references.

  8. A Comparison of Open Surgery, Robotic-Assisted Surgery and Conventional Laparoscopic Surgery in the Treatment of Morbidly Obese Endometrial Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mendivil, Alberto A.; Rettenmaier, Mark A.; Abaid, Lisa N.; Brown, John V.; Micha, John P.; Lopez, Katrina L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The intent of this retrospective study was to assess the operative outcomes of morbidly obese endometrial cancer patients who were treated with either open surgery (OS) or a minimally invasive procedure. Methods: Morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg/m2) patients with endometrial cancer who underwent OS, robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RS), or conventional laparoscopic surgery (LS) were eligible. We sought to discern any outcome differences with regard to operative time, perioperative complications, and hospital stay. Results: Sixteen patients were treated with LS (BMI = 47.9 kg/m2), 13 were managed via RS (BMI = 51.2 kg/m2), and 24 underwent OS (BMI = 53.7 kg/m2). The OS (1.35 hours) patients had a significantly shorter operative duration than the LS (1.82 hours) and RS (2.78 hours) patients (P < .001); blood loss was greater in the OS (250 mL) group in comparison with the RS (100 mL) and LS (175 mL) patients (P = .002). Moreover, the OS (4 days) subjects had a significantly longer hospital stay than the LS (2 days) and RS (2 days) patients (P = .002). Conclusion: In the present study, we ascertained that minimally invasive surgery was associated with longer operative times but lower rates of blood loss and shorter hospital stay duration compared with treatment comprising an open procedure. PMID:25848196

  9. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer Undergoing Surgery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well erlotinib hydrochloride works in treating patients with bladder cancer undergoing surgery. Erlotinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

  10. [Conservative surgery and radiotherapy of early breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Okawa, T; Haga, S; Kajiwara, T; Kimura, T; Hamano, K; Ito, Y; Izo, M

    1992-09-01

    Radiation dose-effect relationship is reviewed. In conservative treatment of early breast cancer, necessity of radiation is discussed and surgery with radiotherapy technique in our hospital is presented. Our procedures consist of lumpectomy which is removal of 1 cm of normal tissue containing primary breast cancer and complete axillary dissection and postoperative radiotherapy of 46 Gy with 9 Gy of electron boost. Since November 1987, 51 patients treated by this procedure have shown a good local control and a satisfactory cosmetic results. We can conclude that the positive aspects of radiotherapy in the management of conservative therapy for early breast cancer are overwhelming. PMID:1470146

  11. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Gregory B; Breen, David J; Monson, John RT

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and localisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets, which can be stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding. Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient’s overall condition before definitive surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum. Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging. Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:11819841

  12. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy is a standard therapy for early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, recent developments in oncoplastic surgery have improved cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, a breast surgeon’s current role in BCS is not only to perform a curative resection of cancerous lesions with adequate surgical margins, but also to preserve the shape and appearance of the treated breast. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery (EBCS), which has the advantage of a less noticeable scar, was developed more than ten years ago. Recently, some clinical studies have reported the feasibility, oncological outcomes, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction of EBCS. Herein, we will review the EBCS clinical studies that have been conducted so far and discuss current issues regarding this operative method. PMID:25083503

  13. Thirty days post-operative mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; den Boer, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of surgery for colorectal cancer is cure. Unfortunately post-operative mortality occurs. This study aims to identify co-morbidity and causes of mortality in the post-operative period in relation to direct technical complications of surgery. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer were included. Co-morbidity was determined via the Charlson co-morbidity score. The post-operative course was studied and cause of death within 30 days was determined. Patients were divided in two groups: group 1 died within 30 days after surgery and group 2 survived for longer than 30 days. Results Twenty three out of 333 patients (6.9%) with colon cancer and 6 out of 112 (5.3%) with rectal cancer died in the post-operative period. Patients in group 1 were significantly older than patients in group 2 (P<0.001). Patients in group 1 with colon cancer also significantly had more often a higher stage of cancer (P=0.03). The Charlson co-morbidity score for patients with colon cancer in group 1 was mean 5.17 (SD 1.57, range, 1-8), and for rectal cancer mean 4.83 (SD 2.32, range, 2-7). There was no difference in Charlson co-morbidity score when patients from groups 1 and 2 were compared. In group 1, 13 (44%) died as a direct consequence of technical surgical complications. Sixteen patients died due to complications because of pre-existing co-morbidity. Conclusions Post-operative mortality very often is the direct result of pre-existing co-morbidity and not always the direct result of the surgical procedure. PMID:26697192

  14. Current State of Vascular Resections in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Thilo; Schneider, Lutz; Büchler, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the Western world and, even in 2014, a therapeutic challenge. The only chance for long-term survival is radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy which can be performed in about 20% of all PDAC patients by the time of diagnosis. As pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years, extended operations, including vascular resections, have become more frequently performed in specialized centres and the border of resectability has been pushed forward to achieve a potentially curative approach in the respective patients in combination with neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies. In contrast to adjuvant treatment which has to be regarded as a cornerstone to achieve long-term survival after resection, neoadjuvant treatment strategies for locally advanced findings are currently under debate. This overview summarizes the possibilities and evidence of vascular, namely, venous and arterial, resections in PDAC surgery. PMID:26609306

  15. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: A systematic review of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tony Wing Chung; Lee, Janet Fung Yee; Futaba, Kaori; Hon, Sophie Sok Fei; Ngo, Dennis Kwok Yu; Ng, Simon Siu Man

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To give a comprehensive review of current literature on robotic rectal cancer surgery. METHODS: A systematic review of current literature via PubMed and Embase search engines was performed to identify relevant articles from january 2007 to november 2013. The keywords used were: “robotic surgery”, “surgical robotics”, “laparoscopic computer-assisted surgery”, “colectomy” and “rectal resection”. RESULTS: After the initial screen of 380 articles, 20 papers were selected for review. A total of 1062 patients (male 64.0%) with a mean age of 61.1 years and body mass index of 24.9 kg/m2 were included in the review. Out of 1062 robotic-assisted operations, 831 (78.2%) anterior and low anterior resections, 132 (12.4%) intersphincteric resection with coloanal anastomosis, 98 (9.3%) abdominoperineal resections and 1 (0.1%) Hartmann’s operation were included in the review. Robotic rectal surgery was associated with longer operative time but with comparable oncological results and anastomotic leak rate when compared with laparoscopic rectal surgery. CONCLUSION: Robotic colorectal surgery has continued to evolve to its current state with promising results; feasible surgical option with low conversion rate and comparable short-term oncological results. The challenges faced with robotic surgery are for more high quality studies to justify its cost. PMID:24936229

  16. Optical coherence tomography in guided surgery of GI cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Abelevich, Alexander I.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Denisenko, Arkady N.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kutis, Irina S.

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new high spatial resolution, real-time optical imaging modality, known from prior pilot studies for its high sensitivity to invasive cancer. We reported our results in an OCT feasibility study for accurate determination of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. The OCT study enrolled 19 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and 24 patients with distal esophageal carcinoma (14 squamous cell carcinomas, 10 adenocarcinomas). During pre-surgery planning endoscopy we performed in vivo OCT imaging of the tumor border at four dial clock axes (12, 3, 6 and 9 o"clock). The OCT border then was marked by an electrocoagulator, or by a methylene blue tattoo. A cold biopsy (from the esophagus) was performed at visual and OCT borders and compared with visual and OCT readings. 27 post-surgery excised specimens were analyzed. OCT borders matched the histopathology in 94% cases in the rectum and 83.3% in the esophagus. In the cases of a mismatch between the OCT and histology borders, a deep tumor invasion occurred in the muscle layer (esophagus, rectum). Because of its high sensitivity to mucosal cancer, OCT can be used for pre-surgery planning and surgery guidance of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. However, deep invasion in the rectum or esophageal wall has to be controlled by alternative diagnostic modalities.

  17. Association Between Serotonin Transport Polymorphisms and Postdischarge Nausea and Vomiting in Women Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wesmiller, Susan W.; Bender, Catherine M.; Sereika, Susan M.; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Conley, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To examine the association of the serotonin transport gene and postdischarge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) in women following breast cancer surgery. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting A comprehensive cancer center in Pittsburgh, PA. Sample 80 post-menopausal women treated surgically for early-stage breast cancer. Methods Data were collected using standardized instruments after surgery but before the initiation of chemotherapy. Blood or saliva were used for DNA extraction and analyzed following standardized protocols. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Main Research Variables Serotonin transport gene (SLC6A4), nausea, vomiting, pain, and anxiety. Findings Women who inherited the LA/LA genotypes were at greater risk for nausea and vomiting when compared to women who carried any other combination of genotypes. Twenty-one percent of women reported nausea and vomiting an average of one month following surgery and prior to initiation of adjuvant therapy. Those women who experienced PDNV reported significantly higher anxiety and pain scores. Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that variability in the genotypes of the serotonin transport gene may help to explain the variability in PDNV in women following breast cancer surgery and why 20%–30% of patients do not respond to antiemetic medications. Implications for Nursing Nurses need to be aware that women who do not experience postoperative nausea and vomiting following surgery for breast cancer continue to be at risk for PDNV long after they have been discharged from the hospital, and this frequently is accompanied by pain and anxiety. PMID:24578078

  18. State Cancer Profiles - Prevalence Method

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Method of Estimation and Data Sources Prevalence Method Calculation of complete cancer prevalence requires several years of incidence data and accurate vital status information at end of follow-up. Five states from

  19. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  20. Clinicopathological study of cholelithiasis following gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ogoshi, K; Makuuchi, H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare liver function tests preoperatively and postoperatively in 2 cohorts of patients, those that developed gallstones after gastrectomy for cancer and those that did not develop gallstones. The cohorts were taken from 698 consecutive patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer between April 1980 and March 1995. In comparison with 698 patients, the gallstone group was characterized by the findings that the incidence of cholelithiasis was significantly higher in totally-gastrectomized patients and patients with upper stomach cancer. Comparison of the perioperative status revealed a significantly higher rate of complications in the gallstone patients. Analysis of the changes in liver function showed significantly higher values of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase at time points of 1 and 3 months after surgery in the gallstone patients. The results suggest that the postoperative development of liver dysfunction and complications is associated with the formation of gallstones. PMID:15818039

  1. The current status and future perspectives of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is most common cancer in Korea. Surgery is still the main axis of treatment. Due to early detection of gastric cancer, the innovation of surgical instruments and technological advances, gastric cancer treatment is now shifting to a new era. One of the most astonishing changes is that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is becoming more dominant treatment for early gastric cancer. These MIS are represented by endoscopic resection, laparoscopic surgery, robotic surgery, single-port surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Among them, laparoscopic gastrectomy is most actively performed in the field of surgery. Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) for early gastric cancer (EGC) has already gained popularity in terms of the short-term outcomes including patient's quality of life. We only have to wait for the long-term oncologic results of Korean Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group. Upcoming top issues following oncologic safety of LADG are function-preserving surgery for EGC, application of laparoscopy to advanced gastric cancer and sentinel lymph node navigation surgery. In the aspect of technique, laparoscopic surgery at present could reproduce almost the whole open procedures. However, the other fields mentioned above need more evidences and experiences. All these new ideas and attempts provide technical advances, which will minimize surgical insults and maximize the surgical outcomes and the quality of life of patients. PMID:22066116

  2. Comparison of Compliance of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Between Laparoscopic and Open Surgery in Patients With Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kan Ho; An, Hoon; Jeong, Hyeonseok; Cho, Hyunjin; Gwak, Geumhee; Yang, Keun Ho; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hong Ju; Kim, Young Duk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have shown that the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy improves the survival rate. Recently, laparoscopic surgery has been used to treat patients with colon cancer. We analyzed the relationship between the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy and the operation method. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 147 patients diagnosed with colon cancer from January 1, 2009, to May 31, 2012. The numbers of patients who underwent laparoscopic and open surgery were 91 and 56, respectively. We analyzed the relationship between the operation method and various factors such as the completion rate of chemotherapy, the patient's age, gender, and physical activity, the postoperative hospital stay, the start time of chemotherapy, and the patient's body mass index (BMI), TNM stage, and type of health insurance. Results In the laparoscopic surgery group, the postoperative hospital stay (13.5 ± 14.82 days vs. 19.6 ± 11.38 days, P = 0.001) and start time of chemotherapy (17.7 ± 17.48 days vs. 23.0 ± 15.00 days, P = 0.044) were shorter, but the percent complete of chemotherapy (71/91 [78.0%] vs. 38/56 [67.8%], P = 0.121), and survival rate (88/91 [96.7%], 47/56 [83.9%], P = 0.007) were higher than they were in the open surgery group. Patients who were elderly, had a low BMI, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were less likely to complete adjuvant chemotherapy than other patients were. Conclusion Laparoscopic surgery shows a shorter postoperative hospital stay, a shorter start time of chemotherapy, and a higher survival rate. Laparoscopic surgery may be expected to increase compliance of chemotherapy and to improve survival rate. PMID:25580414

  3. Conservative surgery for multifocal/multicentric breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) breast cancer is regularly considered a relative contraindication for breast-conserving therapy (BCT). There are two reasons for this wide spread notion: However, we concur that if optimal 'cytoreductive surgery' is achieved this will result in good local control (i.e. in-breast relapse <10% at 10 years). This can only be achieved on the basis of the right imaging, image guidance for non-palpable foci, and tumor free (invasive as well as ductal carcinoma in situ) margins after adequate pathological assessment. Surgery must then be followed by whole breast irradiation and systemic treatments as indicated by primary cancer biology. Careful planning and adaptive application of oncoplastic techniques will result in an optimal cosmetic results. The meticulous work of Roland Holland and coworkers(1) in the early 1980's on whole breast specimen showed invasive foci at more then 2 cm distance from the invasive primary cancer in more then 40% of specimen. Although multiple tumor foci may occur in up to 60% of mastectomy specimens, equivalent survival outcomes were observed in prospective trials comparing BCT and mastectomy for clinically unifocal lesions, suggesting that the majority of these foci are not, or do not become, biologically relevant or clinically significant with appropriate treatment. As diagnostic tools advance, MF and MC tumors are more commonly diagnosed. Cancers that previously would have been classified as unifocal now can be detected as MF or MC. In addition, locoregional treatment modalities have improved significantly over the past decade. More recent studies reflect these advances in diagnosis and treatment. Studies evaluated staging MRI showed that up to 19% of woman with diagnosed breast cancer harbor a second malignant ipsilateral lesion. These findings should only have consequences when additional lesions are proven cancer. Multiple enhancing lesions on MRI are in itself not an indication for a mastectomy. The Z0011 trial and the AMAROS trial demonstrated a similar phenomenon for axillary treatment; less surgery does not necessarily lead to inferior local control or survival outcomes. Recent studies supplement the growing evidence that treatment of patients with MF/MC breast cancer with BCS, radiotherapy, and adjuvant systemic therapy can result in low rates of in-breast recurrence. PMID:26303986

  4. Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heon; Jin, Gong Yong Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Kwon, Keun Sang; Lynch, David

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

  5. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: surgery, surveillance and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by autosomal dominance and high penetrance. In 30-50% of cases, a causative germline mutation in CDH1, the E-cadherin gene, may be identified. Female carriers of CDH1 mutations also have an increased (20-40%) risk of lobular breast cancer. Endoscopic surveillance of patients with CDH1 mutations is ineffective because early foci of HDGC are typically small and underlie normal mucosa. CDH1 mutation carriers are therefore offered the option of prophylactic gastrectomy, which commonly reveals early foci of invasive signet-ring cell cancer. We review recommendations for genetic testing, surveillance and prophylactic surgery in HDGC. Areas for future research are discussed, including development of new screening modalities, optimal timing of prophylactic gastrectomy, identification of additional causative mutations in HDGC, management of patients with CDH1 missense mutations and prevention/early detection of lobular breast cancer in CDH1 mutation carriers. PMID:18684065

  6. Primary debulking surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery for patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the survival and perioperative morbidity between primary debulking surgery (PDS) and neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery (NAC/IDS) in treating patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 67 patients with stage IIIC or IV EOC treated at Peking University Cancer Hospital from January 2006 to June 2009. Wherein, 37 and 30 patients underwent PDS and NAC/IDS, respectively. Results No difference in overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) was observed between NAC/IDS group and PDS group (OS: 41.2 vs. 39.1 months, P=0.23; PFS: 27.1 vs. 24.3 months, P=0.37). The optimal debulking rate was 60% in the NAC/IDS group, which was significantly higher than that in the PDS group (32.4%) (P=0.024). The NAC/IDS group had significantly less intraoperative estimated blood loss and transfusion, lower nasogastric intubation rate, and earlier ambulation and recovery of intestinal function than the PDS group (P<0.05). Conclusions NAC/IDS is less invasive than PDS, and offers the advantages regarding optimal cytoreduction rate, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative recovery, without significantly impairing the survival compared with PDS in treating patients with stage IIIC or IV EOC. Therefore, NAC/IDS may be a valuable treatment alternative for EOC patients. PMID:23358672

  7. Therapeutic effects of laparotomy and laparoscopic surgery on patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Gaoping; Zheng, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effects of laparotomy and laparoscopic surgery on patients with gastric cancer. Methods: Sixty-six patients with gastric cancer who were treated in our hospital from January 2012 to December 2013 were selected and divided into a control group and an observation group by the random number method (n=33). The control group was treated by traditional laparotomy, and the observation group was treated by laparoscopic surgery. CD4/CD8 ratios and IgG expressions in the patients were detected on preoperative and postoperative fourth days. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, time of anal gas evacuation and time of postoperative independent ambulation of the two groups were observed. Results: The intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, time of anal gas evacuation, time of postoperative independent ambulation, time of urinary catheter indwelling and average hospitalization stay length of the observation group were significantly different from those of the control group (P<0.05). The postoperative rates of fever and complications in the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group, and the two groups had significantly different CD4/CD8 ratios and IgG levels on the postoperative 4th day (P<0.05). Conclusion: Compared with traditional laparotomy, laparoscopic surgery can well treat patients with gastric cancer minimally invasively. Meanwhile, their postoperative recovery was facilitated due to slightly affected humoral immunity and cellular immune function. PMID:26150846

  8. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This research trial studies comprehensive patient questionnaires in predicting complications in older patients with gynecologic cancer undergoing surgery. Comprehensive patient questionnaires completed before surgery may help identify complications, such as the need for assistance in taking medications, decreased mobility, decreased social activity, and falls, and may improve outcomes for older patients with gynecologic cancer.

  9. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  10. A multimodal nano agent for image-guided cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinzi; Muhanna, Nidal; De Souza, Raquel; Wada, Hironobu; Chan, Harley; Akens, Margarete K; Anayama, Takashi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Serra, Stefano; Irish, Jonathan; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative imaging technologies including computed tomography and fluorescence optical imaging are becoming routine tools in the cancer surgery operating room. They constitute an enabling platform for high performance surgical resections that assure local control while minimizing morbidity. New contrast agents that can increase the sensitivity and visualization power of existing intraoperative imaging techniques will further enhance their clinical benefit. We report here the development, detection and visualization of a dual-modality computed tomography and near-infrared fluorescence nano liposomal agent (CF800) in multiple preclinical animal models of cancer. We describe the successful application of this agent for combined preoperative computed tomography based three-dimensional surgical planning and intraoperative target mapping (>200 Hounsfield Units enhancement), as well as near-infrared fluorescence guided resection (>5-fold tumor-to-background ratio). These results strongly support the clinical advancement of this agent for image-guided surgery with potential to improve lesion localization, margin delineation and metastatic lymph node detection. PMID:26218742

  11. Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes of Laparoscopic versus Open Surgery for Middle and Lower Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaotang; Jiang, Feizhao; Tu, Jingfu; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer remain controversial because anatomical and complex surgical procedures specifically influence oncologic outcomes. This study analyzes the long-term outcomes of laparoscopic versus open surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer. Methods Patients (laparoscopic: n = 129, open: n = 152) who underwent curative resection for middle and lower rectal cancer from 2003 to 2008 participated in the study. The same surgical team performed all operations. The mean follow up time of all patients was 74.3 months. Results No statistical difference in local recurrence rate (7.8% vs. 7.2%; log-rank = 0.024; P = 0.876) and distant recurrence rate (20.9% vs.16.4%; log-rank = 0.699; P = 0.403) between laparoscopic and open groups were observed within 5 years. The 5-year overall survival rates of the laparoscopic and open groups were 72.9% and 75.7%, respectively; no significant statistical difference was observed between them (log-rank = 0.163; P = 0.686). The 5-year survival rates between groups were not different between stages: Stage I (92.6% vs. 86.7%; log-rank = 0.533; P = 0.465); stage II (75.8% vs. 80.5%; log-rank = 0.212; P = 0.645); and Stage III (63.8% vs. 69.1%, log-rank = 0272;P = 0.602). However, significant statistical difference amongst different stages were observed (log-rank = 1.802; P = 0.003). Conclusion Laparoscopic and open surgery for middle and lower rectal cancer offer equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes. Laparoscopic surgery is feasible in these patients. PMID:26335944

  12. Surgery for gallbladder cancer in the US: a need for greater lymph node clearance

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Nicholas N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is a rare malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Often identified incidentally after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for presumably benign biliary disease, reoperation with partial hepatic resection and periportal lymph node dissection (LND) is frequently performed. The impact of lymph node (LN) clearance for GBC remains unclear. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried for patients diagnosed with GBC between 1988 and 2009. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of survival. Results A total of 11,815 patients diagnosed with GBC were identified. Cancer-directed surgery was performed in 8,436 (71.3%) patients. Optimal LN clearance (defined as ?4 LNs) is associated with young age, advanced T-stage, no radiation therapy, and radical surgery (all <0.001). Greater LND improves survival for all stages (P<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariable analysis of patients with node-negative disease demonstrated that early stage, greater LND, and radical surgery were strong independent predictors of survival. Conclusions Extensive lymphadenectomy correlates with longer survival even in node negative patients. Extensive LND should be performed in patients with GBC as many patients in the USA are undertreated. PMID:26487937

  13. Cloud-Based Service Information System for Evaluating Quality of Life after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hao-Yun; Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Liang, Tyng-Yeu; Lee, King-The; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although recent studies have improved understanding of quality of life (QOL) outcomes of breast conserving surgery, few have used longitudinal data for more than two time points, and few have examined predictors of QOL over two years. Additionally, the longitudinal data analyses in such studies rarely apply the appropriate statistical methodology to control for censoring and inter-correlations arising from repeated measures obtained from the same patient pool. This study evaluated an internet-based system for measuring longitudinal changes in QOL and developed a cloud-based system for managing patients after breast conserving surgery. Methods This prospective study analyzed 657 breast cancer patients treated at three tertiary academic hospitals. Related hospital personnel such as surgeons and other healthcare professionals were also interviewed to determine the requirements for an effective cloud-based system for surveying QOL in breast cancer patients. All patients completed the SF-36, Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and its supplementary breast cancer measure (QLQ-BR23) at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively. The 95% confidence intervals for differences in responsiveness estimates were derived by bootstrap estimation. Scores derived by these instruments were interpreted by generalized estimating equation before and after surgery. Results All breast cancer surgery patients had significantly improved QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 subscale scores throughout the 2-year follow-up period (p<0.05). During the study period, QOL generally had a negative association with advanced age, high Charlson comorbidity index score, tumor stage III or IV, previous chemotherapy, and long post-operative LOS. Conversely, QOL was positively associated with previous radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Additionally, patients with high scores for preoperative QOL tended to have high scores for QLQ-C30, QLQ-BR23 and SF-36 subscales. Based on the results of usability testing, the five constructs were rated on a Likert scale from 1–7 as follows: system usefulness (5.6±1.8), ease of use (5.6±1.5), information quality (5.4±1.4), interface quality (5.5±1.4), and overall satisfaction (5.5±1.6). Conclusions The current trend in clinical medicine is applying therapies and interventions that improve QOL. Therefore, a potentially vast amount of internet-based QOL data is available for use in defining patient populations that may benefit from therapeutic intervention. Additionally, before undergoing breast conserving surgery, patients should be advised that their postoperative QOL depends not only on the success of the surgery, but also on their preoperative functional status. PMID:26422018

  14. The role of the robotic technique in minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Luca, Fabrizio; Petz, Wanda; Valvo, Manuela; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Zuccaro, Massimiliano; Biffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery is feasible, oncologically safe, and offers better short-term outcomes than traditional open procedures in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, and time until return to working activity. Nevertheless, laparoscopic techniques are not widely used in rectal surgery, mainly because they require a prolonged and demanding learning curve that is available only in high-volume and rectal cancer surgery centres experienced in minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery is a new technology that enables the surgeon to perform minimally invasive operations with better vision and more intuitive and precise control of the operating instruments, promising to overcome some of the technical difficulties associated with standard laparoscopy. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data on clinical and oncological outcomes of minimally invasive surgery in rectal cancer, focusing on robotic surgery, and providing original data from the authors’ centre. PMID:24101946

  15. Influence of old age on the postoperative outcomes of obstructive colorectal cancer surgery after the insertion of a stent

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hee; Baek, Seong Kyu; Bae, Ok Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In some patients more than 70 years of age with obstructive colorectal cancer, their concerns about the postoperative complications lead them to refuse surgery after the insertion of a stent. This study aimed to compare the postoperative outcomes between obstructive colorectal cancer patients aged less than 70 years and those aged 70 years and more who underwent surgery after the insertion of a colonoscopic stent. Methods Patients with obstructive colorectal cancer who underwent surgery after the insertion of a colonoscopic stent between March 2004 and March 2014 were reviewed retrospectively by using medical records. The patients were divided into two groups: 22 patients were aged less than 70 years (group A) and 30 patients were aged more than 70 years (group B). Results Although no significant difference in comorbidity was noted between the two groups, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was higher in group B. There was no significant difference in cancer location, stage, or the time from the insertion of the stent to operation. The perioperative results including operation time, blood loss, and length of stay were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative complications were also not significantly different. Conclusion The surgical outcomes of elderly patients were similar to those of younger patients, despite higher ASA scores. These results indicate that surgery can be performed safely in elderly patients with obstructive colorectal cancer after the insertion of a stent. PMID:26448917

  16. Factors influencing the surgery intentions and choices of women with early breast cancer: the predictive utility of an extended theory of planned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women diagnosed with early breast cancer (stage I or II) can be offered the choice between mastectomy or breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy due to equivalence in survival rates. A wide variation in the surgical management of breast cancer and a lack of theoretically guided research on this issue highlight the need for further research into the factors influencing women’s choices. An extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) could provide a basis to understand and predict women’s surgery choices. The aims of this study were to understand and predict the surgery intentions and choices of women newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, examining the predictive utility of an extended TPB. Methods Sixty-two women recruited from three UK breast clinics participated in the study; 48 women, newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, completed online questionnaires both before their surgery and after accessing an online decision support intervention (BresDex). Questionnaires assessed views about breast cancer and the available treatment options using items designed to measure constructs of an extended TPB (i.e., attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and anticipated regret), and women’s intentions to choose mastectomy or BCS. Objective data were collected on women’s choice of surgery via the clinical breast teams. Multiple and logistic regression analyses examined predictors of surgery intentions and subsequent choice of surgery. Results The extended TPB accounted for 69.9% of the variance in intentions (p <.001); attitudes and subjective norms were significant predictors. Including additional variables revealed anticipated regret to be a more important predictor than subjective norms. Surgery intentions significantly predicted surgery choices (p <.01). Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of an extended TPB in predicting and understanding women’s surgery intentions and choices for early breast cancer. Understanding these factors should help to identify key components of interventions to support women while considering their surgery options. PMID:23962230

  17. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  18. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E. . E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

  19. Predictors of Initial Levels and Trajectories of Anxiety in Women Prior to and For Six Months Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kyranou, Marianna; Puntillo, Kathleen; Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Neuhaus, John; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of breast cancer in combination with the anticipation of surgery evokes fear, uncertainty, and anxiety in most women. Objective In patients who underwent breast cancer surgery, study purposes were to examine how ratings of state anxiety changed from the time of the preoperative assessment to 6 months after surgery and to investigate whether specific demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychosocial adjustment characteristics predicted the preoperative levels of state anxiety and/or characteristics of the trajectories of state anxiety. Interventions/Methods Patients (n=396) were enrolled preoperatively and completed the Spielberger State Anxiety inventory monthly for six months. Using hierarchical linear modeling, demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychosocial adjustment characteristics were evaluated as predictors of initial levels and trajectories of state anxiety. Results Patients experienced moderate levels of anxiety prior to surgery. Higher levels of depressive symptoms and uncertainty about the future, as well as lower levels of life satisfaction, less sense of control, and greater difficulty coping predicted higher preoperative levels of state anxiety. Higher preoperative state anxiety, poorer physical health, decreased sense of control, and more feelings of isolation predicted higher state anxiety scores over time. Conclusions Moderate levels of anxiety persist in women for six months following breast cancer surgery. Implications for Practice Clinicians need to implement systematic assessments of anxiety to identify high risk women who warrant more targeted interventions. In addition, ongoing follow-up is needed in order to prevent adverse postoperative outcomes and to support women to return to their preoperative levels of function. PMID:24633334

  20. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  1. The Role of Immediate Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Reconstruction for Thyroid Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) is one of the most serious problems in conducting surgery for thyroid cancer. Different treatments are available for the management of UVFP including intracordal injection, type I thyroplasty, arytenoid adduction, and laryngeal reinnervations. The effects of immediate recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) reconstruction during thyroid cancer surgery with or without UVFP before the surgery were evaluated with videostroboscopic, aerodynamic, and perceptual analyses. All subjects experienced postoperative improvements in voice quality. Particularly, aerodynamic analysis showed that the values for all patients entered normal ranges in both patients with and without UVFP before surgery. Immediate RLN reconstruction has the potential to restore a normal or near-normal voice by returning thyroarytenoid muscle tone and bulk seen with vocal fold denervation. Immediate RLN reconstruction is an efficient and effective approach to the management of RLN resection during surgery for thyroid cancer. PMID:20628531

  2. Control chart methods for monitoring surgical performance: a case study from gastro-oesophageal surgery.

    PubMed

    Collins, G S; Jibawi, A; McCulloch, P

    2011-06-01

    Graphical methods are becoming increasingly used to monitor adverse outcomes from surgical interventions. However, uptake of such methods has largely been in the area of cardiothoracic surgery or in transplants with relatively little impact made in surgical oncology. A number of the more commonly used graphical methods including the Cumulative Mortality plot, Variable Life-Adjusted Display, Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) and funnel plots will be described. Accounting for heterogeneity in case-mix will be discussed and how ignoring case-mix can have considerable consequences. All methods will be illustrated using data from the Scottish Audit of Gastro-Oesophageal Cancer services (SAGOCS) data set. PMID:21195577

  3. Meta-analysis of robotic and laparoscopic surgery for treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuang; Jiang, Hong-Gang; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Zhou, Shu-Yang; Liu, Xiao-Sun; Yu, Ji-Ren

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To conduct a meta-analysis to determine the relative merits of robotic surgery (RS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) for rectal cancer. METHODS: A literature search was performed to identify comparative studies reporting perioperative outcomes for RS and LS for rectal cancer. Pooled odds ratios and weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using either the fixed effects model or random effects model. RESULTS: Eight studies matched the selection criteria and reported on 661 subjects, of whom 268 underwent RS and 393 underwent LS for rectal cancer. Compared the perioperative outcomes of RS with LS, reports of RS indicated favorable outcomes considering conversion (WMD: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.11-0.58; P = 0.001). Meanwhile, operative time (WMD: 27.92, 95% CI: -13.43 to 69.27; P = 0.19); blood loss (WMD: -32.35, 95% CI: -86.19 to 21.50; P = 0.24); days to passing flatus (WMD: -0.18, 95% CI: -0.96 to 0.60; P = 0.65); length of stay (WMD: -0.04; 95% CI: -2.28 to 2.20; P = 0.97); complications (WMD: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.71-1.55; P = 0.82) and pathological details, including lymph nodes harvested (WMD: 0.41, 95% CI: -0.67 to 1.50; P = 0.46), distal resection margin (WMD: -0.35, 95% CI: -1.27 to 0.58; P = 0.46), and positive circumferential resection margin (WMD: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.12-2.39; P = 0.42) were similar between RS and LS. CONCLUSION: RS for rectal cancer is superior to LS in terms of conversion. RS may be an alternative treatment for rectal cancer. Further studies are required. PMID:22215947

  4. Grantee Research Highlight: Impact on Outcomes of Structure & Process in Cancer Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    Every year thousands of Americans die or experience serious complications when they have elective cancer surgery. The rates of complications and excess mortality vary widely across hospitals and surgeons, with some having very low rates and others much higher rates.

  5. Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer could forego radical prostatectomy and live as long as men who have immediate surgery, according to long-awaited results from a clinical trial published July 19, 2012, in NEJM.

  6. Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Results from the PIVOT trial showed that some men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer who forego radical prostatectomy may live as long as men who have immediate surgery. This article explores how the findings may affect clinical practice.

  7. ONE WEEK VERSUS FOUR WEEK HEPARIN PROPHYLAXIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY FOR COLORECTAL CANCER.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-28

    The Primary Study Objective is to Assess the Efficacy and; Safety of Extended 4-week Heparin Prophylaxis Compared to; Prophylaxis Given for 8±2 Days After Planned Laparoscopic; Surgery for Colorectal Cancer.; The Clinical Benefit Will be Evaluated as the Difference in; the Incidence of VTE or VTE-related Death Occurring Within 30 Days; From Surgery in the Two Study Groups.

  8. Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence After Surgery and Radiotherapy or Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T.-K.; Bhosale, Priya R.; Crane, Christopher H.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Skibber, John M. M.D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Eng, Cathy; Wolff, Robert A.; Janjan, Nora A.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Das, Prajnan

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To identify patterns of locoregional recurrence in patients treated with surgery and preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1989 and October 2001, 554 patients with rectal cancer were treated with surgery and preoperative (85%) or postoperative (15%) radiotherapy, with 95% receiving concurrent chemotherapy. Among these patients, 46 had locoregional recurrence as the first site of failure. Computed tomography images showing the site of recurrence and radiotherapy simulation films were available for 36 of the 46 patients. Computed tomography images were used to identify the sites of recurrence and correlate the sites to radiotherapy fields in these 36 patients. Results: The estimated 5-year locoregional control rate was 91%. The 36 patients in the study had locoregional recurrences at 43 sites. There were 28 (65%) in-field, 7 (16%) marginal, and 8 (19%) out-of-field recurrences. Among the in-field recurrences, 15 (56%) occurred in the low pelvis, 6 (22%) in the presacral region, 4 (15%) in the mid-pelvis, and 2 (7%) in the high pelvis. Clinical T stage, pathologic T stage, and pathologic N stage were significantly associated with the risk of in-field locoregional recurrence. The median survival after locoregional recurrence was 24.6 months. Conclusions: Patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy or chemoradiation for rectal cancer had a low risk of locoregional recurrence, with the majority of recurrences occurring within the radiation field. Because 78% of in-field recurrences occur in the low pelvic and presacral regions, consideration should be given to including the low pelvic and presacral regions in the radiotherapy boost field, especially in patients at high risk of recurrence.

  9. Robotic versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Heui; Lim, Sungwon; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Robotic surgery (RS) overcomes the limitations of previous conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS). Although meta-analyses have been published recently, our study evaluated the latest comparative surgical, urologic, and sexual results for rectal cancer and compares RS with CLS in patients with rectal cancer only. Methods We searched three foreign databases (Ovid-MEDLINE, Ovid-Embase, and Cochrane Library) and five Korean databases (KoreaMed, KMbase, KISS, RISS, and KisTi) during July 2013. The Cochrane Risk of Bias and the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized were utilized to evaluate quality of study. Dichotomous variables were pooled using the risk ratio (RR), and continuous variables were pooled using the mean difference (MD). All meta-analyses were conducted with Review Manager, V. 5.3. Results Seventeen studies involving 2,224 patients were included. RS was associated with a lower rate of intraoperative conversion than that of CLS (RR, 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.54). Time to first flatus was short (MD, -0.13; 95% CI, -0.25 to -0.01). Operating time was longer for RS than that for CLS (MD, 49.97; 95% CI, 20.43-79.52, I2 = 97%). International Prostate Symptom Score scores at 3 months better RS than CLS (MD, -2.90; 95% CI, -5.31 to -0.48, I2 = 0%). International Index of Erectile Function scores showed better improvement at 3 months (MD, -2.82; 95% CI, -4.78 to -0.87, I2 = 37%) and 6 months (MD, -2.15; 95% CI, -4.08 to -0.22, I2 = 0%). Conclusion RS appears to be an effective alternative to CLS with a lower conversion rate to open surgery, a shorter time to first flatus and better recovery in voiding and sexual function. RS could enhance postoperative recovery in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:26448918

  10. Correlation of ADRB1 rs1801253 Polymorphism with Analgesic Effect of Fentanyl After Cancer Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tian, Yanli; Zhao, Chunlei; Sui, Zhifu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Congmin; Yang, Rongya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our study aimed to explore the association between ?1-adrenoceptor (ADRB1) rs1801253 polymorphism and analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgeries in Chinese Han populations. MATERIAL AND METHODS Postoperative fentanyl consumption of 120 patients for analgesia was recorded. Genotype distributions were detected by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) method. Postoperative pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) method. Differences in postoperative VAS score and postoperative fentanyl consumption for analgesia in different genotype groups were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test was also performed to test the analgesic effect of fentanyl. RESULTS Frequencies of Gly/Gly, Gly/Arg, Arg/Arg genotypes were 45.0%, 38.3%, and 16.7%, respectively, and passed the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) test. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) had no significant differences at different times. After surgery, the VAS score and fentanyl consumption in Arg/Arg group were significantly higher than in other groups at the postoperative 2nd hour, but the differences were not obvious at the 4th hour, 24th hour, and the 48th hour. The results suggest that the Arg/Arg homozygote increased susceptibility to postoperative pain. The preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test suggested that individuals with Arg/Arg genotype showed worse analgesic effect of fentanyl compared to other genotypes. CONCLUSIONS In Chinese Han populations, ADRB1 rs1801253 polymorphism might be associated with the analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgery. PMID:26694722

  11. Correlation of ADRB1 rs1801253 Polymorphism with Analgesic Effect of Fentanyl After Cancer Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Tian, Yanli; Zhao, Chunlei; Sui, Zhifu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Congmin; Yang, Rongya

    2015-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to explore the association between ?1-adrenoceptor (ADRB1) rs1801253 polymorphism and analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgeries in Chinese Han populations. Material/Methods Postoperative fentanyl consumption of 120 patients for analgesia was recorded. Genotype distributions were detected by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) method. Postoperative pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) method. Differences in postoperative VAS score and postoperative fentanyl consumption for analgesia in different genotype groups were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test was also performed to test the analgesic effect of fentanyl. Results Frequencies of Gly/Gly, Gly/Arg, Arg/Arg genotypes were 45.0%, 38.3%, and 16.7%, respectively, and passed the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) test. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) had no significant differences at different times. After surgery, the VAS score and fentanyl consumption in Arg/Arg group were significantly higher than in other groups at the postoperative 2nd hour, but the differences were not obvious at the 4th hour, 24th hour, and the 48th hour. The results suggest that the Arg/Arg homozygote increased susceptibility to postoperative pain. The preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test suggested that individuals with Arg/Arg genotype showed worse analgesic effect of fentanyl compared to other genotypes. Conclusions In Chinese Han populations, ADRB1 rs1801253 polymorphism might be associated with the analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgery. PMID:26694722

  12. Effect of Interval to Definitive Breast Surgery on Clinical Presentation and Survival in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Hammond, A.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of clinical presentation and interval to breast surgery on local recurrence and survival in early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 397 patients with Stage T1-T2N0 breast carcinoma treated with conservative surgery and breast radiotherapy between 1985 and 1992 were reviewed at the London Regional Cancer Program. The clinical presentation consisted of a mammogram finding or a palpable lump. The intervals from clinical presentation to definitive breast surgery used for analysis were 0-4, >4-12, and >12 weeks. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival were determined for the three groups. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical presentation and interval to definitive surgery on survival. Results: The median follow-up was 11.2 years. No statistically significant difference was found in local recurrence as a function of the interval to definitive surgery (p = .424). A significant difference was noted in disease-free survival (p = .040) and cause-specific survival (p = .006) with an interval of >12 weeks to definitive breast surgery. However, the interval to definitive surgery was dependent on the presentation for cause-specific survival, with a substantial effect for patients with a mammographic presentation and a negligible effect for patients with a lump presentation (interaction p = .041). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that an interval of >12 weeks to breast surgery might be associated with decreased survival for patients with a mammographic presentation, but it appeared to have no effect on survival for patients presenting with a palpable breast lump.

  13. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This trial studies the physical function and quality-of-life before and after surgery in patients with stage I cervical cancer. Studying quality-of-life in patients undergoing surgery for cervical cancer may help determine the intermediate-term and long-term effects of surgery.

  14. Metachronous second primary lung cancer surgically treated five years or more after the initial surgery

    PubMed Central

    KOEZUKA, SATOSHI; HATA, YOSHINOBU; OTSUKA, HAJIME; MAKINO, TAKASHI; TOCHIGI, NAOBUMI; SHIBUYA, KAZUTOSHI; IYODA, AKIRA

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment for metachronous second primary lung cancer following curative resection of primary lung cancer may be challenging. Standard surgical strategies for metachronous second primary lung cancer have not yet been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent surgical resection for metachronous second primary lung cancer. A total of 12 patients surgically treated for metachronous second primary lung cancer ?5 years after the initial surgery were retrospectively analyzed. The overall 5-year survival after the second surgery was 56.5%. There was no operative mortality. Patients with T1aN0M0 metachronous second primary lung cancer experienced a significantly higher 5-year overall survival rate compared with other patients (100 vs. 26.7%, respectively; P=0.0336). Among patients who underwent sublobar resection, all 3 patients with T1aN0M0 disease remained alive at the last follow-up, while 4 of the 5 patients (80%) with non-T1aN0M0 disease had developed recurrence. Surgery for metachronous second primary lung cancer may be safely performed. Early-stage metachronous second primary lung cancer was associated with a good prognosis, even among patients who underwent sublobar resection. Early detection of metachronous second primary lung cancer with close long-term follow-up following initial surgery may improve surgical outcomes.

