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Sample records for candida glabrata isolates

  1. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Norwegian Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kari-Mette; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Ingebretsen, André; Vikholt, Katharina Johnsen; Örtengren, Ulf Thore; Olsen, Ingar; Enersen, Morten; Gaustad, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients have resulted in greater incidence of invasive fungal infections with high mortality. Candida albicans infections dominate, but during the last decade, Candida glabrata has become the second highest cause of candidemia in the United States and Northern Europe. Reliable and early diagnosis, together with appropriate choice of antifungal treatment, is needed to combat these challenging infections. Objectives To confirm the identity of 183 Candida glabrata isolates from different human body sites using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and VITEK®2, and to analyze isolate protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven antifungal drugs was determined for the isolates to elucidate susceptibility. Design A total of 183 C. glabrata isolates obtained between 2002 and 2012 from Norwegian health-care units were analyzed. For species verification and differentiation, biochemical characterization (VITEK®2) and mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF) were used. MIC determination for seven antifungal drugs was undertaken using E-tests®. Results Using VITEK®2, 92.9% of isolates were identified as C. glabrata, while all isolates (100%) were identified as C. glabrata using MALDI-TOF. Variation in protein spectra occurred for all identified C. glabrata isolates. The majority of isolates had low MICs to amphotericin B (≤1 mg/L for 99.5%) and anidulafungin (≤0.06 mg/L for 98.9%). For fluconazole, 18% of isolates had MICs >32 mg/L and 82% had MICs in the range ≥0.016 mg/L to ≤32 mg/L. Conclusions Protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility characteristics of the C. glabrata isolates were diverse. Clustering of protein profiles indicated that many azole resistant isolates were closely related. In most cases, isolates had highest susceptibility to amphotericin B and anidulafungin. The results confirmed previous observations of high

  2. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of European and African Candida glabrata isolates.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, V; Lo Passo, C; van Diepeningen, A D; Rharmitt, S; Delfino, D; Cascio, A; Nnadi, N E; Cilo, B D; Sampaio, P; Tietz, H-J; Pemán, J; Criseo, G; Romeo, O; Scordino, F

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the genetic relatedness and epidemiology of 127 clinical and environmental Candida glabrata isolates from Europe and Africa using multilocus microsatellite analysis. Each isolate was first identified using phenotypic and molecular methods and subsequently, six unlinked microsatellite loci were analyzed using automated fluorescent genotyping. Genetic relationships were estimated using the minimum-spanning tree (MStree) method. Microsatellite analyses revealed the existence of 47 different genotypes. The fungal population showed an irregular distribution owing to the over-representation of genetically different infectious haplotypes. The most common genotype was MG-9, which was frequently found in both European and African isolates. In conclusion, the data reported here emphasize the role of specific C. glabrata genotypes in human infections for at least some decades and highlight the widespread distribution of some isolates, which seem to be more able to cause disease than others. PMID:26946511

  3. Mechanisms of azole resistance among clinical isolates of Candida glabrata in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierzanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Naumiuk, Łukasz; Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Candida glabrata is currently ranked as the second most frequently isolated aetiological agent of human fungal infections, next only to Candida albicans. In comparison with C. albicans, C. glabrata shows lower susceptibility to azoles, the most common agents used in treatment of fungal infections. Interestingly, the mechanisms of resistance to azole agents in C. albicans have been much better investigated than those in C. glabrata. The aim of the presented study was to determine the mechanisms of resistance to azoles in 81 C. glabrata clinical isolates from three different hospitals in Poland. The investigation was carried out with a Sensititre Yeast One test and revealed that 18 strains were resistant to fluconazole, and 15 were cross-resistant to all other azoles tested (voriconazole, posaconazole and itraconazole). One isolate resistant to fluconazole was cross-resistant to voriconazole, and resistance to voriconazole only was observed in six other isolates. All strains were found to be susceptible to echinocandins and amphotericin B, and five were classified as resistant to 5-fluorocytosine. The sequence of the ERG11 gene encoding lanosterol 14-α demethylase (the molecular target of azoles) of 41 isolates, including all strains resistant to fluconazole and three resistant only to voriconazole, was determined, and no amino acid substitutions were found. Real-time PCR studies revealed that 13 of 15 azole-resistant strains showed upregulation of the CDR1 gene encoding the efflux pump. No upregulation of expression of the CDR2 or ERG11 gene was observed. PMID:25818698

  4. Expression of Efflux Pumps and Fatty Acid Activator One Genes in Azole Resistant Candida Glabrata Isolated From Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Farahyar, Shirin; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Rezaie, Sassan; Falahati, Mehraban; Safara, Mahin; Raoofian, Reza; Hatami, Kamran; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-07-01

    Acquired azole resistance in opportunistic fungi causes severe clinical problems in immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms of azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida glabrata. Six unmatched strains were obtained from an epidemiological survey of candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts that included azole and amphotericin B susceptible and azole resistant clinical isolates. Candida glabrata CBS 138 was used as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility testing of clinical isolates was evaluated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technology, semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and sequencing were employed for identification of potential genes involved in azole resistance. Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 1 (CgCDR1) and Candida glabrata Candida drug resistance 2 (CgCDR2) genes, which encode for multidrug transporters, were found to be upregulated in azole-resistant isolates (≥2-fold). Fatty acid activator 1 (FAA1) gene, belonging to Acyl-CoA synthetases, showed expression in resistant isolates ≥2-fold that of the susceptible isolates and the reference strain. This study revealed overexpression of the CgCDR1, CgCDR2, and FAA1 genes affecting biological pathways, small hydrophobic compounds transport, and lipid metabolism in the resistant clinical C.glabrata isolates. PMID:27424018

  5. In Vitro Activities of Six Antifungal Drugs Against Candida glabrata Isolates: An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Amirrajab, Nasrin; Badali, Hamid; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast with several unique biological features and associated with an increased incidence rate of candidiasis. It exhibits a great degree of variation in its pathogenicity and antifungal susceptibility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the following six antifungal drugs against clinical C. glabrata strains: amphotericin B (AmB), ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FCZ), itraconazole (ITZ), voriconazole (VCZ), and caspofungin (CASP). Materials and Methods Forty clinical C. glabrata strains were investigated using DNA sequencing. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined as described in clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4). Results The sequence analysis of the isolate confirmed as C. glabrata and deposited on NCBI GenBank under the accession number no. KT763084-KT763123. The geometric mean MICs against all the tested strains were as follows, in increasing order: CASP (0.17 g/mL), VCZ (0.67 g/mL), AmB (1.1 g/mL), ITZ (1.82 g/mL), KTZ (1.85 g/mL), and FCZ (6.7 g/mL). The resistance rates of the isolates to CASP, FCZ, ITZ, VZ, KTZ, and AmB were 5%, 10%, 72.5%, 37.5%, 47.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions These findings confirm that CASP, compared to the other antifungals, is the potent agent for treating candidiasis caused by C. glabrata. However, the clinical efficacy of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:27540459

  6. Echinocandin resistance and population structure of invasive Candida glabrata isolates from two university hospitals in Germany and Austria.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Ulrike; Schmidt, Dirk; Willinger, Birgit; Steinmann, Eike; Buer, Jan; Rath, Peter-Michael; Steinmann, Joerg

    2016-05-01

    Echinocandin resistance in Candida glabrata is emerging and is associated with the presence of FKS mutations. In this study, we analysed the antifungal susceptibility, presence of FKS mutations and clonality of C. glabrata blood culture isolates from two hospitals in Germany and Austria. Susceptibility testing of 64 C. glabrata bloodstream isolates from two university hospitals was performed with broth microdilution method according to EUCAST. In addition, all isolates were screened for FKS mutations. Molecular fingerprinting was performed by microsatellite PCR with three separate primer pairs and semiautomated repetitive sequenced-based PCR (rep-PCR). One C. glabrata isolate from Germany (1.5%) was echinocandin resistant, with a corresponding mutation in FKS2 gene hot spot 1. The discriminatory power of microsatellite PCR was higher than that of rep-PCR (Simpson Index of 0.94 vs. 0.88); microsatellite PCR created 31 separate genotypes, whereas rep-PCR created 17. Predominant genotypes or clusters of isolates from Germany and Austria were present, with no epidemiological evidence of nosocomial transmissions. Although we found a low incidence of echinocandin resistance in C. glabrata in our settings, further surveillance projects in central Europe are warranted for monitoring future epidemiological trends. The genetic population structure of C. glabrata demonstrates overrepresented geographical clusters. PMID:26806376

  7. Two Clinical Isolates of Candida glabrata Exhibiting Reduced Sensitivity to Amphotericin B Both Harbor Mutations in ERG2

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Claire M.; Bader, Oliver; Parker, Josie E.; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Kelly, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel isolates of Candida glabrata exhibiting reduced sensitivity to amphotericin B (MIC, 8 μg ml−1) were found to be ERG2 mutants, wherein Δ8-sterol intermediates comprised >90% of the total cellular sterol fraction. Both harbored an alteration at Thr121 in ERG2; the corresponding residue (Thr119) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential for sterol Δ8-Δ7 isomerization. This constitutes the first report of C. glabrata harboring mutations in ERG2 and exhibiting reduced sensitivity to amphotericin B. PMID:23027188

  8. Fluconazole resistance in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, C A; Pye, G W; Troke, P F; Johnson, E M; Warnock, D W

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of infection with Candida glabrata in which the organism became resistant to fluconazole and in which pre- and posttreatment isolates were available for comparison. The organism was cross-resistant to ketoconazole and itraconazole, in common with other azole-resistant yeasts. Fluconazole was a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P-450-dependent 14 alpha-sterol demethylase (P-450DM) in lysates of cells from both susceptible and resistant cultures (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.2 microM), indicating that resistance was unrelated to changes in P-450DM. Instead, it appeared to arise from a permeability barrier to fluconazole, since resistant cells were unable to take up radiolabelled drug. PMID:8239613

  9. Screening protocol for Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Land, G; Burke, J; Shelby, C; Rhodes, J; Collett, J; Bennett, I; Johnson, J

    1996-01-01

    A screening test has been developed for the presumptive identification of Torulopsis (Candida) glabrata from other common clinical isolates of yeast-like fungi. An interlaboratory comparison of a protocol consisting of morphology on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and trehalose fermentation at 42 degrees C was successful in differentiating T. glabrata from other taxa that are frequent or possible clinical isolates. The screening results for 517 clinical yeast isolates, 241 of which were T. glabrata, were compared with their final identification via commercial systems (API20C Yeast Identification System [bioMERIEUX, Hazelwood, Mo.] and Rapid Yeast Identification Panel [Dade Microscan, Sacramento, Calif.]). The trehalose screening test has a sensitivity and a specificity of 97.8 and 95.8%, respectively, and a positive predictive value of 97.4% and a negative predictive value of 96.5%. Overall, the trehalose screen had an efficiency rating of 93.9% for ruling in or out T. glabrata. Since T. glabrata represents a substantial part of the workload in a clinical laboratory, a significant reduction in direct and indirect costs should be realized. PMID:8862605

  10. FKS mutations and elevated echinocandin MIC values among Candida glabrata isolates from U.S. population-based surveillance.

    PubMed

    Zimbeck, Alicia J; Iqbal, Naureen; Ahlquist, Angela M; Farley, Monica M; Harrison, Lee H; Chiller, Tom; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2010-12-01

    Candida glabrata is the second leading cause of candidemia in the United States. Its high-level resistance to triazole antifungal drugs has led to the increased use of the echinocandin class of antifungal agents for primary therapy of these infections. We monitored C. glabrata bloodstream isolates from a population-based surveillance study for elevated echinocandin MIC values (MICs of ≥0.25 μg/ml). From the 490 C. glabrata isolates that were screened, we identified 16 isolates with an elevated MIC value (2.9% of isolates from Atlanta and 2.0% of isolates from Baltimore) for one or more of the echinocandin drugs caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin. All of the isolates with elevated MIC values had a mutation in the previously identified hot spot 1 of either the glucan synthase FKS1 (n = 2) or FKS2 (n = 14) gene. No mutations were detected in hot spot 2 of either FKS1 or FKS2. The predominant mutation was mutation of FKS2-encoded serine 663 to proline (S663P), found in 10 of the isolates with elevated echinocandin MICs. Two of the mutations, R631G for FKS1 and R665G for FKS2, have not been reported previously for C. glabrata. Multilocus sequence typing indicated that the predominance of the S663P mutation was not due to the clonal spread of a single sequence type. With a rising number of echinocandin therapy failures reported, it is important to continue to monitor rates of elevated echinocandin MIC values and the associated mutations. PMID:20837754

  11. Essential Oils, Silver Nanoparticles and Propolis as Alternative Agents Against Fluconazole Resistant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Szweda, Piotr; Gucwa, Katarzyna; Kurzyk, Ewelina; Romanowska, Ewa; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Zielińska Jurek, Anna; Kuś, Piotr Marek; Milewski, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Development of effective and safe therapeutic treatment of fungal infections remains one of the major challenge for modern medicine. The aim of presented investigation was to analyze the in vitro antifungal activity of selected essential oils, ethanolic extracts of propolis and silver nanoparticles dropped on TiO2 against azole-resistant C. albicans (n = 20), C. glabrata (n = 14) and C. krusei (n = 10) clinical isolates. Among tested essential oils, the highest activity has definitely been found in the case of the oil isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, with MIC and MFC values for all tested strains in the range of 0.0006-0.0097 % (v/v) and 0.0012-0.019 % (v/v), respectively. High activity was also observed for the Lemon, Basil, Thyme, Geranium and Clove (from buds) essential oils. Significant differences in fungicidal activity have been observed in the case of four tested propolis samples. Only one of them revealed high activity, with MFC values in the range from 0.156 to 1.25 % (v/v). Satisfactory fungicidal activity, against C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates, was also observed in the case of silver nanoparticles, however C. krusei isolates were mostly resistant. We also revealed that constituents of most of essential oils and propolis as well as silver nanoparticles are not substrates for drug transporters, which belong to the most important factors affecting resistance of Candida spp. clinical isolates to many of conventional antimycotics. To conclude, the results of our investigation revealed that essential oils, propolis and silver nanoparticles represent high potential for controlling and prevention candidiasis. PMID:25805904

  12. Candida glabrata Binding to Candida albicans Hyphae Enables Its Development in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tati, Swetha; Davidow, Peter; McCall, Andrew; Hwang-Wong, Elizabeth; Rojas, Isolde G.; Cormack, Brendan; Edgerton, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms of Candida glabrata in oral candidiasis, especially because of its inability to form hyphae, are understudied. Since both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are frequently co-isolated in oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we examined their co-adhesion in vitro and observed adhesion of C. glabrata only to C. albicans hyphae microscopically. Mice were infected sublingually with C. albicans or C. glabrata individually, or with both species concurrently, to study their ability to cause OPC. Infection with C. glabrata alone resulted in negligible infection of tongues; however, colonization by C. glabrata was increased by co-infection or a pre-established infection with C. albicans. Furthermore, C. glabrata required C. albicans for colonization of tongues, since decreasing C. albicans burden with fluconazole also reduced C. glabrata. C. albicans hyphal wall adhesins Als1 and Als3 were important for in vitro adhesion of C. glabrata and to establish OPC. C. glabrata cell wall protein coding genes EPA8, EPA19, AWP2, AWP7, and CAGL0F00181 were implicated in mediating adhesion to C. albicans hyphae and remarkably, their expression was induced by incubation with germinated C. albicans. Thus, we found a near essential requirement for the presence of C. albicans for both initial colonization and establishment of OPC infection by C. glabrata. PMID:27029023

  13. β-Aescin at subinhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) enhances susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to nystatin.

    PubMed

    Franiczek, Roman; Gleńsk, Michał; Krzyżanowska, Barbara; Włodarczyk, Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Aescin (escin) derived from the seeds of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) is a natural mixture of triterpene saponins exhibiting a wide variety of pharmacological properties, including antiinflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities. However, data concerning antifungal activities of these compounds are limited. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to α-aescin sodium, β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium using the disk diffusion (DD) and broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Moreover, the influence of subinhibitory concentration (0.5×MIC) of β-aescins on the nystatin MIC was also studied. In general, the results obtained by the DD assay correlated well with those obtained by the BMD method. Both β-aescins effectively inhibited the growth of all 24 strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 8 to 32 μg/ml for β-aescin crystalline, whereas those of β-aescin sodium were slightly lower and ranged from 4 to 16 μg/ml. In contrast, α-aescin sodium was found to be completely ineffective against the strains studied. MIC values of nystatin were reduced 2-16-fold and 2-4-fold in the presence of subinhibitory concentration of β-aescin crystalline and β-aescin sodium, respectively. Results of the present study may suggest the additive interaction between β-aescin and nystatin. PMID:26092104

  14. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida(TM) by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits overlapping with C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produ...

  15. Expression Plasmids for Use in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zordan, Rebecca E.; Ren, Yuxia; Pan, Shih-Jung; Rotondo, Giuseppe; Peñas, Alejandro De Las; Iluore, Joseph; Cormack, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a series of CEN/ARS episomal plasmids containing different Candida glabrata promoters, allowing for a range of constitutive or regulated expression of proteins in C. glabrata. The set of promoters includes three constitutive promoters (EGD2pr, HHT2pr, PDC1pr), two macrophage/phagocytosis-induced promoters (ACO2pr, LYS21pr), and one nutritionally regulated promoter (MET3pr). Each promoter was cloned into two plasmid backbones that differ in their selectable marker, URA3, or the dominant-selectable NAT1 gene, which confers resistance to the drug nourseothricin. Expression from the 12 resulting plasmids was assessed using GFP as a reporter and flow cytometry or quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess expression levels. Together this set of plasmids expands the toolkit of expression vectors available for use with C. glabrata. PMID:23934995

  16. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection. PMID:17725566

  17. A multiplex PCR protocol for rapid identification of Candida glabrata and its phylogenetically related species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Scordino, Fabio; Pernice, Ida; Lo Passo, Carla; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a multiplex PCR protocol for the detection of Candida glabrata and its closely related species Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis. The method uses four PCR primers, targeting the ITS1 region and the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene. The combination of these primers yielded unique results to all Candida species tested. The PCR assay we developed was found to be a rapid, specific and easy to perform method and it will be useful for characterizing large numbers of isolates for epidemiological studies. PMID:19635503

  18. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chew, SY; Cheah, YK; Seow, HF; Sandai, D; Than, LTL

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Methods and Results Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Conclusions Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. PMID:25688886

  19. Production of White Colonies on CHROMagar Candida Medium by Members of the Candida glabrata Clade and Other Species with Overlapping Phenotypic Traits▿

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Justin A.; Chase, Nancy; Lee, Richard; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Merz, William G.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that species of the Candida glabrata clade and species with phenotypic traits that overlap those of C. glabrata would produce white colonies on CHROMagar Candida medium. Of 154 isolates (seven species) tested, C. bracarensis, C. nivariensis, C. norvegensis, C. glabrata, and C. inconspicua produced white colonies; the Pichia fermentans group and C. krusei did not. Many of these species are difficult to identify phenotypically; white colonies may signal the need for the use of molecular approaches. PMID:18685009

  20. Candida glabrata among Candida spp. from environmental health practitioners of a Brazilian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Catarina; de Oliveira Silva, Elisa; Gonçalves, Lindyanne Lemos; Nery, Jéssica Maria; Silva, Naiara Chaves; Dias, Amanda Latercia Tranches

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of the species Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida was evaluated in a Brazilian Tertiary Hospital from the environment and health practitioners. In a 12-month period we had a total positivity of 19.65% of Candida spp. The most recurring non-albicans Candida species was C. glabrata (37.62%), generally considered a species of low virulence, but with a higher mortality rate than C. albicans. Subsequently, C. parapsilosis (25.74%) and C. tropicalis (16.86%) were the second and third most commonly isolated species. Considering the total samples collected from the emergency room and from the inpatient and the pediatric sector, 19.10% were positive for Candida spp., with the predominance of non-albicans Candida species (89.42%). The high percentage of positivity occurred in the hands (24.32%) and the lab coats (21.88%) of the health care assistants. No sample of C. albicans presented a profile of resistance to the drugs. All the non-albicans Candida species presented a decreased susceptibility to miconazole and itraconazole, but they were susceptible to nystatin. Most of the isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and amphotericin B. As expected, a high resistance rate was observed in C. glabrata and C. krusei, which are intrinsically less susceptible to this antifungal agent. The contamination of environmental surfaces by Candida spp. through hand touching may facilitate the occurrence of Candida infections predominantly in immunocompromised patients. In addition to that, the antifungal agents used should be carefully evaluated considering local epidemiologic trends in Candida spp. infections, so that therapeutic choices may be better guided. PMID:26991302

  1. Cytotoxic and cytokine inducing properties of Candida glabrata in single and mixed oral infection models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lulu; Kashleva, Helena; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection, with Candida albicans being the most prevalent etiologic agent and Candida glabrata emerging as an important pathogen. C. glabrata is frequently co-isolated with C. albicans from oral lesions. Although C. albicans has been shown to trigger significant cytokine responses and cell damage, C. glabrata has not been systematically studied yet. The purpose of this study was to characterize the ability of C. glabrata to induce proinflammatory cytokine responses and host damage as a single infecting organism and in combination with C. albicans, using in vitro models of the oral mucosa. In monolayer oral epithelial cell cultures, C. glabrata failed to induce a significant interleukin-1α and interleukin-8 cytokine response and showed lower cytotoxicity, compared to C. albicans. However, C. glabrata triggered a significantly higher granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor response than C. albicans. C. glabrata strains showed a strain-dependent tissue damaging ability and a superficial invasion of the mucosal compartment in a 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model of the human oral mucosa and submucosa. In the 3-D system, co-infection failed to promote host damage beyond the levels of infection with C. albicans alone. These studies indicate that C. glabrata induces cytokines in human oral epithelium in a strain-specific manner, but its tissue/cell damaging ability, compared to C. albicans, is low. Synergy between C. glabrata and C. albicans in cytokine induction and host damage was not observed with the strains tested. PMID:17306958

  2. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika; Sanglard, Dominique; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  3. Candida glabrata survives and replicates in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Duarte, Ana Rosa; Castrejón-Jiménez, Nayeli Shantal; Baltierra-Uribe, Shantal Lizbeth; Pérez-Rangel, Sofia Judith; Carapia-Minero, Natalee; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Luna-Herrera, Julieta; López-Santiago, Rubén; Rodríguez-Tovar, Aída Verónica; García-Pérez, Blanca Estela

    2016-06-01

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic pathogen that is considered the second most common cause of candidiasis after Candida albicans Many characteristics of its mechanisms of pathogenicity remain unknown. Recent studies have focused on determining the events that underlie interactions between C. glabrata and immune cells, but the relationship between this yeast and osteoblasts has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms of interaction between human osteoblasts and C. glabrata, and to identify the roles played by some of the molecules that are produced by these cells in response to infection. We show that C. glabrata adheres to and is internalized by human osteoblasts. Adhesion is independent of opsonization, and internalization depends on the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that C. glabrata survives and replicates in osteoblasts and that this intracellular behavior is related to the level of production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. Opsonized C. glabrata stimulates the production of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 cytokines. Adhesion and internalization of the pathogen and the innate immune response of osteoblasts require viable C. glabrata These results suggest that C. glabrata modulates immunological mechanisms in osteoblasts to survive inside the cell. PMID:27073253

  4. Role of FKS Mutations in Candida glabrata: MIC values, echinocandin resistance, and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pham, Cau D; Iqbal, Naureen; Bolden, Carol B; Kuykendall, Randall J; Harrison, Lee H; Farley, Monica M; Schaffner, William; Beldavs, Zintars G; Chiller, Tom M; Park, Benjamin J; Cleveland, Angela A; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2014-08-01

    Candida glabrata is the second leading cause of candidemia in U.S. hospitals. Current guidelines suggest that an echinocandin be used as the primary therapy for the treatment of C. glabrata disease due to the high rate of resistance to fluconazole. Recent case reports indicate that C. glabrata resistance to echinocandins may be increasing. We performed susceptibility testing on 1,380 isolates of C. glabrata collected between 2008 and 2013 from four U.S. cities, Atlanta, Baltimore, Knoxville, and Portland. Our analysis showed that 3.1%, 3.3%, and 3.6% of the isolates were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin, respectively. We screened 1,032 of these isolates, including all 77 that had either a resistant or intermediate MIC value with respect to at least one echinocandin, for mutations in the hot spot regions of FKS1 and FKS2, the major mechanism of echinocandin resistance. Fifty-one isolates were identified with hot spot mutations, 16 in FKS1 and 35 in FKS2. All of the isolates with an FKS mutation except one were resistant to at least one echinocandin by susceptibility testing. Of the isolates resistant to at least one echinocandin, 36% were also resistant to fluconazole. Echinocandin resistance among U.S. C. glabrata isolates is a concern, especially in light of the fact that one-third of those isolates may be multidrug resistant. Further monitoring of U.S. C. glabrata isolates for echinocandin resistance is warranted. PMID:24890592

  5. Candida bracarensis Detected Among Isolates of Candida glabrata by Petide Nucleic Acid Fluorescence in Situ Hybirdization: Susceptibility Data and Documentation of Presumed Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular taxonomic studies have revealed new yeast (Candida) species among phenotypically-delineated species: the best example being Candida dubliniensis. This study was designed to determine the occurrence of two new molecularly-defined species, Candida bracarensis and Candida nivariensis, which ...

  6. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  7. Clotrimazole Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates Correlates with Increased Expression of the Drug:H+ Antiporters CgAqr1, CgTpo1_1, CgTpo3, and CgQdr2

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Catarina; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Miranda, Isabel M.; Silva-Dias, Ana; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Rodrigues, Acácio G.; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    For years, antifungal drug resistance in Candida species has been associated to the expression of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters. More recently, a few drug efflux pumps from the Drug:H+ Antiporter (DHA) family have also been shown to play a role in this process, although to date only the Candida albicans Mdr1 transporter has been demonstrated to be relevant in the clinical acquisition of antifungal drug resistance. This work provides evidence to suggest the involvement of the C. glabrata DHA transporters CgAqr1, CgQdr2, CgTpo1_1, and CgTpo3 in the clinical acquisition of clotrimazole drug resistance. A screening for azole drug resistance in 138 C. glabrata clinical isolates, from patients attending two major Hospitals in Portugal, was performed. Based on this screening, 10 clotrimazole susceptible and 10 clotrimazole resistant isolates were selected for further analysis. The transcript levels of CgAQR1, CgQDR2, CgTPO1_1, and CgTPO3 were found to be significantly up-regulated in resistant isolates when compared to the susceptible ones, with a level of correlation that was found to be similar to that of CgCDR2, an ABC gene known to be involved in the clinical acquisition of resistance. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the CgTPO3 gene was deleted in an azole resistant C. glabrata isolate, exhibiting high levels of expression of this gene. The deletion of CgTPO3 in this isolate was found to lead to decreased resistance to clotrimazole and fluconazole, and increased accumulation of azole drugs, thus suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the manifestation of azole resistance. PMID:27148215

  8. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24252826

  9. Arteriovenous graft infection caused by Candida glabrata: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hung-Ling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Wu, Wei-Tsung; Lu, Po-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The infection rate of arteriovenous (AV) grafts is high, but fungal etiology is rare. Only five cases of graft infection due to Candida albicans (C. albicans) or C. tropicalis have been described in the literature. Herein, we report the first case of AV graft infection caused by C. glabrata. A 60-year-old woman on maintenance hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease was admitted because of intermittent fever, for 10 days. Upon physical examination, tenderness over the AV graft site was noticed. Blood culture yielded C. glabrata and her clinical symptoms improved after she was treated with micafungin for 1 month. However, C. glabrata candidemia reoccurred 5 weeks later. Cure was achieved after removal of the AV graft and anidulafungin treatment. Pus was observed in the removed graft, from which C. glabrata was isolated. The outcome of our case and patients from the literature review suggest that removal of the infected graft is important for treatment success of AV graft Candida infection. PMID:23838263

  10. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  11. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response.

    PubMed

    Nash, Evelyn E; Peters, Brian M; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  12. UPC2A is required for high-level azole antifungal resistance in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Sarah G; Caudle, Kelly E; Vermitsky, John-Paul; Chadwick, Sean G; Toner, Geoffrey; Barker, Katherine S; Gygax, Scott E; Rogers, P David

    2014-08-01

    Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of Candida infections, is associated with high rates of mortality and often exhibits resistance to the azole class of antifungal agents. Upc2 and Ecm22 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Upc2 in Candida albicans are the transcriptional regulators of ERG11, the gene encoding the target of azoles in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Recently two homologs for these transcription factors, UPC2A and UPC2B, were identified in C. glabrata. One of these, UPC2A, was shown to influence azole susceptibility. We hypothesized that due to the global role for Upc2 in sterol biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans, disruption of UPC2A would enhance the activity of fluconazole in both azole-susceptible dose-dependent (SDD) and -resistant C. glabrata clinical isolates. To test this hypothesis, we constructed mutants with disruptions in UPC2A and UPC2B alone and in combination in a matched pair of clinical azole-SDD and -resistant isolates. Disruption of UPC2A in both the SDD and resistant isolates resulted in increased susceptibility to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors, including a reduction in fluconazole MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration, enhanced azole activity by time-kill analysis, a decrease in ergosterol content, and downregulation of baseline and inducible expression of several sterol biosynthesis genes. Our results indicate that Upc2A is a key regulator of ergosterol biosynthesis and is essential for resistance to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors in C. glabrata. Therefore, the UPC2A pathway may represent a potential cotherapeutic target for enhancing azole activity against this organism. PMID:24867980

  13. Application of CHROMagar Candida for rapid screening of clinical specimens for Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, and Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Houston, A; Coffmann, S

    1996-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a new differential culture medium that allows selective isolation of yeasts and simultaneously identifies colonies of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. We evaluated the use of this medium with 316 yeast isolates including 247 isolated directly on CHROMagar from clinical material. Over 95% of stock and clinical isolates of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei were correctly identified on the basis of colony morphology and pigmentation on CHROMagar. Additionally, CHROMagar also allowed the identification of C. (Torulopsis) glabrata at a similar level of accuracy. The overall agreement between two observers in reading the CHROMagar plates was 95%. Growth of Candida sp. isolates on CHROMagar had no adverse effect on antifungal MICs or Vitek identification results. In parallel, cultures of 548 stool and rectal swab specimens set up on CHROMagar and Sabouraud glucose agar (SGA) were positive in 234 instances. CHROMagar was positive and SGA was negative for 11 specimens, and CHROMagar was negative and SGA was positive for 18 specimens. A single yeast species was isolated on both media from 162 specimens, and in 146 (90%) of these specimens the same species was detected on both CHROMagar and SGA. A total of 43 of the 234 positive cultures contained mixtures of yeast species. Twenty (47%) of these mixed cultures were detected only on CHROMagar. CHROMagar is extremely useful in making a rapid presumptive identification of common yeast species. This capability plus the ability to detect mixed cultures of Candida spp. promises to improve and streamline the work flow in the mycology and clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:8748273

  14. Medical treatment of a pacemaker endocarditis due to Candida albicans and to Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Roger, P M; Boissy, C; Gari-Toussaint, M; Foucher, R; Mondain, V; Vandenbos, F; le Fichoux, Y; Michiels, J F; Dellamonica, P

    2000-09-01

    We describe a case of pacemaker infection due to two fungal species: Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large vegetation on the intraventricular wires. Because of severe underlying diseases, surgery was believed to be contraindicated. The patient was treated using high dose of fluconazole, resulting in clinical improvement and negative blood cultures. However, 2 months later, the patient underwent a fatal stroke. At autopsy, a large vegetation was found only all along the wires. Postmortem culture of the infected material was positive for both C. albicans and C. glabrata. PMID:11023765

  15. Intracellular survival of Candida glabrata in macrophages: immune evasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lydia; Seider, Katja; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a successful human opportunistic pathogen which causes superficial but also life-threatening systemic infections. During infection, C. glabrata has to cope with cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages, which belong to the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Candida glabrata is able to survive and even replicate inside macrophages while causing surprisingly low damage and cytokine release. Here, we present an overview of recent studies dealing with the interaction of C. glabrata with macrophages, from phagocytosis to intracellular growth and escape. We review the strategies of C. glabrata that permit intracellular survival and replication, including poor host cell activation, modification of phagosome maturation and phagosome pH, adaptation to antimicrobial activities, and mechanisms to overcome the nutrient limitations within the phagosome. In summary, these studies suggest that survival within macrophages may be an immune evasion and persistence strategy of C. glabrata during infection. PMID:26066553

  16. Upregulation of the Adhesin Gene EPA1 Mediated by PDR1 in Candida glabrata Leads to Enhanced Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Silva, Luis A.; Moeckli, Beat; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata is the second most common Candida species causing disseminated infection, after C. albicans. C. glabrata is intrinsically less susceptible to the widely used azole antifungal drugs and quickly develops secondary resistance. Resistance typically relies on drug efflux with transporters regulated by the transcription factor Pdr1. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in PDR1 lead to a hyperactive state and thus efflux transporter upregulation. Our laboratory has characterized a collection of C. glabrata clinical isolates in which azole resistance was found to correlate with increased virulence in vivo. Contributing phenotypes were the evasion of adhesion and phagocytosis by macrophages and an increased adhesion to epithelial cells. These phenotypes were found to be dependent on PDR1 GOF mutation and/or C. glabrata strain background. In the search for the molecular effectors, we found that PDR1 hyperactivity leads to overexpression of specific cell wall adhesins of C. glabrata. Further study revealed that EPA1 regulation, in particular, explained the increase in adherence to epithelial cells. Deleting EPA1 eliminates the increase in adherence in an in vitro model of interaction with epithelial cells. In a murine model of urinary tract infection, PDR1 hyperactivity conferred increased ability to colonize the bladder and kidneys in an EPA1-dependent way. In conclusion, this study establishes a relationship between PDR1 and the regulation of cell wall adhesins, an important virulence attribute of C. glabrata. Furthermore, our data show that PDR1 hyperactivity mediates increased adherence to host epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo through upregulation of the adhesin gene EPA1. IMPORTANCE Candida glabrata is an important fungal pathogen in human diseases and is also rapidly acquiring drug resistance. Drug resistance can be mediated by the transcriptional activator PDR1, and this results in the upregulation of multidrug transporters

  17. Upregulation of the Adhesin Gene EPA1 Mediated by PDR1 in Candida glabrata Leads to Enhanced Host Colonization.

    PubMed

    Vale-Silva, Luis A; Moeckli, Beat; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common Candida species causing disseminated infection, after C. albicans. C. glabrata is intrinsically less susceptible to the widely used azole antifungal drugs and quickly develops secondary resistance. Resistance typically relies on drug efflux with transporters regulated by the transcription factor Pdr1. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in PDR1 lead to a hyperactive state and thus efflux transporter upregulation. Our laboratory has characterized a collection of C. glabrata clinical isolates in which azole resistance was found to correlate with increased virulence in vivo. Contributing phenotypes were the evasion of adhesion and phagocytosis by macrophages and an increased adhesion to epithelial cells. These phenotypes were found to be dependent on PDR1 GOF mutation and/or C. glabrata strain background. In the search for the molecular effectors, we found that PDR1 hyperactivity leads to overexpression of specific cell wall adhesins of C. glabrata. Further study revealed that EPA1 regulation, in particular, explained the increase in adherence to epithelial cells. Deleting EPA1 eliminates the increase in adherence in an in vitro model of interaction with epithelial cells. In a murine model of urinary tract infection, PDR1 hyperactivity conferred increased ability to colonize the bladder and kidneys in an EPA1-dependent way. In conclusion, this study establishes a relationship between PDR1 and the regulation of cell wall adhesins, an important virulence attribute of C. glabrata. Furthermore, our data show that PDR1 hyperactivity mediates increased adherence to host epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo through upregulation of the adhesin gene EPA1. IMPORTANCE Candida glabrata is an important fungal pathogen in human diseases and is also rapidly acquiring drug resistance. Drug resistance can be mediated by the transcriptional activator PDR1, and this results in the upregulation of multidrug transporters. Intriguingly

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Candida glabrata for Diacetyl Production

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Xu, Nan; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Candida glabrata, an efficient pyruvate-producing strain, was metabolically engineered for the production of the food ingredient diacetyl. A diacetyl biosynthetic pathway was reconstructed based on genetic modifications and medium optimization. The former included (i) channeling carbon flux into the diacetyl biosynthetic pathway by amplification of acetolactate synthase, (ii) elimination of the branched pathway of α-acetolactate by deleting the ILV5 gene, and (iii) restriction of diacetyl degradation by deleting the BDH gene. The resultant strain showed an almost 1∶1 co-production of α-acetolactate and diacetyl (0.95 g L−1). Furthermore, addition of Fe3+ to the medium enhanced the conversion of α-acetolactate to diacetyl and resulted in a two-fold increase in diacetyl production (2.1 g L−1). In addition, increased carbon flux was further channeled into diacetyl biosynthetic pathway and a titer of 4.7 g L−1 of diacetyl was achieved by altering the vitamin level in the flask culture. Thus, this study illustrates that C. glabrata could be tailored as an attractive platform for enhanced biosynthesis of beneficial products from pyruvate by metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:24614328

  19. Growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of Candida glabrata are affected by different glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2016-06-01

    Glucose is an important fuel source to support many living organisms. Its importance in the physiological fitness and pathogenicity of Candida glabrata, an emerging human fungal pathogen has not been extensively studied. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of glucose on the growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. In addition, its effect on the expression of a putative high affinity glucose sensor gene, SNF3 was also investigated. Glucose concentrations were found to exert effects on the physiological responses of C. glabrata. The growth rate of the species correlated positively to the amount of glucose. In addition, low glucose environments were found to induce C. glabrata to form biofilm and resist amphotericin B. Conversely, high glucose environments promoted oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. The expression of CgSNF3 was found to be significantly up-regulated in low glucose environments. The expression of SNF3 gene in clinical isolates was found to be higher compared to ATCC laboratory strains in low glucose concentrations, which may explain the better survivability of clinical isolates in the low glucose environment. These observations demonstrated the impact of glucose in directing the physiology and virulence fitness of C. glabrata through the possible modulation by SNF3 as a glucose sensor, which in turn aids the species to adapt, survive and thrive in hostile host environment. PMID:26358577

  20. In Vitro Fungicidal Activities of Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis Evaluated by Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. PMID:25801575

  1. Recurrent Episodes of Candidemia Due to Candida glabrata with a Mutation in Hot Spot 1 of the FKS2 Gene Developed after Prolonged Therapy with Caspofungin

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Sara; Gómez-López, Alicia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Jiménez Díez-Canseco, Leticia; Gómez-Garcés, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    We report two episodes of recurrent candidemia caused by echinocandin-resistant Candida glabrata in a 69-year-old patient who underwent repeated abdominal surgery. In the first episode of candidemia, an echinocandin-susceptible Candida glabrata strain was isolated, and the patient was treated with caspofungin. The isolates from the later episodes showed resistance to echinocandins. Analysis of the HS1 region of the FKS2 gene showed the amino acid substitution S663P. Microsatellite analysis demonstrated a strong genetic relationship between the isolates. PMID:22391532

  2. Propargyl-Linked Antifolates are Dual Inhibitors of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Species of Candida, primarily C. albicans and with increasing prevalence, C. glabrata, are responsible for the majority of fungal bloodstream infections that cause morbidity, especially among immune compromised patients. While the development of new antifungal agents that target the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), in both Candida species would be ideal, previous attempts have resulted in antifolates that exhibit inconsistencies between enzyme inhibition and antifungal properties. In this article, we describe the evaluation of pairs of propargyl-linked antifolates that possess similar physicochemical properties but different shapes. All of these compounds are effective at inhibiting the fungal enzymes and the growth of C. glabrata; however, the inhibition of the growth of C. albicans is shape-dependent with extended para-linked compounds proving more effective than compact, meta-linked compounds. Using crystal structures of DHFR from C. albicans and C. glabrata bound to lead compounds, 13 new para-linked compounds designed to inhibit both species were synthesized. Eight of these compounds potently inhibit the growth of both fungal species with three compounds displaying dual MIC values less than 1 μg/mL. Analysis of the active compounds shows that shape and distribution of polar functionality is critical in achieving dual antifungal activity. PMID:24568657

  3. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    PubMed

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals. PMID:27452427

  4. The Drosophila Toll pathway controls but does not clear Candida glabrata infections.

    PubMed

    Quintin, Jessica; Asmar, Joelle; Matskevich, Alexey A; Lafarge, Marie-Céline; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2013-03-15

    The pathogenicity of Candida glabrata to patients remains poorly understood for lack of convenient animal models to screen large numbers of mutants for altered virulence. In this study, we explore the minihost model Drosophila melanogaster from the dual perspective of host and pathogen. As in vertebrates, wild-type flies contain C. glabrata systemic infections yet are unable to kill the injected yeasts. As for other fungal infections in Drosophila, the Toll pathway restrains C. glabrata proliferation. Persistent C. glabrata yeasts in wild-type flies do not appear to be able to take shelter in hemocytes from the action of the Toll pathway, the effectors of which remain to be identified. Toll pathway mutant flies succumb to injected C. glabrata. In this immunosuppressed background, cellular defenses provide a residual level of protection. Although both the Gram-negative binding protein 3 pattern recognition receptor and the Persephone protease-dependent detection pathway are required for Toll pathway activation by C. glabrata, only GNBP3, and not psh mutants, are susceptible to the infection. Both Candida albicans and C. glabrata are restrained by the Toll pathway, yet the comparative study of phenoloxidase activation reveals a differential activity of the Toll pathway against these two fungal pathogens. Finally, we establish that the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway and yapsins are required for virulence of C. glabrata in this model. Unexpectedly, yapsins do not appear to be required to counteract the cellular immune response but are needed for the colonization of the wild-type host. PMID:23401590

  5. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from condiments against fluconazole-resistant and -sensitive Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Soares, I H; Loreto, É S; Rossato, L; Mario, D N; Venturini, T P; Baldissera, F; Santurio, J M; Alves, S H

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Salvia officinalis (sage), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Ocimum basilicum (basil) and Zingiber officinale (ginger) were assessed against Candida glabrata isolates. One group contained 30 fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata isolates, and the second group contained fluconazole-resistant isolates derived from the first group after the in vitro induction of fluconazole-resistance, for a total of 60 tested isolates. The broth microdilution methodology was used. Concentrations of 50μg/mL, 100μg/mL, 200μg/mL, 400μg/mL, 800μg/mL, 1600μg/mL and 3200μg/mL of the essential oils were used, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined. Thyme, sage, rosemary, basil and ginger essential oils showed no antifungal activity at the tested concentrations. Antimicrobial activity less than or equal to 3200μg/mL was observed for oregano, Mexican oregano and cinnamon essential oils. Both the oregano and Mexican oregano essential oils showed high levels of antifungal activity against the fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata group, whereas the cinnamon essential oil showed the best antifungal activity against the fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates. PMID:26281965

  6. Direct Isolation of Candida spp. from Blood Cultures on the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Lynn L.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Dooley, David P.

    2003-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a selective and differential chromogenic medium that has been shown to be useful for identification of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, and perhaps Candida glabrata. Colony morphology and color have been well defined when CHROMagar Candida has been used to isolate yeast directly from clinical specimens, including stool, urine, respiratory, vaginal, oropharyngeal, and esophageal sources. Direct isolation of yeast on CHROMagar Candida from blood cultures has not been evaluated. We evaluated whether the color and colony characteristics produced by Candida spp. on CHROMagar Candida were altered when yeasts were isolated directly from blood cultures. Fifty clinical isolates of Candida were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated at 35°C in an automated blood culture system. When growth was detected, an aliquot was removed and plated onto CHROMagar Candida. As a control, CHROMagar Candida plates were inoculated with the same isolate of yeast grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar simultaneously. No significant difference was detected in color or colony morphology between the blood and control isolates in any of the tested organisms. All C. albicans (n = 12), C. tropicalis (n = 12), C. glabrata (n = 9), and C. krusei (n = 5) isolates exhibited the expected species-specific colony characteristics and color, whether isolated directly from blood or from control cultures. CHROMagar Candida can be reliably used for direct isolation of yeast from blood cultures. Direct isolation could allow mycology laboratories to more rapidly identify Candida spp., enable clinicians to more quickly make antifungal agent selections, and potentially decrease patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:12791890

  7. Heteroresistance to Fluconazole Is a Continuously Distributed Phenotype among Candida glabrata Clinical Strains Associated with In Vivo Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Zimmerman, Offer; Finn, Talya; Amit, Sharon; Novikov, Anna; Wertheimer, Noa; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata causes persistent infections in patients treated with fluconazole and often acquires resistance following exposure to the drug. Here we found that clinical strains of C. glabrata exhibit cell-to-cell variation in drug response (heteroresistance). We used population analysis profiling (PAP) to assess fluconazole heteroresistance (FLCHR) and to ask if it is a binary trait or a continuous phenotype. Thirty (57.6%) of 52 fluconazole-sensitive clinical C. glabrata isolates met accepted dichotomous criteria for FLCHR. However, quantitative grading of FLCHR by using the area under the PAP curve (AUC) revealed a continuous distribution across a wide range of values, suggesting that all isolates exhibit some degree of heteroresistance. The AUC correlated with rhodamine 6G efflux and was associated with upregulation of the CDR1 and PDH1 genes, encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporters, implying that HetR populations exhibit higher levels of drug efflux. Highly FLCHR C. glabrata was recovered more frequently than nonheteroresistant C. glabrata from hematogenously infected immunocompetent mice following treatment with high-dose fluconazole (45.8% versus 15%, P = 0.029). Phylogenetic analysis revealed some phenotypic clustering but also variations in FLCHR within clonal groups, suggesting both genetic and epigenetic determinants of heteroresistance. Collectively, these results establish heteroresistance to fluconazole as a graded phenotype associated with ABC transporter upregulation and fluconazole efflux. Heteroresistance may explain the propensity of C. glabrata for persistent infection and the emergence of breakthrough resistance to fluconazole. PMID:27486188

  8. Effect of tyrosol on adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Arias, Laís Salomão; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2015-09-01

    The prevention of adhesion of Candida cells to acrylic surfaces can be regarded as an alternative to prevent denture stomatitis. The use of quorum sensing molecules, such as tyrosol, could potentially interfere with the adhesion process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of tyrosol on adhesion of single and mixed cultures of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata to acrylic resin surfaces. Tyrosol was diluted in each yeast inoculum (10(7) cells/ml in artificial saliva) at 25, 50, 100, and 200 mM. Then, each dilution was added to wells of 24-well plates containing the acrylic specimens, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 2 h. After, the effect of tyrosol was determined by total biomass quantification, metabolic activity of the cells and colony-forming unit counting. Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was used as a positive control. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak post hoc test (α = 0.05). The results of total biomass quantification and metabolic activity revealed that the tyrosol promoted significant reductions (ranging from 22.32 to 86.16%) on single C. albicans and mixed cultures. Moreover, tyrosol at 200 mM and CHG significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the number of adhered cells to the acrylic surface for single and mixed cultures of both species, with reductions ranging from 1.74 to 3.64-log10. In conclusion, tyrosol has an inhibitory effect on Candida adhesion to acrylic resin, and further investigations are warranted to clarify its potential against Candida infections. PMID:26162470

  9. Iron-depletion promotes mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial integrity in pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Minoru; Tanabe, Koichi; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ueno, Keigo; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Umeyama, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata, a haploid budding yeast, is the cause of severe systemic infections in immune-compromised hosts. The amount of free iron supplied to C. glabrata cells during systemic infections is severely limited by iron-chelating proteins such as transferrin. Thus, the iron-deficiency response in C. glabrata cells is thought to play important roles in their survival inside the host's body. In this study, we found that mitophagy was induced under iron-depleted conditions, and that the disruption of a gene homologous to ATG32, which is responsible for mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, blocked mitophagy in C. glabrata. The mitophagic activity in C. glabrata cells was not detected on short-period exposure to nitrogen-starved conditions, which is a mitophagy-inducing condition used in S. cerevisiae. The mitophagy-deficient atg32Δ mutant of C. glabrata also exhibited decreased longevity under iron-deficient conditions. The mitochondrial membrane potential in Cgatg32Δ cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells under iron-depleted conditions. In a mouse model of disseminated infection, the Cgatg32Δ strain resulted in significantly decreased kidney and spleen fungal burdens compared with the wild-type strain. These results indicate that mitophagy in C. glabrata occurs in an iron-poor host tissue environment, and it may contribute to the longevity of cells, mitochondrial quality control, and pathogenesis. PMID:27347716

  10. Iron-depletion promotes mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial integrity in pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Nagi, Minoru; Tanabe, Koichi; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ueno, Keigo; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Umeyama, Takashi; Ohno, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-08-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid budding yeast, is the cause of severe systemic infections in immune-compromised hosts. The amount of free iron supplied to C. glabrata cells during systemic infections is severely limited by iron-chelating proteins such as transferrin. Thus, the iron-deficiency response in C. glabrata cells is thought to play important roles in their survival inside the host's body. In this study, we found that mitophagy was induced under iron-depleted conditions, and that the disruption of a gene homologous to ATG32, which is responsible for mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, blocked mitophagy in C. glabrata. The mitophagic activity in C. glabrata cells was not detected on short-period exposure to nitrogen-starved conditions, which is a mitophagy-inducing condition used in S. cerevisiae. The mitophagy-deficient atg32Δ mutant of C. glabrata also exhibited decreased longevity under iron-deficient conditions. The mitochondrial membrane potential in Cgatg32Δ cells was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells under iron-depleted conditions. In a mouse model of disseminated infection, the Cgatg32Δ strain resulted in significantly decreased kidney and spleen fungal burdens compared with the wild-type strain. These results indicate that mitophagy in C. glabrata occurs in an iron-poor host tissue environment, and it may contribute to the longevity of cells, mitochondrial quality control, and pathogenesis. PMID:27347716

  11. Defining the transcriptomic landscape of Candida glabrata by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Linde, Jörg; Duggan, Seána; Weber, Michael; Horn, Fabian; Sieber, Patricia; Hellwig, Daniela; Riege, Konstantin; Marz, Manja; Martin, Ronny; Guthke, Reinhard; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-02-18

    Candida glabrata is the second most common pathogenic Candida species and has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial fungal infections. Its reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs and its close relationship to Saccharomyces cerevisiae make it an interesting research focus. Although its genome sequence was published in 2004, little is known about its transcriptional dynamics. Here, we provide a detailed RNA-Seq-based analysis of the transcriptomic landscape of C. glabrata in nutrient-rich media, as well as under nitrosative stress and during pH shift. Using RNA-Seq data together with state-of-the-art gene prediction tools, we refined the annotation of the C. glabrata genome and predicted 49 novel protein-coding genes. Of these novel genes, 14 have homologs in S. cerevisiae and six are shared with other Candida species. We experimentally validated four novel protein-coding genes of which two are differentially regulated during pH shift and interaction with human neutrophils, indicating a potential role in host-pathogen interaction. Furthermore, we identified 58 novel non-protein-coding genes, 38 new introns and condition-specific alternative splicing. Finally, our data suggest different patterns of adaptation to pH shift and nitrosative stress in C. glabrata, Candida albicans and S. cerevisiae and thus further underline a distinct evolution of virulence in yeast. PMID:25586221

  12. Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Echinocandin Nonsusceptible Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections: Data From a Large Multisite Population-Based Candidemia Surveillance Program, 2008–2014

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Cleveland, Angela A.; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Schaffner, William; Beldavs, Zintar G.; Derado, Gordana; Pham, Cau D.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Smith, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Echinocandins are first-line treatment for Candida glabrata candidemia. Echinocandin resistance is concerning due to limited remaining treatment options. We used data from a multisite, population-based surveillance program to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for echinocandin nonsusceptible (NS) C glabrata candidemia. Methods. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infections Program conducts population-based laboratory surveillance for candidemia in 4 metropolitan areas (7.9 million persons; 80 hospitals). We identified C glabrata cases occurring during 2008–2014; medical records of cases were reviewed, and C glabrata isolates underwent broth microdilution antifungal susceptibility testing. We defined echinocandin-NS C glabrata (intermediate or resistant) based on 2012 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoints. Independent risk factors for NS C glabrata were determined by stepwise logistic regression. Results. Of 1385 C glabrata cases, 83 (6.0%) had NS isolates (19 intermediate and 64 resistant); the proportion of NS isolates rose from 4.2% in 2008 to 7.8% in 2014 (P < .001). The proportion of NS isolates at each hospital ranged from 0% to 25.8%; 3 large, academic hospitals accounted for almost half of all NS isolates. In multivariate analysis, prior echinocandin exposure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3; 95% CI, 2.6–1.2), previous candidemia episode (aOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2–5.1), hospitalization in the last 90 days (aOR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0–3.5, and fluconazole resistance [aOR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0–6.4]) were significantly associated with NS C glabrata. Fifty-nine percent of NS C glabrata cases had no known prior echinocandin exposure. Conclusion. The proportion of NS C glabrata isolates rose significantly during 2008–2014, and NS C glabrata frequency differed across hospitals. In addition to acquired resistance resulting from prior drug exposure, occurrence of NS C