  15. Thirty-Day Mortality After Primary Cytoreductive Surgery for Advanced Ovarian Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Thrall, Melissa M.; Goff, Barbara A.; Symons, Rebecca Gaston; Flum, David R.; Gray, Heidi J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with increased 30-day mortality after advanced ovarian cancer debulking among elderly women. Methods A database linking Medicare records with the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) data was used to identify a cohort of 5,475 women aged 65 and older who had primary debulking surgery for stage III or IV epithelial ovarian cancer (diagnosed1995-2005). Women were stratified by acuity of hospital admission. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify patient and treatment related variables associated with 30-day mortality. Results Five-thousand four-hundred seventy-five women had surgery for advanced ovarian cancer, and the overall 30-day mortality was 8.2%. Women admitted electively had a 30-day mortality of 5.6 % (251/4517) and those admitted emergently had a 30-day mortality of 20.1% (168/835). Advancing age, increasing stage, and increasing comorbidity score were all associated with an increase in 30-day mortality (all p<0.05) among elective admissions. A high risk group of women admitted electively included those aged 75 or older with stage IV disease and women aged 75 or older with stage III disease and a comorbidity score of 1 or more. This group had an observed 30-day mortality of 12.7% (95%CI 10.7%-14.9%). Conclusions Age, cancer stage, and comorbidity scores may be helpful to stratify electively admitted patients based on predicted postoperative mortality. If validated in a prospective cohort, these factors may help identify women who may benefit from alternative treatment strategies. PMID:21860281

  16. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  17. Clinicopathologic Factors Affecting Recurrence after Curative Surgery for Stage I Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Min Ae; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Sun A; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Yu, Chang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The objective of the current study was to identify the clinicopathological risk factors affecting recurrence after a curative resection for stage I colorectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively studied 434 patients who underwent a curative resection for stage I colorectal cancer between January 1999 and December 2004. Postoperative oral chemotherapy was performed in 189 patients (45.3%). The following prognostic factors were correlated with recurrence: age, gender, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level, location of tumor, T stage, size of tumor, histologic differentiation, growth pattern, and lymphovascular invasion. The median follow-up duration was 65 months. Results The overall recurrence rate was 4.6% (20/434). The median time to recurrence was 33 months. Two-thirds of the recurrence occurred more than two years after surgery. Risk factors associated with recurrence were rectal cancer (P = 0.009), T2 stage (P = 0.010), and infiltrative growth pattern (P = 0.020). A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis demonstrated that the infiltrative growth pattern was an independent predictor for recurrence. Tumor cell budding was observed in all pathologic reviews with recurrence. Conclusion Long-term follow-up is necessary for stage I colorectal patients with high risk factors like rectal cancer, T2 stage, and infiltrative growth pattern. PMID:22413082

  18. Pricing of Surgeries for Colon Cancer: Patient Severity and Market Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dor, Avi; Koroukian, Siran; Xu, Fang; Stulberg, Jonah; Delaney, Conor; Cooper, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective Examine effects of HMO penetration, hospital competition, and patient severity on the uptake of laparoscopic colectomy and its price relative to open surgery for colon cancer. Methods We used 2002-2007 the MarketScan Database to identify admissions for privately insured colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic or open partial colectomy (n=1,035 and n=6,389, respectively). Patient and health plan characteristics were retrieved from these data; HMO market penetration rates and an index of hospital market concentration, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI), were derived from national databases. Logistic and logarithmic regressions were used to examine the odds of having laparoscopic colectomy, effect of covariates on colectomy prices, and the differential price of laparoscopy. Results Adoption of laparoscopy was highly sensitive to market forces, with a 10% increase in HMO penetration leading to a 10.3% increase in the likelihood of undergoing laparoscopic colectomy (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.109, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.062, 1.158), and a 10% increase in HHI resulting in 6.6% lower likelihood (AOR: 0.936 (0.880, 0.996)). Price models indicated that the price of laparoscopy was 7.6% lower than for open surgery (transformed coefficient (Coeff): 0.927 (0.895, 0.960)). A 10% increase in HMO penetration was associated with 1.6% lower price (Coeff: 0.985 (0.977, 0.992)), while a 10% increase in HHI was associated with 1.6% higher price (Coeff: 1.016 (1.006, 1.027), p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusions Laparoscopy was significantly associated with lower hospital prices. Moreover, Impact Laparoscopic surgery may result in cost savings, while market pressures contribute to its adoption. PMID:22569703

  19. Conventional versus nerve-sparing radical surgery for cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Keewon; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Seo, Joung Hwa; Kim, Sang Youn; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min A; Hong, Kyoung Sup; Jeong, Chang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although nerve-sparing radical surgery (NSRS) is an emerging technique for reducing surgery-related dysfunctions, its efficacy is controversial in patients with cervical cancer. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to compare clinical outcomes, and urinary, anorectal, and sexual dysfunctions between conventional radical surgery (CRS) and NSRS. Methods After searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, two randomized controlled trials, seven prospective and eleven retrospective cohort studies were included with 2,253 patients from January 2000 to February 2014. We performed crude analyses and then conducted subgroup analyses according to study design, quality of study, surgical approach, radicality, and adjustment for potential confounding factors. Results Crude analyses showed decreases in blood loss, hospital stay, frequency of intraoperative complications, length of the resected vagina, duration of postoperative catheterization (DPC), urinary frequency, and abnormal sensation in NSRS, whereas there were no significant differences in other clinical parameters and dysfunctions between CRS and NSRS. In subgroup analyses, operative time was longer (standardized difference in means, 0.948; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.642 to 1.253), while intraoperative complications were less common (odds ratio, 0.147; 95% CI, 0.035 to 0.621) in NSRS. Furthermore, subgroup analyses showed that DPC was shorter, urinary incontinence or frequency, and constipation were less frequent in NSRS without adverse effects on survival and sexual functions. Conclusion NSRS may not affect prognosis and sexual dysfunctions in patients with cervical cancer, whereas it may decrease intraoperative complications, and urinary and anorectal dysfunctions despite long operative time and short length of the resected vagina when compared with CRS. PMID:25872891

  20. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. )

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  1. Influence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra M; Nagendra, H R; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Vinay, C; Chandrashekara, S; Gopinath, K. S.; Srinath, B. S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines—soluble Interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. Results: Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay (P = 0.003), days of drain retention (P = 0.001) and days for suture removal (P = 0.03) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group (P < 0.001), as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. Conclusion: The results suggest possible benefits of yoga in reducing postoperative complications in breast cancer patients. PMID:21829282

  2. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ?66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  3. Factors Affecting Survival in Patients Undergoing Palliative Spine Surgery for Metastatic Lung and Hepatocellular Cancer: Dose the Type of Surgery Influence the Surgical Results for Metastatic Spine Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kee-Yong; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Park, Hyung-Youl

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment for metastatic spine disease has been becoming more prominent with the help of technological advances and a few favorable reports on the surgery. In cases of this peculiar condition, it is necessary to establish the role of surgery and analyze the factors affecting survival. Methods From January 2011 to April 2015, 119 patients were surgically treated for metastatic spine lesions. To reduce the bias along the heterogeneous cancers, the primary cancer was confined to either the lung (n = 25) or the liver (n = 18). Forty-three patients (male, 32; female, 11; mean age, 57.5 years) who had undergone palliative surgery were enrolled in this study. Posterior decompression and fusion was performed in 30 patients (P group), and anteroposterior (AP) reconstruction was performed in 13 patients (AP group) for palliative surgery. Pre- and postoperative (3 months) pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), performance status (Karnofsky performance score), neurologic status (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade), and spinal instability neoplastic score (SINS) were compared. The survival period and related hazard factors were also assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. Results Most patients experienced improvements in pain and performance status (12.3% ± 17.2%) at 3 months postoperatively. In terms of neurologic recovery, 9 patients (20.9%) graded ASIA D experienced neurological improvement to ASIA E while the remainder was status quo. In an analysis according to operation type, there was no significant difference in patient demographics. At 12 months postoperatively, cumulative survival rates were 31.5% and 38.7% for the P group and the AP group, respectively (p > 0.05). Survival was not affected by the pre- and postoperative pain scale, Tokuhashi score, neurologic status, SINS, or operation type. Preoperative Karnofsky performance score (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 0.96) and improvement of performance status after surgery (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.97) significantly affected survival after operation. Conclusions There was no significant difference in surgical outcomes and survival rates between posterior and AP surgery for metastatic lesions resulting from lung and hepatocellular cancer. Preoperative Karnofsky score and improvement of performance status had a significant impact on the survival rate following surgical treatment for these metastatic spine lesions. PMID:26330957

  4. Pathological Characterization of Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Underwent Debulking Surgery in Combination With Diaphragmatic Surgery: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takeshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Sagawa, Yasukazu; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-12-01

    Despite exhaustive efforts to detect early-stage ovarian cancers, greater than two-thirds of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although diaphragmatic metastasis is not rare in advanced ovarian cancer patients and often precludes optimal cytoreductive surgery, little is known about the mechanisms and predictive factors of metastasis to the diaphragm. Thus, as an initial step toward investigating such factors, the present study was conducted to characterize the pathological status of ovarian cancer patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery.This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study of patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery at our institution between January 2005 and July 2015. Clinicopathological data were reviewed by board-certified gynecologists, pathologists, and cytopathologists. The rates of various pathological findings were investigated and compared by Fisher exact test between 2 groups: 1 group that was pathologically positive for diaphragmatic metastasis (group A) and another group that was pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis (group B).Forty-six patients were included: 41 patients pathologically positive and 5 pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis. The rates of metastasis to the lymph node (95.8% vs 20%, P?=?0.001) and metastasis to the peritoneum except for the diaphragm (97.6% vs 60.0%, P?=?0.028) were significantly increased in group A compared with group B. However, no significant differences between the 2 groups were found for rates of histological subtypes (high-grade serous or non-high-grade serous), the presence of ascites, the presence of malignant ascites, exposure of cancer cells on the ovarian surface, blood vascular invasion in the primary lesion, and lymphovascular invasion in the primary lesion.Our study demonstrated that metastasis to the lymph node and nondiaphragmatic metastasis to the peritoneum are significantly associated with metastasis to the diaphragmatic peritoneum, indicating that these factors may be pathological predictors of diaphragmatic metastasis in patients with ovarian cancer. However, as the data available are not sufficient to demonstrate the predictive power of these factors, a further comprehensive, large-scale study should be performed. PMID:26683966

  5. Feasibility of Using Low-Cost Motion Capture for Automated Screening of Shoulder Motion Limitation after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gritsenko, Valeriya; Dailey, Eric; Kyle, Nicholas; Taylor, Matt; Whittacre, Sean; Swisher, Anne K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if a low-cost, automated motion analysis system using Microsoft Kinect could accurately measure shoulder motion and detect motion impairments in women following breast cancer surgery. Design Descriptive study of motion measured via 2 methods. Setting Academic cancer center oncology clinic. Participants 20 women (mean age = 60 yrs) were assessed for active and passive shoulder motions during a routine post-operative clinic visit (mean = 18 days after surgery) following mastectomy (n = 4) or lumpectomy (n = 16) for breast cancer. Interventions Participants performed 3 repetitions of active and passive shoulder motions on the side of the breast surgery. Arm motion was recorded using motion capture by Kinect for Windows sensor and on video. Goniometric values were determined from video recordings, while motion capture data were transformed to joint angles using 2 methods (body angle and projection angle). Main Outcome Measure Correlation of motion capture with goniometry and detection of motion limitation. Results Active shoulder motion measured with low-cost motion capture agreed well with goniometry (r = 0.70–0.80), while passive shoulder motion measurements did not correlate well. Using motion capture, it was possible to reliably identify participants whose range of shoulder motion was reduced by 40% or more. Conclusions Low-cost, automated motion analysis may be acceptable to screen for moderate to severe motion impairments in active shoulder motion. Automatic detection of motion limitation may allow quick screening to be performed in an oncologist's office and trigger timely referrals for rehabilitation. PMID:26076031

  6. Chemoradiation Therapy for Potentially Resectable Gastric Cancer: Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Who Do Not Undergo Planned Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Das, Prajnan; Janjan, Nora A.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Phan, Alexandria T.; Delclos, Marc E.; Maru, Dipen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed treatment outcomes among resectable gastric cancer patients treated preoperatively with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) but rendered ineligible for planned surgery because of clinical deterioration or development of overt metastatic disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2004, 39 patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer received preoperative CRT but failed to undergo surgery. At baseline clinical staging, 33 (85%) patients had T3-T4 disease, and 27 (69%) patients had nodal involvement. Most patients received 45 Gy of radiotherapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Twenty-one patients underwent induction chemotherapy before CRT. Actuarial times to local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The cause for surgical ineligibility was development of metastatic disease (28 patients, 72%; predominantly peritoneal, 18 patients), poor performance status (5 patients, 13%), patient/physician preference (4 patients, 10%), and treatment-related death (2 patients, 5%). With a median follow-up of 8 months (range, 1-95 months), actuarial 1-year LC, DC, and OS were 46%, 12%, and 36%, respectively. Median LC and OS were 11.0 and 10.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with potentially resectable gastric cancer treated with preoperative CRT are found to be ineligible for surgery principally because of peritoneal progression. Patients who are unable to undergo planned surgery have outcomes comparable to that of patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with chemotherapy alone. CRT provides durable LC for the majority of the remaining life of these patients.

  7. A Precision Method for Contouring Bioresorbable Implants in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeLacure, Mark D.; Kuriakose, M. Abraham

    2002-01-01

    Bioresorbable implants (meshs and plates) are increasingly used in reconstructive craniofacial and skull base surgery. Usually these implants must be contoured to fit the complex craniofacial anatomy ex vivo; occasionally final contouring is performed in vivo and must be done without damaging surrounding structures (e.g., dura, brain). We report a precision method for in vivo contouring of bioresorbable implants using the Shaw hemostatic thermal scalpel. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167661

  8. Neoadjuvant Treatment Does Not Influence Perioperative Outcome in Rectal Cancer Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Alexis; Weitz, Juergen Slodczyk, Matthias; Koch, Moritz; Jaeger, Dirk; Muenter, Marc; Buechler, Markus W.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for perioperative morbidity in patients undergoing resection of primary rectal cancer, with a specific focus on the effect of neoadjuvant therapy. Methods and Materials: This exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data included all patients who underwent anterior resection/low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary rectal cancer between October 2001 and October 2006. The study endpoints were perioperative surgical and medical morbidity. Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors were performed. Results: A total of 485 patients were included in this study; 425 patients (88%) underwent a sphincter-saving anterior resection/low anterior resection, 47 (10%) abdominoperineal resection, and 13 (2%) multivisceral resection. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was performed in 100 patients (21%), and 168 (35%) underwent neoadjuvant short-term radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy). Patient age and operative time were independently associated with perioperative morbidity, and operative time, body mass index >27 kg/m{sup 2} (overweight), and resection type were associated with surgical morbidity. Age and a history of smoking were confirmed as independent prognostic risk factors for medical complications. Neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with a worse outcome. Conclusion: The results of this prospective study have identified several risk factors associated with an adverse perioperative outcome after rectal cancer surgery. In addition, neoadjuvant therapy was not associated with increased perioperative complications.

  9. The Role of Secondary Cytoreductive Surgery in Patients with Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian, Tubal, and Peritoneal Cancers: A Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chi-Mu; Chou, Yiing-Jeng; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Twu, Nae-Fang; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Peng-Hui; Lai, Chung-Ru

    2012-01-01

    Background. All published reports concerning secondary cytoreductive surgery for relapsed ovarian cancer have essentially been observational studies. However, the validity of observational studies is usually threatened from confounding by indication. We sought to address this issue by using comparative effectiveness methods to adjust for confounding. Methods. Using a prospectively collected administrative health care database in a single institution, we identified 1,124 patients diagnosed with recurrent epithelial, tubal, and peritoneal cancers between 1990 and 2009. Effectiveness of secondary cytoreductive surgery using the conventional Cox proportional hazard model, propensity score, and instrumental variable were compared. Sensitivity analyses for residual confounding were explored using an array approach. Results. Secondary cytoreductive surgery prolonged overall survival with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.76 (range 0.66–0.87), using the Cox proportional hazard model. Propensity score methods produced comparable results: 0.75 (range 0.64–0.86) by nearest matching, 0.73 (0.65–0.82) by quintile stratification, 0.71 (0.65–0.77) by weighting, and 0.72 (0.63–0.83) by covariate adjustment. The instrumental variable method also produced a comparable estimate: 0.75 (range 0.65–0.86). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the true treatment effects may approach the null hypothesis if the association between unmeasured confounders and disease outcome is high. Conclusions. This comparative effectiveness study provides supportive evidence for previous reports that secondary cytoreductive surgery may increase overall survival for patients with recurrent epithelial, tubal, and peritoneal cancers. PMID:22591974

  10. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Osteen, R T; Smith, B L

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. Using histologic findings in the biopsy as a guide, it may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. Radiation therapy can be avoided safely in patients who have pathologically negative axillas by level I and II dissection. There appears to be no advantage to routine dissection of level III lymph nodes. Lymphedema of the arm and breast increases with more extensive dissections and with radiation therapy. PMID:2218816

  11. Increased precision of orthotopic and metastatic breast cancer surgery guided by matrix metalloproteinase-activatable near-infrared fluorescence probes

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Zhang, Qian; Mao, Yamin; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Ye, Jinzuo; Wang, Jiandong; Wang, Zhongliang; Du, Yang; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging technology has allowed the use of fluorescence molecular imaging-guided breast cancer surgery (FMI-guided BCS) to specifically label tumour cells and to precisely distinguish tumour margins from normal tissues intra-operatively, a major challenge in the medical field. Here, we developed a surgical navigation system for real-time FMI-guided BCS. Tumours derived from highly metastatic 4T1-luc breast cancer cells, which exhibit high expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), were established in nude mice; these mice were injected with smart MMP-targeting and “always-on” HER2-targeting near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes. The fluorescence signal was imaged to assess in vivo binding of the probes to the tumour and metastatic sites. Then, orthotopic and metastatic breast tumours were precisely removed under the guidance of our system. The post-operative survival rate of mice was improved by 50% with the new method. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining for MMP2 and CD11b further confirmed the precision of tumour dissection. Our method facilitated the accurate detection and complete removal of breast cancer tumours and provided a method for defining the molecular classification of breast cancer during surgery, thereby improving prognoses and survival rates. PMID:26395067

  12. PREDICT: a new UK prognostic model that predicts survival following surgery for invasive breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Wishart, Gordon C.; Azzato, Elizabeth M.; Greenberg, David C.; Rashbass, Jem; Kearins, Olive; Lawrence, Gill; Caldas, Carlos; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2010-01-06

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prognostication model to predict overall and breast cancer specific survival for women treated for early breast cancer in the UK. Methods Using the Eastern Cancer Registration...

  13. Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a tattoo that looks like the areola (the dark area around your nipple). There are two main ... feeling in your breast, nipple, and areola (the dark area around your nipple). Maybe. After surgery, the ...

  14. Early enteral nutrition in combination with parenteral nutrition in elderly patients after surgery due to gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongping; Sun, Zhufeng; Huang, Jianwei; Shen, Zhaozai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of nutritional support via different routes in elderly patients after surgery for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Methods: 105 patients with GI cancer were randomly divided into early enteral nutrition (EEN) group (n = 35), total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group (n = 35) and EN+PN group (n = 35). Results: The nutrition status and immunity were significantly compromised in all patients, while the liver function was improved at 3 days after surgery as compared to those before surgery. At 7 days after surgery, they returned to preoperative level. The nutrition status was comparable among 3 groups at 3 and 7 days after surgery (P > 0.05). ALT, AST, ALP and GGT in TNP group were significantly higher than those in EEN group and EN+PN group (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in the liver function between EEN group and EN+PN group (P > 0.05). The CD3+ cells, CD4+ cells and CD4/CD8 in EEN group and EN+PN group were significantly higher than those in TPN group (P < 0.05), but significant difference was not observed between EEN group and EN+PN group (P > 0.05). The NK cells in EN+PN group were significantly higher than in TPN group (P < 0.01). The incidence of diarrhea in EEN group was significantly higher than in TPN group and EN+PN group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: EN+PN is superior to EEN alone and TPN alone in the old patients with GI cancer in reducing the postoperative complications, improving the immunity and decreasing the hospital stay. PMID:26550350

  15. Evaluation of leptin serum concentrations during surgery and first-line chemotherapy in primary epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna; Markowska, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The available data on serum leptin levels in ovarian cancer present contradictory results. The majority of authors report lower leptin levels in those patients in comparison to healthy individuals. However, there is no data regarding leptin concentrations during therapy in women with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Material and methods Blood samples were collected at the time of diagnosis, after initial surgery, and after first-line chemotherapy. Leptin serum concentrations were analysed using ELISA technique. Additionally, parallel measurements of CA125 levels were performed. Results Fifty-three patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer met the inclusion criteria and were included in our study. Our analysis revealed a significant difference in mean preoperative serum leptin concentrations between early and advanced ovarian cancer patients (p < 0.0001). We identified statistically significant elevation of mean serum leptin levels (p < 0.001) after complete macroscopic cytoreduction and after first-line chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer cases. Discussion In this cohort, a significant elevation of postoperative serum leptin levels after complete macroscopic cytoreduction were shown. Moreover, elevation of leptin levels corresponded with remission after chemotherapy. Further studies are needed to determine if leptin can be a potential marker of surgery completeness as well as a marker in chemotherapy response evaluation. PMID:25477753

  16. Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget’s disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

  17. Can Acute Pain Treatment Reduce Postsurgical Comorbidity after Breast Cancer Surgery? A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Hosokawa, Toyoshi; Okamoto, Akiko; Matsuda, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Yosuke; Yamakita, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Sawa, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Regional analgesia, opioids, and several oral analgesics are commonly used for the treatment of acute pain after breast cancer surgery. While all of these treatments can suppress the acute postsurgical pain, there is growing evidence that suggests that the postsurgical comorbidity will differ in accordance with the type of analgesic used during the surgery. Our current study reviewed the effect of analgesics used for acute pain treatments on the major comorbidities that occur after breast cancer surgery. A considerable number of clinical studies have been performed to investigate the relationship between the acute analgesic regimen and common comorbidities, including inadequate quality of recovery after the surgery, persistent postsurgical pain, and cancer recurrence. Previous studies have shown that the choice of the analgesic modality does affect the postsurgical comorbidity. In general, the use of regional analgesics has a beneficial effect on the occurrence of comorbidity. In order to determine the best analgesic choice after breast cancer surgery, prospective studies that are based on a clear definition of the comorbidity state will need to be undertaken in the future. PMID:26495309

  18. Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Lungs Warning Signs Of Lung Disease Asthma COPD Influenza Lung Cancer Pneumonia SUPPORT & COMMUNITY Lung HelpLine ... Your Lungs Warning Signs Of Lung Disease Asthma COPD Influenza Lung Cancer Pneumonia SUPPORT AND COMMUNITY Lung ...

  19. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery: The Contemporary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gil Chai; Holsinger, Floyd Christopher; Li, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    Traditional open surgical approaches are indicated for treatment of select tumor subsites of head and neck cancer, but can also result in major cosmetic and functional morbidity. Transoral surgical approaches have been used for head and neck cancer since the 1960s, with their application continuing to evolve with the changing landscape of this disease and recent innovations in surgical instrumentation. The potential to further reduce treatment morbidity with transoral surgery, while optimizing oncologic outcomes, continues to be investigated. This review examines current literature evaluating oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes achieved through transoral head and neck surgery. PMID:26568549

  20. Comparison of quality of life after stereotactic body radiotherapy and surgery for early-stage prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As the long-term efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) becomes established and other prostate cancer treatment approaches are refined and improved, examination of quality of life (QOL) following prostate cancer treatment is critical in driving both patient and clinical treatment decisions. We present the first study to compare QOL after SBRT and radical prostatectomy, with QOL assessed at approximately the same times pre- and post-treatment and using the same validated QOL instrument. Methods Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with either radical prostatectomy (n?=?123 Spanish patients) or SBRT (n?=?216 American patients). QOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) grouped into urinary, sexual, and bowel domains. For comparison purposes, SBRT EPIC data at baseline, 3?weeks, 5, 11, 24, and 36?months were compared to surgery data at baseline, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36?months. Differences in patient characteristics between the two groups were assessed using Chi-squared tests for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were constructed for each EPIC scale to account for correlation among repeated measures and used to assess the effect of treatment on QOL. Results The largest differences in QOL occurred in the first 1–6?months after treatment, with larger declines following surgery in urinary and sexual QOL as compared to SBRT, and a larger decline in bowel QOL following SBRT as compared to surgery. Long-term urinary and sexual QOL declines remained clinically significantly lower for surgery patients but not for SBRT patients. Conclusions Overall, these results may have implications for patient and physician clinical decision making which are often influenced by QOL. These differences in sexual, urinary and bowel QOL should be closely considered in selecting the right treatment, especially in evaluating the value of non-invasive treatments, such as SBRT. PMID:23164305

  1. Single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao-Yu; Lin, Chen-Sung; Shih, Chih-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, novel results using pulmonary wedge resection executed through single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) was first described. Since that time, single-port VATS has been advocated for the treatment of a spectrum of thoracic diseases, especially lung cancer. Lung cancer remains one of the top three cancer-related deaths in Taiwan, and surgical resection remains the “gold standard” for early-stage lung cancer. Anatomical resections (including pneumonectomy, lobectomy, and segmentectomy) remain the primary types of lung cancer surgery, regardless of whether conventional open thoracotomy, or 4/3/2-ports VATS are used. In the past three years, several pioneers have reported their early experiences with single-port VATS lobectomy, segmentectomy, and pneumonectomy for lung cancer. Our goal was to appraise their findings and review the role of single-port VATS in the treatment of lung cancer. In addition, the current concept of mini-invasive surgery involves not only smaller resections (requiring only a few incisions), but also sub-lobar resection as segmentectomy. Therefore, our review will also address these issues. PMID:24455171

  2. Retrospective cohort study of an enhanced recovery programme in oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Gatenby, P A C; Shaw, C; Hine, C; Scholtes, S; Koutra, M; Andrew, H; Hacking, M; Allum, W H

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Enhanced recovery programmes have been established in some areas of elective surgery. This study applied enhanced recovery principles to elective oesophageal and gastric cancer surgery. Methods An enhanced recovery programme for patients undergoing open oesophagogastrectomy, total and subtotal gastrectomy for oesophageal and gastric malignancy was designed. A retrospective cohort study compared length of stay on the critical care unit (CCU), total length of inpatient stay, rates of complications and in-hospital mortality prior to (35 patients) and following (27 patients) implementation. Results In the cohort study, the median total length of stay was reduced by 3 days following oesophagogastrectomy and total gastrectomy. The median length of stay on the CCU remained the same for all patients. The rates of complications and mortality were the same. Conclusions The standardised protocol reduced the median overall length of stay but did not reduce CCU stay. Enhanced recovery principles can be applied to patients undergoing major oesophagogastrectomy and total gastrectomy as long as they have minimal or reversible co-morbidity. PMID:26414360

  3. Prognostic Indicators of Surgery for Esophageal Cancer: A 5 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadim; Bangash, Adil; Sadiq, Muzaffaruddin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: To assess the prognostic indicators preoperatively presenting and influencing the mortality rate following esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort study, conducted at the Department of Surgery, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from 1 January 2003 till 31 December 2008. Group 1 included patients who had undergone sub-total esophagectomy and were alive at completion of 12 months; whereas Group 2 included those patients who died by the completion of 12 months. Data were recollected from the Data Bank. A list of variables common to all patients from both groups was categorized and subsequently all data related to each individual patient were placed and analyzed on the version 13.0 of SPSSR for Windows. Results: Significant findings of a lower mean level of serum albumin from Group 2 were observed, whereas serum transferrin levels, also found lower in Group 2, were not statistically significant. Findings of serum pre-albumin, with a mean value of 16.12 mg/dl (P<0.05) and Geansler’s index for the evaluation of the presence of obstructive pulmonary disease prior to surgery showed a lower reading of mean ratio in Group 2. Anastamotic leak was not a common finding in the entire study. In most cases, the choice of conduit was the remodeled stomach. Nine patients from Group 2 were observed with evident leak on the fifth to seventh post-operative day following contrast swallow studies. This was statistically insignificant (P = 0.051) on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Pre-operative variables including weight loss, low serum albumin and pre-albumin, Geansler’s index, postoperative chylothorax, pleural effusion, and hospital stay, are predictive of mortality in patients who undergo esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. PMID:20871187

  4. Safety of thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer without interruption of anti-platelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Jung, Hee Suk; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Chung, Kyung Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bleeding concerns have led to the general recommendation that antiplatelet agents (APAs) be discontinued 7-10 days preoperatively, but this could increase the risk of perioperative cardiovascular events. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the safety of APA continuation during thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer. Methods Between January 2009 and February 2015, 164 patients taking APAs underwent curative resection. Comparisons were conducted between two groups: preoperatively interrupted APA administration (group I, n=106) and continued APA administration (group N, n=58). Results Group N had a significantly higher revised cardiac risk index (rCRI) (P=0.001). Lobectomy was performed in the majority of patients [95 (89.6%) in group I; 52 (89.7%) in group N]. There were no significant differences in intraoperative outcomes, such as the thoracotomy conversion rate, operating time, intraoperative transfusion, and amount of blood loss during the operation, or postoperative outcomes, such as postoperative bleeding and thrombotic complications, postoperative transfusions, and operative mortality. Within group N, the patients taking aspirin + clopidogrel (n=11) had significantly greater postoperative bleeding (P=0.005), and more postoperative transfusions (P=0.003) and chest tube drainage over a 3-day period (P=0.049) compared with other antiplatelet regimens. Conclusions Continued use of APAs during thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer could be safely done in patients at high risk of cardiac or thrombotic events. However, in patients administered aspirin + clopidogrel, it may be the best to continue aspirin only because of an increased risk of postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirements. PMID:26716042

  5. Factors that Affect Patients' Decision-Making about Mastectomy or Breast Conserving Surgery, and the Psychological Effect of this Choice on Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Mahmut; Ustaalioglu, Basak O; Garip, Meral; Kiziltan, Emre; Bilici, Ahmet; Seker, Mesut; Erkol, Burcak; Salepci, Taflan; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Turhal, Nazim S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Primary treatment is surgery, with breast conserving surgery (BCS) being widely used for early-stage disease. Due to changes in body image, depressive symptoms can occur after surgery. Here, we evaluate factors that affect patients' decision on surgery, and investigate differences in the level of depression after mastectomy or BCS in a population of Turkish patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy or BCS and were followed up at our institution between 2007 and 2008 were included. Patients were questioned about their involvement in surgical decision-making. Depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria via a Structural Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). Severity of depression was evaluated by using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). RESULTS: Patients who were older than 50 years, had more than 1 child, a history of lactation, and a positive family history of breast cancer mostly preferred mastectomy. However, patients who sought a second opinion and further information on BCS preferred BCS (p < 0.005). There was no statistical correlation between marital status, first childbearing age, and educational status and the decision on surgery type (p > 0.005). Mastectomy patients were prone to depression, but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.099). CONCLUSION: Age, parenthood, lactation, and positive familial history, as well as thorough information about the type of surgery were important factors for the patients' decision. After breast cancer surgery, patients might experience depression affecting treatment and quality of life. Therefore, adequate information and communication are essential. PMID:21048831

  6. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: Current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be associated to reduced conversion rates. Other short-term outcomes are comparable to conventional laparoscopy techniques, if not better. Ultimately, pathological data evaluation suggests that oncologic safety may be preserved after robotic total mesorectal excision. However, further studies are required to evaluate oncologic safety and functional results. PMID:25339823

  7. Intrusive thoughts and quality of life among men with prostate cancer before and three months after surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sudden, unwelcome and repetitive thoughts about a traumatic event – intrusive thoughts – could relate to how men assess their quality of life after prostate-cancer diagnosis. We aimed to study the prevalence of intrusive thoughts about prostate cancer and their association with quality-of-life outcomes before and after radical prostatectomy. Methods During the first year of the LAPPRO-trial, 971 men scheduled for radical prostatectomy were prospectively included from 14 urological centers in Sweden. Of those, 833 men responded to two consecutive study-specific questionnaires before and three months after surgery (participation rate 86%). The association of intrusive thoughts with three quality-of-life outcomes, i.e. self-assessed quality of life, depressive mood and waking up with anxiety was estimated by prevalence ratios that were calculated, together with a 95% confidence interval, at the same time-point as well as over time. Fisher’s exact-test was used to analyze differences between respondents and non-respondents. Wilcoxon signed-ranks and Cochran-Armitage trend tests were used for analysis of change over time. To validate new questions on intrusive thoughts, written answers to open-ended questions were read and analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Results Before surgery, 603 men (73%) reported negative intrusive thoughts about their cancer at some time in the past month and 593 men (59%) reported such thoughts three months after surgery. Comparing those reporting intrusive thoughts at least weekly or once a week before surgery with those who did not, the prevalence ratio (95% confidence interval), three months after surgery, for waking up in the middle of the night with anxiety was 3.9 (2.7 to 5.5), for depressed mood 1.8 (1.6 to 2.1) and for impaired self-assessed quality of life 1.3 (1.2 to 1.5). Conclusion The prevalence of negative intrusive thoughts about prostate cancer at the time of surgery associates with studied quality-of-life outcomes three months later. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN06393679 PMID:24025241

  8. Study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study looked at women at high risk of ovarian cancer who had no clinical signs of the disease and who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The study results showed cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the par

  9. NCI study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study of women at high risk of ovarian cancer but with no clinical signs of the disease, who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) found cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the participants. RRSO is a surgical procedure in which a woman’s ovaries and fallopian tubes are preventively removed.

  10. Malnutrition at the Time of Surgery Affects Negatively the Clinical Outcome of Critically Ill Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shpata, Vjollca; Prendushi, Xhensila; Kreka, Manika; Kola, Irena; Kurti, Floreta; Ohri, Ilir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition is a frequent concomitant of surgical illness, especially in gastrointestinal cancer surgery. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in the GI cancer patients and its relation with clinical outcome. We also examined associations between the energy balance and clinical outcomes in these patients. Methods: Prospective study on 694 surgical patients treated in the ICU of the UHC of Tirana. Patients were divided into well-nourished and malnourished groups according to their nutritional status. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of malnutrition and cumulated energy balance on clinical outcome. Results: The prevalence of pre-operative malnutrition was 65.3% for all surgical patients and 84.9% for gastrointestinal cancer patients. Malnutrition, as analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model, is an independent risk factor for higher complications, infections, and mortality, longer stay in the ventilator and ICU. Also this model showed that cumulated energy balance correlated with infections, and mortality and was independently associated with the length ventilator and ICU stay. Conclusion: This study shows that malnutrition is a significant problem in surgical patients, especially in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Malnutrition and cumulated energy deficit in gastro-intestinal surgery patients with malignancy is an independent risk factor on increased post-operative morbidity and mortality. PMID:25568549

  11. Rankings versus reality in pancreatic cancer surgery: a real-world comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Zeling; West, James K; Zhou, Zheng; McDade, Theodore; Smith, Jillian K; Ng, Sing-Chau; Kent, Tara S; Callery, Mark P; Moser, A James; Tseng, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients are increasingly confronted with systems for rating hospitals. However, the correlations between publicized ratings and actual outcomes after pancreatectomy are unknown. Methods The Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy Hospital Inpatient Discharge Database was queried to identify pancreatic cancer resections carried out during 2005–2009. Hospitals performing fewer than 10 pancreatic resections in the 5-year period were excluded. Primary outcomes included mortality, complications, median length of stay (LoS) and a composite outcomes score (COS) combining primary outcomes. Ranks were determined and compared for: (i) volume, and (ii) ratings identified from consumer-directed hospital ratings including the US News & World Report (USN), Consumer Reports, Healthgrades and Hospital Compare. An inter-rater reliability analysis was performed and correlation coefficients (r) between outcomes and ratings, and between rating systems were calculated. Results Eleven hospitals in which a total of 804 pancreatectomies were conducted were identified. Surgical volume correlated with overall outcome, but was not the strongest indicator. The highest correlation referred to that between USN rank and overall outcome. Mortality was most strongly correlated with Healthgrades ratings (r = 0.50); however, Healthgrades ratings demonstrated poorer correlations with all other outcomes. Consumer Reports ratings showed inverse correlations. Conclusions The plethora of publicly available hospital ratings systems demonstrates heterogeneity. Volume remains a good but imperfect indicator of surgical outcomes. Further systematic investigation into which measures predict quality outcomes in pancreatic cancer surgery will benefit both patients and providers. PMID:24245953

  12. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  13. [Current status and novel approach of robotic surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohui

    2015-08-01

    With the development of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic technique is now widely used in rectal surgery because of its advantages in terms of pain control, recovery of bowel function, length of hospital stay, short- and long-term outcomes. Total mesorectal excision(TME) is recommended as the standard procedure for rectal cancer. Laparoscopic TME, however, can be challenging due to its two-dimensional vision, restricted instrument movements, and a prolonged learning curve. Robotic surgery overcomes these intrinsic limitations by superior three-dimensional magnified optics, stable retraction platform, and 7 degrees of freedom of instrument movements, and offers an easier operation and shorter learning curve. This review summarizes the advantages as well as the current status of robotic rectal surgery, and explores the novel approach and new techniques with the related literature and the author's own experience. PMID:26303685

  14. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-02

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  15. The dark side of the moon: Impact of moon phases on long-term survival, mortality and morbidity of surgery for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Superstition is common and causes discomfiture or fear, especially in patients who have to undergo surgery for cancer. One superstition is, that moon phases influence surgical outcome. This study was performed to analyse lunar impact on the outcome following lung cancer surgery. Methods 2411 patients underwent pulmonary resection for lung cancer in the past 30 years at our institution. Intra-and postoperative complications as well as long-term follow-up data were entered in our lung-cancer database. Factors influencing mortality, morbidity and survival were analyzed. Results Rate of intra-operative complications as well as rate of post-operative morbidity and mortality was not significantly affected by moon phases. Furthermore, there was no significant impact of the lunar cycle on long-term survial. Conclusion In this study there was no evidence that outcome of surgery for lung cancer is affected by the moon. These results may help the physician to quite the mind of patients who are somewhat afraid of wrong timing of surgery with respect to the moon phases. However, patients who strongly believe in the impact of moon phase should be taken seriously and correct timing of operations should be conceded to them as long as key-date scheduling doesn't constrict evidence based treatment regimens. PMID:19380291

  16. Risk-reducing Surgery in Women at Risk for Familial Breast or Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhiem, K.; Pfeifer, K.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Kiechle, M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated 5?% of breast cancers and 10?% of ovarian cancers may be due to inherited autosomal dominant breast and ovarian cancer alleles BRCA1 und BRCA2. According to population-based studies 1 or 2 women per 1000 carry such a risk allele. The cumulative cancer risk for healthy women with a BRCA-mutation is between 60 and 85?% for breast cancer and between 20 and 60?% for ovarian cancer. Recent studies have reported an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer in women after unilateral breast cancer. Since 1997 the German Cancer Aid has supported an interdisciplinary approach for high-risk women consisting of genetic testing, counselling and prevention in 12 specialised centres. Since 2005 this concept has received additional support from health insurance companies, and results have been assessed with regard to outcomes (e.g. reduced mortality due to more intensive early diagnosis). The number of centres has increased to 15 at various university hospitals. These interdisciplinary centres offer women the opportunity to participate in a structured screening programme for the early diagnosis of breast cancer and provide non-directive counselling on the options for risk-reducing surgery, e.g., prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer. Such surgical interventions can significantly reduce the risk of disease, the respective disease-specific mortality and – particularly prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy – total mortality in BRCA-mutation carriers. PMID:26640291

  17. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  18. Surgery Triggers Outgrowth of Latent Distant Disease in Breast Cancer: An Inconvenient Truth?

    PubMed Central

    Retsky, Michael; Demicheli, Romano; Hrushesky, William; Baum, Michael; Gukas, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    We review our work over the past 14 years that began when we were first confronted with bimodal relapse patterns in two breast cancer databases from different countries. These data were unexplainable with the accepted continuous tumor growth paradigm. To explain these data, we proposed that metastatic breast cancer growth commonly includes periods of temporary dormancy at both the single cell phase and the avascular micrometastasis phase. We also suggested that surgery to remove the primary tumor often terminates dormancy resulting in accelerated relapses. These iatrogenic events are apparently very common in that over half of all metastatic relapses progress in that manner. Assuming this is true, there should be ample and clear evidence in clinical data. We review here the breast cancer paradigm from a variety of historical, clinical, and scientific perspectives and consider how dormancy and surgery-driven escape from dormancy would be observed and what this would mean. Dormancy can be identified in these diverse data but most conspicuous is the sudden synchronized escape from dormancy following primary surgery. On the basis of our findings, we suggest a new paradigm for early stage breast cancer. We also suggest a new treatment that is meant to stabilize and preserve dormancy rather than attempt to kill all cancer cells as is the present strategy. PMID:24281072

  19. Surgery Theoretic Methods in Group Actions Sylvain Cappell \\Lambda and Shmuel Weinberger y

    E-print Network

    Weinberger, Shmuel

    Surgery Theoretic Methods in Group Actions Sylvain Cappell \\Lambda and Shmuel Weinberger y This paper is intended to give a brief introduction to the applications of the ideas of surgery of signal achievements of the surgery theoretic view­ point, notably in the directions of producing examples

  20. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  2. Is Early Oral Feeding after Gastric Cancer Surgery Feasible? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liansheng; Mou, Tingyu; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoxin

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the feasibility and safety of early oral feeding (EOF) after gastrectomy for gastric cancer through a systematic review and meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials. Methods A literature search in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane library databases was performed for eligible studies published between January 1995 and March 2014. Systematic review was carried out to identify randomized controlled trials comparing EOF and traditional postoperative oral feeding after gastric cancer surgery. Meta-analyses were performed by either a fixed effects model or a random effects model according to the heterogeneity using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Six studies remained for final analysis. Included studies were published between 2005 and 2013 reporting on a total of 454 patients. No significant differences were observed for postoperative complication (RR?=?0.95; 95%CI, 0.70 to 1.29; P?=?0.75), the tolerability of oral feeding (RR?=?0.98; 95%CI, 0.91 to 1.06; P?=?0.61), readmission rate (RR?=?1; 95%CI, 0.30 to 3.31; P?=?1.00) and incidence of anastomotic leakage (RR?=?0.31; 95%CI, 0.01 to 7.30; P?=?0.47) between two groups. EOF after gastrectomy for gastric cancer was associated with significant shorter duration of the hospital stay (WMD?=??2.36; 95%CI, ?3.37 to ?1.34; P<0.0001) and time to first flatus (WMD?=??19.94; 95%CI, ?32.03 to ?7.84; P?=?0.001). There were no significant differences in postoperative complication, tolerability of oral feeding, readmission rates, duration of hospital stay and time to first flatus among subgroups stratified by the time to start EOF or by partial and total gastrectomy or by laparoscopic and open surgery. Conclusions The result of this meta-analysis showed that EOF after gastric cancer surgery seems feasible and safe, even started at the day of surgery irrespective of the extent of the gastric resection and the type of surgery. However, more prospective, well-designed multicenter RCTs with more clinical outcomes are needed for further validation. PMID:25397686

  3. [Predictive factors for locally recurrent rectal cancer after primary curative surgery].

    PubMed

    Gao, Haoji; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Ren

    2015-11-25

    Local recurrence is a major clinical challenge after primary rectal cancer surgery. Although there is a possibility that R0 resection can be achieved, the outcome is still not favorable due to the low R0 resection rate and complexity of the surgery. Therefore prevention has a higher priority over treatment afterwards. As TME principle is accepted worldwide, the local recurrence rate has been reduced dramatically. And there are other factors associated with local recurrence including CRM, operation type, staging and PNI. Proper chemoradiotherapy may reduce the risk, however benefit always comes with side effect, therefore risk stratification is important. PMID:26616817

  4. A case of anaphylactic shock attributed to latex allergy during gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woohyung; Lee, Jue Hee; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Latex allergy is a known cause of allergic contact dermatitis. It produces mild symptoms, including skin rash and itching, which usually subside in a few days. However, latex allergy can also induce anaphylaxis, a severe type I hypersensitivity reaction that can cause urticaria, angioedema, hypotension, tachycardia, and bronchospasm. We report a case of anaphylactic shock during gastric cancer surgery in a patient with no previous allergic history. Surgery was suspended when hypotension, tachycardia, and wheezing developed. A thorough workup revealed that the patient had a latex allergy. The patient subsequently underwent curative gastrectomy performed with latex-free procedures. PMID:22319734

  5. Quality of life after conservative laryngeal surgery: a multidimensional method of evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vigili, Maurizio Giovanni; Colacci, Anna Cristina; Magrini, Marta; Cerro, Paola; Marzetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of quality of life (QoL) and satisfaction with care are particularly important in the field of oncology. The definition of QoL and the requirements for its measurement are still a matter of debate, but it is generally accepted that QoL is a multidimensional concept involving three different domains: physical, psychological and social. The aim of this study was to test a simple, inexpensive, multidimensional method of QoL measurement, based both on patients' perception of clinical outcome and the quantitatively evaluated clinical outcome, equally weighted, in patients who underwent three different types of conservative laryngeal surgery: horizontal laryngectomy (HG), supraglottic laryngectomy (SL) and subtotal reconstructive laryngectomy (SRL). The following were carried out for each patient: subjective-objective evaluation of speech [computerized spectrographic analysis of fundamental frequency (FO), percentage of noise and intensity and logopedic evaluation of speech], evaluation of deglutition (videofluoroscopic parameters, and qualitative assessment) and evaluation of physical, social, emotional and functional well-being (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, FACT-G, and modified University of Washington Quality of life Scale, UWQoL). Each assessment was given a score rating from one to three points. The overall evaluation of the qualitative and quantitative score for each field and for each type of laryngeal surgery shows that SL results in the best post-operative QoL. Although HG is less damaging and involves swifter functional recovery times, its slightly lower score is due to the poorer quality of speech. The analysis of the results obtained confirm the need to set up an evaluation protocol combining both the subjective perceptions of the patient, as well as the more objective evaluation of the functions that are impaired following surgery. The protocol described above, although limited by the low number of cases, was easy to carry out, inexpensive and applicable in relation to the various types of surgery that may compromise phonation and deglutition. PMID:11954919

  6. Endoscopic laser scalpel for head and neck cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Snehal; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Kirov, Stefan; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, such as laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy, provide reliable disease control with reduced impact on the function of the diseased organ. Surgical lasers can ablate, cut and excise tissue while sealing small blood vessels minimizing bleeding and risk of lymphatic metastases from tumors. Lasers with wavelengths in the IR are readily absorbed by water causing minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ideal for surgery near critical anatomical structures. MIS techniques have largely been unable to adopt the use of lasers partly due to the difficulty in bringing the laser into the endoscopic cavity. Hollow waveguide fibers have been adapted to bring surgical lasers to endoscopy. However, they deliver a beam that diverges rapidly and requires careful manipulation of the fiber tip relative to the target. Thus, the principal obstacle for surgical lasers in MIS procedures has been a lack of effective control instruments to manipulate the laser in the body cavity and accurately deliver it to the targeted tissue. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and built an endoscopic laser system that incorporates a miniature dual wedge beam steering device, a video camera, and the control system for remote and /or robotic operation. The dual wedge Risley device offers the smallest profile possible for endoscopic use. Clinical specifications and design considerations will be presented together with descriptions of the device and the development of its control system.

  7. Role of Surgery in locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nazim, Syed Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients present with locally advanced prostate cancer with inherent higher risk of local recurrence and systemic relapse after initial treatment. Recent literature favors combination of radiation therapy and extended hormonal therapy for this subset of patients. The effectiveness of Radical prostatectomy (RP) alone for locally advanced prostate cancer is controversial and is a focus of debate. However, it can decrease the tumor burden and allows the accurate and precise pathological staging with the need for subsequent treatment. Comparison of RP and other treatment modalities is difficult and incorrect because of inherent selection bias. RP as a part of multi-modality treatment (with neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) and with adjuvant or salvage radiation therapy (RT)/HT) can provide long term overall and cancer specific survival. Surgical treatment (such as transurethral resection (TUR), JJ stenting and percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) placement etc.) can also provide symptomatic improvement and palliative care to improve quality of life of patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sources of data/study selection: The articles published between years 1998-2014 were searched on electronic databases Pubmed, Science direct, Google scholar and Embase and used for preparation of this review. PMID:26150873

  8. www.yalecancercenter.org Surgery for Endocrine Cancers

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    .wnpr.org #12;Welcome to Yale Cancer Center Answers with Dr. Francine Foss and Dr. Lynn Wilson. Dr. Foss from Sweden. I grew up in a small town in the northern part of Sweden. From relatively early on I knew

  9. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: implications of genetic testing for screening and prophylactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastric cancer show familial clustering, and 3% show autosomal dominance and high penetrance. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an autosomal-dominant, inherited cancer syndrome in which affected individuals develop diffuse-type gastric cancer at a young age. Inactivating mutations in the E-cadherin gene CDH1 have been identified in 30% to 50% of patients. CDH1 mutation carriers have an approximately 70% lifetime risk of developing DGC, and affected women carry an additional 20% to 40% risk of developing lobular breast cancer. Because endoscopic surveillance is ineffective in identifying early HDGC, gene-directed prophylactic total gastrectomy currently is offered for CDH1 mutation carriers. In series of asymptomatic individuals undergoing total gastrectomy for CDH1 mutations, the removed stomachs usually contain small foci of early DGC, making surgery not prophylactic but curative. The authors of this review recommend consideration of total gastrectomy in CDH1 mutation carriers at an age 5 years younger than the youngest family member who developed gastric cancer. Individuals who choose not to undergo prophylactic gastrectomy should be followed with biannual chromoendoscopy, and women with CDH1 mutations also should undergo regular surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging studies of the breast. Because of the emergence of gene-directed gastrectomy for HDGC, today, a previously lethal disease is detected by molecular techniques, allowing curative surgery at an early stage. PMID:18798546

  10. Current Status of Surgical Planning for Orthognathic Surgery: Traditional Methods versus 3D Surgical Planning

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudeh, Jeffrey A.; Howell, Lori K.; Boutros, Shadi; Scott, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthognathic surgery has traditionally been performed using stone model surgery. This involves translating desired clinical movements of the maxilla and mandible into stone models that are then cut and repositioned into class I occlusion from which a splint is generated. Model surgery is an accurate and reproducible method of surgical correction of the dentofacial skeleton in cleft and noncleft patients, albeit considerably time-consuming. With the advent of computed tomography scanning, 3D imaging and virtual surgical planning (VSP) have gained a foothold in orthognathic surgery with VSP rapidly replacing traditional model surgery in many parts of the country and the world. What has yet to be determined is whether the application and feasibility of virtual model surgery is at a point where it will eliminate the need for traditional model surgery in both the private and academic setting. Methods: Traditional model surgery was compared with VSP splint fabrication to determine the feasibility of use and accuracy of application in orthognathic surgery within our institution. Results: VSP was found to generate acrylic splints of equal quality to model surgery splints in a fraction of the time. Drawbacks of VSP splint fabrication are the increased cost of production and certain limitations as it relates to complex craniofacial patients. Conclusions: It is our opinion that virtual model surgery will displace and replace traditional model surgery as it will become cost and time effective in both the private and academic setting for practitioners providing orthognathic surgical care in cleft and noncleft patients. PMID:25750846

  11. Risk-reducing surgery in hereditary gynecological cancer: Clinical applications in Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    ADACHI, MASATAKA; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; NAKAMURA, KANAKO; NOGAMI, YUYA; UMENE, KIYOKO; MASUDA, KENTA; KISU, IORI; UEKI, ARISA; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2015-01-01

    Risk-reducing surgery (RRS) is defined as a prophylactic approach with removal of organs at high risk of developing cancer, which is performed in cases without lesions or absence of clinically significant lesions. Hereditary gynecological cancers for which RRS is performed include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome. For HBOC, RRS in the United States (US) is recommended for women with mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA)1 and BRCA2 genes and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is generally performed. This procedure may reduce the risk of breast, ovarian, Fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer, although ovarian deficiency symptoms occur postoperatively. For Lynch syndrome, RRS in the US is considered for postmenopausal women or for women who do not desire to bear children and BSO and hysterectomy are usually performed. This approach may reduce the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer, although ovarian deficiency symptoms also occur. For RRS, there are several issues that must be addressed to reduce the risk of cancer development in patients with HBOC or Lynch syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to discuss RRS with a focus on hereditary gynecological cancer. PMID:25798252

  12. PiCO2 monitoring of transferred jejunum perfusion using an air tonometry technique after hypopharyngeal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Imanishi, Yorihisa; Ito, Fumihiro; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Kato, Takashi; Nameki, Hideo; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of intraluminal PCO2 (PiCO2) monitoring by air tonometry for the assessment of the vascular condition of the transferred jejunum after surgery for hypopharyngeal cancer.PiCO2 in the transplanted jejunum of 24 patients was monitored using air tonometry after radical surgery for hypopharyngeal cancer from 2003 to 2010.All but 1 patient, who removed the catheter before monitoring began, were monitored safely. PiCO2 in the transferred jejunum correlated with arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) that was measured concurrently, and dissociation of PiCO2 from PaCO2 was observed in cases with vascular complication. In those cases without postoperative vascular complication, the PiCO2 value gradually increased for 3 hours but then decreased by 12 hours after surgery. Three patients experienced major vascular complication. All 3 patients had continuous elevation of PiCO2 >100 mm Hg, although vascular flow in 1 patient recovered by removal of a venous thrombosis and reanastomosis of the vein 7.5 hours after surgery. Four other patients who experienced elevation of PiCO2 had their skin suture released for decompression of their neck wound, resulting in a decrease in PiCO2 after treatment.The current results demonstrated that continuous monitoring of PiCO2 by air tonometry accurately reflects the vascular condition of the transferred jejunum, and this method is one of the best options for postoperative monitoring of jejunum blood perfusion. PMID:25789955

  13. Evolution of Gastric Cancer Treatment: From the Golden Age of Surgery to an Era of Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer imposes a global health burden. Although multimodal therapies have proven to benefit patients with advanced diseases after curative surgery, the prognosis of most advanced cancer patients still needs to be improved. Surgical extirpation is the mainstay of gastric cancer treatment. Indeed, without curative surgery, variations and combinations of chemotherapy and/or radiation cannot bring clinically meaningful success. Centered around D2 surgery, adjuvant and peri-operative multimodal therapies have improved survival in a certain group of gastric cancer patients. Moving toward a personalized cancer therapy era, molecular targeted strategies have been tested in clinical trials for gastric cancer. With some success and failures, we have learned valuable lessons regarding the biology of gastric cancer and the clinical relevance of biological therapies in addition to conventional treatments. Future treatment of gastric cancer will be shifted to molecularly tailored and genome information-based personalized therapy. Collaboration across disciplines and actively adopting emerging anti-cancer strategies, along with in-depth understanding of molecular and genetic underpinnings of tumor development and progression, are imperative to realizing personalized therapy for gastric cancer. Although many challenges remain to be overcome, we envision that the era of precision cancer medicine for gastric cancer has already arrived and anticipate that current knowledge and discoveries will be transformed into near-future clinical practice for managing gastric cancer patients. PMID:26256958

  14. Risk Factors and Indications for 30-Day Readmission After Primary Surgery for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    AlHilli, Mariam; Langstraat, Carrie; Tran, Christine; Martin, Janice; Weaver, Amy; McGree, Michaela; Mariani, Andrea; Cliby, William; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify patients at risk for postoperative morbidities, we evaluated indications and factors associated with 30-day readmission after epithelial ovarian cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing primary surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer between January 2, 2003, and December 29, 2008, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fit to identify factors associated with 30-day readmission. A parsimonious multivariable model was identified using backward and stepwise variable selection. Results In total, 324 (60.2%) patients were stage III and 91 (16.9%) were stage IV. Of all 538 eligible patients, 104 (19.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. Cytoreduction to no residual disease was achieved in 300 (55.8%) patients, and 167 (31.0%) had measurable disease (?1 cm residual disease). The most common indications for readmission were surgical site infection (SSI; 21.2%), pleural effusion/ascites management (14.4%), and thromboembolic events (12.5%). Multivariate analysis identified American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher (odds ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–2.89; P = 0.007), ascites [1.76 (1.11–2.81); P = 0.02], and postoperative complications during initial admission [grade 3–5 vs none, 2.47 (1.19–5.16); grade 1 vs none, 2.19 (0.98–4.85); grade 2 vs none, 1.28 (0.74–2.21); P = 0.048] to be independently associated with 30-day readmission (c-index = 0.625). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the sole predictor of readmission for SSI (odds ratio, 3.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–4.33; P = 0.04). Conclusions Clinically significant risk factors for 30-day readmission include American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or higher, ascites and postoperative complications at initial admission. The SSI and pleural effusions/ascites are common indications for readmission. Systems can be developed to predict patients needing outpatient management, improve care, and reduce costs. PMID:25611896

  15. The Role of VATS in Lung Cancer Surgery: Current Status and Prospects for Development

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Dariusz; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of anatomic lung resection by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) 20 years ago, VATS has experienced major advances in both equipment and technique, introducing a technical challenge in the surgical treatment of both benign and malignant lung disease. The demonstrated safety, decreased morbidity, and equivalent efficacy of this minimally invasive technique have led to the acceptance of VATS as a standard surgical modality for early-stage lung cancer and increasing application to more advanced disease. Formerly there was much debate about the feasibility of the technique in cancer surgery and proper lymph node handling. Although there is a lack of proper randomized studies, it is now generally accepted that the outcome of a VATS procedure is at least not inferior to a resection via a traditional thoracotomy. PMID:26294970

  16. Colonic Metastasis Presenting as an Intraluminal Fungating Mass 8 Years After Surgery for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Rye; Kim, Bong Man; Kim, You Me; Lee, Won Ae

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of colonic metastasis from ovarian cancer presented as an intraluminal fungating mass mimicking primary colon cancer 8 years after surgery for ovarian cancer. A 70-year-old woman presented with constipation. She had undergone an extended total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for an ovarian papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma 8 years earlier. Colonoscopy showed a large fungating mass 10 cm from the anal verge that was suspected to be colorectal cancer. A computed tomography scan showed a bulky intraluminal fungating mass in the rectosigmoid junction. After a lower anterior resection and a pathologic diagnosis, a diagnosis of a papillary serous adenocarcinoma due to metastasis from an ovarian tumor was made for this patient. PMID:26576399

  17. Current status of robotic surgery for rectal cancer: A bird's eye view

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Ajit; Melich, George; Marecik, Slawomir J; Park, John J; Prasad, Leela M

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for rectal cancer is now widely performed via the laparoscopic approach and has been validated in randomized controlled trials to be oncologically safe with better perioperative outcomes than open surgery including shorter length of stay, earlier return of bowel function, better cosmesis, and less analgesic requirement. Laparoscopic surgery, however, has inherent limitations due to two-dimensional vision, restricted instrument motion and a very long learning curve. Robotic surgery with its superb three-dimensional magnified optics, stable retraction platform and 7 degrees of freedom of instrument movement offers significant benefits during Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) including ease of operation, markedly lower conversion rates and better quality of the specimen in addition to shorter (steeper) learning curves. This review summarizes the current evidence for the adoption of robotic TME for rectal cancer with supporting data from the literature and from the authors’ own experience. All relevant articles from PubMed using the search terms listed below and published between 2000 and 2014 including randomized trials, meta-analyses, prospective studies, and retrospective reviews with substantial numbers were included. PMID:25598596

  18. A novel spectral imaging system for use during pancreatic cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peller, Joseph; Shipley, A. E.; Trammell, Susan R.; Abolbashari, Mehrdad; Farahi, Faramarz

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Most pancreatic cancer patients will die within the first year of diagnosis, and just 6% will survive five years. Currently, surgery is the only treatment that offers a chance of cure for pancreatic cancer patients. Accurately identifying the tumors margins in real time is a significant difficulty during pancreatic cancer surgery and contributes to the low 5-year survival rate. We are developing a hyperspectral imaging system based on compressive sampling for real-time tumor margin detection to facilitate more effective removal of diseased tissue and result in better patient outcomes. Recent research has shown that optical spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue and will likely become an important minimally invasive diagnostic tool for a range of diseases. Reflectance spectroscopy provides information about tissue morphology, while laser-induced autofluorescence spectra give accurate information about the content and molecular structure of the emitting tissue. We are developing a spectral imaging system that targets emission from collagen and NAD(P)H as diagnostics for differentiating healthy and diseased pancreatic tissue. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of our camera system to acquire hyperspectral images and its potential application for imaging autofluorescent emission from pancreatic tissue.

  19. Techniques and Outcome of Surgery for Locally Advanced and Local Recurrent Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Renehan, A G

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced primary rectal cancer is variably defined, but generally refers to T3 and T4 tumours. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment for these tumours but there is a high-risk for local recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2011) guidelines recommend that patients with these tumours be considered for preoperative chemoradiotherapy and this is the starting point for any discussion, as it is standard care. However, there are many refinements of this pathway and these are the subject of this overview. In surgical terms, there are two broad settings: (i) patients with tumours contained within the mesorectal envelope, or in the lower rectum, limited to invading the sphincter muscles (namely some T2 and most T3 tumours); and (ii) patients with tumours directly invading or adherent to pelvic organs or structures, mainly T4 tumours - here referred to as primary rectal cancer beyond total mesorectal excision (PRC-bTME). Major surgical resection using the principles of TME is the mainstay of treatment for the former. Where anal sphincter sacrifice is indicated for low rectal cancers, variations of abdominoperineal resection - referred to as tailored excision - including the extralevator abdominoperineal excision (ELAPE), are required. There is debate whether or not plastic reconstruction or mesh repair is required after these surgical procedures. To achieve cure in PRC-bTME tumours, most patients require extended multivisceral exenterative surgery, carried out within specialist multidisciplinary centres. The surgical principles governing the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer (RRC) parallel those for PRC-bTME, but typically only half of these patients are suitable for this type of major surgery. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality are considerable after surgery for PRC-bTME and RRC, but unacceptable levels of variation in clinical practice and outcome exist globally. To address this, there are now major efforts to standardise terminology and classifications, to allow appropriate comparisons in future studies. PMID:26683258

  20. Surgery for endometrial cancers with suspected cervical involvement: is radical hysterectomy needed (a GOTIC study)?

    PubMed Central

    Takano, M; Ochi, H; Takei, Y; Miyamoto, M; Hasumi, Y; Kaneta, Y; Nakamura, K; Kurosaki, A; Satoh, T; Fujiwara, H; Nagao, S; Furuya, K; Yokota, H; Ito, K; Minegishi, T; Yoshikawa, H; Fujiwara, K; Suzuki, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radical hysterectomy is recommended for endometrial adenocarcinoma patients with suspected gross cervical involvement. However, the efficacy of operative procedure has not been confirmed. Methods: The patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma who had suspected gross cervical involvement and underwent hysterectomy between 1995 and 2009 at seven institutions were retrospectively analysed (Gynecologic Oncology Trial and Investigation Consortium of North Kanto: GOTIC-005). Primary endpoint was overall survival, and secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and adverse effects. Results: A total of 300 patients who underwent primary surgery were identified: 74 cases with radical hysterectomy (RH), 112 patients with modified radical hysterectomy (mRH), and 114 cases with simple hysterectomy (SH). Median age was 47 years, and median duration of follow-up was 47 months. There were no significant differences of age, performance status, body mass index, stage distribution, and adjuvant therapy among three groups. Multi-regression analysis revealed that age, grade, peritoneal cytology status, and lymph node involvement were identified as prognostic factors for OS; however, type of hysterectomy was not selected as independent prognostic factor for local recurrence-free survival, PFS, and OS. Additionally, patients treated with RH had longer operative time, higher rates of blood transfusion and severe urinary tract dysfunction. Conclusion: Type of hysterectomy was not identified as a prognostic factor in endometrial cancer patients with suspected gross cervical involvement. Perioperative and late adverse events were more frequent in patients treated with RH. The present study could not find any survival benefit from RH for endometrial cancer patients with suspected gross cervical involvement. Surgical treatment in these patients should be further evaluated in prospective clinical studies. PMID:24002604

  1. High morbidity in myocardial infarction and heart failure patients after gastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sang-Ho; Kim, Young-Woo; Yu, Wansik; Lee, Sang Ho; Park, Young Kyu; Park, Seong-Heum; Jeong, In Ho; Lee, Sang Eok; Park, Yongwhi; Lee, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate to morbidity and mortality differences between 4 underlying heart diseases, myocardial infarction (MI), angina pectoris (Angina), heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF), after radical surgery for gastric cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from 221 patients of a total of 15167 patients who underwent radical gastrectomy and were preoperatively diagnosed with a history of Angina, MI, HF, or AF in 8 hospitals. RESULTS: We find that the total morbidity rate is significantly higher in the MI group (44%) than the Angina (15.7%), AF (18.8%), and HF (23.1%) groups (P < 0.01). Moreover, we note that the risk for postoperative cardiac problems is higher in patients with a history of HF (23.1%) than patients with a history of Angina (2.2%), AF (4.3%), or MI (6%; P = 0.01). The HF and MI groups each have 1 case of cardiogenic mortality. CONCLUSION: We conclude that MI patients have a higher risk of morbidity, and HF patients have a higher risk of postoperative cardiac problems than Angina or AF. PMID:26074701

  2. Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Elective Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kusumi, Takaya; Hosokawa, Masao; Sumikawa, Sosuke; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence and risk factors for incisional surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing elective open surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods. We conducted prospective surveillance of incisional SSI after elective colorectal resections performed by a single surgeon for a 1-year period. Variables associated with infection, as identified in the literature, were collected and statistically analyzed for their association with incisional SSI development. Results. A total of 224 patients were identified for evaluation. The mean patient age was 67 years, and 120 (55%) were male. Thirty-three (14.7%) patients were diagnosed with incisional SSI. Multivariate analysis suggested that incisional SSI was independently associated with TNM stages III and IV (odds ratio [OR], 2.4) and intraoperative hypotension (OR, 3.4). Conclusions. The incidence of incisional SSI in our cohort was well within values generally reported in the literature. Our data suggest the importance of the maintenance of intraoperative normotension to reduce the development of incisional SSI. PMID:24800067

  3. Learning curve: the surgeon as a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Renzulli, Pietro; Laffer, Urban T

    2005-01-01

    The individual surgeon is an independent prognostic factor for outcome in colorectal cancer surgery. The surgeon's learning curve is therefore directly related to the patient's outcome. The exact shape of the learning curve, however, is unknown. The present study reviewed supervision, training/teaching, specialization, surgeon's caseload, and hospital's caseload as the five main surgeon- and hospital-related confounding factors for outcome, and examined their influence on the learning curve as well as their interactions and prognostic significance. All five confounding factors were related to outcome. The highest degree of evidence, however, was found for training/teaching (introduction of total mesorectal excision), specialization in colorectal surgery (special interest, board-certification, specialized colorectal cancer units), and the surgeon's caseload. Five surgeon- and hospital-related factors directly influence the surgeon's learning curve and are therefore rightly considered predictors of outcome in colorectal cancer surgery. Improvements in supervision, training/teaching, specialization, the surgeon's caseload, and the hospital's caseload will therefore translate into enhanced patient outcome. PMID:15865024

  4. [Patient safety in oncology surgery: experience of the São Paulo State Cancer Institute].

    PubMed

    Vendramini, Regiane Cristina Rossi; da Silva, Elaine Aparecida; Ferreira, Karine Azevedo São Leão; Possari, João Francisco; Baia, Wânia Regina Mollo

    2010-09-01

    Patient safety concerns in surgery are increasing. The frequency of surgery-related adverse events and errors is high, and most could be avoided. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) proposed the Universal Protocol (UP-JCAHO) for preventing wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong person surgery. In Brazil, very few health-care institutions have adopted this Protocol. Thus, there is a need to improve its dissemination and assess its effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to report the experiences of the Sao Paulo State Cancer Institute (ICESP, acronym in Portuguese) in implementing the UP-JCAHO. The Protocol comprises three steps: pre-operative verification process, marking the operative site and Time out immediately before starting the procedure. The ICESP surgical center (SC) has been functioning since November 2008. The UP-JCAHO is applied to all surgeries. A total 1019 surgeries were performed up to June 2009. No errors or adverse events were registered. The implementation of the UP-JCAHO is simple. It can be a useful tool to prevent error and adverse events in SC. PMID:20964064

  5. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy.

  6. Outcome of transoral robotic surgery for stage I-II oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J W L; Smeele, L E; Hilgers, F J M; van den Brekel, M W M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally T1-2N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma is treated with a single treatment modality, being either radiotherapy or surgery. Currently, minimally invasive surgery, such as transoral robotic surgery (TORS), is gaining popularity. The aim of this study is to assess whether T1-2N0 oropharyngeal cancer can be safely and effectively resected with TORS, and to determine the oncologic and functional outcomes. In addition, the long-term quality-of-life outcomes are reported. Between 2007 and 2012, 18 patients with early stage oropharyngeal cancers underwent transoral resection with the da Vinci robot system in the Netherlands Cancer Institute. All surviving patients filled out the self-report assessments of quality-of-life questionnaires. Median robot-assisted operating time was 115 min (range 43-186 min), while median estimated blood loss was 5 ml (range 0-125 ml). In three cases the exposure was insufficient to obtain clear tumor margins because of tumor extension and local anatomy. Fourteen patients had clear surgical margins. Four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Nine patients underwent an elective unilateral neck dissection. The oropharyngeal cancer recurred in two patients. Regarding the quality of life, patients who needed postoperative radiotherapy had a worse outcome and patients treated with transoral resection only did quite well. TORS seems to be an oncologically safe surgical treatment for early stage T1-2N0 oropharyngeal cancer based on this relatively small group of patients. Selecting patients in whom sufficient surgical exposure can be obtained, should be performed with the greatest care to avoid the need for adjuvant radiotherapy. Comparing radiotherapy and TORS or CO2 laser should be the next step in finding the optimal treatment for patients with T1-2N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:24609641

  7. Quality of life in rectal cancer surgery: What do the patient ask?

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Luglio, Gaetano

    2015-12-27

    Rectal cancer surgery has dramatically changed with the introduction of the total mesorectal excision (TME), which has demonstrated to significantly reduce the risk of local recurrence. The combination of TME with radiochemotherapy has led to a reduction of local failure to less than 5%. On the other hand, surgery for rectal cancer is also impaired by the potential for a significant loss in quality of life. This is a new challenge surgeons should think about nowadays: If patients live more, they also want to live better. The fight against cancer cannot only be based on survival, recurrence rate and other oncological endpoints. Patients are also asking for a decent quality of life. Rectal cancer is probably a paradigmatic example: Its treatment is often associated with the loss or severe impairment of faecal function, alteration of body anatomy, urogenital problems and, sometimes, intractable pain. The evolution of laparoscopic colorectal surgery in the last decades is an important example, which emphasizes the importance that themes like scar, recovery, pain and quality of life might play for patients. The attention to quality of life from both patients and surgeons led to several surgical innovations in the treatment of rectal cancer: Sphincter saving procedures, reservoir techniques (pouch and coloplasty) to mitigate postoperative faecal disorders, nerve-sparing techniques to reduce the risk for sexual dysfunction. Even more conservative procedures have been proposed alternatively to the abdominal-perineal resection, like the local excisions or transanal endoscopic microsurgery, till the possibility of a wait and see approach in selected cases after radiation therapy. PMID:26730279

  8. Lymphatic mapping and lymphedema surgery in the breast cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Manrique, Oscar; Sosin, Michael; Hashmi, Mahjabeen Aftab; Poysophon, Poysophon; Henderson, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Upper limb lymphedema can be an unfortunate sequela following the oncologic treatment of breast cancer. The surgical treatment of lymphedema has had a recent renewed clinical interest paralleling innovative descriptions of surgical techniques and imaging modalities. In addition, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema has allowed improved translation to the clinical condition. Various surgical options exist to decrease the symptom-burden of upper limb lymphedema, including vascularized lymph node (VLN) transfer, lymphovenous bypass (LVB), liposuction, lymphatic grafting, and excisional procedures. Modern imaging techniques help to improve the consistency and accuracy of these surgical treatment options. A multi-modal treatment plan utilizing non-operative and surgical therapies has the potential to improve various factors related to overall patient quality of life. This review details all of the current operative treatment strategies and modern imaging modalities used in the treatment of lymphedema. PMID:26161309

  9. Lymphatic mapping and lymphedema surgery in the breast cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Oscar; Sosin, Michael; Hashmi, Mahjabeen Aftab; Poysophon, Poysophon; Henderson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upper limb lymphedema can be an unfortunate sequela following the oncologic treatment of breast cancer. The surgical treatment of lymphedema has had a recent renewed clinical interest paralleling innovative descriptions of surgical techniques and imaging modalities. In addition, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema has allowed improved translation to the clinical condition. Various surgical options exist to decrease the symptom-burden of upper limb lymphedema, including vascularized lymph node (VLN) transfer, lymphovenous bypass (LVB), liposuction, lymphatic grafting, and excisional procedures. Modern imaging techniques help to improve the consistency and accuracy of these surgical treatment options. A multi-modal treatment plan utilizing non-operative and surgical therapies has the potential to improve various factors related to overall patient quality of life. This review details all of the current operative treatment strategies and modern imaging modalities used in the treatment of lymphedema. PMID:26161309

  10. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  11. Travel time to radiotherapy and uptake of breast-conserving surgery for early stage cancer in Northern England.

    PubMed

    Sauerzapf, V A; Jones, A P; Haynes, R; Crawford, S M; Forman, D

    2008-09-01

    Patients with early stage breast cancer can opt for either mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS), but BCS requires daily radiotherapy for some weeks. The hypothesis that ease of access to radiotherapy might affect choice of surgery was investigated using records of 6014 breast cancer patients in Northern England. Adjusting for the effects of age, deprivation and hospital type, the choice of BCS was not associated with the estimated car journey time to radiotherapy for most women but there was an association for patients living in places without a regular bus service, so transport problems might influence surgery choice for a minority of women. PMID:17951094

  12. Case-Matched comparison of contemporary radiation therapy to surgery in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Sophie G.; Mills, Stacey E.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Theodorescu, Dan . E-mail: dt9d@virginia.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Few studies critically compare current radiotherapy techniques to surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, despite an urgent need to determine which approach offers superior cancer control. Our objective was to compare rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (BFS) and surrogates of disease specific survival among men with high risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate as a function of treatment modality. Methods and Materials: Retrospective data from 409 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {>=}10 or Gleason 7-10 or Stage {>=}T2b cancer treated uniformly at one university between March 1988 and December 2000 were analyzed. Patients had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy implant alone (BTM), or external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy boost with short-term neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (BTC). From the total study population a 1:1 matched-cohort analysis (208 patients matched via prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score) comparing RP with BTC was performed as well. Results: Estimated 4-year BFS rates were superior for patients treated with BTC (BTC 72%, BTM 25%, RP 53%; p < 0.001). Matched analysis of BTC vs. RP confirmed these results (BTC 73%, BTM 55%; p = 0.010). Relative risk (RR) of biochemical relapse for BTM and BTC compared with RP were 2.92 (1.95-4.36) and 0.56 (0.36-0.87) (p < 0.001, p = 0.010). RR for BTC from the matched cohort analysis was 0.44 (0.26-0.74; p = 0.002). Conclusions: High-risk prostate cancer patients receiving multimodality radiation therapy (BTC) display apparently superior BFS compared with those receiving surgery (RP) or brachytherapy alone (BTM)

  13. Case management vocational rehabilitation for women with breast cancer after surgery: a feasibility study incorporating a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of methodologically robust vocational rehabilitation (VR) intervention trials. This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a VR trial of women with breast cancer to inform the development of a larger interventional study. Methods Women were recruited in Scotland and randomised to either a case management VR service or to usual care. Data were collected on eligibility, recruitment and attrition rates to assess trial feasibility, and interviews conducted to determine trial acceptability. Sick leave days (primary outcome) were self-reported via postal questionnaire every 4 weeks during the first 6 months post-surgery and at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures were change in employment pattern, quality of life and fatigue. Results Of the 1,114 women assessed for eligibility, 163 (15%) were eligible. The main reason for ineligibility was age (>65 years, n = 637, 67%). Of those eligible, 111 (68%) received study information, of which 23 (21%) consented to participate in the study. Data for 18 (78%) women were analysed (intervention: n = 7; control: n = 11). Participants in the intervention group reported, on average, 53 fewer days of sick leave over the first 6 months post-surgery than those in the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.122; 95% confidence interval ?15.8, 122.0). No statistically significant differences were found for secondary outcomes. Interviews with trial participants indicated that trial procedures, including recruitment, randomisation and research instruments, were acceptable. Conclusions Conducting a pragmatic trial of effectiveness of a VR intervention among cancer survivors is both feasible and acceptable, but more research about the exact components of a VR intervention and choice of outcomes to measure effectiveness is required. VR to assist breast cancer patients in the return to work process is an important component of cancer survivorship plans. Trial registration ISRCTN29666484 PMID:23768153

  14. Impact of the Preoperative Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) Score on the Survival after Curative Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Yasuhito; Shibutani, Masatsune; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Nagahara, Hisashi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Sugano, Kenji; Ikeya, Tetsuro; Muguruma, Kazuya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, the preoperative immune-nutritional status has been reported to correlate with the survival rate in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, there have been no reports on the relationship between the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score and the clinical outcome after curative surgery for CRC. We herein evaluated the prognostic significance of the CONUT score in patients with CRC, and then compared the accuracy of the CONUT score and the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) as a predictor of survival. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of 204 patients who underwent curative surgery for Stage II/III CRC. Patients were divided into two groups according to the CONUT score and the PNI. Results The five-year cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate was significantly higher at 92.7% in the low CONUT group, compared to a rate of 81.0% in the high CONUT group (p=0.0016). The five-year CSS was 71.2% in the low PNI group and 92.3% in the high PNI group, which showed a significant difference (p=0.0155). A multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis and the CONUT score were independent risk factors for CSS. Conclusion This study suggested that the CONUT score is a strong independent predictor of the survival among CRC patients. PMID:26147805

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery in gastric cancer patients with extensive lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Seiji; Ito, Yuichi; Misawa, Kazunari; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Taira

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer with extensive lymph node metastasis (ELM) is usually considered unresectable and is associated with poor outcomes. Cases with clinical enlargement of the para-aortic lymph nodes and/or bulky lymph node enlargement around the celiac artery and its branches are generally dealt with as ELM. A standard treatment for gastric cancer with ELM has yet to be determined. Two phase II studies of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery showed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin followed by surgical resection with extended lymph node dissection could represent a treatment option for gastric cancer with ELM. However, many clinical questions remain unresolved, including the criteria for diagnosing ELM, optimal regime, number of courses and extent of lymph node dissection. PMID:26677442

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery in gastric cancer patients with extensive lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Seiji; Ito, Yuichi; Misawa, Kazunari; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Taira

    2015-12-10

    Gastric cancer with extensive lymph node metastasis (ELM) is usually considered unresectable and is associated with poor outcomes. Cases with clinical enlargement of the para-aortic lymph nodes and/or bulky lymph node enlargement around the celiac artery and its branches are generally dealt with as ELM. A standard treatment for gastric cancer with ELM has yet to be determined. Two phase II studies of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery showed that neoadjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin followed by surgical resection with extended lymph node dissection could represent a treatment option for gastric cancer with ELM. However, many clinical questions remain unresolved, including the criteria for diagnosing ELM, optimal regime, number of courses and extent of lymph node dissection. PMID:26677442

  17. Influence of yoga on mood states, distress, quality of life and immune outcomes in early stage breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra M; Nagendra, H R; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Vinay, C; Chandrashekara, S; Gopinath, K S; Srinath, B S

    2008-01-01

    Context: Breast cancer patients awaiting surgery experience heightened distress that could affect postoperative outcomes. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on mood states, treatment-related symptoms, quality of life and immune outcomes in breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Settings and Design: Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited for a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy plus exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes following surgery. Materials and Methods: Subjects were assessed prior to surgery and four weeks thereafter. Psychometric instruments were used to assess self-reported anxiety, depression, treatment-related distress and quality of life. Blood samples were collected for enumeration of T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 %, CD8 % and natural killer (NK) cell % counts) and serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM). Statistical Analysis Used: We used analysis of covariance to compare interventions postoperatively. Results: Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga n = 33, control n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the state (P = 0.04) and trait (P = 0.004) of anxiety, depression (P = 0.01), symptom severity (P = 0.01), distress (P < 0.01) and improvement in quality of life (P = 0.01) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significantly lesser decrease in CD 56% (P = 0.02) and lower levels of serum IgA (P = 0.001) in the yoga group as compared to controls following surgery. Conclusions: The results suggest possible benefits for yoga in reducing postoperative distress and preventing immune suppression following surgery. PMID:21829279

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George; Palma, David A.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Yaremko, Brian P.; Malthaner, Richard; Mocanu, Joseph D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Robotic Surgery for Rectal Cancer Focusing on Short-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Woo; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Roh, Yun Ho; Kang, Jeonghyun; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the total cost of robotic surgery (RS) is known to be higher than that of laparoscopic surgery (LS), the cost-effectiveness of RS has not yet been verified. The aim of the study is to clarify the cost-effectiveness of RS compared with LS for rectal cancer. From January 2007 through December 2011, 311 and 560 patients underwent totally RS and conventional LS for rectal cancer, respectively. A propensity score-matching analysis was performed with a ratio of 1:1 to reduce the possibility of selection bias. Costs and perioperative short-term outcomes in both the groups were compared. Additional costs due to readmission were also analyzed. The characteristics of the patients were not different between the 2 groups. Most perioperative outcomes were not different between the groups except for the operation time. Complications within 30 days of surgery were not significantly different. Total hospital charges and patients’ bill were higher in RS than in LS. The total hospital charges for patients who recovered with or without complications were higher in RS than in LS, although their short-term outcomes were similar. In patients with complications, the postoperative course after RS appeared to be milder than that of LS. Total hospital charges for patients who were readmitted due to complications were similar between the groups. RS showed similar short-term outcomes with higher costs than LS. Therefore, cost-effectiveness focusing on short-term perioperative outcomes of RS was not demonstrated. PMID:26039115

  20. Current and Future Intraoperative Imaging Strategies to Increase Radical Resection Rates in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Handgraaf, Henricus J. M.; Boonstra, Martin C.; Van Erkel, Arian R.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Putter, Hein; Van De Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Mieog, J. Sven D.

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Even the small minority that undergoes resection with curative intent has low 5-year survival rates. This may partly be explained by the high number of irradical resections, which results in local recurrence and impaired overall survival. Currently, ultrasonography is used during surgery for resectability assessment and frozen-section analysis is used for assessment of resection margins in order to decrease the number of irradical resections. The introduction of minimal invasive techniques in pancreatic surgery has deprived surgeons from direct tactile information. To improve intraoperative assessment of pancreatic tumor extension, enhanced or novel intraoperative imaging technologies accurately visualizing and delineating cancer cells are necessary. Emerging modalities are intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and freehand nuclear imaging using tumor-specific targeted contrast agents. In this review, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature on laparoscopic ultrasonography and we summarized and discussed current and future intraoperative imaging modalities and their potential for improved tumor demarcation during pancreatic surgery. PMID:25157372

  1. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis on clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Kang; Chen, Nan-Zheng; Zheng, Jian-Bao; He, Sai; Sun, Xue-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the main malignant tumors threatening human health. Surgery plays a pivotal role in treating colorectal cancer. The present study aimed to compare the clinical effect in patients with rectal cancer undergoing laparoscopic versus open surgery by meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years. The data showed that 14 RCTs comparing laparoscopic surgery with conventional open surgery for rectal cancer matched the selection criteria and reported on 2,114 subjects, of whom 1,111 underwent laparoscopic surgery and 1,003 underwent open surgery for rectal cancer. Blood loss (P<0.00001), days to passage of flatus (P=0.0003), first bowel movement (P=0.0006), fluids intake (P<0.00001), walking independently (P<0.00001), length of hospital duration (P=0.003) and the rate of wound infection (P=0.04) were all significantly reduced following laparoscopic surgery. The incidence of complications, such as ureteric injury (P=0.33), urinary retention (P=0.43), ileus (P=0.05), anastomotic leakage (P=0.09) and incisional hernia (P=0.88), were not significantly different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in lymph nodes harvested (P=0.88), length of specimen (P=0.60), circumferential resection margin (CRM) (P=0.86), regional recurrence ((P=0.08), port site or wound metastasis (P=0.67), distant metastasis (P=0.12), 3-year overall survival (OS) (P=0.42), 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.44), 5-year OS (P=0.60) and 5-year DFS (P=0.70). Therefore, laparoscopy for the treatment of patients with rectal cancer has the advantage of recovery and the same complications and prognosis as laparotomy, which indicates that laparoscopy may provide a potential survival benefit for patients with rectal cancer. PMID:25279204

  2. Multifocality and multicentricity are not contraindications for sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Alberta; Dionigi, Paolo; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Limonta, Giorgio; Garancini, Silvana; De Palma, Diego; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Vanoli, Cristiana; Diurni, Mario; Carcano, Giulio; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Background After the availability of the results of validation studies, the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has replaced routine axillary dissection (AD) as the new standard of care in early unifocal breast cancers. Multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) tumors have been considered a contraindication for this technique due to the possible incidence of a higher false-negative rate. This prospective study evaluates the lymphatic drainage from different tumoral foci of the breast and assesses the accuracy of SLNB in MF-MC breast cancer. Patients and methods Patients with preoperative diagnosis of MF or MC infiltrating and clinically node-negative (cN0) breast carcinoma were enrolled in this study. Two consecutive groups of patients underwent SLN mapping using a different site of injection of the radioisotope tracer: a) "2ID" Group received two intradermal (ID) injections over the site of the two dominant neoplastic nodules. A lymphoscintigraphic study was performed after each injection to evaluate the route of lymphatic spreading from different sites of the breast. b) "A" Group had periareolar (A) injection followed by a conventional lymphoscintigraphy. At surgery, both radioguided SLNB (with frozen section exam) and subsequent AD were planned, regardless the SLN status. Results A total 31 patients with MF (n = 12) or MC (n = 19) invasive, cN0 cancer of the breast fulfil the selection criteria. In 2 ID Group (n = 15) the lymphoscintigraphic study showed the lymphatic pathways from two different sites of the breast which converged into one major lymphatic trunk affering to the same SLN(s) in 14 (93.3%) cases. In one (6.7%) MC cancer two different pathways were found, each of them affering to a different SLN. In A Group (n = 16) lymphoscintigraphy showed one (93.7%) or two (6.3%) lymphatic channels, each connecting areola with one or more SLN(s). Identification rate of SLN was 100% in both Groups. Accuracy of frozen section exam on SLN was 96.8% (1 case of micrometastasis was missed). SLN was positive in 13 (41.9%) of 31 patients, including 4 cases (30.7%) of micrometastasis. In 7 of 13 (53.8%) patients the SLN was the only site of axillary metastasis. SLNB accuracy was 96.8% (30 of 31), sensitivity 92.8 (13 of 14), and false-negative rate 7.1% (1 of 14). Since the case of skip metastasis was identified by the surgeon intraoperatively, it would have been no impact in the clinical practice. Conclusion Our lymphoscintigraphic study shows that axillary SLN represents the whole breast regardless of tumor location within the parenchyma. The high accuracy of SLNB in MF and MC breast cancer demonstrates, according with the results of other series published in the literature, that both MF and MC tumors do not represent a contraindication for SLNB anymore. PMID:17116258

  3. The effect of stellate ganglion block on intractable lymphedema after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Park, Hahck Soo; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  4. The Effect of Stellate Ganglion Block on Intractable Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Cho, Soo Young; Baik, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Hak

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the upper limb after breast cancer surgery is a disease that carries a life-long risk and is difficult to cure once it occurs despite the various treatments which have been developed. Two patients were referred from general surgery department for intractable lymphedema. They were treated with stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs), and the circumferences of the mid-point of their each upper and lower arms were measured on every visit to the pain clinic. A decrease of the circumference in each patient was observed starting after the second injection. A series of blocks were established to maintain a prolonged effect. Both patients were satisfied with less swelling and pain. This case demonstrates the benefits of an SGB for intractable upper limb lymphedema. PMID:25589949

  5. OVSCORE - a validated score to identify ovarian cancer patients not suitable for primary surgery

    PubMed Central

    DORN, JULIA; BRONGER, HOLGER; KATES, RONALD; SLOTTA-HUSPENINA, JULIA; SCHMALFELDT, BARBARA; KIECHLE, MARION; DIAMANDIS, ELEFTHERIOS P.; SOOSAIPILLAI, ANTONINUS; SCHMITT, MANFRED; HARBECK, NADIA

    2015-01-01

    Following primary debulking surgery, the presence of a residual tumor mass is one of the most important prognostic factors in ovarian cancer. In a previous study, we established the OVSCORE, an algorithm to predict surgical outcome, based on the clinical factors of nuclear grading and ascitic fluid volume, plus the cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), KLK6 and KLK13. In the present study, OVSCORE performance was tested in an independent ovarian cancer patient cohort consisting of 87 patients. The impact of KLKs, KLK5, 6, 7 and 13 and other clinical factors on patient prognosis and outcome was also evaluated. The OVSCORE proved to be a strong and statistically significant predictor of surgical success in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC, 0.777), as well as positive and negative predictive value in this independent study group. KLK6 and 13 individually did not show clinical relevance in this cohort, but two other KLKs, KLK5 and KLK7, were associated with advanced FIGO stage, higher nuclear grade and positive lymph node status. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis for overall survival (OS), KLK7 had a protective impact on OS. This study confirms the role of KLKs in ovarian cancer for surgical success and survival, and validates the novel OVSCORE algorithm in an independent collective. As a key clinical application, the OVSCORE could aid gynecological oncologists in identifying those ovarian cancer patients unlikely to benefit from radical surgery who could be candidates for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:25436002

  6. Development of new devices for detection of gastric cancer on laparoscopic surgery using near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shunko A.; Fuchi, Shingo; Mori, Kensaku; Hasegawa, Junichi; Misawa, Kazunari; Nakanishi, Hayao

    2015-03-01

    In recent year, for the treatment of gastric cancer the laparoscopic surgery is performed, which has good benefits, such as low-burden, low-invasive and the efficacy is equivalent to the open surgery. For identify location of the tumor intraperitoneally for extirpation of the gastric cancer, several points of charcoal ink is injected around the primary tumor. However, in the time of laparoscopic operation, it is difficult to estimate specific site of primary tumor, because the injected charcoal ink diffusely spread to the area distant from the tumor in the stomach. Therefore, a broad area should be resected which results in a great stress for the patients. To overcome this problem, we focused in the near-infrared wavelength of 1000nm band which have high biological transmission. In this study, we developed a fluorescent clip which was realized with glass phosphor (Yb3+, Nd3+ doped to Bi2O3-B2O3 based glasses. ?p: 976 nm, FWHM: 100 nm, size: 2x1x3 mm) and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system for clip-derived near-infrared light. To evaluate clinical performance of a fluorescent clip and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system, we used resected stomach (thickness: 13 mm) from the patients. Fluorescent clip was fixed on the gastric mucosa, and an excitation light (?: 808 nm) was irradiated from outside of stomach for detection of fluorescence through stomach wall. As a result, fluorescence emission from the clip was successfully detected. Furthermore, we confirmed that detection sensitivity of the emission of fluorescence from the clip depends on the output power of the excitation light. We conformed that the fluorescent clip in combination with laparoscopic fluorescent detection system is very useful method to identify the exact location of the primary gastric cancer.