  13. Efficient Mating-Type Switching in Candida glabrata Induces Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Boisnard, Stéphanie; Zhou Li, Youfang; Arnaise, Sylvie; Sequeira, Gregory; Raffoux, Xavier; Enache-Angoulvant, Adela; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Fairhead, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an apparently asexual haploid yeast that is phylogenetically closer to Saccharomyces cerevisiae than to Candida albicans. Its genome contains three MAT-like cassettes, MAT, which encodes either MATa or MATalpha information in different strains, and the additional loci, HML and HMR. The genome also contains an HO gene homolog, but this yeast has never been shown to switch mating-types spontaneously, as S. cerevisiae does. We have recently sequenced the genomes of the five species that, together with C. glabrata, make up the Nakaseomyces clade. All contain MAT-like cassettes and an HO gene homolog. In this work, we express the HO gene of all Nakaseomyces and of S. cerevisiae in C. glabrata. All can induce mating-type switching, but, despite the larger phylogenetic distance, the most efficient endonuclease is the one from S. cerevisiae. Efficient mating-type switching in C. glabrata is accompanied by a high cell mortality, and sometimes results in conversion of the additional cassette HML. Mortality probably results from the cutting of the HO recognition sites that are present, in HML and possibly HMR, contrary to what happens naturally in S. cerevisiae. This has implications in the life-cycle of C. glabrata, as we show that efficient MAT switching is lethal for most cells, induces chromosomal rearrangements in survivors, and that the endogenous HO is probably rarely active indeed. PMID:26491872

  14. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. PMID:26048009

  15. Drug-Resistant Candida glabrata Infection in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients are at risk for candidemia, and increasing Candida spp. resistance poses an emerging threat. We determined rates of antifungal drug resistance, identified factors associated with resistance, and investigated the correlation between resistance and all-cause mortality rates among cancer patients with ≥1 C. glabrata–positive blood culture at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, during March 2005–September 2013. Of 146 isolates, 30 (20.5%) were resistant to fluconazole, 15 (10.3%) to caspofungin, and 10 (6.8%) to multiple drugs (9 caspofungin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluconazole, 1 to amphotericin B). Independently associated with fluconazole resistance were azole preexposure, hematologic malignancy, and mechanical ventilation. Independently associated with caspofungin resistance were echinocandin preexposure, monocytopenia, and total parenteral nutrition. Fluconazole resistance was highly associated with caspofungin resistance, independent of prior azole or echinocandin use. Caspofungin resistance was associated with increased 28-day all-cause mortality rates. These findings highlight the need for good stewardship of antifungal drugs. PMID:25340258

  16. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  17. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Iosue, Christine L; Attanasio, Nicholas; Shaik, Noor F; Neal, Erin M; Leone, Sarah G; Cali, Brian J; Peel, Michael T; Grannas, Amanda M; Wykoff, Dennis D

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  18. Time-to-reporting of blood culture positivity and central venous catheter-associated Candida glabrata fungemia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Stempel, Jessica M; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2016-07-01

    Among cancer patients with Candida glabrata (the Candida species with the slowest in-vitro growth) fungemia, time-to-positive blood culture reporting (TTR) was shorter in catheter-associated candidemia (mean±standard deviation: 67±35 h) than in candidemia from other sources (79±31, P<.01). TTR<48 h was 92% specific for catheter-associated C. glabrata fungemia. PMID:27133559

  19. Propensity Score Analysis of the Role of Initial Antifungal Therapy in the Outcome of Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Puig-Asensio, M; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Aguado, J M; Merino, P; Lora-Pablos, D; Guinea, J; Martín-Dávila, P; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Almirante, B

    2016-06-01

    Candida glabrata isolates have reduced in vitro susceptibility to azoles, which raises concerns about the clinical effectiveness of fluconazole for treating bloodstream infection (BSI) by this Candida species. We aimed to evaluate whether the choice of initial antifungal treatment (fluconazole versus echinocandins or liposomal amphotericin B [L-AmB]-based regimens) has an impact on the outcome of C. glabrata BSI. We analyzed data from a prospective, multicenter, population-based surveillance program on candidemia conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of Spain (May 2010 to April 2011). Adult patients with an episode of C. glabrata BSI were included. The main outcomes were 14-day mortality and treatment failure (14-day mortality and/or persistent C. glabrata BSI for ≥48 h despite antifungal initiation). The impact of using fluconazole as initial antifungal treatment on the patients' prognosis was assessed by logistic regression analysis with the addition of a propensity score approach. A total of 94 patients with C. glabrata BSI were identified. Of these, 34 had received fluconazole and 35 had received an echinocandin/L-AmB-based regimen. Patients in the echinocandin/L-AmB group had poorer baseline clinical status than did those in the fluconazole group. Patients in the fluconazole group were more frequently (55.9% versus 28.6%) and much earlier (median time, 3 versus 7 days) switched to another antifungal regimen. Overall, 14-day mortality was 13% (9/69) and treatment failure 34.8% (24/69), with no significant differences between the groups. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for baseline characteristics by propensity score, fluconazole use was not associated with an unfavorable evolution (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for 14-day mortality, 1.16, with 95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.22 to 6.17; adjusted OR for treatment failure, 0.83, with 95% CI of 0.27 to 2.61). In conclusion, initial fluconazole treatment was not associated with a poorer outcome than that

  20. Molecular identification of Candida orthopsilosis isolated from blood culture.

    PubMed

    Yong, P V C; Chong, P P; Lau, L Y; Yeoh, R S C; Jamal, F

    2008-02-01

    The incidence of candidemia and invasive candidiasis have increased markedly due to the increasing number of immunocompromised patients. There are five major medically important species of Candida with their frequency of isolation in the diminishing order namely Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. In addition, there are numerous other species of Candida which differ in their genetic makeup, virulence properties, drug susceptibilities and sugar assimilation capabilities. In this report, an unusual Candida species was isolated from the blood of two leukaemic patients. Conventional culture and biochemical tests identified the Candida species as C. parapsilosis. Using fungal-specific oligonucleotide primers ITS1 and ITS4, we managed to amplify the ribosomal RNA gene and its internal transcribed spacer region from the genomic DNA of these isolates. The PCR products were then purified and subjected to automated DNA sequencing using BLAST and CLUSTAL sequence analysis identified these isolates to be Candida orthopsilosis. Candida orthopsilosis is a new species recently identified in 2005, being morphologically indistinguishable from C. parapsilosis and was previously classified as a subspecies of C. parapsilosis. This report highlights the importance of complementing traditional culture and biochemical-based identification methods with DNA-based molecular assays such as PCR as the latter is more superior in terms of its discriminatory power and speed. PMID:18266075

  1. Genome-wide survey of transcriptional initiation in the pathogenic fungus, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Toshihiro; Nakayama, Hironobu; Ueno, Keigo; Inukai, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Koichi; Nagi, Minoru; Bard, Martin; Chibana, Hiroji

    2014-06-01

    DNA sequencing of the 5'-flanking region of the transcriptome effectively identifies transcription initiation sites and also aids in identifying unknown genes. This study describes a comprehensive polling of transcription start sites and an analysis of full-length complementary DNAs derived from the genome of the pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the sequence reads derived from a cDNA library prepared from cells grown under different culture conditions against the reference genomic sequence of the Candida Genome Database (CGD: http://www.candidagenome.org/) revealed the expression of 4316 genes and their acknowledged transcription start sites (TSSs). In addition this analysis also predicted 59 new genes including 22 that showed no homology to the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a genetically close relative of C. glabrata. Furthermore, comparison of the 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) and core promoters of C. glabrata to those of S. cerevisiae showed various global similarities and differences among orthologous genes. Thus, the C. glabrata transcriptome can complement the annotation of the genome database and should provide new insights into the organization, regulation, and function of genes of this important human pathogen. PMID:24725256

  2. Failed Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Caused by Recurrent Candida glabrata Infection with Prior Serratia marcescens Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Keenan, Kendra E.; Updike, Wanda S.; Oliver, Marquam R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 58-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic male patient who initially sustained a proximal humerus fracture from a fall. The fracture fixation failed and then was converted to a humeral hemiarthroplasty, which became infected with Candida glabrata and Serratia marcescens. After these infections were believed to be cured with antibacterial and antifungal treatments and two-stage irrigation and debridement, he underwent conversion to a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Unfortunately, the C. glabrata infection recurred and, nearly 1.5 years after implantation of the reverse total shoulder, he had a resection arthroplasty (removal of all implants and cement). His surgical and pharmacologic treatment concluded with (1) placement of a tobramycin-impregnated cement spacer also loaded with amphotericin B, with no plan for revision arthroplasty (i.e., the spacer was chronically retained), and (2) chronic use of daily oral fluconazole. We located only three reported cases of Candida species causing infection in shoulder arthroplasties (two C. albicans, one C. parapsilosis). To our knowledge, a total shoulder arthroplasty infected with C. glabrata has not been reported, nor has a case of a C. glabrata and S. marcescens periprosthetic coinfection in any joint. In addition, it is well known that S. marcescens infections are uncommon in periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:25431708

  3. Convergent Evolution of Calcineurin Pathway Roles in Thermotolerance and Virulence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Lien; Konieczka, Jay H.; Springer, Deborah J.; Bowen, Samantha E.; Zhang, Jing; Silao, Fitz Gerald S.; Bungay, Alice Alma C.; Bigol, Ursela G.; Nicolas, Marilou G.; Abraham, Soman N.; Thompson, Dawn A.; Regev, Aviv; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an emerging human fungal pathogen that is frequently drug tolerant, resulting in difficulties in treatment and a higher mortality in immunocompromised patients. The calcium-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin plays critical roles in controlling drug tolerance, hyphal growth, and virulence in diverse fungal pathogens via distinct mechanisms involving survival in serum or growth at host temperature (37° and higher). Here, we comprehensively studied the calcineurin signaling cascade in C. glabrata and found novel and uncharacterized functions of calcineurin and its downstream target Crz1 in governing thermotolerance, intracellular architecture, and pathogenesis in murine ocular, urinary tract, and systemic infections. This represents a second independent origin of a role for calcineurin in thermotolerant growth of a major human fungal pathogen, distinct from that which arose independently in Cryptococcus neoformans. Calcineurin also promotes survival of C. glabrata in serum via mechanisms distinct from C. albicans and thereby enables establishment of tissue colonization in a murine systemic infection model. To understand calcineurin signaling in detail, we performed global transcript profiling analysis and identified calcineurin- and Crz1-dependent genes in C. glabrata involved in cell wall biosynthesis, heat shock responses, and calcineurin function. Regulators of calcineurin (RCN) are a novel family of calcineurin modifiers, and two members of this family were identified in C. glabrata: Rcn1 and Rcn2. Our studies demonstrate that Rcn2 expression is controlled by calcineurin and Crz1 to function as a feedback inhibitor of calcineurin in a circuit required for calcium tolerance in C. glabrata. In contrast, the calcineurin regulator Rcn1 activates calcineurin signaling. Interestingly, neither Rcn1 nor Rcn2 is required for virulence in a murine systemic infection model. Taken together, our findings show that calcineurin signaling plays

  4. Candida glabrata susceptibility to antifungals and phagocytosis is modulated by acetate

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Sandra; Alves, Rosana; Carneiro, Catarina; Silva, Sónia; Brown, Alistair J.; Istel, Fabian; Kuchler, Karl; Sampaio, Paula; Casal, Margarida; Henriques, Mariana; Paiva, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is considered a major opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans. The capacity of this yeast species to cause infections is dependent on the ability to grow within the human host environment and to assimilate the carbon sources available. Previous studies have suggested that C. albicans can encounter glucose-poor microenvironments during infection and that the ability to use alternative non-fermentable carbon sources, such as carboxylic acids, contributes to the virulence of this fungus. Transcriptional studies on C. glabrata cells identified a similar response, upon nutrient deprivation. In this work, we aimed at analyzing biofilm formation, antifungal drug resistance, and phagocytosis of C. glabrata cells grown in the presence of acetic acid as an alternative carbon source. C. glabrata planktonic cells grown in media containing acetic acid were more susceptible to fluconazole and were better phagocytosed and killed by macrophages than when compared to media lacking acetic acid. Growth in acetic acid also affected the ability of C. glabrata to form biofilms. The genes ADY2a, ADY2b, FPS1, FPS2, and ATO3, encoding putative carboxylate transporters, were upregulated in C. glabrata planktonic and biofilm cells in the presence of acetic acid. Phagocytosis assays with fps1 and ady2a mutant strains suggested a potential role of FPS1 and ADY2a in the phagocytosis process. These results highlight how acidic pH niches, associated with the presence of acetic acid, can impact in the treatment of C. glabrata infections, in particular in vaginal candidiasis. PMID:26388859

  5. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  6. In vitro modulation of probiotic bacteria on the biofilm of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shu Yih; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Seow, Heng Fong; Sandai, Doblin; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2015-08-01

    A conspicuous new concept of pathogens living as the microbial societies in the human host rather than free planktonic cells has raised considerable concerns among scientists and clinicians. Fungal biofilms are communities of cells that possess distinct characteristic such as increased resistance to the immune defence and antimycotic agents in comparison to their planktonic cells counterpart. Therefore, inhibition of the biofilm may represent a new paradigm for antifungal development. In this study, we aim to evaluate the in vitro modulation of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata biofilms using probiotic lactobacilli strains. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 were shown to have completely inhibited C. glabrata biofilms and the results were corroborated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed scanty structures of the mixed biofilms of C. glabrata and probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, biofilm-related C. glabrata genes EPA6 and YAK1 were downregulated in response to the probiotic lactobacilli challenges. The present study suggested that probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 strains inhibited C. glabrata biofilm by partially impeding the adherence of yeast cells and the effect might be contributed by the secretory compounds produced by these probiotic lactobacilli strains. Further investigations are required to examine and identify the biofilm inhibitory compounds and the mechanism of probiotic actions of these lactobacilli strains. PMID:26028405

  7. Potassium Uptake Mediated by Trk1 Is Crucial for Candida glabrata Growth and Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Hušeková, Barbora; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of potassium homeostasis is crucial for all types of cells, including Candida glabrata. Three types of plasma-membrane systems mediating potassium influx with different transport mechanisms have been described in yeasts: the Trk1 uniporter, the Hak cation-proton symporter and the Acu ATPase. The C. glabrata genome contains only one gene encoding putative system for potassium uptake, the Trk1 uniporter. Therefore, its importance in maintaining adequate levels of intracellular potassium appears to be critical for C. glabrata cells. In this study, we first confirmed the potassium-uptake activity of the identified gene’s product by heterologous expression in a suitable S. cerevisiae mutant, further we generated a corresponding deletion mutant in C. glabrata and analysed its phenotype in detail. The obtained results show a pleiotropic effect on the cell physiology when CgTRK1 is deleted, affecting not only the ability of trk1Δ to grow at low potassium concentrations, but also the tolerance to toxic alkali-metal cations and cationic drugs, as well as the membrane potential and intracellular pH. Taken together, our results find the sole potassium uptake system in C. glabrata cells to be a promising target in the search for its specific inhibitors and in developing new antifungal drugs. PMID:27058598

  8. Persistence of Pigment Production by Yeast Isolates Grown on CHROMagar Candida Medium

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Green, Judith A.; Dooley, David P.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the persistence of pigmentation in yeast isolates grown on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida over 7 days. Candida, Cryptococcus, and Trichosporon isolates were inoculated alone or mixed onto duplicate sets of plates and incubated at 30 and 35°C. Candida albicans and Candida krusei were readily identified throughout the reading period, but Candida glabrata was difficult to differentiate from other species until the 3- or 4-day time point. Candida tropicalis produced colonies similar to those of rare Cryptococcus and Trichosporon species, and mixed cultures were often difficult to identify as such. PMID:12454192

  9. Global Analysis of the Evolution and Mechanism of Echinocandin Resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Babak, Sheena D.; Babak, Tomas; Diezmann, Stephanie; Hill, Jessica A.; Xie, Jinglin Lucy; Chen, Ying-Lien; Poutanen, Susan M.; Rennie, Robert P.; Heitman, Joseph; Cowen, Leah E.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance has a profound impact on human health. Candida glabrata is a leading human fungal pathogen that can rapidly evolve resistance to echinocandins, which target cell wall biosynthesis and are front-line therapeutics for Candida infections. Here, we provide the first global analysis of mutations accompanying the evolution of fungal drug resistance in a human host utilizing a series of C. glabrata isolates that evolved echinocandin resistance in a patient treated with the echinocandin caspofungin for recurring bloodstream candidemia. Whole genome sequencing identified a mutation in the drug target, FKS2, accompanying a major resistance increase, and 8 additional non-synonymous mutations. The FKS2-T1987C mutation was sufficient for echinocandin resistance, and associated with a fitness cost that was mitigated with further evolution, observed in vitro and in a murine model of systemic candidemia. A CDC6-A511G(K171E) mutation acquired before FKS2-T1987C(S663P), conferred a small resistance increase. Elevated dosage of CDC55, which acquired a C463T(P155S) mutation after FKS2-T1987C(S663P), ameliorated fitness. To discover strategies to abrogate echinocandin resistance, we focused on the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and downstream effector calcineurin. Genetic or pharmacological compromise of Hsp90 or calcineurin function reduced basal tolerance and resistance. Hsp90 and calcineurin were required for caspofungin-dependent FKS2 induction, providing a mechanism governing echinocandin resistance. A mitochondrial respiration-defective petite mutant in the series revealed that the petite phenotype does not confer echinocandin resistance, but renders strains refractory to synergy between echinocandins and Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors. The kidneys of mice infected with the petite mutant were sterile, while those infected with the HSP90-repressible strain had reduced fungal burden. We provide the first global view of mutations accompanying the

  10. Use of CHROMagar Candida medium for isolation of yeasts from dental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, D; Ludford, R; Clark, D T; Brailsford, S R; Pankhurst, C L; Tinsley, G F; Fiske, J; Lewis, D; Daly, B; Khalifa, N

    1995-01-01

    A new differential medium, CHROMagar Candida, for the isolation of clinically important yeasts was investigated to determine its usefulness in facilitating the study of oral yeasts. The recovery of yeasts on the medium was not significantly different from the recovery on Sabouraud dextrose agar. The identities of 450 green colonies on CHROMagar Candida, presumptively identified as Candida albicans on the basis of the manufacturer's instructions, were confirmed by testing for beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. Candida tropicalis also formed distinctive colonies, and other yeasts including Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata, Candida Parapsilosis, Candida Magnoliae, Candida lusitaniae, Candida Famata, Candida kefir, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were readily distinguished from C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates. CHROMagar Candida is a very useful medium, and its use will facilitate the study of yeasts associated with dental diseases. PMID:8576366

  11. Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwald, Anne G.; Arora, Gaurav; Ferrandino, Rocco; Gerace, Erica L.; Mohammednetej, Maedeh; Nosair, Waseem; Rattila, Shemona; Subic, Amanda Zirzow; Rolfes, Ronda

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an important human fungal pathogen whose incidence continues to rise. Because many clinical isolates are resistant to azole drugs, the drugs of choice to treat such infections are members of the echinocandin family, although there are increasing reports of resistance to these drugs as well. In efforts to better understand the genetic changes that lead to altered responses to echinocandins, we screened a transposon-insertion library of mutants for strains to identify genes that are important for cellular responses to caspofungin, a member of this drug family. We identified 16 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased tolerance, and 48 genes that, when disrupted, caused increased sensitivity compared to the wild-type parental strain. Four of the genes identified as causing sensitivity are orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes encoding proteins important for the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. In addition, several other genes are orthologs of the high affinity Ca2+ uptake system (HACS) complex genes. We analyzed disruption mutants representing all 64 genes under 33 different conditions, including the presence of cell wall disrupting agents and other drugs, a variety of salts, increased temperature, and altered pH. Further, we generated knockout mutants in different genes within the CWI pathway and the HACS complex, and found that they too exhibited phenotypes consistent with defects in cell wall construction. Our results indicate that small molecules that inhibit the CWI pathway, or that the HACS complex, may be an important means of increasing the efficacy of caspofungin. PMID:27449515

  12. Histidine Degradation via an Aminotransferase Increases the Nutritional Flexibility of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Katja; Richter, Martin Ernst; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Ramachandra, Shruthi; Kiehntopf, Michael; Brock, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire nutrients during infections is an important attribute in microbial pathogenesis. Amino acids are a valuable source of nitrogen if they can be degraded by the infecting organism. In this work, we analyzed histidine utilization in the fungal pathogen of humans Candida glabrata. Hemiascomycete fungi, like C. glabrata or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possess no gene coding for a histidine ammonia-lyase, which catalyzes the first step of a major histidine degradation pathway in most other organisms. We show that C. glabrata instead initializes histidine degradation via the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8. Although ARO8 is also present in S. cerevisiae and is induced by extracellular histidine, the yeast cannot use histidine as its sole nitrogen source, possibly due to growth inhibition by a downstream degradation product. Furthermore, C. glabrata relies only on Aro8 for phenylalanine and tryptophan utilization, since ARO8, but not its homologue ARO9, was transcriptionally activated in the presence of these amino acids. Accordingly, an ARO9 deletion had no effect on growth with aromatic amino acids. In contrast, in S. cerevisiae, ARO9 is strongly induced by tryptophan and is known to support growth on aromatic amino acids. Differences in the genomic structure of the ARO9 gene between C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae indicate a possible disruption in the regulatory upstream region. Thus, we show that, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata has adapted to use histidine as a sole source of nitrogen and that the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8, but not Aro9, is the enzyme required for this process. PMID:24728193

  13. Evaluation of CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST and VITEK® MS for identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Koc, Ayse Nedret; Sav, Hafize; Aydemir, Gonca

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare conventional methods, CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS system for the identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures. Fifty-four strains were identified according to conventional methods, CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS. Sequencing was used as the reference method. The 54 strains included 32 Candida parapsilosis, 19 Candida albicans, 1 Candida glabrata and 2 Candida tropicalis according to the reference method. One C. albicans and one C. glabrata isolate were misidentified as C. parapsilosis by CHROMagar Candida. Two C. parapsilosis and three C. albicans isolates were misidentified by VITEK2 YST card. CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS identified correctly 96.2%, 90.7% and 100% of all strains, respectively. We found that the CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS system are easy, rapid and accurate alternative methods for the identification of yeast species in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:26700081

  14. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  15. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  16. Enhancement of acetoin production in Candida glabrata by in silico-aided metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetoin is a promising chemical compound that can potentially serve as a high value-added platform for a broad range of applications. Many industrial biotechnological processes are moving towards the use of yeast as a platform. The multi-auxotrophic yeast, Candida glabrata, can accumulate a large amount of pyruvate, but produces only trace amounts of acetoin. Here, we attempted to engineer C. glabrata to redirect the carbon flux of pyruvate to increase acetoin production. Results Based on an in silico strategy, a synthetic, composite metabolic pathway involving two distinct enzymes, acetolactate synthase (ALS) and acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC), was constructed, leading to the accumulation of acetoin in C. glabrata. Further genetic modifications were introduced to increase the carbon flux of the heterologous pathway, increasing the production of acetoin to 2.08 g/L. Additionally, nicotinic acid was employed to regulate the intracellular NADH level, and a higher production of acetoin (3.67 g/L) was obtained at the expense of 2,3-butanediol production under conditions of a lower NADH/NAD+ ratio. Conclusion With the aid of in silico metabolic engineering and cofactor engineering, C. glabrata was designed and constructed to improve acetoin production. PMID:24725668

  17. Candida glabrata sepsis associated with chorioamnionitis in an IVF twin pregnancy: Should we deliver?

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Qi; Ng, Oon Tek; Khong, Chit Chong

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of in vitro fertilization (IVF)-acquired Candida glabrata chorioamnionitis successfully treated through systemic maternal antifungal treatment prior to delivery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its kind in the literature. C. glabrata chorioamnionitis in pregnancy is rare, but the current literature suggests a very high fetal fatality in such cases. It is known to have an association with cervical stitch, amniocentesis, chorionic villous sampling, and assisted reproductive techniques such as IVF. Given the increasing global use of artificial reproductive techniques, it is important to raise awareness of this condition and highlight its potential complications. Early recognition of possible fetal infection could enable early initiation of systemic antifungal treatment. It would be prudent to consider early delivery once fetal maturity is achieved despite normal fetal monitoring. PMID:25510957

  18. Dithiocarbamates are strong inhibitors of the beta-class fungal carbonic anhydrases from Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Monti, Simona Maria; Maresca, Alfonso; Viparelli, Francesca; Carta, Fabrizio; De Simone, Giuseppina; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-01-15

    A series of N-mono- and N,N-disubstituted dithiocarbamates have been investigated as inhibitors of three β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, that is, Can2, CaNce103 and CgNce103, respectively. These enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the subnanomolar to the micromolar range, depending on the substitution pattern at the nitrogen atom from the dithiocarbamate zinc-binding group. This new class of β-CA inhibitors may have the potential for developing antifungal agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which drug resistance was reported, and may also explain the efficacy of dithiocarbamates as agricultural antifungal agents. PMID:22209456

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Candida species isolated from urine at an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ergon, M C; Gülay, Z

    2005-03-01

    Candida spp. has been the leading microorganism isolated from the urine specimens of patients hospitalized at the Anesthesiology and Reanimation intensive care unit (ICU) of Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Izmir, since 1998. This study was undertaken to investigate the clonal relationship of Candida urine isolates in order to find the mode of spread among the patients. Epidemiological surveillance of 38 Candida albicans, 15 Candida tropicalis and 12 Candida glabrata recovered from the urine specimens of patients who were hospitalized in the ICU between June 11, 2000 and October 15, 2001 was carried out by antifungal susceptibility testing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Two short primers [Cnd3 (5'-CCAGATGCAC-3') and Cnd4 (5'-ACGGTACACT-3')] were used for RAPD. None of the isolates had high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (>1 microg ml(-1)) against amphotericin B with MIC50 values of 0.5 microg ml(-1), 0.5 microg ml(-1) and 0.125 microg ml(-1) for C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. However, three C. glabrata isolates were resistant and one C. albicans and five C. glabrata isolates were dose-dependent susceptible (D-DS) to fluconazole. Among C. albicans isolates 19 and 20 patterns were detected with primers Cnd3 and Cnd4, respectively. When primers Cnd3 and Cnd4 were evaluated together, three and four genotypes were identified for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. Our results suggest that the source of C. albicans isolates was mostly endogenous. It is difficult to interpret the mode of spread of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata urine isolates as we obtained insufficient banding patterns for these species. PMID:15743431

  20. Biofilm formation in Candida glabrata: What have we learnt from functional genomics approaches?

    PubMed

    d'Enfert, Christophe; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are a source of therapeutic failures because of their intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials. Candida glabrata is one of the pathogenic yeasts that is responsible for life-threatening disseminated infections and able to form biofilms on medical devices such as vascular and urinary catheters. Recent progresses in the functional genomics of C. glabrata have been applied to the study of biofilm formation, revealing the contribution of an array of genes to this process. In particular, the Yak1 kinase and the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex have been shown to relieve the repression exerted by subtelomeric silencing on the expression of the EPA6 and EPA7 genes, thus allowing the encoded adhesins to exert their key roles in biofilm formation. This provides a framework to evaluate the contribution of other genes that have been genetically linked to biofilm development and, based on the function of their orthologs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, appear to have roles in adaptation to nutrient deprivation, calcium signaling, cell wall remodeling and adherence. Future studies combining the use of in vitro and animal models of biofilm formation, omics approaches and forward or reverse genetics are needed to expand the current knowledge of C. glabrata biofilm formation and reveal the mechanisms underlying their antifungal tolerance. PMID:26678748

  1. Development of a Candida glabrata dominant nutritional transformation marker utilizing the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase gene (amdS).

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianmin; Blaylock, Morganne; Wickes, Cameron F; Welte, William; Mehrtash, Adrian; Wiederhold, Nathan; Wickes, Brian L

    2016-05-01

    The gene encodingAspergillus nidulansacetamidase (amdS) was placed under control ofCandida albicans ACT1promoter and terminator sequences and then cloned into a plasmid containingC. glabrata ARS10,CEN8orARS10+CEN8sequences. All plasmids transformedC. glabratawild-type cells to acetamide+, with theARS-only containing plasmid transforming cells at the highest frequencies (>1.0 × 10(4)transformants μg(-1)). Plasmids were rapidly lost under non-selective conditions with the frequency dependent on chromosomal element, thus recycling the acetamide- phenotype. TheamdSplasmid was used to transform a set of clinical isolates resistant to a variety of antifungal drugs. All strains were successfully transformed to the acetamide+ phenotype at high frequency, confirming that this plasmid construct could be used as a simple dominant marker on virtually any strain. Gap repair experiments demonstrated that just as inSaccharomyces cerevisiae, gap repair functions efficiently inC. glabrata, suggesting thatC. glabratahas numerous similarities toS. cerevisiaewith regard to ease of molecular manipulation. TheamdSsystem is inexpensive and efficient, and combined with existingC. glabrataplasmid elements, confers a high transformation frequency forC. glabratawith a phenotype that can be easily recycled. PMID:26975388

  2. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required. PMID:27433120

  3. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups. PMID:26971635

  4. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  5. Candida glabrata tryptophan-based pigment production via the Ehrlich pathway.

    PubMed

    Brunke, Sascha; Seider, Katja; Almeida, Ricardo Sergio; Heyken, Antje; Fleck, Christian Benjamin; Brock, Matthias; Barz, Dagmar; Rupp, Steffen; Hube, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    Pigments contribute to the pathogenicity of many fungi, mainly by protecting fungal cells from host defence activities. Here, we have dissected the biosynthetic pathway of a tryptophan-derived pigment of the human pathogen Candida glabrata, identified key genes involved in pigment production and have begun to elucidate the possible biological function of the pigment. Using transcriptional analyses and a transposon insertion library, we have identified genes associated with pigment production. Targeted deletion mutants revealed that the pigment is a by-product of the Ehrlich pathway of tryptophan degradation: a mutant lacking a tryptophan-upregulated aromatic aminotransferase (Aro8) displayed significantly reduced pigmentation and a recombinantly expressed version of this protein was sufficient for pigment production in vitro. Pigment production is tightly regulated as the synthesis is affected by the presence of alternative nitrogen sources, carbon sources, cyclic AMP and oxygen. Growth of C. glabrata on pigment inducing medium leads to an increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide, an effect which was not observed with a mutant defective in pigmentation. Furthermore, pigmented yeast cells had a higher survival rate when exposed to human neutrophils and caused increased damage in a monolayer model of human epithelia, indicating a possible role of pigmentation during interactions with host cells. PMID:20199593

  6. Roles of vacuolar H+-ATPase in the oxidative stress response of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Nakayama, Hironobu; Minematsu, Asuka; Yamauchi, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Kohei; Takazono, Takahiro; Shimamura, Shintaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is responsible for the acidification of eukaryotic intracellular compartments and plays an important role in oxidative stress response (OSR), but its molecular bases are largely unknown. Here, we investigated how V-ATPase is involved in the OSR by using a strain lacking VPH2, which encodes an assembly factor of V-ATPase, in the pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata The loss of Vph2 resulted in increased H2O2 sensitivity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level independently of mitochondrial functions. The Δvph2 mutant also displayed growth defects under alkaline conditions accompanied by the accumulation of intracellular ROS and these phenotypes were recovered in the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Both expression and activity levels of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) and catalase (Cta1) were decreased in the Δvph2 mutant. Phenotypic analyses of strains lacking and overexpressing these genes revealed that Sod2 and Cta1 play a predominant role in endogenous and exogenous OSR, respectively. Furthermore, supplementation of copper and iron restored the expression of SOD2 specifically in the Δvph2 mutant, suggesting that the homeostasis of intracellular cupper and iron levels maintained by V-ATPase was important for the Sod2-mediated OSR. This report demonstrates novel roles of V-ATPase in the OSR in C. glabrata. PMID:27370212

  7. Gastric trichobezoar associated with perforated peptic ulcer and Candida glabrata infection

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Héctor Losada; Catalán, Cecilia Huenchullán; Demetrio, Rodrigo Arriagada; Rivas, Macarena Espinoza; Parraguez, Natalia Castagnoli; Alvarez, Martín Alanis

    2014-01-01

    Bezoars are accumulations of human or plant fiber located in the gastrointestinal tract of both humans and animals. Patients remain asymptomatic for several years, and the symptoms develop as these accumulations increase in size to the point of obstruction or perforation. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient at 10 d postpartum, who presented with acute abdomen associated with sepsis. Given the urgency of the clinical picture, at no point was the presence of a giant bezoar at gastric level suspected, specifically a trichobezoar. The emergency abdominal and pelvic ultrasound revealed only unspecific signs of perforated hollow viscus. Diagnosis was therefore made intraoperatively. A complete gastric trichobezoar was found with gastric perforation and secondary peritonitis. The peritoneal fluid culture revealed Candida glabrata. PMID:25516871

  8. Interactions between copy number and expression level of genes involved in fluconazole resistance in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Abbes, Salma; Mary, Charles; Sellami, Hayet; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Ayadi, Ali; Ranque, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to elucidate the relative involvement of drug resistance gene copy number and overexpression in fluconazole resistance in clinical C. glabrata isolates using a population-based approach. Methods: Fluconazole resistance levels were quantified using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) via Etest method. Both gene expression levels and gene copy number of CgCDR1, CgPDH1, CgERG11, and CgSNQ2 were assessed via quantitative real-time PCR. The influence of the main effects and first-level interactions of both the expression level and copy number of these genes on fluconazole resistance levels were analyzed using a multivariate statistical model. Results: Forty-three C. glabrata isolates were collected from 30 patients during in a hospital survey. In the multivariate analysis, C. glabrata fluconazole MICs were independently increased by CgSNQ2 overexpression (p < 10−4) and the interaction between CgPDH1 gene copy number and CgPDH1 expression level (p = 0.038). In contrast, both CgPDH1 overexpression (p = 0.049) and the interaction between CgSNQ2 and CgERG11 expression (p = 0.003) led to a significant decrease in fluconazole MICs. Conclusion: Fluconazole resistance in C. glabrata involves complex interactions between drug resistance gene expression and/or copy number. The population-based multivariate analysis highlighted the involvement of the CgSNQ2 gene in fluconazole resistance and the complex effect of the other genes such as PDH1 for which overexpression was associated with reduced fluconazole resistance levels, while the interaction between PDH1 overexpression and copy number was associated with increased resistance levels. PMID:24273749

  9. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure ofCandida albicansandCandida glabratamixed biofilmin vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50of CAS and FLU against singleCandida spp.and mixedCandida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicansandC. glabratamixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages ofCandidabiofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU ofCandida glabratawere demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, ofCandida albicansandCandida glabratamixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent. PMID:26768371

  10. Time to Positivity and Detection of Growth in Anaerobic Blood Culture Vials Predict the Presence of Candida glabrata in Candidemia: a Two-Center European Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaasch, Achim J.; Soriano, Alex; Torres, Jorge-Luis; Vergara, Andrea; Morata, Laura; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; De La Calle, Cristina; Alejo, Izaskun; Hernández, Cristina; Cardozo, Celia; Marco, Franscesc; Del Río, Ana; Almela, Manel; Mensa, Josep; Martínez, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This study shows the accuracy of exclusive or earlier growth in anaerobic vials to predict Candida glabrata in a large series of candidemic patients from two European hospitals using the Bactec 9240 system. Alternatively, C. glabrata can be predicted by a time to positivity cutoff value, which should be determined for each setting. PMID:24899027

  11. Identification of Candida glabrata Genes Involved in pH Modulation and Modification of the Phagosomal Environment in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Franziska; Allert, Stefanie; Brunke, Sascha; Schwarzmüller, Tobias; Ames, Lauren; Zubiria-Barrera, Cristina; Mansour, Michael K.; Becken, Ulrike; Barz, Dagmar; Vyas, Jatin M.; Reiling, Norbert; Haas, Albert; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata currently ranks as the second most frequent cause of invasive candidiasis. Our previous work has shown that C. glabrata is adapted to intracellular survival in macrophages and replicates within non-acidified late endosomal-stage phagosomes. In contrast, heat killed yeasts are found in acidified matured phagosomes. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the processes leading to inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. We show that phagosomes containing viable C. glabrata cells do not fuse with pre-labeled lysosomes and possess low phagosomal hydrolase activity. Inhibition of acidification occurs independent of macrophage type (human/murine), differentiation (M1-/M2-type) or activation status (vitamin D3 stimulation). We observed no differential activation of macrophage MAPK or NFκB signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors after internalization of viable compared to heat killed yeasts, but Syk activation decayed faster in macrophages containing viable yeasts. Thus, delivery of viable yeasts to non-matured phagosomes is likely not triggered by initial recognition events via MAPK or NFκB signaling, but Syk activation may be involved. Although V-ATPase is abundant in C. glabrata phagosomes, the influence of this proton pump on intracellular survival is low since blocking V-ATPase activity with bafilomycin A1 has no influence on fungal viability. Active pH modulation is one possible fungal strategy to change phagosome pH. In fact, C. glabrata is able to alkalinize its extracellular environment, when growing on amino acids as the sole carbon source in vitro. By screening a C. glabrata mutant library we identified genes important for environmental alkalinization that were further tested for their impact on phagosome pH. We found that the lack of fungal mannosyltransferases resulted in severely reduced alkalinization in vitro and in the delivery of C. glabrata to acidified phagosomes. Therefore, protein

  12. Identification of local clinical Candida isolates using CHROMagar Candida™ as a primary identification method for various Candida species.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, P; Jamal, F; Chong, P P; Ng, K P

    2011-08-01

    The objective of our study was to study the effectiveness of CHROMagar Candida™ as the primary identification method for various clinical Candida isolates, other than the three suggested species by the manufacturer. We studied 34 clinical isolates which were isolated from patients in a local teaching hospital and 7 ATCC strains. These strains were first cultured in Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB) for 36 hours at 35ºC, then on CHROMagar plates at 30ºC, 35ºC and 37ºC. The sensitivity of this agar to identify Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida rugosa, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis ranged between 25 and 100% at 30ºC, 14% and 100% at 35ºC, 56% and 100% at 37ºC. The specificity of this agar was 100% at 30ºC, between 97% and 100% at 35ºC, 92% and 100% at 37ºC. The efficiency of this agar ranged between 88 and 100% at 30ºC, 83% and 100% at 35ºC, 88% and 100% at 37ºC. Each species also gave rise to a variety of colony colours ranging from pink to green to blue of different colony characteristics. Therefore, the chromogenic agar was found to be useful in our study for identifying clinical Candida isolates. PMID:22041745

  13. Candida duobushaemulonii: an emerging rare pathogenic yeast isolated from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boatto, Humberto Fabio; Cavalcanti, Sarah Desirée Barbosa; Del Negro, Gilda Mb; Girão, Manoel João Bc; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Ishida, Kelly; Gompertz, Olga Fischman

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Candida species isolated from women diagnosed with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) and their partners; and to evaluate the fluconazole (FLZ) susceptibility of the isolates. In a period of six years, among 172 patients diagnosed with vulvovaginal candidiasis, 13 women that presented RVVC and their partners were selected for this investigation. The isolates were obtained using Chromagar Candida medium, the species identification was performed by phenotypic and molecular methods and FLZ susceptibility was evaluated by E-test. Among 26 strains we identified 14 Candida albicans, six Candida duobushaemulonii, four Candida glabrata, and two Candida tropicalis. Agreement of the isolated species occurred in 100% of the couples. FLZ low susceptibility was observed for all isolates of C. duobushaemulonii (minimal inhibitory concentration values from 8-> 64 µg/mL), two C. glabrata isolates were FLZ-resistant and all C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates were FLZ-susceptible. This report emphasises the importance of accurate identification of the fungal agents by a reliable molecular technique in RVVC episodes besides the lower antifungal susceptibility profile of this rare pathogen C. duobushaemulonii to FLZ. PMID:27304096

  14. Virulence factors of Candida species isolated from patients with urinary tract infection and obstructive uropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alenzi, Faris Q.B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fungal urinary tract infections due to Candida have increased significantly in recent years. Our research objective was to study Candida species in urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) associated with obstructive uropathy and to investigate the virulence factors of the isolated Candida. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (cases): 50 patients with UTIs and obstructive uropathy. Group II (control): 50 patients with UTIs but with no functional or anatomical obstruction of their urinary tract. Clinical histories and physical examinations, together with laboratory investigations of urine samples were carried out in all patients in this study. Mid stream urine samples were examined microscopically and by fungal cell culture. The isolated Candida species were identified by analytical profile index (API). Candida Virulence factors were determined for the isolated Candida. The susceptibility to fluconazole was evaluated. Results: This study revealed an overall isolation rate of 27% of Candida species among all patient groups. The rate was 36% in cases, and 18% in controls, a difference found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). By API, C.albicans was detected in 44% of Candida species in cases, and in 33% in controls. While C.glabrata was detected in 28% of Candida species in cases, and in 22% in controls. C.tropicalis was detected in 17% of Candida species in cases, and in 22% in controls. Both C.krusei and C.kyfr were detected in 5.5% of Candida species in cases, and in 11% in controls. In terms of virulence factors the study showed that 11 out of 27 (40.5%) of Candida isolates were biofilm positive by tube adherence. Phospholipase activity was demonstrated in 12 out of 27 (44.5%) of Candida isolates. Secretory aspartic proteinase activity was demonstrated in 13 out of 27 (48%) of the Candida isolates. Conclusion: Candida is an important cause of UTIs and obstructive uropathy is a major predisposing factor

  15. Production of white colonies on CHROMagar Candida BD by species in the C. glabrata clade, and other species with overlapping phenotypic traits.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromogenic agars are important diagnostic media used in the clinical mycology laboratory. Candida spp. that produced white colonies on CHROMagar Candida (Becton Dickinson) (CAC) were found during a study designed to detect and identify C. bracarensis, a newly-described species in the C. glabrata c...

  16. Candida ciferrii and Candida chiropterorum isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Furman, R M; Ahearn, D G

    1983-01-01

    Ten clinical yeast isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control from diverse geographic areas were identified as Candida ciferrii and Candida chiropterorum. The association of C. ciferrii with clinical specimens, particularly its repeated isolation from a case of onychomycosis, suggests that this species may be an etiological agent of superficial yeast infections. Images PMID:6227630

  17. [In vitro nystatin sensitivity of vaginal isolates of Candida spp].

    PubMed

    Andreu, C M; Medina, Y E; Gonzáles, T C; Llanes, D M

    2001-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nistatine, one of the most used antifungal agents for this micosis, was determined in 68 Candida strains isolated from vaginal smears. Candida albicans represented 75% of the total strains whereas C. parapsilosis, C. krusei and C. glabrata were much less frequently found. The predisposing factors were pregnancy and antibacterial treatment whereas leukorrhea and itching were the prevailing symptoms in most of the cases. MIC values from the use of a broth dilution method ranged from 0,5-8mg/mL and the geometric mean was 1.36mg/ mL. For C. albicans, MIC was 4mg/mL due to two strains that showed the highest MIC values (8 mg/mL). Similarly, the strains showed low MIC values, this means that therapeutic failures are not inherent to the emergence of resistant strains. PMID:15846923

  18. Prevalence of Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis in vulvovaginal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianling; Shan, Yingying; Fan, Shangrong; Liu, Xiaoping

    2014-10-01

    Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis were isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis were found in presumptive Candida glabrata isolates, which were identified using the API Candida system. We retrospectively re-examined vaginal presumptive Candida glabrata isolates for Candida nivariensis and Candida bracarensis from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012, via detection of the ITS1 region and the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene. Among 301 presumptive Candida glabrata isolates, 293 isolates were confirmed as C. glabrata (97.34 %), 7 isolates were identified as C. nivariensis (2.33 %) and 1 isolate was identified as C. bracarensis (0.33 %). The C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis isolates were confirmed by sequencing. All C. nivariensis isolates were susceptible to nystatin and susceptible or susceptible dose-dependent to fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, and clotrimazole. The C. bracarensis isolate was susceptible to nystatin and the tested azoles. Among the seven patients with VVC caused by C. nivariensis and who were treated with various antifungal agents, only one patient achieved mycological eradication at both the day 7-14 and day 30-35 follow-ups. The C. bracarensis isolate was isolated from a symptomatic pregnant woman; additional data for this patient were unavailable. We conclude that C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis existed in the vaginal samples of patients with VVC. Therapeutic efficacy in the patients with C. nivariensis was poor and inconsistent with the observed in vitro antifungal susceptibility, which requires further study. PMID:25118875

  19. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  20. Species identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida bloodstream isolates from population-based surveillance studies in two U.S. cities from 2008 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Iqbal, Naureen; Cleveland, Angela A; Farley, Monica M; Harrison, Lee H; Bolden, Carol B; Baughman, Wendy; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Park, Benjamin J; Chiller, Tom

    2012-11-01

    Between 2008 and 2011, population-based candidemia surveillance was conducted in Atlanta, GA, and Baltimore, MD. Surveillance had been previously performed in Atlanta in 1992 to 1993 and in Baltimore in 1998 to 2000, making this the first population-based candidemia surveillance conducted over multiple time points in the United States. From 2,675 identified cases of candidemia in the current surveillance, 2,329 Candida isolates were collected. Candida albicans no longer comprised the majority of isolates but remained the most frequently isolated species (38%), followed by Candida glabrata (29%), Candida parapsilosis (17%), and Candida tropicalis (10%). The species distribution has changed over time; in both Atlanta and Baltimore the proportion of C. albicans isolates decreased, and the proportion of C. glabrata isolates increased, while the proportion of C. parapsilosis isolates increased in Baltimore only. There were 98 multispecies episodes, with C. albicans and C. glabrata the most frequently encountered combination. The new species-specific CLSI Candida MIC breakpoints were applied to these data. With the exception of C. glabrata (11.9% resistant), resistance to fluconazole was very low (2.3% of isolates for C. albicans, 6.2% for C. tropicalis, and 4.1% for C. parapsilosis). There was no change in the proportion of fluconazole resistance between surveillance periods. Overall echinocandin resistance was low (1% of isolates) but was higher for C. glabrata isolates, ranging from 2.1% isolates resistant to caspofungin in Baltimore to 3.1% isolates resistant to anidulafungin in Atlanta. Given the increase at both sites and the higher echinocandin resistance, C. glabrata should be closely monitored in future surveillance. PMID:22875889

  1. Candida isolates from pregnant women and their antifungal susceptibility in a Malaysian tertiary-care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Siti Norbaya; Noor, Sabariah Md; Nor, Lailatul Akmar Mat; Osman, Malina; Rahman, MM

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pregnant women are susceptible to vaginal colonization and infection by yeast. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of Candida spp in high vaginal swabs of pregnant women and their antifungal susceptibility. Methods: High vaginal swab samples received from Serdang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia during 2011 initially had microscopic examination, Gram-staining and fungal culture. These were finally confirmed by growth in chromogenic medium (CHROMagarCandida; Difco BBL, USA) and commercial biochemical identification kit (API 20C AUX; bioMérieux, Lyon, France). Antifungal susceptibility was performed by E-test method. Results: Out of 1163 specimens 200 (17.2%) candida spp were confirmed from high vaginal swabs of pregnant women. Candida albicans (83.5%) is the most common species detected followed by Candida glabrata (16%) and Candida famata (0.05%). All C. albicans and C.famata isolates were susceptible to fluconazole while C.glabrata isolates were dose dependent susceptibility. First and second trimester, and diabetes were considered significant factors in patients for the vaginal candidiasis (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In pregnant women, C. albicans was the frequently isolated yeast from high vaginal swabs. Routine screening and treatment are important of pregnant women regardless of symptoms. PMID:26150863

  2. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  3. Probing the Active Site of Candida Glabrata Dihydrofolate Reductase with High Resolution Crystal Structures and the Synthesis of New Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a fungal strain resistant to many commonly administered antifungal agents, has become an emerging threat to human health. In previous work, we validated that the essential enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, is a drug target in C. glabrata. Using a crystal structure of dihydrofolate reductase from C. glabrata bound to an initial lead compound, we designed a class of biphenyl antifolates that potently and selectively inhibit both the enzyme and the growth of the fungal culture. In this work, we explore the structure-activity relationships of this class of antifolates with four new high resolution crystal structures of enzyme:inhibitor complexes and the synthesis of four new inhibitors. The designed inhibitors are intended to probe key hydrophobic pockets visible in the crystal structure. The crystal structures and an evaluation of the new compounds reveal that methyl groups at the meta and para positions of the distal phenyl ring achieve the greatest number of interactions with the pathogenic enzyme and the greatest degree of selectivity over the human enzyme. Additionally, antifungal activity can be tuned with substitution patterns at the propargyl and para-phenyl positions.

  4. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Yankee C.; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q.; Melônio, Luciane C.; Ribeiro, Patrícia C.S.; Cosme, Lécia M.; Rhoden, Cristianne R.; Marques, Sirlei G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections. PMID:26221096

  5. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candida species from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Yankee C; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Q; Melônio, Luciane C; Ribeiro, Patrícia C S; Cosme, Lécia M; Rhoden, Cristianne R; Marques, Sirlei G

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%), Candida tropicalis (30.1%), C. glabrata (7.4%), Candida parapsilosis (5.5%), Candida krusei (4.6%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%), Trichosporon spp . (3.7%), Candida norvegensis (0.9%), Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9%) and Pichia farinosa (0.9%). A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%), respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4%) and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%). Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections. PMID:26221096

  6. Identification of signature volatiles to discriminate Candida albicans, glabrata, krusei and tropicalis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Moritz; Hartwig, Stefan; Schütte, Eyke; Gillissen, Bernhard; Preissner, Robert; Schmidt-Westhausen, Andrea Maria; Paris, Sebastian; Kastner, Isabell; Preissner, Saskia

    2016-02-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most frequent fungal infection of the oral cavity. Clinical diagnoses require mycological confirmation, which is time-consuming in case of culture testing. The aim of the study was to identify signature volatiles to develop a chairside breath test to diagnose oral candidiasis. Headspaces above Candida albicans, glabrata, tropicalis, krusei cultures, and growth media as control were analysed after eight and 24 h using offline gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The identification of signature volatiles was assisted using various microbial databases. Retrieved volatile patterns enabled Candida species discrimination in vitro. For C. albicans 3-methyl-2-butanone and styrene and for C. krusei a combination of p-xylene, 2-octanone, 2-heptanone and n-butyl acetate were found to be specific. 1-hexanol was found in C. tropicalis, but is emitted by a variety of other microorganisms. C. glabrata was characterised through the absence of these volatiles. The development of a breath test is a promising approach in confirming suspicions of oral candidiasis. To confirm the retrieved results in vivo, breath tests in affected and healthy subjects have to be performed. PMID:26667499

  7. Posttreatment Antifungal Resistance among Colonizing Candida Isolates in Candidemia Patients: Results from a Systematic Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R H; Johansen, H K; Søes, L M; Lemming, L E; Rosenvinge, F S; Nielsen, L; Olesen, B; Kristensen, L; Dzajic, E; Astvad, K M T; Arendrup, M C

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of intrinsic and acquired resistance among colonizing Candida isolates from patients after candidemia was investigated systematically in a 1-year nationwide study. Patients were treated at the discretion of the treating physician. Oral swabs were obtained after treatment. Species distributions and MIC data were investigated for blood and posttreatment oral isolates from patients exposed to either azoles or echinocandins for <7 or ≥ 7 days. Species identification was confirmed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing, susceptibility was examined by EUCAST EDef 7.2 methodology, echinocandin resistance was examined by FKS sequencing, and genetic relatedness was examined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). One hundred ninety-three episodes provided 205 blood and 220 oral isolates. MLST analysis demonstrated a genetic relationship for 90% of all paired blood and oral isolates. Patients exposed to azoles for ≥ 7 days (n = 93) had a significantly larger proportion of species intrinsically less susceptible to azoles (particularly Candida glabrata) among oral isolates than among initial blood isolates (36.6% versus 12.9%; P < 0.001). A similar shift toward species less susceptible to echinocandins among 85 patients exposed to echinocandins for ≥ 7 days was not observed (4.8% of oral isolates versus 3.2% of blood isolates; P > 0.5). Acquired resistance in Candida albicans was rare (<5%). However, acquired resistance to fluconazole (29.4%; P < 0.05) and anidulafungin (21.6%; P < 0.05) was common in C. glabrata isolates from patients exposed to either azoles or echinocandins. Our findings suggest that the colonizing mucosal microbiota may be an unrecognized reservoir of resistant Candida species, especially C. glabrata, following treatment for candidemia. The resistance rates were high, raising concern in general for patients exposed to antifungal

  8. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility of 186 Candida isolates from vulvovaginal candidiasis in southern China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Li, Wen; Wang, Jie-Di; Huang, Wen-Ming; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2015-04-01

    There is limited information regarding the molecular epidemiology and antifungal susceptibilities of Candida isolates using the Neo-Sensitabs method in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). From August 2012 to March 2013, 301 non-pregnant patients aged 18-50 years with suspected VVC were prospectively screened at a teaching hospital in southern China. The vaginal isolates were identified by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer and the D1/D2 domain. Antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents was performed using the Neo-Sensitabs tablet diffusion method. Candida species were isolated from 186 cases (61.79 %). The most common pathogen was Candida albicans (91.4 %), followed by Candida glabrata (4.3 %), Candida tropicalis (3.2 %) and Candida parapsilosis (1.1 %). The susceptibility rates to C. albicans were higher for caspofungin, voriconazole and fluconazole than those for itraconazole, miconazole, ketoconazole and terbinafine (P<0.01). The resistance rates to C. albicans were 4.7, 6.5, 7.1, 7.6, 12.3, 27.7 and 74.7 % for caspofungin, miconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, ketoconazole and terbinafine, respectively. No drugs tested apart from fluconazole exhibited differences in resistance between C. albicans and non-albicans Candida isolates. The results demonstrate that, using DNA sequencing, C. albicans is the most common isolate from Chinese patients with VVC. Caspofungin, voriconazole and fluconazole may be preferable to other azoles and terbinafine in the treatment of VVC. PMID:25596116

  9. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  10. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S W; Tsang, Dominic N C; Lai, Christopher K C; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  11. Candida duobushaemulonii: an emerging rare pathogenic yeast isolated from recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Boatto, Humberto Fabio; Cavalcanti, Sarah Desirée Barbosa; Del Negro, Gilda MB; Girão, Manoel João BC; Francisco, Elaine Cristina; Ishida, Kelly; Gompertz, Olga Fischman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Candida species isolated from women diagnosed with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) and their partners; and to evaluate the fluconazole (FLZ) susceptibility of the isolates. In a period of six years, among 172 patients diagnosed with vulvovaginal candidiasis, 13 women that presented RVVC and their partners were selected for this investigation. The isolates were obtained using Chromagar Candida medium, the species identification was performed by phenotypic and molecular methods and FLZ susceptibility was evaluated by E-test. Among 26 strains we identified 14Candida albicans, six Candida duobushaemulonii, four Candida glabrata, and twoCandida tropicalis. Agreement of the isolated species occurred in 100% of the couples. FLZ low susceptibility was observed for all isolates of C. duobushaemulonii (minimal inhibitory concentration values from 8-> 64 µg/mL), two C. glabrataisolates were FLZ-resistant and all C. albicans and C. tropicalis isolates were FLZ-susceptible. This report emphasises the importance of accurate identification of the fungal agents by a reliable molecular technique in RVVC episodes besides the lower antifungal susceptibility profile of this rare pathogen C. duobushaemulonii to FLZ. PMID:27304096

  12. Species distribution & antifungal susceptibility pattern of oropharyngeal Candida isolates from human immunodeficiency virus infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Das, Partha Pratim; Saikia, Lahari; Nath, Reema; Phukan, Sanjib Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The changing spectrum of Candida species in causation of oropharyngeal candidiasis and their antifungal susceptibility pattern among the HIV infected individuals has made the identification to species level mandatory and detection of drug resistance necessary for patient care. The present study was carried out to determine the species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of oral Candida isolates colonizing or infecting both HIV seropositive and seronegative individuals. Methods: A case-control study was conducted including 141 consecutive, non-repeat HIV-seropositive individuals and an equal number of sex and age matched HIV-seronegative control. Speciation of the oropharyngeal Candida isolates was done using standard yeast identification protocol. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by the disk-diffusion method as well as by Fungitest method. Results: From the 59 culture positive HIV seropositive cases, 61 Candida isolates were recovered; Candida albicans (n=47, 77.0%), C. dubliniensis (n=9, 14.7%), C. parapsilosis (n=2, 3.2%), C. glabrata (n=2, 3.2%), and C. famata (n=1, 1.6%). Candida colonization in HIV-seropositive individuals was significantly higher than that of HIV-seronegative (control) group. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed (n=6, 9.3%) C. albicans isolates resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole by disk-diffusion method whereas no resistance was seen by Fungitest method. Interpretation & conclusions: C. albicans was the commonest Candida species infecting or colonizing HIV seropositive individuals. Oropharyngeal Candida isolates had high level susceptibility to all the major antifungals commonly in use. Increased level of immunosuppression in HIV-seropositives and drug resistance of non-albicans Candida species makes identification and susceptibility testing of Candida species necessary in different geographical areas of the country. PMID:27377507

  13. Accurate initiation of mRNA synthesis in extracts from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A

    1993-12-01

    We demonstrate the successful adaptation to other yeast species of a protocol previously described for production of transcriptionally active whole cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Woontner and Jaehning, 1990, J. Biol. Chem. 265, 8979-8982). Extracts prepared from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata were all capable of initiating transcription from a template containing the S. cerevisiae CYC1 TATA box fused to a G-less cassette. Transcription in all of the extracts was sensitive to inhibition by alpha-amanitin, indicating that it was catalysed by RNA polymerase II, and was dramatically stimulated by the chimeric activator GAL4/VP16. The different extracts used different subsets of a group of three initiation sites. PMID:8154183

  14. Colonization and antifungals susceptibility patterns of Candida species isolated from hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Navid, Mojgan; Torabizadeh, Mehdi; Mazdarani, Shahnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that there are an increasing in invasive candidiasis during 2-3 last decades. Although, Candida albicans is considered as the most common candidiasis agents, other non-albicans such as C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis were raised as infectious agents. Resistance to fluconazole among non-albicans species is an important problem for clinicians during therapy and prophylaxis. Objectives: The aim of current study was to detect the Candida species from hospitalized neonatal and children in intensive care units (ICUs) and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In addition, the susceptibility of isolated agents were also evaluated against three antifungals. Materials and Methods: In the present study 298 samples including 98 blood samples, 100 urines and 100 swabs from oral cavity were inoculated on CHROMagar Candida. Initial detection was done according to the coloration colonies on CHROMagar Candida . Morphology on cornmeal agar, germ tube formation and growth at 45°C were confirmed isolates. Amphotericin B, fluconazole and terbinafine (Lamisil) were used for the susceptibility tests using microdilution method. Results: In the present study 21% and 34% of urines and swabs from oral cavity were positive for Candida species, respectively. The most common species was C. albicans (62.5%) followed by C. tropicalis (15.6%), C. glabrata (6.3%) and Candida species (15.6%). Our study indicated that the most tested species of Candida, 70.3% were sensitive to fluconazole at the concentration of ≤8 μg/mL. Whereas 9 (14.1%) of isolates were resistant to amphotericine B at ≥8 μg/mL. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of species identification and antifungals susceptibility testing for hospitalized patients in ICUs and NICUs wards. PMID:26312235

  15. In vitro biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates: any association with clinical characteristics?

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Benedek, Kálmán; Juhász, Emese; Iván, Miklós; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Candida spp. are a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) and are associated with high mortality rates. Biofilm production is a virulence factor of Candida spp., and has been linked with poor clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to assess biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates at our institute, and to determine whether in vitro biofilm production is associated with any clinical characteristics of infection. During the four-year study period, 93 cases of Candida BSI were analysed. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (66.7 %), followed by C. glabrata (9.7 %), C. parapsilosis (9.7 %), C. tropicalis (9.7 %) and C. krusei (4.3 %). Biofilm production was more prevalent among non-albicans Candida spp. (77.4 %) than C. albicans (30.6 %) (P = 0.02). Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor of BSI caused by biofilm producing non-albicans Candida isolates. No risk factors predisposing to bloodstream infection caused by a biofilm producing C. albicans isolate were identified. Biofilm production was not verified as a risk factor of mortality. PMID:26678484

  16. Isolation of Different Species of Candida in Patients With Vulvovaginal Candidiasis From Sari, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Taheri, Zahra; Galinimoghadam, Tahereh; Aghili, Seyed Reza; Yazdani Cherati, Jamshid; Mosayebi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC) is a frequent, complex and cumbersome condition that can cause physical and psychological distress for the involved individual. Candida albicans was reported as the most common agent of VVC yet it seems that we are recently encountering changes in the pattern of Candida species in VVC. Objectives: In this study we assessed different species of Candida isolated from patients with VVC, residing in Sari, Iran. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-four patients with vulvovaginitis were enrolled in this study. Samples were collected by a wet swab. Each vaginal swab was examined microscopically and processed for fungal culture. The identification of Candida species was done by morphological and physiological methods such as culture on CHROMagar Candida media and sugar assimilation test with the HiCandida identification kit (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: Out of 234 patients with vulvovaginitis, 66 (28.2%) patients showed VVC. Of these patients, 16 (24.2%) had recurrent VVC (RVVC). The age group of 20 - 29 year-olds had the highest frequency of VVC (48.5%). Erythema concomitant with itching (40.9%) was the most prevalent sign in VVC patients. Fifty-seven (86.4%) of the collected samples had positive results from both microscopic examination and culture. In total, 73 colonies of Candida spp. were isolated from 66 patients with VVC. The most common identified species of Candida were C. albicans (42.5%), C. glabrata (21.9%) and C. dubliniensis (16.4%). In patients with RVVC and patients without recurrence, C. albicans and non-albicans species of Candida were frequent species, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study showed that non-albicans species of Candida are more frequent than C. albicans in patients with VVC. This result is in line with some recent studies indicating that non-albicans species of Candida must be considered in gynecology clinics due to the reported azole resistance in these species. PMID

  17. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  18. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses. PMID:26491100

  19. Ibuprofen-Mediated Reversal of Fluconazole Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Candida

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Kotwal, Aarti; Thakuria, Bhaskar; Kakati, Barnali; Chauhan, Bhupendra Singh; Patras, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In view of the increasing prevalence of invasive Candidiasis in today’s health-care scenario and the emergence of fluconazole resistance among clinical isolates of Candida, we sought to determine if Ibuprofen could elicit a reversal of fluconazole resistance and thereby offer a potential therapeutic breakthrough in fluconazole-resistant Candidiasis. Materials and Methods: We selected 69 clinical isolates of Candida, which demonstrated an MIC of >32 μg/ml for fluconazole, and subjected them to broth microdilution in presence and absence of Ibuprofen. Results: Forty two of the 69 isolates (60.9%) demonstrated reversal of Fluconazole resistance with concomitant use of Ibuprofen. This was characterized by significant species-wise variation (p=0.00008), with all the C. albicans isolates and none of the C. glabrata isolates demonstrating such reversal. Only 22.2% and 37.7% of C. krusei and C. tropicalis isolates respectively showed Ibuprofen-mediated reversal of Fluconazole resistance. Conclusion: Since Ibuprofen is a known efflux pump inhibitor, our findings hint at the possible mechanism of Fluconazole resistance in most of our Candida isolates and suggest a potential therapeutic alternative that could be useful in the majority of Fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida. PMID:25737988

  20. Phenotypic Switching in Candida glabrata Accompanied by Changes in Expression of Genes with Deduced Functions in Copper Detoxification and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Zhao, Rui; Daniels, Karla; Radke, Josh; Soll, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Most strains of Candida glabrata switch spontaneously between a number of phenotypes distinguishable by graded brown coloration on agar containing 1 mM CuSO4, a phenomenon referred to as “core switching.” C. glabrata also switches spontaneously and reversibly from core phenotypes to an irregular wrinkle (IWr) phenotype, a phenomenon referred to as “irregular wrinkle switching.” To identify genes differentially expressed in the core phenotypes white (Wh) and dark brown (DB), a cDNA subtraction strategy was employed. Twenty-three genes were identified as up-regulated in DB, four in Wh, and six in IWr. Up-regulation was verified in two unrelated strains, one a and one α strain. The functions of these genes were deduced from the functions of their Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologs. The majority of genes up-regulated in DB (78%) played deduced roles in copper assimilation, sulfur assimilation, and stress responses. These genes were differentially up-regulated in DB even though the conditions of growth for Wh and DB, including CuSO4 concentration, were identical. Hence, the regulation of these genes, normally regulated by environmental cues, has been usurped by switching, presumably as an adaptation to the challenging host environment. These results are consistent with the suggestion that switching provides colonizing populations with a minority of cells expressing a phenotype that allows them to enrich in response to an environmental challenge, a form of rapid adaptation. However, DB is the most commonly expressed phenotype at sites of host colonization, in the apparent absence of elevated copper levels. Hence, up-regulation of these genes by switching suggests that in some cases they may play roles in colonization and virulence not immediately obvious from the roles played by their orthologs in S. cerevisiae. PMID:16087748

  1. [Phenotypic and genotypic identification of Candida strains isolated as nosocomial pathogens].

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Fatih; Ergünay, Koray; Ozyurt, Mustafa; Ardıç, Nurittin; Hoşbul, Tuğrul; Haznedaroğlu, Tunçer

    2011-07-01

    Over the last decade, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections and antifungal agents used to treat these infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections among patients in intensive care units. One of the main goals of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of infectious Candida species isolated in our hospital and accordingly supply data for hospital infection (HI) control. The other aim of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and practical applicability of traditional and molecular methods used to identify Candida isolates to the species level. A total of 77 Candida strains that were isolated from various clinical specimens of 60 hospitalized patients (29 male, 24 female; 7 were children) were included in the study. Fifty-seven (74%) of those isolates were defined as HI agents according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The most common Candida species identified as agents of HI were C.albicans (22; 38.6%), followed by C.tropicalis (14; 24.6%), C.parapsilosis (13; 22.8%), C.glabrata (7; 12.3%) and Candida spp. (1; 1.75%). It was determined that bloodstream (26; 45.6%) and urinary tract infections (24; 42.1%) were the most frequently encountered nosocomial infections caused by Candida species. In addition it was detected that the most frequent causative agent of bloodstream infections was C.parapsilosis (10; 38.5%) and of urinary tract infections was C.albicans (12; 50%). The evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of traditional phenotypic methods [germ tube formation, chlamydospore formation in corn meal agar, growth at 45°C, colony characteristics on CHROMagar Candida medium, carbohydrate assimilation properties detected by API ID 32C (BioMerieux, France) system] and some molecular techniques [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using ITS-1, ITS-3 and ITS 4 primers, PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCRRFLP

  2. Fluconazole susceptibility and ERG11 gene expression in vaginal candida species isolated from Lagos Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Pam, Victoria K; Akpan, Juliet U; Oduyebo, Oyinlola O; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Fowora, Muinah A; Oladele, Rita O; Ogunsola, Folasade T; Smith, Stella I

    2012-01-01

    Fluconazole resistance is an important type of resistance in Candida because in most countries, fluconazole is the drug of choice for vulvovaginal candidiasis. Candida species resist fluconazole by various mechanisms but there is paucity of data on these in our environment. Such mechanisms include among others, over-expression of the ERG11 gene, which codes for synthesis of the target enzymes in the fungus. The aim of this study was to screen Candida spp. resistant to fluconazole for the expression of ERG11 gene. Fluconazole susceptibility test was performed on 28 clinical strains of Candida species previously obtained from students of a School of Nursing in Lagos, Nigeria. They were identified by API Candida, CHROMagar candida and germ tube test. Using 25 mcg discs, fluconazole susceptibility was determined by the disc diffusion method and results were interpreted in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria; sensitive (S), resistant (R) and susceptible dose dependent (SDD). The R and SDD isolates were subsequently evaluated for the presence of ERG11 gene. Of the 28 clinical isolates, 14 were identified as C. albicans and six as C. tropicalis. The remaining isolates were identified as C. glabrata (2), C. famata (2) C. kefyr (2) one each of C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii respectively. In this study, 18 were susceptible (S) to fluconazole, eight were SDD and two were resistant to the antifungal agent. Out of the 14 C. albicans isolates, 12 were susceptible, one showed high level resistance and similar number showed susceptible dose dependence. ERG11 was detected in three susceptible dose dependent Candida species. This analysis demonstrates that susceptible dose dependence should not be overlooked as it may be associated with the presence of ERG11 gene and resistance to fluconazole. There is a need to consider routine antifungal susceptibility testing for Candida species causing vulvovaginitis. PMID:22493755

  3. Species Distribution and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Vulvovaginal Candida Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Dai; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Wen-Xiang; Bai, Hui-Hui; Dong, Han-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was a common infection associated with lifelong harassment of woman's social and sexual life. The purpose of this study was to describe the species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida species (Candida spp.) isolated from patients with VVC over 8 years. Methods: Species which isolated from patients with VVC in Peking University First Hospital were identified using chromogenic culture media. Susceptibility to common antifungal agents was determined using agar diffusion method based on CLSI M44-A2 document. SPSS software (version 14.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis, involving statistical description and Chi-square test. Results: The most common strains were Candida (C.) albicans, 80.5% (n = 1775) followed by C. glabrata, 18.1% (n = 400). Nystatin exhibited excellent activity against all species (<4% resistant [R]). Resistance to azole drugs varied among different species. C. albicans: clotrimazole (3.1% R) < fluconazole (16.6% R) < itraconazole (51.5% R) < miconazole (54.0% R); C. glabrata: miconazole (25.6% R) < clotrimazole (50.5% R) < itraconazole (61.9% R) < fluconazole (73.3% R); Candida krusei: clotrimazole (0 R) < fluconazole (57.7% R) < miconazole (73.1% R) < itraconazole (83.3% R). The susceptibility of fluconazole was noticeably decreasing among all species in the study period. Conclusions: Nystatin was the optimal choice for the treatment of VVC at present. The species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from patients with VVC had changed over time. PMID:27174323

  4. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; de Almeida, Adriana Araújo; de Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires; Grisolia/, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-01-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candidaspecies known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei - A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. kruseidemands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  5. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  6. Identification of Components of the SUMOylation Machinery in Candida glabrata: ROLE OF THE DESUMOYLATION PEPTIDASE CgUlp2 IN VIRULENCE.

    PubMed

    Gujjula, Rahul; Veeraiah, Sangeetha; Kumar, Kundan; Thakur, Suman S; Mishra, Krishnaveni; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-09-01

    Regulation of protein function by reversible post-translational modification, SUMOylation, is widely conserved in the eukaryotic kingdom. SUMOylation is essential for cell growth, division, and adaptation to stress in most organisms, including fungi. As these are key factors in determination of fungal virulence, in this study, we have investigated the importance of SUMOylation in the human pathogen, Candida glabrata We identified the enzymes involved in small ubiquitin-like modifier conjugation and show that there is strong conservation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. glabrata We demonstrate that SUMOylation is an essential process and that adaptation to stress involves changes in global SUMOylation in C. glabrata Importantly, loss of the deSUMOylating enzyme CgUlp2 leads to highly reduced small ubiquitin-like modifier protein levels, and impaired growth, sensitivity to multiple stress conditions, reduced adherence to epithelial cells, and poor colonization of specific tissues in mice. Our study thus demonstrates a key role for protein SUMOylation in the life cycle and pathobiology of C. glabrata. PMID:27382059

  7. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes†||‡

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain, and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 Å apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5-β-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product. PMID:20968298

  8. Gain-of-Function Mutations in PDR1, a Regulator of Antifungal Drug Resistance in Candida glabrata, Control Adherence to Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Silva, Luís; Ischer, Françoise; Leibundgut-Landmann, Salomé

    2013-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an emerging opportunistic pathogen that is known to develop resistance to azole drugs due to increased drug efflux. The mechanism consists of CgPDR1-mediated upregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters. A range of gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in CgPDR1 have been found to lead not only to azole resistance but also to enhanced virulence. This implicates CgPDR1 in the regulation of the interaction of C. glabrata with the host. To identify specific CgPDR1-regulated steps of the host-pathogen interaction, we investigated in this work the interaction of selected CgPDR1 GOF mutants with murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1)-derived macrophages, as well as different epithelial cell lines. GOF mutations in CgPDR1 did not influence survival and replication within macrophages following phagocytosis but led to decreased adherence to and uptake by macrophages. This may allow evasion from the host's innate cellular immune response. The interaction with epithelial cells revealed an opposite trend, suggesting that GOF mutations in CgPDR1 may favor epithelial colonization of the host by C. glabrata through increased adherence to epithelial cell layers. These data reveal that GOF mutations in CgPDR1 modulate the interaction with host cells in ways that may contribute to increased virulence. PMID:23460523

  9. Identification and characterization of nine atypical Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Albaina, Olatz; Sahand, Ismail H; Brusca, María I; Sullivan, Derek J; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Moragues, María D

    2015-02-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a pathogenic yeast of the genus Candida closely related to Candida albicans. The phenotypic similarity of these two species often leads to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates in clinical samples. DNA-based methods continue to be the most effective means of discriminating accurately between the two species. Here, we report on the identification of nine unusual Candida isolates that showed ambiguous identification patterns on the basis of their phenotypic and immunological traits. The isolates were categorized into two groups. Group I isolates were unable to produce germ tubes and chlamydospores, and to agglutinate commercial latex particles coated with a mAb highly specific for C. dubliniensis. Group II isolates grew as pink and white colonies on CHROMagar Candida and ChromID Candida, respectively. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained with API/ID32C together with PCR amplification with specific primers and DNA sequencing allowed reliable identification of the nine unusual clinical isolates as C. dubliniensis. PMID:25480879

  10. Real-World Experience with Echinocandin MICs against Candida Species in a Multicenter Study of Hospitals That Routinely Perform Susceptibility Testing of Bloodstream Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M. Hong; Shoham, Shmuel; Vazquez, Jose A.; Morris, Arthur J.; Pasculle, William A.; Kubin, Christine J.; Klinker, Kenneth P.; Carver, Peggy L.; Hanson, Kimberly E.; Chen, Sharon; Lam, Simon W.; Potoski, Brian A.; Clarke, Lloyd G.; Shields, Ryan K.; Clancy, Cornelius J.

    2014-01-01

    Reference broth microdilution methods of Candida echinocandin susceptibility testing are limited by interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs. Recently revised Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint MICs for echinocandin nonsusceptibility may not be valid for commercial tests employed in hospital laboratories. Indeed, there are limited echinocandin susceptibility testing data from hospital laboratories. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study of 9 U.S., Australian, and New Zealand hospitals that routinely tested Candida bloodstream isolates for echinocandin susceptibility from 2005 to 2013. Eight hospitals used Sensititre YeastOne assays. The Candida spp. were C. albicans (n = 1,067), C. glabrata (n = 911), C. parapsilosis (n = 476), C. tropicalis (n = 185), C. krusei (n = 104), and others (n = 154). Resistance and intermediate rates were ≤1.4% and ≤3%, respectively, for each echinocandin against C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. Resistance rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were ≤7.5% and ≤5.6%, respectively. Caspofungin intermediate rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were 17.8% and 46.5%, respectively, compared to ≤4.3% and ≤4.4% for other echinocandins. Using CLSI breakpoints, 18% and 19% of C. glabrata isolates were anidulafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible and micafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible, respectively; similar discrepancies were observed for 38% and 39% of C. krusei isolates. If only YeastOne data were considered, interhospital modal MIC variability was low (within 2 doubling dilutions for each agent). In conclusion, YeastOne assays employed in hospitals may reduce the interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs against Candida species that are observed between reference laboratories using CLSI broth microdilution methods. The significance of classifying isolates as caspofungin intermediate and anidulafungin/micafungin susceptible will

  11. SNF3 as High Affinity Glucose Sensor and Its Function in Supporting the Viability of Candida glabrata under Glucose-Limited Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Chew, Shu Yih; Rangasamy, Premmala; Mohd Desa, Mohd N.; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is an emerging human fungal pathogen that has efficacious nutrient sensing and responsiveness ability. It can be seen through its ability to thrive in diverse range of nutrient limited-human anatomical sites. Therefore, nutrient sensing particularly glucose sensing is thought to be crucial in contributing to the development and fitness of the pathogen. This study aimed to elucidate the role of SNF3 (Sucrose Non Fermenting 3) as a glucose sensor and its possible role in contributing to the fitness and survivability of C. glabrata in glucose-limited environment. The SNF3 knockout strain was constructed and subjected to different glucose concentrations to evaluate its growth, biofilm formation, amphotericin B susceptibility, ex vivo survivability and effects on the transcriptional profiling of the sugar receptor repressor (SRR) pathway-related genes. The CgSNF3Δ strain showed a retarded growth in low glucose environments (0.01 and 0.1%) in both fermentation and respiration-preferred conditions but grew well in high glucose concentration environments (1 and 2%). It was also found to be more susceptible to amphotericin B in low glucose environment (0.1%) and macrophage engulfment but showed no difference in the biofilm formation capability. The deletion of SNF3 also resulted in the down-regulation of about half of hexose transporters genes (four out of nine). Overall, the deletion of SNF3 causes significant reduction in the ability of C. glabrata to sense limited surrounding glucose and consequently disrupts its competency to transport and perform the uptake of this critical nutrient. This study highlighted the role of SNF3 as a high affinity glucose sensor and its role in aiding the survivability of C. glabrata particularly in glucose limited environment. PMID:26648919

  12. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  13. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  14. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-06-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  15. Saliva promotes survival and even proliferation of Candida species in tap water.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Vanessa; Migeot, Virginie; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Deborde, Marie; Imbert, Christine

    2011-11-01

    Candida yeasts colonize the human oral cavity as commensals or opportunistic pathogens. They may be isolated from water circulating in dental unit waterlines mixed with traces of saliva mainly because of the dysfunction of antiretraction valves. This study deals with the growth ability of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis in tap water with saliva (0-20% v/v). Results show that C. glabrata is the most susceptible species in tap water. Furthermore, saliva promotes both survival and proliferation of the three studied Candida species in tap water. PMID:22092759

  16. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  17. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka; Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  18. Antifungal susceptibility of invasive Candida bloodstream isolates from the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thean Yen; Hsu, Li Yang; Alejandria, Marissa M; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Chinniah, Terrence; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Choudhury, Saugata; Chen, Yen Hsu; Shin, Jong Hee; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Mendoza, Myrna; Prabhu, Kavitha; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Tan, Ai Ling; Phan, Xuan Thi; Tran, Thi Thanh Nga; Nguyen, Gia Binh; Doan, Mai Phuong; Huynh, Van An; Nguyen, Su Minh Tuyet; Tran, Thanh Binh; Van Pham, Hung

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species are of increasing importance and associated with significant mortality. We performed a multi-centre prospective observational study to identify the species and antifungal susceptibilities of invasive bloodstream isolates of Candida species in the Asia-Pacific region. The study was carried out over a two year period, involving 13 centers from Brunei, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Identification of Candida species was performed at each study center, and reconfirmed at a central laboratory. Susceptibility testing was performed using a commercial broth dilution panel (Sensititre YeastOne YST-010, Thermofisher, United Kingdom) with susceptibility categorisation (S = susceptible, S-DD = susceptible dose-dependent) applied using breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Eight hundred and sixty-one Candida isolates were included in the study. The most common species were C. albicans (35.9%), C. tropicalis (30.7%), C. parapsilosis (15.7%), and C. glabrata (13.6%). Non-albicans species exceeded C. albicans species in centers from all countries except Taiwan. Fluconazole susceptibility was almost universal for C. albicans (S = 99.7%) but lower for C. tropicalis (S = 75.8%, S-DD = 6.1%), C. glabrata (S-DD = 94.9%), and C. parapsilosis (S = 94.8%). Echinocandins demonstrated high rates of in vitro susceptibility (S>99%) against C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis This study demonstrates that non-albicans species are the most common isolates from bloodstream infections in most countries in the Asia-Pacific region, with C. tropicalis as the predominant species. Because of the prevalence of reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in non-albicans species, the study indicates that echinocandins should be the antifungal of choice in clinically unstable or high-risk patients with documented candidemia. PMID:26868904

  19. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2016-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  20. Activity of Isavuconazole and Other Azoles against Candida Clinical Isolates and Yeast Model Systems with Known Azole Resistance Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel, broad-spectrum, antifungal azole. In order to evaluate its interactions with known azole resistance mechanisms, isavuconazole susceptibility among different yeast models and clinical isolates expressing characterized azole resistance mechanisms was tested and compared to those of fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Candida albicans and C. glabrata ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters (CDR1, CDR2, and CgCDR1), major facilitator (MDR1), and lanosterol 14-α-sterol-demethylase (ERG11) alleles with mutations were used. In addition, pairs of C. albicans and C. glabrata strains from matched clinical isolates with known azole resistance mechanisms were investigated. The expression of ABC transporters increased all azole MICs, suggesting that all azoles tested were substrates of ABC transporters. The expression of MDR1 did not increase posaconazole, itraconazole, and isavuconazole MICs. Relative increases of azole MICs (from 4- to 32-fold) were observed for fluconazole, voriconazole, and isavuconazole when at least two mutations were present in the same ERG11 allele. Upon MIC testing of azoles with clinical C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates with known resistance mechanisms, the MIC90s of C. albicans for fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole were 128, 2, 1, 0.5, and 2 μg/ml, respectively, while in C. glabrata they were 128, 2, 4, 4, and 16 μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the effects of azole resistance mechanisms on isavuconazole did not differ significantly from those of other azoles. Resistance mechanisms in yeasts involving ABC transporters and ERG11 decreased the activity of isavuconazole, while MDR1 had limited effect. PMID:26482310

  1. Synergistic Activity of Chloroquine with Fluconazole against Fluconazole-Resistant Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro activity of chloroquine and the interactions of chloroquine combined with fluconazole against 37 Candida isolates were tested using the broth microdilution, disk diffusion, and Etest susceptibility tests. Synergistic effect was detected with 6 of 9 fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates, with Candida krusei ATCC 6258, and with all 12 fluconazole-resistant Candida tropicalis isolates. PMID:25512426

  2. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity.

    PubMed

    Parolin, Carola; Marangoni, Antonella; Laghi, Luca; Foschi, Claudio; Ñahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Calonghi, Natalia; Cevenini, Roberto; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17) by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection. PMID:26098675

  3. Isolation of Vaginal Lactobacilli and Characterization of Anti-Candida Activity

    PubMed Central

    Parolin, Carola; Marangoni, Antonella; Laghi, Luca; Foschi, Claudio; Ñahui Palomino, Rogers Alberto; Calonghi, Natalia; Cevenini, Roberto; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by Lactobacillus spp., which form a critical line of defence against pathogens, including Candida spp. The present study aims to identify vaginal lactobacilli exerting in vitro activity against Candida spp. and to characterize their antifungal mechanisms of action. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy premenopausal women. The isolates were taxonomically identified to species level (L. crispatus B1-BC8, L. gasseri BC9-BC14 and L. vaginalis BC15-BC17) by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide and lactate. Fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae were evaluated by broth micro-dilution method. The broadest spectrum of activity was observed for L. crispatus BC1, BC4, BC5 and L. vaginalis BC15, demonstrating fungicidal activity against all isolates of C. albicans and C. lusitaniae. Metabolic profiles of lactobacilli supernatants were studied by 1H-NMR analysis. Metabolome was found to be correlated with both taxonomy and activity score. Exclusion, competition and displacement experiments were carried out to investigate the interference exerted by lactobacilli toward the yeast adhesion to HeLa cells. Most Lactobacillus strains significantly reduced C. albicans adhesion through all mechanisms. In particular, L. crispatus BC2, L. gasseri BC10 and L. gasseri BC11 appeared to be the most active strains in reducing pathogen adhesion, as their effects were mediated by both cells and supernatants. Inhibition of histone deacetylases was hypothesised to support the antifungal activity of vaginal lactobacilli. Our results are prerequisites for the development of new therapeutic agents based on probiotics for prophylaxis and adjuvant therapy of Candida infection. PMID:26098675

  4. New Insights into the Structure of (1→3,1→6)-β-D-Glucan Side Chains in the Candida glabrata Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Lowman, Douglas W.; West, Lara J.; Bearden, Daniel W.; Wempe, Michael F.; Power, Trevor D.; Ensley, Harry E.; Haynes, Ken; Williams, David L.; Kruppa, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    β-glucan is a (1→3)-β-linked glucose polymer with (1→6)-β-linked side chains and a major component of fungal cell walls. β-glucans provide structural integrity to the fungal cell wall. The nature of the (1–6)-β-linked side chain structure of fungal (1→3,1→6)-β-D-glucans has been very difficult to elucidate. Herein, we report the first detailed structural characterization of the (1→6)-β-linked side chains of Candida glabrata using high-field NMR. The (1→6)-β-linked side chains have an average length of 4 to 5 repeat units spaced every 21 repeat units along the (1→3)-linked polymer backbone. Computer modeling suggests that the side chains have a bent curve structure that allows for a flexible interconnection with parallel (1→3)-β-D-glucan polymers, and/or as a point of attachment for proteins. Based on these observations we propose new approaches to how (1→6)-β-linked side chains interconnect with neighboring glucan polymers in a manner that maximizes fungal cell wall strength, while also allowing for flexibility, or plasticity. PMID:22096604

  5. Echinocandin resistance in two Candida haemulonii isolates from pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Muro, Marisol Dominguez; Motta, Fábio de Araújo; Burger, Marion; Melo, Analy Salles de Azevedo; Dalla-Costa, Líbera Maria

    2012-11-01

    We report 3 cases of patients with Candida haemulonii isolates that were obtained from hemocultures. In 2 of the 3 cases, isolates exhibited resistance to echinocandins and fluconazole. This is the first report of an echinocandin-resistant species of this fungus in pediatric patients. PMID:22895037

  6. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm. PMID:27020154

  7. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  8. Candida baotianmanensis sp. nov. and Candida pseudoviswanathii sp. nov., two ascosporic yeast species isolated from the gut of beetles.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong-Cheng; Xu, Long-Long; Zhang, Lin; Hui, Feng-Li

    2015-10-01

    Four yeast strains were isolated from the gut of beetles collected on Baotianman Mountain and People's Park of Nanyang in Henan Province, China. These strains produced unconjugated asci with one or two ellipsoidal to elongate ascospores in a persistent ascus. Phylogenetic analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates represent two novel sexual species in the Candida/Lodderomyces clade. Candida baotianmanensis sp. nov. was located in a statistically well-supported branch together with Candida maltosa. Candida pseudoviswanathii sp. nov. formed a subclade with its closest relative Candida viswanathii supported by a strong bootstrap value. The two novel species were distinguished from their most closely related described species, Candida maltosa and Candida viswanathii, in the D1/D2 LSU rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences and in phenotypic traits. The type strain of Candida baotianmanensis sp. nov. is NYNU 14719T ( = CBS 13915T = CICC 33052T), and the type strain of Candida pseudoviswanathii sp. nov. is NYNU 14772T ( = CBS 13916T = CICC 33053T). The MycoBank numbers for Candida baotianmanensis sp. nov. and Candida pseudoviswanathii sp. nov. are MB 812621 and MB 812622. PMID:26297152

  9. Prospective evaluation of the chromogenic medium CandiSelect 4 for differentiation and presumptive identification of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; de Hoog, G Sybren; Cornelissen, Akke; Lyu, Qian; Mou, Lili; Liu, Taohua; Cao, Yu; Vatanshenassan, Mansoureh; Kang, Yingqian

    2016-02-01

    Rapid identification of pathogenic yeasts is a crucial step in timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. For diagnostics in the clinical laboratory, simplified alternatives to barcoding are needed. CandiSelect 4 (CS4) medium, a chromogenic medium for isolation of clinical yeasts, allows routine recognition of Candida albicans and presumptive identification of Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. We evaluated an extension of this method with 46 non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) and 7 Malassezia species. The medium supported growth of all species tested and a wide diversity of cultural types were observed. Colony colours were in violet, turquoise (including green and blue), or white tinges. Eight NCAC species produced violet pigmentation similar to that of C. albicans. Most NCAC species, including C. glabrata and C. tropicalis were distributed in the turquoise group. Malassezia species were invariably blue. PMID:26781374

  10. Antifungal Activity of Plant Extracts against Candida Species from Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, K.; Kumar, L. Sathish; Rajendran, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Bhaskar, K.; Sajit Khan, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy five patients with oral lesions attending the different departments of Rajah Muthiah Medical College and Hospital, Annamalai University were screened for Candida. Forty six (61.3%) Candida strains were isolated from the oral lesions. Of the 46 Candida strains, Candida albicans accounted for 35 (76.08%), Candida glabrata for 5 (10.86%), Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei for 2 (4.34%) each and Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii for one (2.17%) each. Antifungal activity of ethanol extracts of five plant species that included Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea, Odina wodier, Momordica charantia and Melia azedarach and two algal species, Sargassum wightii and Caulerpa scalpelliformis were tested against 25 isolated strains by disc diffusion method. Antifungal activity was observed at 100 mg/ml for Syzygium jambolanum, Cassia siamea and Caulerpa scalpelliformis and at 10 mg/ml for Sargassum wightii. PMID:21369447

  11. Growth and acid production of Candida species in human saliva supplemented with glucose.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Hughes, A; Weetman, D A; MacFarlane, T W

    1986-05-01

    Growth characteristic and acid production of oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata in glucose supplemented and glucose-free, pooled, human whole saliva were examined. Both Candida species exhibited sigmoidal growth curves in batch cultures of mixed saliva, supplemented with glucose. The growth of Candida in saliva was accompanied by a rapid decline in pH from 7.5 to 3.2 over 48 h and the major acidic components initiating and sustaining this pH drop were pyruvates and acetates. These acidic metabolites may play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral Candida infections. PMID:3091791

  12. [Evaluation of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method in the identifi cation of Candida species isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Gonca; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa Altay

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, increased number of patients who are hospitalized in intensive care units, received immunosuppressive therapy and treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics that can lead an increase in the incidence of systemic candidiasis. In these patients, the most common clinical manifestation is candidemia. Since the identification of Candida species isolated from blood cultures is time consuming by conventional (morphological and biochemical) methods, rapid, reliable and accurate methods are needed. For this purpose novel systems have been developed to identify the agent directly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) method for the identification of Candida species by comparing with the conventional methods. A total of 50 patients who were admitted to Erciyes University Medical Faculty Hospital clinics and followed with prediagnosis of systemic fungal infections whose blood cultures were positive for the yeasts between July 2011 and July 2012 were included in the study. The conventional identification of Candida isolates was performed by considering macroscopic and microscopic morphology, germ tube test, cycloheximide sensitivity, urease activity and carbohydrate assimilation patterns with API 20C AUX (bioMerieux, France) test. PNA FISH method was conducted by the use of a commercial kit namely Yeast Traffic Light(®) PNA FISH (AdvanDx, USA). According to morphological and biochemical characteristics (conventional methods), 19 (38%) out of 50 Candida isolates were identified as C.albicans, 12 (24%) as C.glabrata, five (10%) as C.parapsilosis, five (10%) as C.kefyr, four (8%) as C.krusei, two (4%) as C.guilliermondii, two (4%) as C.tropicalis and one (2%) as C.lusitaniae. On the other hand, 24 (48%) of the isolates were identified as C.albicans/C.parapsilosis (with green fluorescence), 16 (32%) as C.glabrata/C.krusei (with red fluorescence) and one (%2) as C.tropicalis (with yellow

  13. Effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women.

    PubMed

    Alczuk, Silvia de Souza Dantas; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia de Souza; Rocha-Brischiliari, Sheila Cristina; Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane Suemi; Martins, Helen Priscilla Rodrigues; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta de; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in HIV-infected women contributed to the impairment of their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use on the vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women. This cross-sectional study included 178 HIV-infected (HIV group) and 200 HIV-uninfected women (control) that were studied at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE) for sexually transmitted diseases (STD)/AIDS of the city of Maringá, Brazil, from April 1 to October 30, 2011. The yeasts were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was tested by the reference microdilution method. Higher frequencies of total vaginal Candida spp. isolation were found in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. However, both groups showed a similar frequency of colonization and VVC. Although C. albicans was the most frequent and sensitive to azolics and polyenes in both HIV-infected and uninfected women, the emerging resistance of C. glabrata to amphotericin B in the HIV-infected women was observed. Although higher frequency of vaginal Candida spp. isolation had been observed in the HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected women, colonization and VVC showed similar frequency in both groups, indicating that HAART appears to protect against vaginal colonization and VVC. PMID:25923898

  14. EFFECT OF HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY ON VAGINAL Candida spp. ISOLATION IN HIV-INFECTED COMPARED TO HIV-UNINFECTED WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    ALCZUK, Silvia de Souza Dantas; BONFIM-MENDONÇA, Patrícia de Souza; ROCHA-BRISCHILIARI, Sheila Cristina; SHINOBU-MESQUITA, Cristiane Suemi; MARTINS, Helen Priscilla Rodrigues; GIMENES, Fabrícia; de ABREU, André Luelsdorf Pimenta; CARVALHO, Maria Dalva de Barros; PELLOSO, Sandra Marisa; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet; CONSOLARO, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

     Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) in HIV-infected women contributed to the impairment of their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use on the vaginal Candida spp. isolation in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected women. This cross-sectional study included 178 HIV-infected (HIV group) and 200 HIV-uninfected women (control) that were studied at the Specialized Assistance Service (SAE) for sexually transmitted diseases (STD)/AIDS of the city of Maringá, Brazil, from April 1 to October 30, 2011. The yeasts were isolated and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was tested by the reference microdilution method. Higher frequencies of total vaginal Candida spp. isolation were found in the HIV-infected group than in the control group. However, both groups showed a similar frequency of colonization and VVC. Although C. albicans was the most frequent and sensitive to azolics and polyenes in both HIV-infected and uninfected women, the emerging resistance of C. glabrata to amphotericin B in the HIV-infected women was observed. Although higher frequency of vaginal Candida spp. isolation had been observed in the HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected women, colonization and VVC showed similar frequency in both groups, indicating that HAART appears to protect against vaginal colonization and VVC. PMID:25923898

  15. CHROMagar Candida as the Sole Primary Medium for Isolation of Yeasts and as a Source Medium for the Rapid-Assimilation-of-Trehalose Test

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa P.; Zinchuk, Riva; Larone, Davise H.

    2005-01-01

    The chromogenic medium BBL CHROMagar Candida (CAC) was evaluated as a sole primary medium for the isolation of yeasts from clinical specimens in which yeasts are the primary concern. Additionally, the reliability of the rapid-assimilation-of-trehalose (RAT) test in yielding correct results with isolates taken from CAC was assessed. A total of 270 throat, urine, and genital (TUG) specimens were streaked onto CAC, Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), inhibitory mold agar (IMA), and Mycosel (MYC). A total of 69 blood culture broths that were smear positive for yeast were streaked onto CAC and SDA. A 1-h RAT test (NCCLS M35-A) was performed simultaneously on isolates from CAC and SDA. A total of 112 TUG specimens yielded yeast colonies (CAC, 111 colonies; IMA, 105; SDA, 103; MYC, 91). The 69 blood culture yeasts grew on both CAC and SDA. Mixed cultures of yeasts were detected on 11 CAC plates but were unrecognized on other media. Colonies suspected of being C. glabrata on 32 CAC plates were all RAT test positive and confirmed to be C. glabrata; of 59 colonies with various characteristics of color and morphology on CAC, none were RAT positive, and all were conventionally identified as yeasts other than C. glabrata (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). The same isolates from SDA tested for RAT produced six false negatives and no false positives (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 100%). The results show that CAC can be used as the sole primary medium for recovery of yeasts from clinical specimens. Additionally, isolates grown on CAC yield excellent results with the RAT test utilized in this study. PMID:15750085

  16. CHROMagar Candida Medium for Direct Susceptibility Testing of Yeast from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace L.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2005-01-01

    An evaluation was performed on 95 blood cultures positive for Candida spp. to determine the correlation of direct susceptibility testing of fluconazole versus both standardized disk diffusion and MIC methods. For direct testing, an aliquot taken from BD BACTEC Plus and/or BD BACTEC Lytic/10 bottles (Becton Dickinson [BD], Sparks, MD) positive by gram stain for yeast was subcultured to CHROMagar Candida (BD), and a 25-μg fluconazole disk (BD) was placed on the plate. The area of growth inhibition surrounding the disk was measured at 24 and 48 h. In addition, a subculture of the isolate was tested by a microdilution MIC using YeastOne (TREK Diagnostics Systems Inc., OH) and disk diffusion (NCCLS M44-A) using a standardized inoculum plated onto CHROMagar Candida as well as Mueller-Hinton agar to which 2% glucose and 0.5 μg/ml methylene blue dye was added (MH-GMB). The categorical interpretation derived from the MIC was used as the reference to which the disk diffusion results were compared. There were a total of 41 Candida albicans, 23 Candida glabrata, 20 Candida parapsilosis, 9 Candida tropicalis, and 1 each of Candida krusei and Candida lusitaniae tested. At 24 h there was full agreement among the methods for all C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. lusitaniae, and C. krusei isolates. For the C. parapsilosis isolates at 24 h there was one very major discrepancy using the direct CHROMagar and one major error with the standardized MH-GMB. The majority of the errors were seen at 24 h with the C. glabrata isolates. Of the 23 C. glabrata isolates at 24 h by direct CHROMagar, there were 10 minor and 1 very major error; by MH-GMB there were 12 minor and 2 very major errors; and by standardized CHROMagar Candida there were 13 minor and 2 major errors. There were no very major errors with C. glabrata when all plates were read at 48 h. At 24 h by the direct and standardized CHROMagar the majority of C. glabrata isolates were more resistant, whereas by MH-GMB they were more

  17. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Beckius, Miriam L; Floyd, Karon L; Horvath, Lynn L; Murray, Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glabrata. Methods We evaluated the usefulness of CaC in the identification of C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. firmetaria, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. inconspicua, C. kefyr, C. lipolytica, C. lusitaniae, C. norvegensis, C. parapsilosis, and C. rugosa. Results Most NAC produced colonies that were shades of pink, lavender, or ivory. Several isolates of C. firmetaria and all C. inconspicua produced colonies difficult to differentiate from C. krusei. Most C. rugosa isolates produced unique colonies with morphology like C. krusei except in a light blue-green color. C. glabrata isolates produced small dark violet colonies that could be differentiated from the pink and lavender colors produced by other species. All seventeen isolates of C. dubliniensis produced green colonies similar to those produced by C. albicans. Conclusion C. glabrata and C. rugosa appear distinguishable from other species using CaC. Some NAC, including C. firmetaria and C. inconspicua, could be confused with C. krusei using this medium. PMID:16390552

  18. Evaluation of chromogenic media and seminested PCR in the identification of Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Daef, Enas; Moharram, Ahmed; Eldin, Salwa Seif; Elsherbiny, Nahla; Mohammed, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Identification of Candida cultured from various clinical specimens to the species level is increasingly necessary for clinical laboratories. Although sn PCR identifies the species within hours but its cost-effectiveness is to be considered. So there is always a need for media which help in the isolation and identification at the species level. The study aimed to evaluate the performance of different chromogenic media and to compare the effectiveness of the traditional phenotypic methods vs. seminested polymerase chain reaction (sn PCR) for identification of Candida species. One hundred and twenty seven Candida strains isolated from various clinical specimens were identified by conventional methods, four different chromogenic media and sn PCR. HiCrome Candida Differential and CHROMagar Candida media showed comparably high sensitivities and specificities in the identification of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei. CHROMagar Candida had an extra advantage of identifying all C. parapsilosis isolates. CHROMagar-Pal’s medium identified C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei with high sensitivities and specificities, but couldn’t identify C. glabrata or C. parapsilosis. It was the only medium that identified C. dubliniensis with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Biggy agar showed the least sensitivities and specificities. The overall concordance of the snPCR compared to the conventional tests including CHROMAgar Candida in the identification of Candida species was 97.5%. The use of CHROMAgar Candida medium is an easy and accurate method for presumptive identification of the most commonly encountered Candida spp. PMID:24948942

  19. The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nermin H; Melake, Nahla A; Somily, Ali M; Zakaria, Azza S; Baddour, Manal M; Mahmoud, Amany Z

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the incidence of biofilm formation among Candida isolates and to investigate the effect of high doses of fluconazole {FLC}, voriconazole {VOC} and amphotericin B {AMB}, singly and in combination on mature biofilms. Moreover, it aimed to assess the expression of selected genes (CDR1, KRE1 and SKN1) responsible for Candida biofilm resistance. The study included 49 patients; samples were collected from the King Khalid Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Isolates were prepared for biofilm formation and quantification using 0.4% (w/v) crystal violet. Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) were conducted by the broth microdilution method. Biofilm eradication was evaluated using counting, XTT stain intensity and observed under the inverted microscope. Selected genes were evaluated in Candida biofilms under the effect of antifungal exposure using QPCR. The major isolates were Candida albicans (65.3%) followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. 77.6% of the strains were biofilm formers. AMB showed susceptibility in 87.8% of isolates, followed by VOC (77.6%) and FLC (67.3%). MIC50 and MIC90 were (0.03, 0.125), (0.5, 8), (2, >128) μg/ml for AMB, VOC and FLC, respectively. 34.7% and 18.4% of the isolates were antagonistic to AMB/FLC and AMB/VOC, respectively. Mature biofilms of ten selected isolates were found resistant to FLC (1000 μg/ml). VOR and AMB concentration required to inhibit biofilm formation was 16-250 fold higher than the MIC for planktonic cells. Isolates showed significant reduction with antifungal combination when compared with the untreated controls (p value ⩽ 0.01), or using fluconazole alone (p value ⩽ 0.05). High doses of the antifungals were employed to assess the effect on the persisters' selected gene expression. Marked over expression of SKN1 and to a

  20. Performance of chromogenic media for Candida in rapid presumptive identification of Candida species from clinical materials

    PubMed Central

    Pravin Charles, M. V.; Kali, Arunava; Joseph, Noyal Mariya

    2015-01-01

    Background: In perspective of the worldwide increase in a number of immunocompromised patients, the need for identification of Candida species has become a major concern. The development of chromogenic differential media, introduced recently, facilitate rapid speciation. However, it can be employed for routine mycology workup only after an exhaustive evaluation of its benefit and cost effectiveness. This study was undertaken to evaluate the benefit and cost effectiveness of chromogenic media for speciation of Candida clinical isolates. Materials and Methods: Sputum samples of 382 patients were screened for the presence of Candida spp. by Gram stain and culture on sabouraud dextrose agar. Candida species were identified using Gram stain morphology, germ tube formation, cornmeal agar with Tween-80, sugar fermentation tests and morphology on HiCrome Candida differential agar. All the Candida isolates were inoculated on HiCrome Candida agar (HiMedia, Mumbai, India). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of HiCrome agar for identification of Candida albicans were 90% and 96.42%, respectively whereas sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate fermentation test were 86.67% and 74.07%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity values of HiCrome agar for detection of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata were above 90%. Conclusions: We found HiCrome agar has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the conventional method. In addition, use of this differential media could significantly cut down the turnaround time as well as cost of sample processing. PMID:26109791

  1. Evaluation of the new chromogenic medium Candida ID 2 for isolation and identification of Candida albicans and other medically important Candida species.

    PubMed

    Eraso, Elena; Moragues, María D; Villar-Vidal, María; Sahand, Ismail H; González-Gómez, Nagore; Pontón, José; Quindós, Guillermo

    2006-09-01

    The usefulness of Candida ID 2 (CAID2) reformulated medium (bioMérieux, France) has been compared with that of the former Candida ID (CAID; bioMérieux), Albicans ID 2 (ALB2; bioMérieux), and CHROMagar Candida (CAC; Chromagar, France) chromogenic media for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically relevant yeasts. Three hundred forty-five stock strains from culture collections, and 103 fresh isolates from different clinical specimens were evaluated. CAID2 permitted differentiation based on colony color between Candida albicans (cobalt blue; sensitivity, 91.7%; specificity, 97.2%) and Candida dubliniensis (turquoise blue; sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 96.6%). Candida tropicalis gave distinguishable pink-bluish colonies in 97.4% of the strains in CAID2 (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 100%); the same proportion was reached in CAC, where colonies were blue-gray (sensitivity, 97.4%; specificity, 98.7%). CAC and CAID2 showed 100% sensitivity values for the identification of Candida krusei. However, with CAID2, experience is required to differentiate the downy aspect of the white colonies of C. krusei from other white-colony-forming species. The new CAID2 medium is a good candidate to replace CAID and ALB2, and it compares well to CAC for culture and presumptive identification of clinically relevant Candida species. CAID2 showed better results than CAC in some aspects, such as quicker growth and color development of colonies from clinical specimens, detection of mixed cultures, and presumptive differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:16954270

  2. 40 CFR 180.1144 - Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Candida oleophila isolate I-182... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1144 Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Candida oleophila isolate I-182, when used as a post-harvest biological...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1144 - Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Candida oleophila isolate I-182... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1144 Candida oleophila isolate I-182; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Candida oleophila isolate I-182, when used as a post-harvest biological...