  7. Role of Peritoneal Lavage Cytology and Prediction of Prognosis and Peritoneal Recurrence After Curative Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Joon; Ki, Young-Jun; Cho, Sang Sik; Moon, Sun Mi; Park, Sun Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In colorectal cancer, the role of detecting free malignant cells from peritoneal lavage is currently unclear. In this study, we investigated the positive rate of free malignant cells in peritoneal lavage fluid and their predictive value for prognosis and peritoneal recurrence after a curative resection. Methods From October 2009 to December 2011, in a prospective manner, we performed cytologic examinations of peritoneal lavage fluid obtained just after the abdominal incision from 145 patients who underwent curative surgery for colorectal cancer. We used proportional hazard regression models to analyze the predictive role of positive cytology for peritoneal recurrence and survival. Results Among total 145 patients, six patients (4.1%) showed positive cytology. During the median follow-up of 32 months (range, 8-49 months), 27 patients (18.6%) developed recurrence. Among them, 5 patients (3.4%) showed peritoneal carcinomatosis. In the multivariate analysis, positive cytology was an independent predictive factor for peritoneal recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 136.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.2-1,531.9; P < 0.0001) and an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival (HR, 11.4; 95% CI, 1.8-72.0; P = 0.009) and for disease-free survival (HR, 11.1; 95% CI, 3.4-35.8; P < 0.0001). Conclusion Positive cytology of peritoneal fluid was significantly associated with peritoneal recurrence and worse survival in patients undergoing curative surgery for colorectal cancer. Peritoneal cytology might be a useful tool for selecting patients who need intraperitoneal or systemic chemotherapy. PMID:25580413

  8. Effect of a 10-week yoga programme on the quality of life of women after breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Merecz, Dorota; Wójcik, Aleksandra; ?wi?tkowska, Beata; Sierocka, Kamilla; Najder, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The following research is aimed at determining the effect of yoga on the quality of life of women after breast cancer surgery. Material and methods A 10-week yoga programme included 90-minute yoga lessons once a week. To estimate the quality of life, questionnaires developed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23) were used. An experimental group consisted of 12 women who practised yoga, a control group – of 16 women who did not. Between groups there were no differences in age, time from operation and characteristics associated with disease, treatment and participation in rehabilitation. Results Our results revealed an improvement of general health and quality of life, physical and social functioning as well as a reduction of difficulties in daily activities among exercising women. Also their future prospects enhanced – they worried less about their health than they used to before participating in the programme. As compared to baseline, among exercising women, fatigue, dyspnoea and discomfort (pain, swelling, sensitivity) in the arm and breast on the operated side decreased. Conclusions Participation in the exercising programme resulted in an improvement of physical functioning, reduction of fatigue, dyspnoea, and discomfort in the area of the breast and arm on the operated side. Based on our results and those obtained in foreign studies, we conclude that rehabilitation with the use of yoga practice improves the quality of life of the patients after breast cancer surgery. However, we recommend further research on this issue in Poland. PMID:26327853

  9. Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section

    E-print Network

    Department of Surgery Colorectal Surgery Section 200 Hawkins Drive, 4621 JCP Iowa City, IA 52242.uihealthcare.org Colorectal Surgery and General Gastrointestinal Surgery Education Topics Neoplastic Disease 1. Controversies. Management of the patient with Stage IV colorectal cancer: Role of surgery 5. Options in patients

  10. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  11. Efficacy of Physiotherapy for Urinary Incontinence following Prostate Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baku?a, Stanis?aw

    2014-01-01

    The study enrolled 81 with urinary incontinence following radical prostate-only prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups. The patients in Group I were additionally subdivided into two subgroups with respect to the physiotherapeutic method used. The patients of subgroup IA received a rehabilitation program consisting of three parts. The patients of subgroup IB rehabilitation program consist of two parts. Group II, a control group, had reported for therapy for persistent urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy but had not entered therapy for personal reasons. For estimating the level of incontinence, a 1-hour and 24-hour urinary pad tests, the miction diary, and incontinence questionnaire were used, and for recording the measurements of pelvic floor muscles tension, the sEMG (surface electromyography) was applied. The therapy duration depended on the level of incontinence and it continued for not longer than 12 months. Superior continence outcomes were obtained in Group I versus Group II and the difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio for regaining continence was greater in the rehabilitated Group I and smaller in the group II without the rehabilitation. A comparison of continence outcomes revealed a statistically significant difference between Subgroups IA versus IB. The physiotherapeutic procedures applied on patients with urine incontinence after prostatectomy, for most of them, proved to be an effective way of acting, which is supported by the obtained results. PMID:24868546

  12. Survival Outcome After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiangpeng; Schipper, Matthew; Kidwell, Kelley; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Ren, Yanping; Chang, Andrew; Lv, Fanzhen; Orringer, Mark; Spring Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: This study compared treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with those of surgery in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies of SBRT and surgery were retrieved through extensive searches of the PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library databases from 2000 to 2012. Original English publications of stage I NSCLC with adequate sample sizes and adequate SBRT doses were included. A multivariate random effects model was used to perform a meta-analysis to compare survival between treatments while adjusting for differences in patient characteristics. Results: Forty SBRT studies (4850 patients) and 23 surgery studies (7071 patients) published in the same period were eligible. The median age and follow-up duration were 74 years and 28.0 months for SBRT patients and 66 years and 37 months for surgery patients, respectively. The mean unadjusted overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years with SBRT were 83.4%, 56.6%, and 41.2% compared to 92.5%, 77.9%, and 66.1% with lobectomy and 93.2%, 80.7%, and 71.7% with limited lung resections. In SBRT studies, overall survival improved with increasing proportion of operable patients. After we adjusted for proportion of operable patients and age, SBRT and surgery had similar estimated overall and disease-free survival. Conclusions: Patients treated with SBRT differ substantially from patients treated with surgery in age and operability. After adjustment for these differences, OS and DFS do not differ significantly between SBRT and surgery in patients with operable stage I NSCLC. A randomized prospective trial is warranted to compare the efficacy of SBRT and surgery.

  13. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.; University of Melbourne, Melbourne

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  14. DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AFTER BREAST CANCER SURGERY: RELATIONSHIPS WITH GLOBAL, CANCER-RELATED, AND LIFE EVENT STRESS

    PubMed Central

    GOLDEN-KREUTZ, DEANNA M.; ANDERSEN, BARBARA L.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY For women with breast cancer, rates of depression are the third highest of any cancer diagnostic group. Stress, defined as life events or perceptions of stress, is associated with depressive symptoms. However, little is known about the relationships between different types of stress and these symptoms in women with breast cancer. This relationship was tested in 210 women assessed after initial surgical treatment for regional breast cancer. Using Hierarchical Multiple Regression, three types of stress were examined: the occurrence of five stressful life events in the year prior to cancer diagnosis, perceptions of global stress, and perceptions of cancer-related traumatic stress. Other potentially relevant correlates of depressive symptoms were also examined, including the personality trait neuroticism, sociodemographics, and disease/treatment characteristics. Fifty-three percent of the variance in depressive symptoms was accounted for by three stress variables (perceptions of global and cancer-related traumatic stress and the life event-major financial difficulty) and two control variables (neuroticism and racial group). Specifically, global stress perceptions coupled with cancer-related intrusive thoughts and financial concerns along with the tendency towards negativity (neuroticism) may conspire to heighten a women’s risk for depressive symptoms. Assessing multiple sources of stress would improve our ability to identify women ‘at risk’ for depressive symptoms and provide appropriate intervention. PMID:15022156

  15. Combinations of Gene Ontology and Pathway Characterize and Predict Prognosis Genes for Recurrence of Gastric Cancer After Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Guo, Zhanjun; Wang, Cuijv

    2015-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of death from cancer globally. The most common cause of GC is the infection of Helicobacter pylori, but ?11% of cases are caused by genetic factors. However, recurrences occur in approximately one-third of stage II GC patients, even if they are treated with adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This is potentially due to expression variation of genes; some candidate prognostic genes were identified in patients with high-risk recurrences. The objective of this study was to develop an effective computational method for meaningfully interpreting these GC-related genes and accurately predicting novel prognostic genes for high-risk recurrence patients. We employed properties of genes (gene ontology [GO] and KEGG pathway information) as features to characterize GC-related genes. We obtained an optimal set of features for interpreting these genes. By applying the minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm, we predicted the GC-related genes. With the same approach, we further predicted the genes for the prognostic of high-risk recurrence. We obtained 1104 GO terms and KEGG pathways and 530 GO terms and KEGG pathways, respectively, that characterized GC-related genes and recurrence-related genes well. Finally, three novel prognostic genes were predicted to help supplement genetic markers of high-risk GC patients for recurrence after surgery. An in-depth text mining indicated that the results are quite consistent with previous knowledge. Survival analysis of patients confirmed the novel prognostic genes as markers. By analyzing the related genes, we developed a systematic method to interpret the possible underlying mechanism of GC. The novel prognostic genes facilitate the understanding and therapy of GC recurrences after surgery. PMID:26154702

  16. Alternative method for cardioplegia delivery during totally endoscopic robotic intracardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Go; Ishikawa, Norihiko

    2014-09-01

    The optimal technique for antegrade cardioplegia delivery during totally endoscopic robotic surgery is still evolving. Cardioplegia delivery with endovascular balloon clamping of the aorta is commonly used but this method has several disadvantages and may lead to serious complications. We describe a novel cardioplegia delivery procedure for totally endoscopic intracardiac surgeries such as atrial septal defect closure and mitral valve repair. The method uses a transthoracic aortic clamp and an antegrade cardioplegia cannula without the need for thoracotomy. The technique is safe and reliable, permits simple cardioplegic arrest, and prevents complications related to endovascular balloon clamping during robot-assisted intracardiac surgery. PMID:25193212

  17. Role of near-infrared fluorescence imaging in head and neck cancer surgery: from animal models to humans.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Ihab; Milet, Clément; Coll, Jean-Luc; Reyt, Emile; Righini, Christian Adrien; Hurbin, Amandine

    2015-10-01

    Complete resection of head and neck cancers with negative surgical margins improves the prognosis of the disease and decreases the recurrence rate. Near-infrared fluorescence-guided surgery of head and neck cancer is a rapidly evolving field that represents an invaluable tool for tumor detection and resection. Here, we present a literature review of the principles of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and its use in head and neck cancer surgery. We discuss important studies in both animal models and humans that have been carried out up to this point. We also outline the important fluorescent molecules and devices used in head and neck fluorescence imaging-guided surgery. Although near-infrared fluorescence-guided surgery for head and neck cancers showed efficacy in animal models, its use in humans is limited by the small number of fluorescent probes that are approved for clinical use. However, it is considered as a novel surgical aid that helps delineate tumor margins preoperatively and could spare patients from the added morbidity that is associated with additional surgery or chemoradiation. In addition, it is a useful tool to detect sentinel lymph nodes as well as metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:25115313

  18. uPAR-targeted multimodal tracer for pre- and intraoperative imaging in cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    van Willigen, Danny M.; Stammes, Marieke A.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Tummers, Quirijn R.J.G.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Beekman, Freek J.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Löwik, Clemens W.G.M.; Frangioni, John V.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W.B.; Sier, Cornelis F.M.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre- and intraoperative diagnostic techniques facilitating tumor staging are of paramount importance in colorectal cancer surgery. The urokinase receptor (uPAR) plays an important role in the development of cancer, tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis and over-expression is found in the majority of carcinomas. This study aims to develop the first clinically relevant anti-uPAR antibody-based imaging agent that combines nuclear (111In) and real-time near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging (ZW800-1). Conjugation and binding capacities were investigated and validated in vitro using spectrophotometry and cell-based assays. In vivo, three human colorectal xenograft models were used including an orthotopic peritoneal carcinomatosis model to image small tumors. Nuclear and NIR fluorescent signals showed clear tumor delineation between 24h and 72h post-injection, with highest tumor-to-background ratios of 5.0 ± 1.3 at 72h using fluorescence and 4.2 ± 0.1 at 24h with radioactivity. 1-2 mm sized tumors could be clearly recognized by their fluorescent rim. This study showed the feasibility of an uPAR-recognizing multimodal agent to visualize tumors during image-guided resections using NIR fluorescence, whereas its nuclear component assisted in the pre-operative non-invasive recognition of tumors using SPECT imaging. This strategy can assist in surgical planning and subsequent precision surgery to reduce the number of incomplete resections. PMID:25895028

  19. New tumor regression grade for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant therapy and radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Hao; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Sai; Yin, Jie; Du, Feng; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo

    2015-12-01

    In this retrospective study, we defined a new tumor regression grade (NTRG), which we used to evaluate the prognosis of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant therapy and then underwent radical surgery between June 2004 and October 2011. Calculated as the TRG plus a lymph node score, the NTRG was determined for 347 patients: NTRG 0, 46 patients (13.3%); NTRG 1, 63 (18.2%); NTRG 2, 183 (52.7%); NTRG 3, 30 (8.6%); NTRG 4, 25 (7.2%). Among this group, 45 (97.8%) NTRG 0, 56 (88.9%) NTRG 1, 148 (80.9%) NTRG 2, 24 (66.7%) NTRG 3, and 10 (40.0%) NTRG 4 patients experienced 5-year disease-free survival. We also found that NTRG is significantly associated with 5-year local recurrence, distant metastasis and disease-free survival (P = 0.004, 0.007 and 0.039, respectively). The NTRG may thus be an independent prognostic factor for oncologic outcomes in rectal cancer patients after neoadjuvant therapy and radical surgery, but this conclusion must be validated in randomized trials. PMID:26540466

  20. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery versus open resection of lung metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Zhiliang; Zhang, Haoliang; Gui, Linyan; Wang, Wenbo; Zhao, Song

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the short and long-term survival outcomes between video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and open resection of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Between January 2006 and January 2013, 57 patients underwent VATS of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. These patients were compared with a consecutive matched group of 57 patients who underwent open resection within the same period. The two groups were similar in terms of age, gender, tumor size, number of tumors, tumor laterality and type of pulmonary resections. The operative time was longer in the VATS group, but the estimated blood loss was less in the VATS group than in the open group. Postoperative 30-day mortality, 30-day complications were similar between the groups. More complications were classified as major in patients underwent open resection, though the difference was not significant (P = 0.297). The 5-year overall survival rate was 50% for VATS and 46% for open resection (P = 0.251). The 5-year overall disease-free survival time was similar in two groups (P = 0.457). The findings suggest that VATS is associated with less blood loss than open resection for lung metastases of colorectal cancer. According to our results, VATS for lung metastases from colorectal cancer is equivalent to open resection in terms of long-term survival outcomes. PMID:26550296

  1. Immediate breast volume replacement using a free dermal fat graft after breast cancer surgery: multi-institutional joint research of short-term outcomes in 262 Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Fujii, Teruhiko; Hirokaga, Kouichi; Ishigure, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Tomoyo; Kayano, Shuji; Miyamoto, Sachio; Sagara, Yasuaki; Sakurai, Takashi; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Sotome, Keiichi; Ueo, Hiroaki; Wakita, Kazuyuki; Watatani, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediate volume replacement using a free dermal fat graft (FDFG) has been proven safe with early postoperative benefits. The aims of the present study were to clarify adequate indications and risk factors associated with operative morbidity. Patients and methods A multi-institutional analysis of partial mastectomy with immediate volume replacement with FDFG was undertaken in 14 hospitals specializing in breast cancer treatment. Clinical and oncological variables were analyzed to identify factors associated with postoperative complications. Results A total of 262 cases were analyzed. Considering the observation period and overlap of patients, 13 (5.4%) out of 242 patients had complications within 1 month of surgery while 7 (4.6%) out of 151 patients developed complications 1-12 months after surgery. Two hundred and eleven out of 242 patients were statistically examined using a multivariate analysis, which revealed that the weight of resected breast tissue, size of implanted FDFG (cranio-caudal length), and weight of implanted FDFG were associated with a higher likelihood of postoperative complications. Conclusions Immediate breast volume replacement using a FDFG after breast cancer surgery should be done for selected patients with breast cancer to avoid postoperative complications. The prospective and larger investigations are warranted for the establishment of appropriate guidelines. PMID:26005649

  2. Update on the management of pancreatic cancer: Surgery is not enough

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Daniel; Gustafsson, Adam; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the fourth cause of death in cancer and has a 5-year survival of < 5%. Only about 15% of the patients present with a resectable PDAC with potential to undergo “curative” surgery. After surgery, local and systemic recurrence, is though very common. The median survival of resected patients with adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery is only 20-23 mo. This underscores the significant need to improve PDAC management strategies. Increased survival rate is dependent on new breakthroughs in our understanding of not at least tumor biology. The aim of this review is to update and comment on recent knowledge concerning PDAC biology and new diagnostics and treatment modalities. One fundamental approach to improve survival rates is by earlier and improved diagnosis of the disease. In recent years, novel blood-based biomarkers have emerged based on genetic, epigenetic and protein changes in PDAC with very promising results. For biomarkers to enter clinical practice they need to have been developed using adequate control groups and provide high sensitivity and specificity and by this identify patients at risk already in a pre-symptomatic stage. Another way to improve outcomes, is by employing neoadjuvant treatments thereby increasing the number of resectable cases. Novel systemic treatment regimes like FOLFIRINOX and nab-paclitaxel have demonstrated improvements in prolonging survival in advanced cases, but long-term survival is still scarce. The future improved understanding of PDAC biology will inevitably render new treatment options directed against both the cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:25805920

  3. Cataract surgery and methods of wound closure: a review

    PubMed Central

    Matossian, Cynthia; Makari, Sarah; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Clear corneal incisions are routinely used in cataract surgery, but watertight wound closure may not always be achieved, which can increase the risk for anterior chamber fluid egress or ocular surface fluid ingress. A new US Food and Drug Administration-approved ocular sealant appears to have good efficacy in sealing clear corneal incisions; its use may be indicated when wound integrity is in question. PMID:26045656

  4. The Long-Term Outcomes of Induction Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uramoto, Hidetaka; Akiyama, Hirohiko; Nakajima, Yuki; Kinoshita, Hiroyasu; Inoue, Takuya; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Nishimura, Yu; Saito, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the concept of induction therapy followed by surgical resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) has found general acceptance, the appropriate indications and the strategy for this treatment are still controversial. Methods From 2000 through 2008, 36 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. We retrospectively reviewed these cases, analyzed the outcomes and examined the prognosis. Results The median radiation dose given was 60 Gy. Chemotherapy included a platinum agent in all cases; cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 9 cases, and a carboplatin-based chemotherapy regimen was administered to 27. A complete resection was performed in 94% of the patients. Seventeen (47.2%) patients exhibited a complete pathological response, and downstaging was induced in 26 (72%) cases. The morbidity and 30-day mortality rates were 11.1 and 0%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate in the patients with complete resection (n = 33) was 83.3%. Conclusions Induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for LA-NSCLC provided a favorable prognosis for selected patients. A complete pathological response was found in about half of cases. This strategy is feasible and was associated with low morbidity and high resectability rates, suggesting that it contributed to improving the treatment results. PMID:25493083

  5. Endoscopy vs surgery in the treatment of early gastric cancer: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, André; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Yagi, Osmar Kenji; de Moura, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux; de Moura, Eduardo Turiani Hourneaux; Bravo, José Gonçalves Pereira; Yamazaki, Kendi; Sakai, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report a systematic review, establishing the available data to an unpublished 2a strength of evidence, better handling clinical practice. METHODS: A systematic review was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, LILACS, Scopus and CINAHL databases. Information of the selected studies was extracted on characteristics of trial participants, inclusion and exclusion criteria, interventions (mainly, mucosal resection and submucosal dissection vs surgical approach) and outcomes (adverse events, different survival rates, mortality, recurrence and complete resection rates). To ascertain the validity of eligible studies, the risk of bias was measured using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The analysis of the absolute risk of the outcomes was performed using the software RevMan, by computing risk differences (RD) of dichotomous variables. Data on RD and 95%CIs for each outcome were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel test and inconsistency was qualified and reported in ?2 and the Higgins method (I2). Sensitivity analysis was performed when heterogeneity was higher than 50%, a subsequent assay was done and other findings were compiled. RESULTS: Eleven retrospective cohort studies were selected. The included records involved 2654 patients with early gastric cancer that filled the absolute or expanded indications for endoscopic resection. Three-year survival data were available for six studies (n = 1197). There were no risk differences (RD) after endoscopic and surgical treatment (RD = 0.01, 95%CI: -0.02-0.05, P = 0.51). Five-year survival data (n = 2310) showed no difference between the two groups (RD = 0.01, 95%CI: -0.01-0.03, P = 0.46). Recurrence data were analized in five studies (1331 patients) and there was no difference between the approaches (RD = 0.01, 95%CI: -0.00-0.02, P = 0.09). Adverse event data were identified in eight studies (n = 2439). A significant difference was detected (RD = -0.08, 95%CI: -0.10--0.05, P < 0.05), demonstrating better results with endoscopy. Mortality data were obtained in four studies (n = 1107). There was no difference between the groups (RD = -0.01, 95%CI: -0.02-0.00, P = 0.22). CONCLUSION: Three-, 5-year survival, recurrence and mortality are similar for both groups. Considering complication, endoscopy is better and, analyzing complete resection data, it is worse than surgery. PMID:26675093

  6. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Octreotide as Palliative Therapy for Cancer-Related Bowel Obstruction That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-31

    Colorectal Cancer; Constipation, Impaction, and Bowel Obstruction; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  8. Determining Which Patients Require Irradiation of the Supraclavicular Nodal Area After Surgery for N1 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Lim, Young Hyuk; Ahn, Jin Suk; Yang, Jung Hyun; Nam, Suk Jin

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: We designed this study to determine which patients have a high risk of supraclavicular node recurrence in N1 breast cancer previously treated with surgery but not having received supraclavicular radiation therapy (SCRT) and to identify which patients needed SCRT. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 448 pathologic N1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy or breast-conserving treatment, but without SCRT, between 1994 and 2003. Mastectomy was performed in 302 patients (67.4%). The median number of axillary nodes dissected was 17 (range, 5-53). Systemic chemotherapy was administered in 443 patients (98.9%), and 144 patients received radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The median follow-up was 88 months (range, 15-170 months). Results: At follow-up, the treatment failed in 101 patients (22.5%), and 39 patients (8.7%) had supraclavicular node recurrence. Prognostic factors in supraclavicular node recurrence included lymphovascular invasion (p < 0.0001), extracapsular extension (p < 0.0001), the number of involved axillary nodes (p = 0.0003), and the level of involved axillary nodes (p = 0.012) in univariate and multivariate analyses. The total number of prognostic factors correlated well with supraclavicular node recurrence. In the analysis of 5-year supraclavicular node recurrence-free survival, patients with two or more factors showed a significantly higher recurrence rate than did patients with fewer than two factors (96.8% and 72.9%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The prognostic factors associated with supraclavicular node recurrence were lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, and the number and level of involved axillary nodes. Patients with two or more prognostic factors might benefit from SCRT.

  9. Integration of robotics into two established programs of minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer appears to decrease surgical complications

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Goicoechea, Joel; Soto, Enrique; Chuang, Linus; Gretz, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare peri- and postoperative outcomes and complications of laparoscopic vs. robotic-assisted surgical staging for women with endometrial cancer at two established academic institutions. Methods Retrospective chart review of all women that underwent total hysterectomy with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy by robotic-assisted or laparoscopic approach over a four-year period by three surgeons at two academic institutions. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were measured. Secondary outcomes included operative time, blood loss, transfusion rate, number of lymph nodes retrieved, length of hospital stay and need for re-operation or re-admission. Results Four hundred and thirty-two cases were identified: 187 patients with robotic-assisted and 245 with laparoscopic staging. Both groups were statistically comparable in baseline characteristics. The overall rate of intraoperative complications was similar in both groups (1.6% vs. 2.9%, p=0.525) but the rate of urinary tract injuries was statistically higher in the laparoscopic group (2.9% vs. 0%, p=0.020). Patients in the robotic group had shorter hospital stay (1.96 days vs. 2.45 days, p=0.016) but an average 57 minutes longer surgery than the laparoscopic group (218 vs. 161 minutes, p=0.0001). There was less conversion rate (0.5% vs. 4.1%; relative risk, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 1.34; p=0.027) and estimated blood loss in the robotic than in the laparoscopic group (187 mL vs. 110 mL, p=0.0001). There were no significant differences in blood transfusion rate, number of lymph nodes retrieved, re-operation or re-admission between the two groups. Conclusion Robotic-assisted surgery is an acceptable alternative to laparoscopy for staging of endometrial cancer and, in selected patients, it appears to have lower risk of urinary tract injury. PMID:23346310

  10. Development and feasibility of a set of quality indicators relative to the timeliness and organisation of care for new breast cancer patients undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because breast cancer is a major public health issue, it is particularly important to measure the quality of the care provided to patients. Survival rates are affected by the timeliness of care, and waiting times constitute key quality criteria. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a set of quality indicators (QIs) relative to the timeliness and organisation of care in new patients with infiltrating, non-inflammatory and metastasis-free breast cancer undergoing surgery. The ultimate aim was to use these QIs to compare hospitals. Methods The method of QI construction and testing was developed by COMPAQ-HPST. We first derived a set of 8 QIs from consensus guidelines with the aid of experts and professional associations and then tested their metrological properties in a panel of 60 volunteer hospitals. We assessed feasibility using a grid exploring 5 dimensions, discriminatory power using the Gini coefficient as a measure of dispersion, and inter-observer reliability using the Kappa coefficient. Results Overall, 3728 records were included in the analyses. All 8 QIs showed acceptable feasibility (but one QI was subject to misinterpretation), fairly strong agreement between observers (Kappa?=?0.66), and wide variations in implementation among hospitals (Gini coefficient?surgery, time to postoperative multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM), conformity of MDTM). Four are suitable for use only in hospitals offering surgery with on-site postoperative treatment (waiting time to first appointment after surgery, patient information, time to first postoperative treatment, and traceability of information relating to prognosis). Currently, in the French healthcare system, a patient receives cancer care from different institutions whose databases cannot as yet be easily merged. Nationwide implementation of QIs covering the entire care pathway will thus be a challenge. PMID:22721001

  11. Intraoperative Targeted Optical Imaging: A Guide towards Tumor-Free Margins in Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Bean, Jero; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last several decades, development of various imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography greatly facilitated the early detection of cancer. Another important aspect that is closely related to the survival of cancer patients is complete tumor removal during surgical resection. The major obstacle in achieving this goal is to distinguish between tumor tissue and normal tissue during surgery. Currently, tumor margins are typically assessed by visual assessment and palpation of the tumor intraoperatively. However, the possibility of microinvasion to the surrounding tissues makes it difficult to determine an adequate tumor-free excision margin, often forcing the surgeons to perform wide excisions including the healthy tissue that may contain vital structures. It would be ideal to remove the tumor completely, with minimal safety margins, if surgeons could see precise tumor margins during the operation. Molecular imaging with optical techniques can visualize the tumors via fluorophore conjugated probes targeting tumor markers such as proteins and enzymes that are upregulated during malignant transformation. Intraoperative use of this technique may facilitate complete excision of the tumor and tumor micromasses located beyond the visual capacity of the naked eye, ultimately improving the clinical outcome and survival rates of cancer patients. PMID:24372232

  12. Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is not associated with an increase in the circulating levels of several inflammation-related factors.

    PubMed

    Crucitti, Antonio; Corbi, Maddalena; Tomaiuolo, Pasquina Mc; Fanali, Caterina; Mazzari, Andrea; Lucchetti, Donatella; Migaldi, Mario; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that inflammatory response triggered by surgery might induce the release of molecules that could promote proliferation, invasion and metastasis of surviving cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, the levels of multiple inflammation-related circulating factors were analyzed in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. A Luminex xMAP system was used to simultaneously assess levels of IL-1?, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, FGF, eotaxin, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-?, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, PDGF-BB, RANTES, TNF-? and VEGF in 20 colorectal cancer patients and 10 age-matched non-neoplastic patients. In cancer patients analyses were performed at baseline (before surgery) and at different time points (up to 30 days) following laparoscopic surgery. Significantly higher levels of IL-1?, IL-7, IL-8, G-CSF, IFN-? and TNF-? were detected in colorectal cancer patients compared to controls at baseline. In colorectal cancer patients, circulating levels decreased progressively following surgery and after day 30 post-surgery were no longer different from controls. These findings suggest that expression levels of several cytokines are higher in colorectal cancer patients compared to control subjects and no significant increase in several inflammation-related circulating factors is observed following laparoscopic surgery for cancer. Confirmation and validation in a different and larger cohort of patients are warranted. PMID:25875151

  13. [Preoperative evaluation of laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer with a virtual three-dimensional multi-imaging].

    PubMed

    Takemasa, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Intraoperative palpation around the target organs and an overview of the operative field are difficult to achieve in laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer. Understanding the three-dimensional anatomy of the target organs and the neighboring structures along with a precise preoperative diagnosis is essential in individual cases for completion of an appropriate laparoscopic procedure. A routine virtual three-dimensional multi-imaging integrating PET/MDCT, CT colonography and CT angiography is useful for a precise diagnosis. Local anatomy and patient's features directly affect surgical outcome, especially in the laparoscopic surgery for the rectal cancer. CT pelvimetry is useful for a preoperative prediction of the difficulties of the laparoscopic surgery. These data should be taken into account when planning this procedure. PMID:24597352

  14. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and surgery: two gold standards for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hanbo

    2015-01-01

    There is growing clinical equipoise between surgery and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in the management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (ES-NSCLC). Increasing evidence suggest similar outcomes between these modalities. Through the guidance of a multidisciplinary team, a shared decision making approach in this setting in favoured. PMID:26207241

  15. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  16. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan ; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ?3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  17. Pain on the first postoperative day after head and neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Inhestern, Johanna; Schuerer, Jenny; Illge, Christina; Thanos, Ira; Meissner, Winfried; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative pain within the first 24 h after head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery was assessed. Factors influencing postoperative pain were identified. In a prospective cohort single center study 145 HNC patients rated their pain on the first postoperative day using questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment (QUIPS) including numeric rating scales (NRS, 0-10) for the determination of patient's pain on ambulation, his maximal and minimal pain. QUIPS allowed a standardized assessment of patients' characteristics and pain-related parameters. The influence of these parameters on the patients' postoperative pain was estimated by univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. One-third had already pain prior to the surgical intervention. Overall, the mean pain on ambulation, maximal pain and minimal pain were 2.55 ± 2.36, 3.18 ± 2.86, and 1.38 ± 2.86 (NRS), respectively. 53 % of the patients had maximal pain scores >3. Multivariate analysis revealed independent predictors for more postoperative pain on ambulation: intensity of chronic preoperative pain, usage of non-opioids on ward, and existence of pain documentation on ward. Intensity of chronic preoperative pain and usage of non-opioids on ward were independent risk factors for more maximal pain. Intensity of chronic preoperative pain was independently associated to more minimal pain. Concerning pain management side effects, the risk for drowsiness increased with longer time of surgery. Postoperative pain after HNC surgery is highly variable and seems often to be unnecessarily high. Many patients seem to receive less analgesia than needed or ineffective analgesic drug regimes. PMID:25261106

  18. Ovarian tuberculosis masquerading as ovarian cancer in HIV infected patient: a plea to avoid unnecessary surgery.

    PubMed

    Denue, Ballah Akawu; Kwayabura, Salisu Aliyu; Ngadda, Haruna Asura

    2014-01-01

    Female patients who present with adnexial mass and weight loss should not be presumed to have ovarian carcinoma until after extensive investigation. This is to avoid the mistake of radical surgery with its attendant morbidity and mortality. An important disease to consider in our environment is ovarian TB that respond well to medication. A 35 year old HIV-1 positive house wife presented with fever, persistent vomiting, progressive weight loss, vague abdominal pain and swelling. Patient occasionally ingest unpasteurized milk since childhood but had no sustained contact with adult with chronic cough. She had no menstrual abnormality. Imaging studies revealed right ovarian mass measuring 11.8 cm x 10 cm. Right ovarian malignancy was highly suspected, for which she underwent exploratory laporotomy. Histopathology result was consistent with tuberculous granuloma. Chest radiograph was normal. Her CD4 count was 541 cells/ul. Patient was commenced on anti tuberculotic therapy based on the Nigerian National TB control and she responded well. Tuberculosis of the ovary can masquerade as ovarian cancer, especially among HIV patients in regions where TB-HIV co infections is endemic, it should be ruled out before performing extended surgery. PMID:25829975

  19. Postthoracotomy Pain Syndrome Following Surgery for Lung Cancer: Symptoms and Impact on Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Kathleen G.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Dabbs, Annette De Vito; Ferson, Peter F.; King, Linda; Dudjak, Linda A.; Zullo, Thomas G.; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q.

    2015-01-01

    Postthoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is a common complication following thoracic surgery. Most studies examining the influence of PTPS on patient-reported symptoms include few patients managed using a minimally invasive approach. Associated sensory changes, potentially neuropathic in origin, are not well described. We therefore examined the symptoms and quality of life (QOL) of patients with and without PTPS who underwent a standard thoracotomy (n = 43) or minimally invasive surgery (n = 54). Patients in this prospective, cross-sectional study completed questionnaires to assess pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), neuropathic symptoms (Neuropathic Symptom Questionnaire), symptom distress (Symptom Distress Scale), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and QOL (Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy–Lung). Excepting younger age (p = .009), no demographic or surgical characteristic differentiated patients with and without PTPS. Patients with PTPS described discomfort as pain only (15.1%), neuropathic symptoms only (30.2%) or pain and neuropathic symptoms (54.7%). Scores differed between patients with and without PTPS for symptom distress (p < .001), anxiety and depression (p < .001), and QOL (p = .009), with higher distress associated with PTPS. Despite new surgical techniques, PTPS remains common and results in considerable distress. A focused assessment is needed to identify all experiencing this condition, with referral to pain management specialists if symptoms persist.

  20. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Pajak, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Radiation therapy alone, surgery alone, or the combination of these two modalities, remain the accepted treatments in the management of epidermoid carcinomas of the mucosa of the head and neck. These modalities of therapy produce comparable results; but, radiotherapy alone has the advantage that it can conserve anatomy and function. Irradiation with teletherapy techniques, at times supplemented by interstitial brachytherapy, with doses ranging from 6600 to 8000 cGy, results in satisfactory tumor response (CR). The CR of T1N0 and T2N0 lesions will be 99% and 90% respectively, but only 29% in T4N3 tumors treated with radiation only. To improve on the limited CR rate achieved in the advanced stages, surgery is combined pre or post-irradiation, or reserved for the salvage of failures. In the oral cavity and oropharynx, these possible options give comparable tumor control and survival, but in the supraglottic larynx post-operative irradiation is superior to pre- operative radiotherapy. Tumor recurrence rates in the head and neck range from 15 to 34% depending on initial site, stage and type of therapy. Cancer control activities that emphasize prevention and early diagnosis should present a better future for these patients.

  1. Preoperative Concurrent Radiochemotherapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Kyu; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Keunchil; Park, Joon Oh; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Kwhanmien

    2006-01-01

    This is to examine whether aggressive multimodality therapy improves the treatment outcomes in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty-three consecutive NSCLC patients with N2 disease, confirmed by mediastinoscopic biopsy, received preoperative thoracic radiation therapy (45 Gy/5 weeks) concurrent with two cycles of oral etoposide and intravenous cisplatin and surgery. Postoperative radiation therapy (PORT, 18 Gy/2 weeks) was optionally recommended for those with the risk factors of loco-regional recurrence based on the surgical and pathological findings. Surgical resection was performed in 38 patients (71.7%), and down-staging was achieved in 19 patients (50%). The median survival period was 27 months in 38 patients who underwent resection, and the rates at 3-yr of overall survival, loco-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and disease-free survival were 44.3%, 87.9%, 32.9%, and 29.3%. Significantly favorable factor regarding overall survival was achieving p0/I stage by the multivariate analysis. PORT was successful in reducing locoregional recurrences in patients with the risk factors. Current preoperative concurrent radiochemotherapy and surgery by the authors resulted in comparable survival with other reports, however, further refinement of multimodality approach may be warranted for more effective reduction of distant metastasis. PMID:16614506

  2. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  3. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... appearance and self-image through both reconstructive and cosmetic procedures. Reconstructive procedures correct defects on the face ... a woman's breast after surgery for breast cancer. Cosmetic (also called aesthetic ) procedures alter a part of ...

  4. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P < .05). Compared to FP-FIF, IP-IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage, clinical effect, and economic burden should be taken into comprehensive consideration when choosing an RT technique in clinical practice. PMID:25311257

  5. Cavernostomy for Pulmonary Aspergillosis Associated with Destroyed Lung after Surgery for Lung Cancer: Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryo; Fujiwara, Taiki; Yamakawa, Hisami

    2015-01-01

    Slow, progressive, and destructive changes in the residual lung after surgery for lung cancer, known as “destroyed lung,” are delayed nonrecurrent complications. Destroyed lung can be a difficult condition to treat due to repeated infections and is therefore a complication that should not be ignored. We had three cases of intractable pulmonary aspergillosis difficult to treat associated with destroyed lung, after lung cancer surgery. Two of these patients followed a characteristic clinical course, which started with a cystic change just below the pleura and subsequently led to respiratory failure and death due to repeated infections. The third patient followed a similar clinical course and is currently under regular follow-up. Our cases suggest that concomitant occurrence of severe complications following surgery for lung cancer, such as destroyed lung and pulmonary aspergillosis, should be monitored because these complications can lead to respiratory failure and fatal clinical course. Radical surgery is not possible, especially when medical treatment is ineffective in controlling repeated infections and the patient's general condition is worsened due to prolonged chronic inflammation. Therefore, aggressive surgical intervention should be considered before patients worsen. PMID:26576311

  6. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer is beneficial to elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has short or long-term benefits in elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer compared with open surgery. Between June 2007 and December 2014, 579 patients older than 70 years underwent radical pulmonary resection for non-small-cell lung cancer, including 138 who received VATS and 441 who received open surgery. A retrospective pair-matched study was performed to compare 194 patients (97 pairs) who underwent either VATS or open resection. Patients were matched by age, sex, comorbidity, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, tumor location, clinical TNM stage, and extent of pulmonary resection. Short and long-term outcomes were compared between the two groups. The overall incidence of postoperative 30-day complications was significantly lower in the VATS group than in the open surgery group. The major postoperative 30-day complication trended lower in the VATS group but was not significantly different. The length of postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival was similar between the two groups. In summary, in surgical management of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, VATS is associated with lower rates of morbidity as well as comparable disease-free survival and overall survival outcomes. PMID:26550301

  7. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  8. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-13

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  9. Clinical comparison of laparoscopy vs open surgery in a radical operation for rectal cancer: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen; Shen, Jia-Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Wu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jun; Huang, Ke-Jian; Qiu, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diverse immediate and long-term clinical outcomes, a retrospective comparison between laparoscopic and conventional operation was performed. METHODS: A total number of 916 clinical cases, from January 2006 to December 2013 in our hospital, were analyzed which covered 492 patients underwent the laparoscopy in radical resection (LRR) and 424 cases in open radical resection (ORR). A retrospective analysis was proceeded by comparing the general information, surgery performance, pathologic data, postoperative recovery and complications as well as long-term survival to investigate the diversity of immediate and long-term clinical outcomes of laparoscopic radical operation. RESULTS: There were no statistically significance differences between gender, age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), tumor loci, tumor node metastasis stages, cell differentiation degree or American Society of Anesthesiologists scores of the patients (P > 0.05). In contrast to the ORR group, the LRR group experienced less operating time (P < 0.001), a lower blood loss (P < 0.001), and had a 2.44% probability of conversion to open surgery. Postoperative bowel function recovered more quickly, analgesic usage and the average hospital stay (P < 0.001) were reduced after LRR. Lymph node dissection during LRR appeared to be slightly more than in ORR (P = 0.338). There were no obvious differences in the lengths and margins (P = 0.182). And the occurrence rate in the two groups was similar (P = 0.081). Overall survival rate of ORR and LRR for 1, 3 and 5 years were 94.0% and 93.6% (P = 0.534), 78.1% and 80.9% (P = 0.284) and 75.2% and 77.0% (P = 0.416), respectively. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy as a radical operation for rectal cancer was safe, produced better immediate outcomes. Long-term survival of laparoscopy revealed that it was similar to the open operation.

  10. The correlates of benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery in non-small-cell lung cancer: a metaregression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is widely used, it is not clear which subgroup of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients should be treated with this approach, and if a particular benefit associated with NCT exists. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential correlates of benefit from NCT in patients with NSCLC. Methods All randomized clinical trials (RCTs) utilizing a NCT arm (without radiotherapy) versus a control arm before surgery were included for metaregression analysis. All regression analyses were weighed for trial size. Separate analyses were conducted for trials recruiting patients with different stages of disease. Previously published measures of treatment efficacy were used for the purpose of this study, regardless of being published in full text or abstract form. Results A total of 14 RCTs, consisting of 3,615 patients, were selected. Histology, stage, various characteristics of the NCT protocol, and different trial features including trial quality score were not associated with the benefit of NCT. However, in trials of stage 3 disease only, there was a greater benefit in terms of reduction in mortality from NCT, if protocols with three chemotherapeutics were used (B?=??0.18, t?=??5.25, P?=?0.006). Conclusions We think that patients with stage 3 NSCLC are served better with NCT before surgery if protocols with three chemotherapy agents or equally effective combinations are used. In addition, the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is consistent with regard to disease and patient characteristics. This finding should be tested in future RCTs or individual patient data meta-analyses. PMID:22877422

  11. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant predictors of receiving mastectomy after NT. PMID:26691964

  12. Pancreatic cancer surgery and nutrition management: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Afaneh, Cheguevara; Gerszberg, Deborah; Slattery, Eoin; Seres, David S.; Chabot, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreaticobiliary tumors. These patients typically present in a malnourished state. Various screening tools have been employed to help with preoperative risk stratification. Examples include the subjective global assessment (SGA), malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST), and nutritional risk index (NRI). Adequate studies have not been performed to determine if perioperative interventions, based on nutrition risk assessment, result in less morbidity and mortality. The routine use of gastric decompression with nasogastric sump tubes may be unnecessary following elective pancreatic resections. Instead, placement should be selective and employed on a case-by-case basis. A wide variety of feeding modalities are available, oral nutrition being the most effective. Artificial nutrition may be provided by temporary nasal tube (nasogastric, nasojejunal, or combined nasogastrojejunal tube) or surgically placed tube [gastrostomy (GT), jejunostomy (JT), gastrojejunostomy tubes (GJT)], and intravenously (parenteral nutrition, PN). The optimal tube for enteral feeding cannot be determined based on current data. Each is associated with a specific set of complications. Dual lumen tubes may be useful in the presence of delayed gastric emptying (DGE) as the stomach may be decompressed while feeds are delivered to the jejunum. However, all feeding tubes placed in the small intestine, except direct jejunostomies, commonly dislodge and retroflex into the stomach. Jejunostomies are associated with less frequent, but more serious complications. These include intestinal torsion and bowel necrosis. PN is associated with septic, metabolic, and access-related complications and should be the feeding strategy of last-resort. Enteral feeds are clearly preferred over parental nutrition. A sound understanding of perioperative nutrition may improve patient outcomes. Patients undergoing pancreatic cancer surgery should undergo multidisciplinary nutrition screening and intervention, and the surgical/oncological team should include nutrition professionals in managing these patients in the perioperative period. PMID:25713805

  13. Next generation design, development, and evaluation of cryoprobes for minimally invasive surgery and solid cancer therapeutics: in silico and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Abdul Mateen A G; Srivastava, Atul; Atrey, M D

    2015-02-01

    Cryosurgery is a widely regarded minimally invasive surgery for treatment of various types of cancers. It involves destruction of cancer cells within a limited spatial domain by exposing them to very low temperatures while minimizing injury to surrounding peripheral healthy tissues. Surprisingly, despite increasing demands for cryosurgery, there has been limited innovation in the design of cryoprobes, particularly in solid tumors (e.g., breast, prostate, and lung cancers). For advances in cancer therapeutics, integrative biology research can illuminate the mechanistic interface between a surgical cryoprobe and its tissue site of action. Here, we describe the design and development of three novel low pressure liquid nitrogen (LN2) cryoprobes with different physical dimensions and the parameters that determine their effectiveness experimentally, using water and bio-gel as the phase changing mediums. Smaller diameter low pressure probes produced lesser cryogenic injury. Vapor Separator is found to be an effective means (particularly for smaller diameter probes) to remove the vapor lock in the LN2 low pressure cryoprobes and also to reduce the precooling time. The low pressure LN2 cryoprobes produced lower probe temperatures and consequently larger and faster iceball growth for low cooling loads. Additionally, a numerical code was written in MATLAB based on the Enthalpy method to simulate the bio-heat transfer in a cryosurgical process. The numerical code is validated by analytical solution, laboratory experiments, and data from an in vivo cryosurgery. The developed numerical code is presented herein to illustrate that LN2 cryoprobes capable of producing lower probe temperatures produce more efficient cryosurgical operation by reducing the buffer zone and duration of surgery.This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, on design of the next generation of LN2 surgical cryoprobes. These new surgical cryoprobes offer potentials for future preclinical and clinical testing in solid cancers. PMID:25683889

  14. Immediate breast reconstruction and psychological adjustment in women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Holly, P; Kennedy, P; Taylor, A; Beedie, A

    2003-11-01

    Current debate exists regarding the timing of reconstructive surgery following mastectomy for breast cancer, with research pointing in favour of immediate reconstruction. This cross-sectional study sought to compare the psychological outcome of breast cancer treatment in women who had either received mastectomy and immediate reconstruction using autogenous tissue (n?=?30), or mastectomy alone (n?=?34), and also determine adjustment factors in this population as a whole. Participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, body image, self-esteem, coping and perceived social support at a time point 3?-?15 months after initial surgery. No significant differences were revealed between the two groups on any of the outcome measures. Poor body image, low self-esteem, and a tendency to use coping strategies characterized by helpless/hopelessness and anxious preoccupation, rather than fighting spirit, were highly predictive of distress. Reasons for the lack of differences between the two groups are explored. PMID:21974734

  15. Reduced-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for a Tumor-Specific Mesorectal Excision in Patients With Colorectal Cancer: Initial Experience With 20 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Baek, Se Jin; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Single-port plus one-port, reduced-port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) may decrease collisions between laparoscopic instruments and the camera in a narrow, bony, pelvic cavity while maintaining the cosmetic advantages of single-incision laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this study is to describe our initial experience with and to assess the feasibility and safety of RPLS for tumor-specific mesorectal excisions (TSMEs) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Between May 2010 and August 2012, RPLS for TSME was performed in 20 patients with colorectal cancer. A single port with four channels through an umbilical incision and an additional port in the right lower quadrant were used for RPLS. Results The median operation time was 231 minutes (range, 160-347 minutes), and the estimated blood loss was 100 mL (range, 50-500 mL). We transected the rectum with one laparoscopic stapler in 17 cases (85%). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (range, 3-6 days), and the length of hospital stay was 7 days (range, 5-45 days). The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 16 (range, 7-36), and circumferential resection margin involvement was found in 1 case (5%). Seven patients (35%) developed postoperative complications, and no mortalities occurred within 30 days. During the median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 12-40 months), liver metastasis occurred in 1 patient 10 months after surgery, and local recurrence was nonexistent. Conclusion RPLS for TSME in patients with colorectal cancer is technically feasible and safe without compromising oncologic safety. However, further studies comparing RPLS with a conventional, laparoscopic low-anterior resection are needed to prove the advantages of the RPLS procedure. PMID:25745622

  16. Ultrasound-Assisted Thoracic Paravertebral Block Reduces Intraoperative Opioid Requirement and Improves Analgesia after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Center Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gang; Mao, Feng; Yang, Dongsheng; Guan, Jinghong; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xuejing; Zhang, Yanna; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shen, Songjie; Xu, Zhonghuang; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The contribution of ultrasound-assisted thoracic paravertebral block to postoperative analgesia remains unclear. We compared the effect of a combination of ultrasound assisted-thoracic paravertebral block and propofol general anesthesia with opioid and sevoflurane general anesthesia on volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain in patients having breast cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block with propofol general anesthesia (PPA group, n = 121) or fentanyl with sevoflurane general anesthesia (GA group, n = 126). Volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain intensity were compared between the groups using noninferiority and superiority tests. Results Patients in the PPA group required less sevoflurane than those in the GA group (median [interquartile range] of 0 [0, 0] vs. 0.4 [0.3, 0.6] minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]-hours), less intraoperative fentanyl requirements (100 [50, 100] vs. 250 [200, 300]?g,), less intense postoperative pain (median visual analog scale score 2 [1, 3.5] vs. 3 [2, 4.5]), but more propofol (median 529 [424, 672] vs. 100 [100, 130] mg). Noninferiority was detected for all four outcomes; one-tailed superiority tests for each outcome were highly significant at P<0.001 in the expected directions. Conclusions The combination of propofol anesthesia with ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block reduces intraoperative volatile anesthetic and opioid requirements, and results in less post operative pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00418457 PMID:26588217

  17. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  18. Simulation-Based Optimization for Surgery Scheduling in Operation Theatre Management Using Response Surface Method.