  4. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Clinical Yeast Isolates to the New Antifungal Eberconazole Compared with Their Susceptibilities to Clotrimazole and Ketoconazole

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Mendez, Raúl; López-Jodra, Olga; Morera, Yolanda; Espasa, Mateu; Jimenez, Teresa; Lagunas, Carme

    1999-01-01

    The antifungal activity of eberconazole, a new imidazole derivative, against 124 clinical isolates of Candida comprising eight different species and to 34 isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans was compared to those of clotrimazole and ketoconazole. MICs of eberconazole, determined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards standardized microbroth method, were equal to or lower than those of other azoles, especially for Candida krusei and Candida glabrata, which are usually resistant to triazoles. PMID:10223946

  5. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterisation of the first Italian Candida africana isolate.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-09-01

    One atypical isolate of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans was isolated from an Italian patient with vulvovaginitis. The strain, germ tube positive and chlamydospore-negative showed white-thin turquoise colonies on Candida ID 2 medium. The yeast was identified as Candida africana by using morphological and biochemical tests. On the basis of the molecular results obtained in this study as well as in other studies, C. africana cannot be yet considered as a new species of Candida. It is possible that C. africana represents a new variant of C. albicans like the well-known Candida stellatoidea. To our knowledge, this is the first isolation of C. africana in Italy. PMID:18983430

  6. Combination of different molecular mechanisms leading to fluconazole resistance in a Candida lusitaniae clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Reboutier, David; Piednoël, Mathieu; Boisnard, Stéphanie; Conti, Audrey; Chevalier, Virginie; Florent, Martine; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie; Da Silva, Bruno; Chastin, Christiane; Fallague, Karim; Favel, Anne; Noël, Thierry; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenaël; Chapeland-Leclerc, Florence; Papon, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    We report on the underlying molecular mechanisms likely responsible for the high-level fluconazole resistance in a Candida lusitaniae clinical isolate. Fluconazole resistance correlated with overexpression of ERG11 and of several efflux pump genes, in particular, the orthologs of the Candida albicans MDR1, PDR16, CDR1, CDR2, and YOR1. PMID:19070454

  7. Erratum: Evaluation of CHROMagar Candida, VITEK2 YST and VITEK® MS for identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Mutlu Sariguzel, Fatma; Berk, Elife; Nedret Koc, Ayse; Sav, Hafize; Aydemir, Gonca

    2016-03-01

    Erratum Following publication of the original article (Infez Med. volume 23, issue 4, pages 318-322, year 2015) we became aware of the following errors which we wish to correct. These corrections have no impact over the study results, their interpretation or conclusions. Title The correct title is the following: Evaluation of chromagenic agar, VITEK2 YST and VITEK® MS for identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures Text In the whole text CHROMOMagar Candida shoul be read as chromogenic agar. PMID:27031906

  8. Differential Recovery of Candida Species from Subgingival Sites in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive and Healthy Children from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Portela, M. B.; Souza, I. P. R.; Costa, E. M. M. B.; Hagler, A. N.; Soares, R. M. A.; Santos, A. L. S.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of subgingival Candida species was studied in 52 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and 42 HIV-negative children. Candida was cultured from 22 (42.3%) and 3 (7.1%) HIV-infected and control children, respectively. C. albicans was the most common Candida species isolated from HIV-infected children, followed by C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis. In the HIV-positive group, the prevalence of Candida isolation was significantly higher in children who presented with low CD4+-T-lymphocyte counts, elevated viral loads, and gingivitis. PMID:15583343

  9. [Investigation of the correlation between biofilm forming ability of urinary Candida isolates with the use of urinary catheters and change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hacer; Gülmez, Dolunay

    2016-04-01

    Frequency of Candida species causing urinary tract infections is increasing, and this increase is outstanding in nosocomial urinary tract infections especially in intensive care units. The ability of biofilm formation that is contributed to the virulence of the yeast, plays a role in the pathogenesis of biomaterial-related infections and also constitutes a risk for treatment failure. The aims of this study were to compare biofilm forming abilities of Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of patients with and without urinary catheters, and to investigate the change of antifungal susceptibility in the presence of biofilm. A total of 50 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures of 25 patients with urinary catheters (10 C.tropicalis, 6 C.glabrata, 4 C.albicans, 4 C.parapsilosis, 1 C.krusei) and 25 without urinary catheters (8 C.tropicalis, 6 C.albicans, 4 C.krusei, 3 C.parapsilosis, 2 C.kefyr, 1 C.glabrata, 1 C.lusitaniae) were included in the study. Biofilm forming ability was tested by Congo red agar (CRA) and microplate XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction methods. Fluconazole (FLU) and amphotericin B (AMP-B) susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by reference microdilution method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for planktonic cells and by XTT reduction assay in case of biofilm presence. Biofilm formation was detected in 12 (24%) by CRA and 50 (100%) of the isolates by XTT reduction method. None of the C.albicans (n= 10) and C.tropicalis (n= 18) strains were detected as biofilm positive by CRA, however, these strains were strongly positive by XTT reduction method. No statistically significant correlation was detected between the presence of urinary catheter and biofilm forming ability of the isolate (p> 0.05). This might be caused by the advantage of biofilm forming strains in adhesion to bladder mucosa at the initial stages of infection. For all of the isolates in

  10. Comparative evaluation of macrodilution and alamar colorimetric microdilution broth methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeast isolates.

    PubMed Central

    To, W K; Fothergill, A W; Rinaldi, M G

    1995-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the macrodilution method and the Alamar colorimetric method for the susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine was conducted with 134 pathogenic yeasts. The clinical isolates included 28 Candida albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, 15 Candida parapsilosis, 12 Candida krusei, 10 Candida lusitaniae, 9 Candida guilliermondii, 18 Torulopsis glabrata, and 25 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates. The macrodilution method was performed and interpreted according to the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (document M27-P), and the Alamar colorimetric method was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. For the Alamar colorimetric method, MICs were determined at 24 and 48 h of incubation for Candida species and T. glabrata and at 48 and 72 h of incubation for C. neoformans. The overall agreement within +/- 1 dilution for Candida species and T. glabrata against the three antifungal agents was generally good, with the values for amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine being 85.3, 77.9, and 86.2%, respectively, at the 24-h readings and 69.3, 65.2, and 97.2%, respectively, at the 48-h readings. Most disagreement was noted with fluconazole against C. tropicalis and T. glabrata. Our studies indicate that determination of MICs at 24 h by the Alamar colorimetric method is a valid alternate method for testing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and flucytosine against Candida species but not for testing fluconazole against C. tropicalis and T. glabrata. For flucytosine, much better agreement can be demonstrated against Candida species and T. glabrata at the 48-h readings by the Alamar method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567901

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Candida isolates from AIDS patients showing different fluconazole resistance profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Lischewski, A; Ruhnke, M; Tennagen, I; Schönian, G; Morschhäuser, J; Hacker, J

    1995-01-01

    Thirty Candida isolates obtained from the oropharynxes of three AIDS patients were genotypically characterized. In vitro fluconazole MIC determination revealed increasing fluconazole resistances during treatment, thereby confirming the in vivo situation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis karyotyping, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and hybridizations with Candida albicans repetitive element 2 were used to determine possible genotypic changes. The isolates from two patients showed genetic homogeneity, suggesting the selection for resistant variants. One patient experienced a strain switch to Candida krusei. Horizontal spread of identical strains between the patients could be excluded. However, the molecular methods used might not be sufficient to detect the underlying genetic basis of resistance to fluconazole. PMID:7751395

  12. Antibiofilm activity of carboxymethyl chitosan on the biofilms of non-Candida albicans Candida species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Leonhard, Matthias; Moser, Doris; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2016-09-20

    Although most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, non-C. albicans Candida species have been isolated in increasing numbers in patients. In this study, we determined the inhibition of carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) on single and mixed species biofilm of non-albicans Candida species, including Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata. Biofilm by all tested species in microtiter plates were inhibited nearly 70%. CM-chitosan inhibited mixed species biofilm in microtiter plates and also on medical materials surfaces. To investigate the mechanism, the effect of CM-chitosan on cell viability and biofilm growth was employed. CM-chitosan inhibited Candida planktonic growth as well as adhesion. Further biofilm formation was inhibited with CM-chitosan added at 90min, 12h or 24h after biofilm initiation. CM-chitosan was not only able to inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida cells, but was also active upon the establishment and the development of biofilms. PMID:27261732

  13. Presence of Candida spp. in the oral cavity of heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Patrícia Monteiro; BACAL, Fernando; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi; JUNQUEIRA, Juliana Campos; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Candida spp. can lead to infections or even fungal sepsis particularly among immunocompromized individuals. Objective The aim of the present study was to analyze the presence of Candida spp. among patients subjected to orthotopic heart transplantation. Material and Methods Oral rinses from 50 patients subjected to orthotopic heart transplantation, aged 13 to 70 years, 40 males and 10 females, were examined. Sexage-oral conditions matched-control included 50 individuals who were not subjected to any kind of transplantation and were not immunocompromized for any other reason. Counts of yeasts were expressed as median values of logarithm of cfu/mL and were statistically compared by Mann-Whitney’s test. The heart transplant and control groups were compared for the presence of Candida spp. by chi-square test (p<0.05). Results The results showed statistically significant difference (p=0.001) in the prevalence of Candida spp. between the transplantation and control groups. Counts of yeasts (cfu/mL) in the transplanted group were significantly higher than in the control group (p=0.005). Candida albicans was the most prevalent species isolated from both groups. Conclusion It was concluded that Candida yeast counts were higher in the heart transplant recipients than in the controls. There was higher variation of Candida species among the heart transplant patients and the most frequently isolated samples were: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. Isolates of Candida dubliniensis was not found in either of the groups. PMID:21437462

  14. Cross-Reactivity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Antigen Detection Enzyme Immunoassay with Fungal Antigen Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Rimek, Dagmar; Singh, Jagpal; Kappe, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    We studied the specificity of the PLATELIA CANDIDA Ag enzyme immunoassay by using 130 isolates of 63 clinically relevant fungal species. Antigen extracts of seven Candida spp. (Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. famata, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. lusitaniae, and C. tropicalis) repeatedly yielded positive reactions (>0.5 ng/ml). Geotrichum candidum and Fusarium verticillioides were found to yield borderline-positive reactions (0.25 to 0.50 ng/ml). Antigen preparations from the other 54 fungal species, including yeasts, molds, dermatophytes, and dimorphic fungi, did not cross-react in the assay. PMID:12843102

  15. Time to overcome fluconazole resistant Candida isolates: Solid lipid nanoparticles as a novel antifungal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Moazeni, Maryam; Kelidari, Hamid Reza; Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Ketayoun; Nabili, Mojtaba; Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Akbari, Jafar; Lotfali, Ensieh; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Antifungal therapy results in complications in management due to changes in the patterns of epidemiology and drug susceptibility of invasive fungal infections. In this study, we prepared fluconazole-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (FLZ-SLNs) and investigated the efficacy of the optimal formulation on fluconazole (FLZ)-resistant strains of several Candida species. FLZ-SLN was produced using probe ultrasonication techniques. The morphology of the obtained SLNs was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentrations for the new formulations against fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida were investigated using CLSI document M27-A3. The FLZ-SLNs presented a spherical shape with a mean diameter, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency of 84.8nm, -25mV and 89.6%, respectively. The drug release from FLZ-SLNs exhibited burst release behaviour at the initial stage (the first 30min) followed by a sustained release over 24h FLZ-resistant yeast strains behaved as susceptible strains after treatment with FLZ-SLNs (≤8μg/ml). The MIC50 drug concentrations were 2μg/ml, 1μg/ml and 2μg/ml for FLZ-resistant strains of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata, respectively. In this study, we evaluated novel delivery systems for combating Candida strains that exhibit low susceptibility against the conventional formulation of FLZ as a first-line treatment. PMID:26974361

  16. Prevalence and antifungal susceptibility of Candida albicans and its related species Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana isolated from vulvovaginal samples in a hospital of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Theill, Laura; Dudiuk, Catiana; Morano, Susana; Gamarra, Soledad; Nardin, María Elena; Méndez, Emilce; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Candida africana taxonomical status is controversial. It was proposed as a separate species within the Candida albicans species complex; however, phylogenetic analyses suggested that it is an unusual variety of C. albicans. The prevalence of C. albicans-related species (Candida dubliniensis and C. africana) as vulvovaginal pathogens is not known in Argentina. Moreover, data on antifungal susceptibility of isolates causing vulvovaginal candidiasis is scarce. The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of C. dubliniensis and C. africana in vaginal samples and to evaluate the antifungal susceptibilities of vaginal C. albicans species complex strains. We used a molecular-based method coupled with a new pooled DNA extraction methodology to differentiate C. dubliniensis and C. africana in a collection of 287 strains originally identified as C. albicans isolated from an Argentinian hospital during 2013. Antifungal susceptibilities to fluconazole, clotrimazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, nystatin, amphotericin B and terbinafine were evaluated by using the CLSI M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Of the 287 isolates, 4 C. dubliniensis and one C. africana strains (1.39% and 0.35% prevalence, respectively) were identified. This is the first description of C. africana in Argentina and its identification was confirmed by sequencing the ITS2 region and the hwp1 gene. C. dubliniensis and C. africana strains showed very low MIC values for all the tested antifungals. Fluconazole-reduced-susceptibility and azole cross-resistance were observed in 3.55% and 1.41% of the C. albicans isolates, respectively. These results demonstrate that antifungal resistance is still a rare phenomenon in this kind of isolates. PMID:26922471

  17. Resolution of Discrepant Results for Candida Species Identification by Using DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Coignard, Catherine; Hurst, Steven F.; Benjamin, Lynette E.; Brandt, Mary E.; Warnock, David W.; Morrison, Christine J.

    2004-01-01

    Candida species bloodstream isolates were collected from institutions participating in an active, population-based surveillance for candidemia. Species identifications were performed locally and then confirmed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by phenotype-based methods. Discrepancies in species identification between the referring institution and the CDC were noted for 43 of 935 isolates (4.6%). A DNA probe-based species identification system (PCR-enzyme immunoassay [EIA]) was then used to resolve these discrepancies. The PCR-EIA result was identical to the CDC phenotypic identification method for 98% of the isolates tested. The most frequently misidentified species was Candida glabrata (37% of all discrepant identifications). Such misidentifications could lead to the administration of inappropriate therapy given the propensity of C. glabrata to develop resistance to azole antifungal drugs. PMID:14766873

  18. Comparative Pathogenicity of United Kingdom Isolates of the Emerging Pathogen Candida auris and Other Key Pathogenic Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Borman, Andrew M; Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Candida auris, first described in 2009, has since emerged as an important, multidrug-resistant, nosocomial agent of candidemia, with large outbreaks reported worldwide and high mortality rates associated with therapeutic failure. The current study employed C. auris isolates from a variety of centers in the United Kingdom to evaluate the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen compared to that of other common pathogenic yeast species in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella infection model. We showed that C. auris isolates differ in their growth characteristics in vitro, with a proportion of isolates failing to release daughter cells after budding, resulting in the formation of large aggregates of cells that cannot be physically disrupted. Our results also demonstrate strain-specific differences in the behavior of C. auris in G. mellonella, with the aggregate-forming isolates exhibiting significantly less pathogenicity than their nonaggregating counterparts. Importantly, the nonaggregating isolates exhibited pathogenicity comparable to that of C. albicans, which is currently accepted as the most pathogenic member of the genus, despite the fact that C. auris isolates do not produce hyphae and produce only rudimentary pseudohyphae either in vitro or in G. mellonella. IMPORTANCE The incidence of invasive candidiasis, which includes candidemia and deep tissue infections, continues to rise and is associated with considerable mortality rates. Candida albicans remains the most common cause of invasive candidiasis, although the prevalence of non-albicans species has increased over recent years. Since its first description in 2009, Candida auris has emerged as a serious nosocomial health risk, with widespread outbreaks in numerous hospitals worldwide. However, despite receiving considerable attention, little is known concerning the pathogenicity of this emerging fungal pathogen. Here, using the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model, we show strain

  19. Comparative Pathogenicity of United Kingdom Isolates of the Emerging Pathogen Candida auris and Other Key Pathogenic Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, Adrien; Johnson, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida auris, first described in 2009, has since emerged as an important, multidrug-resistant, nosocomial agent of candidemia, with large outbreaks reported worldwide and high mortality rates associated with therapeutic failure. The current study employed C. auris isolates from a variety of centers in the United Kingdom to evaluate the pathogenicity of this emerging pathogen compared to that of other common pathogenic yeast species in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella infection model. We showed that C. auris isolates differ in their growth characteristics in vitro, with a proportion of isolates failing to release daughter cells after budding, resulting in the formation of large aggregates of cells that cannot be physically disrupted. Our results also demonstrate strain-specific differences in the behavior of C. auris in G. mellonella, with the aggregate-forming isolates exhibiting significantly less pathogenicity than their nonaggregating counterparts. Importantly, the nonaggregating isolates exhibited pathogenicity comparable to that of C. albicans, which is currently accepted as the most pathogenic member of the genus, despite the fact that C. auris isolates do not produce hyphae and produce only rudimentary pseudohyphae either in vitro or in G. mellonella. IMPORTANCE The incidence of invasive candidiasis, which includes candidemia and deep tissue infections, continues to rise and is associated with considerable mortality rates. Candida albicans remains the most common cause of invasive candidiasis, although the prevalence of non-albicans species has increased over recent years. Since its first description in 2009, Candida auris has emerged as a serious nosocomial health risk, with widespread outbreaks in numerous hospitals worldwide. However, despite receiving considerable attention, little is known concerning the pathogenicity of this emerging fungal pathogen. Here, using the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model, we show

  20. In vitro activities of natural products against oral Candida isolates from denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a frequent infectious disease. Treatment of this oral condition is difficult because failures and recurrences are common. The aim of this study was to test the in vitro antifungal activity of pure constituents of essentials oils. Methods Eight terpenic derivatives (carvacrol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, menthone, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol), a phenylpropanoid (eugenol), a phenethyl alcohol (tyrosol) and fluconazole were evaluated against 38 Candida isolated from denture-wearers and 10 collection Candida strains by the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution method. Results Almost all the tested compounds showed antifungal activity with MIC ranges of 0.03-0.25% for eugenol and linalool, 0.03-0.12% for geraniol, 0.06-0.5% for menthol, α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol, 0.03-0.5% for carvacrol, and 0.06-4% for menthone. These compounds, with the exception of farnesol, menthone and tyrosol, showed important in vitro activities against the fluconazole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent Candida isolates. Conclusions Carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, linalool and terpinen-4-ol were very active in vitro against oral Candida isolates. Their fungistatic and fungicidal activities might convert them into promising alternatives for the topic treatment of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis. PMID:22118215

  1. In vitro antimicrobial properties of coconut oil on Candida species in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbolu, D O; Oni, A A; Daini, O A; Oloko, A P

    2007-06-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, coupled with the availability of fewer antifungal agents with fungicidal actions, prompted this present study to characterize Candida species in our environment and determine the effectiveness of virgin coconut oil as an antifungal agent on these species. In 2004, 52 recent isolates of Candida species were obtained from clinical specimens sent to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Their susceptibilities to virgin coconut oil and fluconazole were studied by using the agar-well diffusion technique. Candida albicans was the most common isolate from clinical specimens (17); others were Candida glabrata (nine), Candida tropicalis (seven), Candida parapsilosis (seven), Candida stellatoidea (six), and Candida krusei (six). C. albicans had the highest susceptibility to coconut oil (100%), with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 25% (1:4 dilution), while fluconazole had 100% susceptibility at an MIC of 64 microg/mL (1:2 dilution). C. krusei showed the highest resistance to coconut oil with an MIC of 100% (undiluted), while fluconazole had an MIC of > 128 microg/mL. It is noteworthy that coconut oil was active against species of Candida at 100% concentration compared to fluconazole. Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species. PMID:17651080

  2. Comparison Between Biofilm Production, Phospholipase and Haemolytic Activity of Different Species of Candida Isolated from Dental Caries Lesions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Neetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction C.albicans is the most commonly isolated fungal pathogen in the oral cavity, but isolation of non-albicans Candida is increasing in recent years. We wish to demonstrate the virulence factors of Candida spp. isolated from the dental caries lesion of the children as presence of virulence factors determines the pathogenic potential of any microorganism. Aim To compare biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity of C.albicans with that of non-albicans species of Candida isolated from dental caries lesions of children to evaluate the role of non- albicans species of Candida in formation of dental caries. Materials and Methods Oral swabs were collected from caries lesion of 100 school children of age 5-10 years with dental caries. Candida isolates were tested for biofilm production, phospholipase and haemolytic activity. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-Square test and Mann-Whitney U test wherever applicable using SPSS version 11.5. Results Out of the 100 children with dental caries 37 were positive for Candida by smear or culture and 31 by culture. C.albicans was the most prevalent isolate followed by C.krusei, C.tropicalis and C.albicans. Out of 21 C.albicans isolates, 10 (47.6%) showed phospholipase activity and 18 (85.71%) produced biofilm. Of the 10 non-albicans strains, 5 (50%) showed phospholipase activity and 6 (60%) produced biofilm. All isolates of Candida produced haemolysin (100%). Conclusion There was no statistically relevant difference between the virulence factor production by C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida. In other words, our study shows that both C.albicans and non-albicans species of Candida isolated from caries lesions of the children, produce these virulence factors. So we can say that non-albicans species of Candida also are involved in caries formation. PMID:27190803

  3. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  4. Hospital Specificity, Region Specificity, and Fluconazole Resistance of Candida albicans Bloodstream Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Lockhart, S. R.; Pujol, C.; Swails-Wenger, J. A.; Messer, S. A.; Edmond, M. B.; Jones, R. N.; Wenzel, R. P.; Soll, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    In a survey of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates across the continental United States, 162 Candida albicans isolates were fingerprinted with the species-specific probe Ca3 and the patterns were analyzed for relatedness with a computer-assisted system. The results demonstrate that particular BSI strains are more highly concentrated in particular geographic locales and that established BSI strains are endemic in some, but not all, hospitals in the study and undergo microevolution in hospital settings. The results, however, indicate no close genetic relationship among fluconazole-resistant BSI isolates in the collection, either from the same geographic locale or the same hospital. This study represents the first of three fingerprinting studies designed to analyze the origin, genetic relatedness, and drug resistance of Candida isolates responsible for BSI. PMID:9620370

  5. Candida materiae sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from rotting wood in the Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Anne C; Cadete, Raquel M; Gomes, Fátima C O; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2009-08-01

    Three strains of a novel yeast species, Candida materiae sp. nov., were isolated from rotting wood in an Atlantic rain forest site in Brazil. Analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rDNA showed that this species belonged to the Spathaspora clade and was related to Candida jeffriesii and Spathaspora passalidarum. Unlike C. jeffriesii and S. passalidarum, C. materiae sp. nov. did not ferment xylose. The type strain of C. materiae sp. nov. is UFMG-07-C15.1BT (=CBS 10975T=CBMAI 956T). PMID:19605715

  6. Candida wangnamkhiaoensis sp. nov., an anamorphic yeast species in the Hyphopichia clade isolated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Limtong, Savitree; Kaewwichian, Rungluk; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Yongmanitchai, Wichien; Nakase, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    Two strains representing a single novel yeast species were isolated from a flower of Calycoopteris floribunda Lame (SK170(T)) and insect frass (ST-122) collected in Thailand. On the basis of morphological, biochemical, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, and the sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region, the two strains were assigned as a single novel Candida species in the Hyphopichia clade for which the name Candida wangnamkhiaoensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SK170(T)=BCC 39604(T)=NBRC 106724(T)=CBS 11695(T)). PMID:22331449

  7. Malassezia and Candida colonisation on glans penis of circumcised men.

    PubMed

    Aridoğan, I Atilla; Ilkit, Macit; Izol, Volkan; Ates, Aylin

    2005-09-01

    The Malassezia yeast are members of the normal human cutaneous flora in adults. They also are reported as part of the microflora of the male genital region in mostly uncircumcised males. It has been reported that Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia globosa are the most frequent yeast belonging to the resident microflora of the penis as in other human skin areas. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence of Malassezia and Candida yeast colonisation on the glans penis of circumcised males. Impression preparations were made on modified Dixon agar. The isolates were identified by morphological and physiological characteristics. A total of 245 circumcised males were included in the study. Of the 245 patients examined, 55 (22.4%) were found to have a mycologically proven yeast fungi on their glans penis. In 17 (30.9%) Malassezia, in 36 (65.5%) Candida, in one (1.8%) Malassezia and Candida, and in one (1.8%) Saccharomyces strains were detected. Malassezia furfur (66.7%) was the most common species among the lipophilic yeast, followed by Malassezia globosa (11.1%), Malassezia obtusa (11.1%) and Malassezia slooffiae (11.1%). Candida albicans was the most common non-lipophilic yeast (46.0%), that was isolated among the other yeast, followed by unidentified Candida strains (18.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.1%), Candida glabrata (8.1%), Candida parapsilosis (8.1%), Candida zeylanoides (5.4%), Candida guilliermondii (2.7%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2.7%). The results of this study showed that Malassezia species were also colonised like Candida on the glans penis of circumcised males. PMID:16115108

  8. Candida funiuensi sp. nov., a cellobiose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotten wood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Ren, Yong-Cheng; Zhang, Zheng-Tian; Wu, Fu-Hua; Ke, Tao; Hui, Feng-Li

    2015-06-01

    Two strains of an asexual cellobiose-fermenting yeast species were isolated from rotten wood samples collected in Funiu Mountain Nature Reserve in Henan Province, central China. Molecular phylogenetic analysis that included the nearly complete small subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) rDNA showed that these strains belonged to the Candida kruisii clade, with Candida kruisii and Candida cretensis as their closest phylogenetic neighbours. The nucleotide differences between the novel strains and the type strains of C. kruisii and C. cretensis were 30 and 36 substitutions, respectively, in the D1/D2 LSU rDNA, 40 and 44 substitutions, respectively, in the ITS region and 19 and 23 substitutions, respectively, in the SSU rDNA. The novel strains can also be distinguished from their closest described species, C. kruisii and C. cretensis, by a number of physiological characteristics, and represent a novel species of the genus Candida, for which the name Candida funiuensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NYNU 14625T ( = CICC 33050T = CBS 13911T). The Mycobank number is MB 811503. PMID:25740930

  9. RAPD with microsatellite as a tool for differentiation of Candida genus yeasts isolated in brewing.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Ewa; Czaplińska, Anna; Barszczewski, Wojciech; Wilgosz, Maciej; Wojtatowicz, Maria; Robak, Małgorzata

    2007-05-01

    Fifteen wild yeast strains were isolated in two factories of a lager brewing company in Poland. Their identification with API 32C system showed mainly the presence of Candida sake species (7/15). To differentiate the isolates, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with (GTG)(5), (GAC)(5), (GACA)(4) microsatellite primers and M13 core sequence (5'-GAG GGT GGC GGT TCT-3') were chosen. The results of patterns similarity are presented as dendrograms for each RAPD analysis and for overall patterns. On the overall patterns, all isolates identified as C. sake, except Strain No. 1, were regrouped in one cluster. Collection strain C. sake CBS 617 was similar in 46% to the cluster with six isolates (Strain Nos. 3, 6, 8, 11, 13, 14). The second reference strain C. sake CBS 159 and the Strain No. 1 were regrouped with other Candida species (collection strains) showing, respectively, only 20% and 42% of similarity to other C. sake strains. The similarity based on the overall dendrogram between isolate Nos. 3, 6, 8, 11, 13, 14 and C. sake CBS 617 was 49%. Between those strains and other Candida, the similarity was only 37%. PMID:17188210

  10. Rapid Identification of Medically Important Candida Isolates Using High Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nemcova, Eva; Cernochova, Michaela; Ruzicka, Filip; Malisova, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in non albicans infections and various susceptibility patterns to antifungal agents implies a requirement for the quick and reliable identification of a number of medically important Candida species. Real-time PCR followed by high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) was developed, tested on 25 reference Candida collection strains and validated on an additional 143 clinical isolates in this study. All reference strains and clinical isolates inconclusive when using phenotypic methods and/or HRMA were analysed using ITS2 sequencing. Considering reference and clinical strains together, 23 out of 27 Candida species could be clearly distinguished by HRMA, while the remaining 4 species were grouped in 2 pairs, when applying the mean Tm ± 3 SD values, the shape of the derivative melting curve (dMelt curve) and, in some cases, the normalized and temperature—shifted difference plot against C. krusei. HRMA as a simple, rapid and inexpensive tool was shown to be useful in identifying a wide spectrum of clinically important Candida species. It may complement the current clinical diagnostic approach based on commercially available biochemical kits. PMID:25689781

  11. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic. PMID:26404657

  12. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution ofCandidaspecies in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype ofCandida albicansin vaginal swab. A total of 115Candida albicansstrains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115Candida albicansstrains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicanswas the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance amongCandida albicansisolated from VVC patients. PMID:26468549

  13. In Vitro Susceptibility and Trailing Growth Effect of Clinical Isolates of Candida Species to Azole Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Bandegani, Azadeh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Pakshir, Keyvan; Alinejhad, Navvab; Poostforoush Fard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of resistance to respective antifungal drugs is a primary concern for the treatment of candidiasis. Hence, determining antifungal susceptibility of the isolated yeasts is of special importance for effective therapy. For this purpose, the clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) has introduced a broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). However, the so-called “Trailing effect” phenomenon might sometimes pose ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida against azoles and the frequency of the Trailing effect. Materials and Methods: A total of 193 Candida isolates were prospectively collected and identified through the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Using a broth microdilution test, according to the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, antifungal susceptibilities of the isolated yeasts against Fluconazole (FLU), Itraconazole (ITR), Ketoconazole (KET) and Voriconazole (VOR) were assessed. Moreover, trailing growth was determined when a susceptible MIC was incubated for 24 hours, and turned into a resistant one after 48 hours of incubation. Results: Among the tested antifungal drugs in this study, the highest rate of resistance was observed against ITR (28.5%) followed by VOR (26.4%), FLU (20.8%) and KET (1.5%). The trailing effect was induced in 27 isolates (14.0%) by VOR, in 26 isolates (13.5%) by ITR, in 24 isolates (12.4%) by FLU, and in 19 isolates (9.8%) by KET. Conclusions: The monitoring of antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from clinical sources is highly recommended for the efficient management of patients. Moreover, the trailing effect should be taken into consideration once the interpretation of the results is intended. PMID:27127587

  14. Impact of Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract in patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, S; Ferrer, M; Martín-Loeches, I; Esperatti, M; Di Pasquale, M; Giunta, V; Rinaudo, M; de Rosa, F; Li Bassi, G; Centanni, S; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompetent patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the relationship between Candida spp. isolation in respiratory samples and outcomes or association with other pathogens is controversial. We therefore compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP), with or without Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract. In this prospective non-interventional study, we assessed 385 consecutive immunocompetent patients with ICUAP, according to the presence or absence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract samples. Candida spp. was isolated in at least one sample in 82 (21%) patients. Patients with Candida spp. had higher severity scores and organ dysfunction at admission and at onset of pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, previous surgery, diabetes mellitus and higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission independently predicted isolation of Candida spp. There were no significant differences in the rate of specific aetiological pathogens, the systemic inflammatory response, and length of stay between patients with and without Candida spp. Mortality was also similar, even adjusted for potential confounders in propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.57-2.05, p 0.80 for 28-day mortality and adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.35, p 0.24 for 90-day mortality). Antifungal therapy was more frequently prescribed in patients with Candida spp. in respiratory samples but did not influence outcomes. Candida spp. airway isolation in patients with ICUAP is associated with more initial disease severity but does not influence outcomes in these patients, regardless of the use or not of antifungal therapy. PMID:26369603

  15. Four new Candida cretensis strains isolated from Spanish fermented sausages (chorizo): taxonomic and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Martorell, Patricia; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2008-05-01

    Four yeast strains were isolated from Spanish traditional fermented sausages (chorizo) spoiled by gas production. Using the classical identification procedures, they were identified as Debaryomyces hansenii. However, they fermented galactose and did not produce positive results in Debaryomyces differential medium (DDM), a growth medium highly specific for this species. Phylogenetic analysis showed identical sequences for the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene and almost identical sequences for the 5.8S-ITS region with those of the recently described yeast species Candida cretensis. This result was confirmed by sequencing the gene encoding actin of the type and the new strains. Candida cretensis is a new species included in the so-called Candida kruisii clade that was described from a single strain, isolated from a decaying mushroom in Crete, Greece. The discovery of new strains of C. cretensis in fermented food expands its physiological and ecological diversity. With the description of these new strains isolated from food, three groups of strains can be distinguished within C. cretensis according to the restriction patterns of the intergenic spacer rRNA gene region and on the basis of some physiological properties that are of ecological relevance. PMID:18248417

  16. Multilocus sequence typing of Candida albicans isolates from a burn intensive care unit in Iran.

    PubMed

    Afsarian, Mohammad H; Badali, Hamid; Boekhout, Teun; Shokohi, Tahereh; Katiraee, Farzad

    2015-03-01

    Burn intensive care unit (BICU) patients are specifically exposed to deep-seated nosocomial infections due to Candida albicans. Superficial carriage of C. albicans is a potential source of infection and dissemination, and typing methods could be useful to trace the different isolates. Multilocus sequence typing is a powerful genotyping method for pathogenic micro-organisms, including Candida albicans. Thirty clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from 22 patients that were admitted to the BICU from a burn hospital at Sari, Mazandaran state, Iran, were studied epidemiologically by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy-five variable nucleotide sites were found. Sixty-two alleles were identified among the seven loci of the C. albicans isolates and one new allele was obtained. Eighteen diploid sequence types (DSTs) were identified, and among those 10 were new. These isolates belonged to nine clonal clusters (CCs) while two isolates occurred as singletons. Eleven (36.7 %) isolates belonged to CC 124 after eBURST analysis and 13 isolates (43.3 %) were assigned to clade 4. Approximately 17 % of the 30 isolates belonged to clade 1 (CC 69 and CC 766). Isolates from several patients with burns were found to be related genetically. Some patients yielded multiple isolates with identical DSTs, suggesting colonization or infection caused by cross-contamination between patients. Isolates that show identical or similar allelic profiles are presumed to be identical or closely related and may be used to evaluate the genetic relationships between isolates from a specific environment such as the BICU. PMID:25596113

  17. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    PubMed

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination. PMID:26913969

  18. Evaluation of internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA sequence analysis for molecular characterization of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates from HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Millon, L; Piarroux, R; Drobacheff, C; Monod, M; Grenouillet, F; Bulle, B; Bole, J; Blancard, A; Meillet, D

    2002-12-01

    Molecular typing systems have been needed to study Candida colonization in HIV-infected patients, particularly for investigating virulence and fluconazole resistance. Three methods--electrophoretic karyotyping (EK), detection of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD)--have been most frequently used. In this study, comparative sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA was evaluated for delineation of Candida isolates from 14 HIV-infected patients. EK, ITS sequence analysis, RFLP and RAPD resulted in 11, 10, 9 and 8 DNA genotypes, respectively, from 39 Candida albicans isolates. The 10 genotypes observed using ITS sequence analysis were defined by six variation sites in the sequence. Molecular typing of sequential oral isolates showed the persistence of the same genotype of C. albicans in nine patients, and genotype variation in one patient. EK and RAPD showed that another patient was co-infected by two distinct genotypes and ITS analysis identified one of the two genotypes as Candida dubliniensis. Comparative ITS sequence analysis is a quick and reproducible method that provides clear and objective results, and it also identifies C. dubliniensis. The discriminatory power of this new typing approach could be improved by concomitant analysis of other DNA polymorphic sequences. PMID:12521117

  19. Phenotypic variability and therapeutic implications of Candida species in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Verma, M; Gupta, S R; Urs, A B; Dhakad, M S; Kaur, R

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenotypic variation of Candida species in oral lichen planus (OLP) and the therapeutic implications of our findings. Eighty patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed cases of OLP (64 non-erosive, 16 erosive) and a control group of 80 healthy individuals with no predisposing factors for oral candidiasis were examined for evidence of Candida infection. Oral swabs and smears were obtained for cytology and culture. Identification, speciation and antifungal susceptibility tests of Candida isolates were performed using an automated microbial identification system. Fifty percent of erosive OLP cases, 28% of non-erosive cases and none of the controls showed evidence of Candida. Candida albicans was found predominantly in non-erosive OLP, while other Candida species were predominate in erosive OLP. Non-Candida albicans isolates (C. glabrata, C. krusei) were resistant to the commonly used antifungals, clotrimazole and fluconazole. Candida infection is common in cases of OLP. We recommend antifungal sensitivity testing prior to antifungal therapy for the erosive form of OLP. PMID:26984382

  20. Azole resistance in oropharyngeal Candida albicans strains isolated from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    He, X; Tiballi, R N; Zarins, L T; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-01-01

    For 212 oropharyngeal isolates of Candida albicans, the fluconazole MICs for 50 and 90% of strains tested were 0.5 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively, and those of itraconazole were 0.05 and 0.2 micrograms/ml, respectively. Of 16 isolates for which fluconazole MICs were > 64 micrograms/ml, itraconazole MICs for 14 were < or = 0.8 micrograms/ml and for 2 were > 6.4 micrograms/ml. Most fluconazole-resistant strains remained susceptible to itraconazole; whether itraconazole will prove effective for refractory thrush remains to be shown. PMID:7840596

  1. Detection of Candida dubliniensis in Oropharyngeal Samples from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in North America by Primary CHROMagar Candida Screening and Susceptibility Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William R.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Mcatee, Robert K.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Fothergill, Annette W.; McCarthy, Dora I.; Sanche, Stephen E.; Cantu, Rebecca A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis has been associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). C. dubliniensis isolates may have been improperly characterized as atypical Candida albicans due to the phenotypic similarity between the two species. Prospective screening of oral rinses from 63 HIV-infected patients detected atypical dark green isolates on CHROMagar Candida compared to typical C. albicans isolates, which are light green. Forty-eight atypical isolates and three control strains were characterized by germ tube formation, differential growth at 37, 42, and 45°C, identification by API 20C, fluorescence, chlamydoconidium production, and fingerprinting by Ca3 probe DNA hybridization patterns. All isolates were germ tube positive. Very poor or no growth occurred at 42°C with 22 of 51 isolates. All 22 poorly growing isolates at 42°C and one isolate with growth at 42°C showed weak hybridization of the Ca3 probe with genomic DNA, consistent with C. dubliniensis identification. No C. dubliniensis isolate but only 18 of 28 C. albicans isolates grew at 45°C. Other phenotypic or morphologic tests were less reliable in differentiating C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed fluconazole MICs ranging from ≤0.125 to 64 μg/ml. Two isolates were resistant to fluconazole (MIC, 64 μg/ml) and one strain was dose dependent susceptible (MIC, 16 μg/ml). MICs of other azoles, including voriconazole, itraconazole, and SCH 56592, for these isolates were lower. C. dubliniensis was identified in 11 of 63 (17%) serially evaluated patients. Variability in phenotypic characteristics dictates the use of molecular and biochemical techniques to identify C. dubliniensis. This study identifies C. dubliniensis in HIV-infected patients from San Antonio, Tex., and shows that C. dubliniensis is frequently detected in those patients by using a primary CHROMagar screen. PMID:9738058

  2. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    PubMed Central

    Yücesoy, Mine; Marol, Serhat

    2003-01-01

    Background The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. Methods A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C. tropicalis, 24 C. glabrata, 18 C. parapsilosis, 12 C. krusei, 5 Trichosporon spp., 4 C. kefyr, 2 C. lusitaniae, 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 1 Geotrichum candidum were included. The strains were first identified by germ tube test, morphological characteristics on cornmeal tween 80 agar and Vitek 32 and API 20 C AUX systems. In parallel, they were also streaked onto CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar plates. The results were read according to the color, morphology of the colonies and the existance of halo around them after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. Results The sensitivity and specificity values for C. albicans strains were found to be 99.4, 100% for CHROMagar Candida and 87.0, 75.2% for BiGGY agar, respectively. The sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida to identify C. tropicalis, C. glabrata and C. krusei ranged between 90.9 and 100% while the specificity was 100%. The sensitivity rates for BiGGY agar were 66.6 and 100% while the specificity values were found to be 95.4 and 100% for C. tropicalis and C. krusei, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the use of CHROMagar Candida is an easy and reliable method for the presumptive identification of most commonly isolated Candida species especially C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The lower sensitivity and specificity of BiGGY agar to identify commonly isolated Candida species potentially limits the clinical usefulness of this agar. PMID:14613587

  3. Molecular characterization of Italian Candida parapsilosis isolates reveals the cryptic presence of the newly described species Candida orthopsilosis in blood cultures from newborns.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Delfino, Demetrio; Costanzo, Barbara; Cascio, Antonio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    The authors report the molecular characterization of Candida parapsilosis isolates recovered from the blood and venous central catheter tips of patients admitted to different care units of the Polyclinic Hospital, University of Messina, Italy. Among 97 presumed C. parapsilosis isolates examined, 94 were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and the remaining 3 isolates were found to belong to the cryptic species Candida orthopsilosis which was recovered only from blood cultures of neonates (<30 days old) born prematurely. No C. metapsilosis was found in this study. This study emphasizes the role of C. parapsilosis as an important nosocomial pathogen, and it also describes, for the first time, the occurrence of C. orthopsilosis in newborns. PMID:22244186

  4. Epidemiology, antifungal susceptibility, and pathogenicity of Candida africana isolates from the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Borman, Andrew M; Szekely, Adrien; Linton, Chistopher J; Palmer, Michael D; Brown, Phillipa; Johnson, Elizabeth M

    2013-03-01

    Candida africana was previously proposed as a new species within the Candida albicans species complex, together with C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, although further phylogenetic analyses better support its status as an unusual variant within C. albicans. Here we show that C. africana can be distinguished from C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by pyrosequencing of a short region of ITS2, and we have evaluated its occurrence in clinical samples by pyrosequencing all presumptive isolates of C. albicans submitted to the Mycology Reference Laboratory over a 9-month period. The C. albicans complex constituted 826/1,839 (44.9%) of yeast isolates received over the study period and included 783 isolates of C. albicans, 28 isolates of C. dubliniensis, and 15 isolates of C. africana. In agreement with previous reports, C. africana was isolated exclusively from genital specimens, in women in the 18-to-35-year age group. Indeed, C. africana constituted 15/251 (6%) of "C. albicans" isolates from female genital specimens during the study period. C. africana isolates were germ tube positive, grew significantly more slowly than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis on conventional mycological media, could be distinguished from the other members of the C. albicans complex by appearance on chromogenic agar, and were incapable of forming chlamydospores. Here we present the detailed evaluation of epidemiological, phenotypic, and clinical features and antifungal susceptibility profiles of United Kingdom isolates of C. africana. Furthermore, we demonstrate that C. africana is significantly less pathogenic than C. albicans and C. dubliniensis in the Galleria mellonella insect systemic infection model. PMID:23303503

  5. Molecular Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia Collected in a Population-Based Study in Spain in 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Zaragoza, Óscar; Escribano, Pilar; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Pemán, Javier; Sánchez-Reus, Ferrán

    2014-01-01

    We report the molecular identifications and antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates causing fungemia collected in the CANDIPOP population-based study conducted in 29 Spanish hospitals. A total of 781 isolates (from 767 patients, 14 of them having mixed fungemia) were collected. The species found most frequently were Candida albicans (44.6%), Candida parapsilosis (24.5%), Candida glabrata (13.2%), Candida tropicalis (7.6%), Candida krusei (1.9%), Candida guilliermondii (1.7%), and Candida lusitaniae (1.3%). Other Candida and non-Candida species accounted for approximately 5% of the isolates. The presence of cryptic species was low. Compared to findings of previous studies conducted in Spain, the frequency of C. glabrata has increased. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed by using EUCAST and CLSI M27-A3 reference procedures; the two methods were comparable. The rate of fluconazole-susceptible isolates was 80%, which appears to be a decrease compared to findings of previous studies, explained mainly by the higher frequency of C. glabrata. Using the species-specific breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values, the rate of voriconazole and posaconazole in vitro resistance was low (<2%). In the case of C. tropicalis, using the EUCAST procedure, the rate of azole resistance was around 20%. There was a correlation between the previous use of azoles and the presence of fluconazole-resistant isolates. Resistance to echinocandins was very rare (2%), and resistance to amphotericin B also was very uncommon. The sequencing of the hot spot (HS) regions from FKS1 or FKS2 genes in echinocandin-resistant isolates revealed previously described point mutations. The decrease in the susceptibility to fluconazole in Spanish isolates should be closely monitored in future studies. PMID:24366741

  6. Total Protein Profile and Drug Resistance in Candida albicans Isolated from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Thawani, Vijay; Mehra, Arti

    2016-01-01

    This study was done to assess the antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to evaluate its total protein profile based on morphological difference on drug resistance. Hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. albicans from various clinical specimens were tested for susceptibility against four antifungal agents, namely, fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, and ketoconazole. A significant increase of drug resistance in clinical isolates of C. albicans was observed. The study showed 50% fluconazole and itraconazole resistance at 32 μg mL−1 with a MIC50 and MIC90 values at 34 and 47 and 36 and 49 μg mL−1, respectively. All isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B and ketoconazole. The SDS-PAGE protein profile showed a prevalent band of ~52.5 kDa, indicating overexpression of gene in 72% strains with fluconazole resistance. Since the opportunistic infections of Candida spp. are increasing along with drug resistance, the total protein profile will help in understanding the evolutionary changes in drug resistance and also to characterize them. PMID:27478638

  7. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Monika; Kaur, Ravinder; Chadha, Sanjim

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient's symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17%) and C. dubliniensis (12.5%). Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%), C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each), and C. kefyr (3%). Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species. PMID:27092278

  8. Candida Species Prevalence Profile in HIV Seropositive Patients from a Major Tertiary Care Hospital in New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Monika; Kaur, Ravinder; Chadha, Sanjim

    2016-01-01

    Candida is a common opportunistic pathogen during the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression. Changes in the clinical severity of candidiasis and the Candida species prevalence profile may be a reflection of immunological changes in HIV positive patients. The aim of this study was to document the changing pattern of Candida species prevalence profile in HIV seropositive patients from a tertiary care hospital in North India. One hundred and twenty HIV seropositive subjects were recruited for Candida microbial screening. Clinical specimens including blood, oral swabs, expectorated or induced sputum/bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and urine were collected depending on the patient's symptoms. A total of 128 Candida isolates were obtained from 88 cases and 7 different Candida species were identified. C. albicans (50%) was the most common species isolated followed by C. glabrata (17%) and C. dubliniensis (12.5%). Other species isolated were C. parapsilosis (7.8%), C. krusei, C. tropicalis (4.6% each), and C. kefyr (3%). Strong clinical suspicion along with optimal sampling of an accurate diagnosis of Candida species involved would go a long way in decreasing the morbidity associated with non-albicans Candida species. PMID:27092278

  9. Sensitivity of clinical isolates of Candida to essential oils from Burseraceae family

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Miloš; Smiljkovic, Marija; Markovic, Tatjana; Cirica, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Markovic, Dejan; Sokovic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antifungal activity of four commercial essential oils from the Burseraceae family - two Boswellia carterii Flueck oils, Canarium luzonicum (Blume) A. Gray oil, and Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl oil, against most common Candida spp. recovered from the human oral cavity. The essential oil samples were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. The analysis showed that major essential oils' components were α-pinene (23.04 % and 31.84 %), limonene (45.62 %) and curzerene (34.65 %), respectively. Minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum fungicidal (MFC) concentrations were determined using a microdilution standardized technique. All tested Candida spp. clinical isolates and ATCC strains showed susceptibility to tested essential oils in a dose dependent manner. The strongest antifungal activity was shown by essential oil of B. carterii, sample 2; the average MIC values ranged from 1.25 to 1.34 mg/ml, and MFC values ranged from 2.50 to 3.75 mg/ml, depending on the fungus. This study supports the possible use of essential oils from the Bursecaceae family in reduction and elimination of Candida spp. populations in patients with oral cavity fungal infections. PMID:27330531

  10. Sensitivity of clinical isolates of Candida to essential oils from Burseraceae family.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Miloš; Smiljkovic, Marija; Markovic, Tatjana; Cirica, Ana; Glamoclija, Jasmina; Markovic, Dejan; Sokovic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and antifungal activity of four commercial essential oils from the Burseraceae family - two Boswellia carterii Flueck oils, Canarium luzonicum (Blume) A. Gray oil, and Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl oil, against most common Candida spp. recovered from the human oral cavity. The essential oil samples were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. The analysis showed that major essential oils' components were α-pinene (23.04 % and 31.84 %), limonene (45.62 %) and curzerene (34.65 %), respectively. Minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum fungicidal (MFC) concentrations were determined using a microdilution standardized technique. All tested Candida spp. clinical isolates and ATCC strains showed susceptibility to tested essential oils in a dose dependent manner. The strongest antifungal activity was shown by essential oil of B. carterii, sample 2; the average MIC values ranged from 1.25 to 1.34 mg/ml, and MFC values ranged from 2.50 to 3.75 mg/ml, depending on the fungus. This study supports the possible use of essential oils from the Bursecaceae family in reduction and elimination of Candida spp. populations in patients with oral cavity fungal infections. PMID:27330531

  11. Resistance Mechanisms and Clinical Features of Fluconazole-Nonsusceptible Candida tropicalis Isolates Compared with Fluconazole-Less-Susceptible Isolates.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Ji; Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Wee-Gyo; Kim, Mi-Na; Lee, Kyungwon; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Im, Young Jun

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the azole resistance mechanisms and clinical features of fluconazole-nonsusceptible (FNS) isolates of Candida tropicalis recovered from Korean surveillance cultures in comparison with fluconazole-less-susceptible (FLS) isolates. Thirty-five clinical isolates of C. tropicalis, comprising 9 FNS (fluconazole MIC, 4 to 64 μg/ml), 12 FLS (MIC, 1 to 2 μg/ml), and 14 control (MIC, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml) isolates, were assessed. CDR1, MDR1, and ERG11 expression was quantified, and the ERG11 and UPC2 genes were sequenced. Clinical features of 16 patients with FNS or FLS bloodstream isolates were analyzed. Both FNS and FLS isolates had >10-fold higher mean expression levels of CDR1, MDR1, and ERG11 genes than control isolates (P values of <0.02 for all). When FNS and FLS isolates were compared, FNS isolates had 3.4-fold higher mean ERG11 expression levels than FLS isolates (P = 0.004), but there were no differences in those of CDR1 or MDR1 Of all 35 isolates, 4 (2 FNS and 2 FLS) and 28 (8 FNS, 11 FLS, and 9 control) isolates exhibited amino acid substitutions in Erg11p and Upc2p, respectively. Both FNS and FLS bloodstream isolates were associated with azole therapeutic failure (3/4 versus 4/7) or uncleared fungemia (4/6 versus 4/10), but FNS isolates were identified more frequently from patients with previous azole exposure (6/6 versus 3/10; P = 0.011) and immunosuppression (6/6 versus 3/10; P = 0.011). These results reveal that the majority of FNS C. tropicalis isolates show overexpression of CDR1, MDR1, and ERG11 genes, and fungemia develops after azole exposure in patients with immunosuppression. PMID:27044550

  12. Epidemiology, species distribution, antifungal susceptibility, and ERG11 mutations of Candida species isolated from pregnant Chinese Han women.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Su, M Q; Ma, Y Y; Xin, Y J; Han, R B; Zhang, R; Wen, J; Hao, X K

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of antifungal agents has led to increasing azole resistance in Candida species. A major azole-resistance mechanism involves point mutations in the ERG11 gene, which encodes cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14a-demethylase. In this study, vaginal swabs were obtained from 657 pregnant Chinese Han women and cultured appropriately. The open reading frame of the obtained fungal species were amplified by PCR and sequenced; additionally, the ERG11 gene of the isolated Candida species was amplified and sequenced, and the antifungal susceptibility of the isolated species was determined. The vaginal swabs of 124 women produced fungal cultures; five species of Candida were isolated from the patients, among which Candida albicans was predominant. Twelve C. albicans isolates (13.8%) were resistant to fluconazole and 2 (2.2%) were resistant to itraconazole. Seventeen mutations, including 9 silent and 8 missense mutations, were identified in the ERG11 gene of 31 C. albicans isolates. Our findings suggest that infection caused by C. albicans and non-C. albicansis common in Chinese Han women of reproductive age. Moreover, the relationship between Candida infection and certain epidemiological factors emphasizes the need to educate women about the precise diagnosis and punctual treatment of vaginitis. PMID:27173274

  13. Candida species distribution, genotyping and virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of kidney transplant recipients of two geographic regions of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a diploid yeast that in some circumstances may cause oral or oropharyngeal infections. This investigation aimed to study the prevalence of Candida spp. and to analyze the ABC genotypes of 76 clinical isolates of C. albicans obtained from the oral cavity of kidney transplant patients from two distinct geographic regions of Brazil. Methods We typed 48 strains with ABC genotyping and Microsatelitte using primer M13 and tested three virulence factors in vitro: phospholipase activity, morphogenesis and the ability to evade from polymorphonuclear neutrophils phagocytosis. Results C. albicans was the most prevalent species (86.4%), followed by C. tropicalis (4.5%). C. albicans genotype A was the most prevalent (58 isolates; 76.4%), followed by genotype C (15 isolates; 19.7%) and genotype B (3 isolates; 3.9%). When Microsatellite technique with primer M13 was applied, 80% of the isolates from the South were placed within the same cluster. The majority of Genotype C strains were grouped together within two different clusters. Genotype C was considered more resistant to PMNs attack than genotypes A and B. Strains isolated from the South of Brazil showed also better ability to combat PMNs phagocytosis. Conclusions We found a high rate of C. albicans genotype C strains isolated from the oral cavity of this group of patients. This study characterized oral C. albicans strains isolated from kidney transplant recipients and will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. PMID:24628850

  14. Nucleotide substitutions in the Candida albicans ERG11 gene of azole-susceptible and azole-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Slemp-Migiel, Anna; Rother, Magdalena; Gołąbek, Karolina; Wiczkowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    One of the mechanisms of Candida albicans resistance to azole drugs used in antifungal therapy relies on increased expression and presence of point mutations in the ERG11 gene that encodes sterol 14α demethylase (14DM), an enzyme which is the primary target for the azole class of antifungals. The aim of the study was to analyze nucleotide substitutions in the Candida albicans ERG11 gene of azole-susceptible and azole-resistant clinical isolates. The Candida albicans isolates represented a collection of 122 strains selected from 658 strains isolated from different biological materials. Samples were obtained from hospitalized patients. Fluconazole susceptibility was tested in vitro using a microdilution assay. Candida albicans strains used in this study consisted of two groups: 61 of the isolates were susceptible to azoles and the 61 were resistant to azoles. Four overlapping regions of the ERG11 gene of the isolates of Candida albicans strains were amplified and sequenced. The MSSCP (multitemperature single strand conformation polymorphism) method was performed to select Candida albicans samples presenting genetic differences in the ERG11 gene fragments for subsequent sequence analysis. Based on the sequencing results we managed to detect 19 substitutions of nucleotides in the ERG11 gene fragments. Sequencing revealed 4 different alterations: T495A, A530C, G622A and A945C leading to changes in the corresponding amino acid sequence: D116E, K128T, V159I and E266D. The single nucleotide changes in the ERG11 gene did not affect the sensitivity of Candida albicans strains, whereas multiple nucleotide substitutions in the ERG11 gene fragments indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs. PMID:24340302

  15. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  16. Characterization of Candida famata Isolated from Poultry Feces for Possible Probiotic Applications.