    PubMed

    Liang, Feng; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fung, Richard Y K

    2015-11-01

    Operation theatre is one of the most significant assets in a hospital as the greatest source of revenue as well as the largest cost unit. This paper focuses on surgery scheduling optimization, which is one of the most crucial tasks in operation theatre management. A combined scheduling policy composed of three simple scheduling rules is proposed to optimize the performance of scheduling operation theatre. Based on the real-life scenarios, a simulation-based model about surgery scheduling system is built. With two optimization objectives, the response surface method is adopted to search for the optimal weight of simple rules in a combined scheduling policy in the model. Moreover, the weights configuration can be revised to cope with dispatching dynamics according to real-time change at the operation theatre. Finally, performance comparison between the proposed combined scheduling policy and tabu search algorithm indicates that the combined scheduling policy is capable of sequencing surgery appointments more efficiently. PMID:26385551

  19. Anaesthetic management of laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer in patients of dilated cardiomyopathy with poor ejection fraction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yao-Hua; Hu, Liang; Xia, Jin; Hao, Quan-Shui; Feng, Li; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    A patient with dilated cardiomyopathy with poor ejection fraction posted for laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer which was successfully performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation was reported. Our observations strongly indicate that detailed preoperative assessment, watchful intraoperative monitoring, and skillful optimization of fluid status and hemodynamic play important role in the high risk patient under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. PMID:26309623

  20. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer in a patient with tuberculous kyphosis and dwarfism: a rare case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yao, Si-Yuan; Ikeda, Atsushi; Tada, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    With accumulated surgical experience, the contraindications to laparoscopic surgery have been decreasing. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted for a variety of diseases. However, surgery in patients with anatomic deformities are still a challenge for surgeons, specifically abdominal surgery in patients with severe kyphosis. A 71-year-old man with a diagnosis of ascending colon cancer had severe kyphosis with extremely short stature, secondary to tuberculous spondylitis. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was successfully performed with a single umbilical incision plus one port. This is the first reported case involving laparoscopic surgery in a patient with tuberculous kyphosis. The purpose of this report is to describe the surgical skills of reduced port laparoscopic surgery in a patient with altered habitus. With proper planning and a meticulous operation, minimally invasive surgery could be safely achieved. PMID:26240628

  1. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer in a patient with tuberculous kyphosis and dwarfism: a rare case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Tada, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    With accumulated surgical experience, the contraindications to laparoscopic surgery have been decreasing. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted for a variety of diseases. However, surgery in patients with anatomic deformities are still a challenge for surgeons, specifically abdominal surgery in patients with severe kyphosis. A 71-year-old man with a diagnosis of ascending colon cancer had severe kyphosis with extremely short stature, secondary to tuberculous spondylitis. Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was successfully performed with a single umbilical incision plus one port. This is the first reported case involving laparoscopic surgery in a patient with tuberculous kyphosis. The purpose of this report is to describe the surgical skills of reduced port laparoscopic surgery in a patient with altered habitus. With proper planning and a meticulous operation, minimally invasive surgery could be safely achieved. PMID:26240628

  2. Costs of medical care after open or minimally invasive prostate cancer surgery: A population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lowrance, William T.; Eastham, James A.; Yee, David S.; Laudone, Vincent P.; Denton, Brian; Scardino, Peter T.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy (MRP) and open radical prostatectomy (ORP) have similar short-term clinical and functional outcomes. MRP with robotic assistance is generally more expensive than ORP, but it is not clear whether subsequent costs of care vary by approach. Methods In the linked SEER-Medicare database we identified men age 66 or older who received MRP or ORP in 2003-2006 for prostate cancer. Total cost of care was estimated as the sum of Medicare payments from all claims for hospital care, outpatient care, physician services, home health and hospice care, and durable medical equipment in the first year from date of surgical admission. We estimated the impact of surgical approach on costs controlling for patient and disease characteristics. Results Of 5,445 surgically-treated prostate cancer patients, 4,454 (82%) had ORP and 991 (18%) had MRP. Mean total first-year costs were more than $1,200 greater for MRP compared with ORP ($16,919 vs. $15692, p=0.08). Controlling for patient and disease characteristics, MRP was associated with 2% greater mean total payments, but this difference was not statistically significant. First-year costs were greater for men who were older, black, lived in the Northeast, had lymph node involvement, more advanced tumor stage or greater comorbidity. Conclusions In this population-based cohort of older men, MRP and ORP had similar economic outcomes. From a payer’s perspective, any benefits associated with MRP may not translate to net savings compared with ORP in the first year after surgery. PMID:22025192

  3. Outcome After Conservative Surgery and Breast Irradiation in 5,717 Patients With Breast Cancer: Implications for Supraclavicular Nodal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Scotti, Vieri; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Detti, Beatrice; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Cardillo, Carla Deluca; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and predictive factors of patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy to the whole breast only, without supraclavicular nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 5,717 patients with pT1-T4 breast cancer were treated at the University of Florence. The median age of the patient population was 55 years (range, 30-80 years). All patients were followed for a median of 6.8 years (range, 1-27 years). Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended in 1,535 patients (26.9%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 2,951 patients (51.6%). The patients were split into three groups according to number of positive axillary nodes (PAN): P1, negative axillary lymph nodes; P2, one to three PAN; P3, more than three PAN. Results: The P3 patients had a higher incidence of supraclavicular fossa recurrence (SFR) compared with P2 and P1 patients. However, the incidence of SFR in P3 patients was low (only 5.5%), whereas the incidence of distant metastases (DM) was 27.2%. Distant metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor for breast cancer survival. Additionally, in the subgroup of patients who developed local recurrence, DM was the most important death predictor. Conclusion: Our series suggests that isolated SFR in patients who did not receive supraclavicular radiotherapy is infrequent, as well as in those patients who have more than three PAN, and SFR seems not to influence the outcome, which depends on DM occurrence.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  5. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Designing a wearable navigation system for image-guided cancer resection surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Pengfei; Ding, Houzhu; Wang, Jinkun; Liu, Peng; Ling, Qiang; Chen, Jiayu; Xu, Junbin; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    A wearable surgical navigation system is developed for intraoperative imaging of surgical margin in cancer resection surgery. The system consists of an excitation light source, a monochromatic CCD camera, a host computer, and a wearable headset unit in either of the following two modes: head-mounted display (HMD) and Google glass. In the HMD mode, a CMOS camera is installed on a personal cinema system to capture the surgical scene in real-time and transmit the image to the host computer through a USB port. In the Google glass mode, a wireless connection is established between the glass and the host computer for image acquisition and data transport tasks. A software program is written in Python to call OpenCV functions for image calibration, co-registration, fusion, and display with augmented reality. The imaging performance of the surgical navigation system is characterized in a tumor simulating phantom. Image-guided surgical resection is demonstrated in an ex vivo tissue model. Surgical margins identified by the wearable navigation system are co-incident with those acquired by a standard small animal imaging system, indicating the technical feasibility for intraoperative surgical margin detection. The proposed surgical navigation system combines the sensitivity and specificity of a fluorescence imaging system and the mobility of a wearable goggle. It can be potentially used by a surgeon to identify the residual tumor foci and reduce the risk of recurrent diseases without interfering with the regular resection procedure. PMID:24980159

  7. Designing a wearable navigation system for image-guided cancer resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Shao, Pengfei; Ding, Houzhu; Wang, Jinkun; Liu, Peng; Ling, Qiang; Chen, Jiayu; Xu, Junbin; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    A wearable surgical navigation system is developed for intraoperative imaging of surgical margin in cancer resection surgery. The system consists of an excitation light source, a monochromatic CCD camera, a host computer, and a wearable headset unit in either of the following two modes: head-mounted display (HMD) and Google glass. In the HMD mode, a CMOS camera is installed on a personal cinema system to capture the surgical scene in real-time and transmit the image to the host computer through a USB port. In the Google glass mode, a wireless connection is established between the glass and the host computer for image acquisition and data transport tasks. A software program is written in Python to call OpenCV functions for image calibration, co-registration, fusion, and display with augmented reality. The imaging performance of the surgical navigation system is characterized in a tumor simulating phantom. Image-guided surgical resection is demonstrated in an ex vivo tissue model. Surgical margins identified by the wearable navigation system are co-incident with those acquired by a standard small animal imaging system, indicating the technical feasibility for intraoperative surgical margin detection. The proposed surgical navigation system combines the sensitivity and specificity of a fluorescence imaging system and the mobility of a wearable goggle. It can be potentially used by a surgeon to identify the residual tumor foci and reduce the risk of recurrent diseases without interfering with the regular resection procedure. PMID:24980159

  8. Transoperative refusion: a simple and safe method in emergency surgery.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Luiz Carlos Buarque; Valoes, Sérgio Henrique Chagas; Leitão Neto, José da Silva

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to reinforce the importance of blood reinfusion as a cheap, safe and simple method, which can be used in small hospitals, especially those in which there is no blood bank. Moreover, even with the use of devices that perform the collection and filtration of blood, more recent studies show that the cost-benefit ratio is much better when autologous transfusion is compared with blood transfusions, even when there is injury to hollow viscera and blood contamination. It is known that the allogeneic blood transfusion carries a number of risks to patients, among them are the coagulation disorders mediated by excess enzymes in the conserved blood, and deficiency in clotting factors, mainly the Factor V, the proacelerin. Another factor would be the risk of contamination with still unknown pathogens or that are not investigated during screening for selection of donors, such as the West Nile Fever and Creutzfeldt-Jacob, better known as "Mad Cow" disease. Comparing both methods, we conclude that blood autotransfusion has numerous advantages over heterologous transfusion, even in large hospitals. We are not against blood transfusions, just do not agree that the patient's own blood is discarded without making sure there will be enough blood in stock to get him out of the hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25295992

  9. Immune checkpoints: Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein 1 in breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    KOLACINSKA, AGNIESZKA; CEBULA-OBRZUT, BARBARA; PAKULA, LUKASZ; CHALUBINSKA-FENDLER, JUSTYNA; MORAWIEC-SZTANDERA, ALINA; PAWLOWSKA, ZOFIA; ZAWLIK, IZABELA; MORAWIEC, ZBIGNIEW; JESIONEK-KUPNICKA, DOROTA; SMOLEWSKI, PIOTR

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoints refer to a plethora of inhibitory pathways built into the immune system, and recent studies have emphasized the role of these checkpoints in carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate two major immune checkpoints, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), in the serum of 35 patients with stage I and II breast cancer. Serum concentrations of CTLA-4 and PD-1 were measured at three time points: i) Preoperatively; ii) during anesthesia following the harvesting of sentinel nodes (SNs); and iii) 24 h postoperatively. Control samples were obtained from 25 healthy, age-matched females. Assessment of CTLA-4 and PD-1 expression levels was conducted using flow cytometry. A statistically significant difference in PD-1 expression was identified between breast cancer patients preoperatively and healthy controls (26.31±11.87 vs. 12.72±8.15; P<0.0001). In addition, a statistically significant association was found between CTLA-4 and PD-1 levels prior to surgery (P=0.0084). In addition, CTLA-4 expression was associated with age (P=0.0453), with elevated levels of CTLA-4 detected in older breast cancer patients. Higher PD-1 expression levels were observed in T2 tumors compared with T1 tumors prior to surgery and intraoperatively; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Furthermore, a decrease in PD-1 levels was observed subsequent to harvesting SNs with metastasis, but not in SN-negative patients (P=0.05). A negative correlation was also observed between PD-1 expression and progesterone receptor (PR) status following surgery (P=0.024). These results provided a basis for further investigation of immune checkpoints in breast cancer. Breast cancer patients exhibit an altered profile of immune checkpoint markers, with higher concentrations of PD-1 observed in larger, PR-negative tumors. PMID:26622629

  10. Oncoplastic Surgical Techniques for Personalized Breast Conserving Surgery in Breast Cancer Patient with Small to Moderate Sized Breast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Wan Wook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2011-01-01

    Oncoplastic surgery has revolutionized the field of breast conserving surgery (BCS). The final aims of this technique are to obtain an adequate resection margin that will reduce the rate of local recurrence while simultaneously improving cosmetic outcomes. To obtain successful results after oncoplastic surgery, it is imperative that patients be risk-stratified based on risk factors associated with positive margins, that relevant imaging studies be reviewed, and that the confirmation of negative margins be confirmed during the initial operation. Patients who had small- to moderate-sized breasts are the most likely to be dissatisfied with the cosmetic outcome of surgery, even if the defect is small; therefore, oncoplastic surgery in this population is warranted. Reconstruction of the remaining breast tissue is divided into volume displacement and volume replacement techniques. The use of the various oncoplastic surgeries is based on tumor location and excised breast volume. If the excised volume is less than 100 g, the tumor location is used to determine which technique should be used, with the most commonly used technique being volume displacement. However, if the excised volume is greater than 100 g, the volume replacement method is generally used, and in cases where more than 150 g is excised, the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap may be used to obtain a pleasing cosmetic result. The local recurrence rate after oncoplastic surgery was lower than that of conventional BCS, as oncoplastic surgery reduced the rate of positive resection margins by resecting a wider section of glandular tissue. If the surgeon understands the advantages and disadvantages of oncoplastic surgery, and the multidisciplinary breast team is able to successfully collaborate, then the success rate of BCS with partial breast reconstruction can be increased while also yielding a cosmetically appealing outcome. PMID:22323910

  11. Clinical observation of docetaxel or gemcitabine combined with cisplatin in the chemotherapy after surgery for stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuqiang; Ji, Xuexian; Zhou, Xiao; Shi, Qilin; Yu, Huanming; Fu, Hengqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel combined with cisplatin (DP) and gemcitabine combined with cisplatin (GP) in postoperative chemotherapy after surgery of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 92 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after surgery were enrolled, and they were treated with DP (DP group) and GP (GP group). The efficacy and toxicity of the medications were then compared. Results: Approximately 92.4% (85 out of 92) of the patients received chemotherapy for more than three weeks. In DP and GP groups, the incidence rates of grade III-IV thrombocytopenia were 24.4% and 6.38%, respectively, whereas the incidence rates of alopecia were 88.9% and 25.5%, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Disease-free survival rates in DP group in one and two years were 76.5% and 50.47%, respectively, whereas in GP group were 77.8% and 49.52%, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: These results showed similar disease-free survival rates of DP and GP therapies in one and two years after surgery for NSCLC. However, DP group exhibited higher incidence of grade III-IV thrombocytopenia and alopecia than GP group. Therefore, we should select a specific treatment for each patient according to individual differences. PMID:26648993

  12. Clinical observation of docetaxel or gemcitabine combined with cisplatin in the chemotherapy after surgery for stage II–III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xue-Xian; Zhou, Xiao; Shi, Qi-Lin; Yu, Huan-Ming; Fu, Heng-Qin; Ji, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aimed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel combined with cisplatin (DP) and gemcitabine combined with cisplatin (GP) in postoperative chemotherapy after surgery of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods A total of 92 patients diagnosed with NSCLC after surgery were enrolled, and they were treated with DP (DP group) and GP (GP group). The efficacy and toxicity of the medications were then compared. Results Approximately 92.4% (85 out of 92) of the patients received chemotherapy for more than three weeks. In the DP and GP groups, the incidence rates of grade III–IV thrombocytopenia were 24.4% and 6.38%, respectively, whereas the incidence rates of alopecia were 88.9% and 25.5%, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Disease-free survival rates in DP group in one and two years were 76.5% and 50.47%, respectively, whereas in the GP group they were 77.8% and 49.52%, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions These results showed similar disease-free survival rates of DP and GP therapies in one and two years after surgery for NSCLC. However, the DP group exhibited higher incidence rates of grade III–IV thrombocytopenia and alopecia than the GP group. Therefore, we should select a specific treatment for each patient according to individual differences. PMID:26557781

  13. Genomic Sequencing in Determining Treatment in Patients With Metastatic Cancer or Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-27

    Metastatic Neoplasm; Recurrent Neoplasm; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  14. Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Multiple Ipsilateral Breast Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  15. Role of Enteral Immunonutrition in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Liang, Hui; Yi, Li-Juan; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Zeng, Zi; Shuai, Ting; Ou, Yang-Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common upper gastrointestinal malignancies. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of curative treatment for GC. Enteral immunonutrition (EIN) has been increasingly used to enhance host immunity and relieve inflammatory response of patients undergoing surgery for GC; however, conclusions across studies still remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of EIN for such patients. We searched some electronic databases including PubMed, EBSCO-Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and EMBASE to identify any latent studies which investigated the effects of EIN compared with standard EN on GC patients who undergoing surgery until the end of December 30, 2014. Relative risk (RR), mean difference (MD), or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated and we also assessed heterogeneity by using Cochrane Q and I2 statistic combined with corresponding P-value. We included 9 eligible studies which included 785 patients eventually. The meta-analysis results shown that EIN increased level of IgA (MD, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.12–0.51), IgG (MD, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.73–2.28), IgM (MD, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06–0.39), CD4+ (SMD, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.53–1.09), CD3+ (SMD, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.21–1.15), CD4+/CD8+ ratio (MD, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.12–1.01), and NK cell (MD, 2.35; 95% CI, 0.66–4.05); decreased IL-6 (MD, ?98.22; 95% CI, ?156.16 to ?40.28) and TNF-? (MD, ?118.29; 95% CI, ?162.00 to ?74.58), but not improve remained outcomes of interest involving postoperative complications, length of hospitalization, serum total protein, and CD8+. Descriptive analysis suggested that EIN also increased the concentration of IL-2 but not CRP. Impact on lymphocytes remains inconsistent. EIN is effective for enhancing host immunity and relieving the inflammatory response in GC patients undergoing gastrectomy, but clinical outcomes cannot be benefit from it. Heterogeneity caused by different compositions and timing of administration of EIN regimes and not enough sample size and number of eligible studies in most of sensitive analyses with subgroup analysis may impaired the power of our study, and thus some large-scale and well-designed studies are warranted to further establish effects. PMID:26252314

  16. Colorectal cancer liver metastases: laparoscopic and open radiofrequency-assisted surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vavra, Petr; Nowakova, Jana; Ostruszka, Petr; Jurcikova, Jana; Martinek, Lubomir; Penhaker, Marek; Ihnat, Peter; Habib, Nagy; Zonca, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The liver is the most common site of colorectal metastases (colorectal liver metastases – CLM). Surgical treatment in combination with oncological therapy is the only potentially curative method. Unfortunately, only 10–25% of patients are suitable for surgery. Traditionally, open liver resection (OLR) is usually performed. However, laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has become popular worldwide in the last two decades. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness and benefits of radiofrequency minor LLR of CLM in comparison with OLR. Material and methods The indication for surgery was CLM and the possibility to perform minor laparoscopic or OLR not exceeding two hepatic segments according to Couinaud's classification. Results Sixty-six minor liver resections for CLM were performed. Twenty-five (37.9%) patients underwent a laparoscopic approach and 41 (62.1%) patients underwent OLR. The mean operative time was 166.4 min for LLR and 166.8 min for OLR. Average blood loss was 132.3 ±218.0 ml during LLR and 149.5 ±277.5 ml during OLR. Length of hospital stay was 8.4 ±2.0 days for LLR and 10.5 ±5.8 days for OLR. All resections were R0. There was no case of mortality. Postoperative complications were recognized in 9 (13.6%) patients: 8 in the group of OLR patients and 1 in the LLR group. The median survival time for LLR was 70.5 months and for OLR 61.9 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was higher for LLR vs. OLR – 82.1% vs. 69.8%. The average length of disease-free interval after LLR was greater (52.2 months) in comparison with OLR (49.4%). The 5-year disease-free interval was 63.2% for LLR and 58% for OLR. Conclusions Outcomes and oncological radicality of minor laparoscopic liver resections of CLM are comparable to outcomes of OLR. PMID:26240620

  17. Combination Chemotherapy and Filgrastim Before Surgery in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  18. Reoperation rates after breast conserving surgery for breast cancer among women in England: retrospective study of hospital episode statistics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether rate of reoperation after breast conserving surgery is associated with patients’ characteristics and investigate whether reoperation rates vary among English NHS trusts. Design Cohort study using patient level data from hospital episode statistics. Setting English NHS trusts. Participants Adult women who had breast conserving surgery between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2008. Main outcome measure Reoperation rates after primary breast conserving surgery within 3 months, adjusted using logistic regression for tumour type, age, comorbidity, and socioeconomic deprivation. Tumours were grouped by whether a carcinoma in situ component was coded at the time of the primary breast conserving surgery. Results 55?297 women had primary breast conserving surgery in 156 NHS trusts during the three year period. 11?032 (20.0%, 95% confidence interval 19.6% to 20.3%) women had at least one reoperation. 10?212 (18.5%, 18.2% to 18.8%) had one reoperation only; of these, 5943 (10.7%, 10.5% to 11.0%) had another breast conserving procedure and 4269 (7.7%, 7.5% to 7.9%) had a mastectomy. Of the 45?793 women with isolated invasive disease, 8229 (18.0%) had at least one reoperation. In comparison, 2803 (29.5%) of the 9504 women with carcinoma in situ had at least one reoperation (adjusted odds ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 2.0). Substantial differences were found in the adjusted reoperation rates among the NHS trusts (10th and 90th centiles 12.2% and 30.2%). Conclusion: One in five women who had breast conserving surgery in England had a reoperation. Reoperation was nearly twice as likely when the tumour had a carcinoma in situ component coded. Women should be informed of this reoperation risk when deciding on the type of surgical treatment of their breast cancer. PMID:22791786

  19. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery*: A Prospective Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-12-01

    Malignant ascites (MA) is most commonly observed in patients scheduled for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) surgery and is supposed as a major risk factor promoting perioperative hemodynamic deterioration. We aimed to assess the hemodynamic consequences of MA on systemic circulation in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery.This study is a predefined post-hoc analysis of a randomized controlled pilot trial comparing intravenous solutions within a goal-directed algorithm to optimize hemodynamic therapy in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery. Ascites was used to stratify the EOC patients prior to randomization in the main study. We analyzed 2 groups according to the amount of ascites (NLAS: none or low ascites [<500?mL] vs HAS: high ascites group [>500?mL]). Differences in hemodynamic variables with respect to time were analyzed using nonparametric analysis for longitudinal data and multivariate generalized estimating equation adjusting the analysis for the randomized study groups of the main study.A total of 31 patients in the NLAS and 16 patients in the HAS group were analyzed. Although cardiac output was not different between groups suggesting a similar circulatory blood flow, the HAS group revealed higher heart rates and lower stroke volumes during surgery. There were no differences in pressure-based hemodynamic variables. In the HAS group, fluid demands, reflected by the time to reindication of a fluid challenge after preload optimization, increased steadily, whereas stroke volume could not be maintained at baseline resulting in hemodynamic instability after 1.5?h of surgery. In contrast, in the NLAS group fluid demands were stable and stroke volume could be maintained during surgery. Clinically relevant associations of the type of fluid replacement with hemodynamic consequences were particularly observed in the HAS group, in which transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was associated to an improved circulatory flow and reduced vasopressor and fluid demands, whereas the administration of artificial infusion solutions was related to opposite effects.Malignant ascites >500?mL implies increased fluid demands and substantial alterations in circulatory blood flow during cancer surgery. Fresh frozen plasma transfusion promotes recovering hemodynamic stability in patients with malignant ascites >500?mL, in whom artificial infusion solutions could not prevent from hemodynamic deterioration. PMID:26656336

  20. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  1. Adjuvant Therapy Completion Rates in Patients with Gastric Cancer Undergoing Perioperative Chemotherapy Versus a Surgery-First Approach.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eva; Ahmad, Rima; Hong, Theodore S; Clark, Jeffrey W; Kwak, Eunice L; Rattner, David W; Mullen, John T

    2016-01-01

    Delayed recovery after gastrectomy may preclude the administration of adjuvant therapy in a significant percentage of patients who undergo elective gastrectomy as the initial therapy for gastric cancer. Clinicopathologic and treatment variables of 155 patients undergoing potentially curative gastrectomy for stages Ib-IIIc gastric adenocarcinoma from 2001 to 2014 were analyzed, and rates of receipt of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients treated with either a surgery-first approach (SURG) or neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery followed by postoperative therapy (PERIOP) were compared. SURG patients (n?=?93) were older and more likely to have distal tumors and to undergo distal gastrectomy and D1 lymphadenectomy than PERIOP patients (n?=?62). The distribution of ASA scores was similar between groups. SURG patients were less likely than PERIOP patients to complete at least one cycle of chemotherapy (56 vs 100 %, P?=?0.001) and all recommended chemotherapy and radiation therapy (44 vs 66 %, P?=?0.013). These findings were consistent for SURG patients treated during different time periods throughout the study and for patients of poorer performance status. A significantly higher percentage of gastric cancer patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy receive some or all of the recommended components of multimodality therapy than patients treated with a surgery-first approach. PMID:26394879

  2. A comparative analysis of lung cancer patients treated with lobectomy via three-dimensional video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery versus two-dimensional resection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengliang; Mo, Lili; Ma, Yegang; Peng, Guilin; Ren, Yi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yongyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) vision systems are now available for thoracic surgery. It is unclear whether 3D video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is superior to 2D VATS systems. This study aimed to compare the operative and perioperative data between 2D and 3D VATS lobectomy (VTL) and to identify the actual role of 3D VTL in thoracic surgery. Methods A two-institutional comparative study was conducted from November 2013 to November 2014 at Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute and the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, China, of 300 patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients were assigned to receive either the 3D VATS (n=150) or 2D VATS (n=150) lobectomy. The operative and perioperative data between 2D VATS and 3D VATS were compared. Results Although there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of each single complication, a significantly less operative time was found in the 3D VATS group (145 min) than in the 2D VATS group (176 min) (P=0.006). Postoperative mortality rates in 3D VATS and 2D VATS groups were both 0%.No significant difference was found between groups for estimated blood loss (P=0.893), chest drainage tube placement time (P=0.397), length of hospital stay (P=0.199), number of lymph nodes resected (P=0.397), postoperative complications (P=0.882) and cost of care (P=0.913). Conclusions Early results of this study demonstrate that the 3D VATS lobectomy procedure can be performed with less operative time. 3D VATS and 2D VATS lobectomy are both safe procedures in first-line surgical treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26623103

  3. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  4. Does the preoperative administration of tranexamic acid reduce perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements after head neck cancer surgery? A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anjan; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Debabrata; Chhaule, Subinay; Mitra, Tapobrata; Mukherjee, Anindya; Mandal, Subrata Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery is associated with high intraoperative blood loss which may require urgent blood transfusion. Many strategies have been recommended to decrease the need for allogenic transfusion. Use of perioperative tranexamic acid (TA) has a promising role. Aims: This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single preoperative bolus dose of TA on blood loss prevention and red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing HNC surgery. Study Design: A prospective, double-blind, and randomized controlled study. Materials and Methods: From 2007 July to 2010 January; 80 patients, aged (35–55), of American Society of Anesthesiologists II-III scheduled for unilateral HNC surgeries were randomly received either TA (Group T) in a dose of 20 mg/kg diluted to 25 cc with normal saline or an equivalent volume of normal saline (Group C) in a tertiary care hospital. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, platelet count, packed cell volume, fibrinogen level, D-dimer level were measured pre- and post-operatively. Results: Saline (C) Group required more blood, colloid, crystalloid for blood loss. In Group T, 32 patients did not require transfusion of any blood products compared to five patients in Group C (P < 0.0001) and only eight units of blood was transfused in Group T, whereas a total of 42 units of blood was transfused in Group C. Even after numerous transfusions, Hb% after 6 h and 24 h in Group C were significantly low in comparison with Group T (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Thus, TA significantly reduces blood loss and chances of colloid, blood, and crystalloid transfusion caused by HNC surgery. PMID:26712979

  5. An Analytical Method For Multi-class Molecular Cancer Classification

    E-print Network

    Poggio, Tomaso

    . Introduction The accurate classification of human cancer is an important component of modern cancer treatmentAn Analytical Method For Multi-class Molecular Cancer Classification Ryan Rifkin # & , Sayan-wise classification problems using such global gene expression patterns. However, classification across multiple

  6. QuickSilver: A Phase II Study Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria to Identify “Good Prognosis” Rectal Cancer Patients Eligible for Primary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, two nonrandomized, prospective cohort studies used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the circumferential resection margin to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery and have reported favorable outcomes. Objective The objective of this project was to conduct a Phase II trial to assess the safety and feasibility of MRI criteria to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery in the North American setting. Methods Patients with newly diagnosed primary rectal cancer attending surgical clinics at participating centers will be invited to participate in the study. The inclusion criteria for the study are: (1) diagnosis of rectal cancer (0-15 cm) from the anal verge on endoscopy and proximal extent of tumor at or below the sacral promontory on computed tomography (CT) or MRI; (2) meets all MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal tumor as defined by the study protocol; (3) 18 years or older; and (4) able to provide written consent. The initial assessment will include: (1) clinical and endoscopic examination of the primary tumor; (2) CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis; and (3) pelvic MRI. All potentially eligible cases will be presented at a multidisciplinary cancer conference to assess for eligibility based on the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” tumor which include: (1) predicted circumferential resection margin (CRM) > 1 mm; (2) definite T2, T2/early T3, or definite T3 tumor with < 5 mm of extramural depth of invasion (EMD); (3) any N0, N1, or N2; and (4) absence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI). All patients fulfilling the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal cancer and the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be invited to participate in the study and proceed to primary surgery. The safety of the MRI criteria will be evaluated by assessing the positive CRM rate and is the primary outcome for the study. Results We expect to have a minimum of 300 potentially eligible patients, and based on a 30% eligibility rate and 80% participation rate, it is expected that 75 patients will be recruited over the two year study period. A Data Safety Monitoring Committee has been organized, and the study will be stopped if a positive CRM of >10% is reported at any interim assessment, which will occur after every 25 patients accrued in the study. Conclusions It is expected that the results of this study will show that use of MRI criteria to identify “good prognosis” rectal cancers eligible for primary surgery will be safe (ie, positive margin less than 10%). Therefore, these results will have significant potential to change the current management of rectal cancer in North America and result in improved quality of life for rectal cancer patients and survivors, while reducing overall health care costs. Trial Registration ISRCTN05107772; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN05107772/ (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation/6WhhUhXkA). PMID:25871328

  7. Additional data in the debate on stage I non-small cell lung cancer: surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Dorsey, Jay F

    2015-08-01

    Lobectomy has been the standard of care for patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), resulting in nearly universal local control and excellent overall survival. However, up to one-quarter of early stage patients are unable to undergo or refuse definitive resection. With the increasing adoption of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy among medical inoperable patients, tumor control and overall survival rates in this population have significantly improved. Trials demonstrating excellent outcomes among both medically inoperable and medical operable patients with stage I NSCLC have spurred interest in comparisons between surgery and SABR. The recent publication of the randomized STARS and ROSEL trials demonstrated fewer toxicities and an improvement in overall survival among patients treated with SABR compared with surgery. Based on these trials and retrospective comparisons between the modalities, definitive SABR now more firmly appears to be a viable first-line option for treating patients with operable stage I NSCLC. PMID:26366389

  8. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J. (Berkeley, CA); Weaver, Valerie M. (Oakland, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  9. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Ratiometric Activatable Cell-Penetrating Peptides Label Pancreatic Cancer, Enabling Fluorescence-Guided Surgery, Which Reduces Metastases and Recurrence in Orthotopic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Metildi, Cristina A.; Felsen, Csilla N.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Hoffman, Robert M.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)-cleavable ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptides (RACPPs) conjugated to Cy5 and Cy7 fluorophores to accurately label pancreatic cancer for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) in an orthotopic mouse model. Methods Orthotopic mouse models were established using MiaPaCa-2-GFP human pancreatic cancer cells. Two weeks after implantation, tumor-bearing mice were randomized to conventional white light reflectance (WLR) surgery or FGS. FGS was performed at far-red and infrared wavelengths with a customized fluorescence-dissecting microscope 2 h after injection of MMP-2 and MMP-9-cleavable RACPPs. Green fluorescence imaging of the GFP-labeled cancer cells was used to assess the effectiveness of surgical resection and monitor recurrence. At 8 weeks, mice were sacrificed to evaluate tumor burden and metastases. Results Mice in the WLR group had larger primary tumors than mice in the FGS group at termination [1.72 g ± standard error (SE) 0.58 vs. 0.25 g ± SE 0.14; respectively, p = 0.026). Mean disease-free survival was significantly lengthened from 5.33 weeks in the WLR group to 7.38 weeks in the FGS group (p = 0.02). Recurrence rates were lower in the FGS group than in the WLR group (38 vs. 73 %; p = 0.049). This translated into lower local and distant recurrence rates for FGS compared to WLR (31 vs. 67 for local recurrence, respectively, and 25 vs. 60 % for distant recurrence, respectively). Metastatic tumor burden was significantly greater in the WLR group than in the FGS group (96.92 mm2 ± SE 52.03 vs. 2.20 mm2 ± SE 1.43; respectively, ?2 = 5.455; p = 0.02). Conclusions RACPPs can accurately and effectively label pancreatic cancer for effective FGS, resulting in better postresection outcomes than for WLR surgery. PMID:25319581

  11. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  12. A novel method and workflow for stereotactic surgery with a mobile intraoperative CT imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Clinthorne, Neal

    2015-03-01

    xCAT®, (Xoran Technologies, LLC., Ann Arbor, MI) is a CT imaging device that has been used for minimally invasive surgeries. Designed with flat panel and cone-beam imaging technique, it provides a fast, low-dose CT imaging alternative for diagnosis and examination purposes at hospitals. With its unique compact and mobile characteristics, it allows scanning inside crowded operating rooms (OR). The xCAT allows acquisition of images in the OR that show the most recent morphology during the procedure. This can potentially improve outcomes of surgical procedures such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and other neurosurgeries, since brain displacement and deformation (brain shift) often occur between pre-operative imaging and electrode placement during surgery. However, the small gantry size of the compact scanner obstructs scanning of patients with stereotactic frames or skull clamp. In this study, we explored a novel method, in which we first utilized the xCAT to obtain CT images with fiducial markers, registered the stereotactic frame with those markers, and finally, target measurements were calculated and set up on the frame. The new procedure workflow provides a means to use CT images obtained inside of OR for stereotactic surgery and can be used in current intraoperative settings. Our phantom validation study in lab shows that the procedure workflow with this method is easy to conduct.

  13. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  14. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  15. Regional nodal recurrence in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (BCS+RT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pejavar, Sunanda; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To review regional nodal (RN) management and identify predictors of RN relapse in patients treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I and II breast cancer (N = 1920) underwent BCS+RT from 1973 to 2003. Patients undergoing RN were treated with a median dose of 46 Gy. Patients undergoing axillary dissection (AXD, N = 1330) were treated to the breast alone if node-negative (N = 984), and to the breast and supraclavicular fossa if node-positive (N = 346). Patients who did not undergo AXD (N = 590) were treated with RT to the supraclavicular fossa and axilla. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) was performed on 126 patients. SN-negative patients (N = 110) were treated with tangents only. There were 16 SN-positive patients who did not undergo complete AXD and were treated with RT. Results: As of September 2005, there have been 36 RN relapses for an actuarial nodal control rate (NCR) of 98% at 10 years. There was no difference in NCR between those undergoing AXD (NCR = 97.4%) and those receiving RT without AXD (NCR = 97.9%). In multivariate analysis, young age, non-Caucasian race, and pathologic nodal status correlated with increased risk of nodal relapse. Of the 126 patients undergoing SNB, there was only 1 nodal recurrence. None of the 16 SN-positive patients treated with RT without AXD had nodal failure. Conclusions: In patients undergoing BCS+RT, both regional nodal irradiation and AXD (including SNB) resulted in equally high rates of regional nodal control. Nodal RT may also be an effective treatment for SN-positive patients.

  16. Unexpected extensions of non-small-cell lung cancer diagnosed during surgery: revisiting exploratory thoracotomies and incomplete resections

    PubMed Central

    Foucault, Christophe; Mordant, Pierre; Grand, Bertrand; Achour, Karima; Arame, Alex; Dujon, Antoine; Le Pimpec Barthes, Françoise; Riquet, Marc

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Only patients with a complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may expect long-term survival. Despite the recent progress in imaging and induction therapy, a thoracotomy may remain exploratory or with incomplete resection (R2). Our purpose was to revisit these situations. METHODS A total of 5305 patients who underwent surgery for NSCLC between 1980 and 2009 were reviewed. We compared the epidemiology, pathology, causes and prognosis characteristics of exploratory thoracotomy (ET) and R2 resections. RESULTS ET and R2 resections were observed in 223 (4%) and 197 (4%) patients, respectively. The frequency of ET decreased with time, while the frequency of R2 resection remained almost stable. The indications for ET and R2 resections were not significantly different. In comparison with ET, R2 resections were characterized by a significantly higher frequency of induction therapy (22 vs 17%, P < 10?3), adenocarcinomas (49 vs 15%, P < 10?6), T1–T2 (53 vs 29%, P < 10?6) and N0–N1 extension (67 vs 42%, P = 10?6). R2 resections were also characterized by a higher rate of postoperative complications (19.1 vs 9.9%, P = 0.014), with no significant difference in postoperative mortality (6.9 vs 4.9%, P = non significant). R2 resections resulted in a higher 5-year survival compared with ET (11.1 vs 1.2%, P = 10?3). There was no long-term survivor after ET, except during the last decade. CONCLUSIONS ET and R2 remain unavoidable. In comparison with ET, R2 resection is associated with a higher rate of postoperative complications, but a higher long-term survival. PMID:23343836

  17. Morbidity of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy (SLN) Alone Versus SLN and Completion Axillary Lymph Node Dissection After Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Igor; Guller, Ulrich; Berclaz, Gilles; Koechli, Ossi R.; Schaer, Gabriel; Fehr, Mathias K.; Hess, Thomas; Oertli, Daniel; Bronz, Lucio; Schnarwyler, Beate; Wight, Edward; Uehlinger, Urs; Infanger, Eduard; Burger, Daniel; Zuber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the morbidity after sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy compared with SLN and completion level I and II axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in a prospective multicenter study. Summary Background Data: ALND after breast cancer surgery is associated with considerable morbidity. We hypothesized: 1) that the morbidity in patients undergoing SLN biopsy only is significantly lower compared with those after SLN and completion ALND level I and II; and 2) that SLN biopsy can be performed with similar intermediate term morbidity in academic and nonacademic centers. Methods: Patients with early stage breast cancer (pT1 and pT2 ? 3 cm, cN0) were included between January 2000 and December 2003 in this prospective Swiss multicenter study. All patients underwent SLN biopsy. In all patients with SLN macrometastases and most patients with SLN micrometastases (43 of 68) or isolated tumor cells (11 of 19), a completion ALND was performed. Postoperative morbidity was assessed based on a standardized protocol. Results: SLN biopsy alone was performed in 449 patients, whereas 210 patients underwent SLN and completion ALND. The median follow-ups were 31.0 and 29.5 months for the SLN and SLN and completion ALND groups, respectively. Intermediate-term follow-up information was available from 635 of 659 patients (96.4%) of enrolled patients. The following results were found in the SLN versus SLN and completion ALND group: presence of lymphedema (3.5% vs. 19.1%, P < 0.0001), impaired shoulder range of motion (3.5% vs. 11.3%, P < 0.0001), shoulder/arm pain (8.1% vs. 21.1%, P < 0.0001), and numbness (10.9% vs. 37.7%, P < 0.0001). No significant differences regarding postoperative morbidity after SLN biopsy were noticed between academic and nonacademic hospitals (P = 0.921). Conclusions: The morbidity after SLN biopsy alone is not negligible but significantly lower compared with level I and II ALND. SLN biopsy can be performed with similar short- and intermediate-term morbidity in academic and nonacademic centers. PMID:17435553

  18. The impact of age on changes in quality of life among breast cancer survivors treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bantema-Joppe, E J; de Bock, G H; Woltman-van Iersel, M; Busz, D M; Ranchor, A V; Langendijk, J A; Maduro, J H; van den Heuvel, E R

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of young age on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by comparing HRQoL of younger and older breast cancer patients, corrected for confounding, and of young patients and a general Dutch population. Methods: The population consisted of breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III) after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. Health-related quality of life was prospectively assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The association between age (?50; 51–70; ?70 years) and HRQoL over time was analysed with mixed modelling. The clinical relevance of differences between/within age groups was estimated with Cohen's D and consensus-based guidelines. The HRQoL data from the young patient cohort were compared with Dutch reference data at 3 years after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 1420 patients completed 3200 questionnaires. Median follow-up was 34 (range 6–70) months. Median age was 59 (range 28–85) years. Compared with older subjects, young women reported worse HRQoL in the first year after radiotherapy, but clinical relevance was limited. Three years after radiotherapy, HRQoL values in the younger group were equal to those in the reference population. Pain and fatigue after radiotherapy improved, with medium clinical relevance. Conclusions: Three years after radiotherapy for breast cancer, young age was not a risk factor for decreased HRQoL. PMID:25602967

  19. [A case report of the use of laparoscopic surgery to remove an adrenal tumor following resection of sigmoid colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Okano, Miho; Yasui, Masayoshi; Nishino, Masaya; Hosoda, Yohei; Nagai, Kenichi; Kim, Yongkook; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2014-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy and partial cystectomy for sigmoid colon cancer following colostomy. The final staging of the tumor was T3, N1, tub2, M0, fStage IIIa. She received 6 courses of CapeOX (oxaliplatin 130mg/m², capecitabine 200mg/m²) as adjuvant chemotherapy, which was discontinued because of severe general fatigue. At the same time, an increase in the levels of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was detected and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed an expanded adrenal mass. Since whole-body ¹?F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) showed no evidence of multiple organ metastases except for the right adrenal tumor, a solitary adrenal metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer was strongly suspected. Hence, colostomy closure and laparoscopic adrenalectomy were concurrently performed. Histological examination revealed non-functional adrenal adenoma. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery was a reasonable choice even in this complex case. PMID:25731277

  20. PET-CT limitations in early stage non-small cell lung cancer: to whom more aggressive approach in radiotherapy and surgery should be directed?