    PubMed

    Al-Seraih, Alaa; Flahaut, Christophe; Krier, François; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2015-12-01

    We studied here the yeast content of poultry feces, collected randomly from a French farm located in the north of the country. Thus, 81 yeast colonies were isolated and clustered into 22 distinct groups using the rep-PCR method. A single colony was taken from each group and identified using biochemical (ID 32C system) and molecular (sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA and ITS1-5.8-ITS2 rDNA region) methods. Both methods led to the identification of Candida famata species. One isolate of C. famata strains, named strain Y5, was further studied for its cytotoxicity, adhesion, and surface properties, hemolytic activity, and its survival in simulated gastric and intestine environments. The data obtained advocate the probiotic potential of this isolate. PMID:26459296

  17. In vitro pharmacodynamic modelling of anidulafungin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Ortega, Ignacio; Eraso, Elena; Suárez, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fit anidulafungin in vitro static time-kill data from nine strains of Candida with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model in order to describe the antifungal activity of this drug against Candida spp. Time-kill data from strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis clades were best fit using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model and resulted in a set of PD parameters (Emax, EC50 and Hill factor) for each fungal strain. The data were analysed with NONMEM 7. Anidulafungin was effective in a species- and concentration-dependent manner against the strains of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis clades as observed with the EC50 estimates. Maximum killing rate constant (Emax) values were higher against C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis complex strains. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activity of anidulafungin against Candida can be accurately described using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model. PMID:26857078

  18. ERG11 mutations and expression of resistance genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghao; Sheng, Fang; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Li, Chunyang

    2015-11-01

    Azole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans poses significant challenges for its antibiotic treatment. The conformational change of the target enzyme 14 alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) due to ERG11 gene mutations is one of the mechanisms resulting in the azole resistance. ERG11 of 23 isolates (8 susceptible and 15 resistant) and 6 standard strains of Candida albicans were amplified and sequenced. Nineteen missense mutations were detected. Two mutations, G487T (A114S) and T916C (Y257H), coexisted exclusively in 14 fluconazole-resistant isolates. To identify the resistance mechanisms in the isolates with G487T and T916C mutations, we compared the expression of 5 resistance-related genes in the 14 azole-resistant isolates with those in the susceptible type strain ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae AD/CDR1 and AD/CDR2. The tested values of mRNA transcription of CDR1 and CDR2 were higher than that of control strain, while the semi-quantified Cdr1p values were not higher in all of the 14 resistant isolates. And the data analyzed with t test suggest that both of the differences are significant (P < 0.0005) when the resistant isolates are considered as a whole. Cdr2p was up-regulated in 5 isolates, and down-regulated or even undetectable in the remaining 9 isolates. The transcription of ERG11, MDR1, and FLU1 varied in these isolates. These data suggested that overexpression of the five genes might not be the reason of resistance in the 14 isolates with G487T and T916C, especially in the 5 isolates (GZ09, GZ15, GZ16, GZ58, and 4263) in which neither translation of Cdr1p/Cdr2p nor transcription of ERG11, MDR1, or FLU1 was detected up-regulated. The results suggest that Erg11p conformational change due to the point mutations is most likely responsible for the azole resistance in these isolates. PMID:26349561

  19. The Evaluation of the Distribution of Yeast like Fungi 'Candida Species' at a Tertiary Care Center in Western Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ece, Gulfem; Samlioglu, Pinar; Akkoclu, Gulgun; Atalay, Sabri; Kose, Sukran

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Candida infections have increased due to transplant patients, prolonged ICU stay and invasive procedures. The most common isolated strain is C. albicans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of Candida isolates at Tepecik Education and Research Hospital. Materials and Methods: Yeast like fungi were isolated between 13.01.2010 and 19.08.2011 at Mycology Laboratory. The identification was done by conventional methods and carbohydrate assimilation profile using the ID32C identification system (Biomerieux, France). Results: Yeast like fungi were isolated from 337 clinical specimens. They consisted of urine, blood culture, respiratory specimen and wound. The most isolated yeast strains were C.albicans (38.6%), C.tropicalis (13.9%), C. parapsilosis (28.4%), C.glabrata (7.4%), C.krusei (3.8%). Conclusion: Recently there is an increment in Candida infections. In this study the most common strain was C.albicans and the rate C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were lower than expected. C. parapsilosis was the most isolated strain in blood cultures and this may be due to invasive procedures and the use of indwelling catheters. PMID:23028245

  20. Molecular Diversity of Candida albicans Isolated from Immunocompromised Patients, Based on MLST Method

    PubMed Central

    AFSARIAN, Seyed Mohammad Hosein; BADALI, Hamid; SHOKOHI, Tahereh; NAJAFIPOUR, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: As regards multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method directly analyze the polymorphism within DNA sequences; we performed the first nationwide study on the genotypic relationships of Candida albicans strains obtained from oropharynx and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from immunocompromised patients. Methods: Fourteen epidemiologically unrelated clinical strains of C. albicans were obtained from three hospitals in Mazandaran Province, Iran (2006 to 2012) from seven patients with pulmonary infections and the rest with oropharyngeal samples of immunocompromised patients. Seven loci of housekeeping genes were sequenced for all fourteen isolates. Results: MLST was applied to a subset of 14 unrelated isolates. Seventy-one (2.5%) nucleotide sites were found to be variable. Accordingly, 60 different alleles were identified in seven loci among the isolates, among which two new alleles were obtained. Furthermore, 12 independent diploid sequence types (DSTs) including five novel DSTs were identified. The fourteen unrelated isolates were placed in 10 clonal clusters (CC) while two isolates were singletons, by eBURST analysis. Most of the isolates belonged to CC461 of eBURST analysis from the clade 11 and two isolates assigned to CC172 from the clade 15. Conclusion: Pathogen distribution and relatedness for determining the epidemiology of nosocomial infections is highly recommended for pathogen control methods. PMID:26587501

  1. Resistance mechanisms in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates from vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Cernicka, Jana; Subik, Julius

    2006-05-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently identified yeast species causing mycotic vaginitis. A significant number of vaginal yeast isolates are resistant to azole antifungal agents in vitro. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms of resistance in 22 randomly selected fluconazole-resistant vaginal C. albicans isolates. Twelve isolates in this collection were found to be cross-resistant to itraconazole and 15 to voriconazole. Most of them also displayed decreased susceptibility to terbinafine. Northern blot analyses revealed overexpression of the MDR1 gene in all isolates, which in some isolates was accompanied by elevated levels of CDR1/CDR2 and ERG11 expression. Sequence analysis of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified ERG11 gene of selected azole-resistant isolates identified D116E and V488I amino acid alterations in Erg11p that are known to be conserved in fluconazole-resistant strains. The results demonstrate that decreased susceptibilities of vaginal yeast isolates to clinically used azole derivatives are the result of a combination of several molecular mechanisms involving drug efflux and alterations in the structure or cellular amount of 14-alpha-lanosterol demethylase. PMID:16621465

  2. Genotypic variation and slime production among blood and catheter isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Branchini, M L; Pfaller, M A; Rhine-Chalberg, J; Frempong, T; Isenberg, H D

    1994-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity and slime production among 31 isolates of C. parapsilosis from individual patients with bloodstream or catheter infections. DNA subtyping was performed by using electrophoretic karyotyping plus restriction endonuclease analysis with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Slime production was evaluated by growing organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Overall there were 14 DNA subtypes among the 31 isolates. Eighty percent of the isolates produced slime; 67% of the isolates were moderately to strongly positive, 13% were weakly positive, and 20% were not slime producers. The ability of isolates of a given DNA type to produce slime under these conditions was variable. The results of these studies indicate moderate genotypic variation among clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis. The propensity of these isolates to form slime in glucose-containing solutions suggests that this phenotypic characteristic may contribute to the ability of C. parapsilosis to adhere to plastic catheters and cause infections. PMID:8150956

  3. Antifungal susceptibility patterns of a global collection of fungal isolates: results of the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program (2013).

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Mariana; Messer, Shawn A; Rhomberg, Paul R; Pfaller, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Among 1846 fungal clinical isolates from 31 countries, echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. ranged from 0.0% to 2.8% (highest for anidulafungin versus Candida glabrata), and fluconazole resistance was noted among 11.9% and 11.6% of the C. glabrata and Candida tropicalis, respectively. Two isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus displayed elevated MICs for itraconazole and carried cyp51a mutations encoding TR34 L98H. All Cryptococcus neoformans had azole MIC values below epidemiological cutoff values. The increasing resistance among certain species and more frequent reports of breakthrough infections in patients undergoing antifungal therapy highlights the importance of antifungal surveillance to guide therapy for patients with invasive fungal infections. PMID:27061369

  4. Comparison of in vitro susceptibility characteristics of Candida species from cases of invasive candidiasis in solid organ and stem cell transplant recipients: Transplant-Associated Infections Surveillance Network (TRANSNET), 2001 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Wagner, Debra; Iqbal, Naureen; Pappas, Peter G; Andes, David R; Kauffman, Carol A; Brumble, Lisa M; Hadley, Susan; Walker, Randall; Ito, James I; Baddley, John W; Chiller, Tom; Park, Benjamin J

    2011-07-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among both solid organ transplant (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Candida is the most common cause of IFI in SOT recipients and the second most common cause of IFI in HSCT recipients. We determined susceptibilities to fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for 383 invasive Candida sp. isolates from SOT and HSCT recipients enrolled in the Transplant-Associated Infection Surveillance Network and correlated these results to clinical data. Fluconazole resistance in C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis isolates was low (1%), but the high percentage of C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates within this group of patients increased the overall percentage of fluconazole resistance to 16%. Voriconazole resistance was 3% overall but was 8% among C. glabrata isolates. On multivariable analysis, among HSCT recipients fluconazole nonsusceptibility was independently associated with C. glabrata, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia, diabetes active at the time of the IFI, and any prior amphotericin B use; among SOT recipients, fluconazole nonsusceptibility was independently associated with any fluconazole use in the 3 months prior to the IFI, C. glabrata, ganciclovir use in the 3 months prior to the IFI, diabetes acquired since the transplant, and gender. PMID:21562099

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Fluconazole Resistance in Candida parapsilosis Isolates from a U.S. Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Nina T.; Pham, Cau D.; Cleveland, Angela A.

    2014-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is the second or third most common cause of candidemia in many countries. The Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends fluconazole as the primary therapy for C. parapsilosis candidemia. Although the rate of fluconazole resistance among C. parapsilosis isolates is low in most U.S. institutions, the resistance rate can be as high as 7.5%. This study was designed to assess the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in 706 incident bloodstream isolates from U.S. hospitals. We sequenced the ERG11 and MRR1 genes of 122 C. parapsilosis isolates with resistant (30 isolates; 4.2%), susceptible dose-dependent (37 isolates; 5.2%), and susceptible (55 isolates) fluconazole MIC values and used real-time PCR of RNA from 17 isolates to investigate the regulation of MDR1. By comparing these isolates to fully fluconazole-susceptible isolates, we detected at least two mechanisms of fluconazole resistance: an amino acid substitution in the 14-α-demethylase gene ERG11 and overexpression of the efflux pump MDR1, possibly due to point mutations in the MRR1 transcription factor that regulates MDR1. The ERG11 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in 57% of the fluconazole-resistant isolates and in no susceptible isolates. The MRR1 SNPs were more difficult to characterize, as not all resulted in overexpression of MDR1 and not all MDR1 overexpression was associated with an SNP in MRR1. Further work to characterize the MRR1 SNPs and search for overexpression of other efflux pumps is needed. PMID:25451046

  6. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included

  7. Small-molecule suppressors of Candida albicans biofilm formation synergistically enhance the antifungal activity of amphotericin B against clinical Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    You, Jianlan; Du, Lin; King, Jarrod B.; Hall, Brian E.; Cichewicz, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    A new class of fungal biofilm inhibitors represented by shearinines D (3) and E (4) were obtained from a Penicillium sp. isolate. The inhibitory activities of 3 and 4 were characterized using a new imaging flow-cytometer technique, which enabled the rapid phenotypic analysis of Candida albicans cell types (budding yeast cells, germ tube cells, pseudohyphae, and hyphae) in biofilms populations. The results were confirmed by experimental data obtained from three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy and 2,3- bis-(2-methoxy-4- nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) assays. These data indicate that 3 and 4 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation by blocking the outgrowth of hyphae at a relatively late stage of biofilm development (IC50 = 8.5 μM and 7.6 μM, respectively). However, 3 and 4 demonstrated comparatively weak activity at disrupting existing biofilms. Compounds 3 and 4 also exhibited synergistic activities with amphotericin B against C. albicans and others clinical Candida isolates by enhancing the potency of amphotericin B up to eight-fold against cells in both developing and established biofilms. These data suggest that the Candida biofilm disruption and amphotericin B potentiating effects of 3 and 4 could be mediated through multiple biological targets. The shearinines are good tools for testing the potential advantages of using adjunctive therapies in combination with antifungals. PMID:23387427

  8. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates. PMID:27280049

  9. Micafungin triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis biofilms, including caspofungin non-susceptible isolates.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2015-01-01

    Candida biofilms play an important role in infections associated with medical devices and are resistant to antifungals. We hypothesized that the echinocandin micafungin (MICA) exerts an enhanced antifungal activity against caspofungin (CAS)-susceptible (CAS-S) and CAS-non-susceptible (CAS-NS) Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis which is at least in part through apoptosis, even in the biofilm environment. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, lack of plasma membrane integrity, and metacaspase activation following exposure of Candida biofilm to MICA for 3h at 37°C in RPMI 1640 medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration was higher for CAS (2.0-16.0 μg/mL) than for MICA (1.0-8.0 μg/mL) for Candida biofilms. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Elevated intracellular ROS levels and depolarization of MMP was evident in CAS-S C. albicans (3.0-4.2 fold) and C. parapsilosis (4.8-5.4 fold) biofilms compared with CAS-NS (1.2 fold) after exposure to MICA (0.25x-1xMIC). Finally higher ß-1, 3 glucan levels were seen in sessile cells compared to planktonic cells, especially in CAS-NS strains. MICA treatment might induce a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic process in biofilms of both CAS-S C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, and to some degree in CAS-NS strains. PMID:26065323

  10. DNA fingerprinting and electrophoretic karyotype of environmental and clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed Central

    Carruba, G; Pontieri, E; De Bernardis, F; Martino, P; Cassone, A

    1991-01-01

    The endonuclease restriction pattern (DNA fingerprinting) and the electrophoretic karyotype of 16 Candida parapsilosis isolates from environmental and clinical sources were investigated. DNA from both whole cells and separated mitochondria was digested with enzymes, including EcoRI, BamHI, KpnI, BglII, HpaII, PvuII, and HindIII. Regardless of their source and pathogenic properties, all isolates showed a uniform, reproducible, and overlapping whole-cell DNA fingerprinting with each endonuclease digest. Mitochondrial DNA fragments were, in all cases, major contributors to the total cellular DNA restriction pattern. In contrast, the electrophoretic karyotype generated by rotating field gel electrophoresis (RFGE) or contour clamped homogeneous field electrophoresis (CHEF) showed a remarkable polymorphism among the isolates. This polymorphism concerned the smaller molecular size section of the karyotype (range, 1.8 to 0.7 Mb), where at least two to five chromosomal bands could be consistently detected by both RFGE and CHEF. Larger (greater than or equal to 3.0 to 1.9 Mb) chromosome-sized DNA bands (four in CHEF and three in RFGE) were quite distinct and common to all isolates. Thus, seven karyotype classes could be defined, on the basis of both the number and size of putative chromosomes. The three categories of isolates (soil, vaginal, and hematological) were not randomly distributed among the seven classes. In particular, the four hematological isolates had a karyotype pattern which was clearly distinct from that shown by the three environmental isolates, and of the nine vaginal isolates only one shared a class with isolates from another source (soil). Although tentative, the classification was totally consistent with the independent and reproducible results obtained by the two pulse-field electrophoretic techniques employed. It is suggested that the electrophoretic analysis of the karyotype might be particularly useful for epidemiological and pathogenicity studies on

  11. Mechanisms of azole resistance in Candida albicans clinical isolates from Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Yan; Shi, Ce; Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Yue; Xiang, Ming-Jie

    2015-04-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanism(s) of azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans collected in Shanghai, China, focusing on the role of efflux pumps, target enzymes of fluconazole (Erg11), respiratory status and the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. Clinical isolates of C. albicans (n = 30) were collected from 30 different non-HIV-infected patients in four hospitals in Shanghai. All 30 C. albicans isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and 5-fluorocytosine. Twelve C. albicans isolates showed resistance to at least one type of triazole antifungal. Flow cytometry analysis of rhodamine 6G efflux showed that azole-resistant isolates had greater efflux pump activity, which was consistent with elevated levels of CDR1 and CDR2 genes that code for ABC efflux pumps. However, we did not observe increased expression of ERG11 and MDR1 or respiratory deficiency. Several mutations of ERG11 and TAC1 genes were detected. The F964Y mutation in the TAC1 gene was identified for the first time. Two main sterols, ergosterol and lanosterol, were identified by GC-MS chromatogram, and no missense mutations were found in ERG3. Furthermore, seven amino acid substitutions in ERG11, A114S, Y132H, Y132F, K143Q, K143R, Y257H and G448E were found, by Type II spectral quantitative analysis, to contribute to low affinity binding between Erg11 and fluconazole. PMID:25748216

  12. Antifungal Susceptibility Analysis of Clinical Isolates of Candida parapsilosis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    LOTFALI, Ensieh; KORDBACHEH, Parivash; MIRHENDI, Hossein; ZAINI, Farideh; GHAJARI, Ali; MOHAMMADI, Rasoul; NOORBAKHSH, Fatemeh; MOAZENI, Maryam; FALLAHI, Aliakbar; REZAIE, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida parapsilosis is an emergent agent of invasive fungal infections. This yeast is one of the five most widespread yeasts concerned in invasive candidiasis. C. parapsilosis stands out as the second most common yeast species isolated from patients with bloodstream infections especially in neonates with catheter. Recently several reports suggested that its reduced susceptibility to azoles and polyene might become a cause for clinical concern, although C. parapsilosis is not believed to be intensely prone to the development of antifungal resistance. Methods: In the present report, One hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis complex were identified and differentiated by using PCR-RFLP analysis. The isolates were then analyzed to determine their susceptibility profile to fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITC) and amphotericin B. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results were analyzed according to the standard CLSI guide. Results: All of isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis. No C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis strains were found. Evaluation of the antifungal susceptibility profile showed that only three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to fluconazole, three (2.5%) C. parapsilosis were resistant to itraconazole and two (1.7%) C. parapsilosis were amphotericin B resistant. Conclusion: Profiles in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis can provide important information for the control of antifungal resistance as well as distribution and susceptibility profiles in populations. PMID:27141494

  13. High Recovery Rate of Non-albicans Candida Species Isolated From Burn Patients With Candidemia in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh; Nouranibaladezaei, Seyed Zahra; Nasrolahi Omran, Ayatollah; Kondori, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood stream infections (BSIs) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Microorganisms responsible for BSI are generally bacteria; however, Candida spp. are the infection agents in as many as 8% of all cases. Burn wound colonization and infections are generally the first steps to systemic infection. Candidemia in burn patients has been associated with high mortality and a prolonged hospital stay. Objectives: Candidemia in burn patients has been defined as a preterminal event, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates among these patients. The aim of this study was to establish the incidence of candidemia in burn patients in Iran. Patients and Methods: We consecutively collected 405 blood samples from 113 burn patients. The yeast isolates were identified to the species level using conventional procedures. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of the Candida isolates to amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was performed using the Etest. Results: Twenty-seven samples (6.7%) of the blood cultures from 13 patients (12%) were positive for Candida species. Candida parapsilosis (38%) and C. tropicalis (38%) were the most commonly found Candida species, followed by C. albicans (15%) and C. guilliermondii (15%) in the patients. The incidence of candidemia was significantly correlated with increased duration of hospitalization, increased time of stay in the intensive care unit, and higher mortality. The antifungal susceptibility tests demonstrated that amphotericin B and voriconazole had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against Candida spp. Conclusions: Non-albicans Candida should be considered as significant pathogens in burned patients with candidemia. PMID:26587207

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel electricity-producing yeast, Candida sp. IR11.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-09-01

    A novel iron-reducing yeast, Candida sp. IR11, was isolated from an anodic biofilm in a MFC reactor fed glucose as a feedstock. 200-250 mV of voltage was produced in the air-cathode MFC inoculated with a pure culture of the strain IR11 where glucose was supplied as a feedstock. When the strain IR11 was inoculated into a conventional MFC treating rejected wastewater from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, maximum power density and coulombic efficiency were enhanced from 15.2 ± 0.36 to 20.6 ± 1.52 mW m(-2) and from 14.4 ± 0.45% to 21.9 ± 0.71%, respectively. In addition, the inoculation with IR11 improved COD removal from 79.1 ± 1.53% to 91.3 ± 5.29%. The quantitative PCR results showed that the strain IR11 successfully attached the anodic biofilm of the MFC reactors. These results indicate that Candida sp. IR11 is a promising biocatalyst for the enhancement of MFC performance. PMID:26092068

  15. Molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in clinical Candida species isolated from Tunisian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Eddouzi, Jamel; Parker, Josie E; Vale-Silva, Luis A; Coste, Alix; Ischer, Françoise; Kelly, Steve; Manai, Mohamed; Sanglard, Dominique

    2013-07-01

    Antifungal resistance of Candida species is a clinical problem in the management of diseases caused by these pathogens. In this study we identified from a collection of 423 clinical samples taken from Tunisian hospitals two clinical Candida species (Candida albicans JEY355 and Candida tropicalis JEY162) with decreased susceptibility to azoles and polyenes. For JEY355, the fluconazole (FLC) MIC was 8 μg/ml. Azole resistance in C. albicans JEY355 was mainly caused by overexpression of a multidrug efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, Mdr1. The regulator of Mdr1, MRR1, contained a yet-unknown gain-of-function mutation (V877F) causing MDR1 overexpression. The C. tropicalis JEY162 isolate demonstrated cross-resistance between FLC (MIC > 128 μg/ml), voriconazole (MIC > 16 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (MIC > 32 μg/ml). Sterol analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that ergosterol was undetectable in JEY162 and that it accumulated 14α-methyl fecosterol, thus indicating a perturbation in the function of at least two main ergosterol biosynthesis proteins (Erg11 and Erg3). Sequence analyses of C. tropicalis ERG11 (CtERG11) and CtERG3 from JEY162 revealed a deletion of 132 nucleotides and a single amino acid substitution (S258F), respectively. These two alleles were demonstrated to be nonfunctional and thus are consistent with previous studies showing that ERG11 mutants can only survive in combination with other ERG3 mutations. CtERG3 and CtERG11 wild-type alleles were replaced by the defective genes in a wild-type C. tropicalis strain, resulting in a drug resistance phenotype identical to that of JEY162. This genetic evidence demonstrated that CtERG3 and CtERG11 mutations participated in drug resistance. During reconstitution of the drug resistance in C. tropicalis, a strain was obtained harboring only defective Cterg11 allele and containing as a major sterol the toxic metabolite 14α-methyl-ergosta-8,24(28)-dien-3α,6β-diol, suggesting

  16. Reduced susceptibility of Candida albicans clinical isolates to azoles and detection of mutations in the ERG11 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai-Fei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xi-Hai; Ye, Ying; Li, Jia-Bin

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of Candida albicans isolated from clinic specimens to azole antifungal agents and estimated the association of the ERG11 mutations with azole resistance during recent 5years in China. In this study, novel mutations G346A, A434V, and L480F in ERG11 may be related to azole resistance in C. albicans. PMID:24070847

  17. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE NADPH-CYTOCHROME P-450 OXIDOREDUCTASE GENE FROM CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene coding for the Candida tropicalis NADPH-cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase (CPR, NADPH: ferricytochrome oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) was isolated by immunoscreening of a C. tropicalis gtll expression library and colony hybridization of a C. tropicalis genomic library. he C. ...

  18. ISOLATION OF THE ALKANE INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a gtll library. solation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. ranscripts of this gene were indu...

  19. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14a-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. his was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. dentit...

  20. ISOLATION OF THE CANDIDA TROPICALIS GENE FOR P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN SACCAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have isolated the gene for cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis. This was accomplished by screening genomic libraries of strain ATCC750 in E. coli using a DNA fragment containing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14DM gene. Identi...

  1. [Isolated yeast species in urine samples in a Spanish regional hospital].

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, Victor; Ros, Luis; Sorlózano, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Candiduria detection in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients is of great clinical significance. The aim of our study was to describe the isolation frequency of significant species of yeasts in urine samples processed in our hospital during the period 2010- 2013, and to analyze their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal agents. Species identification was performed by seeding on a chromogenic medium, the filamentation test and automated systems (ASM Vitek and MALDI Biotyper), while susceptibility was determined using the ASM Vitek system. Of the 632 yeast isolates in urine, 371 were Candida albicans species and 261 non-C. albicans Candida spp. The species with the highest number of resistant isolates were Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Based on the results obtained, we believe that species identification and the susceptibility study should be current practice in the laboratories when species other than C. albicans are isolated. PMID:26507634

  2. Clonal Strain Persistence of Candida albicans Isolates from Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Alexander J.; Rennison, Claire; Raza, Muhammad; Lilic, Desa; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder characterised by susceptibility to chronic Candida and fungal dermatophyte infections of the skin, nails and mucous membranes. Molecular epidemiology studies of CMC infection are limited in number and scope and it is not clear whether single or multiple strains inducing CMC persist stably or are exchanged and replaced. We subjected 42 C. albicans individual single colony isolates from 6 unrelated CMC patients to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Multiple colonies were typed from swabs taken from multiple body sites across multiple time points over a 17-month period. Among isolates from each individual patient, our data show clonal and persistent diploid sequence types (DSTs) that were stable over time, identical between multiple infection sites and exhibit azole resistant phenotypes. No shared origin or common source of infection was identified among isolates from these patients. Additionally, we performed C. albicans MLST SNP genotype frequency analysis to identify signatures of past loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events among persistent and azole resistant isolates retrieved from patients with autoimmune disorders including CMC. PMID:26849050

  3. Variations in DNA subtype, antifungal susceptibility, and slime production among clinical isolates of Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Hollis, R J

    1995-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important nosocomial pathogen that can proliferate in high concentrations of glucose and form biofilms on prosthetic materials. We investigated the genotypic diversity, slime production, and antifungal susceptibility among 60 isolates of C. parapsilosis from 44 patients and 10 patient care providers from five different medical centers. Molecular typing was performed using macrorestriction digest profiles with BssHII followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REAG) and by electrophoretic karyotyping (EK). Slime production was evaluated by growing the organisms in Sabouraud broth with 8% glucose and examining the walls of the tubes for the presence of an adherent slime layer. Antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, and itraconazole was determined using National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards proposed standard methods. Overall 28 different DNA types were identified by REAG and EK methods. MIC90 values ranged from 0.12 microgram/ml for itraconazole to 1.0 microgram/ml for fluconazole and amphotericin B. Sixty-five percent of the isolates produced slime: 37% were moderately to strongly positive, 28% were weakly positive, and 35% were negative. Overall, 83% of blood and catheter isolates were slime positive versus 53% of isolates from all other sites (P < 0.05). These data underscore the genetic diversity and susceptibility of C. parapsilosis to antifungal agents. Slime production may be important in enabling C. parapsilosis to cause catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:7789100

  4. Comparison of Human and Soil Candida tropicalis Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Chao; Chang, Te-Pin; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chen, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ching-Fu; Hsieh, Chih-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by treatment-resistant non-albicans Candida species, such as C. tropicalis, has increased, which is an emerging challenge in the management of fungal infections. Genetically related diploid sequence type (DST) strains of C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole circulated widely in Taiwan. To identify the potential source of these wildly distributed DST strains, we investigated the possibility of the presence in soil of such C. tropicalis strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DST typing methods. A total of 56 C. tropicalis isolates were recovered from 26 out of 477 soil samples. Among the 18 isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole, 9 belonged to DST149 and 3 belonged to DST140. Both DSTs have been recovered from our previous studies on clinical isolates from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance of Yeasts (TSARY) program. Furthermore, these isolates were more resistant to agricultural azoles. We have found genetically related C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole from the human hosts and environmental samples. Therefore, to prevent patients from acquiring C. tropicalis with reduced susceptibility to azoles, prudent use of azoles in both clinical and agricultural settings is advocated. PMID:22496832

  5. Investigation of mutations in Erg11 gene of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolates from Turkish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manastır, Lerzan; Ergon, M Cem; Yücesoy, Mine

    2011-03-01

    Widespread use of fluconazole has resulted in resistance in strains of Candida. The aim of our study was to investigate Y132H and other mutations in the ERG11 gene in conferring fluconazole resistance to C. albicans isolates. Seven fluconazole-resistant (R)/susceptible dose-dependent (SDD)/trailing and 10 fluconazole-susceptible (S) isolates were included. Restriction enzyme analysis was performed on all isolates for Y132H mutation and sequence analysis was performed for other mutations in the ERG11 gene. None of our strains had Y132H mutation. One single mutation (D153E, E266D, D116E, V437I) was detected in isolates 348, 533, 644, 1453, 2157, while the others had more than one nucleotide change. D116E and E266D, which were two mutations found in fluconazole R/SDD/trailing isolates with the highest frequency, were also detected in azole S strains. K143R, G464S, G465S and V488I mutations were determined in three of the R/SDD isolates. S412T and R469K mutations were detected only in this group of strains by sequence analysis. Mutations such as K143R, G464S, G465S, V488I, S412T and R469K in the ERG11 gene were determined to be effective mechanisms in our fluconazole R/SDD C. albicans isolates. Other mechanisms of resistance, such as overexpression of ERG11 and efflux pumps and mutations in the ERG3 gene should also be investigated. PMID:19732347

  6. Whole genome sequencing of emerging multidrug resistant Candida auris isolates in India demonstrates low genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C; Kumar, N; Pandey, R; Meis, J F; Chowdhary, A

    2016-09-01

    Candida auris is an emerging multidrug resistant yeast that causes nosocomial fungaemia and deep-seated infections. Notably, the emergence of this yeast is alarming as it exhibits resistance to azoles, amphotericin B and caspofungin, which may lead to clinical failure in patients. The multigene phylogeny and amplified fragment length polymorphism typing methods report the C. auris population as clonal. Here, using whole genome sequencing analysis, we decipher for the first time that C. auris strains from four Indian hospitals were highly related, suggesting clonal transmission. Further, all C. auris isolates originated from cases of fungaemia and were resistant to fluconazole (MIC >64 mg/L). PMID:27617098

  7. In vitro effects of glycyrrhetinic acid on the growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Rassu, Mario; Bertoloni, Giulio

    2009-04-01

    Compounds derived from Glycyrrhiza glabra L. root have been used widely for centuries for their numerous therapeutic properties. The present study aimed to test the in vitro activity against Candida albicans strains of the compound 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid (18-beta GA), derived from the root of Glycyrrhiza species. This antimicrobial activity was assessed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) method on C. albicans strains that were isolated from patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). The in vitro growth of the C. albicans strains was markedly reduced, in a pH-dependent manner, by relatively low doses (6.2 microg/mL) of 18-beta GA. The results demonstrate that 18-beta GA is a promising biological alternative for the topical treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). PMID:19067381

  8. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F.; Bain, Judith M.; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26528256

  9. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Candida albicans strains isolated from infectious disease patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lvyin; Du, Xin; Li, Tianming; Song, Yan; Zai, Shubei; Hu, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, as an opportunistic pathogen, can cause superficial and life-threatening candidiasis in immunocompromised individuals. The formation of surface-associated biofilms and the appearance of drug resistance pose a significant challenge for clinical intervention. In this study, a total of 104 hospital-acquired C. alibcans clinical isolates were collected from sterile sites and mucosal lesions of 92 infectious disease patients in the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center and analysed. The resistance rates to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were 12.5 %, 15.4 % and 11.5 % respectively. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis identified 63 diploid sequence types (DSTs) with a decentralized phylogeny, of which 37 DSTs (58.7 %) had not been reported in the online MLST database. Loss of heterozygosity was observed in ACC1 and ADP1 sequences obtained from six sequential isolates from a patient receiving antifungal treatment, which exemplified the effect of microevolution on C. albicans genetic alterations. Biofilm formation capability, an important virulence trait of C. albicans, was variable among strains isolated from different anatomical sites (P = 0.0302) and affected by genotypes (P = 0.0185). The mRNA levels of the azole antifungal target ERG11 gene and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) were detected in 9-18.1 % of azole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) isolates. Twelve mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions in ERG11 were found in azole-resistant and S-DD isolates. Among them, A114S, Y132H and Y257H substitution in the ERG11 gene may be primarily related to azole resistance. Taken together, we observed a high level of diversity within C. albicans isolates. Multiple inter-related underlying mechanisms, including genetic and environmental factors, may account for high surface adhesion or azole resistance in clinical C. albicans infections. PMID:25351710

  10. The evolution of drug resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Martinez, Diego A; Delorey, Toni; Li, Bi yu; White, Theodore C; Cuomo, Christina; Rao, Reeta P; Berman, Judith; Thompson, Dawn A; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a member of the healthy human microbiome and a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Infections are typically treated with azole inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis often leading to drug resistance. Studies in clinical isolates have implicated multiple mechanisms in resistance, but have focused on large-scale aberrations or candidate genes, and do not comprehensively chart the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we leveraged next-generation sequencing to analyze 43 isolates from 11 oral candidiasis patients. We detected newly selected mutations, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy-number variations and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. LOH events were commonly associated with acquired resistance, and SNPs in 240 genes may be related to host adaptation. Conversely, most aneuploidies were transient and did not correlate with drug resistance. Our analysis also shows that isolates also varied in adherence, filamentation, and virulence. Our work reveals new molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of drug resistance and host adaptation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00662.001 PMID:25646566

  11. Evaluation of anti-Candida potential of geranium oil constituents against clinical isolates of Candida albicans differentially sensitive to fluconazole: inhibition of growth, dimorphism and sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Rathod, V; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-07-01

    Fluconazole (FLC) susceptibility of isolates of Candida spp., (n = 42) and efficacy as well as mechanism of anti-Candida activity of three constituents of geranium oil is evaluated in this study. No fluconazole resistance was observed among the clinical isolates tested, however 22% were susceptible-dose-dependent (S-DD) [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 16 μg ml(-1)] and a standard strain of C. albicans ATCC 10231 was resistant (≥ 64 μg ml(-1)). Geraniol and geranyl acetate were equally effective, fungicidal at 0.064% v/v concentrations i.e. MICs (561 μg ml(-1) and 584 μg ml(-1) respectively) and killed 99.9% inoculum within 15 and 30 min of exposures respectively. Citronellol was least effective and fungistatic. C. albicans dimorphism (Y → H) was highly sensitive to geranium oil constituents tested (IC50 approximately 0.008% v/v). Geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol brought down MICs of FLC by 16-, 32- and 64-fold respectively in a FLC-resistant strain. Citronellol and geraniol arrested cells in G1 phase while geranyl acetate in G2-M phase of cell cycle at MIC(50). In vitro cytotoxicity study revealed that geraniol, geranyl acetate and citronellol were non-toxic to HeLa cells at MICs of the C. albicans growth. Our results indicate that two of the three geranium oil constituents tested exhibit excellent anti-Candida activity and significant synergistic activity with fluconazole. PMID:20337938

  12. Effects of Treated versus Untreated Polystyrene on Caspofungin In Vitro Activity against Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Annette W; McCarthy, Dora I; Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sanders, Carmita; McElmeel, Maria; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Significant interlaboratory variability is observed in testing the caspofungin susceptibility of Candida species by both the CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methodologies. We evaluated the influence of treated versus untreated polystyrene microtiter trays on caspofungin MICs using 209 isolates of four Candida species, including 16 C. albicans and 11 C. glabrata isolates with defined FKS mutations. Caspofungin MICs were also determined using the commercially available YeastOne and Etest assays and 102 isolates. All C. glabrata isolates had caspofungin MICs of ≥0.5 μg/ml, the clinical breakpoint for caspofungin resistance in this species, measured using trays made of treated polystyrene, regardless of the FKS status. In contrast, susceptible isolates could readily be distinguished from resistant/non-wild-type isolates when caspofungin MICs were measured using untreated polystyrene trays and both the YeastOne and Etest assays. Similar results were also observed for C. krusei isolates, as all isolates had caspofungin MICs above the threshold for resistance measured using treated polystyrene trays. In contrast, C. albicans isolates could be correctly identified as susceptible or resistant when caspofungin MICs were measured with treated or untreated trays and with the YeastOne and Etest assays. MICs falsely elevated above the resistance breakpoint were also not observed for C. tropicalis isolates. These results demonstrated that the use of treated polystyrene may be one factor that leads to falsely elevated caspofungin in vitro susceptibility results and that this may also be a greater issue for some Candida species than for others. PMID:26763959

  13. The influence of chemical composition of commercial lemon essential oils on the growth of Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Białoń, M; Krzyśko-Łupicka, T; Koszałkowska, M; Wieczorek, P P

    2014-02-01

    Candida yeasts are saprophytes naturally present in the environment and forming colonies on human mucous membranes and skin. They are opportunistic fungi that cause severe and even fatal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Several essential oils, including eucalyptus, pine, cinnamon and lemon, have been shown to be effective against Candida strains. This study addresses the chemical composition of some commercial lemon essential oils and their antifungal potential against selected Candida yeast strains. Antifungal potential and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for six commercial lemon essential oils against five Candida yeast strains (Candida albicans 31, Candida tropicalis 32, Candida glabrata 33, Candida glabrata 35 and Candida glabrata 38). On the basis of the GCMS analysis, it was found that the tested lemon essential oils had different chemical compositions, but mostly, they contained almost exclusively terpenes and oxygenated terpenes. The tests show that antifungal potential of lemon essential oils against Candida yeast strains was related to the high content of monoterpenoids and the type of Candida strains. From six tested commercial oils, only four (ETJA, Vera-Nord, Avicenna-Oil and Aromatic Art) shows antifungal potential against three Candida species (C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata). Vera-Nord and Avicenna-Oil show the best activity and effectively inhibit the growth of the C. albicans strain across the full range of the concentrations used. Our study characterises lemon essential oils, which could be used as very effective natural remedies against candidiasis caused by C. albicans. PMID:24436010

  14. Determination of Isavuconazole Susceptibility of Aspergillus and Candida Species by the EUCAST Method

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Susan J.; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel expanded-spectrum triazole, which has recently been approved by the FDA as an orphan drug to treat invasive aspergillosis and is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials for invasive candidiasis. The susceptibility of relatively few clinical isolates has been reported. In this study, the isavuconazole susceptibilities of 1,237 Aspergillus and 2,010 Candida geographically diverse clinical isolates were determined by EUCAST methodology at four European mycology laboratories, producing the largest multicenter data set thus far for this compound. In addition, a blinded collection of 30 cyp51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus clinical isolates and 10 wild-type isolates was tested. From these two data sets, the following preliminary epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) values were suggested: 2 mg/liter for Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus flavus; 4 mg/liter for Aspergillus niger; 0.25 mg/liter for Aspergillus nidulans; and 0.03 mg/liter for Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis. Unfortunately, ECOFFs could not be determined for Candida glabrata or Candida krusei due to an unexplained interlaboratory MIC variation. For the blinded collection of A. fumigatus isolates, all MICs were ≤2 mg/liter for wild-type isolates. Differential isavuconazole MICs were observed for triazole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates with different cyp51A alterations: TR34/L98H mutants had elevated isavuconazole MICs, whereas isolates with G54 and M220 alterations had MICs in the wild-type range, suggesting that the efficacy of isavuconazole may not be affected by these alterations. This study will be an aid in interpreting isavuconazole MICs for clinical care and an important step in the future process of setting official clinical breakpoints. PMID:23959309

  15. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Candida albicans Complex Isolated from Patients with Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Sharifynia, Somayeh; Badali, Hamid; Sharifi Sorkherizi, Mina; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Hadian, Atefe; Shahrokhi, Shadi; Ghandchi, Ghazale; Rezaie, Sassan

    2016-06-01

    Candidiasis, the main opportunistic fungal infection has been increased over the past decades. This study aimed to characterize C.albicans species complex (C.albicans, C.dubliniensis, and C.africana) isolated from patients with respiratory infections by molecular tools and in vitro antifungal susceptibilities by using broth microdilution method according to CLSI M27-A3 guidelines. Totally, 121 respiratory samples were collected from patients with respiratory infections. Of these, 83 strains were germ tube positive and green colonies on chromogenic media, so initially identified as C.albicans species complex and subsequently were classified as C.albicans (89.15%), C.dubliniensis (9.63%), and C.africana (1.2%) based on PCR-RFLP and amplification of hwp1 gene. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) results showed that all tested isolates of C.albicans complex were highly susceptible to triazole drugs. However, caspofungin had highest activity against C.albicans, C.dubliniensis, and C.africana. Our findings indicated the variety of antifungal resistance of Candida strains in different areas. These results may increase the knowledge about the local distribution of the mentioned strains as well as their antifungal susceptibility pattern which play an important role in appropriate therapy. PMID:27306344

  16. Molecular mechanisms associated with Fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida albicans isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Vidhate, Pallavi; Kusro, Chanchal; Waman, Vaishali; Saxena, Vandana; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Risbud, Arun

    2016-02-01

    Resistance to azole antifungals is a significant problem in Candida albicans. An understanding of resistance at molecular level is essential for the development of strategies to tackle resistance and rationale design of newer antifungals and target-based molecular approaches. This study presents the first evaluation of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical C.albicans isolates from India. Target site (ERG11) alterations were determined by DNA sequencing, whereas real-time PCRs were performed to quantify target and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2, MDR1) in 87 [Fluconazole susceptible (n = 30), susceptible-dose dependent (n = 30) and resistant (n = 27)] C.albicans isolates. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole was observed in 74.1% isolates. Six amino acid substitutions were identified, including 4 (E116D, F145L, E226D, I437V) previously reported ones and 2 (P406L, Q474H) new ones. CDR1 over-expression was seen in 77.7% resistant isolates. CDR2 was exclusively expressed with CDR1 and their concomitant over-expression was associated with azole cross-resistance. MDR1 and ERG11 over-expression did not seem to be associated with resistance. Our results show that drug efflux mediated by Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CDR1 is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance and azole cross-resistance in C. albicans and indicate the need for research directed towards developing strategies to tackle efflux mediated resistance to salvage azoles. PMID:26648048

  17. Candida albicans and C. tropicalis Isolates from the Expired Breathes of Captive Dolphins and Their Environments in an Aquarium

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hideo; Ueda, Keiichi; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Yanagisawa, Makio; Murata, Yoshiteru; Murata, Michiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Murakami, Masaru; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Inomata, Tomo; Miyahara, Hirokazu; Sano, Ayako; Uchida, Senzo

    2010-01-01

    Genotypes of Candida spp. isolated from exhalation of 20 dolphins, 11 water samples from captive pools, and 24 oral cavities of staff members in an aquarium using a combination of multiple drug resistance 1 gene (MDR1) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 5.8s-ITS 2 regions of ribosomal RNA gene (ITS rDNA) sequences were studied. The holding ratios of the dolphins, captive pools, and staff members were 70, 90, and 29%, respectively. Isolated pathogenic yeast species common to the dolphins and environments were Candida albicans and C. tropicalis. Identical genotypes in both Candida spp. based on the combination of MDR1 and ITSrDNA were found in some dolphins, between a dolphin and a staff, among dolphins and environments, and among environments. The results indicated the diffusion and exchange of pathogenic yeasts at the aquarium among dolphins and environments. The isolates at the aquarium showed higher rates of resistance to azole antifungals compared to reference isolates. PMID:21234394

  18. Antifungal Resistance to Fluconazole and Echinocandins Is Not Emerging in Yeast Isolates Causing Fungemia in a Spanish Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Sánchez, Carlos; Muñoz, Patricia; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of fungemia epidemiology requires identification of strains to the molecular level. Various studies have shown that the rate of resistance to fluconazole ranges from 2.5% to 9% in Candida spp. isolated from blood samples. However, trends in antifungal resistance have received little attention and have been studied only using CLSI M27-A3 methodology. We assessed the fungemia epidemiology in a large tertiary care institution in Madrid, Spain, by identifying isolates to the molecular level and performing antifungal susceptibility testing according to the updated breakpoints of European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) definitive document (EDef) 7.2. We studied 613 isolates causing 598 episodes of fungemia in 544 patients admitted to our hospital (January 2007 to December 2013). Strains were identified after amplification and sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and further tested for in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, micafungin, and anidulafungin. Resistance was defined using EUCAST species-specific breakpoints, and epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) were applied as tentative breakpoints. Most episodes were caused by Candida albicans (46%), Candida parapsilosis (28.7%), Candida glabrata (9.8%), and Candida tropicalis (8%). Molecular identification enabled us to better detect cryptic species of Candida guilliermondii and C. parapsilosis complexes and episodes of polyfungal fungemia. The overall percentage of fluconazole-resistant isolates was 5%, although it was higher in C. glabrata (8.6%) and non-Candida yeast isolates (47.4%). The rate of resistance to echinocandins was 4.4% and was mainly due to the presence of intrinsically resistant non-Candida species. Resistance mainly affected non-Candida yeasts. The rate of resistance to fluconazole and echinocandins did not change considerably during the study period. PMID:24867979

  19. Correlation between azole susceptibilities, genotypes, and ERG11 mutations in Candida albicans isolates associated with vulvovaginal candidiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shu-Hua; Wan, Zhe; Li, Juan; Xu, Jianping; Li, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2010-08-01

    The relationship between susceptibilities to fluconazole and itraconazole and microsatellite CAI genotypes were examined from a total of 154 Candida albicans isolates (97 isolates causing vulvovaginitis in Chinese women and 6 vaginal isolates and 51 oral cavity isolates from asymptomatic carriers). The two dominant genotypes, CAI 30-45 (45 isolates) and CAI 32-46 (33 isolates), associated with vulvovaginitis showed significantly different azole susceptibility patterns with strong statistical support. CAI 32-46 isolates were usually less susceptible to both fluconazole and itraconazole than CAI 30-45 isolates and than the oral isolates with other diversified CAI genotypes. Remarkably different mutation patterns in the azole target gene ERG11 were correspondingly observed among C. albicans isolates representing different genotypes and sources. Isolates with the same or similar CAI genotypes usually possessed identical or phylogenetically closely related ERG11 sequences. Loss of heterozygosity in ERG11 was observed in all the CAI 32-46 isolates but not in the CAI 30-45 isolates and most of the oral isolates sequenced. Compared with the ERG11 sequence of strain SC5314 (X13296), two homozygous missense mutations (G487T and T916C) leading to two amino acid changes (A114S and Y257H) in Erg11p were found in CAI 32-46 isolates. The correlation between azole susceptibility and C. albicans genotype may be of potential therapeutic significance. PMID:20516286

  20. Epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that Candida colonization contributes to increasing invasion of candidiasis in hospitalized neonates. Few studies investigated the epidemiology and risk factors of Candida colonization among hospitalized and non-hospitalized infants. This prospective study investigated the major epidemiological characteristics of Candida species colonizing oral and rectal sites of Jordanian infants. Methods Infants aged one year or less who were examined at the pediatrics outpatient clinic or hospitalized at the Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan, were included in this study. Culture swabs were collected from oral and rectal sites and inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. All Candida isolates were confirmed by the Remel RapID yeast plus system, and further investigated for specific virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility MIC using E-test. Genotyping of C. albicans isolates was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis method. Results A total of 61/492 (12.4%) infants were colonized with Candida species by either their oral/rectal sites or both. Rectal colonization was significantly more detected than oral colonization (64.6% verses 35.4%), particularly among hospitalized infants aged more than one month. The pattern and rates of colonization were as follows: C. albicans was the commonest species isolated from both sites and accounted for 67.1% of all isolates, followed by C.kefyr (11.4%), each C. tropicalis and C. glabrata (8.9%) and C. parapsilosis (3.8%). A various rates of Candida isolates proved to secrete putative virulence factors in vitro; asparatyl proteinase, phospholipase and hemolysin. C. albicans were associated significantly (P < 0.05) with these enzymes than other Candida species. All Candida isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B and caspofungin, whereas 97% of Candida species isolates were susceptible to fluconazole using E-test. The genetic similarity of 53 C. albicans isolates as

  1. Evaluation of APR1 Gene Expression in Candida albicans Strains Isolated From Patients With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Amri Saroukolaei, Shahla; Ghabaee, Mojdeh; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Khosravi, Alireza; Badiei, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Intracellular aspartic proteinase A enzyme is expressed by the APR1 gene and is one of the important factors in the development of systemic candidiasis caused by Candida albicans. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of the APR1 gene in C. albicans isolates obtained from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and from controls. Patients and Methods The samples were obtained from 135 MS patients with candidiasis and 100 matched controls of healthy individuals during 2010 - 2011. The clinical and control isolates of C. albicans obtained from individuals were cultured onto sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA). The evaluation of APR1 gene expression was performed using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Results There was a statistically significant difference in APR1 gene expression of C. albicans strains between MS patients (mean ± SD: 0.5208 ± 0.11518) and the control group (mean ± SD: 0.7603 ± 0.11405) (P = 0.000). Significant correlations were found between the APR1 gene expression of C. albicans strains from MS patients with regard to age and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (P = 0.000). The mean values of EDSS were 1.6074 ± 0.1081 after antifungal treatment and 2.2519 ± 0.1323 before antifungal treatment (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was observed between the APR1 gene expression with regard to sex and MS subtypes. Conclusions The results suggested that APR1 gene expression in C. albicans strains isolated from MS patients may be an important factor for invasive C. albicans strains in the progression of MS disease. PMID:27540458

  2. Assessment of antifungal activity of herbal and conventional toothpastes against clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Adwan, Ghaleb; Salameh, Yousef; Adwan, Kamel; Barakat, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the anticandidal activity of nine toothpastes containing sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate and herbal extracts as an active ingredients against 45 oral and non oral Candida albicans (C. albicans) isolates. Methods The antifungal activity of these toothpaste formulations was determined using a standard agar well diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical package, SPSS windows version 15, by applying mean values using one-way ANOVA with post-hoc least square differences (LSD) method. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All toothpastes studied in our experiments were effective in inhibiting the growth of all C. albicans isolates. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from toothpaste that containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients, while the lowest activity was obtained from toothpaste containing sodium monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient. Antifungal activity of Parodontax toothpaste showed a significant difference (P< 0.001) against C. albicans isolates compared to toothpastes containing sodium fluoride or herbal products. Conclusions In the present study, it has been demonstrated that toothpaste containing both herbal extracts and sodium fluoride as active ingredients are more effective in control of C. albicans, while toothpaste that containing monofluorophosphate as an active ingredient is less effective against C. albicans. Some herbal toothpaste formulations studied in our experiments, appear to be equally effective as the fluoride dental formulations and it can be used as an alternative to conventional formulations for individuals who have an interest in naturally-based products. Our results may provide invaluable information for dental professionals. PMID:23569933

  3. Candida and candidaemia. Susceptibility and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-11-01

    significantly higher mortality than C. parapsilosis and that C. glabrata and C. krusei mainly emerged in the post fluconazole era and in settings with azole selection pressure. Moreover, it was less surprising that infections due to mutant C. albicans isolates with echinocandin MICs of 1-2 mg/l were not good targets for the echinocandins despite the fact that the outcome for infections involving wild type C. parapsilosis for which similar echinocandin MICs were similar was not inferior. This last observation highlights the importance of providing optimal, reproducible and sensitive reference susceptibility testing methods and notably accompanied by appropriate breakpoints that allow a separation and detection of susceptible and resistant isolates against which the commercial tests can be validated. Correct detection of resistant isolates is for obvious reasons crucial in order to avoid inappropriate treatment. And if the test method cannot correctly identify resistant isolates it makes little sense performing susceptibility testing at all. On the other hand misclassification of susceptible isolates as resistant is also an issue as the patient is thereby deprived an appropriate treatment option among the few available. These comments may seem very basic; nevertheless, it has taken a lot of effort and patience to optimise the susceptibility tests, understand the variability issue for caspofungin testing, to provide appropriate breakpoints that reduced misclassifications to a minimum and not the least to facilitate a harmonisation of breakpoints across the Atlantic sea. We initially realised that the CLSI method and echinocandin breakpoint misclassified resistant isolates. This was due to the endorsement of a single susceptibility breakpoint across all Candida species and the three echinocandins and therefore set as high as 2 mg/l in order to include and not bisect the C. parapsilosis population. Through our comprehensive comparisons of echinocandin susceptibility testing using

  4. Antifungal activity of cathelicidin peptides against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida species isolated from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Scarsini, Michele; Tomasinsig, Linda; Arzese, Alessandra; D'Este, Francesca; Oro, Debora; Skerlavaj, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a frequent gynecological condition caused by Candida albicans and a few non-albicans Candida spp. It has a significant impact on the quality of life of the affected women also due to a considerable incidence of recurrent infections that are difficult to treat. The formation of fungal biofilm may contribute to the problematic management of recurrent VVC due to the intrinsic resistance of sessile cells to the currently available antifungals. Thus, alternative approaches for the prevention and control of biofilm-related infections are urgently needed. In this regard, the cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immunity are potential candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials as many of them display activity against biofilm formed by various microbial species. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities of the cathelicidin peptides LL-37 and BMAP-28 against pathogenic Candida spp. also including C. albicans, isolated from vaginal infections, and against C. albicans SC5314 as a reference strain. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against planktonic and biofilm-grown Candida cells by using microdilution susceptibility and XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assays and, in the case of established biofilms, also by CFU enumeration and fluorescence microscopy. BMAP-28 was effective against planktonically grown yeasts in standard medium (MIC range, 2-32μM), and against isolates of C. albicans and Candida krusei in synthetic vaginal simulated fluid (MIC range 8-32μM, depending on the pH of the medium). Established 48-h old biofilms formed by C. albicans SC5314 and C. albicans and C. krusei isolates were 70-90% inhibited within 24h incubation with 16μM BMAP-28. As shown by propidium dye uptake and CFU enumeration, BMAP-28 at 32μM killed sessile C. albicans SC5314 by membrane permeabilization with a faster killing kinetics

  5. Candida queiroziae sp. nov., a cellobiose-fermenting yeast species isolated from rotting wood in Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata O; Cadete, Raquel M; Badotti, Fernanda; Mouro, Adriane; Wallheim, Daniela O; Gomes, Fátima C O; Stambuk, Boris U; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2011-03-01

    Eight strains of a novel yeast species were isolated from rotting wood and wood-boring insects in Atlantic Rain Forest ecosystems in Brazil. Sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the yeast belongs to the Scheffersomyces clade and that it is related to Candida lignicola and Candida coipomoensis. The new species was isolated from rotting wood of three different localities and a wood-boring insect suggesting that these substrates are its ecological niche. This new yeast species is able to assimilate cellobiose and other compounds related to rotting wood. Strong fermentation of cellobiose in Durham tubes was observed for the strains of this new yeast. The new species produced an intracellular β-glucosidase responsible for cellobiose hydrolysis. The novel species, Candida queiroziae sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain of C. queiroziae is UFMG-CLM 5.1(T) (=CBS 11853(T) = NRRL Y-48722(T)). PMID:21136162

  6. Antifungal drug resistance pattern of Candida. spp isolated from vaginitis in Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Jasem; Havasian, Mohamad Reza; Panahi, Jafar; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal Candidiasis is the most common and important opportunistic fungal infection in women. By increasing use of antifungal drugs in recent years, it has caused drug resistance. This study aims to evaluate antifungal drugs susceptibility of Candida. spp isolated of women with vaginitis from Ilam-Iran during 2013-2014. samples were collected and cultured from 385 women with vaginitis, then Candida.spp was diagnosed by standard method. Antifungal drug susceptibility test for nystatin 100 unit/disk, fluconazole 10µg/disk, itraconazole 10µg/disk, ketoconazole 10µg/disk, amphotericinB 20µg/disk, clotrimazole 10µg/disk, posaconazole 5µg/disk, and voriconazole 1µg/disk were carried out by M44-A method(CLSI). From all culture positive samples, 150 isolates were Candida albicans and 89 isolates were non-albicans. The resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, nystatin and amphotericin B was 76%, 62%, 72%, 55%, 6%, 7%, 1% and 0%. The highest resistance was seen for fluconazole , itraconazole, and the highest susceptible was seen for nystatin and amphotericin B. These results indicate nystatin and amphotericin B can be used as the first line for empirical therapy of vaginal candidiasis in the district. PMID:26124561

  7. Rapid detection of Candida species in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with pulmonary symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Kaboli, Saeed; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Candida species, especially C. albicans, are commensals on human mucosal surfaces, but are increasingly becoming one of the important invasive pathogens as seen by a rise in its prevalence in immunocompromised patients and in antibiotic consumption. Thus, an accurate identification of Candida species in patients with pulmonary symptoms can provide important information for effective treatment. A total of 75 clinical isolates of Candida species were obtained from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with pulmonary symptoms. Candida cultures were identified based on nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-ITS2 rDNA) sequence analysis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). Molecular identification indicated that the isolates belonged predominantly to C. albicans (52%), followed by C. tropicalis (24%), C. glabrata (14.7%), C. krusei (5.3%), C. parapsilosis (1.3%), C. kefyr (1.3%) and C. guilliermondii (1.3%). Given the increasing complexity of disease profiles and their management regimens in diverse patients, rapid and accurate identification of Candida species can lead to timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. PMID:26887241

  8. Rapid detection of Candida species in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with pulmonary symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Kaboli, Saeed; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Candida species, especially C. albicans, are commensals on human mucosal surfaces, but are increasingly becoming one of the important invasive pathogens as seen by a rise in its prevalence in immunocompromised patients and in antibiotic consumption. Thus, an accurate identification of Candida species in patients with pulmonary symptoms can provide important information for effective treatment. A total of 75 clinical isolates of Candida species were obtained from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with pulmonary symptoms. Candida cultures were identified based on nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-ITS2 rDNA) sequence analysis by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). Molecular identification indicated that the isolates belonged predominantly to C. albicans (52%), followed by C. tropicalis (24%), C. glabrata (14.7%), C. krusei (5.3%), C. parapsilosis (1.3%), C. kefyr (1.3%) and C. guilliermondii (1.3%). Given the increasing complexity of disease profiles and their management regimens in diverse patients, rapid and accurate identification of Candida species can lead to timely and appropriate antifungal therapy. PMID:26887241

  9. Candidaemia with uncommon Candida species: predisposing factors, outcome, antifungal susceptibility, and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C A; Marriott, D; Playford, E G; Nguyen, Q; Ellis, D; Meyer, W; Sorrell, T C; Slavin, M

    2009-07-01

    The risk factors for and clinical features of bloodstream infection with uncommon Candida spp. (species other than C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicals and C. krusei) are incompletely defined. To identify clinical variables associated with these species that might guide management, 57 cases of candidaemia resulting from uncommon Candida spp. were analysed in comparison with 517 episodes of Candida albicans candidaemia (2001-2004). Infection with uncommon Candida spp. (5.3% of candidaemia cases), as compared with C. albicans candidaemia, was significantly more likely to be outpatient-acquired than inpatient-acquired (15 of 57 vs. 65 of 517 episodes, p 0.01). Prior exposure to fluconazole was uncommon (n=1). Candida dubliniensis was the commonest species (n=22, 39%), followed by Candida guilliermondii (n=11, 19%) and Candida lusitaniae (n=7, 12%).C. dubliniensis candidaemia was independently associated with recent intravenous drug use (p 0.01) and chronic liver disease (p 0.03), and infection with species other than C. dubliniensis was independently associated with age<65 years (p 0.02), male sex (p 0.03) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (p 0.05). Presence of sepsis at diagnosis and crude 30-day mortality rates were similar for C. dubliniensis-related, non-C. dubliniensis-related and C. albicans-related candidaemia. Haematological malignancy was the commonest predisposing factor in C. guilliermondii (n=3, 27%) and C. lusitaniae (n=3, 43%) candidaemia. The 30-day mortality rate of C. lusitaniae candidaemia was higher than the overall death rate for all uncommon Candida spp. (42.9% vs. 25%, p not significant). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin; five strains (9%) had fluconazole MIC values of 16-32 mg/L. Candidaemia due to uncommon Candida spp. is emerging among hospital outpatients; certain clinical variables may assist in recognition of this entity. PMID:19614718

  10. Echinocandin and Triazole Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles for Clinical Opportunistic Yeast and Mold Isolates Collected from 2010 to 2011: Application of New CLSI Clinical Breakpoints and Epidemiological Cutoff Values for Characterization of Geographic and Temporal Trends of Antifungal Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Shawn A.; Woosley, Leah N.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program monitors global susceptibility and resistance rates of newer and established antifungal agents. We report the echinocandin and triazole antifungal susceptibility patterns for 3,418 contemporary clinical isolates of yeasts and molds. The isolates were obtained from 98 laboratories in 34 countries during 2010 and 2011. Yeasts not presumptively identified by CHROMagar, the trehalose test, or growth at 42°C and all molds were sequence identified using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (yeasts) or ITS, translation elongation factor (TEF), and 28S (molds) genes. Susceptibility testing was performed against 7 antifungals (anidulafungin, caspofungin, micafungin, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole) using CLSI methods. Rates of resistance to all agents were determined using the new CLSI clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff value criteria, as appropriate. Sequencing of fks hot spots was performed for echinocandin non-wild-type (WT) strains. Isolates included 3,107 from 21 Candida spp., 146 from 9 Aspergillus spp., 84 from Cryptococcus neoformans, 40 from 23 other mold species, and 41 from 9 other yeast species. Among Candida spp., resistance to the echinocandins was low (0.0 to 1.7%). Candida albicans and Candida glabrata that were resistant to anidulafungin, caspofungin, or micafungin were shown to have fks mutations. Resistance to fluconazole was low among the isolates of C. albicans (0.4%), Candida tropicalis (1.3%), and Candida parapsilosis (2.1%); however, 8.8% of C. glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole. Among echinocandin-resistant C. glabrata isolates from 2011, 38% were fluconazole resistant. Voriconazole was active against all Candida spp. except C. glabrata (10.5% non-WT), whereas posaconazole showed decreased activity against C. albicans (4.4%) and Candida krusei (15.2% non-WT). All agents except for the echinocandins were active against C. neoformans, and the

  11. Erg11 mutations associated with azole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ming-Jie; Liu, Jin-Yan; Ni, Pei-Hua; Wang, Shengzheng; Shi, Ce; Wei, Bing; Ni, Yu-Xing; Ge, Hai-Liang

    2013-06-01

    The widespread use of azoles has led to increasing azole resistance among Candida albicans strains. One mechanism of azole resistance involves point mutations in the ERG11 gene, which encodes the target enzyme (cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase). In the present study, we amplified and sequenced the ERG11 gene of 23 C. albicans clinical isolates. Seventeen mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions were found, of which seven (K143Q, Y205E, A255V, E260V, N435V, G472R, and D502E) were novel. We further verified the contribution of the amino acid substitutions to azole resistance using site-directed mutagenesis of the ERG11 gene to recreate these mutations for heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We observed that substitutions A114S, Y132H, Y132F, K143R, Y257H, and a new K143Q substitution contributed to significant increases (≧fourfold) in fluconazole and voriconazole resistance; changes in itraconazole resistance were not significant (≦twofold). PMID:23480635

  12. DNA fingerprinting of Candida rugosa via repetitive sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Redkar, R J; Dubé, M P; McCleskey, F K; Rinaldi, M G; Del Vecchio, V G

    1996-01-01

    A repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) technique was developed to characterize the genotypic relatedness among Candida rugosa isolates. Two repetitive sequences, viz., Care-2 and Com29 from Candida albicans, were used to design primers Ca-21, Ca-22, and Com-21, respectively. When used alone or in combination, these primers generated discriminatory fingerprints by amplifying the adjacent variable regions of the genome. Twenty-three isolates from burn patients, eight from other human sources, and four C. rugosa isolates pathogenic in animals were placed into nine fingerprinting groups. Different primers placed these isolates into identical groups, indicating that rep-PCR is a specific and reproducible technique for molecular characterization of C. rugosa. Moreover, these primers unequivocally discriminated among other important Candida species such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. kefyr, and C. lusitaniae. These data confirm the conservation of repetitive sequences in Candida species. Because of its ease and sensitivity, rep-PCR offers a relatively rapid and discriminatory method for molecular typing of C. rugosa in outbreaks. PMID:8784568

  13. ALS1 and ALS3 gene expression and biofilm formation in Candida albicans isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Roudbarmohammadi, Shahla; Roudbary, Maryam; Bakhshi, Bita; Katiraee, Farzad; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Falahati, Mehraban

    2016-01-01

    Background: A cluster of genes are involved in the pathogenesis and adhesion of Candida albicans to mucosa and epithelial cells in the vagina, the important of which is agglutinin-like sequence (ALS) genes. As well as vaginitis is a significant health problem among women, the antifungal resistance of Candida species is continually increasing. This cross-sectional study investigates the expression of ALS1 and ALS3 genes and biofilm formation in C. albicans isolate isolated from vaginitis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three recognized isolates of C. albicans were collected from women with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis in Iran, cultured on sabouraud dextrose agar, and then examined for gene expression. Total messenger RNA (mRNA) extracted from C. albicans isolates and complementary DNA synthesized using reverse transcriptase enzyme. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primer was used to evaluate the expression of ALS1 and ALS3 through housekeeping (ACT1) genes. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was performed to assess adherence capacity and biofilm formation in the isolated. Results: Forty isolates (75.8%) expressed ALS1 and 41 isolates (77.7%) expressed ALS3 gene. Moreover, 39 isolates (74%) were positive for both ALS1 and ALS3 mRNA by the RT-PCR. Adherence capability in isolates with ALS1 or ALS3 genes expression was greater than the control group (with any gene expression), besides, it was significantly for the most in the isolates that expressed both ALS1 and ALS3 genes simultaneously. Conclusion: The results attained indicated that there is an association between the expression of ALS1 and ALS3 genes and fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. A considerable percent of the isolates expressing the ALS1 and ALS3 genes may have contributed to their adherence to vagina and biofilm formation. PMID:27376044

  14. Multicenter Comparison of the Etest and EUCAST Methods for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates to Micafungin.

    PubMed

    Bougnoux, M-E; Dannaoui, E; Accoceberry, I; Angoulvant, A; Bailly, E; Botterel, F; Chevrier, S; Chouaki, T; Cornet, M; Dalle, F; Datry, A; Dupuis, A; Fekkar, A; Gangneux, J P; Guitard, J; Hennequin, C; Le Govic, Y; Le Pape, P; Maubon, D; Ranque, S; Sautour, M; Sendid, B; Chandenier, J

    2016-08-01

    In vitro susceptibility of 933 Candida isolates, from 16 French hospitals, to micafungin was determined using the Etest in each center. All isolates were then sent to a single center for determination of MICs by the EUCAST reference method. Overall essential agreement between the two tests was 98.5% at ±2 log2 dilutions and 90.2% at ±1 log2 dilutions. Categorical agreement was 98.2%. The Etest is a valuable alternative to EUCAST for the routine determination of micafungin MICs in medical mycology laboratories. PMID:27297480

  15. Frequent detection of ‘azole’ resistant Candida species among late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chronic use of antifungal agents in the treatment of fungal infection in general and oropharyngeal candidiasis mainly in AIDS patient’s leads to the selection of strain resistant to these therapies and a shift in the spectrum of Candida species. This study determines the species diversity and in vitro susceptibility of Candida isolates from late presenting AIDS patients in northwest Ethiopia. Methods Two hundred and twenty one HIV/AIDS patients were assessed with a standardized evaluation form at enrolment. Oral rinses were cultured on CHROMagar plates at 37°C for 48 hours and Candida species identification were made following standard microbiological techniques. In vitro drug susceptibility tests were made using broth microdilution method. Results The colonization rate of Candida species was found to be 82.3% (177/215). C. albicans was the predominant species isolated from 139 (81%) patients but there was a diversity of other species. C. glabrata was the most frequent non-albicans species isolated in 22.5% (40/177) of the patients followed by C. tropicalis 14.1% (27/177), C. krusei 5.6% (10) and other unidentifiable Candida species 4% (7/177). Recurrent episodes of oropharyngeal candidiasis and previous exposure to antifungal drugs were found to be predisposing factors for colonization by non-albicans species. Irrespective of the Candida species identified 12.2% (11/90), 7.7% (7/90) and 4.7% (4) of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole, respectively. In contrast, resistance to micafungin, amphotericin B and 5-Fluorocytosine was infrequent. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients are orally colonized by single or multiple albicans and non- albicans Candida species that are frequently resistant to azoles and occasionally to amphotericin B, 5-Fluorocytosine and micafungin. These highlight the need for national surveillance for examining Candida epidemiology and resistance to antifungal drugs. PMID:23398783

  16. Evaluation of virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility patterns of different Candida species isolated from the female camel (Camelus dromedarius) genital tract.

    PubMed

    Sharifzadeh, Aghil; Soltani, Minoo; Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2015-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the enzymatic activity of different Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility patterns. The study involved a total of 83 isolates of Candida from the genital tract of the female Camelus dromedarius. After species identification, the isolates were analysed for the production/activity of phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. In addition, the agar disc diffusion method was performed on the basis of CLSI guidelines M44-A2 protocol for antifungal susceptibility testing. All the isolates were able to produce phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin. A total of 35.48%, 87.09% and 64.51% of C. albicans isolates exhibited very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities, respectively, whereas very high phospholipase, proteinase and haemolytic activities were determined in 5.76%, 23.07% and 45.16% of non-C. albicans isolates respectively. Overall, 61 (73.5%) of Candida isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, 70 (84.3%) susceptible to clotrimazole, 82 (98.8%) susceptible to voriconazole, 76 (91.6%) susceptible to itraconazole, 75 (90.4%) susceptible to ketoconazole, 83 (100%) susceptible to amphotericin B, 81 (97.6%) susceptible to nystatin and 36 (43.4%) susceptible to flucytosine. Candida isolates showed higher haemolytic activity than that of other secreted hydrolases among vaginal Candida species. In addition, amphotericin B was the most in vitro effective antifungal drug and flucytosine had the poorest activity under such conditions. PMID:26152466

  17. The prevalence of Candida onychomycosis in Southeastern Serbia from 2011 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Otašević, Suzana; Barac, Aleksandra; Pekmezovic, Marina; Tasic, Sinisa; Ignjatović, Aleksandra; Momčilović, Stefan; Stojanović, Predrag; Arsic Arsenijevic, Valentina; Hay, Roderick

    2016-03-01

    Despite the increasing of onychomycosis caused by Candida spp., in referent literature, there is still data insufficiency about this nail infection. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine epidemiological characteristics of Candida onychomycosis, the antifungal susceptibility of isolated species in vitro, and to compare the results of antifungal susceptibility testing with conducted treatment in period from 2011 to the end of March 2015. Out of 761 patients who were underwent clinical and mycological examinations, 137 had Candida species isolated from nails. The dominant species was Candida albicans (C. albicans) (36.59%) followed by C. parapsilosis (23.78%), C. krusei (9.76%), and C. guilliermondii (6.71%). Antifungal susceptibility in vitro testing showed good susceptibility to antimycotics, except C. krusei, which was resistance to fluconazole (FCZ) and isolates of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata which were dose dependent to itraconazole (ITZ) and fluconazole. Evaluation of medical histories determined that combined therapy, which included pulsed systemic regimen of ITZ with topical application of clotrimazole, had better clinical outcomes regarding the proscribed only topical application of clotrimazole. Multidisciplinary approach of dermatologists and mycologists is required in solving the problem of onychomycosis, which is the dominant nail disease. PMID:26710983

  18. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Pozzatti, Patrícia; Scheid, Liliane Alves; Spader, Tatiana Borba; Atayde, Margareth Linde; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of selected essential oils obtained from plants used as spices was evaluated against both fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. The Candida species studied were Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei. For comparison purposes, they were arranged in groups as C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans. The essential oils were obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Breyn, Lippia graveolens HBK, Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum vulgare L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Thymus vulgaris L., and Zingiber officinale. The susceptibility tests were based on the M27-A2 methodology. The chemical composition of the essential oils was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and by retention indices. The results showed that cinnamon, Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils have different levels of antifungal activity. Oregano and ginger essential oils were found to be the most and the least efficient, respectively. The main finding was that the susceptibilities of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and Candida non-albicans to Mexican oregano, oregano, thyme, and ginger essential oils were higher than those of the fluconazole-susceptible yeasts (P<0.05). In contrast, fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and Candida non-albicans were less susceptible to cinnamon essential oil than their fluconazole-susceptible counterparts (P<0.05). A relationship between the yeasts' susceptibilities and the chemical composition of the essential oils studied was apparent when these 2 parameters were compared. Finally, basil, rosemary, and sage essential oils did not show antifungal activity against Candida isolates at the tested concentrations. PMID:18997851

  19. Phytochemical Analysis and Modulation of Antibiotic Activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in Multiresistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Calixto Júnior, João T.; Morais, Selene M.; Martins, Clécio G.; Vieira, Larissa G.; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B.; Carneiro, Joara N. P.; Machado, Antonio J. P.; Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Tintino, Saulo R.; Coutinho, Henrique D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  20. Phytochemical analysis and modulation of antibiotic activity by Luehea paniculata Mart. & Zucc. (Malvaceae) in multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Calixto Júnior, João T; Morais, Selene M; Martins, Clécio G; Vieira, Larissa G; Morais-Braga, Maria Flaviana B; Carneiro, Joara N P; Machado, Antonio J P; Menezes, Irwin R A; Tintino, Saulo R; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of fungal infections has led to the continuous search for new drugs. Extracts of Luehea paniculata, a tree of multiple medicinal uses, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity, as well as its modulator potential of the Fluconazole antibiotic. Chemical prospecting of ethanol extracts of leaf and bark was carried out, the quantification of total phenols and flavonoids, characterized by the HPLC-DAD technique. The rosmarinic acid and the vitexin flavonoid were observed as major constituents in ELELP and ESWELP, respectively. Antioxidant activity was also evaluated by the method of scavenging the free radical DPPH, and quercetin was used as standard, obtaining IC50 values: 0.341 (mg/mL) for ELELP and 0.235 (mg/mL) for ESWELP. The microdilution assay was performed for antifungal activity against strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis and showed minimum inhibitory concentrations values ≥1024 μg/mL. In the modulator action of extracts on Fluconazole against multiresistant clinical isolates of Candida (subinhibitory concentration minimum of 128 μg/mL), a significant synergism was observed, indicating that the extracts potentiated the antifungal effect against C. tropicalis, where antioxidant flavonoids could be responsible. This is the first report about modifying activity of the antibiotic action of a species of the genus Luehea. PMID:25821822

  1. Molecular Identification and Echinocandin Susceptibility of Candida parapsilosis Complex Bloodstream Isolates in Italy, 2007–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lovero, Grazia; Borghi, Elisa; Balbino, Stella; Cirasola, Daniela; De Giglio, Osvalda; Perdoni, Federica; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Morace, Giulia; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Candida parapsilosis group encompasses three species: C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. Here, we describe the incidence and echinocandin susceptibility profile of bloodstream isolates of these three species collected from patients admitted to an Italian university hospital from 2007 to 2014. Molecular identification of cryptic species of the C. parapsilosis complex was performed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the gene encoding secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme BanI. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the broth microdilution method according to European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST EDef 7.2) and Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI M27-A3) guidelines, and the results were compared with those obtained using the E-test and Sensititre methods. Of the 163 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 136 (83.4%) were identified as C. parapsilosis, and 27 (16.6%) as C. orthopsilosis. The species-specific incidences were 2.9/10,000 admissions for C. parapsilosis and 0.6/10,000 admissions for C. orthopsilosis. No resistance to echinocandins was detected with any of the methods. The percent essential agreement (EA) between the EUCAST and E-test/Sensititre methods for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin susceptibility was, respectively, as follows: C. parapsilosis, 95.6/97.8, 98.5/88.2, and 93.4/96.3; C. orthopsilosis, 92.6/92.6, 96.3/77.8, and 63.0/66.7. The EA between the CLSI and E-test/Sensititre methods was, respectively, as follows: C. parapsilosis, 99.3/100, 98.5/89.0, and 96.3/98.5; C. orthopsilosis, 96.3/92.6, 100/81.5, and 92.6/88.9. Only minor discrepancies, ranging from 16.9% (C. parapsilosis) to 11.1% (C. orthopsilosis), were observed between the CLSI and E-test/Sensititre methods. In conclusion, this epidemiologic study shows a typical C. parapsilosis complex species distribution, no echinocandin resistance, and it

  2. Genotypic evolution of azole resistance mechanisms in sequential Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Coste, Alix; Selmecki, Anna; Forche, Anja; Diogo, Dorothée; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Berman, Judith; Sanglard, Dominique

    2007-10-01

    TAC1 (for transcriptional activator of CDR genes) is critical for the upregulation of the ABC transporters CDR1 and CDR2, which mediate azole resistance in Candida albicans. While a wild-type TAC1 allele drives high expression of CDR1/2 in response to inducers, we showed previously that TAC1 can be hyperactive by a gain-of-function (GOF) point mutation responsible for constitutive high expression of CDR1/2. High azole resistance levels are achieved when C. albicans carries hyperactive alleles only as a consequence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TAC1 locus on chromosome 5 (Chr 5), which is linked to the mating-type-like (MTL) locus. Both are located on the Chr 5 left arm along with ERG11 (target of azoles). In this work, five groups of related isolates containing azole-susceptible and -resistant strains were analyzed for the TAC1 and ERG11 alleles and for Chr 5 alterations. While recovered ERG11 alleles contained known mutations, 17 new TAC1 alleles were isolated, including 7 hyperactive alleles with five separate new GOF mutations. Single-nucleotide-polymorphism analysis of Chr 5 revealed that azole-resistant strains acquired TAC1 hyperactive alleles and, in most cases, ERG11 mutant alleles by LOH events not systematically including the MTL locus. TAC1 LOH resulted from mitotic recombination of the left arm of Chr 5, gene conversion within the TAC1 locus, or the loss and reduplication of the entire Chr 5. In one case, two independent TAC1 hyperactive alleles were acquired. Comparative genome hybridization and karyotype analysis revealed the presence of isochromosome 5L [i(5L)] in two azole-resistant strains. i(5L) leads to increased copy numbers of azole resistance genes present on the left arm of Chr 5, among them TAC1 and ERG11. Our work shows that azole resistance was due not only to the presence of specific mutations in azole resistance genes (at least ERG11 and TAC1) but also to their increase in copy number by LOH and to the addition of extra Chr 5

  3. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Bloodstream Isolates of Candida Species from Nine Hospitals in Korea: Application of New Antifungal Breakpoints and Relationship to Antifungal Usage

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Lee, Wee Gyo; Park, Yeon-Joon; Uh, Young; Kim, Shine-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    We applied the new clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to a multicenter study to determine the antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of Candida species in Korea, and determined the relationship between the frequency of antifungal-resistant Candida BSI isolates and antifungal use at hospitals. Four hundred and fifty BSI isolates of Candida species were collected over a 1-year period in 2011 from nine hospitals. The susceptibilities of the isolates to four antifungal agents were determined using the CLSI M27 broth microdilution method. By applying the species-specific CBPs, non-susceptibility to fluconazole was found in 16.4% (70/428) of isolates, comprising 2.6% resistant and 13.8% susceptible-dose dependent isolates. However, non-susceptibility to voriconazole, caspofungin, or micafungin was found in 0% (0/370), 0% (0/437), or 0.5% (2/437) of the Candida BSI isolates, respectively. Of the 450 isolates, 72 (16.0%) showed decreased susceptibility to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥4 μg/ml]. The total usage of systemic antifungals varied considerably among the hospitals, ranging from 190.0 to 7.7 defined daily dose per 1,000 patient days, and fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed agent (46.3%). By Spearman’s correlation analysis, fluconazole usage did not show a significant correlation with the percentage of fluconazole resistant isolates at hospitals. However, fluconazole usage was significantly correlated with the percentage of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (r = 0.733; P = 0.025) or the percentage of isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ≥4 μg/ml) (r = 0.700; P = 0.036) at hospitals. Our work represents the first South Korean multicenter study demonstrating an association between antifungal use and antifungal resistance among BSI isolates of Candida at hospitals using the new CBPs of the CLSI. PMID:25706866

  4. Analysis of clinical and environmental Candida parapsilosis isolates by microsatellite genotyping--a tool for hospital infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Sampaio, P; Rosado, L; Videira, Z; Grenouillet, F; Pais, C

    2015-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, causing candidaemia worldwide. Nosocomial outbreaks triggered by this species have been frequently described, particularly in cancer patients. For a better understanding of its epidemiology, several typing methods are used and microsatellite analysis has been reported as highly discriminant. The main objective of this work was to study C. parapsilosis isolates by application of microsatellite genotyping to distinguish epidemiologically related strains, compare clinical and environmental isolates and determine possible routes of dispersion of the isolates in the hospital setting. A total of 129 C. parapsilosis isolates from different origins, including hospital environment and hands of healthcare workers, were genotyped using four microsatellite markers. The isolates were recovered from different health institutions. Analysis of C. parapsilosis isolates from hospital environment showed great genotypic diversity; however, the same or very similar genotypes were also found. The same multilocus genotype was shared by isolates recovered from the hand of a healthcare worker, from the hospital environment and from patients of the same healthcare institution, suggesting that these could be possible routes of transmission and that infections due to C. parapsilosis may be mainly related with exogenous transmission to the patient. Examination of sequential isolates from the same patients showed that colonizing and bloodstream isolates had the same multilocus genotype in the majority of cases. We demonstrate that this typing method is able to distinguish clonal clusters from genetically unrelated genotypes and can be a valuable tool to support epidemiologic investigations in the hospital setting. PMID:26070962

  5. Carbohydrate assimilation profiles of the first Italian Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates recovered from an HIV-infected individual.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, G M; Pignato, S; Salvo, S; Giammanco, G

    2000-12-01

    A total of six Candida dubliniensis isolates were obtained during 1 year of monitoring by monthly swabs from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual in Catania, Italy. To the authors' knowledge, this constitutes the first recovery of C. dubliniensis from a human in Italy. Our identification procedure was based on colony color on CHROMagar Candida and carbohydrate assimilation profiles obtained by two commercial systems: API ID 32C and API 20C AUX. Karyotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed the phenotypic identification. The biocodes obtained with API 20C AUX and with API ID 32C were 6172134 and 7142140015, respectively, for all six isolates. Both biocodes corresponded to those described in the literature as being produced by most C. dubliniensis isolates with each of the two identification systems. Our results confirm that both API 20C AUX and API ID 32C are able to rapidly and accurately differentiate C. dubliniensis from C. albicans. PMID:11191815

  6. Trends in antifungal susceptibility and virulence of Candida spp. from the nasolacrimal duct of horses.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Bittencourt, Paula Vago; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pinheiro, Mariana; Nogueira-Filho, Evilázio Fernandes; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2016-02-01

    This was a cross-sectional study to investigate the antifungal susceptibility and production of virulence factors in strains of Candida isolated from the outlet and the lumen of the nasolacrimal duct of horses in the state of Ceará, Brazil. The samples were obtained from 103 horses. Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect the material from the outlet of the nasolacrimal duct and urethral probes, for the instillation of 2 ml of saline solution, were used to collect samples from the lumen of the nasolacrimal duct. A total of 77 Candida isolates were obtained, with C. famata, C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis sensu lato as the most prevalent species. One isolate (C. glabrata) was resistant to caspofungin. One isolate was resistant only to fluconazole (C. parapsilosis sensu lato), 11 were resistant only to itraconazole (7 C. tropicalis, 2 C. guilliermondii, 1 C. famata, 1 C. parapsilosis sensu lato), while eight C. tropicalis showed resistance to both azoles. Overall, 28 isolates produced phospholipases and 12 produced proteases. These results highlight the importance of investigating the antifungal susceptibility and virulence trends of Candida spp. from the microbiota of the nasolacrimal duct of horses. PMID:26483435

  7. Biofilm formation is a risk factor for mortality in patients with Candida albicans bloodstream infection-Scotland, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, R; Sherry, L; Nile, C J; Sherriff, A; Johnson, E M; Hanson, M F; Williams, C; Munro, C A; Jones, B J; Ramage, G

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infections caused by Candida species remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Biofilm formation by Candida species is an important virulence factor for disease pathogenesis. A prospective analysis of patients with Candida bloodstream infection (n = 217) in Scotland (2012-2013) was performed to assess the risk factors associated with patient mortality, in particular the impact of biofilm formation. Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 280) and clinical records for 157 patients were collected through 11 different health boards across Scotland. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates was assessed in vitro with standard biomass assays. The role of biofilm phenotype on treatment efficacy was also evaluated in vitro by treating preformed biofilms with fixed concentrations of different classes of antifungal. Available mortality data for 134 patients showed that the 30-day candidaemia case mortality rate was 41%, with predisposing factors including patient age and catheter removal. Multivariate Cox regression survival analysis for 42 patients showed a significantly higher mortality rate for Candida albicans infection than for Candida glabrata infection. Biofilm-forming ability was significantly associated with C. albicans mortality (34 patients). Finally, in vitro antifungal sensitivity testing showed that low biofilm formers and high biofilm formers were differentially affected by azoles and echinocandins, but not by polyenes. This study provides further evidence that the biofilm phenotype represents a significant clinical entity, and that isolates with this phenotype differentially respond to antifungal therapy in vitro. Collectively, these findings show that greater clinical understanding is required with respect to Candida biofilm infections, and the implications of isolate heterogeneity. PMID:26432192

  8. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  9. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  10. In vitro fluconazole susceptibility of 1,903 clinical isolates of Candida albicans and the identification of ERG11 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ying; Zhao, Yingjie; Hu, Xuefei; Cai, Zhenyu; Liu, Xin; Jin, Guilin; Zhang, Jieyu; Zhang, Jingyi; Liu, Jinhui; Huang, Xiaotian

    2013-08-01

    Abstract Fluconazole resistance of Candida albicans has been reported to be the result of one or more specific point mutations in ERG11 gene. In this study, we amplified and sequenced the entire ERG11 coding sequence of 72 isolates of C. albicans to search for possible mutations. Twenty-seven silent mutations and 14 missense mutations were identified. While the mutations K342R and V437I were found as single-amino-acid changes in Erg11p, other mutations were detected simultaneously in individual isolates. Several different clinical isolates had the same pattern of multiple amino acid alternations: (1) A114S with Y257H was identified in 11 resistant and 3 susceptible dose-dependent isolates without any other silent mutation and may be associated with resistance; (2) Y132H combined with G450E was identified in two fluconazole-resistant isolates and is known to contribute to resistance; and (3) the coexistence of D116E, K128T, Y132H, and G465S was first described in five reduced-susceptibility isolates, but the correlation of this pattern with resistance is still uncertain. These data indicate that multiple amino acid substitutions in Erg11p were found frequently in clinical isolates and may be associated with fluconazole resistance. PMID:23484590

  11. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra . E-mail: rp47@hotmail.com

    2005-06-24

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance.

  12. Rapid Development of Candida krusei Echinocandin Resistance during Caspofungin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Forastiero, A.; Garcia-Gil, V.; Rivero-Menendez, O.; Garcia-Rubio, R.; Monteiro, M. C.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Jordan, R.; Agorio, I.

    2015-01-01

    In invasive candidiasis, there has been an epidemiological shift from Candida albicans to non-albicans species infections, including infections with C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. Although the prevalence of C. krusei remains low among yeast infections, its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole raises epidemiological and therapeutic concerns. Echinocandins have in vitro activity against most Candida spp. and are the first-line agents in the treatment of candidemia. Although resistance to echinocandin drugs is still rare, individual cases of C. krusei resistance have been reported in recent years, especially with strains that have been under selective pressure. A total of 15 C. krusei strains, isolated from the blood, urine, and soft tissue of an acute lymphocytic leukemia patient, were analyzed. Strains developed echinocandin resistance during 10 days of caspofungin therapy. The molecular epidemiology of the isolates was investigated using two different typing methods: PCR-based amplification of the species-specific repetitive polymorphic CKRS-1 sequence and multilocus sequence typing. All isolates were genetically related, and the mechanism involved in decreased echinocandin susceptibility was characterized. Clinical resistance was associated with an increase in echinocandin MICs in vitro and was related to three different mutations in hot spot 1 of the target enzyme Fks1p. Molecular evidence of the rapid acquisition of resistance by different mutations in FKS1 highlights the need to monitor the development of resistance in C. krusei infections treated with echinocandin drugs. PMID:26324281

  13. Rapid development of Candida krusei echinocandin resistance during caspofungin therapy.

    PubMed

    Forastiero, A; Garcia-Gil, V; Rivero-Menendez, O; Garcia-Rubio, R; Monteiro, M C; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Jordan, R; Agorio, I; Mellado, E

    2015-11-01

    In invasive candidiasis, there has been an epidemiological shift from Candida albicans to non-albicans species infections, including infections with C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. Although the prevalence of C. krusei remains low among yeast infections, its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole raises epidemiological and therapeutic concerns. Echinocandins have in vitro activity against most Candida spp. and are the first-line agents in the treatment of candidemia. Although resistance to echinocandin drugs is still rare, individual cases of C. krusei resistance have been reported in recent years, especially with strains that have been under selective pressure. A total of 15 C. krusei strains, isolated from the blood, urine, and soft tissue of an acute lymphocytic leukemia patient, were analyzed. Strains developed echinocandin resistance during 10 days of caspofungin therapy. The molecular epidemiology of the isolates was investigated using two different typing methods: PCR-based amplification of the species-specific repetitive polymorphic CKRS-1 sequence and multilocus sequence typing. All isolates were genetically related, and the mechanism involved in decreased echinocandin susceptibility was characterized. Clinical resistance was associated with an increase in echinocandin MICs in vitro and was related to three different mutations in hot spot 1 of the target enzyme Fks1p. Molecular evidence of the rapid acquisition of resistance by different mutations in FKS1 highlights the need to monitor the development of resistance in C. krusei infections treated with echinocandin drugs. PMID:26324281

  14. Genetic similarity and phenotypic diversity of commensal and pathogenic strains of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hellstein, J; Vawter-Hugart, H; Fotos, P; Schmid, J; Soll, D R

    1993-12-01

    Colony phenotype and genetic similarity were assessed within and between groups of commensal and pathogenic strains of Candida albicans collected from the oral cavities of individuals in a single geographical locale. Thirty-eight percent of pathogenic isolates contained predominant or minor variant colony morphologies (other than smooth) when samples from the sites of infection were cultured on plates, while 16% of commensal isolates contained minor variant colony morphologies when samples from the sites of carriage were cultured. The genetic similarities of isolates within and between groups were assessed by DNA fingerprinting by using Southern blot hybridization with the fingerprinting probe Ca3 and analysis with the computer-assisted, automated Dendron system. Both the commensal and the pathogenic groups contained a major cluster of genetically similar C. albicans isolates representing 31 and 33% of the strains in the respective groups. When a combined dendrogram of both commensal and pathogenic isolates was generated, the major clusters of genetically similar isolates in each group mixed into one large cluster. Minor clusters in the individual dendrograms also mixed. These results suggest common clonal origins for commensal and pathogenic strains in the same geographical locale. PMID:8308110

  15. Genetic similarity and phenotypic diversity of commensal and pathogenic strains of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    Hellstein, J; Vawter-Hugart, H; Fotos, P; Schmid, J; Soll, D R

    1993-01-01

    Colony phenotype and genetic similarity were assessed within and between groups of commensal and pathogenic strains of Candida albicans collected from the oral cavities of individuals in a single geographical locale. Thirty-eight percent of pathogenic isolates contained predominant or minor variant colony morphologies (other than smooth) when samples from the sites of infection were cultured on plates, while 16% of commensal isolates contained minor variant colony morphologies when samples from the sites of carriage were cultured. The genetic similarities of isolates within and between groups were assessed by DNA fingerprinting by using Southern blot hybridization with the fingerprinting probe Ca3 and analysis with the computer-assisted, automated Dendron system. Both the commensal and the pathogenic groups contained a major cluster of genetically similar C. albicans isolates representing 31 and 33% of the strains in the respective groups. When a combined dendrogram of both commensal and pathogenic isolates was generated, the major clusters of genetically similar isolates in each group mixed into one large cluster. Minor clusters in the individual dendrograms also mixed. These results suggest common clonal origins for commensal and pathogenic strains in the same geographical locale. Images PMID:8308110

  16. Biofilm formation by Candida species on silicone surfaces and latex pacifier nipples: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Luiz Cezar; Charone, Senda; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo; Portela, Maristela Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the growth and development of biofilm formation by isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on silicone and latex pacifier nipples. The silicone and latex surfaces were evaluated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The plastic component of the nipple also seems to be an important factor regarding the biofilm formation by Candida spp. The biofilm growth was measured using the MTT reduction reaction. C. albicans was found to have a slightly greater capacity of forming biofilm compared to the other Candida species. Analysis of the pattern of biofilm development by C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on latex and silicon pacifier shields showed an increased biofilm formation regarding the latter substrate. Silicone was shown to be more resistant to fungal colonization, particularly in the case of C. parapsilosis, despite the lack of any statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In addition, silicone has a smoother surface compared to latex, whose surface was found to be rugose and irregular. PMID:19476097

  17. Susceptibility and molecular characterization of Candida species from patients with vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Gheniffer; Vicente, Vania Aparecida; Gomes, Renata Rodrigues; Muro, Marisol Dominguez; Pinheiro, Rosangela Lameira; Ferrari, Carolina; Herkert, Patricia Fernanda; Takimura, Marcos; Carvalho, Newton Sérgio de; Queiroz-Telles, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects women of reproductive age, which represents approximately 15-25% of vaginitis cases. The present study aimed to isolate and characterize yeast from the patients irrespective of the presentation of clinical symptoms. The isolates were subjected to in vitro susceptibility profile and characterization by molecular markers, which intended to assess the distribution of species. A total of 40 isolates were obtained and identified through the CHROMagar, API20aux and by ITS and D1/D2 regions sequencing of DNAr gene. Candida albicans strains were genotyped by the ABC system and the isolates were divided into two genotypic groups. The identity of the C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, C. kefyr and Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates was confirmed by the multilocus analysis. The strains of Candida, isolated from patients with complications, were found to be resistant to nystatin but sensitive to fluconazole, amphotericin B and ketoconazole, as observed by in vitro sensitivity profile. The isolates from asymptomatic patients, i.e., the colonized group, showed a dose-dependent sensitivity to the anti-fungal agents, fluconazole and amphotericin B. However, the isolates of C. albicans that belong to distinct genotypic groups showed the same in vitro susceptibility profile. PMID:26991298

  18. Biofilm-forming ability and adherence to poly-(methyl-methacrylate) acrylic resin materials of oral Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Dolapci, Istar; Dogan, Arife

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion to acrylic resin specimens and biofilm formation capability of Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects' oral rinse solutions. MATERIALS AND METHODS The material tested was a heat-cured acrylic resin (Acron Duo). Using the adhesion and crystal violet assays, 14 oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive subjects and 2 references Candida strains (C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 90128) were compared for their biofilm production and adhesion properties to acrylic surfaces in vitro. RESULTS There were no significant differences in adhesion (P=.52) and biofilm formation assays (P=.42) by statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION Denture stomatitis and increased prevalence of candidal carriage in HIV infected patients is unlikely to be related to the biofilm formation and adhesion abilities of C. albicans to acrylic resin materials. PMID:24605203

  19. Description of Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. for placement of Candida auringiensis, Candida salmanticensis and Candida tartarivorans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence analyses have demonstrated that species of the polyphyletic anamorphic ascomycete genus Candida may be members of described teleomorphic genera, members of the Candida tropicalis clade upon which the genus Candida is circumscribed, or members of isolated clades that represent undescribe...

  20. Cilofungin (LY121019), an antifungal agent with specific activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G S; Myles, C; Pratt, K J; Washington, J A

    1988-01-01

    Cilofungin (LY121019) is an antifungal agent that interferes with beta-glucan synthesis in the cells walls of fungi. The activity of this agent against 256 clinical isolates of yeasts was determined. It was found to be very active in vitro against Candida albicans (MIC for 90% of isolates [MIC90], less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; minimal fungicidal concentration for 90% of isolates [MFC90], less than or equal to 0.31 micrograms/ml) and C. tropicalis (MIC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml; MFC90, less than or equal to 0.31 microgram/ml) and moderately active against Torulopsis glabrata (MIC90 and MFC90, less than or equal to 20 micrograms/ml). All C. parapsilosis, Cryptococcus, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were resistant. The activity of cilofungin was affected by medium and inoculum size. Antibiotic medium no. 3 was used as the standard medium. Isolates of C. albicans and C. tropicalis demonstrated a paradoxical effect in Sabouraud dextrose broth and yeast nitrogen base broth in that growth was partially inhibited at MICs equivalent to those in antibiotic medium no. 3, but growth continued, in many instances, throughout all concentrations tested. There was decreased activity of cilofungin with inocula greater than 10(5) CFU/ml. The temperature and duration of incubation did not affect its activity. Images PMID:3058017

  1. Competitive Interactions between C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei during Biofilm Formation and Development of Experimental Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; dos Santos, Jéssica Diane; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Anbinder, Ana Lia; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the interactions between Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in mixed infections. Initially, these interactions were studied in biofilms formed in vitro. CFU/mL values of C. albicans were lower in mixed biofilms when compared to the single biofilms, verifying 77% and 89% of C. albicans reduction when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. After that, we expanded this study for in vivo host models of experimental candidiasis. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic Candida suspensions for analysis of survival rate and quantification of fungal cells in the haemolymph. In the groups with single infections, 100% of the larvae died within 18 h after infection with C. albicans. However, interaction groups achieved 100% mortality after 72 h of infection by C. albicans-C. glabrata and 96 h of infection by C. albicans-C. krusei. C. albicans CFU/mL values from larvae hemolymph were lower in the interacting groups compared with the monoespecies group after 12 h of infection. In addition, immunosuppressed mice were also inoculated with monotypic and heterotypic microbial suspensions to induce oral candidiasis. C. albicans CFU/mL values recovered from oral cavity of mice were higher in the group with single infection by C. albicans than the groups with mixed infections by C. albicans-C. glabrata and C. albicans-C. krusei. Moreover, the group with single infection by C. albicans had a higher degree of hyphae and epithelial changes in the tongue dorsum than the groups with mixed infections. We concluded that single infections by C. albicans were more harmful for animal models than mixed infections with non-albicans species, suggesting that C. albicans establish competitive interactions with C. krusei and C. glabrata during biofilm formation and development of experimental candidiasis. PMID:26146832

  2. Oral administration of the broad-spectrum antibiofilm compound toremifene inhibits Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    De Cremer, Kaat; Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Peeters, Annelies; Kucharíková, Soña; Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Van Dijck, Patrick; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-12-01

    We here report on the in vitro activity of toremifene to inhibit biofilm formation of different fungal and bacterial pathogens, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, Candida krusei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. We validated the in vivo efficacy of orally administered toremifene against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm formation in a rat subcutaneous catheter model. Combined, our results demonstrate the potential of toremifene as a broad-spectrum oral antibiofilm compound. PMID:25288093

  3. Comparative Lipidomics in Clinical Isolates of Candida albicans Reveal Crosstalk between Mitochondria, Cell Wall Integrity and Azole Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Yadav, Vipin; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged usage of antifungal azoles which target enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis invariably leads to the development of multi-drug resistance (MDR) in Candida albicans. We had earlier shown that membrane lipids and their fluidity are closely linked to the MDR phenomenon. In one of our recent studies involving comparative lipidomics between azole susceptible (AS) and azole resistant (AR) matched pair clinical isolates of C. albicans, we could not see consistent differences in the lipid profiles of AS and AR strains because they came from different patients and so in this study, we have used genetically related variant recovered from the same patient collected over a period of 2-years. During this time, the levels of fluconazole (FLC) resistance of the strain increased by over 200-fold. By comparing the lipid profiles of select isolates, we were able to observe gradual and statistically significant changes in several lipid classes, particularly in plasma membrane microdomain specific lipids such as mannosylinositolphosphorylceramides and ergosterol, and in a mitochondrial specific phosphoglyceride, phosphatidyl glycerol. Superimposed with these quantitative and qualitative changes in the lipid profiles, were simultaneous changes at the molecular lipid species levels which again coincided with the development of resistance to FLC. Reverse transcriptase-PCR of the key genes of the lipid metabolism validated lipidomic picture. Taken together, this study illustrates how the gradual corrective changes in Candida lipidome correspond to the development of FLC tolerance. Our study also shows a first instance of the mitochondrial membrane dysfunction and defective cell wall (CW) in clinical AR isolates of C. albicans, and provides evidence of a cross-talk between mitochondrial lipid homeostasis, CW integrity and azole tolerance. PMID:22761908

  4. Candida tropicalis as a Predominant Isolate from Clinical Specimens and its Antifungal Susceptibility Pattern in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanram, Kalyani

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of infections caused by Candida species has increased considerably over the past three decades mainly due to the rise of the AIDS epidemic, an increasingly aged population, higher numbers of immunocompromised patients and the more widespread use of indwelling medical devices. Candida tropicalis is emerging pathogenic yeast among non-albicans species. Recently drug-resistant C.tropicalis was also reported in hospitals. Aim and Objective The present study aimed to isolate and speciate C. tropicalis from various clinical samples and to determine its antifungal susceptibility profile. Materials and Methods Clinical samples such as urine, blood, exudates and vaginal swab which were submitted to the Microbiology laboratory during the year 2013 were screened for the growth of Candidia species, which then identified as C.tropicalis by the routine microbiological procedures such as germ tube formation, assimilation and fermentation of sugars and colony color on HICHROM Candida agar. Antifungal susceptibility was performed by disc diffusion method with the drugs Amphotericin-B, Itraconazole, Ketaconazole and Fluconazole on C. tropicalis isolates. Results A total number of 112 Candida isolates were isolated during the year 2012 from various clinical specimens. Among them 61 (54.3%) were identified as C.tropicalis. All the C. tropicalis isolates were sensitive to Amphotericin-B (100%) but 23 isolates (37.7%) were resistant to Fluconazole. Conclusion We conclude that identification of Candida species is important to know the prevalent species in the clinical setup and routine antifungal susceptibility should be performed to avoid inappropriate treatment. PMID:26393128

  5. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, P; Boerlin-Petzold, F; Goudet, J; Durussel, C; Pagani, J L; Chave, J P; Bille, J

    1996-01-01

    A total of 189 Candida albicans isolates have been typed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The results obtained confirm the clonal mode of reproduction of C. albicans. The C. albicans populations found in the oropharynx of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, in the oropharynx of healthy carriers, or in association with invasive candidiasis could not be distinguished. No clone or group of clones could be associated with the appearance of clinical disorders or with a reduced in vitro susceptibility to the antifungal agent fluconazole. Multiple and sequential oral isolates from 24 HIV-infected patients were also typed by restriction enzyme analysis with the enzymes EcoRI and HinfI and by use of the Ca3 repetitive probe. The results obtained by the combination of all three typing methods show that all but one patient each carried a unique major C. albicans clone in their oropharynx. The 21 patients with sequential isolates had the same C. albicans clones in their throats during recurrent oropharyngeal candidiasis episodes, independently of clinical status or of changes of in vitro susceptibility to fluconazole. Finally, several isolates of the same C. albicans clone found simultaneously in the oropharynx of a patient may present different levels of susceptibility to fluconazole. PMID:8727910

  6. Occurrence and diversity of Candida genus in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Chi, Zhenming; Yue, Lixi; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Dechao

    2008-11-01

    A total of 317 yeast isolates from seawater, sediments, mud of salterns, guts of marine fishes and marine algae were obtained. The results of routine identification and molecular characterization showed that six isolates among these marine yeasts belonged to Candida genus as Candida intermedia for YA01a, Candida parapsilosis for 3eA2, Candida quercitrusa for JHSb, Candia rugosa for wl8, Candida zeylanoides for TJY13a, and Candida membranifaciens for W14-3. Isolates YA01a ( Candida intermedia), wl8 ( Candida rugosa), 3eA2 ( Candida parapsilosis), and JHSb ( Candida quercitrusa) were found producing cell-bound lipase, while isolate W14-3 ( Candida membranifaciens) producing riboflavin. These marine yeast Candida spp. seem to have wide potential applications in biotechnology.