    PubMed Central

    Kepka, Lucyna; Socha, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    This editorial comments on the study by Paravati et al., which reported on the incidence of occult regional lymph node metastases in PET-CT T1T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. A central location and the size of the tumor were shown to be the strongest predictors of the risk of occult nodal disease. Authors comment that in view of limitations of modern imaging, as well as the reported negative predictive value (NPV) of invasive staging methods, the choice of therapeutic options as the extent of surgery (lobectomy or sublobar resection) or radiotherapy [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or conformal radiotherapy (RT) with some forms of elective nodal irradiation (ENI)] should consider tumor’s characteristics and not be based only on imaging and invasive staging modalities. PMID:26716026

  1. Early Contralateral Shoulder-Arm Morbidity in Breast Cancer Patients Enrolled in a Randomized Trial of Post-Surgery Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaenssens, Nele; Vinh-hung, Vincent; Miedema, Geertje; Versmessen, Harijati; Lamote, Jan; Vanhoeij, Marian; Lievens, Pierre; van Parijs, Hilde; Storme, Guy; Voordeckers, Mia; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder/arm morbidity is a common complication of breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy (RT), but little is known about acute contralateral morbidity. Methods Patients were 118 women enrolled in a RT trial. Arm volume and shoulder mobility were assessed before and 1–3 months after RT. Correlations and linear regression were used to analyze changes affecting ipsilateral and contralateral arms, and changes affecting relative interlimb differences (RID). Results Changes affecting one limb correlated with changes affecting the other limb. Arm volume between the two limbs correlated (R = 0.57). Risk factors were weight increase and axillary dissection. Contralateral and ipsilateral loss of abduction strongly correlated (R = 0.78). Changes of combined RID exceeding 10% affected the ipsilateral limb in 25% of patients, and the contralateral limb in 18%. Aromatase inhibitor therapy was significantly associated with contralateral loss of abduction. Conclusions High incidence of early contralateral arm morbidity warrants further investigations. PMID:22904635

  2. Oral cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth ... mouth and difficulty swallowing Disfigurement of the face, head, and neck after surgery Other spread ( metastasis ) of the cancer

  3. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  4. A miniaturized imaging system for optical guided surgery of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Ihab; Milet, Clément; Dorval, Paul; Gayet, Pascal; Rizo, Philippe; Henry, Maxime; Reyt, Emile; Josserand, Véronique; Hurbin, Amandine; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery, FIGS, has lately shown a huge potential in oncologic and lymphatic related surgeries. In some indications such as liver or heart surgery, fluorescence-reachable anatomic structures are limited by the access to the surgical field. Nevertheless, most of the systems available on the market are too large to image the sides of cavities. Small devices are clearly required to improve workability of fluorescence imaging systems. The current work describes the evaluation of Fluostick a CE med certified instrument dedicated to narrow area imaging. This small size device is made of an optical head connected to a control box. We tested this instrumentation at the preclinical level for the optical-guided surgery of head and neck tumors.

  5. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL ?1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  6. NATO PILOT STUDY ON ADVANCED CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NCEA scientists are participating in a study of advanced cancer risk assessment methods, conducted under the auspices of NATO's Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society. The product will be a book of case studies that illustrate advanced cancer risk assessment methods, avail...

  7. Method for detecting the presence of prostate cancer

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Luo, Jun-Li; Tan, Wei

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for cancer diagnosis, treatment and drug screening. In particular, the present invention provides compositions and methods for targeting the nuclear translocation of IkB kinase-.alpha. (IKK.alpha.) and the IKK.alpha.-mediated suppression of Maspin expression observed in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  8. Efficacy Evaluation of Subtotal and Total Gastrectomies in Robotic Surgery for Gastric Cancer Compared with that in Open and Laparoscopic Resections: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aikou, Susumu; Takahashi, Takamasa

    2014-01-01

    Purposes Robotic gastrectomy (RG), as an innovation of minimally invasive surgical method, is developing rapidly for gastric cancer. But there is still no consensus on its comparative merit in either subtotal or total gastrectomy compared with laparoscopic and open resections. Methods Literature searches of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library were performed. We combined the data of four studies for RG versus open gastrectomy (OG), and 11 studies for robotic RG versus laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG). Moreover, subgroup analyses of subtotal and total gastrectomies were performed in both RG vs. OG and RG vs. LG. Results Totally 12 studies involving 8493 patients met the criteria. RG, similar with LG, significantly reduced the intraoperative blood loss than OG. But the duration of surgery is longer in RG than in both OG and LG. The number of lymph nodes retrieved in RG was close to that in OG and LG (WMD?=??0.78 and 95% CI, ?2.15?0.59; WMD?=?0.63 and 95% CI, ?2.24?3.51). And RG did not increase morbidity and mortality in comparison with OG and LG (OR?=?0.92 and 95% CI, 0.69?1.23; OR?=?0.72 and 95% CI, 0.25?2.06) and (OR?=?1.06 and 95% CI, 0.84?1.34; OR?=?1.55 and 95% CI, 0.49?4.94). Moreover, subgroup analysis of subtotal and total gastrectomies in both RG vs. OG and RG vs. LG revealed that the scope of surgical dissection was not a positive factor to influence the comparative results of RG vs. OG or LG in surgery time, blood loss, hospital stay, lymph node harvest, morbidity, and mortality. Conclusions This meta-analysis highlights that robotic gastrectomy may be a technically feasible alternative for gastric cancer because of its affirmative role in both subtotal and total gastrectomies compared with laparoscopic and open resections. PMID:25068955

  9. Sentinel Lymph Node Surgery after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients With Node-Positive Breast Cancer: The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z1071 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Boughey, Judy C.; Suman, Vera J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Ahrendt, Gretchen M.; Wilke, Lee G.; Taback, Bret; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Kuerer, Henry M.; Bowling, Monet; Flippo-Morton, Teresa S.; Byrd, David R.; Ollila, David W.; Julian, Thomas B.; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; McCall, Linda; Symmans, W. Fraser; Le-Petross, Huong T.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Nelson, Heidi; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Sentinel lymph node (SLN) surgery provides reliable nodal staging information with less morbidity than axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for clinically node-negative (cN0) breast cancer patients. The application of SLN surgery for staging the axilla following chemotherapy for women who initially had node-positive breast cancer (cN1) is unclear because of high false negative results reported in previous studies. Objective To determine the false negative rate (FNR) for SLN surgery following chemotherapy in patients initially presenting with biopsy-proven node-positive breast cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients The ACOSOG Z1071 trial enrolled women with clinical T0–4 N1–2, M0 breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Following chemotherapy, patients underwent both SLN surgery and ALND. SLN surgery using both blue dye and a radiolabeled colloid mapping agent was encouraged. Main Outcome Measure The primary endpoint was the FNR of SLN surgery after chemotherapy in women who presented with cN1 disease. We examined the likelihood that the FNR in those with 2 or more SLNs examined was greater than 10%, the rate expected for women undergoing SLN surgery who present with clinically node-negative disease. Results Seven hundred fifty-six patients were enrolled from 136 institutions. Of 663 evaluable patients with cN1 disease, 649 underwent chemotherapy followed by both SLN surgery and ALND. A SLN could not be identified in 46 patients (7.1%). Only one SLN was excised in 78 patients (12.0%). Of the remaining 525 patients with 2 or more SLNs removed, no cancer was identified in the axillary lymph nodes of 215 patients yielding a pathological complete nodal response of 41.0% (95% CI: 36.7%–45.3%). In 39 patients, cancer was not identified in the SLNs but was found in lymph nodes obtained with ALND resulting in a FNR of 12.6% (90% Bayesian Credible Interval, 9.85%–16.05%). Conclusions and Relevance Among women with cN1 breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy who had 2 or more SLNs examined, the FNR was not found to be 10% or less. Given this FNR threshold, changes in approach and patient selection that result in greater sensitivity would be necessary to support the use of SLN surgery as an alternative to ALND. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov; trial identifier NCT00881361. PMID:24101169

  10. Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery and Erlotinib Hydrochloride After Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cancer of the Esophagus or Gastroesophageal Junction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer

  11. Outcome of platinum-based chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer patients with pleural dissemination detected during surgery

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MADOKA; MURAKAMI, HARUYASU; NAITO, TATEAKI; KENMOTSU, HIROTSUGU; TAIRA, TETSUHIKO; AKAMATSU, HIROAKI; ONO, AKIRA; IMAI, HISAO; TAKAHASHI, TOSHIAKI; ENDO, MASAHIRO; NAKAJIMA, TAKASHI; OHDE, YASUHISA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUYUKI

    2013-01-01

    Pleural dissemination detected by computed tomography (CT) is considered to be unfavorable for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the prognosis of NSCLC patients who are diagnosed with pleural dissemination at the time of surgery has yet to be adequately elucidated. To assess the outcomes of platinum-based chemotherapy in NSCLC patients in whom pleural dissemination was detected during exploratory thoracotomy with or without a videoscope, the clinical records of NSCLC patients who were admitted to Shizuoka Cancer Center between September, 2002 and April, 2009 were reviewed. A total of 19 patients were included in this study, 12 males and 7 females, with a median age of 65 years. All patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma and 6 were epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation-positive. The median number of treatment cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy was 4 (range, 1–6 cycles) and the objective response rate was 21% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.5–43]. The median progression-free and overall survival were 10.4 (95% CI: 6.3–18.4) and 50.5 months (95% CI: 32.5–98.0), respectively. Of the 18 patients with reported disease progression, 9 (50%) developed locoregional tumor progression. In conclusion, NSCLC patients in whom pleural dissemination is detected during surgery tend to have a favorable prognosis for survival. Systemic chemotherapy and additional local treatment may improve their clinical outcomes. PMID:24649275

  12. Long-term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-Xu; Zhao, Li-Ying; Lin, Tian; Liu, Hao; Deng, Hai-Jun; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Yan, Jun; Li, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-year survival after laparoscopic surgery vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer. METHODS: This study enrolled 406 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for stages II and III rectal cancer between January 2000 and December 2009 [laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR), n = 152; open rectal resection (ORR), n = 254]. Clinical characteristics, operative outcomes, pathological outcomes, postoperative recovery, and 5-year survival outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Most of the clinical characteristics were similar except age (59 years vs 55 years, P = 0.033) between the LRR group and ORR group. The proportion of anterior resection was higher in the LRR group than that in the ORR group (81.6% vs 66.1%, P = 0.001). The LRR group had less estimated blood loss (50 mL vs 200 mL, P < 0.001) and a lower rate of blood transfusion (4.6% vs 11.8%, P = 0.019) compared to the ORR group. The pathological outcomes of the two groups were comparable. The LRR group was associated with faster recovery of bowel function (2.8 d vs 3.7 d, P < 0.001) and shorter postoperative hospital stay (11.7 d vs 13.7 d, P < 0.001). The median follow-up time was 63 mo in the LRR group and 65 mo in the ORR group. As for the survival outcomes, the 5-year local recurrence rate (16.0% vs 16.4%, P = 0.753), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate (63.0% vs 63.1%, P = 0.589), and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate (68.1% vs 63.5%, P = 0.682) were comparable between the LRR group and the ORR group. Stage by stage, there were also no statistical differences between the LRR group and the ORR group in terms of the 5-year local recurrence rate (stage II: 6.3% vs 8.7%, P = 0.623; stage III: 26.4% vs 23.2%, P = 0.747), 5-year DFS rate (stage II: 77.5% vs 77.6%, P = 0.462; stage III: 46.5% vs 50.9%, P = 0.738), and 5-year OS rate (stage II: 81.4% vs 74.3%, P = 0.242; stage III: 53.9% vs 54.1%, P = 0.459). CONCLUSION: LRR for stages II and III rectal cancer can yield comparable long-term survival while achieving short-term benefits compared to open surgery. PMID:25987773

  13. Department of Surgery Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery

    E-print Network

    ­ Workup and Management 4. Parathyroidectomy for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism 5. Adrenal Incidentaloma Surgery Education Topics 1. Management of Thyroid Nodules 2. Thyroid Cancer 3. Primary Hyperparathyroidism Colorectal Cancer Syndromes 27. Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism 28. Medullary Thyroid Cancer #12;

  14. Effects of pretreatment with intravenous palonosetron for propofol-remifentanil-based anesthesia in breast and thyroid cancer surgery: a double-blind, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kye Hyeok; Rim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, So Young; Lee, Su Nam; Lee, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    Background We postulated that palonosetron, a novel antiemetic agent, might have the effect of alleviating injection pain from propofol and rocuronium. A double-blind, controlled study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of palonosetron on injection pain during total intravenous anesthesia and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) using propofol-remifentanil in breast and thyroid cancer surgery. Methods Sixty patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Before injection of propofol and rocuronium, patients in group S (n = 30) received 4 ml of saline and patients in group P (n = 30) received 75 µg (1.5 ml) of palonosetron mixed with 2.5 ml of saline (n = 30). Patients were evaluated by a blinded anesthesiologist with regard to the scoring of injection pain of propofol, withdrawal response by rocuronium, PONV, shivering, postoperative pain, recall of pain, and overall satisfaction. Results The differences between groups in the incidence of injection pain due to propofol and rocuronium were insignificant. However, in group P, the severity of propofol-induced injection pain (3% vs. 33%, P = 0.003) and postoperative pain (P = 0.038) was significantly lower during the first 12 h after surgery. No differences were observed between the groups with respect to PONV, shivering, recall of pain, and overall satisfaction. Conclusions We concluded that pretreatment of palonosetron was effective to reduce the severity of propofol-induced injection pain and early postoperative pain, although it did not reduce the incidence of injection pain from propofol and rocuronium. PMID:25097733

  15. A Novel Method for Implementation of Frameless StereoEEG in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Roman; Diehl, Beate; Wehner, Tim; Zombori, Gergely; Kinghorn, Jane; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) is an invasive diagnostic procedure in epilepsy surgery that is usually implemented with frame-based methods. OBJECTIVE: To describe a new technique of frameless SEEG and report a prospective case series at a single center. METHODS: Image integration and planning of electrode trajectories were performed preoperatively on specialized software and exported to a Medtronic S7 StealthStation. Trajectories were implemented by frameless stereotaxy using percutaneous drilling and bolt insertion. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients went this technique, with the insertion of 187 intracerebral electrodes. Of 187 electrodes, 175 accurately reached their neurophysiological target, as measured by postoperative computed tomography reconstruction and multimodal image integration with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Four electrodes failed to hit their target due to extradural deflection, and 3 were subsequently resited satisfactorily. Eight electrodes were off target by a mean of 3.6 mm (range, 0.9-6.8 mm) due to a combination of errors in bolt trajectory implementation and bending of the electrode. There was 1 postoperative hemorrhage that was clinically asymptomatic and no postoperative infections. Sixteen patients were offered definitive cortical resections, and 6 patients were excluded from resective surgery. CONCLUSION: Frameless SEEG is a novel and safe method for implementing SEEG and is easily translated into clinical practice. ABBREVIATIONS: EA, accuracy of electrode delivery SEEG, stereoelectroencephalography PMID:25161004

  16. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  17. Radiochemotherapy With Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil After Transurethral Surgery in Patients With Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian . E-mail: Christian.Weiss@strahlen.med.uni-erlangen.de; Engehausen, Dirk G.; Krause, Frens S.; Papadopoulos, Thomas; Dunst, Juergen; Sauer, Rolf; Roedel, Claus

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To give an update on the long-term outcome of an intensified protocol of combined radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin after initial transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) with selective organ preservation in bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twelve patients with muscle-invading or high-risk T1 (G3, associated Tis, multifocality, diameter >5 cm) bladder cancer were enrolled in a protocol of TURBT followed by concurrent cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day as 30-min infusion) and 5-FU (600 mg/m{sup 2}/day as 120-h continuous infusion), administered on Days 1-5 and 29-33 of radiotherapy. Response to treatment was evaluated by restaging TURBT 4-6 weeks after RCT. In case of invasive residual tumor or recurrence, salvage cystectomy was recommended. Results: Ninety-nine patients (88.4%) had no detectable tumor at restaging TURBT; 71 patients (72%) have been continuously free from local recurrence or distant metastasis. Superficial relapse occurred in 13 patients and muscle-invasive recurrence in 11 patients. Overall and cause-specific survival rates for all patients were 74% and 82% at 5 years, respectively. Of all surviving patients, 82% maintained their own bladder, 79% of whom were delighted or pleased with their urinary condition. Hematologic Grade 3/4 toxicity occurred in 23%/6% and Grade 3 diarrhea in 21% of patients. One patient required salvage cystectomy due to a shrinking bladder. Conclusion: Concurrent RCT with 5-FU/cisplatin has been associated with acceptable acute and long-term toxicity. Overall and cause-specific survival rates are encouraging. More than 80% of patients preserved their well-functioning bladder.

  18. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  19. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Effect of 131I ‘clear residual thyroid tissue’ after surgery on the function of parathyroid gland in differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHI-HUA; LI, FENG-QI; HAN, JIAN-KUI; LI, XIAN-JUN

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignant tumor of the endocrine glands. Although surgery is the optimal treatment utilized, the disease is characterized by recurrence and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of iodine-131 (131I) ‘clear residual thyroid tissue’ following surgery on the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and its effect on the function of the parathyroid gland. A total of 160 patients diagnosed with DTC, who were consecutively admitted to our Hospital between June 2012 and June 2014 and underwent total thyroidectomy or subtotal resection, were included in the present study. After three months, the patients were administered 131I ‘clear residual thyroid tissue’ treatment and underwent a whole body scan after 1 week to determine whether ‘clear residual thyroid tissue’ treatment was successful or not. The treatment was repeated within 3 months if not successful. Of the 160 patients, 24 patients had cancer metastasis (15.0%). The average dose of 131I used for the first time was 6.4+1.2 GBq and the treatment was successful in 66 cases (41.3%). The average treatment time was 2.8±0.6 therapy sessions. The results showed that, prior to and following the first treatment and at the end of the follow up, levels of the parathyroid hormone, serum calcium and phosphorus were compared, and no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) was observed. There were 5 patients with persistent hypothyroidism and 8 patients with transient hypothyroidism. The levels of thyroglobulin were significantly decreased, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). A total of 48 patients (30%) with hypothyroidism were identified. In conclusion, the results have shown that DTC resection and 131I ‘clear residual thyroid tissue’ treatment did not significantly impair the parathyroid function, thereby improving the treatment effect. PMID:26668598

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jun-Gi; Cho, Hyun Min; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

  3. [Progress of the laparoscopic colorectal surgery with special consideration regarding cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Buchmann, P; Dinçler, S

    2006-04-26

    The development of laparoscopic surgery began with the diagnostic coelioscopy in 1901 and the first appendectomy in 1983. Its worldwide spread started in 1987 with the cholecystectomy. Four years later the right hemicolectomy and sigmoid resection were also described. The initial euphoria however evaporated when the first reports of port-site-metastasis appeared. The controversy whether one should be allowed or not to operate carcinomas laparoscopically, provoked a boom in research with as result that in 2000 it had been confirmed that the incidence of port-site-metastasis was about the same as drain-site-metastasis after open procedures (0.9%). Randomized studies comparing laparoscopic interventions and open surgery showed no difference in the long-term results of colon-carcinoma. For experienced surgeons this is also the case for rectum-carcinoma. Hereby the learning curve is of great importance and has been put at 30 to 70 procedures, taken into account the duration of the operation or other criteria such as conversion to open surgery and complications. With growing experience the amount of material used during an operation goes down, which results in a lower overall cost of the minimal-invasive technique compared with open surgery. In cost calculations one should also take into account the fact that the recovery time and the return to every-day life is generally quicker for patients after laparoscopic surgery while overall they also have a significant better quality of life score (SF-36) in the longer term. Currently, i.e. in 2006 the laparoscopic colorectal surgery has become an established procedure. It is thought that laparoscopic interventions give additional advantages because the immune system is less affected but this must still be confirmed through research. PMID:16686322

  4. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  5. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5 values, and absolute and relative V5 values in male vs. female patients. Pearson correlation analysis was used to determine correlations between dosimetric factors. Results: Eighteen (16.4%) of the 110 patients developed postoperative pulmonary complications. Two of these died of progressive pneumonia. Hospitalizations were significantly longer for patients with postoperative pulmonary complications than for those without (median, 15 days vs. 11 days, p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, female gender (p = 0.017), higher mean lung dose (p = 0.036), higher relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy (V5) (p = 0.023), and smaller volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5-35 Gy (VS5-VS35) (p < 0.05) were all significantly associated with an increased incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. No other clinical factors were significantly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort. On multivariate analysis, the volume of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5) was the only significant independent factor associated with postoperative pulmonary complications (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Dosimetric factors but not clinical factors were found to be strongly associated with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation plus surgery. The volume of the lung spared from doses of {>=}5 Gy was the only independent dosimetric factor in multivariate analysis. This suggests that ensuring an adequate volume of lung unexposed to radiation might reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications.

  6. Complementary and Alternative Methods and Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer treatment are there? Why are complementary and alternative therapies harder to evaluate? What are the risks of ... treatment? Can I safely use an alternative or complementary therapy? Will my insurance cover alternative and complementary therapies? ...

  7. [Foreskin surgery].

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Maija; Taskinen, Seppo; Ossi, Lindell

    2010-01-01

    Balanitis, phimosis and foreskin adhesions are common indications for foreskin surgery during childhood. In phimosis, the foreskin cannot be drawn behind the glans penis because of the narrow external opening of the former. It is important to be able to distinguish between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, since their treatment is different. In adulthood, the need for surgery can be caused by phimosis, a difficult sequel of paraphimosis, recurrent inflammations of the glans penis and foreskin, diseases and cancers of the skin as well as difficulties at intercourse due to the shortness of the frenulum of the prepuce of the penis. PMID:20405611

  8. PERSPECTIVE Inside the box New method for breast cancer imaging

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xudong

    that shapes the world Badger Engineers · Field reports: Mark Scheuer and MattYounkle, in their own words1 PERSPECTIVE Inside the box New method for breast cancer imaging COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY for breast cancer imaging better tailored to women with a particularly high risk factor. By

  9. A mixed methods assessment of coping with pediatric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alderfer, Melissa A.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Marsac, Meghan L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child coping and parent coping assistance with cancer-related stressors during treatment. Fifteen children (aged 6-12) with cancer and their parents (N = 17) completed semi-structured interviews and self-report measures to assess coping and coping assistance. Results suggest families utilized a broad array of approach and avoidance strategies to manage cancer and its treatment. Quantitative and qualitative assessments provided complementary and unique contributions to understanding coping among children with cancer and their parents. Using a mixed methods approach to assess coping provides a richer understanding of families’ experiences, which can better inform clinical practice. PMID:24428250

  10. Overall Survival Is Impacted by Birthplace and Not Extent of Surgery in Asian Americans with Resectable Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirchoff, Daniel D; Deutsch, Gary B; Fujita, Manabu; Lee, David Y; Sim, Myung Shin; Lee, Ji Hey; Bilchik, Anton J

    2015-11-01

    Survival from gastric cancer in the USA still lags behind Asia. Genetic, environmental, and tumor biology differences, along with extent of surgery have been implicated. Our aim was to evaluate survival outcomes in Asian-American gastric cancer patients undergoing surgical resection by comparing place of birth and clinicopathologic characteristics (including evaluation of 15 lymph nodes).The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried to identify patients treated surgically for gastric cancer with curative intent in the USA (2000-2010). US-born versus foreign-born Asian-American patients were analyzed for survival. Secondary comparison was made to non-Asian patients. Stage IV and non-surgical patients were excluded. Of 10,089 patients identified, 1467 patients were Asian: 271 were born in the USA, and 1196 were born outside the USA. Median survival was 32 months for non-Asians and 29 months for US-born Asians versus 61 months for Asian immigrants (p?

  11. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  12. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion.

    PubMed

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-11-27

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  13. Anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery: The role of blood perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rutegård, Martin; Rutegård, Jörgen

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer remains a common and often devastating complication. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been studied extensively and are used for patient selection, especially whether to perform a diverting stoma or not. From the current literature, data suggest that perfusion in the rectal stump rather than in the colonic limb may be more important for the integrity of the colorectal anastomosis. Moreover, available research suggests that the mid and upper rectum is considerably more vascularized than the lower part, in which the posterior compartment seems most vulnerable. These data fit neatly with the observation that anastomotic leaks are far more frequent in patients undergoing total compared to partial mesorectal excision, and also that most leaks occur dorsally. Clinical judgment has been shown to ineffectively assess anastomotic viability, while promising methods to measure blood perfusion are evolving. Much interest has recently been turned to near-infrared light technology, enhanced with fluorescent agents, which enables intraoperative perfusion assessment. Preliminary data are promising, but large-scale controlled trials are lacking. With maturation of such technology, perfusion measurements may in the future inform the surgeon whether anastomoses are at risk. In high colorectal anastomoses, anastomotic revision might be feasible, while a diverting stoma could be fashioned selectively instead of routinely for low anastomoses. PMID:26649151

  14. Optimal cytoreductive surgery for underlying ovarian cancer associated with deep venous thrombosis without placement of inferior vena cava filter: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, HONGWEI; SHANG, JIANHONG; NIU, GANG; LIU, JUN; YOU, ZESHAN; HE, SHANYANG

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer associated with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is an uncommon, potentially life-threatening condition. The primary therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this condition is up-front primary cytoreductive surgery, with placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter prior to surgery to prevent fatal pulmonary embolism. The present study describes the case of a 49-year-old female, who presented with DVT unresponsive to anticoagulant therapy in the lower extremities prior to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. During the search for the underlying malignancy, transvaginal sonography (TVS) revealed a cystic solid mass in the pelvic cavity. Subsequently, the patient underwent up-front primary cytoreductive surgery without placement of a preoperative IVC filter, followed by six cycles of chemotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma stage IIIC, complicated by DVT, and had survived >3 years without relapse at the time of completion of the present study. The successful outcome of the present case demonstrated that occult primary cancer should be suspected in patients with DVT unresponsive to anticoagulant therapy. The present study also indicated that up-front primary cytoreductive surgery without placement of an IVC filter represents an effective potential strategy for the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer associated with DVT, as the thrombus strongly adheres to the vessel wall following organization. PMID:26622893

  15. Using endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy singular tissue plural tissues in organ-preserving surgery of laryngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulbakin, D. E.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Gynter, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    Our study has demonstrated feasibility of performing larynx preservation surgeries in patients with recurrent laryngeal cancer after failure of radiotherapy. The technique of combined laryngeal reconstruction with endografts from superelastic titanium-nickelid-based alloy Singular tissue Plural tissues results in improvement of life quality by preserving laryngeal functions.

  16. An association between preoperative anemia and decreased survival in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery alone

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Kwok, Young; Krasna, Mark; Bangalore, Madan; Suntharalingam, Mohan . E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for patients presenting with Stage I and II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite optimal staging and surgery, these patients are still at significant risk for failure. The purpose of this study is to report a retrospective analysis of the outcome of patients treated with surgery alone, as well as to analyze prognostic factors associated with survival. Materials and Methods: From May 2000 to November 2002, there was a total of 125 patients who were treated with surgery for NSCLC at University of Maryland Medical Center. Of these, 82 Stage I and II patients who received surgery alone as the definitive therapy were identified. The median age of the entire cohort was 68 years (range, 43-88 years). There were 48 males and 34 females. Sixty-three patients (76.8%) underwent lobectomies whereas 19 patients (23.2%) underwent nonlobectomy (wedge resection or segmentectomy) procedures. Patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy were excluded from the study. Factors included in univariate and multivariate analyses were age, sex, tumor histology, pathologic stage, p53 status, preoperative hemoglobin (Hgb), and type of surgery performed. Endpoints of the study were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Median follow-up was 20.8 months (range, 0.4-43.2 months). For the entire cohort, the 2-year RFS was 66.0% and 2-year OS was 76.3%. Median survival for the entire cohort has not been achieved. In univariate analysis, the only factor that achieved statistical significance was preoperative Hgb level. Patients who had preoperative Hgb <12 mg/dL experienced significantly worse RFS (mean RFS: 26.6 months vs. 34.9 months, p = 0.043) and OS (median OS: 27 months vs. 42.5 months, p = 0.011). For Stage I patients (n = 72), the 2-year RFS and OS were 66.4% and 77.1%, respectively. In the subgroup of stage IA patients (n = 37), there was a trend toward decreased overall survival in the anemic patients (2-year OS of 65.6% vs. 90.9%, p = 0.07). For Stage II patients (n = 10), the 2-year RFS and OS were 60.0% and 66.7%. In the Cox multivariate regression analysis, the only factor that achieved statistical significance was preoperative Hgb, with patients with Hgb <12 mg/dL having decreased RFS (RR 4.1, p = 0.020) and OS (RR 2.9, p = 0.026). There was a trend toward worse RFS (p = 0.056) and OS (p = 0.068) in p53-negative patients (n = 39). Stage, histologic type, type of surgery performed, age, and sex did not affect outcome. Conclusions: In our cohort of mostly Stage I NSCLC patients treated with surgery only, preoperative Hgb <12 mg/dL predicted for worse outcome. This effect was observed even in the traditionally low-risk subgroup of completely resected stage IA patients. Much has been written in the literature about anemia causing possible worsening of tumor hypoxia within solid tumors, thereby increasing radio-resistance. This has been a popular argument to explain poorer outcomes of anemic patients with solid tumors who undergo radiotherapy. However, our data suggest that anemia may be a sign of a more aggressive tumor that is at an increased risk of failure independent of the treatment modality.

  17. Is bariatric surgery an option for women with gynecologic cancer? Examining weight loss counseling practices and training among gynecologic oncology providers?

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Robert; McCann, Georgia A.; Carpenter, Kristen M.; Cohn, David E.; Noria, Sabrena; Mikami, Dean; Needleman, Bradley J.; O’Malley, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate gynecologic oncology provider (GOP) practices regarding weight loss (WL) counseling, and to assess their willingness to initiate weight loss interventions, specifically bariatric surgery (WLS). Methods Members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology were invited to complete an online survey of 49 items assessing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to WL counseling. Results A total of 454 participants initiated the survey, yielding a response rate of 30%. The majority of respondents (85%) were practicing GOP or fellows. A majority of responders reported that >50% of their patient population is clinically obese (BMI ? 30). Only 10% reported having any formal training in WL counseling, most often in medical school or residency. Providers who feel adequate about WL counseling were more likely to offer multiple WL options to their patients (p < .05). Over 90% of responders believe that WLS is an effective WL option and is more effective than self-directed diet and medical management of obesity. Providers who were more comfortable with WL counseling were significantly more likely to recommend WLS (p < .01). Approximately 75% of respondents expressed interest in clinical trials evaluating WLS in obese cancer survivors. Conclusions The present study suggests that GOP appreciate the importance of WL counseling, but often fail to provide it. Our results demonstrate the paucity of formal obesity training in oncology. Providers seem willing to recommend WLS as an option to their patients but also in clinical trials examining gynecologic cancer outcomes in women treated with BS. PMID:24933102

  18. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival in patients with T-4 or N+ rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy, surgery, and intraoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Cortes, Javier; Garcia-Sabrido, Jose L.; Gomez-Espi, Marina; Valle, Emilio del; Munoz-Jimenez, Fernando; Alvarez, Emilio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Fluoropyrimidine-radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with preoperative radiotherapy have proven to induce tumor and nodal downstaging effects, sphincter preservation promotion, and mid-term favorable survival rates. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy may improve pelvic control in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer stages. Potential predictive factors for response and disease-free survival, with intense local multidisciplinary approach, are analyzed. Methods and Materials: One hundred fifteen patients with rectal cancer were treated with oral 5-fluorouracil or Tegafur with preoperative radiotherapy, surgery, and intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy to identify potential pre- and on-treatment characteristics that might be of prognostic value for disease outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: Older patients and those treated with Tegafur were more likely to achieve a major histologic response, categorized as persistence of minimal residual microscopic disease foci in the surgical specimen ('mic' response). Factors unfavorably associated with disease-free survival in the multivariate model were male gender and persistence of macroscopic disease in the rectal wall ('mac' response). Accordingly, 3-year disease-free survival rates in the groups of patients with 0, 1, or 2 of these risk factors were 100%, 81%, and 53%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Females with an intense pathologic response (pT{sub mic} residue) to preoperative chemoradiotherapy have an excellent 3-year disease-free survival. This information might be of interest for stratification of patients in the development of adjuvant treatment trials.

  19. NIM: A Node Influence Based Method for Cancer Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Yang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    The classification of different cancer types owns great significance in the medical field. However, the great majority of existing cancer classification methods are clinical-based and have relatively weak diagnostic ability. With the rapid development of gene expression technology, it is able to classify different kinds of cancers using DNA microarray. Our main idea is to confront the problem of cancer classification using gene expression data from a graph-based view. Based on a new node influence model we proposed, this paper presents a novel high accuracy method for cancer classification, which is composed of four parts: the first is to calculate the similarity matrix of all samples, the second is to compute the node influence of training samples, the third is to obtain the similarity between every test sample and each class using weighted sum of node influence and similarity matrix, and the last is to classify each test sample based on its similarity between every class. The data sets used in our experiments are breast cancer, central nervous system, colon tumor, prostate cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lung cancer. experimental results showed that our node influence based method (NIM) is more efficient and robust than the support vector machine, K-nearest neighbor, C4.5, naive Bayes, and CART. PMID:25180045

  20. Wait-and-see or radical surgery for rectal cancer patients with a clinical complete response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Hao; Yin, Jie; Liu, Sai; Hu, Junjie; Du, Feng; Yuan, Jiatian; Lv, Bo; Fan, Jun; Leng, Shusheng; Zhang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    A wait-and-see policy might be considered instead of surgery for rectal cancer patients with no residual tumor or involved lymph nodes on imaging or endoscopy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (clinical complete response, cCR). In this cohort study, we compared the oncologic outcomes of rectal cancer patients with a cCR who were managed according to a wait-and-see policy (observation group) or with surgery (surgery group). In the observation group, follow-up was performed every 3 months for the first year and consisted of MRI, endoscopy with biopsy, computed tomography and transrectal ultrasonography. In the surgery group, patients received radical surgery. Long-term oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Thirty patients were enrolled in the observation group (median follow-up, 60 months; range, 18-100 months), and 92 patients were enrolled in the surgery group (median follow-up, 58 months; range, 18-109 months). The 5-year disease free survival and overall survival rates were similar in the two groups: 90.0% vs. 94.3% (P = 0.932) and 100.0% vs. 95.6% (P = 0.912), respectively. We conclude that for rectal cancer patients with a cCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, a wait-and-see policy with strict selection criteria, follow-up and salvage treatments achieves outcomes at least as good as radical surgery. Additionally, we declare that the pCR (pathologic complete regression) and non-pCR subgroups of patients with a cCR have similar long-term failure (local recurrence and/or distant metastasis) rate. PMID:26472284

  1. Natural History of Brain Function, Quality of Life, and Seizure Control in Patients With Brain Tumor Who Have Undergone Surgery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This trial studies the natural history of brain function, quality of life, and seizure control in patients with brain tumor who have undergone surgery. Learning about brain function, quality of life, and seizure control in patients with brain tumor who have undergone surgery may help doctors learn more about the disease and find better methods of treatment and on-going care.

  2. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOEpatents

    Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

    2007-05-08

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  3. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-21

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  6. New "Fluid Biopsy" Detects Cancer Without Surgery | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first step in treating cancer is characterizing an individual’s tumor, and for most cancers that means going under the surgeon’s knife and having the tumor or a piece of it removed and sent for examination by a pathologist. Because surgical biopsies are highly invasive, they are only very rarely repeated and so they only provide a single snapshot of a patient’s cancer at the moment that the tumor or piece of tissue is removed from the patient’s body for initial characterization.

  7. Effect of a genomic classifier test on clinical practice decisions for patients with high-risk prostate cancer after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Badani, Ketan K; Thompson, Darby J; Brown, Gordon; Holmes, Daniel; Kella, Naveen; Albala, David; Singh, Amar; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Hornberger, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of a genomic classifier (GC) test for predicting metastasis risk after radical prostatectomy (RP) on urologists' decision-making about adjuvant treatment of patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Subjects and Methods Patient case history was extracted from the medical records of each of the 145 patients with pT3 disease or positive surgical margins (PSMs) after RP treated by six high-volume urologists, from five community practices. GC results were available for 122 (84%) of these patients. US board-certified urologists (n = 107) were invited to provide adjuvant treatment recommendations for 10 cases randomly drawn from the pool of patient case histories. For each case, the study participants were asked to make an adjuvant therapy recommendation without (clinical variables only) and with knowledge of the GC test results. Recommendations were made without knowledge of other participants' responses and the presentation of case histories was randomised to minimise recall bias. Results A total of 110 patient case histories were available for review by the study participants. The median patient age was 62 years, 71% of patients had pT3 disease and 63% had PSMs. The median (range) 5-year predicted probability of metastasis by the GC test for the cohort was 3.9 (1–33)% and the GC test classified 72% of patients as having low risk for metastasis. A total of 51 urologists consented to the study and provided 530 adjuvant treatment recommendations without, and 530 with knowledge of the GC test results. Study participants performed a mean of 130 RPs/year and 55% were from community-based practices. Without GC test result knowledge, observation was recommended for 57% (n = 303), adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for 36% (n = 193) and other treatments for 7% (n = 34) of patients. Overall, 31% (95% CI: 27–35%) of treatment recommendations changed with knowledge of the GC test results. Of the ART recommendations without GC test result knowledge, 40% (n = 77) changed to observation (95% CI: 33–47%) with this knowledge. Of patients recommended for observation, 13% (n = 38 [95% CI: 9–17%]) were changed to ART with knowledge of the GC test result. Patients with low risk disease according to the GC test were recommended for observation 81% of the time (n = 276), while of those with high risk, 65% were recommended for treatment (n = 118; P < 0.001). Treatment intensity was strongly correlated with the GC-predicted probability of metastasis (P < 0.001) and the GC test was the dominant risk factor driving decisions in multivariable analysis (odds ratio 8.6, 95% CI: 5.3–14.3%; P < 0.001). Conclusions Knowledge of GC test results had a direct effect on treatment strategies after surgery. Recommendations for observation increased by 20% for patients assessed by the GC test to be at low risk of metastasis, whereas recommendations for treatment increased by 16% for patients at high risk of metastasis. These results suggest that the implementation of genomic testing in clinical practice may lead to significant changes in adjuvant therapy decision-making for high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:24784420

  8. PERSISTENT BREAST PAIN FOLLOWING BREAST CANCER SURGERY IS ASSOCIATED WITH PERSISTENT SENSORY CHANGES, PAIN INTERFERENCE, AND FUNCTIONAL IMPAIRMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Dale J.; Paul, Steven M.; West, Claudia; Levine, Jon D.; Hamolsky, Deborah; Elboim, Charles; Schmidt, Brian L.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Abrams, Gary; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Inter-individual variability exists in persistent breast pain following breast cancer surgery. Recently, we used growth mixture modeling to identify three subgroups of women (n=398) with distinct persistent breast pain trajectories over six months following surgery (i.e., Mild, Moderate, Severe). Purposes of this study were to identify demographic and clinical characteristics that differed among the breast pain classes and, using linear mixed effects modeling, determine how changes over time, in sensitivity in the breast scar area, pain qualities, pain interference, and hand and arm function differed among these classes. Several demographic and clinical characteristics differentiated the breast pain classes. Of note, 60% to 80% of breast scar sites tested were much less sensitive than the unaffected breast. Significant group effects were observed for pain qualities and interference scores, such that, on average, women in the Severe Pain class reported higher scores than women in the Moderate Pain class. In addition, women in the Moderate Pain class reported higher scores than women in the Mild Pain class. Compared to the Mild Pain class, women in the Severe Pain class had significantly impaired grip strength and women in the Moderate and Severe Pain classes had impaired flexion and abduction. PMID:25439318

  9. CPI-613 and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Effect of melatonin on depressive symptoms and anxiety in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa V; Andersen, Lærke T; Madsen, Michael T; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars S; Bokmand, Susanne; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances are known problems in patients with breast cancer. The effect of melatonin as an antidepressant in humans with cancer has not been investigated. We investigated whether melatonin could lower the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer in a three-month period after surgery and assessed the effect of melatonin on subjective parameters: anxiety, sleep, general well-being, fatigue, pain and sleepiness. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial undertaken from July 2011 to December 2012 at a department of breast surgery in Copenhagen, Denmark. Women, 30-75 years, undergoing surgery for breast cancer and without signs of depression on Major Depression Inventory (MDI) were included 1 week before surgery and received 6 mg oral melatonin or placebo for 3 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of depressive symptoms measured by MDI. The secondary outcomes were area under the curve (AUC) for the subjective parameters. 54 patients were randomized to melatonin (n = 28) or placebo (n = 26) and 11 withdrew from the study (10 placebo group and 1 melatonin group, P = 0.002). The risk of developing depressive symptoms was significantly lower with melatonin than with placebo (3 [11 %] of 27 vs. 9 [45 %] of 20; relative risk 0.25 [95 % CI 0.077-0.80]), giving a NNT of 3.0 [95 % CI 1.7-11.0]. No significant differences were found between AUC for the subjective parameters. No differences in side effects were found (P = 0.78). Melatonin significantly reduced the risk of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer during a three-month period after surgery. PMID:24756186

  11. Priorities for development of research methods in occupational cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Elizabeth M; Schulte, Paul A; Bayard, Steve; Blair, Aaron; Brandt-Rauf, Paul; Butler, Mary Ann; Dankovic, David; Hubbs, Ann F; Jones, Carol; Karstadt, Myra; Kedderis, Gregory L; Melnick, Ronald; Redlich, Carrie A; Rothman, Nathaniel; Savage, Russell E; Sprinker, Michael; Toraason, Mark; Weston, Ainsley; Olshan, Andrew F; Stewart, Patricia; Zahm, Sheila Hoar

    2003-01-01

    Occupational cancer research methods was identified in 1996 as 1 of 21 priority research areas in the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA). To implement NORA, teams of experts from various sectors were formed and given the charge to further define research needs and develop strategies to enhance or augment research in each priority area. This article is a product of that process. Focus on occupational cancer research methods is important both because occupational factors play a significant role in a number of cancers, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality, and also because occupational cohorts (because of higher exposure levels) often provide unique opportunities to evaluate health effects of environmental toxicants and understand the carcinogenic process in humans. Despite an explosion of new methods for cancer research in general, these have not been widely applied to occupational cancer research. In this article we identify needs and gaps in occupational cancer research methods in four broad areas: identification of occupational carcinogens, design of epidemiologic studies, risk assessment, and primary and secondary prevention. Progress in occupational cancer will require interdisciplinary research involving epidemiologists, industrial hygienists, toxicologists, and molecular biologists. PMID:12524210

  12. Evaluation of a cholecystokinin 2 receptor-targeted near-infrared dye for fluorescence-guided surgery of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wayua, Charity; Low, Philip S

    2014-02-01

    Surgical resection of malignant disease remains one of the most effective tools for treating cancer. Tumor-targeted near-infrared dyes have the potential to improve contrast between normal and malignant tissues, thereby enabling surgeons to more quantitatively resect malignant disease. Because the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R and its tumor-specific splice variant CCK2i4svR) is overexpressed in cancers of the lungs, colon, thyroid, pancreas, and stomach, but absent or inaccessible to parenterally administered drugs in most normal tissues, we have undertaken to design a targeting ligand that can deliver attached near-infrared dyes to CCK2R+ tumors. We report here the synthesis and biological characterization of a CCK2R-targeted conjugate of the near-infrared dye, LS-288 (CRL-LS288). We demonstrate that CRL-LS288 binds selectively to CCK2R+ cancer cells with low nanomolar affinity (Kd = 7 × 10(-9) M). We further show that CRL-LS288 localizes primarily to CCK2R-expressing HEK 293 murine tumor xenografts and that dye uptake in these xenografts is significantly reduced when CCK2R are blocked by preinjection of excess ligand (CRL) or when mice are implanted with CCK2R-negative tumors. Because CRL-LS288 is also found to reveal the locations of distant tumor metastases, we suggest that CRL-LS288 has the potential to facilitate intraoperative identification of malignant disease during a variety of cancer debulking surgeries. PMID:24325469

  13. Chemoradiation May Help Some Patients with Bladder Cancer Avoid Radical Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that adding chemotherapy to radiation therapy as a treatment for bladder cancer may reduce the risk of a recurrence more than radiation alone, without causing a substantial increase in side effects.

  14. [Nursing care in reconstructive surgery in cases of head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Ben Saad, Majda; Spindler, Charlotte; Tidière, Mélanie; Wagner, Valérie; Wintz, Lydie

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract favours an organ- and function- preserving surgical approach. The nursing care draws on multiple skills, on both a technical and educational level, in order to assure global patient management. PMID:26369744

  15. Isolated port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Falbo, Angela; Oppedisano, Rosamaria; Russo, Tiziana; Zullo, Fulvio

    2011-01-01

    ? Isolated port-site metastasis is a rare event after laparoscopy in the surgical staging of endometrial cancer. ? More aggressive strategies in case of potentially increased risk for port-site metastasis are needed. PMID:24371603

  16. An albumin-based theranostic nano-agent for dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy to inhibit lymphatic metastasis of cancer post surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Wang, Xin; He, Jingkang; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-11-01

    A large variety of cancers are associated with a high incidence of lymph node metastasis, which leads to a high risk of cancer death. Herein, we demonstrate that multimodal imaging guided photothermal therapy can inhibit tumor metastasis after surgery by burning the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) with metastatic tumor cells. A near-infrared dye, IR825, is absorbed onto human serum albumin (HSA), which is covalently linked with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) molecules to chelate gadolinium. The formed HSA-Gd-IR825 nanocomplex exhibits strong fluorescence together with high near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and in the mean time could serve as a T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In vivo bi-modal fluorescence and MR imaging uncovers that HSA-Gd-IR825 after being injected into the primary tumor would quickly migrate into tumor-associated SLNs through lymphatic circulation. Utilizing the strong NIR absorbance of HSA-Gd-IR825, SLNs with metastatic cancer cells can be effectively ablated under exposure to a NIR laser. Such treatment when combined with surgery to remove the primary tumor offers remarkable therapeutic outcomes in greatly inhibiting further metastatic spread of cancer cells and prolonging animal survival. Our work presents an albumin-based theranostic nano-probe with functions of multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy, together with a 'photothermal ablation assisted surgery' strategy, promising for future clinical cancer treatment. PMID:25132606

  17. Hysteroscopic surgery for conservative management in endometrial cancer: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Sonsoles; Castellanos, Teresa; Lapuente, Fernando; Chiva, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecologic malignancy, usually diagnosed in postmenopausal women. However, an incidence rate of 2–14% of cases consisting of women under the age of 45 years old has been reported. Multiple reports have described the conservative treatment of this tumour in selected patients with the objective of preserving fertility. In this article, we review the literature to evaluate the results of conservative treatment of endometrial cancer with hysteroscopic resection. PMID:25729418

  18. Palliative Surgery for Rare Cases of Anterior Urethral Metastasis in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Gómez, Enrique; Carrasco Aznar, Jose Carlos; Moreno Rodríguez, Maria del Mar; Valero Rosa, José; Requena Tapia, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Penis metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare, and its management varies from case to case as there are very few cases reported in the literature. We describe a patient with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy who presented with urethral bleeding as a symptom of anterior urethral metastasis during followup. We propose a way to manage this and review the literature. PMID:25161796

  19. Clinical feasibility and efficacy of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) anatomical resection in patients with central lung cancer: a comparison with thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee Suk; Choi, Se Hoon; Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung Il

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomical pulmonary resection in patients with central lung cancer. Methods Between July 2004 and December 2011, 465 patients underwent anatomical pulmonary resection and systematic mediastinal lymph node sampling or dissection for central lung cancer. Because patients were not randomized to receive VATS, clinical outcomes were compared using a propensity score matching design, giving 88 patients in each group. Results A lobectomy was attempted in 69 patients of the thoracotomy group and 64 of the VATS group, bilobectomy in 19 patients of the thoracotomy group and 21 of the VATS group, and segmentectomy in 3 patients of the VATS group. There were no differences in the anatomical distribution of pulmonary resections between the two groups. There was no operation related in-hospital mortality. There were 34 postoperative complications in 30 patients, without significant differences between the two groups. The median hospital stay and chest tube indwelling period of the VATS group were shorter than those of the thoracotomy group by 2 days and 1 day, respectively (P<0.05). During a median follow-up of 32.5 months (range, 0.5-95.8 months), there was no difference between the two groups in 3-year recurrence-free or overall survivals (OS). Conclusions VATS anatomical pulmonary resection is safe and feasible for central lung cancer, providing a low operative mortality and favorable outcomes in selected patients. Further case studies with long-term outcome data are necessary to verify our conclusions.