  7. Patterns of Amphotericin B Killing Kinetics against Seven Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Gobernado, Miguel; Viudes, Angel; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana

    2004-01-01

    In a previous study tolerance to amphotericin B (AMB) was found among Candida parapsilosis and C. dubliniensis strains by seeding the whole volumes of wells used for MIC determinations, and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFC) for non-C. albicans Candida strains were demonstrated to be above the levels safely achievable in serum. As an extension of that study, we performed time-kill assays with 26 blood culture isolates (6 C. albicans, 5 C. parapsilosis, 5 C. krusei, 4 C. glabrata, 3 C. lusitaniae, and 3 C. tropicalis isolates), 3 oropharyngeal C. dubliniensis isolates, 3 AMB-susceptible isolates (ATCC 90028, ATCC 22019, ATCC 6254), and 6 AMB-resistant isolates (ATCC 200955, ATCC 200956, ATCC 200950, ATCC 200951, ATCC 200952, ATCC 200953) using RPMI 1640 medium and 0.12 to 32 μg of AMB per ml and determined the numbers of CFU per milliliter at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h. MFCs and time-kill patterns were species specific (MFCs, ≤1 μg/ml for all C. dubliniensis and C. albicans isolates except AMB-resistant strain ATCC 200955; MFCs, 2 to >16 μg/ml for the other isolates). The times required to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) at four times the MIC were 2 h for C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, 16 h for C. glabrata, 24 h for C. parapsilosis and C. lusitaniae, and ≥40 h for C. tropicalis and C. krusei. The killing rate increased as the AMB concentration was increased up to 2 μg/ml. The highest killing rates were achieved for C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, and C. lusitaniae, while viable C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis cells were present after 48 h (MICs, ≤2 μg/ml) when AMB was used at 2 μg/ml. Time-kill curves and MFCs can detect viable cells after 48 h when AMB is used at ≥2 μg/ml. The failure of AMB treatment could be due to its poor killing activity against some species at the concentrations reached in patients' serum. PMID:15215097

  8. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Nur Saeida; Abdullah, Hasmah; Abdul Wahab, Wan Nor Amilah Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined using the two-fold serial dilution technique of concentrations ranging from 16 mg/ml to 0.03 mg/ml. After 24 h, the minimum fungicidal concentrations were determined by subculturing the wells, which showed no turbidity on the agar plate. Potential phytochemical group in the crude extracts was screened by phytochemical qualitative tests and subsequently subjected to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Both methanol and aqueous extracts displayed substantial anti-Candida activity and pyrogallol was the major component of both crude extracts. Conclusions: Data from current study suggested that Q. infectoria gall extracts are a potential source to be developed as anti-candidiasis. PMID:25709331

  9. Using ammonium-tolerant yeast isolates: Candida halophila and Rhodotorula glutinis to treat high strength fermentative wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Yang, M; Hei, L; Zheng, S

    2003-03-01

    Two ammonium-tolerant yeast strains were isolated from sludge samples contaminated with monosodium glutamate manufacturing wastewater and were identified as Candida haplophila and Rhodotorula glutinis. The tolerance of the two yeast isolates to ammonia and their chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal perfomances were evaluated under batch and bench-scale conditions. The mixture of the two isolates was found to grow well in an artificial medium containing 25% (NH4)2SO4 and could effectively remove COD from monosodium glutamate wastewater even when the concentrations of NH4+-N and free NH3-N reached as high as 18,977 and 879 mg l(-1) respectively. A fixed-bed yeast reactor, which was initially inoculated with the yeast mixture, permitted a constant COD removal rate of over 80% during a period of near 2-month continuous running even when the influent COD was increased from 8,000 to 25,000 mg l(-1). The effluent was accompanied with suspended solids (SS) of over 4,500 mg l(-1), which was mainly composed of yeast cells and could be considered as a source of animal forage additive. The residual COD of effluents from the yeast reactor could be further reduced to under 500 mg l(-1) by a combination process of activated sludge treatment and coagulation technologies. PMID:12703863

  10. Comparative evaluation of three antifungal susceptibility test methods for Candida albicans isolates and correlation with response to fluconazole therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, M; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Engelmann, E; Trautmann, M

    1996-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities were determined for 56 Candida albicans isolates obtained from the oral cavities of 41 patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. The agents tested included fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, flucytosine, and amphotericin B. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution technique following National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards document M27-P (M27-P micro), a broth microdilution technique using high-resolution medium (HR micro), and the Etest with solidified yeast-nitrogen base agar. The in vitro findings were correlated with in vivo response to fluconazole therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis. For all C. albicans isolates from patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis not responding to fluconazole MICs were found to be > or = 6.25 micrograms/ml by the M27-P micro method and > or = 25 micrograms/ml by the HR micro method as well as the Etest. However, for several C. albicans isolates from patients who responded to fluconazole therapy MICs found to be above the suggested breakpoints of resistance. The appropriate rank order of best agreement between the M27-P micro method and HR micro method was amphotericin B > fluconazole > flucytosine > ketoconazole > itraconazole. The appropriate rank order with best agreement between the M27-P micro method and the Etest was flucytosine > amphotericin B > fluconazole > ketoconazole > or = itraconazole. It could be concluded that a good correlation between in vitro resistance and clinical failure was found with all methods. However, the test methods used in this study did not necessarily predict clinical response to therapy with fluconazole. PMID:8940474

  11. Description of Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. for placement of Candida auringiensis, Candida salmanticensis and Candida tartarivorans.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2016-07-01

    DNA sequence analyses have demonstrated that species of the polyphyletic anamorphic ascomycete genus Candida may be members of described teleomorphic genera, members of the Candida tropicalis clade upon which the genus Candida is circumscribed, or members of isolated clades that represent undescribed genera. From phylogenetic analysis of gene sequences from nuclear large subunit rRNA, mitochondrial small subunit rRNA and cytochrome oxidase II, Candida auringiensis (NRRL Y-17674(T), CBS 6913(T)), Candida salmanticensis (NRRL Y-17090(T), CBS 5121(T)), and Candida tartarivorans (NRRL Y-27291(T), CBS 7955(T)) were shown to be members of an isolated clade and are proposed for reclassification in the genus Groenewaldozyma gen. nov. (MycoBank MB 815817). Neighbouring taxa include species of the Wickerhamiella clade and Candida blankii. PMID:27142089

  12. Nationwide Sentinel Surveillance of Bloodstream Candida Infections in 40 Tertiary Care Hospitals in Spain▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cisterna, R.; Ezpeleta, G.; Telleria, O.; Guinea, J.; Regueiro, B.; Garcia-Rodríguez, J.; Esperalba, J.

    2010-01-01

    Candidemia studies have documented geographic differences in rates and epidemiology, underscoring the need for surveillance to monitor trends. We conducted prospective candidemia surveillance in Spain to assess the incidence, species distribution, frequency of antifungal resistance, and risk factors for acquiring a Candida infection. Prospective laboratory-based surveillance was conducted from June 2008 to June 2009 in 40 medical centers located around the country. A case of candidemia was defined as the isolation of a Candida species from a blood culture. Incidence rates were calculated per 1,000 admissions. Antifungal susceptibility tests were performed by using broth microdilution assay according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. We detected 984 cases, for an overall incidence of 1.09 cases per 1,000 admissions. The crude mortality was 20.20%. Candida albicans was the most common species (49.08%), followed by C. parapsilosis (20.73%), C. glabrata (13.61%), and C. tropicalis (10.77%). Overall, decreased susceptibility to fluconazole occurred in 69 (7.01%) incident isolates. Antifungal resistance was rare, and a moderate linear correlation between fluconazole and voriconazole MICs was observed. This is the largest multicenter candidemia study conducted to date and shows the substantial morbidity and mortality of candidemia in Spain. PMID:20826636

  13. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brilhante, Raimunda S.N.; Paiva, Manoel A.N.; Sampaio, Célia M.S.; Castelo-Branco, Débora S.C.M.; Teixeira, Carlos E.C.; de Alencar, Lucas P.; Bandeira, Tereza J.P.G.; Monteiro, André J.; Cordeiro, Rossana A.; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro A.; Sidrim, José J.C.; Moreira, José L.B.; Rocha, Marcos F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 μg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 μg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 μg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps. PMID:26887224

  14. Isolation, characterization and mechanism of action of an antimicrobial peptide from Lecythis pisonis seeds with inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Maria Eliza Brambila; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Carvalho, André de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced by a range of organisms as a first line of defense against invaders or competitors. Owing to their broad antimicrobial activity, AMPs have attracted attention as a potential source of chemotherapeutic drugs. The increasing prevalence of infections caused by Candida species as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients requires new drugs. Lecythis pisonis is a Lecythydaceae tree that grows in Brazil. The AMPs produced by this tree have not been described previously. We describe the isolation of 12 fractions enriched in peptides from L. pisonis seeds. Of the 12 fractions, at 10 μg/ml, the F4 fraction had the strongest growth inhibitory effect (53.7%) in Candida albicans, in addition to a loss of viability of 94.9%. The F4 fraction was separated into seven sub-fractions by reversed-phase chromatography. The F4.7' fraction had the strongest activity at 10 μg/ml, inhibiting C. albicans growth by 38.5% and a 69.3% loss of viability. The peptide in F4.7' was sequenced and was found to be similar to plant defensins. For this reason, the peptide was named L. pisonis defensin 1 (Lp-Def1). The mechanism of action that is responsible for C. albicans inhibition by Lp-Def1 includes a slight increase of reactive oxygen species induction and a significant loss of mitochondrial function. The results described here support the future development of plant defensins, specifically Lp-Def1, as new therapeutic substances against fungi, especially C. albicans. PMID:26245301

  15. Use of CHROMagar Candida for genital specimens in the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Houang, E T; Chu, K C; Koehler, A P; Cheng, A F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate CHROMagar Candida (CA), a new yeast differential medium, for yeast isolation in a clinical laboratory for the routine examination of high vaginal swabs. METHODS: Results of high vaginal swab cultures processed in a standard manner on plates containing equal halves of Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and CA were compared. Non-Candida albicans yeast isolates were further speciated with API 20C AUX or API 32C. To assess the ease of use of CA, laboratory staff lacking in experience of the medium were asked to identify 23 unlabelled yeast cultures on CA by referring to six labelled reference plates. RESULTS: Of the 1784 swab cultures processed, yeasts were isolated from 373 SDA and 368 CA. Of the 78 non-albicans isolates further speciated, CA identified correctly all cultures of C krusei and C tropicalis, and 82% of C glabrata. All the 38 inexperienced laboratory staff achieved 100% accuracy for C albicans and over 90% for C krusei and C tropicalis. CONCLUSIONS: CA is a satisfactory isolation medium for genital specimens, allowing immediate and correct identification of the commonly encountered yeasts and easy recognition of mixed cultures. Images PMID:9306935

  16. In vivo activity of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Study of in vivo antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) and n-BuOH extract (BUTE) of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida spp. Methods The in vitro antifungal activity of HE, BUTE, fluconazole (FLU), and itraconazole (ITRA) was determined by the broth microdilution method. We obtained values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC) for 46 strains of C. albicans and 10 of C. glabrata isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC was induced in hyperestrogenic Wistar rats with azole-susceptible C. albicans (SCA), azole-resistant C. albicans (RCA), and azole-resistant C. glabrata (RCG). The rats were treated intravaginally with 0.1 mL of HE or BUTE at concentrations of 1%, 2.5% and 5%; 100 μg/mL of FLU (treatment positive control); or distilled water (negative control) at 1, 24, and 48 h after induction of the infection, and the progress of VVC was monitored by culturing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The toxicity was evaluated in cervical cells of the HeLa cell line. Results The extracts showed in vitro inhibitory and fungicidal activity against all the isolates, and the MIC and MFC values for the C. glabrata isolates were slightly higher. In vivo, the SCA, RCA, and RCG infections were eliminated by 21 days post-infection, with up to 5% HE and BUTE, comparable to the activity of FLU. No cytotoxic action was observed for either extract. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that HE and BUTE from S. saponaria show inhibitory and fungicidal activity in vitro, in addition to in vivo activity against azole-resistant vaginal isolates of C. glabrata and azole-susceptible and resistant isolates of C. albicans. Also considering the lack of cytotoxicity and the low concentrations of the extracts necessary to eliminate the infection in vivo, HE and BUTE show promise for continued studies with purified antifungal substances in VVC yeast

  17. FUNGEMIA CAUSED BY Candida SPECIES IN A CHILDREN'S PUBLIC HOSPITAL IN THE CITY OF SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL: STUDY IN THE PERIOD 2007-2010

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Vanessa Kummer Perinazzo; Ruiz, Luciana da Silva; Oliveira, Nélio Alessandro Jesus; Moreira, Débora; Hahn, Rosane Christine; Melo, Analy Salles de Azevedo; Nishikaku, Angela Satie; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Candidemia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the health care environment. The epidemiology of Candida infection is changing, mainly in relation to the number of episodes caused by species C. non-albicans. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of yeasts of the genus Candida, in a four-year period, isolated from blood of pediatric patients hospitalized in a public hospital of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. In this period, yeasts from blood of 104 patients were isolated and, the identified species of Candida by phenotypic and genotypic methods were: C. albicans (39/104), C. tropicalis (25/104), C. parapsilosis (23/104), Pichia anomala (6/104), C. guilliermondii (5/104), C. krusei (3/104), C. glabrata (2/104) and C. pararugosa (1/104). During the period of the study, a higher frequency of isolates of C. non-albicans (63.55%) (p = 0.0286) was verified. In this study we verified the increase of the non-albicans species throughout the years (mainly in 2009 and 2010). Thus, considering the peculiarities presented by Candida species, a correct identification of species is recommended to lead to a faster diagnosis and an efficient treatment. PMID:25076430

  18. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism to identify Candida species, related to onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Badiee, Parisa; Badali, Hamid; Abastabar, Mahdi; Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Hadipour, Mahboubeh; Yazdani, Hajar; Heshmat, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is one of the most common clinical forms of fungal infections due to both filamentous fungi and yeasts. The genus of Candida is one of the most prominent causes of onychomycosis in all around the world. Although Candida albicans is still the most frequent cause of nail infections, use of broad-spectrum antifungal agents has led to a shift in the etiology of C. albicans to non-albicans species. The aim of the present study is rapid and precise identification of candida species isolated from nail infection by using of PCR-RFLP technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 360 clinical yeast strains were collected from nail infections in Iran. Genomic DNA was extracted using FTA; cards. ITS1-5.8SrDNA-ITS2 region was amplified using universal primers and subsequently products were digested with the restriction enzyme MspI. For identification of newly described species (C. parapsilosis complex), the SADH gene was amplified, followed by digestion with Nla III restriction enzyme. Results: Candida albicans was the most commonly isolated species (41.1%), followed by C. parapsilosis (21.4%), C. tropicalis (12.8%), C. kefyr (9.4%), C. krusei (5.5%), C. orthopsilosis (4.1%), C. glabrata (2.8%), C. guilliermondii (1.4%), C. rugosa (0.8%), and C. lusitaniae (0.5%). Patients in the age groups of 51-60 and 81-90 years had the highest and lowest distribution of positive specimens, respectively. Conclusion: Rapid and precise identification of Candida species from clinical specimens lead to appropriate therapeutic plans. PMID:26015921

  19. A Thioether-Stabilized d-Proline-l-Proline-Induced β-Hairpin Peptide of Defensin Segment Increases Its Anti-Candida albicans Ability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingchuan; Yang, Dan; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Jianpeng; Yin, Cuiming; Zhu, Yuxia; Fan, Shangrong; Ng, Tzi Bun; Xia, Jiang; Li, Zigang

    2016-08-01

    We report a β-hairpin dual stabilizing strategy: a d-proline-l-proline (d-Pro-l-Pro) dipeptide as the nucleating turn, and a thioether tether as a side-chain linkage at a precisely designed position to stabilize the β-hairpin. This method was used to modify the C-terminal β-hairpin moiety of the plant defensin, pv-defensin, in order to obtain a stabilized peptide with enhanced anti-Candida albicans activity (MIC 84-3.0 μm), high serum stability (50 % remaining after 48 h) and low hemolysis (<10 % at 152 μm). This modified peptide penetrated the C. albicans cell membrane within 5 min and showed high activity against clinically isolated antibiotic-resistant C. albicans and Candida glabrata strains. PMID:27194395

  20. [Antifungal susceptibility profiles of Candida species to triazole: application of new CLSI species-specific clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values for characterization of antifungal resistance].

    PubMed

    Karabıçak, Nilgün; Alem, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing has newly introduced species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs) for fluconazole and voriconazole. When CBPs can not be determined, wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions are detected and epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) provide valuable means for the detection of emerging resistance. The aim of this study is to determine triazole resistance patterns in Candida species by the recently revised CLSI CBPs. A total of 140 Candida strains isolated from blood cultures of patients with invasive candidiasis hospitalized in various intensive care units in Turkey and sent to our reference laboratory between 2011-2012, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods, and susceptibility testing was performed against fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, by the 24-h CLSI broth microdilution (BMD) method. Azole resistance rates for all Candida species were determined using the new species-specific CLSI CBPs and ECVs criteria, when appropriate. The species distribution of the isolates were as follows; C.parapsilosis (n= 31 ), C.tropicalis (n= 26 ), C.glabrata (n= 21), C.albicans (n= 18), C.lusitaniae (n= 16), C.krusei (n= 16), C.kefyr (n= 9), C.guilliermondii (n= 2), and C.dubliniensis (n= 1). According to the newly determined CLSI CBPs for fluconazole and C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.tropicalis [susceptible (S), ≤ 2 µg/ml; dose-dependent susceptible (SDD), 4 µg/ml; resistant (R), ≥ 8 µg/ml], and C.glabrata (SDD, ≤ 32 µg/ml; R≥ 64 µg/ml) and for voriconazole and C.albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.tropicalis (S, ≤ 0.12 µg/ml; SDD, 0.25-0.5 µg/ml; R, ≥ 1 µg/ml), and C.krusei (S, ≤ 0.5 µg/ml; SDD, 1 µg/ml; R, ≥ 2 µg/ml), it was found that three of C.albicans, one of C.parapsilosis and one of C.glabrata isolates were resistant to fluconazole, while two of C.albicans and two of C

  1. Comparative Analysis of Disc Diffusion and E-test with Broth Micro-dilution for Susceptibility Testing of Clinical Candida Isolates Against Amphotericin B, Fluconazole, Voriconazole and Caspofungin

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Gupta, Prashant; Banerjee, Gopa; Singh, Mastan

    2015-01-01

    Background Antifungal susceptibility testing remains an area of intense interest because of the increasing number of clinical isolates resistant to antifungal therapy. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute has proposed reference broth micro dilution (BMD) method for susceptibility testing. The reference method is time-consuming and poorly suited for the routine clinical laboratory setting. Agar-based susceptibility testing methods, disk diffusion (DD) method and the E-test method can be an easier, reliable and less time consuming alternative for the BMD method. Aim To compare the results of Amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and Caspofungin susceptibility testing by DD, and the E-test method with the CLSI reference method for clinical Candida isolates. Materials and Methods Broth Microdilution (BMD), E-test and Disk diffusion testing of the various clinical Candida isolates was performed in accordance with CLSI documents. The results obtained were analysed and compared. Results The categorical agreement for Amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and Caspofungin susceptibility results by E-test and DD method was 65.2%, 67.4%; 100%, 82.6%; 100%, 100%; 100%, 97.8% respectively. Conclusion The agar-based E-test and disk diffusion methods are reliable alternatives to the BMD method for Candida isolates when test susceptible to fluconazole, voriconazole, and Caspofungin, however the susceptibility testing results must be interpreted with caution in case of Amphotericin B. PMID:26675415

  2. Antifungal Effect of Novel 2-Bromo-2-Chloro-2-(4-Chlorophenylsulfonyl)-1-Phenylethanone against Candida Strains

    PubMed Central

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Wieczorek, Magdalena; Estrada-Mata, Eine; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the antifungal activity of novel a 2-bromo-2-chloro-2-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-1-phenylethanone (compound 4). The synthesis of compound 4 was commenced from sodium 4-chlorobenzene sulfinate and the final product was obtained by treatment of α-chloro-β-keto-sulfone with sodium hypobromite. The sensitivity of 63 clinical isolates belonging to the most relevant Candida species toward compound 4 using the method M27-A3 was evaluated. We observed among most of the clinical strains of C. albicans MIC ranging from 0.00195 to 0.0078 μg/mL. Compound 4 at 32 μg/mL exhibited fungicidal activity against nine Candida strains tested using the MFC assay. Compound 4 displayed anti-Candida activity (with clear endpoint) against 22% of clinical strains of Candida. Under compound 4, Candida susceptibility and tolerance, namely paradoxical effect (PG), was found for only two clinical isolates (C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis) and reference strain 14053 using both M27-A3 and MFC method. We found that compound 4 does not induce toxicity in vivo against larvae of Galleria mellonella (≥97% survival) and it displays reduced toxicity on mammalian cells in vitro (< CC20 at 64 μg/mL). Furthermore, XTT assay denoted clear metabolic activity of sessile cells in the presence of compound 4. Thus, the effect of compound 4 on formed C. albicans biofilms was minimal. Moreover, strain 90028 exhibited no defects in hyphal growth on Caco-2 monolayer under compound 4 influence at MIC = 16 μg/mL. The MIC values of compound 4 against C. albicans 90028, in medium with sorbitol did not suggest that compound 4 acts by inhibiting fungal cell wall synthesis. Our findings with compound 4 suggest a general strategy for antifungal agent development that might be useful in limiting the emergence of resistance in Candida strains. PMID:27610100

  3. Antifungal Effect of Novel 2-Bromo-2-Chloro-2-(4-Chlorophenylsulfonyl)-1-Phenylethanone against Candida Strains.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Wieczorek, Magdalena; Estrada-Mata, Eine; Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the antifungal activity of novel a 2-bromo-2-chloro-2-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-1-phenylethanone (compound 4). The synthesis of compound 4 was commenced from sodium 4-chlorobenzene sulfinate and the final product was obtained by treatment of α-chloro-β-keto-sulfone with sodium hypobromite. The sensitivity of 63 clinical isolates belonging to the most relevant Candida species toward compound 4 using the method M27-A3 was evaluated. We observed among most of the clinical strains of C. albicans MIC ranging from 0.00195 to 0.0078 μg/mL. Compound 4 at 32 μg/mL exhibited fungicidal activity against nine Candida strains tested using the MFC assay. Compound 4 displayed anti-Candida activity (with clear endpoint) against 22% of clinical strains of Candida. Under compound 4, Candida susceptibility and tolerance, namely paradoxical effect (PG), was found for only two clinical isolates (C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis) and reference strain 14053 using both M27-A3 and MFC method. We found that compound 4 does not induce toxicity in vivo against larvae of Galleria mellonella (≥97% survival) and it displays reduced toxicity on mammalian cells in vitro (< CC20 at 64 μg/mL). Furthermore, XTT assay denoted clear metabolic activity of sessile cells in the presence of compound 4. Thus, the effect of compound 4 on formed C. albicans biofilms was minimal. Moreover, strain 90028 exhibited no defects in hyphal growth on Caco-2 monolayer under compound 4 influence at MIC = 16 μg/mL. The MIC values of compound 4 against C. albicans 90028, in medium with sorbitol did not suggest that compound 4 acts by inhibiting fungal cell wall synthesis. Our findings with compound 4 suggest a general strategy for antifungal agent development that might be useful in limiting the emergence of resistance in Candida strains. PMID:27610100

  4. Biofilms formed by Candida albicans bloodstream isolates display phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity that are associated with resistance and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans infections have become increasingly recognised as being biofilm related. Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between biofilm formation and poor clinical outcomes in patients infected with biofilm proficient strains. Here we have investigated a panel of clinical isolates in an attempt to evaluate their phenotypic and transcriptional properties in an attempt to differentiate and define levels of biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation was shown to be heterogeneous; with isolates being defined as either high or low biofilm formers (LBF and HBF) based on different biomass quantification. These categories could also be differentiated using a cell surface hydrophobicity assay with 24 h biofilms. HBF isolates were more resistance to amphotericin B (AMB) treatment than LBF, but not voriconazole (VRZ). In a Galleria mellonella model of infection HBF mortality was significantly increased in comparison to LBF. Histological analysis of the HBF showed hyphal elements intertwined indicative of the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptional analysis of 23 genes implicated in biofilm formation showed no significant differential expression profiles between LBF and HBF, except for Cdr1 at 4 and 24 h. Cluster analysis showed similar patterns of expression for different functional classes of genes, though correlation analysis of the 4 h biofilms with overall biomass at 24 h showed that 7 genes were correlated with high levels of biofilm, including Als3, Eap1, Cph1, Sap5, Plb1, Cdr1 and Zap1. Conclusions Our findings show that biofilm formation is variable amongst C. albicans isolates, and categorising isolates depending on this can be used to predict how pathogenic the isolate will behave clinically. We have shown that looking at individual genes in less informative than looking at multiple genes when trying to categorise isolates at LBF or HBF. These findings are important when developing biofilm-specific diagnostics as these could be

  5. Medium composition influence on Biotin and Riboflavin production by newly isolated Candida sp.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gaby Tiemi; Macedo, Juliana Alves; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2011-07-01

    Complex B vitamins as Biotin and Riboflavin are required by living organisms, not only for growth but also for metabolite production, and the feed market classifies them as growth promoters. Since Brazil will soon be one of the world's biggest animal protein producers, feed production is a large consumer of vitamins and micronutrients. The industry requires 10 mg riboflavin/0.2 mg biotin per kilogram of feed; a ratio of 40 ~ 50:1. Although few studies have been conducted specifically on riboflavin production using factorial design and surface response method as an optimization strategy, it is a common practice in biotechnology with many research reports available. However, there are no reports on the use of statistical design for biotin production. This study set out to evaluate medium composition influence on biotin and riboflavin production using a statistical design. There are no studies relating biotin and riboflavin production by Candida sp LEB 130. In this preliminary study to improve the simultaneous production of biotin and riboflavin, the maximum riboflavin/biotin ratio of 8.3 μg/mL was achieved with medium component concentrations of: sucrose 30 g/L, KH2PO4 2 g/L, MgSO4 1 g/L and ZnSO4 0.5mL/L. PMID:24031727

  6. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Miller, S.M.; Kurtz, M.B.; Kirsch, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms.

  7. Medium composition influence on Biotin and Riboflavin production by newly isolated Candida sp

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Gaby Tiemi; Macedo, Juliana Alves; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2011-01-01

    Complex B vitamins as Biotin and Riboflavin are required by living organisms, not only for growth but also for metabolite production, and the feed market classifies them as growth promoters. Since Brazil will soon be one of the world’s biggest animal protein producers, feed production is a large consumer of vitamins and micronutrients. The industry requires 10 mg riboflavin/0.2 mg biotin per kilogram of feed; a ratio of 40 ~ 50:1. Although few studies have been conducted specifically on riboflavin production using factorial design and surface response method as an optimization strategy, it is a common practice in biotechnology with many research reports available. However, there are no reports on the use of statistical design for biotin production. This study set out to evaluate medium composition influence on biotin and riboflavin production using a statistical design. There are no studies relating biotin and riboflavin production by Candida sp LEB 130. In this preliminary study to improve the simultaneous production of biotin and riboflavin, the maximum riboflavin/biotin ratio of 8.3 μg/mL was achieved with medium component concentrations of: sucrose 30 g/L, KH2PO4 2 g/L, MgSO4 1 g/L and ZnSO4 0.5mL/L. PMID:24031727

  8. Supplementation of CHROMagar Candida Medium with Pal's Medium for Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Sahand, Ismail H.; Moragues, María D.; Eraso, Elena; Villar-Vidal, María; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida medium is used for the isolation and identification of Candida species, but it does not differentiate Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis. This differentiation can be achieved by using Pal's agar, which cannot be used in primary isolation. We have combined both media to obtain a new medium that can be used for the isolation and identification of C. dubliniensis in primary cultures. PMID:16272515

  9. Evaluation of Virulence Factors and Antifungal Susceptibility in Yeast Isolates from Postmortem Specimens.

    PubMed

    Yagmur, Gulhan; Sav, Hafize; Ziyade, Nihan; Elgormus, Neval; Sen, Sumeyye; Akkoyun Bilgi, Esma; Atan, Yusuf; Buyuk, Yalcin; Kiraz, Nuri

    2016-07-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, especially in cases requiring a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. A total of 99 yeast strains were isolated from 42 postmortem cases. In this study, virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of these species were evaluated. The isolates were identified as Candida albicans (54), C. tropicalis (15), C. glabrata (12), C. parapsilosis (6), C. lipolytica (3), C. utilis (3), C. krusei (2), C. kefyr (1), and Cryptococcus neoformans (3). The most commonly isolated species was C. albicans, and no resistant species were determined. Despite the equal number of specimens, no secretion of significant virulence factors was associated with the postmortem specimen in the Candida species. Postmortem fungal investigations in forensic autopsies are useful in explaining cause of death in such cases, also may lead to protocols for the treatment of fungal infections and contribute to fungal pathogenesis and epidemiological data. PMID:27364280

  10. Isolation of sulphate transport defective mutants of Candida utilis: further evidence for a common transport system for sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate.

    PubMed

    García, M; Benítez, J; Delgado, J; Kotyk, A

    1983-01-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants of Candida utilis were isolated. They did not take up sulphate while incorporation of an organic sulphur source, such as L-methionine, was similar to the wild-type strain. They grew poorly on sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate and, as expected, grew well on methionine. Sulphite reductase activities of the mutants were similar to the wild type strain. The properties of these mutants support the view of a common transport system for sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. PMID:6682073

  11. Comparison of four molecular typing methods for evaluating genetic diversity among Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with oral candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, T M; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Laguna, F; Rodríguez-Tudela, J L

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans strain delineation by karyotyping. NotI restriction pattern analysis, hybridization with specific probe 27A, and PCR fingerprinting with the phage M13 core sequence were performed with 30 isolates from the oral cavities of 30 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and 8 reference strains. Within the panel of clinical isolates, 20 were geographically related, although 10 isolates were susceptible to fluconazole and 10 isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The remaining isolates used in this study were fluconazole resistant and geographically unrelated. A composite DNA type was defined for each of the strains as the combination of types obtained by the four molecular methods. By this procedure, a great diversity of DNA types was found among isolates from the oropharynges of HIV-infected individuals with oral candidiasis. This diversity was not reduced when isolates were evaluated on the basis of whether they came from the same geographical locale and whether they were fluconazole resistant. These data refute the idea of a clonal origin for fluconazole-resistant strains among HIV-positive patients. Karyotyping was the least discriminatory method, yielding 19 DNA types among the 38 strains analyzed. Conversely, hybridization with the 27A probe showed a unique DNA pattern for each of the strains examined in this study. Our results demonstrate that at least two different molecular methods are needed for Candida albicans typing and that there is a great deal of strain variation within the species, irrespective of place of origin or antifungal resistance patterns. PMID:9157142

  12. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing. PMID:2117571

  13. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  14. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  15. Susceptibility characterisation of Candida spp. to four essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rath, C C; Mohapatra, S

    2015-02-01

    In the present investigation, anti-Candida activity of four essential oils i.e. Black cumin (Nigella sativa), Curry leaf (Murraya koienigii), Ajwain (Trachiyspirum ammi), and Betel leaf (Piper betel) were screened against four human pathogenic species of Candida viz. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the oils ranged between 15.62 and 250 μl/ml while studied through tube dilution method. The oils retained their anti-Candida activities even after heat treatment (at 45ΊC, 60ΊC, 100ΊC for 1 hour) and also on autoclaving. Both Ajwain and Black Cumin leaf oils showed better anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, resulting in an irreversible damage to the cells. The anti-Candida activity of these essential oils could be attributable to the membrane inhibition mechanism. The activity of the oils is reported to be microbicidal (Candida-cidal). PMID:25657164

  16. Isolation, characterization, and regulation of the Candida albicans ERG27 gene encoding the sterol 3-keto reductase.

    PubMed

    Pierson, C A; Jia, N; Mo, C; Lees, N D; Sturm, A M; Eckstein, J; Barbuct, R; Bard, M

    2004-10-01

    The Candida albicans ERG27 gene which encodes the 3-keto reductase enzyme required for sterol C-4 demethylation was isolated and found to encode a 349 amino acid protein that is 60% identical at the amino acid level to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg27p. A C. albicans erg27 null was created in a strain containing an integrated ERG27 rescue cassette under the control of the pMAL2 inducible promoter. The C. albicans erg27 strain was able to grow only in the presence of maltose indicating that the ERG27 gene is essential. The C. albicans erg27 null showed complete loss of both 3-keto reductase and oxidosqualene cyclase (Erg7p) activities compromising all sterol synthesis. These results suggest that Erg27p inhibitors might be effective antifungals. To explore ERG27 regulation, an erg11 null strain was generated. C. albicans erg6 and erg24 mutants were also employed along with the inhibitors, itraconazole and zaragozic acid A, to characterize ERG27 expression using Northern analysis. Expression was increased two- to fourfold in erg11, erg6 and erg24 backgrounds. However, itraconazole which targets Erg11p (lanosterol demethylase) increased ERG27 expression 10-fold and zaragozic acid A which targets the Erg9p (squalene synthase) increased ERG27 expression fivefold. The azole and erg11 results support other observations that azoles may affect non-sterol targets. PMID:15552648

  17. Isolation and characterization of Candida membranifaciens subsp. flavinogenie W14-3, a novel riboflavin-producing marine yeast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Chi, Zhenmin; Wang, Xianghong; Ju, Liang; Chi, Zhe; Guo, Ning

    2008-01-01

    We found that the marine yeast strain W14-3 isolated from seawater of China Eastern Sea could produce riboflavin. It is interesting to observe that the marine yeast strain produced a large amount of riboflavin in the medium containing xylose, sucrose, galactose and maltose under the conditions of vigorous shaking. The yeast strain was found to belong to Candida membranifaciens subsp. flavinogenie based on the results of routine and molecular identification. The protein sequences deduced from the partial genes encoding GTP cyclohydrolase II and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase in the yeast exhibited high identity with those of the corresponding enzymes for riboflavin biosynthesis in other yeasts. Fe(3+) available in the medium repressed riboflavin production and expression of the genes responsible for riboflavin biosynthesis in the yeast. The results have evidenced that a riboflavin synthesis pathway indeed existed in the yeast. This is the first study to report that C. membranifaciens subsp. flavinogenie W14-3 from the marine environment could produce riboflavin. PMID:18262398

  18. Biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility of co-cultured Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from canine seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bumroongthai, K; Chetanachan, P; Niyomtham, W; Yurayart, C; Prapasarakul, N

    2016-07-01

    The yeasts Malassezia (M.) pachydermatis and Candida (C.) parapsilosis are often co-isolated in case of canine seborrhea dermatitis (SD) and also are emerging as opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised human beings. Increased information about how their relationship results in biofilm production and an antifungal response would be useful to inform treatment and control. This study was designed to investigate biofilm production derived from co-culture of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis from dog skin and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. We demonstrated that regardless of yeast strain or origin all single and dual cultures produced biofilms within 24 hours, and the greatest amount was present after 72 hours. Biofilm production from mixed cultures was greater than for single strains (P < .05). All sessile forms of the single and dual cultures were resistant to the tested antifungals itraconazole and ketoconazole, whereas planktonic forms were susceptible. The study suggests that dual cultures produce stronger biofilms that are likely to enhance persistence in skin lesions in dogs and result in greater resistance to antifungal treatment. PMID:26868903

  19. Vaginal lactobacilli as potential probiotics against Candida SPP.

    PubMed

    Gil, Natalia F; Martinez, Rafael C R; Gomes, Bruna C; Nomizo, Auro; De Martinis, Elaine C P

    2010-01-01

    Urogenital infections affect millions of people every year worldwide. The treatment of these diseases usually requires the use of antimicrobial agents, and more recently, the use of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures for the management of vaginal infections has been extensively studied. In this work, 11 vaginal lactobacilli isolates, previously obtained from healthy patients, were studied to screen microorganisms with probiotic properties against Candida spp. The LAB were tested for their ability of auto-aggregation, co-aggregation with C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis, adhesion to Caco-2 epithelial cells and production of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). All lactobacilli isolates tested were able to auto-aggregate (ranging from 25.3% to 75.4% assessed at 4 hours of incubation) and to co-aggregate with the four Candida species into different degrees; among them L. crispatus showed the highest scores of co-aggregation. The highest amount of lactic acid was produced by L. salivarius (13.9 g/l), followed by L. johnsonii (6.5 g/l), L. acidophilus (5.5 g/l), and L. jensenii (5.4 g/l). All isolates produced H2O2, but the highest levels (3 - 10 mg/l) were observed for L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, and L. vaginalis. Only L. agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii and L. ruminus were able to adhere to epithelial Caco-2 cells. Among the isolates evaluated, L agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii, and L. ruminus exhibited simultaneously several desirable properties as potential probiotic strains justifying future studies to evaluate their technological properties in different pharmaceutical preparations for human use. PMID:24031455

  20. Vaginal lactobacilli as potential probiotics against Candida SPP.

    PubMed Central

    Gil1, Natalia F.; Martinez, Rafael C.R.; Gomes, Bruna C.; Nomizo, Auro; De Martinis, Elaine C. P.

    2010-01-01

    Urogenital infections affect millions of people every year worldwide. The treatment of these diseases usually requires the use of antimicrobial agents, and more recently, the use of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures for the management of vaginal infections has been extensively studied. In this work, 11 vaginal lactobacilli isolates, previously obtained from healthy patients, were studied to screen microorganisms with probiotic properties against Candida spp. The LAB were tested for their ability of auto-aggregation, co-aggregation with C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis, adhesion to Caco-2 epithelial cells and production of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). All lactobacilli isolates tested were able to auto-aggregate (ranging from 25.3% to 75.4% assessed at 4 hours of incubation) and to co-aggregate with the four Candida species into different degrees; among them L. crispatus showed the highest scores of co-aggregation. The highest amount of lactic acid was produced by L. salivarius (13.9 g/l), followed by L. johnsonii (6.5 g/l), L. acidophilus (5.5 g/l), and L. jensenii (5.4 g/l). All isolates produced H2O2, but the highest levels (3 – 10 mg/l) were observed for L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, and L. vaginalis. Only L. agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii and L. ruminus were able to adhere to epithelial Caco-2 cells. Among the isolates evaluated, L agilis, L. jensenii, L. johnsonii, and L. ruminus exhibited simultaneously several desirable properties as potential probiotic strains justifying future studies to evaluate their technological properties in different pharmaceutical preparations for human use. PMID:24031455

  1. In Vitro Antifungal Activities of Isavuconazole (BAL4815), Voriconazole, and Fluconazole against 1,007 Isolates of Zygomycete, Candida, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Scedosporium Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, Jesús; Peláez, Teresa; Recio, Sandra; Torres-Narbona, Marta; Bouza, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    Isavuconazole (BAL4815) is a promising novel broad-spectrum triazole in late-stage clinical development that has proven active in vitro against Aspergillus and Candida species. We compared the in vitro activities of this agent with those of voriconazole and fluconazole by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M38-A and M27-A2 procedures against a large collection of 1,007 relevant opportunistic fungi collected from 1986 to 2007: Aspergillus spp. (n = 702), Candida spp. (n = 218), Zygomycetes (n = 45), Scedosporium spp. (n = 22), and Fusarium spp. (n = 20). All Candida isolates were from patients with candidemia. For isavuconazole, these techniques were also compared with the Etest. Isavuconazole and voriconazole had MICs at which 50% and 90% of isolates were inhibited (MIC50 and MIC90), respectively, of 1 and 1 μg/ml and 0.5 and 1 μg/ml against Aspergillus spp. and of 0.015 and 0.03 μg/ml and 0.25 and 0.125 μg/ml against Candida spp. (including fluconazole-resistant strains). The MIC50 partial and complete inhibition end points of isavuconazole and voriconazole against the non-Aspergillus molds were as follows: 1 and 2 μg/ml and 16 and >16 μg/ml against Zygomycetes; 1 and 4 μg/ml and 0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml against Scedosporium apiospermum; 4 to 16 and >16 μg/ml and 4 to 8 and 16 to >16 μg/ml (ranges) against Scedosporium prolificans; and 16 and 16 μg/ml and 4 and 4 μg/ml against Fusarium spp. Isavuconazole showed minimal fungicidal concentrations for 50% and 90% of the isolates of 1 and 1 μg/ml against Aspergillus, 16 and >16 μg/ml against Candida, and 4 and >16 μg/ml against Zygomycetes, respectively, and >16 μg/ml against the remaining molds. The Etest proved to be a suitable alternative method for determining the antifungal activities of isavuconazole against Aspergillus and Candida; the Etest results showed 96% and 93% agreement with the results of the CLSI M38-A and M27-A2 methods, respectively. PMID:18212101

  2. Influence of different susceptibility testing methods and media on determination of the relevant fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations for heavy trailing Candida isolates with low-high phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alp, Sehnaz; Sancak, Banu; Hascelik, Gulsen; Arikan, Sevtap

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the incidence of trailing growth with fluconazole in 101 clinical Candida isolates (49 C. albicans and 52 C. tropicalis) and tried to establish the convenient susceptibility testing method and medium for fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. MICs were determined by CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution (BMD) and Etest methods on RPMI-1640 agar supplemented with 2% glucose (RPG) and on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2% glucose and 0.5 μg ml(-1) methylene blue (GMB). BMD and Etest MICs were read at 24 and 48 h, and susceptibility categories were compared. All isolates were determined as susceptible with BMD, Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB at 24 h. While all isolates were interpreted as susceptible at 48 h on Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB, one C. albicans isolate was interpreted as susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) and two C. tropicalis isolates were interpreted as resistant with BMD. On Etest-RPG, trailing growth caused widespread microcolonies within the inhibition zone and resulted in confusion in MIC determination. On Etest-GMB, because of the nearly absence of microcolonies within the zone of inhibition, MICs were evaluated more easily. We conclude that, for the determination of fluconazole MICs of trailing Candida isolates, the Etest method has an advantage over BMD and can be used along with this reference method. Moreover, GMB appears more beneficial than RPG for the fluconazole Etest. PMID:19563491

  3. Declining Incidence of Candidemia and the Shifting Epidemiology of Candida Resistance in Two US Metropolitan Areas, 2008–2013: Results from Population-Based Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Angela Ahlquist; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Hollick, Rosemary; Stein, Betsy; Chiller, Tom M.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Park, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent reports have demonstrated a decline in bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) following adherence to central line insertion practices; however, declines have been less evident for BSIs due to Candida species. Methods We conducted active, population-based laboratory surveillance for candidemia in metropolitan Atlanta, GA and Baltimore, MD over a 5-year period. We calculated annual candidemia incidence and antifungal drug resistance rates. Results We identified 3,848 candidemia cases from 2008–2013. Compared with 2008, candidemia incidence per 100,000 person-years decreased significantly by 2013 in both locations (GA: 14.1 to 9.5, p<0.001; MD: 30.9 to 14.4, p<0.001). A total of 3,255 cases (85%) had a central venous catheter (CVC) in place within 2 days before the BSI culture date. In both locations, the number of CVC-associated cases declined (GA: 473 to 294; MD: 384 to 151). Candida albicans (CA, 36%) and Candida glabrata (CG, 27%) were the most common species recovered. In both locations, the proportion of cases with fluconazole resistance decreased (GA: 8.0% to 7.1%, −10%; MD: 6.6% to 4.9%, −25%), while the proportion of cases with an isolate resistant to an echinocandin increased (GA: 1.2% to 2.9%, +147%; MD: 2.0% to 3.5%, +77%). Most (74%) echinocandin-resistant isolates were CG; 17 (<1%) isolates were resistant to both drug categories (multidrug resistant [MDR], 16/17 were CG). The proportion of CG cases with MDR Candida increased from 1.8% to 2.6%. Conclusions We observed a significant decline in the incidence of candidemia over a five-year period, and increases in echinocandin-resistant and MDR Candida. Efforts to strengthen infection control practices may be preventing candidemia among high-risk patients. Further surveillance for resistant Candida is warranted. PMID:25822249

  4. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in otherwise healthy children and adults with meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Barbati, Elisa; Chaussade, Hélène; Koumar, Yatrika; Levy, Romain; Denis, Blandine; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Sophie; Loop, Michèle; Peeters, Julie; de Selys, Ariel; Vanclaire, Jean; Vermylen, Christiane; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Chatzis, Olga; Liu, Luyan; Migaud, Mélanie; Pedergnana, Vincent; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Netea, Mihai G.; De Bruycker, Jean-Jacques; Bernard, Louis; Reynes, Jacques; Amazrine, Noureddine; Abel, Laurent; Van der Linden, Dimitri; Harrison, Tom; Picard, Capucine; Lortholary, Olivier; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infections of the central nervous system or digestive tract caused by commensal fungi of the genus Candida are rare and life-threatening. The known risk factors include acquired and inherited immunodeficiencies, with patients often displaying a history of multiple infections. Cases of meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida remain unexplained. We studied five previously healthy children and adults with unexplained invasive disease of the central nervous system, or the digestive tract, or both, caused by Candida spp. The patients were aged 39, 7, 17 37, and 26 years at the time of infection and were unrelated but each born to consanguineous parents of Turkish (two patients), Iranian, Moroccan or Pakistani origin. Meningo-encephalitis was isolated in three patients, associated with colitis in a fourth patient, and the fifth patient suffered from isolated colitis. Inherited CARD9 deficiency was recently reported in otherwise healthy patients with other forms of severe disease caused by Candida, Trichophyton, Phialophora, and Exophiala, including meningo-encephalitis, but not colitis, caused by Candida and Exophiala. We therefore sequenced CARD9 in the five patients. All were found to be homozygous for rare and deleterious mutant CARD9 alleles: R70W and Q289* for the three patients with isolated C. albicans meningo-encephalitis, R35Q for the patient with meningo-encephalitis and colitis caused by C. glabrata, and Q295* for the patient with C. albicans colitis. Regardless of their levels of mutant CARD9 protein, the patients’ monocyte-derived dendritic cells responded poorly to CARD9-dependent fungal agonists (curdlan, heat-killed C. albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Exophiala dermatitidis). Invasive infections of the CNS or digestive tract caused by Candida in previously healthy children and even adults may be caused by inherited CARD9 deficiency. PMID:25702837

  5. Growth inhibition and ultrastructural alterations induced by Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase inhibitors in Candida spp. isolates, including non-albicans organisms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although Candida species are commensal microorganisms, they can cause many invasive fungal infections. In addition, antifungal resistance can contribute to failure of treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of inhibitors of Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (24-SMTI), 20-piperidin-2-yl-5α-pregnan-3β-20(R)-diol (AZA), and 24(R,S),25-epiminolanosterol (EIL), against clinical isolates of Candida spp., analysing the ultrastructural changes. Results AZA and EIL were found to be potent growth inhibitors of Candida spp. isolates. The median MIC50 was 0.5 μg.ml-1 for AZA and 2 μg.ml-1 for EIL, and the MIC90 was 2 μg.ml-1 for both compounds. All strains used in this study were susceptible to amphotericin B; however, some isolates were fluconazole- and itraconazole-resistant. Most of the azole-resistant isolates were Candida non-albicans (CNA) species, but several of them, such as C. guilliermondii, C. zeylanoides, and C. lipolytica, were susceptible to 24-SMTI, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Reference strain C. krusei (ATCC 6258, FLC-resistant) was consistently susceptible to AZA, although not to EIL. The fungicidal activity of 24-SMTI was particularly high against CNA isolates. Treatment with sub-inhibitory concentrations of AZA and EIL induced several ultrastructural alterations, including changes in the cell-wall shape and thickness, a pronounced disconnection between the cell wall and cytoplasm with an electron-lucent zone between them, mitochondrial swelling, and the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Fluorescence microscopy analyses indicated an accumulation of lipid bodies and alterations in the cell cycle of the yeasts. The selectivity of 24-SMTI for fungal cells versus mammalian cells was assessed by the sulforhodamine B viability assay. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of 24-SMT may be a novel approach to control Candida spp. infections, including those caused by azole

  6. Candida famata (Candida flareri).

    PubMed

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2012-11-01

    Candida famata (Candida flareri) belongs to the group of so-called 'flavinogenic yeasts', capable of riboflavin oversynthesis under condition of iron starvation. Some strains of C. famata belong to the most flavinogenic organisms known and were used for industrial production of riboflavin for a long time in the USA. C. famata is characterized by high salt tolerance, growing at NaCl concentrations of up to 2.5  M. Development of basic tools for the metabolic engineering of C. famata, such as a transformation system, selective markers, insertional mutagenesis, a reporter system and others, are described. The developed tools were used for cloning and identification of structural and regulatory genes of riboflavin synthesis. The construction of improved yeast strains producing riboflavin, FMN and FAD, based on the industrial riboflavin-producing strain dep8 and its non-reverting analogue AF4, is also described. PMID:23108915

  7. National surveillance of nosocomial blood stream infection due to species of Candida other than Candida albicans: frequency of occurrence and antifungal susceptibility in the SCOPE Program. SCOPE Participant Group. Surveillance and Control of Pathogens of Epidemiologic.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Jones, R N; Messer, S A; Edmond, M B; Wenzel, R P

    1998-02-01

    A national surveillance program of nosocomial blood stream infections (BSI) in the USA between April 1995 and June 1996 revealed that Candida was the fourth leading cause of nosocomial BSI, accounting for 8% of all infections. Forty-eight percent of 379 episodes of candidemia were due to species other than Candida albicans. The rank order of non-C. albicans species was C. glabrata (20%) > C. tropicalis (11%) > C. parapsilosis (8%) > C. krusei (5%) > other Candida spp. (4%). The species distribution varied according to geographic region, with non-C. albicans species predominating in the Northeast (54%) and Southeast (53%) regions, and C. albicans predominating in the Northwest (60%) and Southwest (70%) regions. In vitro susceptibility studies demonstrated that 95% of non-C. albicans isolates were susceptible to 5-fluorocytosine, and 84% and 75% were susceptible to fluconazole and itraconazole, respectively. Geographic variation in susceptibility to itraconazole, but not other agents, was observed. Isolates from the Northwest and Southeast regions were more frequently resistant to itraconazole (29-30%) than those from the Northeast and Southwest regions (17-18%). Molecular epidemiologic studies revealed possible nosocomial transmission (five medical centers). Continued surveillance for the presence of non-C. albicans species among hospitalized patients is recommended. PMID:9554180

  8. Ca3 fingerprinting of Candida albicans bloodstream isolates from the United States, Canada, South America, and Europe reveals a European clade.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Claude; Pfaller, Michael; Soll, David R

    2002-08-01

    It was previously demonstrated by a cluster analysis that 26 unrelated U.S. isolates of Candida albicans separated into three distinct groups (groups I, II, and III) while South African isolates separated into four distinct groups (groups I, II, III, and SA). To verify the absence or underrepresentation of SA isolates in North America, and to identify which groups are represented in Europe and South America, collections of bloodstream isolates from each geographical locale were analyzed by cluster analyses based on genetic fingerprinting with the Ca3 probe. The results verify that North America is almost devoid of SA isolates (2%). However, the results reveal a new clade, designated group E, relatively specific to Europe. While 26% of a European collection of 46 isolates was composed of group E isolates, only 2% of the 164 North American isolates, 5% of 22 South American isolates, and 1% of 361 South African isolates were composed of group E isolates. The North American collection proved to be the least-diverse collection in regard to group representation. In a comparison of collections from the Northeast, Midwest, and Southwest regions of the United States, Canada, and South America, it was demonstrated that both the U.S. Southwest and the South American collections were devoid of group II isolates. Together these results identify for the first time a European-specific clade and demonstrate clear distinctions in the representations of the five demonstrated clades (groups I, II, III, SA, and E) in different geographical locales. PMID:12149321

  9. Combinatorial stresses kill pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Cook, Emily; Jacobsen, Mette; You, Tao; Lenardon, Megan; Ames, Lauren; Barahona, Mauricio; Chandrasekaran, Komelapriya; Coghill, George; Goodman, Daniel; Gow, Neil A R; Grebogi, Celso; Ho, Hsueh-Lui; Ingram, Piers; McDonagh, Andrew; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Pang, Wei; Puttnam, Melanie; Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Romano, Maria Carmen; Silk, Daniel; Stark, Jaroslav; Stumpf, Michael; Thiel, Marco; Thorne, Thomas; Usher, Jane; Yin, Zhikang; Haynes, Ken; Brown, Alistair J P

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic microbes exist in dynamic niches and have evolved robust adaptive responses to promote survival in their hosts. The major fungal pathogens of humans, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, are exposed to a range of environmental stresses in their hosts including osmotic, oxidative and nitrosative stresses. Significant efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the adaptive responses to each of these stresses. In the wild, cells are frequently exposed simultaneously to combinations of these stresses and yet the effects of such combinatorial stresses have not been explored. We have developed a common experimental platform to facilitate the comparison of combinatorial stress responses in C. glabrata and C. albicans. This platform is based on the growth of cells in buffered rich medium at 30°C, and was used to define relatively low, medium and high doses of osmotic (NaCl), oxidative (H(2)O(2)) and nitrosative stresses (e.g., dipropylenetriamine (DPTA)-NONOate). The effects of combinatorial stresses were compared with the corresponding individual stresses under these growth conditions. We show for the first time that certain combinations of combinatorial stress are especially potent in terms of their ability to kill C. albicans and C. glabrata and/or inhibit their growth. This was the case for combinations of osmotic plus oxidative stress and for oxidative plus nitrosative stress. We predict that combinatorial stresses may be highly significant in host defences against these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:22463109

  10. [Determination of Candida colonization and Candida score in patients in anesthesia intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Gökahmetoğlu, Günhan; Mutlu Sarıgüzel, Fatma; Koç, Ayşe Nedret; Behret, Orhan; Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Atalay, Mustafa Altay; Elmalı, Ferhan; Darçın, Kamil

    2016-07-01

    cultures. Of 365 yeast-positive cultures, C.albicans was isolated from 184 (50.4%), C.glabrata from 66 (18%), C.parapsilosis from 42 (11.5%), C.tropicalis from 12 (3.3%), C.kefyr from three (0.8%), and C.krusei from one (0.3%) samples, whereas six (1.6%) samples yielded other yeasts (3 Saprochaete capitata, 3 Trichosporon spp.) and 51 (13.9%) samples yielded multiple yeast growth. The highest colonization rates were detected in rectal swabs (27.4%), urine (23.3%) and throat (22.5%) samples. CI value was found as >0.2 in 65% (52/80), and ≥0.5 in 25% (20/80) of the patients, whereas CS value was >2.5 in only 2.5% (2/80) of the patients. In the statistical evaluation, significant correlations were found between fungal colonization (CI> 0.2) and gender (p=0.032) and length of stay in ICU (p=0.004), and between intensive colonization (CI≥ 0.5) and gender (p=0.008) and age (p=0.012). However, the correlation between Candida colonization and the presence of underlying diseases, APACHE II score, Glasgow coma scale, invasive procedures, use of extended-spectrum antibiotics, presence of bacterial infections, haemodialysis, transfusion and history of previous hospitalization was not statistically significant. Our results have also indicated a statistically significant relationship between fungal colonization and the positivity of C.albicans, C.glabrata, C.parapsilosis ang C.albicans/C.glabrata (p=0.001, p=0.002, p=0.008 and p=0.028, respectively), emphasizing the importance of species-level identification of Candida isolates. The reason of lacking of IC development in our patients may be explained by their low CI and CS values. In conclusion, monitoring of ICU patients who are at high risk for IC in terms of CI and CS would be beneficial. However it is clear that our data need to be supported by multi-center and high-scale studies. PMID:27525399

  11. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  12. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Couzigou, Célia; Gabriel, Frédéric; Biteau, Nicolas; Fitton-Ouhabi, Valérie; Noël, Thierry; Accoceberry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast. PMID:24936404

  13. Candida Parapsilosis and Candida Guillermondii: Emerging Pathogens in Nail Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fich, Felix; Abarzúa-Araya, Alvaro; Pérez, Mario; Nauhm, Yalile; León, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis of the fingernails and toenails is generally caused by dermatophytes and yeasts. Toenail mycoses involve mainly dermatophytes but when Candida is also involved, the strain most commonly isolated worldwide is C. albicans. Aims: To determine Candida strains prevailing in onychomycosis. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational and descriptive study of fungal cultures retrieved from the registry of the microbiology laboratory of the Pontificia Universidad Católica was performed. Specimens obtained from patients attending the healthcare network between December 2007 and December 2010 was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Candida was retrieved from 467 of 8443 specimens (52% fingernails and 48% toenails). Cultures were negative in 5320 specimens (63.6%). Among Candida-positive cultures, parapsilosis was the most commonly isolated strain with 202 cases (43.3%). While isolates of Candida guillermondii were 113 (24.2%), those of Candida albicans were 110 (23.6%), those of spp. were 20 (4.3%) and there were 22 cases of other isolates (4.71%). Among the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida, 136 (29,1%) were men and 331 (70,9%) were women. All patients were older than 18 years old. Clinical files were available for only 169 of the 467 patients with positive cultures for Candida. For those, age, gender, underlying illnesses and use of immunossupresive agents during the trial was reviewed. Conclusions: The present study shows that both C. parapsilosis as well as C. guillermondii appear as emerging pathogens that would be in fact taking the place of C. albicans as the most commonly isolated pathogen in patients with Candida onychomycosis. The relative percentage of C parapsilosis increases every year. Identification of Candida strains as etiological agents of nail candidiasis becomes relevant to the management both nail as well as systemic candidiasis, in view of the

  14. An A643V amino acid substitution in Upc2p contributes to azole resistance in well-characterized clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hoot, Samantha J; Smith, Adam R; Brown, Ryan P; White, Theodore C

    2011-02-01

    The Candida albicans Upc2p transcription factor regulates ERG11, encoding the target of azole drugs. Gain-of-function mutations that contribute to resistance were recently identified in a series of sequential clinical isolates (N. Dunkel, T. T. Liu, K. S. Barker, R. Homayouni, J. Morschhauser, and P. D. Rogers, Eukaryot. Cell 7:1180-1190, 2008). In the present study, UPC2 was sequenced from a matched set of 17 isolates. An A643V substitution was present in all of the isolates in the series that overexpressed ERG11. Azole susceptibility, ergosterol levels, and expression of ERG genes were elevated in the A643V clinical isolates and in reconstructed strains. PMID:21078937

  15. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) element functional in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Jenkinson, H F; Shepherd, M G

    1990-04-01

    An 8.6-kb fragment was isolated from an EcoRI digest of Candida albicans ATCC 10261 genomic DNA which conferred the property of autonomous replication in Saccharomyces cervisiae on the otherwise non-replicative plasmid pMK155 (5.6 kb). The DNA responsible for the replicative function was subcloned as a 1.2-kb fragment onto a non-replicative plasmid (pRC3915) containing the C. albicans URA3 and LEU2 genes to form plasmid pRC3920. This plasmid was capable of autonomous replication in both S. cerevisiae and C. albicans and transformed S. cerevisiae AH22 (leu2-) to Leu+ at a frequency of 2.15 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA, and transformed C. albicans SGY-243 (delta ura3) to Ura+ at a frequency of 1.91 x 10(3) transformants per microgram DNA. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed the presence of two identical regions of eleven base pairs (5'TTTTATGTTTT3') which agreed with the consensus of autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) cores functional in S. cerevisiae. In addition there were two 10/11 and numerous 9/11 matches to the core consensus. The two 11/11 matches to the consensus, CaARS1 and CaARS2, were located on opposite strands in a non-coding AT-rich region and were separated by 107 bp. Also present on the C. albicans DNA, 538 bp from the ARS cores, was a gene for 5S rRNA which showed sequence homology with several other yeast 5S rRNA genes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2196431

  16. Kinetics of phenol biodegradation at high concentration by a metabolically versatile isolated yeast Candida tropicalis PHB5.