  20. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  1. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will also be used to monitor your cancer after treatment. ... the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical ... or after other treatments. If prostate cancer spreads even after ...

  2. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  3. Extension of D-H parameter method to hybrid manipulators used in robot-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanpreet; Singla, Ashish; Soni, Sanjeev

    2015-10-01

    The main focus of this work is to extend the applicability of D-H parameter method to develop a kinematic model of a hybrid manipulator. A hybrid manipulator is a combination of open- and closed-loop chains and contains planar and spatial links. It has been found in the literature that D-H parameter method leads to ambiguities, when dealing with closed-loop chains. In this work, it has been observed that the D-H parameter method, when applied to a hybrid manipulator, results in an orientational inconsistency, because of which the method cannot be used to develop the kinematic model. In this article, the concept of dummy frames is proposed to resolve the orientational inconsistency and to develop the kinematic model of a hybrid manipulator. Moreover, the prototype of 7-degree-of-freedom hybrid manipulator, known as a surgeon-side manipulator to assist the surgeon during a medical surgery, is also developed to validate the kinematic model derived in this work. PMID:26333984

  4. Serum HE4, CA125, YKL-40, bcl-2, cathepsin-L and prediction optimal debulking surgery, response to chemotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most important prognostic factor in the ovarian cancer is optimal cytoreduction. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy, an only optional method of treatment in this case and is still the subject of debate. The object of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of markers: CA 125, HE4, YKL-40 and bcl-2 as well as cathepsin L in predicting optimal cytoreduction and response to chemotherapy. Methods Sera were secured preoperatively. The division into groups was performed retrospectively depending on the method of treatment (surgery vs neoadjuvant chemotherapy) as well as on response to chemotherapy (sensitive vs resistant vs refractory). Comparisons were made between groups, and the diagnostic usefulness of tested proteins was examined. Results We found that statistically significant differences between primary operated patients and patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were applicable only to the tumour markers (CA125 1206.79 vs 2432.38, p?=?0.000191; HE4 78.87 vs 602.45, p?=?0.000004; YKL-40 108.13 vs 203.96, p?=?0.003991). Cathepsin-L and Bcl-2 were statistically insignificant. The cut-off point values were determined for the CA 125 (345 mIU/ml), HE4 (218.43 pmol/L) and YKL-40 (140.9 ng/ml). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were as follows: CA125 (83.3%; 75%; 80.6%; 78.3%), HE4 (86.6%; 91.3%; 92.9%; 84%) and YKL-40 (75%; 83.3%; 84%; 74.1%). Conclusion Among the tested proteins the HE4 marker appears to be helpful in forecasting of optimal cytoreduction and possibly also of the prediction of response to platinum analogues used in first-line treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25018782

  5. The effect of a care program on pain intensity of cancer patients who underwent surgery and hospitalized in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud; Dehgani, Somayeh; Eghbali, Maryam; Daryabeigi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most frequent issues nurses encounter with after or during cancer-related surgeries is pain. For postoperative pain relief, different nonpharmacologic interventions, such as nurse-patient communication, mental support, preoperative education, and consultation can be used. Doing such interventions may decrease postoperative pain. However, the research results regarding the effect of such measurements on pain intensity is contradictory. So in this research study the effect of a pain management plan on pain intensity after cancer surgery was assessed. Materials and Methods: The present study is a pre- and posttest case and control clinical trial, which was conducted in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Care program consisted of pain education, communication with the patient, and pain measurement. Seventy patients were sampled based on the inclusion criteria and randomly assigned in 2 groups. Data were collected using American Pain Society-patient outcome questionnaire, which measured pain intensity. Results: In the experimental group, the mean score of pain intensity before surgery and in the first 12-24 h after surgery was less than the control group. Also comparing pain intensity mean differences before and in the first 12 h, before and in the first 24 h indicated that the experimental group had lower scores than the control group, but these differences were not statistically significant. In both the groups, in the first 24 h following surgery the mean score of pain intensity decreased significantly. Discussion: Results of the present research study suggested that a nursing pain management program consisting consultation, education, and pain assessment may have a clinical effect on cancer patient pain intensity following surgery. However, these results were not statistically significant. This might be due to the limited sample size as well as conducting the program in a short period of time. It is recommended that effects of such a program on the pain intensity will be examined further with a larger sample and in a longer period of time. PMID:23922580

  6. A novel method for teaching key steps of strabismus surgery in the wet lab.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra A; Wrzosek, James A; Chesnutt, David A; Enyedi, Laura B; Cabrera, Michelle T

    2015-10-01

    The surgical laboratory environment plays an important role in modern surgical education. Learning how to complete the key steps of strabismus surgery prior to actual surgery may enhance efficiency and sensitize the surgeon to potential complications. Cadaveric extraocular muscle is difficult to manipulate and specimens are not readily available; therefore, an alternative is needed to teach strabismus surgery techniques. We developed a wet lab to practice the key steps of strabismus surgery using commercially available bacon as an extraocular muscle substitute and cadaveric pig eyes for conjunctival and scleral tissue in a framework of peer teaching, expert supervision, and validated written feedback. PMID:26486033

  7. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical significance.

  8. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  9. Finite-Element Methods for Real-Time Simulation of Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay

    2003-01-01

    Two finite-element methods have been developed for mathematical modeling of the time-dependent behaviors of deformable objects and, more specifically, the mechanical responses of soft tissues and organs in contact with surgical tools. These methods may afford the computational efficiency needed to satisfy the requirement to obtain computational results in real time for simulating surgical procedures as described in Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery (NPO-21192) on page 31 in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Simulation of the behavior of soft tissue in real time is a challenging problem because of the complexity of soft-tissue mechanics. The responses of soft tissues are characterized by nonlinearities and by spatial inhomogeneities and rate and time dependences of material properties. Finite-element methods seem promising for integrating these characteristics of tissues into computational models of organs, but they demand much central-processing-unit (CPU) time and memory, and the demand increases with the number of nodes and degrees of freedom in a given finite-element model. Hence, as finite-element models become more realistic, it becomes more difficult to compute solutions in real time. In both of the present methods, one uses approximate mathematical models trading some accuracy for computational efficiency and thereby increasing the feasibility of attaining real-time up36 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 date rates. The first of these methods is based on modal analysis. In this method, one reduces the number of differential equations by selecting only the most significant vibration modes of an object (typically, a suitable number of the lowest-frequency modes) for computing deformations of the object in response to applied forces.

  10. Long-term outcomes of risk-reducing surgery in unaffected women at increased familial risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Louise; Butow, Phyllis N; Coll, Joseph; Bullen, Tracey; Wilson, Judy; Baylock, Brandi; Meiser, Bettina; Price, Melanie A

    2015-03-01

    This study prospectively investigated long-term psychosocial outcomes for women who opted for risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) and/or risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). Unaffected women from high-risk breast cancer families who had completed baseline questionnaires for an existing study and subsequently underwent RRM and/or RRSO, completed measures of perceived breast and ovarian cancer risk, anxiety, depression, cancer-related anxiety, body image, sexual functioning, menopausal symptoms, use of hormone replacement therapy and decision regret 3 years post-surgery. Outcomes were compared to age- and risk-matched controls. Participants (N = 233) were 17 women who had RRM (39 controls), 38 women who had RRSO (94 controls) and 15 women who had RRM + RRSO (30 controls). Women who underwent RRM and those who underwent RRM + RRSO reported reductions in perceived breast cancer risk and perceived breast and ovarian cancer risk respectively, compared to their respective controls. RRM women reported greater reductions in cancer-related anxiety compared with both controls and RRSO women. RRSO women reported more sexual discomfort than controls and more urogenital menopausal symptoms than controls and RRM only women. No differences in general anxiety, depression or body image were observed. Regret was associated with greater reductions in body image since surgery and more sexual discomfort, although overall regret levels were low. Women who undergo RRM experience psychological benefits associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Although women who undergo RRSO experience some deterioration in sexual and menopausal symptoms, they do not regret their surgery decision. It is vital that women considering these procedures receive detailed information about potential psychosocial consequences. PMID:25283514

  11. January 2011 Sexual Functioning for Women After Cancer or Prophylactic Surgery

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    diagnosis or a change in body image after prophylactic mastectomy can also change the way we feel about of desire for sex (decreased libido), vaginal dryness or tightness, pain during sex, difficulty reaching climax, or negative thoughts or feelings during sex. These changes may be due to cancer treatments

  12. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  13. A Lethal Sequelae of Spinal Infection Complicating Surgery and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin Cheung; Tsang, Helen Hoi Lun

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have undergone neck dissection and radiotherapy are at risk of cervical spine infections. Furthermore, previous radiotherapy and cervical spine infections can lead to fistula formation to the subarachnoid space and intracranial infection. This report discusses the serious consequences of a missed cervical spine infection including cerebrospinal fluid fistula formation and persistent central nervous system infection, and serves as a reminder to clinicians of the possible association between cervical spine infections and prior head and neck surgery and radiotherapy. In all such cases, the posterior pharyngeal wall should be inspected during follow-up. Despite the appearance of an intracranial infection, the cervical spine should be investigated, especially if the response to appropriate antibiotics is suboptimal. PMID:26240724

  14. A Lethal Sequelae of Spinal Infection Complicating Surgery and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin Cheung; Tsang, Helen Hoi Lun; Luk, Keith Dip Kei

    2015-08-01

    Patients who have undergone neck dissection and radiotherapy are at risk of cervical spine infections. Furthermore, previous radiotherapy and cervical spine infections can lead to fistula formation to the subarachnoid space and intracranial infection. This report discusses the serious consequences of a missed cervical spine infection including cerebrospinal fluid fistula formation and persistent central nervous system infection, and serves as a reminder to clinicians of the possible association between cervical spine infections and prior head and neck surgery and radiotherapy. In all such cases, the posterior pharyngeal wall should be inspected during follow-up. Despite the appearance of an intracranial infection, the cervical spine should be investigated, especially if the response to appropriate antibiotics is suboptimal. PMID:26240724

  15. Depression after surgery for breast cancer. Comparison of mastectomy and lumpectomy.

    PubMed

    van Heeringen, C; Van Moffaert, M; de Cuypere, G

    1989-01-01

    The impact of the loss of the breast in women undergoing surgical treatment for breast cancer is subordinated to the confrontation with the diagnosis of a malignancy in causing depression. The equal distribution of depression in mastectomy and in lumpectomy patients supports the hypothesis that it is the confrontation with the potentially lethal outcome of the diagnosis which is decisive in causing depression. The grief reaction following mastectomy has two components: a depressive reaction to the loss of the breast and an anticipatory grief for anticipation of the potentially lethal outcome. Psychosocial therapeutic support in breast malignancy must give priority to coping with the diagnosis of cancer over the loss of the breast. PMID:2641560

  16. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  17. Prognostic Role of Circulating Tumor Cells during Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Curative Surgery Combined with Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inhestern, Johanna; Oertel, Katrin; Stemmann, Viola; Schmalenberg, Harald; Dietz, Andreas; Rotter, Nicole; Veit, Johannes; Görner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger; Junghanß, Christian; Wittekindt, Claus; Pachmann, Katharina; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Background The prognostic role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) after induction chemotherapy using docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) prior to surgery and adjuvant (chemo)radiation in locally advanced oral squamous cell cancer (OSCC) was evaluated. Methods In this prospective study, peripheral blood samples from 40 patients of the phase II study TISOC-1 (NCT01108042) with OSCC before, during, and after treatment were taken. CTCs were quantified using laser scanning cytometry of anti– epithelial cell adhesion molecule–stained epithelial cells. Their detection was correlated with clinical risk factors, recurrence-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Before starting the treatment CTCs were detected in 32 of 40 patients (80%). The median number at baseline was 3295 CTCs/ml. The median maximal number of CTCs during treatment was 5005 CTCs/ml. There was a significant increase of CTCs before postoperative radiotherapy compared to baseline before 1st cycle of IC (p = 0.011), 2nd cycle of IC (p = 0.001), 3rd cycle of IC (p = 0.004), and before surgery (p = 0.002), but not compared to end of therapy (p = 0.118). CTCs at baseline >median was also associated to risk of recurrence (p = 0.014). Maximal CTCs during therapy >median was more frequently observed in tumors of the oral cavity (p=0.022) and related to higher risk of death during follow-up (p = 0.028). Patients with CTCs at baseline >median value had significant lower RFS than patients with CTCs at baseline median during the complete course of therapy had a significantly lower OS than patients with values surgery, and postoperative (chemo)radiation. PMID:26186556

  18. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  19. Mass segmentation using a combined method for cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death for women all over the world and mammography is thought of as one of the main tools for early detection of breast cancer. In order to detect the breast cancer, computer aided technology has been introduced. In computer aided cancer detection, the detection and segmentation of mass are very important. The shape of mass can be used as one of the factors to determine whether the mass is malignant or benign. However, many of the current methods are semi-automatic. In this paper, we investigate fully automatic segmentation method. Results In this paper, a new mass segmentation algorithm is proposed. In the proposed algorithm, a fully automatic marker-controlled watershed transform is proposed to segment the mass region roughly, and then a level set is used to refine the segmentation. For over-segmentation caused by watershed, we also investigated different noise reduction technologies. Images from DDSM were used in the experiments and the results show that the new algorithm can improve the accuracy of mass segmentation. Conclusions The new algorithm combines the advantages of both methods. The combination of the watershed based segmentation and level set method can improve the efficiency of the segmentation. Besides, the introduction of noise reduction technologies can reduce over-segmentation. PMID:22784625

  20. Prevention of surgery-induced suppression of granulocyte function by intravenous application of a fermented extract from Viscum album L. in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Büssing, Arndt; Bischof, Mechtild; Hatzmann, Wolfgang; Bartsch, Felix; Soto-Vera, Danyl; Fronk, Eva-Maria; Gmeindl, Martin; Stein, Gerburg M

    2005-01-01

    Surgical stress and anaesthetics are able to suppress the immune system. This may accelerate the growth and metastasis of residual cancer cells. As Viscum album L. extracts (VA-E) are known to exert both effects, immunomodulating and apoptosis-inducing properties, a Good-Clinical-Practice-guided, prospective bi-centric phase II study was conducted to measure the influence of a perioperative intravenous application of a VA-E on granulocyte function. In 98 patients with breast cancer, it was shown that a single intravenous application of the standardized VA-E "Iscador M special" in a final concentration of 1 mg/individual prior to surgery prevented the surgery-associated inhibition of the oxidative burst. As no VA-E-related side-effects were observed, this distinct route of application may be a rationale to restrict immunosuppression by surgical stress and anaesthesia. PMID:16334172

  1. Corpus Uteri Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Corpus Uteri C540–C559 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) [SEER Note: Do not code dilation and curettage (D&C) as Surgery of Primary Site for invasive cancers] Codes 00 None; no surgery

  2. A Novel Method for Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy by Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Technique in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sugie, Tomoharu; Kassim, Kassim Abdelazeem; Takeuchi, Megumi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Yamagami, Kazuhiko; Masai, Yoshikazu; Toi, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy using indocyanine green (ICG) technique in 411 patients with early breast cancer at three institutes. ICG, a fluorescence source, and blue dye were injected into the subareolar area to enable real-time image-guided surgery and identification of SLN fluorescence after meticulous dissection. The subcutaneous lymphatic channels were precisely detected in all cases. SLN identification rate was 99% (408/411) with a mean of 2.3 nodes identified per patient. Thirty-nine cases (9.5%) had SLNs involved and all of them were ICG positive. Thus, the ICG technique has a high SLN identification rate comparable with that of the radioisotope method. PMID:24281090

  3. Factors Affecting Use and Delay (?8 Weeks) of Adjuvant Chemotherapy after Colorectal Cancer Surgery and the Impact of Chemotherapy-Use and Delay on Oncologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ik Yong; Kim, Bo Ra; Kim, Young Wan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate factors affecting the use and delay ?8 weeks of adjuvant chemotherapy and the impact of chemotherapy use and delay on survival. Methods Between 2005 and 2012, consecutive patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer who were treated with major curative resection were enrolled. Results Among 750 patients with stage II (n = 318) and III (n = 432) disease, 153 (20.4%) did not receive chemotherapy. Among 597 patients with adjuvant chemotherapy, 31 (5.2%) began chemotherapy 8 weeks or more after surgery. Factors associated with not receiving chemotherapy were: age ?80 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.2), American Society of Anesthesiologists score ?3 (HR = 1.9), underlying cerebrovascular disease (HR = 1.7), stage II disease (HR = 2.0), presence of postoperative complications (HR = 2.2), or intensive care unit admission (HR = 2.4). Factors associated with chemotherapy delay ?8 weeks were: male sex (HR = 4.2), rectal primary cancer (HR = 5.4), or presence of postoperative complications (HR = 2.5). Independent prognostic factors for overall survival included TNM III stage (HR = 2.04) and chemotherapy delay ?8 weeks (HR = 0.39) or <8 weeks (HR = 0.22). Independent prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival were TNM III stage (HR = 2.26) and chemotherapy delay <8 weeks (HR = 0.35). Conclusions Postoperative complications were associated with both lack of and delayed chemotherapy. Timely initiation of chemotherapy, defined as <8 weeks, was a favorable prognostic factor for overall and recurrence-free survival. To increase the proportion of patients receiving chemotherapy and timely initiation of chemotherapy, surgical complications should be minimized after curative resection. PMID:26381146

  4. Prognostic value of tumor shrinkage versus fragmentation following radiochemotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hav, Monirath; Libbrecht, Louis; Geboes, Karen; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Boterberg, Tom; Ceelen, Wim; Pattyn, Piet; Cuvelier, Claude

    2015-05-01

    Most patients with rectal cancer receive neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT), causing a variable decrease in tumor mass. We evaluated the prognostic impact of pathologic parameters reflecting tumor response to RCT, either directly or indirectly. Seventy-six rectal cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant RCT between 2006 and 2009 were included. We studied the association between disease-free survival (DFS) and the "classical" clinicopathologic features as well as tumor deposits, circumferential resection margin (CRM), Dworak regression grade, and tumor and nodal downstaging. Patients with tumor downstaging had a longer DFS (p?=?0.05), indicating a more favorable prognosis when regression was accompanied by a decrease in tumor infiltrative depth, referred to as tumor shrinkage. Moreover, tumor downstaging was significantly associated with larger CRM and nodal downstaging (p?=?0.02), suggesting that shrinkage of the primary tumor was associated with a decreased nodal tumor load. Higher Dworak grade did not correlate with tumor downstaging, nor with higher CRM or prolonged DFS. This implies that tumor mass decrease was sometimes due to fragmentation rather than shrinkage of the primary tumor. Lastly, the presence of tumor deposits was clearly associated with reduced DFS (p?=?0.01). Assessment of tumor shrinkage after RCT via tumor downstaging and CRM is a good way of predicting DFS in rectal cancer, and shrinkage of the primary tumor is associated with a decreased nodal tumor load. Assessing regression based on the amount of tumor in relation to stromal fibrosis does not accurately discern tumor fragmentation from tumor shrinkage, which is most likely the reason why Dworak grade had less prognostic relevance. PMID:25693669

  5. Cetuximab and/or Dasatinib in Patients With Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  6. A noninvasive method for focused ultrasound surgery through the human skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2002-05-01

    A technique for focusing ultrasound through the skull bone is described and verified. The approach is based on a layered wave-vector-frequency domain model, which simulates ultrasound propagation through the skull bone using input from CT scans of the head. The algorithm calculates the driving phase of each element in a transducer array in order to maximize the signal at the intended focus. This approach is tested on ten ex vivo human skulls using a 500-element hemispherical array operated at 0.74 MHz. A stereotaxic reference frame is affixed to the skulls in order to provide accurate registration between the CT images and the transducer. The focal quality is assessed with a hydrophone placed inside of the skull. In each trial the phase correction algorithm successfully restored the focus inside the skull in a location within 1 mm from the intended focal point. Focusing at high powers (>800-W electrical input) is demonstrated using a brain phantom placed inside a skull. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using the method for completely noninvasive ultrasound brain surgery and therapy.

  7. Easy and Safe Method for Facial Nerve Identification in Parotid Surgery.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shawn T; Sharankumar, Shetty; Sandya, C J; Sivakumar, Vidhyadharan; Sherry, Peter; Krishnakumar, Thankappan; Subramania, Iyer

    2015-12-01

    Background?A safe and easy anatomical landmark is proposed to identify the facial nerve in parotid surgery. The facial nerve forms the center point between the base of the styloid process and the origin of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. Objective?To evaluate the consistency, accuracy, and safety of the landmark in identifying the facial nerve. Methods?The study was designed in three steps: a cadaver study, a radiologic study, and a prospective clinical study. Anatomy was initially studied in two cadavers. Then the images of 200 temporal styloid regions were studied for consistency of the presence of the styloid base. In the second part of the radiologic study, the distance between the styloid base and the origin of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle was studied in 50 parotid regions. The clinical study involved 25 patients who underwent parotidectomy. Results?The styloid base was present in all the images studied. The mean distance between the styloid base and the origin of the posterior belly of the digastric was found to be 0.72 cm (range: 0.45-0.99 cm). The facial nerve could be identified consistently and safely in all patients. Conclusion?This trident landmark provided safe, accurate, and easy identification of the facial nerve using two fixed bony landmarks. PMID:26682121

  8. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Monan, Wang

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable. PMID:17945663

  9. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-robot assisted orthopedic surgery system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Wang, Monan

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable. PMID:17959437

  10. Predicting the consequences of tongue cancer surgery: design of a 3D patient-specific biomechanical model and evaluation

    E-print Network

    Payan, Yohan

    5216, Grenoble-INP, Grenoble, France 3Department of Maxillo-facial Surgery, University Hospital encouraging steps towards the development of pre-operative planning tongue surgery systems. In particular surgery. A volume image registration-based approach is used, in which an atlas FE mesh is deformed using

  11. Damage Control Surgery for Hepatocellular Cancer Rupture in an Elderly Patient: Survival and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Christodoulidis, Grigorios; Symeonidis, Dimitrios; Diamantis, Alexandros; Tepetes, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rare emergency condition with high mortality rate. Successful management depends on patients' hemodynamic condition upon presentation and comorbidities, correct diagnosis, HCC status, liver function, and future liver remnant, as well as available sources. There is still a debate in the literature concerning the best approach in this devastating complication. Nevertheless, the primary goal should be a definitive bleeding arrest. In most cases, patients with spontaneous rupture of HCC present with hemodynamic instability, due to hemoperitoneum, necessitating an emergency treatment modality. In such cases, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) should be the treatment of choice. Emergency liver resection is an option when TAE fails or in cases with preserved liver function and limited tumors. Otherwise, damage control strategies, as in liver trauma, are a reasonable alternative. We report a case of an elderly patient with hemoperitoneum and hypovolemic shock from spontaneous rupture of undiagnosed HCC, who was treated successfully by emergency surgery and damage control approach. PMID:26504604

  12. 1.5-D high intensity focused ultrasound array for non-invasive prostate cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Curiel, L; Chavrier, F; Souchon, R; Birer, A; Chapelon, J Y

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new spherically curved 1.5-D phased array for the treatment of localized prostatic cancer. The device is designed to conform to the Ablatherm machine (EDAP-Technomed, France), a commercially available machine in which high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment for prostate cancer is administered transrectally. It uses high intensity electronically focused ultrasound to steer a beam along two axes, allowing enough depth to be reached to treat large prostates and eliminating two degrees of mechanical movement. Through computer simulation, it was determined that a curved 1.5-D configuration offered the optimal design. Two configurations were then proposed, and their ability to steer a beam within a target volume centered on the geometric focus of the transducer was simulated. An eight-element prototype was constructed to test the piezo-composite material and its electro-acoustical efficiency. Then, an array was constructed, and a multi-channel amplifier and control system were added, to permit remote operation. Acoustical and electrical measurements were made to verify performance. Finally, the 1.5-D array was tested in vitro on samples of pig liver to confirm the ability to induce lesions. PMID:11885680

  13. Time trends in surgery for lung cancer in France from 2005 to 2012: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Morgant, Marie-Catherine; Pagès, Pierre-Benoit; Orsini, Bastien; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Thomas, Pascal-Alexandre; Barthes, Françoise Le Pimpec; Dahan, Marcel; Bernard, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of survival in patients treated surgically for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between 2005 and 2012.From January 2005 to December 2012, 34?006 patients underwent pulmonary resection for NSCLC and were included in the French national database Epithor. Patients' characteristics, procedures and survival were analysed. Survival according to the management was evaluated for each 2-year period separately: 2005-2006, 2007-2008, 2009-2010 and 2011-2012.The proportions of early-stage cancers and adenocarcinomas increased significantly over the periods. 3-year overall survival (OS) increased significantly from 80.5% for the first period to 81.4% for the last period. For the periods 2005-2006 and 2007-2008, 3-year OS was lower after segmentectomy than after lobectomy (77 and 73% versus 82 and 83%, respectively). For the periods 2009-2010 and 2011-2012, 3-year OS in the two sub-groups was similar. OS after bi-lobectomy or pneumonectomy was lower than after lobectomy for all periods analysed. Systematic nodal dissection increased OS for all periods. Chemotherapy but not radiotherapy improved OS in the first 12 postoperative months for all periods.Changes in histological type and stage linked to advances in surgical and medical practices since 2005 led to an increase in OS in patients with surgical-stage NSCLC. PMID:26250496

  14. Better exercise adherence after treatment for cancer (BEAT Cancer) study: Rationale, design, and methods

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Laura Q.; McAuley, Edward; Anton, Philip M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Vicari, Sandra; Hopkins-Price, Patricia; Verhulst, Steven; Mocharnuk, Robert; Hoelzer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer survivors do not engage in regular physical activity. Our physical activity behavior change intervention for breast cancer survivors significantly improved physical activity and health outcomes post-intervention during a pilot, feasibility study. Testing in additional sites with a larger sample and longer follow-up is warranted to confirm program effectiveness short and longer term. Importantly, the pilot intervention resulted in changes in physical activity and social cognitive theory constructs, enhancing our potential for testing mechanisms mediating physical activity behavior change. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methods for a two-site, randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of the BEAT Cancer physical activity behavior change intervention to usual care on short and longer term physical activity adherence among breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims include examining social cognitive theory mechanisms of physical activity behavior change and health benefits of the intervention. Study recruitment goal is 256 breast cancer survivors with a history of ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I, II, or IIIA disease who have completed primary cancer treatment. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, 3 months (i.e., immediately post-intervention), 6 months, and 12 months and include physical activity, psychosocial factors, fatigue, sleep quality, lower extremity joint dysfunction, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, and waist-to-hip ratio. Confirming behavior change effectiveness, health effects, and underlying mechanisms of physical activity behavior change interventions will facilitate translation to community settings for improving the health and well-being of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21983625

  15. Functional intronic ERCC1 polymorphism from regulomeDB can predict survival in lung cancer after surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yup; Hong, Mi Jeong; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Yi Young; Choi, Jin Eun; Kang, Hyo-Gyoung; Jung, Deuk Kju; Jin, Chengcheng; Do, Sook Kyung; Yoo, Seung Soo; Seok, Yangki; Lee, Eung Bae; Shin, Kyung Min; Jeong, Ji Yun; Lee, Won Kee; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Kim, Young Tae; Jheon, Sanghoon; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-09-15

    We searched for potential regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) using RegulomeDB, a database integrating information from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, and investigated their association with survival after surgery in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among 364 SNPs found within ERCC1 region using RegulomeDB, four top priority SNPs (rs2298881C>A, rs1049739A>G, rs10415949A>G and rs6509214G>T) were selected for this study. The four SNPs were investigated in 316 patients. A replication study was performed (n = 579). Of the four SNPs analyzed in the discovery set, rs2298881C>A and rs6509214G>T were significantly associated with survival outcomes. The association was consistently observed only for rs2298881C>A in the validation cohort. In combined analysis, rs2298881C>A was significantly associated with worse overall survival and disease-free survival (P = 0.0002 and 0.02, respectively). A decreased reporter gene expression for rs2298881 A allele was observed compared with C allele by luciferase assay (P = 0.02). ERCC1 rs2298881C>A, an intronic SNP, is the first genetic polymorphism with functional evidence of regulating its expression, and the SNP is associated with prognosis of NSCLC. Our result supports the role of RegulomeDB as a comprehensive source of prioritized candidate SNPs for genetic association studies. PMID:26056042

  16. Extent of surgery for papillary thyroid cancer: preoperative imaging and role of prophylactic and therapeutic neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Shen, Wen T; Gosnell, Jessica E

    2012-03-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has an excellent prognosis, yet lymph node metastases are common. Most authors agree that central and/or lateral lymph node dissection should be undertaken in patients with abnormal lymph nodes detected on ultrasound, physical examination or intraoperative inspection. However the appropriate extent of prophylactic lymph node dissection for clinically node-negative patients remains the subject of controversy. There have been no randomized trials to date to offer guidance on this issue. The 2006 guidelines of the American Thyroid Association recommended consideration of prophylactic bilateral central lymph node dissection (CLND) for all patients undergoing thyroidectomy for PTC. However, the absence of compelling evidence for a benefit in terms of recurrence or survival, and the potential for increased morbidity, have led many, including our institution, to take an approach of selective central lymph node dissection. This approach is guided by the detection of abnormal lymph nodes on preoperative ultrasound, on physical examination, or during surgery. Postoperatively, ultrasound by an experienced ultrasonographer is the mainstay of evaluation for lymph node recurrence and is combined with monitoring of thyroglobulin and antithyroglobulin antibody levels. Reoperative lymph node dissection is typically undertaken upon detection and fine needle aspiration (FNA) of involved lymph nodes 0.8 cm or greater in size. PMID:22278672

  17. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P?=?0.001, P?=?0.01, P?=?0.008, and P?=?0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P?=?0.035, P?=?0.023, P?=?0.002, and P?=?0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P?=?0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P?=?0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P?=?0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P?=?0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P?=?0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  18. Navigation surgery for intraoperative sentinel lymph node detection using Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence real-time imaging in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Toh, U; Iwakuma, N; Mishima, M; Okabe, M; Nakagawa, S; Akagi, Y

    2015-09-01

    A new sensitive fluorescence imaging system was developed for the real-time identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of a color charge-coupled device camera system for the intraoperative detection of SLNs and to determine its clinical efficacy and sensitivity in patients with operable breast cancer. We assessed a total of 168 patients diagnosed with or suspected of having early-stage breast cancer without metastasis in SLNs. The intraoperative detection of SLNs was performed using the conventional Indigo Carmine dye (indigotindisulfonate sodium) technique combined with a new Indocyanine green (ICG) imaging system (HyperEye Medical System: HEMS, MIZUHO IKAKOGYO, Japan) to map SLNs, in which the lymphatic vessels and SLNs were visualized transcutaneously with illuminating ICG fluorescence. Between January 2012 and May 2013, SLNs were successfully identified in all 168 patients (detection rate: 100%). By histopathology, the sensitivity was 93.8% for the detection of the metastatic involvement of SLNs (15 of 16 nodal-positive patients). After a median follow-up of 30.5 months, none of the patients presented with axillary recurrence. These results suggest that the HEMS imaging system is a feasible and effective method for the detection of SLNs in breast cancer. Furthermore, the HEMS device permitted the transcutaneous visualization of lymphatic vessels under light conditions, thus facilitating the identification and detection of SLNs without affecting the surgical procedure, together with a high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26267663

  19. Analysis Methods Supplement for: Classification and Diagnostic Prediction of Cancers

    E-print Network

    Ringnér, Markus

    Analysis Methods Supplement for: Classification and Diagnostic Prediction of Cancers using Gene the image analysis failed. In Fig. 1 the number of genes each sample removes is shown. We used the natural using PCA on relatively few samples is that components might be singled out due to strong noise

  20. [Value of CT following surgery for rectal cancer (a prospective study)].

    PubMed

    Fezoulidis, I; Imhof, H; Karner-Hanusch, J; Teleky, B; Wunderlich, M; Schiessel, R

    1987-12-01

    The results of computed tomography of 48 patients after operation on rectal carcinoma who underwent close-meshed computer tomographic examinations are given in a prospective study. (First examination 6 weeks after operation, further examinations at intervals of 3 months, mean observation time: 12 months). The results of follow-up by means of computer tomographic examination are compared with clinical examinations and control of CEA levels. The use of computer tomographic examination resulted in 43 confirmed negative, 3 confirmed positive and 2 false negative findings (including cases with CT-aided fine needle biopsy). These results give an accuracy of 96% and thus exceed clinical examination and controls of CEA-level. How far early diagnosis of local recurrence of rectal cancer influences survival time, can be answered after completion of this study in the next few years. PMID:2830075

  1. Breast cancer: a 21 year experience with conservative surgery and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, R.M.; Wilkinson, R.H.; Mahoney, L.J.; Reid, J.G.; MacDonald, W.D.

    1982-06-01

    Evidence is presented from a study of 680 patients followed over a period of 21 years that conservative treatment of breast cancer by local excision of the primary tumor followed by breast irradiation yields results equivalent to the traditional radical approach, with the added benefit of an excellent cosmetic result and improved quality of life. The relative survivals were 83% at 5 years and 71% at 10 years. There was no difference in survival when radiation was given. Breast irradiation significantly reduced relapse in the breast, but axillary irradiation did not influence relapse at this site. Relapse in the breast alone was not detrimental to survival if treated appropriately. Axillary relapse indicated a much poorer prognosis as might be expected.

  2. APN401 in Treating Patients With Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-18

    Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K.; Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W.; Sause, William T.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  4. Prospective Randomized Trial on Postoperative Administration of Diet Containing Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Docosahexaenoic Acid, Gamma-linolenic Acid, and Antioxidants in Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Patients with Free-flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Kiyoaki; Motohashi, Ray; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Minoru; Ueda, Yuri; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this prospective, randomized study was to evaluate the effects of a diet containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and antioxidants in head and neck cancer surgery patients with free-flap reconstruction. METHODS In this randomized, prospective study, 62 patients with head and neck cancers were assigned to receive a general control diet (Ensure® H; Abbott Japan, Tokyo, Japan) or the study diet (Oxepa®; Abbott Japan) containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants (eg vitamins A, E, and C). The primary assessment item was the degree of postoperative inflammation, as assessed by measuring maximum body temperature and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin from the day of surgery to postoperative day 8. Secondary assessment items were lengths of stays in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital. RESULTS The control diet group (n = 32) and study diet group (n = 30) showed no significant difference in energy administered through diet. No significant differences in the parameters of the primary assessment item were noted. Length of stay in the ICU was significantly shorter for the control diet group than for the study diet group (P = 0.011). No significant difference in duration of hospitalization was seen between groups. CONCLUSION No usefulness of a diet containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants was demonstrated. PMID:25368541

  5. [A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated by Conversion Surgery after Multidisciplinary Treatment].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinya; Tominaga, Harumi; Kimura, Yuri; Odagiri, Kazuki; Kurokawa, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Takahashi, Gen; Sawada, Genta; Jeongho, Moon; Inoue, Masasi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Nakahira, Sin; Hatanaka, Nobutaka

    2015-10-01

    A 70-year-old woman who complained of abdominal pain and a prolapsed tumor from the anus was diagnosed with an intestinal obstruction resulting from anal canal cancer. Computed tomography(CT)and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge tumor(11×5×12 cm)invading the vagina and levator ani muscle. Enlarged inguinal lymph nodes on both sides indicated metastasis. The clinical stage was T4b(vagina, levator ani muscle, and pudenda) N0H0M1a (LYM), stage ? (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma: 8th edition). As curative resection was not possible, a transvers colostomy was performed to relieve the intestinal obstruction. This was followed by chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy/1.8 Gy×25; TS-1, 80 mg/body for 2 weeks and a 1-week interval, for 2 courses) and up to 10 courses of Bev+mFOLFOX6 continuously. After this regimen, there was a remarkable reduction in tumor size. Positron emission tomography-CT revealed no FDG uptake in the primary rectal site or inguinal lymph nodes, but a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 6.3 was detected in the vagina. Six weeks after chemotherapy, the patient underwent a pelvic exenteration including resection of the vagina, bladder, and pudenda. The pathological stage was yp T4b (vagina) N0H0M0, stage?. Curative resection was performed, and the patient had a Grade 2 pathological response after chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26489576

  6. Second Tumor Induction Risk in IMRT for Prostate Cancer: An Unbalanced Comparison Between Surgery and Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Calandrino, Riccardo; Perna, Lucia; Belli, Maria Luisa; Botti, Andrea; Cattaneo, Mauro; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Iori, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of second tumor induction for prostate patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy in age classes 50-70. Based on both age-dependent models and doses to critical organs, the risk of second tumor induction was evaluated simulating the small field (prostate and seminal vesicles) and large field (whole pelvis) for Helical Tomotherapy and Rapid Arc. The doses to the organs closest to the treatment volume were derived from treatment planning system data. Whereas, due to the lack of calculation algorithms where leakage and internal radiation scattering are unreliable at a large distance from target, the doses to the organs outside the treatment volume were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses from Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) were also assessed on phantom measurements. The Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for second tumor induction increases from 2.2 to 13.7% as irradiated volume increases and age decreases. IGRT could add a non-negligible factor to the risk when daily set-up verification with high-resolution modality is included. As prostate cancer is detected earlier, the probability of an increase in early stage patients rises, and life expectancy thus increases. Radiotherapy has improved its capability in the tailoring of the dose around the target at the cost of a greater dose to surrounding organs, thus increasing the risk of second tumor induction, especially for those patients expected to survive 15 y or more. PMID:26509622

  7. De-escalation of surgery for early oral cancer--is it oncologically safe?

    PubMed

    Barry, Conor P; Katre, Chetan; Papa, Elena; Brown, James S; Shaw, Richard J; Bekiroglu, Fazilet; Lowe, Derek; Rogers, Simon N

    2013-01-01

    This study is a review of practice for patients with T1 or T2 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anterior tongue and floor of the mouth who presented to the regional maxillofacial unit in Liverpool between 1992 and 2007. We examined trends in management and analysed their effects on resection margins, recurrence, and survival. The Liverpool head and neck oncology database was used to identify patients, and to retrieve their clinical, surgical, and pathological data. When data were missing the case notes and pathology records were reviewed. Follow up was taken to January 2011. A total of 382 patients were included. Despite more conservative treatment with closer resection margins (27% in 1992-1995 and 60% in 2004-2007), fewer free flaps (79% in 1992-1995 and 38% in 2004-2007), and less adjuvant radiotherapy (37% in 1992-1995 and 22% in 2004-2007), there has been no significant increase in local recurrence (14% in 1992-1996 and 8% in 2004-2007), and overall survival has not been adversely affected. This is most striking when T1 tumours are considered in isolation with a consistent trend towards fewer clear margins (95% in 1992-1995 and 28% in 2004-2007) and fewer free flaps (53% in 1992-1995 and 11% in 2004-2007). The case mix was similar over the study period. These data support a more conservative approach to the management of early oral cancer. PMID:22444280

  8. Results of treatment in patients with IIa - IIIast. breast cancer treated by combination of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and surgery (5-year experience)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. A.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Denisov, I. N.; Frank, George A.; Voltchenko, N. N.

    1996-01-01

    Laser therapy with semiconductor laser (wavelength 890 nm) was performed in 41 patients with IIa - IIIast. breast cancer. LLLT was used before surgery and in postoperative period during 2 years. LLLT decreased postoperative complications by 15.3% and decreased duration of lymphorrhea. 5 years survival in patients with IIast. breast cancer treated by LLLT was 100%, in control group--85.71%. In patients with IIIast. breast cancer treated by LLLT survival was 94.44%, in control group--78.94%. 91.3% of patients with IIast. treated by LLLT had not recurrences in 5 year period, in the controls they were in about 77.7%. 82.35% of patients with IIIast. treated by laser therapy had no recurrences in 5 year period, in control group--60%.

  9. Results of treatment of patients with second- to third-stage breast cancer by combination of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and surgery: ten-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. A.; Denisov, I. N.; Frank, George A.; Voltchenko, N. N.

    2000-06-01

    Laser therapy with semiconductor laser was performed on 41 patients with 2nd-3rd stage breast cancer. LLLT was used before surgery and in postoperative during 2 years. LLLT decreased postoperative complications by 15.3 percent and decreased duration of limphorrhea. 86.9 percent of patients with 2nd stage breast cancer survived 10 years after LLLT treatment. For patients with III stage breast cancer treated by LLLT the rate was 83.3 percent. 82.6 percent of patients with 2nd stage treated by LLLT had no recurrences in 10 years period. 77.7 percent of patients with 3RD stage treated by LLLT had no recurrences for the same period of time.

  10. Surgical Techniques for Personalized Oncoplastic Surgery in Breast Cancer Patients with Small- to Moderate-Sized Breasts (Part 1): Volume Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Cho, Young Kyoo; Kim, Wan Wook; Hwang, Seung Ook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the popularity of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), which constitutes 50-60% of all breast cancer surgeries, discussions regarding cosmetic results after BCS are not specifically conducted. The simple conservation of breast tissue is no longer adequate to qualify for BCS completion. The incorporation of oncological and plastic surgery techniques allows for the complete resection of local disease while achieving superior cosmetic outcome. Oncoplastic BCS can be performed in one of the following two ways: 1) volume displacement techniques and 2) volume replacement techniques. This study reports volume displacement surgical techniques, which allow the use of remaining breast tissue after BCS by glandular reshaping or reduction techniques for better cosmetic results. Thorough understanding of these procedures and careful consideration of the patient's breast size, tumor location, excised volume, and volume of the remaining breast tissue during the surgery in choosing appropriate patient and surgical techniques will result in good cosmetic results. Surgery of the contralateral breast may be requested to improve symmetry and may take the form of a reduction mammoplasty or mastopexy. The timing of such surgery and the merits of synchronous versus delayed approaches should be discussed in full with the patients. Because Korean women have relatively small breast sizes compared to Western women, it is not very easy to apply the oncoplastic volume displacement technique to cover defects. However, we have performed various types of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques on Korean women, and based on our experience, we report a number of oncoplastic volume displacement techniques that are applicable to Korean women with small- to moderate-sized breasts. PMID:22493622

  11. A new method of surgical navigation for orthognathic surgery: optical tracking guided free-hand repositioning of the maxillomandibular complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Steve G F; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    In bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, the positioning of the maxilla and the mandible is typically accomplished via 2-splint technique, which may be the sources of several types of inaccuracy. To overcome the limitations of the 2-splint technique, we developed a new navigation method, which guided the surgeon to free-hand reposition the maxillomandibular complex as a whole intraoperatively, without the intermediate splint. In this preliminary study, the feasibility was demonstrated. Five patients with dental maxillofacial deformities were enrolled. Before the surgery, 3-dimensional planning was conducted and imported into a navigation system. During the operation, a tracker was connected to the osteotomized maxillomandibular complex via a splint. The navigation system tracked the movement of the complex and displayed it on the screen in real time to guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. The postoperative result was compared with the plan by analyzing the measured distances between the maxillary landmarks and reference planes, as determined from computed tomography data. The mean absolute errors of the maxillary position were clinically acceptable (<1.0 mm). Preoperative preparation time was reduced to 100 minutes on average. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic results. This navigation method without intraoperative image registration provided a feasible means of transferring virtual planning to the real orthognathic surgery. The real-time position of the maxillomandibular complex was displayed on a monitor to visually guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. In this method, the traditional model surgery and the intermediate splint were discarded, and the preoperative preparation was simplified. PMID:24561364

  12. Cognitive Change after Proton RT vs. Photon or Surgery for Pediatric Brain Tumor | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  13. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  15. Alternative Methods to Treat Nausea and Vomiting from Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Ali; Ebadi, Ahmad; Talaeizadeh, Abdolhassan; Rahmani, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV) is among the most intensive side effects and critical concerns for patients with cancer. Most of these patients experience nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. Sometimes, this is so annoying that it may prevent them from continuing the therapy. With the recent advances, a variety of therapeutic methods are innovated and applied to control CINV. Among them, the main methods include medicinal therapy, relaxation, and herbal therapy. Yet, using dexamethasone together with massage therapy and ginger is identified as the most effective method. PMID:26634155

  16. Endolaryngeal contact laser surgery and voice function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouzhnikov, Marius S.; Lopotko, Anatoly I.

    1997-05-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the voice function in patients with laryngeal pathology who had undergone Nd:YAG contact laser surgery. Surgery technique is believed to be gentle and sparing not only structurally but also functionally. It was shown that the methods of function evaluation of phonation such as the voice dynamic range, the main tone testing, transient characteristics of speech tracing, spectrography and electroreolaryngography can serve as a helpful tool in diagnostics and treatment follow-up. Benign laryngeal growths, cysts, scarring, hypertrophic laryngitis and cancer tumors comprise an essential group leading to phonation disturbances. In recent years essentially new surgical approaches have been initiated in the management of these pathologies. It is assumed that voice function quality is dependent not only on the nature, extent and site of the pathology but, also on the technique of the surgery employed and, consequently, on the degree of operative trauma. Contact laser excisions are, among modern sparing methods of laryngeal surgery. It has been shown that contact laser methods are more advantageous as compared to conventional surgery. The present investigation is aimed at exploring phonation in patients with various laryngeal pathology after Nd:YAG contact laser surgery.

  17. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and Its Role Within the Multidisciplinary Treatment Paradigm of Oropharynx Cancer: Robotics, Lasers, and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Ferris, Robert L

    2015-10-10

    Transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery is a new approach for the treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. Using either a robotic system and/or laser, surgeons gain access through the mouth via minimally invasive technique and thus have improved visualization of the tumors of the oropharynx, without disfiguring incisions. This transoral route of access minimizes long-term speech and swallowing dysfunction. Surgeons view this approach as a considerable technologic advance, analogous to the evolution in radiation therapy from conventional two- and three-dimensional conformal techniques to intensity-modulated techniques. Although the use of radiation with or without chemotherapy to treat oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is supported by evidence from prospective clinical trials, there are no prospective data supporting the use of this new surgical approach for OPC. Here, we review the fundamentals of transoral endoscopic head and neck surgery, with robotics and laser technology, and discuss ongoing clinical trials for patients with OPC. PMID:26351337

  18. Voice following laryngeal cancer surgery: troubleshooting common problems after tracheoesophageal voice restoration.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Glenn W

    2004-06-01

    The introduction of tracheoesophageal voice restoration by Blom and Singer has provided laryngectomy patients with a successful alternative to the use of artificial larynx and esophageal speech. Although this method of communication provides for the rapid acquisition of intelligible, functional speech, there are common problems that may occur in these patients. Close follow-up of patients postoperatively along with thorough patient education is beneficial to improving long-term success with tracheoesophageal speech. The purpose of this article is to discuss common problems encountered in the treatment of patients who have undergone tracheoesophageal puncture and to provide systematic assessment and treatment guidelines that are essential to maintaining functional tracheoesophageal speech. PMID:15163604

  19. Surgery or stereotactic ablative radiation therapy: how will be treated operable patients with early stage not small cell lung cancer in the next future?

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Alberto; Ricchetti, Francesco; Alongi, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Lung neoplasm is the most influent cause of death for cancer. With the increasing of life expectancy in elderly patients and with the intensification of lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography, a further rise of the number of new non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases has been shown. Standard of care of early stage NSCLC patients is lobectomy but approximately 20% of them are not fit for surgery for comorbidities. Due to the high local control rates and the little adverse effects, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) also called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), has rapidly replaced the conventional radiotherapy in not operable patients with stage I NSCLC. We review the evidence for use of SABR in medically inoperable patients with stage I NSCLC, and its possible extension of use to operable patients, from the perspectives of radiation oncologists and thoracic surgeons. Until the results of large randomized trials will be available, the multidisciplinary management, balancing during discussion the advantages/disadvantages of each treatment modality, could be the coming soon best approach for medically operable early-stage NSCLC. As a result, the minimally invasive thoracic surgery advantages and the SABR innovations will be translated into real clinical benefits. PMID:25738145

  20. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry used to screen serum diagnostic markers of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, ZHONG-YIN; JI, TUO; LUO, HE-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify specific serum biomarkers in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery. The study was conducted at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University (Wuhan, China) between January 2012 and January 2014. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to compare and analyze the serum protein profiles of patients with (n=50) and patients without (n=50) recurrence in situ. Biomarker Wizard software was used to analyze and obtain the protein spectrum. In total, nine protein peaks demonstrated statistically significant differences between the recurrence and non-recurrence group (P<0.05), which included two protein peaks (7,731.3 Da and 8,266.5 Da). The two protein peaks were highly expressed in patients with colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgery, but lowly expressed in patients without recurrence. Therefore, the two protein peaks may represent potential biomarkers for the prediction of colon cancer recurrence in situ following surgical treatment. PMID:26137063

  1. Electrocortical Analysis of Patients with Intercostobrachial Pain Treated with TENS after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Julio Guilherme; Santana, Camila Gonçalves; Inocêncio, Kelly Rosane; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Sergio; Bergmann, Anke

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Among the physical therapeutic procedures to decrease pain, there is transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (TENS). There is no consensus about its efficacy for oncological patients, especially for post-mastectomy pain and eletrocortical changes in somatosensory areas. The aim of this study was to analyze acute electrocortical changes after TENS treatment of patients with intercostobrachial post mastectomy pain. [Subjects] Eighteen patients were divided into acupuncture (A) and burst (B) group. [Methods] In this pre and post-intervention study each group was measured for EEG analysis in absulte power in alpha band (8–14?Hz). Outcomes variables were the alpha waveband in the sensorymotor cortex and pain pre-and-post TENS intervention. Data were analyzed using ANOVA to compare times (rest, 10 and 15?min), group and electrodes. Pain was analyzed using percentual pain evaluation (PPE) in both groups. [Results] Outcomes indicate main effects of time and electrodes because of slow (8–10?Hz) and fast alpha (10–12?Hz) wavebands decreased. PPE reduced 88.4% in A and 66.3% in G. [Conclusion] TENS promoted electrical modification in the parietal region and a decrease in pain. Future studies should investigate other wave must be proposed for other bands and use different methods of EEG analysis to elucidate the actual mechanisms behind the efficacy of TENS treatment. PMID:24707082

  2. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Tomatis, Stefano; Valli, Maria Carla; Guzzetti, Renata; Tonoli, Sandro; Bertoni, Filippo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Meregalli, Sofia; Asnaghi, Diego; Arienti, Virginia; Pradella, Renato; Cafaro, Ines

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors.

  4. Effect of Melatonin on Cognitive Function and Sleep in relation to Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Andersen, Lærke Toftegård; Hageman, Ida; Rasmussen, Lars Simon; Bokmand, Susanne; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction are common in patients with breast cancer. Disturbed sleep leads to poor cognitive performance and exogenous melatonin may improve sleep and attenuate cognitive dysfunction. We hypothesized that melatonin would improve sleep and cognitive function after surgery. Methods. This study reports secondary endpoints from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Women, 30–75 years, were randomized to 6mg oral melatonin/placebo for 3 months. We assessed postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) with a neuropsychological test battery, sleep with a diary, and sleep quality with VAS. Results. 54 patients were randomized to melatonin (n = 28) or placebo (n = 26); 11 withdrew (10 placebo, 1 melatonin, P = 0.002). The incidence of POCD was 0% (0/20) [95% CI 0.0%; 16.8%] in the placebo group and 0% (0/26) [95% CI 0.0%; 13.2%] in the melatonin group 2 weeks postoperatively (P = 1.00) and 6.3% (1/16) [95% CI 0.0%; 30.2%] in the placebo group and 0% (0/26) [95% CI 0.0%; 13.2%] in the melatonin group 12 weeks postoperatively (P = 0.38). Sleep efficiency was significantly greater in the melatonin group; mean difference was 4.28% [95% CI 0.57; 7.82] (P = 0.02). The total sleep period was significantly longer in the melatonin group; mean difference was 37.0?min [95% CI 3.6; 69.7] (P = 0.03). Conclusion. Melatonin increased sleep efficiency and total sleep time but did not affect cognitive function. The dropout rate was significantly lower in the melatonin group. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01355523. PMID:25328711

  5. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Strengths and limitations of tractography methods to identify the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography (TG) can visualize Meyer’s loop (ML), providing important information for the epilepsy surgery team, both for preoperative counseling and to reduce the frequency of visual field defects after temporal lobe resection (TLR). This review highlights significant steps in the TG process, specifically the processing of raw data including choice of TG algorithm and the interpretation and validation of results. A lack of standardization of TG of the optic radiation makes study comparisons challenging. We discuss results showing differences between studies and uncertainties large enough to be of clinical relevance and present implications of this technique for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Recent studies in temporal lobe epilepsy patients, employing TG intraoperatively, show promising results in reduction of visual field defects, with maintained seizure reduction. PMID:25853086

  7. Quality Assurance of 4D-CT Scan Techniques in Multicenter Phase III Trial of Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiotherapy (Radiosurgery or Surgery for Operable Early Stage (Stage 1A) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer [ROSEL] Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Lieshout, Maarten van; Schuring, Danny; Heumen, Marielle J.T. van; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Senan, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scanning techniques in institutions participating in a Phase III trial of surgery vs. stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All 9 centers performed a 4D-CT scan of a motion phantom (Quasar, Modus Medical Devices) in accordance with their in-house imaging protocol for SBRT. A cylindrical cedar wood insert with plastic spheres of 15 mm (o15) and 30 mm (o30) diameter was moved in a cosine-based pattern, with an extended period in the exhale position to mimic the actual breathing motion. A range of motion of R = 15 and R = 25 mm and breathing period of T = 3 and T = 6 s were used. Positional and volumetric imaging accuracy was analyzed using Pinnacle version 8.1x at various breathing phases, including the mid-ventilation phase and maximal intensity projections of the spheres. Results: Imaging using eight CT scanners (Philips, Siemens, GE) and one positron emission tomography-CT scanner (Institution 3, Siemens) was investigated. The imaging protocols varied widely among the institutions. No strong correlation was found between the specific scan protocol parameters and the observed results. Deviations in the maximal intensity projection volumes averaged 1.9% (starting phase of the breathing cycle [o]15, R = 15), 12.3% (o15, R = 25), and -0.9% (o30, R = 15). The end-expiration volume deviations (13.4%, o15 and 2.5%, o30), were, on average, smaller than the end-inspiration deviations (20.7%, o15 and 4.5%, o30), which, in turn, were smaller than the mid-ventilation deviations (32.6%, o15 and 8.0%, o30). A slightly larger variation in the mid-ventilation origin position was observed (mean, -0.2 mm; range, -3.6-4.2) than in the maximal intensity projection origin position (mean, -0.1 mm; range, -2.5-2.5). The range of motion was generally underestimated (mean, -1.5 mm; range, -5.5-1). Conclusions: Notable differences were seen in the 4D-CT imaging protocols for SBRT among centers. However, the observed deviations in target volumes were generally small. They were slightly larger for the mid-ventilation phases and smallest for the end-expiration phases. Steps to optimize and standardize the 4D-CT scanning protocols for SBRT are desirable.

  8. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery using mobile computed tomography: New method for locating of small lung nodules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The O-arm is an intraoperative imaging device that can provide computed tomography images. Surgery for small lung tumors was performed based on intraoperative computed tomography images obtained using the O-arm. This study evaluated the usefulness of the O-arm in thoracic surgery. Methods From July 2013 to November 2013, 10 patients with small lung nodules or ground glass nodules underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery using the O-arm. A needle was placed on the visceral pleura near the nodules. After the lung was re-expanded, intraoperative computed tomography was performed using the O-arm. Then, the positional relationship between the needle marking and the tumor was recognized based on the intraoperative computed tomography images, and lung resection was performed. Results In 9 patients, the tumor could be seen on intraoperative computed tomography images using the O-arm. In 1 patient with a ground glass nodule, the lesion could not be seen, but its location could be inferred by comparison between preoperative and intraoperative computed tomography images. In only 1 patient with a ground glass nodule, a pathological complete resection was not performed. There were no complications related to the use of the O-arm. Conclusions The O-arm may be an additional tool to facilitate intraoperative localization and surgical resection of non-palpable lung lesions. PMID:24947848

  9. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Examination of tear film smoothness on corneae after refractive surgeries using a noninvasive interferometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesna, Dorota H.; Kulas, Zbigniew; Kasprzak, Henryk T.; Stenevi, Ulf

    2009-11-01

    A lateral shearing interferometer was used to examine the smoothness of the tear film. The information about the distribution and stability of the precorneal tear film is carried out by the wavefront reflected from the surface of tears and coded in interference fringes. Smooth and regular fringes indicate a smooth tear film surface. On corneae after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or radial keratotomy (RK) surgery, the interference fringes are seldom regular. The fringes are bent on bright lines, which are interpreted as tear film breakups. The high-intensity pattern seems to appear in similar location on the corneal surface after refractive surgery. Our purpose was to extract information about the pattern existing under the interference fringes and calculate its shape reproducibility over time and following eye blinks. A low-pass filter was applied and correlation coefficient was calculated to compare a selected fragment of the template image to each of the following frames in the recorded sequence. High values of the correlation coefficient suggest that irregularities of the corneal epithelium might influence tear film instability and that tear film breakup may be associated with local irregularities of the corneal topography created after the LASIK and RK surgeries.

  11. Standardized Method for Quantification of Developing Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ancukiewicz, Marek; Russell, Tara A.; Otoole, Jean; Specht, Michelle; Singer, Marybeth; Kelada, Alexandra; Murphy, Colleen D.; Pogachar, Jessica; Gioioso, Valeria; Patel, Megha; Skolny, Melissa; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple and practical formula for quantifying breast cancer-related lymphedema, accounting for both the asymmetry of upper extremities' volumes and their temporal changes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed bilateral perometer measurements of the upper extremity in a series of 677 women who prospectively underwent lymphedema screening during treatment for unilateral breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital between August 2005 and November 2008. Four sources of variation were analyzed: between repeated measurements on the same arm at the same session; between both arms at baseline (preoperative) visit; in follow-up measurements; and between patients. Effects of hand dominance, time since diagnosis and surgery, age, weight, and body mass index were also analyzed. Results: The statistical distribution of variation of measurements suggests that the ratio of volume ratios is most appropriate for quantification of both asymmetry and temporal changes. Therefore, we present the formula for relative volume change (RVC): RVC = (A{sub 2}U{sub 1})/(U{sub 2}A{sub 1}) - 1, where A{sub 1}, A{sub 2} are arm volumes on the side of the treated breast at two different time points, and U{sub 1}, U{sub 2} are volumes on the contralateral side. Relative volume change is not significantly associated with hand dominance, age, or time since diagnosis. Baseline weight correlates (p = 0.0074) with higher RVC; however, baseline body mass index or weight changes over time do not. Conclusions: We propose the use of the RVC formula to assess the presence and course of breast cancer-related lymphedema in clinical practice and research.

  12. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  13. Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yong; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Wang Ruozheng

    2012-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

  14. Obesity, Outcomes and Quality of Care: BMI Increases the Risk of Wound-Related Complications in Colon Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Ramzi; Bordeianou, Liliana G.; Sylla, Patricia; Berger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obese patients may face higher complication rates during surgical treatment of colon cancer. This paper aims to measure this effect in a high volume tertiary care center. Methods All colon cancer patients treated surgically at our center from 2004 through 2011 were reviewed. Multivariate regression assessed relationships of complications and stay outcomes with BMI controlled for age, gender, comorbidity score, surgical approach and history of smoking. Results In 1048 included patients, BMI was a predictor of several complications in both laparoscopic and open procedures. For every increase of BMI by one WHO category, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.61 (p<0.001) for wound infection and OR=1.54 for slow healing (p<0.001). Additionally, right colectomies had an OR=3.23 (p=0.017) for wound dehiscence. No further associations with BMI were found. Conclusions BMI was incrementally associated with wound-related complications, illustrating how the proliferation of obesity relates to a growing risk of surgical complications. As the surgical community strives to improve quality of care, patient controllable factors will play an increasingly important role in cost containment and quality improvement. PMID:24139555

  15. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  16. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... three types of thyroid cancer treatment: Surgery Radioactive iodine Medication Surgery is done to remove as much ... out. After the surgery, most patients receive radioactive iodine, which is usually taken by mouth. This substance ...

  17. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Feet » Foot Health Information Surgery When is Foot Surgery Necessary? Many foot problems do not respond ... restore the function of your foot. Types of Foot Surgery Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat ...

  18. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01

    K. , Breast cancer: origins and evolution. J Clin Invest,evolution of human premalignant breast disease. Endocr Relat Cancer,cancer involves progression through stages, beginning with ductal hyper-proliferation, subsequent evolution

  19. Prognostic Impact of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With and Without Extended Surgery and Intraoperative Electrons for Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer: 16-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Alvarez de Sierra, Pedro; Gómez-Espí, Marina; Blanco, Jose; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors associated with survival in patients after intraoperative electrons containing resective surgical rescue of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods and Materials: From January 1995 to December 2011, 60 patients with LRRC underwent extended surgery (n=38: multiorgan [43%], bone [28%], soft tissue [38%]) or nonextended (n=22) surgical resection, including a component of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) to the pelvic recurrence tumor bed. Twenty-eight (47%) of these patients also received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (range, 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 2-189 months), and the 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year rates for locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) were 86%, 52%, and 44%; and 78%, 53%, 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection, EBRT at the time of pelvic rerecurrence, no tumor fragmentation, and non-lymph node metastasis retained significance with regard to LRR. R1 resection and no tumor fragmentation showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusions: EBRT treatment integrated for rescue, resection radicality, and not involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer. Additionally, tumor fragmentation could be compensated by EBRT. Present results suggest that a significant group of patients with LRRC may benefit from EBRT treatment integrated with extended surgery and IOERT.

  20. A non-randomized confirmatory study regarding selection of fertility-sparing surgery for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1203).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Toyomi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Kanato, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takano, Masashi; Baba, Tsukasa; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Ushijima, Kimio; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Fertility-sparing treatment has been accepted as a standard treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer in stage IA non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. In order to expand an indication of fertility-sparing treatment, we have started a non-randomized confirmatory trial for stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The protocol-defined fertility-sparing surgery is optimal staging laparotomy including unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, peritoneal cytology and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection or biopsy. After fertility-sparing surgery, four to six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin are administered. We plan to enroll 250 patients with an indication of fertility-sparing surgery, and then the primary analysis is to be conducted for 63 operated patients with pathologically confirmed stage IA clear cell histology and stage IC unilateral non-clear cell histology grade 1/grade 2. The primary endpoint is 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints are other survival endpoints and factors related to reproduction. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000013380. PMID:26059697

  1. Stomach Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the skin on the abdomen. This allows liquid nutrition to be put straight into the intestine and can help prevent and treat malnutrition. Taking out lymph nodes In either a subtotal or total gastrectomy, ...

  2. Method For Detection Of Cancer Based On Spatial Genome Organization In The Cell Nucleus

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cell Biology of Genomes Group is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic methods for detection of cancer based on spatial genome organization.

  3. Electronic Monitoring Device of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Function in Improving Patient-Centered Care in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-13

    Stage I Adult Liver Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Adult Liver Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Liver Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Liver Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Popovic, Dijana; McCartney, Leah; Watkins, Cynthia B.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ogilvie, Travis; Magliocco, Anthony; Breslin, Tara M.; Temple, Walley; Mew, Daphne; Booske, John H.; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C.

    2007-10-01

    The development of microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques has been driven by reports of substantial contrast in the dielectric properties of malignant and normal breast tissues. However, definitive knowledge of the dielectric properties of normal and diseased breast tissues at microwave frequencies has been limited by gaps and discrepancies across previously published studies. To address these issues, we conducted a large-scale study to experimentally determine the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of a variety of normal, malignant and benign breast tissues, measured from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. Previously, we reported the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue samples obtained from reduction surgeries. Here, we report the dielectric properties of normal (adipose, glandular and fibroconnective), malignant (invasive and non-invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas) and benign (fibroadenomas and cysts) breast tissue samples obtained from cancer surgeries. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set of each characterized sample. Our analyses show that the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissues in the breast is considerable, as large as 10:1, while the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal glandular/fibroconnective tissues in the breast is no more than about 10%.

  6. Instillation and Fixation Methods Useful in Mouse Lung Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Mock, Jason; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The ability to instill live agents, cells, or chemicals directly into the lung without injuring or killing the mice is an important tool in lung cancer research. Although there are a number of methods that have been published showing how to intubate mice for pulmonary function measurements, none are without potential problems for rapid tracheal instillation in large cohorts of mice. In the present paper, a simple and quick method is described that enables an investigator to carry out such instillations in an efficient manner. The method does not require any special tools or lighting and can be learned with very little practice. It involves anesthetizing a mouse, making a small incision in the neck to visualize the trachea, and then inserting an intravenous catheter directly. The small incision is quickly closed with tissue adhesive, and the mice are allowed to recover. A skilled student or technician can do instillations at an average rate of 2 min/mouse. Once the cancer is established, there is frequently a need for quantitative histologic analysis of the lungs. Traditionally pathologists usually do not bother to standardize lung inflation during fixation, and analyses are often based on a scoring system that can be quite subjective. While this may sometime be sufficiently adequate for gross estimates of the size of a lung tumor, any proper stereological quantification of lung structure or cells requires a reproducible fixation procedure and subsequent lung volume measurement. Here we describe simple reliable procedures for both fixing the lungs under pressure and then accurately measuring the fixed lung volume. The only requirement is a laboratory balance that is accurate over a range of 1 mg-300 g. The procedures presented here thus could greatly improve the ability to create, treat, and analyze lung cancers in mice. PMID:26381993

  7. Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?

    SciTech Connect

    Holsinger, F. Christopher Weber, Randal S.

    2007-10-01

    Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' surgery remained the only accepted treatment for head and neck cancer when optimal local and regional control was the goal. Bigger was still better when it came to managing the primary tumor and the neck. The 'commando' procedure and radical neck dissection were the hallmarks of this first generation of treatments of head-and-neck cancer. With the advent of microvascular reconstructive techniques, larger and more comprehensive resections could be performed. Despite these large resections and their 'mutilating' sequelae, overall survival did not improve. Even for intermediate-stage disease in head-and-neck cancer, the 5-year survival rate did not improve >50%. Many concluded that more than the scalpel was needed for optimal local and regional control, especially for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Most important, the multidisciplinary teams must identify and correlate biomarkers in the tumor and host that predict for a response to therapy and for optimal functional recovery. As the pendulum swings back, a scientific approach using tissue biomarkers for the response to treatment in the setting of multidisciplinary trials must emerge as the new paradigm. In the postgenomic era, treatment decisions should be made based on functional and oncologic parameters-not just to avoid perceived morbidity.

  8. Efficacy of multislice computed tomography for gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Hiroshi; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Arimoto, Yuichi; Ohno, Koichi; Fujimoto, Yasuhisa; Oba, Hiroko; Adachi, Kenji; Hirano, Masaya; Terakawa, Shoichi; Tsubakimoto, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of multislice CT for gastroenteric and hepatic surgery. METHODS: Dual-phase helical computed tomography was performed in 50 of 51 patients who underwent gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries. Twenty-eight, eighteen and four patients suffering from colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and liver cancer respectively underwent colorectal surgery (laparoscopic surgery: 6 cases), gastrectomy, and hepatectomy. Three-dimensional computed tomography imaging of the inferior mesenteric artery, celiac artery and hepatic artery was performed. And in the follow-up examination of postoperative patients, multiplanar reconstruction image was made in case of need. RESULTS: Scans in 50 patients were technically satisfactory and included in the analysis. Depiction of major visceral arteries, which were important for surgery and other treatments, could be done in all patients. Preoperative visualization of the left colic artery and sigmoidal arteries, the celiac artery and its branches, and hepatic artery was very useful to lymph node dissection, the planning of a reservoir and hepatectomy. And multiplanar reconstruction image was helpful to diagnosis for the postoperative follow-up of patients. CONCLUSION: Three-dimensional volume rendering or multiplanar reconstruction imaging performed by multislice computed tomography was very useful for gastroenteric and hepatic surgeries. PMID:15770732

  9. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. PMID:23126424

  10. Quality of pathologic response and surgery correlate with survival for completely resected bladder cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sonpavde, Guru; Goldman, Bryan H.; Speights, V.O.; Lerner, Seth P.; Wood, David P.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Trump, Donald L.; Natale, Ronald B.; Grossman, H. Barton; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In a retrospective study of SWOG-S8710/INT-0080 (radical cystectomy [RC] alone vs 3 cycles of MVAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy [NC] before RC for bladder cancer), factors associated with improved overall survival (OS) included pathologic complete response (pCR) defined as P0, treatment with NC, completion of RC with negative margins and ?10 pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) removed. METHODS We used stratified Cox regression to retrospectively study the association of quality of pathologic response post-RC with OS in the subset of S8710 patients that received NC and RC with negative margins. RESULTS Of 154 patients who received NC, 68 (44.2%) were cancer followed by pathological P0 and LN- disease correlate with improved OS. A combination of baseline clinical stage and post-RC pathologic stage may better predict OS. PMID:19517476

  11. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  12. [New method and instrument for maxillary surgery as an alternative to Caldwell-Luc operation].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, V S

    1997-01-01

    A trocar of a novel design for maxillary surgery reduces to minimum operative injury of the cheek soft tissue and bone wall of the sinus providing an effective approach to sinus lesions. It enables widening of the sinus anastomosis by means of the diamond drill and forceps under microscope and endoscope control. The design of the instrument allows the surgeon to operate without the assistant's help. The duration of the operation is reduced, postoperative period runs uneventfully, with minimal negative responses of the cheek soft tissue and sublabial wound. Postoperative complications (subcutaneous emphysema and blood accumulation in the sinus) are corrected by irrigation or disappear spontaneously. The experience gained in operations on 180 patients and 248 sinuses provided the efficacy of the trocar in the removal of the polyps, foreign bodies, fungal masses and cysts both in children and adults. PMID:9334028

  13. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  14. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  15. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  17. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  18. Methods of Suicide among Cancer Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year nationwide population-based data set was used to explore methods of suicide (violent vs. nonviolent) and possible contributing factors among cancer patients in Taiwan. A total of 1,065 cancer inpatients who committed suicide were included as our study sample. The regression shows that those who had genitourinary cancer were 0.55 times (p…

  19. NCI: SBIR & STTR - Funding Opportunities - Contracts - 243 Novel and Improved Methods to Measure Cancer Epigenetic Biomarkers

    Cancer.gov

    Epigenetic markers, especially DNA methylation, have shown promise for early detection of cancerous lesions. However, it is unlikely that any single epigenetic marker has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to accurately and reliably detect early cancers or to predict cancer risk. Also, methods used to measure DNA methylation and other epigenetic markers need to be improved to increase specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility, and throughput.

  20. New method for detection of gastric cancer by hyperspectral imaging: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyotoki, Shu; Nishikawa, Jun; Okamoto, Takeshi; Hamabe, Kouichi; Saito, Mari; Goto, Atsushi; Fujita, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Satori, Shin; Sakaida, Isao

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new, easy, and objective method to detect gastric cancer using hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technology combining spectroscopy and imaging A total of 16 gastroduodenal tumors removed by endoscopic resection or surgery from 14 patients at Yamaguchi University Hospital, Japan, were recorded using a hyperspectral camera (HSC) equipped with HSI technology Corrected spectral reflectance was obtained from 10 samples of normal mucosa and 10 samples of tumors for each case The 16 cases were divided into eight training cases (160 training samples) and eight test cases (160 test samples) We established a diagnostic algorithm with training samples and evaluated it with test samples Diagnostic capability of the algorithm for each tumor was validated, and enhancement of tumors by image processing using the HSC was evaluated The diagnostic algorithm used the 726-nm wavelength, with a cutoff point established from training samples The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rates of the algorithm's diagnostic capability in the test samples were 78.8% (63/80), 92.5% (74/80), and 85.6% (137/160), respectively Tumors in HSC images of 13 (81.3%) cases were well enhanced by image processing Differences in spectral reflectance between tumors and normal mucosa suggested that tumors can be clearly distinguished from background mucosa with HSI technology.

  1. Dysphagia in Tongue Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yu Ri; Kim, Tae Gyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for dysphagia in tongue cancer patients. Dysphagia is a common complication of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in tongue cancer patients. Previous studies have attempted to identify risk factors for dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer, but no studies have focused specifically on tongue cancer patients. Methods This study was conducted on 133 patients who were diagnosed with tongue cancer and who underwent a videofluoroscopy swallowing study (VFSS) between January 2007 and June 2012 at the Asan Medical Center. Data collected from the VFSS were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with aspiration were identified. Results Patients showed a higher incidence of inadequate tongue control, inadequate chewing, delayed oral transit time, aspiration or penetration, vallecular pouch and pyriform residue, and inadequate laryngeal elevation after surgery. Moreover, male gender, extensive tumor resection, a higher node stage, and more extensive lymph node dissection were major risk factors for aspiration in tongue cancer patients. Conclusion Tongue cancer patients have difficulties in the pharyngeal phase as well as the oral phase of swallowing. These difficulties can worsen after tongue cancer surgery. Gender, the extent of tumor resection, and lymph node metastasis affect swallowing in tongue cancer patients. Physicians should take these risk factors into account when administering swallowing therapy to tongue cancer patients. PMID:25932417

  2. Urologic cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Lee, Kwang Suk; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-09-01

    The incidence and prevalence of prostate and kidney cancers have been increasing in Korea during the last decade, and a marked improvement in survival rates has been noted. With a substantial proportion of the cancers diagnosed at an earlier stage of the disease, the landscape of urologic cancer treatment in Korea has been characterized by an exponential increase in the number of patients receiving surgical treatment. Throughout the last decade, an increasing proportion of surgeries have been performed using minimally invasive methods, with a notable increase in robot-assisted surgery.The evaluation and management strategies of urologic cancer in Korea are primarily based on an existing evidence-based framework provided by international guidelines. The adoption and clinical application of novel surgical techniques and systemic agents targeted at advanced stage cancer are promptly adopted; accordingly, multidisciplinary treatment options are often available for various cancers at different stages. At the same time, treatment decisions are greatly influenced by the availability of healthcare resources, which may be limited due to the National Health Insurance reimbursement policy.A racial disparity in cancer features appears to exist for certain urologic cancers among Korean patients, and the optimal management strategy specific for the Korean population has yet to be confirmed. A national comprehensive cancer database is needed for better insight into risk factors, selection of sequential strategies, tumor biology and survival outcome of Korean urologic cancer patients. PMID:26117494

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Computational Method Uncovers Mutations That Drive Cancer | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer gene sequencing initiatives, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas project, are finding thousands of gene mutations in cancer cells, and making sense of all these genetic alterations is proving to be as big a challenge as identifying them. In an attempt to identify the most important of these mutations, researchers at Columbia University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a computation method that can identify so-called driver mutations in human melanomas.

  5. The Dehn Surgery Problem Marc Lackenby

    E-print Network

    Lackenby, Marc

    The Dehn Surgery Problem Marc Lackenby 19 June 2012 #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: Start with a knot or link K in 3-sphere. #12;Dehn surgery This is a method for building 3-manifolds: Start with a knot or link K

  6. Selective laser sintering: application of a rapid prototyping method in craniomaxillofacial reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Aung, S C; Tan, B K; Foo, C L; Lee, S T

    1999-09-01

    Advances in technology have benefited the medical world in many ways and a new generation of computed tomography (CT) scanners and three-dimensional (3-D) model making rapid prototyping systems (RPS) have taken craniofacial surgical planning and management to new heights. With the development of new rapid prototyping systems and the improvements in CT scan technology, such as the helical scanner, biomedical modelling has improved considerably and accurate 3-D models can now be fabricated to allow surgeons to visualise and physically handle a 3-D model on which simulation surgery can be performed. The principle behind this technology is to first acquire digital data (CT scan data) which is then imported to the RPS to fabricate fine layers or cuts of the model which are gradually built up to form the 3-D models. Either liquid resin or nylon powder or special paper may be used to make these models using the various RPS available today. Selective laser sintering (SLS), which employs a CO2 laser beam to solidify special nylon powder and build up the model in layers is described in this case report, where a 23-year old Chinese female with panfacial fracture and a skull defect benefited from SLS biomodelling in the preoperative workup. PMID:10597362

  7. Single cell analysis of cancer cells using an improved RT-MLPA method has potential for cancer diagnosis and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kvastad, L.; Werne Solnestam, B.; Johansson, E.; Nygren, A. O.; Laddach, N.; Sahlén, P.; Vickovic, S.; Bendigtsen, Schirmer C.; Aaserud, M.; Floer, L.; Borgen, E.; Schwind, C.; Himmelreich, R.; Latta, D.; Lundeberg, J.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell analysis techniques have great potential in the cancer genomics field. The detection and characterization of circulating tumour cells are important for identifying metastatic disease at an early stage and monitoring it. This protocol is based on transcript profiling using Reverse Transcriptase Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (RT-MLPA), which is a specific method for simultaneous detection of multiple mRNA transcripts. Because of the small amount of (circulating) tumour cells, a pre-amplification reaction is performed after reverse transcription to generate a sufficient number of target molecules for the MLPA reaction. We designed a highly sensitive method for detecting and quantifying a panel of seven genes whose expression patterns are associated with breast cancer, and optimized the method for single cell analysis. For detection we used a fluorescence-dependent semi-quantitative method involving hybridization of unique barcodes to an array. We evaluated the method using three human breast cancer cell lines and identified specific gene expression profiles for each line. Furthermore, we applied the method to single cells and confirmed the heterogeneity of a cell population. Successful gene detection from cancer cells in human blood from metastatic breast cancer patients supports the use of RT-MLPA as a diagnostic tool for cancer genomics. PMID:26558529

  8. Single cell analysis of cancer cells using an improved RT-MLPA method has potential for cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kvastad, L; Werne Solnestam, B; Johansson, E; Nygren, A O; Laddach, N; Sahlén, P; Vickovic, S; Bendigtsen, Schirmer C; Aaserud, M; Floer, L; Borgen, E; Schwind, C; Himmelreich, R; Latta, D; Lundeberg, J

    2015-01-01

    Single cell analysis techniques have great potential in the cancer genomics field. The detection and characterization of circulating tumour cells are important for identifying metastatic disease at an early stage and monitoring it. This protocol is based on transcript profiling using Reverse Transcriptase Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (RT-MLPA), which is a specific method for simultaneous detection of multiple mRNA transcripts. Because of the small amount of (circulating) tumour cells, a pre-amplification reaction is performed after reverse transcription to generate a sufficient number of target molecules for the MLPA reaction. We designed a highly sensitive method for detecting and quantifying a panel of seven genes whose expression patterns are associated with breast cancer, and optimized the method for single cell analysis. For detection we used a fluorescence-dependent semi-quantitative method involving hybridization of unique barcodes to an array. We evaluated the method using three human breast cancer cell lines and identified specific gene expression profiles for each line. Furthermore, we applied the method to single cells and confirmed the heterogeneity of a cell population. Successful gene detection from cancer cells in human blood from metastatic breast cancer patients supports the use of RT-MLPA as a diagnostic tool for cancer genomics. PMID:26558529

  9. Long-term outcome of induction chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin followed by surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Oto, Takahiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the long-term outcome of induction chemoradiotherapy, using docetaxel and cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy followed by surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mediastinal nodal metastasis. Between January 2000 and July 2006, 22 consecutive NSCLC patients with pathologically proven mediastinal nodal metastasis were treated with tri-modality therapy. The regimen consisted of docetaxel and cisplatin plus concurrent radiation at a dose of 40–46 Gy. The induction therapy was followed by surgery 4–6 weeks later. The pulmonary resections were composed of a lobectomy in 19 patients, including 3 with a sleeve lobectomy, a bilobectomy in 2 patients and a left pneumonectomy in 1 patient. With a median follow-up duration of 8.7 years, the 3-year and 7-year overall survival (OS) rates for the entire population were 72.7 and 63.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that tri-modality therapy is promising for NSCLC patients with mediastinal nodal metastasis. PMID:22354091

  10. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. /sup 125/Iodine implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/Iodine seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with (1) advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), (2) massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and (3) locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  12. /sup 125/I implants as an adjuvant to surgery and external beam radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Fee, W.; Goode, R.; Cox, R.S.

    1983-03-15

    /sup 125/I seeds either individually placed or inserted into absorbable Vicryl suture carriers were utilized in conjunction with surgery and external beam radiotherapy in an attempt to increase local control rates in patients with advanced oropharyngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancers (T3-T4, N2-N3), massive cervical lymphadenopathy (N3) and an unknown primary site and locally recurrent head and neck cancers. Forty-eight patients were treated with 55 implants. The carotid artery was implanted in 15 patients, while seven patients had seeds inserted into the base of the skull region, and another three patients had implants near cranial nerves. Eighteen of the 48 patients were treated for cure. The actuarial survival at five years in this subgroup was 50%. The overall local control in the head and neck area was 58%. In this group no patients to date have had a local failure in the implanted volume. Seventeen patients with comparable stage of disease treated prior to 1974 with curative intent without /sup 125/I implants were analyzed retrospectively for comparison with the implanted patients. The actuarial survival of these patients was 18% and the overall head and neck control was 21%. These differences are statistically significant at a P value of 0.01 and 0.007, respectively. Seventeen patients received implants for local recurrence. The local control in the head and neck area was 50%; however, the 2.5 year actuarial survival was only 17%. The complication rate was 11% (six of 55 implants). The improved survival, the high local control, and the minimal complication rates in this series makes the intraoperative implantation of /sup 125/I seeds and effective adjunctive treatment to surgery and external beam irradiation.

  13. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. Near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy in surgery and medicine: detection of renal stones and bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming; Redd, Douglas C. B.; Li, Yunzhi; Yu, Nai-Teng

    1992-06-01

    Tissue diagnosis and characterization are critically important to the development and applications of laser-based therapeutic procedures in urology (viz., laser lithotripsy and bladder cancer treatment). Recently, we demonstrated for the first time that the new technique of near-infrared laser excited Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy can readily differentiate various types of renal stones and bladder cancer from normal kidney/bladder tissues. It has thus become possible to develop an FT-Raman-based fiberoptic sensor for clinical use in laser lithotripsy and bladder cancer treatment. The future development of such a diagnostic modality will allow a surgeon/physician to take real-time Raman spectra of urinary calculi or cancerous tissue via a flexible fiberoptic probe.

  15. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: Surgery and stress promote cancer metastasis: New outlooks on perioperative mediating mechanisms and immune involvement

    Cancer.gov

    Fig. 1. A schematic representation of the cumulative kinetics of several perioperative risk factors for the initiation of new metastases and the outbreak of preexisting micro-metastases in cancer patients (reviewed in Section 1).

  16. Increasing Age and Treatment Modality Are Predictors for Subsequent Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer Following Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anurag K.; Mashtare, Terry L.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Seixas-Mikelus, Stefanie A.; Kim, Hyung L.; May, Kilian Salerno

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prostate cancer therapy (surgery or external beam irradiation, or both or none) on the actuarial incidence of subsequent bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry from 1973 to 2005 was analyzed. Treatment was stratified as radiotherapy, surgery, both surgery and adjuvant radiation, and neither modality. Brachytherapy was excluded. Results: In all, 555,337 prostate carcinoma patients were identified; 124,141 patients were irradiated; 235,341 patients were treated surgically; 32,744 patients had both surgery and radiation; and 163,111 patients received neither modality. Bladder cancers were diagnosed in: 1,836 (1.48%) men who were irradiated (mean age, 69.4 years), 2,753 (1.09%) men who were treated surgically (mean age, 66.9 years); 683 (2.09%) men who received both modalities (mean age, 67.4 years), and 1,603 (0.98%) men who were treated with neither modality (mean age, 71.8 years). In each treatment cohort, Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that increasing age (by decade) was a significant predictor of developing bladder cancer (p < 0.0001). Incidence of bladder cancer was significantly different for either radiation or surgery alone versus no treatment, radiation versus surgery alone, and both surgery and radiation versus either modality alone (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, age and irradiation were highly significant predictors of being diagnosed with bladder cancer. Conclusions: Following prostate cancer, increasing age and irradiation were highly significant predictors of being diagnosed with bladder cancer. While use of radiation increased the risk of bladder cancer compared to surgery alone or no treatment, the overall incidence of subsequent bladder cancer remained low. Routine bladder cancer surveillance is not warranted.

  17. The importance of nursing research design and methods in cancer pain management. Enhancing care.

    PubMed

    Gaston-Johansson, F; Fall-Dickson, J M

    1995-12-01

    Cancer is diagnosed currently in more than 1 million Americans every year and cancer pain is experienced by patients in all stages of the disease. Even though research indicates that optimal pharmacologic management alone can provide adequate relief for 70% to 90% of these patients, and additional relief can be obtained from nonpharmacologic interventions, the problem of pain continues to exist. This article focuses on the contributions of nurse scientists to the study of cancer pain during the last 5 years. Selected contributions of nursing research designs and methods to the understanding of pain caused by cancer and cancer treatment modalities are reviewed. Limitations of present methodologic approaches to the study of cancer pain and gaps in nursing knowledge are examined. Recommendations for future nursing research designs and methods used to study nursing management of cancer pain and the implications of projected future treatment modalities also are discussed. PMID:7501530

  18. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  19. Frequency of Surgery in Black Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Taioli, Emanuela; Wolf, Andrea S.; Moline, Jacqueline M.; Camacho-Rivera, Marlene; Flores, Raja M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare disease, even less frequently described in minority patients. We used a large population-based dataset to study the role of race in MPM presentation, treatment, and survival. Methods. All cases of pathologically proven MPM were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Age, sex, diagnosis year, stage, cancer-directed surgery, radiation, and vital status were analyzed according to self-reported race (black or white). Results. There were 13,046 white and 688 black MPM patients (incidence: 1.1 per 100,000 whites; 0.5 per 100,000 blacks; age-adjusted, p = 0.01). Black patients were more likely to be female, younger, and with advanced stage and less likely to undergo cancer-directed surgery than whites, after adjustment by stage. On multivariable analysis, younger age and having surgery were associated with longer survival for both cohorts; female gender (HR 0.82 (0.77–0.88)) and early stage at diagnosis (HR 0.83 (0.76–0.90)) were predictive of longer survival in white, but not in black, patients. Conclusions. Surgery was associated with improved survival for both black and white MPM patients. However, black patients were less likely to undergo cancer-directed surgery. Increased surgical intervention in MPM black patients with early stage disease may improve their survival. PMID:26063951

  20. After Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  1. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  2. Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer With One to Three Positive Nodes Have Higher Local and Regional Recurrence Risks Compared With Node-Negative Patients After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T. Jones, Stuart O.; Kader, Hosam A.; Wai, Elaine S.; Speers, Caroline H.; Alexander, Abraham S.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional recurrence according to nodal status in women with T1 to T2 breast cancer and zero to three positive nodes (0-3N+) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: The study subjects comprised 5,688 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1989 and 1999 with pT1 to T2, 0-3N+, M0 breast cancer, who underwent breast-conserving surgery with clear margins and radiotherapy (RT) of the whole breast. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier local, regional, and locoregional recurrence (LR, RR, and LRR, respectively) were compared between the N0 (n = 4,433) and 1-3N+ (n = 1,255) cohorts. The LRR was also examined in patients with one to three positive nodes (1-3N+) treated with and without nodal RT. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. Results: Median follow-up was 8.6 years. Systemic therapy was used in 97% of 1-3N+ and 41% of N0 patients. Nodal RT was used in 35% of 1-3N+ patients. The 10-year recurrence rates in N0 and 1-3N+ cohorts were as follows: LR 5.1% vs. 5.8% (p = 0.04); RR 2.3% vs. 6.1% (p < 0.001), and LRR 6.7% vs. 10.1% (p < 0.001). Among 817 1-3N+ patients treated without nodal RT, 10-year LRR were 13.8% with age <50 years, 20.3% with Grade III, and 23.4% with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative disease. On multivariate analysis, 1-3N+ status was associated with significantly higher LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.55, p < 0.001), whereas nodal RT significantly reduced LRR (HR, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.92, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Patients with 1-3N+ and young age, Grade III, or ER-negative disease have high LRR risks approximating 15% to 20% despite BCS, whole-breast RT and systemic therapy. These patients may benefit with more comprehensive RT volume encompassing the regional nodes.

  3. Simulation methods and tissue property models for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound surgery

    E-print Network

    Connor, Christopher W

    2005-01-01

    Many brain tumors are localized deeply and are currently surgically inaccessible without causing severe damage to the overlying structures of the brain. The current spectrum of non-invasive methods for treating such tumors ...

  4. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  5. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-30

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carci