    PubMed

    Basak, Bikram; Bhunia, Biswanath; Dutta, Subhasish; Chakraborty, Samayita; Dey, Apurba

    2014-01-01

    A highly tolerant phenol-degrading yeast strain PHB5 was isolated from wastewater effluent of a coke oven plant and identified as Candida tropicalis based on phylogenetic analysis. Biodegradation experiments with C. tropicalis PHB5 showed that the strain was able to utilize 99.4% of 2,400 mg l(-1) phenol as sole source of carbon and energy within 48 h. Strain PHB5 was also observed to grow on 18 various aromatic hydrocarbons. Haldane model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μ max = 0.3407 h(-1), K S = 15.81 mg l(-1), K i = 169.0 mg l(-1) (R (2) = 0.9886). The true specific growth rate, calculated from μ max, was 0.2113. A volumetric phenol degradation rate (V max) was calculated by fitting the phenol consumption data with Gompertz model and specific degradation rate (q) was calculated from V max. The q values were fitted with Haldane model, yielding following parameters: q max = 0.2766 g g(-1) h(-1), K S ' = 2.819 mg l(-1), K i ' = 2,093 (R (2) = 0.8176). The yield factor (Y X/S ) varied between 0.185 to 0.96 g g(-1) for different initial phenol concentrations. Phenol degradation by the strain proceeded through a pathway involving production of intermediates such as catechol and cis,cis-muconic acid which were identified by enzymatic assays and HPLC analysis. PMID:23917743

  17. Isolation of fungi from bats of the Amazon basin.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, W Y; Luizão, R C; Barreto da Silva, M do S

    1982-01-01

    A total of 2,886 bats captured in the Amazon Basin of Brazil were processed for the isolation of fungi. From the livers, spleens, and lungs of 155 bats (5.4%), 186 fungal isolates of the genera Candida (123 isolates), Trichosporon (26 isolates), Torulopsis (25 isolates), Kluyveromyces (11 isolates), and Geotrichum (1 isolate) were recovered. Seven known pathogenic species were present: Candida parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, C. albicans, C. stellatoidea, C. pseudotropicalis, Trichosporon beigelii, and Torulopsis glabrata. Twenty-three culture-positive bats showed identical fungal colonization in multiple organs or mixed colonization in a single organ. The fungal isolation rates for individual bat species varied from 1 fungus per 87 bats to 3 fungi per 13 bats, and the mycoflora diversity for members of an individual fungus-bearing bat species varied from 16 fungi per 40 bats to 7 fungi per 6 bats. Of the 38 fungal species isolated, 36 had not been previously described as in vivo bat isolates. Of the 27 culture-positive bat species, 21 had not been previously described as mammalian hosts for medically or nonmedically important fungi. PMID:6890326

  18. Genetics of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, S; Magee, P T

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common fungal pathogens. Infections caused by C. albicans and other Candida species can be life threatening in individuals with impaired immune function. Genetic analysis of C. albicans pathogenesis is complicated by the diploid nature of the species and the absence of a known sexual cycle. Through a combination of parasexual techniques and molecular approaches, an effective genetic system has been developed. The close relationship of C. albicans to the more extensively studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been of great utility in the isolation of Candida genes and development of the C. albicans DNA transformation system. Molecular methods have been used for clarification of taxonomic relationships and more precise epidemiologic investigations. Analysis of the physical and genetic maps of C. albicans and the closely related Candida stellatoidea has provided much information on the highly fluid nature of the Candida genome. The genetic system is seeing increased application to biological questions such as drug resistance, virulence determinants, and the phenomenon of phenotypic variation. Although most molecular analysis to data has been with C. albicans, the same methodologies are proving highly effective with other Candida species. Images PMID:2215421

  19. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates reveals dominance and persistence of a particular epidemiological clone among neonatal intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Delfino, Demetrio; Cascio, Antonio; Lo Passo, Carla; Amorini, Maria; Romeo, Daniela; Pernice, Ida

    2013-01-01

    In this study, using multilocus microsatellite analysis, we report the genetic characterization of 27 Candida parapsilosis isolates recovered in two different periods of time (2007-2009 and 2011-2012) from infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit of a hospital in Messina, Italy. The results revealed the persistence and dominance of a particular infectious genotype among NICU patients and highlight the power of the used microsatellite markers in clarifying epidemiologic associations, detect micro-evolutionary variations and facilitating the recognition of outbreaks. PMID:23022715

  20. An actinomycete isolate from solitary wasp mud nest having strong antibacterial activity and kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Naik, Bindu; Gusain, Omprakash; Bisht, Gajraj S.

    2014-01-01

    An actinomycetes strain designated as MN 2(6) was isolated from the solitary wasp mud nest. The isolate was identified using polyphasic taxonomy. It produced the extensive branched brown substrate and white aerial hyphae that changed into grayish black. The aerial mycelia produced the spiral spore chains with rugose spore surface. The growth was observed between temperature range of 27–37°C, pH 8–10 and below salt concentration of 6% (w/v). The comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic relationship showed that strain MN 2(6) lies in clade with Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T, Streptomyces sporocinereus NBRC 100766T and Streptomyces demainii NRRL B-1478T with which it shares a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.3%. The strain MN 2(6) can be differentiated from type strains based on phenotypic characteristics. The strain MN 2(6) showed most promising activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, acid-fast bacilli and Candida species suggesting broad-spectrum characteristics of the active metabolite. Evaluation of anti-candidal activity of the metabolite of strain MN 2(6) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changed external morphology of yeast. It kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss. However, further studies are required to elucidate the structure of the active metabolite produced by the isolate MN 2(6). PMID:25191320

  1. Heterogeneity of metallo and serine extracellular proteinases in oral clinical isolates of Candida albicans in HIV-positive and healthy children from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Brito Costa, Edja Maria Melo; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Cardoso, Abel Silveira; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Hagler, Allen Norton; de Araújo Soares, Rosangela Maria

    2003-09-22

    Candida yeasts frequently cause life-threatening systemic infections in immunocompromised hosts. In the present study, gelatin-SDS-PAGE analysis was used to characterize extracellular proteinases in 44 oral clinical isolates of Candida albicans from HIV-positive (29/50) and healthy children (15/50). Our survey indicates that these oral clinical isolates of C. albicans have complex extracellular proteolytic activity profiles, which illustrates the heterogeneity of this species. We showed four distinct proteolytic patterns composed of distinct serine (30-58 kDa) and metalloproteinase (64-95 kDa) activities, based on the inhibition profile with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively. This is the first report on secreted serine and metalloproteinases present in the culture supernatant fluids of C. albicans; however, we did not observe a significant correlation between proteolytic profile expressed by the C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive children and CD4(+) T cell count and plasma viral load. PMID:13129652

  2. Development of Candida-Specific Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection and Identification of Eight Medically Important Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Culture-based identification methods have been the gold standard for the diagnosis of fungal infection. Currently, molecular technologies such as real-time PCR assays with short turnaround time can provide desirable alternatives for the rapid detection of Candida microbes. However, most of the published PCR primer sets are not Candida specific and likely to amplify DNA from common environmental contaminants, such as Aspergillus microbes. In this study, we designed pan-Candida primer sets based on the ribosomal DNA-coding regions conserved within Candida but distinct from those of Aspergillus and Penicillium. We demonstrate that the final two selected pan-Candida primer sets would not amplify Aspergillus DNA and could be used to differentiate eight medically important Candida pathogens in real-time PCR assays based on their melting profiles, with a sensitivity of detection as low as 10 fg of Candida genomic DNA. Moreover, we further evaluated and selected species-specific primer sets covering Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida dubliniensis and show that they had high sensitivity and specificity. These real-time PCR primer sets could potentially be assembled into a single PCR array for the rapid detection of Candida species in various clinical settings, such as corneal transplantation. PMID:27103821

  3. Development of Candida-Specific Real-Time PCR Assays for the Detection and Identification of Eight Medically Important Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Nagamine, Kenjiro; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Culture-based identification methods have been the gold standard for the diagnosis of fungal infection. Currently, molecular technologies such as real-time PCR assays with short turnaround time can provide desirable alternatives for the rapid detection of Candida microbes. However, most of the published PCR primer sets are not Candida specific and likely to amplify DNA from common environmental contaminants, such as Aspergillus microbes. In this study, we designed pan-Candida primer sets based on the ribosomal DNA-coding regions conserved within Candida but distinct from those of Aspergillus and Penicillium. We demonstrate that the final two selected pan-Candida primer sets would not amplify Aspergillus DNA and could be used to differentiate eight medically important Candida pathogens in real-time PCR assays based on their melting profiles, with a sensitivity of detection as low as 10 fg of Candida genomic DNA. Moreover, we further evaluated and selected species-specific primer sets covering Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida dubliniensis and show that they had high sensitivity and specificity. These real-time PCR primer sets could potentially be assembled into a single PCR array for the rapid detection of Candida species in various clinical settings, such as corneal transplantation. PMID:27103821

  4. Comparison of proteolytic activity of Candida sp. strains depending on their origin.

    PubMed

    Modrzewska, B; Kurnatowski, P; Khalid, K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the proteolytic activity of various Candida strains isolated from the oral cavity of persons without clinical symptoms of fungal infection, outpatients with oral cavity disorders and patients hospitalized due to head and neck tumors. A secondary aim was to confirm the presence of secreted aspartyl protease (SAP) genes in the isolated strains and then to compare it depending on the fungal species. Material consisted of 134 fungal strains that were analysed by a modified Staib method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the use of specific primer pairs. The greatest proteolytic activity of fungi was observed at pH 3.5. The proteolysis were the strongest for strains isolated from dental patients and the weakest from persons without changes in the oral cavity. In total, 61.9% of the strains exhibited the presence of at least one of the SAP1-3 genes in all examined groups, SAP1 being the most common; SAP4-6 genes were not observed. All genes were more frequent in the strains isolated from the dental patients than from other groups. SAP1-3 genes were present in Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. humicola and C. lipolytica, but were not noted in other isolated species. The lowest activity of proteolytic enzymes and the least number of aspartyl protease genes are observed among strains isolated from patients without clinical symptoms of mycosis. SAP1-3 genes are most frequently detected in the strains isolated from the oral cavity; their presence varies depending on the species of the fungi. PMID:26922385

  5. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  6. Live Candida albicans Suppresses Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Phagocytes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wellington, Melanie; Dolan, Kristy; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important aspect of phagocyte-mediated host responses. Since phagocytes play a crucial role in the host response to Candida albicans, we examined the ability of Candida to modulate phagocyte ROS production. ROS production was measured in the murine macrophage cell line J774 and in primary phagocytes using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. J774 cells, murine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), human monocytes, and human PMN treated with live C. albicans produced significantly less ROS than phagocytes treated with heat-killed C. albicans. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice, but not from BALB/c mice. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS in response to external stimuli. C. albicans and Candida glabrata suppressed ROS production by phagocytes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulated ROS production. The cell wall is the initial point of contact between Candida and phagocytes, but isolated cell walls from both heat-killed and live C. albicans stimulated ROS production. Heat-killed C. albicans has increased surface exposure of 1,3-β-glucan, a cell wall component that can stimulate phagocytes. To determine whether surface 1,3-β-glucan exposure accounted for the difference in ROS production, live C. albicans cells were treated with a sublethal dose of caspofungin to increase surface 1,3-β-glucan exposure. Caspofungin-treated C. albicans was fully able to suppress ROS production, indicating that suppression of ROS overrides stimulatory signals from 1,3-β-glucan. These studies indicate that live C. albicans actively suppresses ROS production in phagocytes in vitro, which may represent an important immune evasion mechanism. PMID:18981256

  7. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of a Geographically and Temporally Matched Set of Candida albicans Isolates from Humans and Nonmigratory Wildlife in Central Illinois ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lauren; Whittington, Julia K.; Pujol, Claude; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored whether wildlife species serve as the reservoir for human Candida albicans strains in a given geographic area. C. albicans isolates were collected from nonmigratory wildlife admitted to the University of Illinois Wildlife Medical Clinic. A geographically and temporally matched set of C. albicans oral isolates was collected from healthy human volunteers. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign strains to genetic clades. Clade 1 isolates, particularly diploid sequence type 69 (DST 69), were most common in humans. Clade 1 strains were less frequently recovered from wildlife, while clade 8 strains, particularly DST 90, were overrepresented in the wildlife collection. All instances where a wildlife and human isolate shared the same DST occurred within clade 1. Clade distributions between human and wildlife isolates were significantly different, demonstrating population isolation between the groups. These differences may indicate limited strain transfer between groups or differential selection of C. albicans isolates in humans and wildlife. Wildlife strains had an amphotericin B MIC significantly lower than that of human isolates; strains with increased susceptibility were from several clades. C. albicans isolates were collected from domestic animals to provide comparisons with human and wildlife data sets. C. albicans isolation from canine and feline oral and anal swabs was infrequent; companion animal isolates were closely related to clade 1 human isolates. Collectively, the data suggest a greater likelihood of C. albicans transfer from humans to animals than from animals to humans. The nontransient human population may maintain the connection between geography and the C. albicans genetic groups recovered from humans. PMID:18621922

  8. In vitro activities of voriconazole (UK-109,496) against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant Candida albicans isolates from oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, M; Schmidt-Westhausen, A; Trautmann, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Candida albicans to a new antifungal triazole, voriconazole (UK-109,496), was investigated in 105 isolates obtained from the oral cavities of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to study this drug's activity against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant isolates. MICs were determined by a broth microdilution technique according to document M27-T from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and by using a broth microdilution technique and a synthetic high-resolution medium. These antifungal susceptibility testing methods showed high levels of agreement (93% for fluconazole and 86% for voriconazole). Data from in vitro studies showed that voriconazole has good activity against fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans isolates; the MICs at which 90% of all isolates were inhibited were 0.19 to 0.39 microgram/ml. We found that for isolates for which fluconazole MICs were high, voriconazole MICs were proportionally higher than those for fluconazole-susceptible C.albicans (P < 0.001). Pretreatment isolates from six patients with fluconazole-refractory esophageal candidiasis were included in the study. For these isolates the MICs were < or = 0.39 microgram/ml, and all patients responded to voriconazole. These results suggest that voriconazole is effective even in the treatment of fluconazole-refractory esophageal candidiasis and should be studied further to determine its clinical relevance in patients with HIV infection. PMID:9055995

  9. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  10. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shino, Beena; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Jaiprakash, Shyamala R; Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  11. Evaluation of caries-associated virulence of biofilms from Candida albicans isolated from saliva of pediatric patients with sickle-cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Brighenti, Fernanda Lourenção; Medeiros, Amanda Coelho; Matos, Bruno Mello; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi

    2014-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the amount of Candida spp. in saliva is higher in children with sickle-cell disease. The results from a recent study demonstrate its participation in the etiology of dental caries. Objective This study assessed caries-associated virulence (production of acid, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity) of biofilms from Candida albicans isolated from saliva of patients with sickle-cell anemia in comparison to isolates obtained from matched healthy children. Material and Methods The isolates were previously obtained from 25 children (4-6 years) and their matched controls (healthy children). One isolate of C. albicans per children was used, totaling 25 isolates per group. The C. albicans biofilms were grown for five days and analyzed regarding the production of lactic acid, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity. The production of lactic acid was determined by the enzymatic method. The concentration of extracellular polysaccharides was determined by the phenol-sulphuric acid method, and the concentration of the protein was analyzed using the QuantiPro BCA kit. The XTT reduction was used to verify the metabolic activity. The data were analyzed with GraphPad Prism at 5%. Results The Mean±standard deviation for acid production, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity of isolates from sickle-cell group was, respectively: 7.1±5.0 mmol/L; 15.6±2.5 μg glucose/mg biofilm; 7,503±3,097 μg/mL; A490 3.5±0.7. For isolates from control group the values obtained were: 3.5±3.3 mmol/L; 12.8±3.4 μg glucose/mg biofilm; 4,995±682 μg/mL; A490 3.4±0.5. The C. albicans isolates from patients with sickle-cell anemia produced a significantly greater quantity of acids (p=0.025), polysaccharides (p=0.025) and proteins (p=0.047) compared with the isolates from control group. However, there was no difference in metabolic activity (XTT) between groups (p=0.750). Conclusion The C

  12. Evaluation of caries-associated virulence of biofilms from Candida albicans isolated from saliva of pediatric patients with sickle-cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; MEDEIROS, Amanda Coelho; MATOS, Bruno Mello; RIBEIRO, Zulene Eveline Abreu; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2014-01-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the amount of Candida spp. in saliva is higher in children with sickle-cell disease. The results from a recent study demonstrate its participation in the etiology of dental caries. Objective This study assessed caries-associated virulence (production of acid, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity) of biofilms from Candida albicans isolated from saliva of patients with sickle-cell anemia in comparison to isolates obtained from matched healthy children. Material and Methods The isolates were previously obtained from 25 children (4-6 years) and their matched controls (healthy children). One isolate of C. albicans per children was used, totaling 25 isolates per group. The C. albicans biofilms were grown for five days and analyzed regarding the production of lactic acid, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity. The production of lactic acid was determined by the enzymatic method. The concentration of extracellular polysaccharides was determined by the phenol-sulphuric acid method, and the concentration of the protein was analyzed using the QuantiPro BCA kit. The XTT reduction was used to verify the metabolic activity. The data were analyzed with GraphPad Prism at 5%. Results The Mean±standard deviation for acid production, extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and metabolic activity of isolates from sickle-cell group was, respectively: 7.1±5.0 mmol/L; 15.6±2.5 μg glucose/mg biofilm; 7,503±3,097 μg/mL; A490 3.5±0.7. For isolates from control group the values obtained were: 3.5±3.3 mmol/L; 12.8±3.4 μg glucose/mg biofilm; 4,995±682 μg/mL; A490 3.4±0.5. The C. albicans isolates from patients with sickle-cell anemia produced a significantly greater quantity of acids (p=0.025), polysaccharides (p=0.025) and proteins (p=0.047) compared with the isolates from control group. However, there was no difference in metabolic activity (XTT) between groups (p=0.750). Conclusion The C

  13. Multicenter Study of Epidemiological Cutoff Values and Detection of Resistance in Candida spp. to Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin Using the Sensititre YeastOne Colorimetric Method

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Fernandez, M.; Cantón, E.; Carver, P. L.; Chen, S. C.-A.; Eschenauer, G.; Getsinger, D. L.; Gonzalez, G. M.; Govender, N. P.; Grancini, A.; Hanson, K. E.; Kidd, S. E.; Klinker, K.; Kubin, C. J.; Kus, J. V.; Lockhart, S. R.; Meletiadis, J.; Morris, A. J.; Pelaez, T.; Quindós, G.; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M.; Sánchez-Reus, F.; Shoham, S.; Wengenack, N. L.; Borrell Solé, N.; Echeverria, J.; Esperalba, J.; Gómez-G. de la Pedrosa, E.; García García, I.; Linares, M. J.; Marco, F.; Merino, P.; Pemán, J.; Pérez del Molino, L.; Roselló Mayans, E.; Rubio Calvo, C.; Ruiz Pérez de Pipaon, M.; Yagüe, G.; Garcia-Effron, G.; Guinea, J.; Perlin, D. S.; Sanguinetti, M.; Shields, R.; Turnidge, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neither breakpoints (BPs) nor epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. with anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin when using the Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) broth dilution colorimetric method. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs have so far proven to be unreliable. Candida species wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (for microorganisms in a species/drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 6,007 Candida albicans, 186 C. dubliniensis, 3,188 C. glabrata complex, 119 C. guilliermondii, 493 C. krusei, 205 C. lusitaniae, 3,136 C. parapsilosis complex, and 1,016 C. tropicalis isolates. SYO MIC data gathered from 38 laboratories in Australia, Canada, Europe, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States were pooled to statistically define SYO ECVs. ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were, respectively, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. glabrata complex, 4, 2, and 4 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis complex, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.25, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 0.25, 1, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 4, 2, and 2 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25, 0.25, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis. Species-specific SYO ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin correctly classified 72 (88.9%), 74 (91.4%), 76 (93.8%), respectively, of 81 Candida isolates with identified fks mutations. SYO ECVs may aid in detecting non-WT isolates with reduced susceptibility to anidulafungin, micafungin, and especially caspofungin, since testing the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to caspofungin by reference methodologies is not recommended. PMID:26282428

  14. Multicenter study of epidemiological cutoff values and detection of resistance in Candida spp. to anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin using the Sensititre YeastOne colorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Alvarez-Fernandez, M; Cantón, E; Carver, P L; Chen, S C-A; Eschenauer, G; Getsinger, D L; Gonzalez, G M; Govender, N P; Grancini, A; Hanson, K E; Kidd, S E; Klinker, K; Kubin, C J; Kus, J V; Lockhart, S R; Meletiadis, J; Morris, A J; Pelaez, T; Quindós, G; Rodriguez-Iglesias, M; Sánchez-Reus, F; Shoham, S; Wengenack, N L; Borrell Solé, N; Echeverria, J; Esperalba, J; Gómez-G de la Pedrosa, E; García García, I; Linares, M J; Marco, F; Merino, P; Pemán, J; Pérez Del Molino, L; Roselló Mayans, E; Rubio Calvo, C; Ruiz Pérez de Pipaon, M; Yagüe, G; Garcia-Effron, G; Guinea, J; Perlin, D S; Sanguinetti, M; Shields, R; Turnidge, J

    2015-11-01

    Neither breakpoints (BPs) nor epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. with anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin when using the Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) broth dilution colorimetric method. In addition, reference caspofungin MICs have so far proven to be unreliable. Candida species wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (for microorganisms in a species/drug combination with no detectable phenotypic resistance) were established for 6,007 Candida albicans, 186 C. dubliniensis, 3,188 C. glabrata complex, 119 C. guilliermondii, 493 C. krusei, 205 C. lusitaniae, 3,136 C. parapsilosis complex, and 1,016 C. tropicalis isolates. SYO MIC data gathered from 38 laboratories in Australia, Canada, Europe, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States were pooled to statistically define SYO ECVs. ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin encompassing ≥97.5% of the statistically modeled population were, respectively, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.12, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. glabrata complex, 4, 2, and 4 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis complex, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.25, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 0.25, 1, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 4, 2, and 2 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, and 0.25, 0.25, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis. Species-specific SYO ECVs for anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin correctly classified 72 (88.9%), 74 (91.4%), 76 (93.8%), respectively, of 81 Candida isolates with identified fks mutations. SYO ECVs may aid in detecting non-WT isolates with reduced susceptibility to anidulafungin, micafungin, and especially caspofungin, since testing the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to caspofungin by reference methodologies is not recommended. PMID:26282428

  15. Potent antifungal activity of extracts and pure compound isolated from pomegranate peels and synergism with fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Endo, Eliana Harue; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado

    2010-09-01

    Activity-guided repeated fractionation of crude hydro alcoholic extract prepared from the fruit peel of Punica granatum on a silica-gel column yielded a compound that exhibited strong antifungal activity against Candida spp. Based on spectral analyses, the compound was identified as punicalagin. Punicalagin showed strong activity against Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis, with MICs of 3.9 and 1.9 microg/ml, respectively. The combination of punicalagin and fluconazole showed a synergistic interaction. MIC for fluconazole decreased twofold when combined with the extract. The FIC index was 0.25. The synergism observed in disk-diffusion and checkerboard assays was confirmed in time-kill curves. The effect of punicalagin on the morphology and ultrastructure in treated yeast cells was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. An irregular budding pattern and pseudohyphae were seen in treated yeasts. By transmission electron microscopy, treated cells showed a thickened cell wall, changes in the space between cell wall and the plasma membrane, vacuoles, and a reduction in cytoplasmic content. Since the punicalagin concentration effective in vitro is achievable in vivo, the combination of this agent with fluconazole represents an attractive prospect for the development of new management strategies for candidiasis, and should be investigated further in in vivo models. PMID:20541606

  16. Microbicidal activity of neutrophils is inhibited by isolates from recurrent vaginal candidiasis (RVVC) caused by Candida albicans through fungal thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Godoy, Janine Silva Ribeiro; de Souza Bonfim Mendonça, Patrícia; Bidóia, Danielle Lazarin; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Lopes Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is characterized by an infection of the vulva and vagina, mainly caused by Candida albicans, a commensal microorganism that inhabits the vaginal, digestive, and respiratory mucosae. Vulvovaginal candidiasis affects approximately 75% of women, and 5% develop the recurrent form (RVVC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether neutrophils microbicidal response is triggered when activated with RVVC isolates caused by C. albicans. Our results showed that RVVC isolates induced neutrophil migration but significantly decrease the microbicidal activity of neutrophils, compared with VVC and ASS isolates. The microbicidal activity of neutrophils is highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). However, this isolate induced detoxification of ROS/RNS produced by neutrophils, reflected by the high level of thiol groups and by the oxygen consumption. Therefore, RVVC isolates induced biochemical changes in the inflammatory response triggered by neutrophils, and these effects were mainly related to the detoxification of ROS/RNS through the thioredoxin reductase (TR), a key antioxidant enzyme in fungi. This might be one of the resistance mechanisms triggered by RVVC caused by C. albicans. PMID:25497972

  17. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in three genomes of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongmei

    2016-06-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, which composed of tandem repeated short units of 1-6bp, have been paying attention continuously. Here, the distribution, composition and polymorphism of microsatellites and compound microsatellites were analyzed in three available genomes of Candida species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida orthopsilosis). The results show that there were 118,047, 66,259 and 61,119 microsatellites in genomes of C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata and C. orthopsilosis, respectively. The SSRs covered more than 1/3 length of genomes in the three species. The microsatellites, which just consist of bases A and (or) T, such as (A)n, (T)n, (AT)n, (TA)n, (AAT)n, (TAA)n, (TTA)n, (ATA)n, (ATT)n and (TAT)n, were predominant in the three genomes. The length of microsatellites was focused on 6bp and 9bp either in the three genomes or in its coding sequences. What's more, the relative abundance (19.89/kbp) and relative density (167.87bp/kbp) of SSRs in sequence of mitochondrion of C. glabrata were significantly great than that in any one of genomes or chromosomes of the three species. In addition, the distance between any two adjacent microsatellites was an important factor to influence the formation of compound microsatellites. The analysis may be helpful for further studying the roles of microsatellites in genomes' origination, organization and evolution of Candida species. PMID:26883055

  18. Sequence Variations and Protein Expression Levels of the Two Immune Evasion Proteins Gpm1 and Pra1 Influence Virulence of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shanshan; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Münzberg, Christin; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, the important human fungal pathogen uses multiple evasion strategies to control, modulate and inhibit host complement and innate immune attack. Clinical C. albicans strains vary in pathogenicity and in serum resistance, in this work we analyzed sequence polymorphisms and variations in the expression levels of two central fungal complement evasion proteins, Gpm1 (phosphoglycerate mutase 1) and Pra1 (pH-regulated antigen 1) in thirteen clinical C. albicans isolates. Four nucleotide (nt) exchanges, all representing synonymous exchanges, were identified within the 747-nt long GPM1 gene. For the 900-nt long PRA1 gene, sixteen nucleotide exchanges were identified, which represented synonymous, as well as non-synonymous exchanges. All thirteen clinical isolates had a homozygous exchange (A to G) at position 73 of the PRA1 gene. Surface levels of Gpm1 varied by 8.2, and Pra1 levels by 3.3 fold in thirteen tested isolates and these differences influenced fungal immune fitness. The high Gpm1/Pra1 expressing candida strains bound the three human immune regulators more efficiently, than the low expression strains. The difference was 44% for Factor H binding, 51% for C4BP binding and 23% for plasminogen binding. This higher Gpm1/Pra1 expressing strains result in enhanced survival upon challenge with complement active, Factor H depleted human serum (difference 40%). In addition adhesion to and infection of human endothelial cells was increased (difference 60%), and C3b surface deposition was less effective (difference 27%). Thus, variable expression levels of central immune evasion protein influences immune fitness of the human fungal pathogen C. albicans and thus contribute to fungal virulence. PMID:25692293

  19. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Yeast Species Isolated from Stool Samples of Children with Suspected or Diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorders and In Vitro Susceptibility Against Nystatin and Fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kantarcioglu, A Serda; Kiraz, Nuri; Aydin, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a general term for a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders of brain development that limits a person's ability to function normally. Etiology has not been clearly defined up to date. However, gut microbiota and the bidirectional communication between the gastrointestinal tract and brain, the so-called microbiota-gut-brain axis, are hypothesized, which may be involved in the etiology of several mental disorders. Recent reports suggest that Candida, particularly Candida albicans, growth in intestines may cause lower absorption of carbohydrates and minerals and higher toxin levels which are thought to contribute autistic behaviors. The aim of this study was to identify the 3-year deposited yeasts isolated from stool samples of children with diagnosed or suspected ASD and to determine in vitro activity of nystatin and fluconazole against these isolates using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3 guidelines. A 17-year retrospective assessment was also done using our laboratory records. Among the species identified, intrinsically fluconazole-resistant Candida krusei (19.8 %) and Candida glabrata (14.8 %) with elevated MICs were remarkable. Overall, C. albicans (57.4 %) was the most commonly isolated species in 17 years. The species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility tests have to be performed using the strain isolated from stool sample, to select the appropriate antifungal agent, if antimycotic therapy is needed. PMID:26442855

  20. Evaluation of Bichro-Dubli Fumouze to distinguish Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sahand, Ismail H; Moragues, María D; Robert, Raymond; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2006-06-01

    We have evaluated the ability of the Bichro-Dubli Fumouze (Fumouze Diagnostics, Levallois-Perret, France) latex agglutination test to identify colonies of Candida dubliniensis grown on different media. The test was positive for 103 of 106 isolates of C. dubliniensis and negative for Candida albicans and other Candida species studied. The sensitivity and specificity of the test were 97.1% and 100%, respectively. The test is very rapid, simple, and reliable giving the same results independently of whether the colonies are grown previously on Sabouraud dextrose agar, CHROMagar Candida medium, Candida ID2 medium, or CHROMagar-Pal's medium. PMID:16529902

  1. Gain-of-function mutations in UPC2 are a frequent cause of ERG11 upregulation in azole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Stephanie A; Barker, Katherine S; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Toner, Geoffrey; Chadwick, Sean G; Gygax, Scott E; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Rogers, P David

    2012-10-01

    In Candida albicans, Upc2 is a zinc-cluster transcription factor that targets genes, including those of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. To date, three documented UPC2 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have been recovered from fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates that contribute to an increase in ERG11 expression and decreased fluconazole susceptibility. In a group of 63 isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole, we found that 47 overexpressed ERG11 by at least 2-fold over the average expression levels in 3 unrelated fluconazole-susceptible strains. Of those 47 isolates, 29 contained a mutation in UPC2, whereas the remaining 18 isolates did not. Among the isolates containing mutations in UPC2, we recovered eight distinct mutations resulting in putative single amino acid substitutions: G648D, G648S, A643T, A643V, Y642F, G304R, A646V, and W478C. Seven of these resulted in increased ERG11 expression, increased cellular ergosterol, and decreased susceptibility to fluconazole compared to the results for the wild-type strain. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed for the four strongest Upc2 amino acid substitutions (A643V, G648D, G648S, and Y642F). Genes commonly upregulated by all four mutations included those involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, in oxidoreductase activity, the major facilitator efflux pump encoded by the MDR1 gene, and the uncharacterized ATP binding cassette transporter CDR11. These findings demonstrate that gain-of-function mutations in UPC2 are more prevalent among clinical isolates than previously thought and make a significant contribution to azole antifungal resistance, but the findings do not account for ERG11 overexpression in all such isolates of C. albicans. PMID:22923048

  2. Emergence of cercariae of Echinostoma caproni and Schistosoma mansoni from Biomphalaria glabrata under different laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Fried, B; LaTerra, R; Kim, Y

    2002-12-01

    Release of Echinostoma caproni cercariae and Schistosoma mansoni from experimentally infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails maintained under different laboratory conditions was studied. Infected snails were isolated individually for 1 h in Stender dishes containing 5 ml of artificial spring water and the number of cercariae released during this time was recorded. Of numerous conditions tested, the addition of lettuce, the use of water conditioned by B. glabrata snails and a temperature of 35 degrees C significantly increased the release of E. caproni cercariae. A significant increase in cercarial release of S. mansoni was seen only in cultures fed lettuce. A temperature of 12 degrees C caused a significant decrease in cercarial release of both E. caproni and S. mansoni. Increased snail activity associated with feeding behaviour was probably responsible for the enhanced cercarial sheds observed in this study. PMID:12498644

  3. Activity of 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol produced by a strain of Streptomyces mutabilis isolated from a Saharan soil against Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Belghit, S; Driche, E H; Bijani, C; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N; Badji, B; Mathieu, F

    2016-06-01

    In a search for new antifungal antibiotics active against Candida albicans and others pathogenic fungi, a strain of actinobacteria, designated G61, was isolated from a Saharan soil and tested for its activity against these microorganisms. The analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence showed a similarity level of 100% with Streptomyces mutabilis NBRC 12800(T). The highest anticandidal activities produced by the strain G61 were obtained on Bennett medium in the fourth day of incubation. The active product, extracted by n-butanol, contained one bioactive spot detected on thin layer chromatography plates. It was purified by HPLC and its chemical structure was determined by spectroscopic analyses as 2,4-Di-tert-butylphenol. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of this product against several strains of pathogenic microorganisms are interesting. PMID:27107984

  4. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species demonstrate reduced susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of non-albicans Candida spp. among Candida isolates from various clinical specimens and analysed their virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility profile. A total of 523 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens. Non-albicans Candida species were the predominant pathogens isolated. Non-albicans Candida species also demonstrated the production of virulence factors once attributed to Candida albicans. Non-albicans Candida demonstrated high resistance to azole group of antifungal agents. Therefore, it can be concluded that non-albicans Candida species have emerged as an important cause of infections. Their isolation from clinical specimen can no longer be ignored as a nonpathogenic isolate nor can it be dismissed as a contaminant. PMID:25404942

  5. EVALUATION OF A RAPID, QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME PCR METHOD FOR ENUMERATION OF PATHOGENIC CANDIDA CELLS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (QRT-PCR) technology, incorporating fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan?) chemistry, was developed for the specific detection and quantification of six pathogenic species of Candida (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata and C....

  6. Description of Diutina gen. nov., Diutina siamensis, f.a. sp. nov., and reassignment of Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida ranongensis, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae to the genus Diutina.

    PubMed

    Khunnamwong, Pannida; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Limtong, Savitree; Lachance, Marc-André

    2015-12-01

    Three strains (DMKU-RE28, DMKU-RE43T and DMKU-RE123) of a novel anamorphic yeast species were isolated from rice leaf tissue collected in Thailand. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the species forms a sister pair with Candida ranongensis CBS 10861T but differs by 24-30 substitutions in the LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 domains and 30-35 substitutions in the ITS region. A phylogenetic analysis based on both the small and the large rRNA gene subunits confirmed this connection and demonstrated the presence of a clade that also includes Candida catenulata, Candida mesorugosa, Candida neorugosa, Candida pseudorugosa, Candida rugosa and Candida scorzettiae. The clade is not closely affiliated to any known teleomorphic genus, and forms a well-separated lineage from currently recognized genera of the Saccharomycetales. Hence, the genus Diutina gen. nov. is proposed to accommodate members of the clade, including Diutina siamensis f.a. sp. nov. and the preceding seven Candida species. The type strain is DMKU-RE43T ( = CBS 13388T = BCC 61183T = NBRC 109695T). PMID:26410375

  7. Overexpression and mutation as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from human immunodeficiency virus patients in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosana, Yeva; Yasmon, Andi; Lestari, Delly Chipta

    2015-09-01

    Fluconazole is the standard treatment for oropharyngeal candidiasis, which is the third most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients in Indonesia. Overuse of this drug could lead to the emergence of resistance. The objective of this study was to analyse the role of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 gene overexpression and mutations in the ERG11 gene as a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. Overexpression of ERG11, CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1 was analysed by real-time reverse transcription PCR, while ERG11 gene mutation analysis was performed using sequencing methods. Seventeen isolates out of 92 strains of C. albicans isolated from 108 HIV patients were found to be resistant to azole antifungals. The highest gene overexpression of ERG11 was found in C. albicans resistant to single fluconazole, while the highest gene overexpression of CDR2 was detected in all isolates of C. albicans resistant to multiple azoles. Amino acid substitutions were observed at six positions, i.e. D116E, D153E, I261V, E266D, V437I and V488I. The amino acid substitution I261V was identified in this study and was probably associated with fluconazole resistance. The combination of overexpression of CDR2 and ERG11 and mutation in the ERG11 gene was found to be a genetic mechanism of fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from HIV patients in Indonesia. PMID:26297039

  8. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  9. Overexpression of Both ERG11 and ABC2 Genes Might Be Responsible for Itraconazole Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Mingfeng; Chen, Jinyan; Wu, Rimao; Zhang, Jianlei; Cui, Rui; Jiang, Yanyu; Chen, Jie; Cao, Xiaoli; Xing, Yi; Zhang, Yuchen; Meng, Juanxia; Deng, Qi; Sui, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the main molecular mechanisms responsible for itraconazole resistance in clinical isolates of Candida krusei. Methods The 14α-demethylases encoded by ERG11 gene in the 16 C.krusei clinical isolates were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and their nucleotide sequences were determined to detect point mutations. Meanwhile, ERG11 and efflux transporters (ABC1 and ABC2) genes were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for their expression in itraconazole-resistant (R), itraconazole-susceptible dose dependent (SDD) and itraconazole-susceptible (S) C.krusei at the mRNA level. Results We found 7-point mutations in ERG11 gene of all the C.krusei clinical isolates, including 6 synonymous mutations and 1 missense mutation (C44T). However, the missense mutation was found in the three groups. The mRNA levels of ERG11 gene in itraconazole-resistant isolates showed higher expression compared with itraconazole-susceptible dose dependent and itraconazole-susceptible ones (P = 0.015 and P = 0.002 respectively). ABC2 gene mRNA levels in itraconazole-resistant group was significantly higher than the other two groups, and the levels of their expression in the isolates appeared to increase with the decrease of susceptibility to itraconazole (P = 0.007 in SDD compared with S, P = 0.016 in SDD with R, and P<0.001 in S with R respectively). While ABC1 gene presented lower expression in itraconazole resistant strains. However, the mRNA levels of ERG11, ABC1 and ABC2 in a C.krusei (CK10) resistant to both itraconazole and voriconazole were expressed highest in all the itraconazole-resistant isolates. Conclusions There are ERG11 gene polymorphisms in clinical isolates of C.krusei. ERG11 gene mutations may not be involved in the development of itraconazole resistance in C.krusei. ERG11 and ABC2 overexpression might be responsible for the acquired itraconazole resistance of these clinical isolates. PMID

  10. Multilaboratory study of epidemiological cutoff values for detection of resistance in eight Candida species to fluconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Pfaller, M A; Bustamante, B; Canton, E; Fothergill, A; Fuller, J; Gonzalez, G M; Lass-Flörl, C; Lockhart, S R; Martin-Mazuelos, E; Meis, J F; Melhem, M S C; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L; Pelaez, T; Szeszs, M W; St-Germain, G; Bonfietti, L X; Guarro, J; Turnidge, J

    2014-01-01

    Although epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. and the triazoles, they are based on MIC data from a single laboratory. We have established ECVs for eight Candida species and fluconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole based on wild-type (WT) MIC distributions for isolates of C. albicans (n=11,241 isolates), C. glabrata (7,538), C. parapsilosis (6,023), C. tropicalis (3,748), C. krusei (1,073), C. lusitaniae (574), C. guilliermondii (373), and C. dubliniensis (162). The 24-h CLSI broth microdilution MICs were collated from multiple laboratories (in Canada, Brazil, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States). The ECVs for distributions originating from ≥6 laboratories, which included ≥95% of the modeled WT population, for fluconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole were, respectively, 0.5, 0.06 and 0.03 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis, 8, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. glabrata, 8, 0.5, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, 32, 0.5, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 1, 0.06, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 1, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, and 1, 0.12, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis. The low number of MICs (<100) for other less prevalent species (C. famata, C. kefyr, C. orthopsilosis, C. rugosa) precluded ECV definition, but their MIC distributions are documented. Evaluation of our ECVs for some species/agent combinations using published individual MICs for 136 isolates (harboring mutations in or upregulation of ERG11, MDR1, CDR1, or CDR2) and 64 WT isolates indicated that our ECVs may be useful in distinguishing WT from non-WT isolates. PMID:24419346

  11. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species.

  12. Isolation of the MIG1 Gene from Candida albicans and Effects of Its Disruption on Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodríguez, Cristina; Gancedo, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a Candida albicans gene (CaMIG1) that encodes a protein homologous to the DNA-binding protein Mig1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMig1). The C. albicans Mig1 protein (CaMig1) differs from ScMig1, in that, among other things, it lacks a putative phosphorylation site for Snf1 and presents several long stretches rich in glutamine or in asparagine, serine, and threonine and has the effector domain located at some distance (50 amino acids) from the carboxy terminus. Expression of CaMIG1 was low and was similar in glucose-, sucrose-, or ethanol-containing media. Disruption of the two CaMIG1 genomic copies had no effect in filamentation or infectivity. Levels of a glucose-repressible α-glucosidase, implicated in both sucrose and maltose utilization, were similar in wild-type or mig1/mig1 cells. Disruption of CaMIG1 had also no effect on the expression of the glucose-repressed gene CaGAL1. CaMIG1 was functional in S. cerevisiae, as judged by its ability to suppress the phenotypes produced by mig1 or tps1 mutations. In addition, CaMig1 formed specific complexes with the URS1 region of the S. cerevisiae FBP1 gene. The existence of a possible functional analogue of CaMIG1 in C. albicans was suggested by the results of band shift experiments. PMID:10629176

  13. Isolation of the MIG1 gene from Candida albicans and effects of its disruption on catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, O; Rodríguez, C; Gancedo, C

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a Candida albicans gene (CaMIG1) that encodes a protein homologous to the DNA-binding protein Mig1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMig1). The C. albicans Mig1 protein (CaMig1) differs from ScMig1, in that, among other things, it lacks a putative phosphorylation site for Snf1 and presents several long stretches rich in glutamine or in asparagine, serine, and threonine and has the effector domain located at some distance (50 amino acids) from the carboxy terminus. Expression of CaMIG1 was low and was similar in glucose-, sucrose-, or ethanol-containing media. Disruption of the two CaMIG1 genomic copies had no effect in filamentation or infectivity. Levels of a glucose-repressible alpha-glucosidase, implicated in both sucrose and maltose utilization, were similar in wild-type or mig1/mig1 cells. Disruption of CaMIG1 had also no effect on the expression of the glucose-repressed gene CaGAL1. CaMIG1 was functional in S. cerevisiae, as judged by its ability to suppress the phenotypes produced by mig1 or tps1 mutations. In addition, CaMig1 formed specific complexes with the URS1 region of the S. cerevisiae FBP1 gene. The existence of a possible functional analogue of CaMIG1 in C. albicans was suggested by the results of band shift experiments. PMID:10629176

  14. In Vitro Anti-Candida Activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Muhammad Ali; Fouladi, Zahra

    2007-01-01

    Zataria multiflora Boiss known as Avishan Shirazi (in Iran) is one of the valuable Iranian medicinal plants. The aim of study was to evaluate anti-Candida activity of Z. multiflora against different species of Candida in vitro. Anti-Candida activity of the aqueous, ethanolic and methanolic maceration extract of the aerial parts of Z. multiflora Boiss was studied in vitro. Anti-Candida activity against Candida species was done using serial dilutions of extracts in Sabouraud's dextrose agar. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the methanolic and ethanolic extracts was 70.7 and 127 mg l−1, respectively. Aqueous extract showed no remarkable activity against Candida species. We conclude that methanolic extract of the aerial parts of Z. multiflora Boiss has more anti-Candida effect at 70.7 mg l−1 compared to ethanolic extract 127 mg l−1. In addition, the isolates of Candida parapsilosis were more susceptible to methanolic extract than other tested species. PMID:17965766

  15. The influence of photodynamic therapy parameters on the inactivation of Candida spp: in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F.; Mima, E. G.; Dovigo, L. N.; Bagnato, V. S.; Jorge, J. H.; de Souza Costa, C. A.; Pavarina, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT), such as pre-irradiation time (PIT), on the inactivation of Candida spp. was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Suspensions of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata were treated with Photogem®, incubated for 5, 10 or 15 min and illuminated with a blue LED light. Colonies were cultivated and log values of CFU ml-1 were analyzed by ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis test. For in vivo evaluation, immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans. PDT was performed on the dorsum of the tongue by topical administration of Photogem® and illumination after 5, 10 or 15 min. C. albicans was recovered from the tongue and the number of CFU ml-1 was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. Animals were killed and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis. Susceptibility of Candida spp. suspensions to PDT was in decreasing order: C. albicans = C. tropicalis < C. krusei < C. glabrata. No significant difference was observed among the different PIT (p > 0.05), both in vivo and in vitro. A significant reduction (p < 0.05) of log(CFU ml-1) of C. albicans from tongues of mice was observed with no adverse effects in the tissue. PDT was effective to inactivate in vitroCandida spp. and for reduction of C. albicans in vivo, independently of the PIT used.

  16. In vitro antifungal activity of hydroxychavicol isolated from Piper betle L

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hydroxychavicol, isolated from the chloroform extraction of the aqueous leaf extract of Piper betle L., (Piperaceae) was investigated for its antifungal activity against 124 strains of selected fungi. The leaves of this plant have been long in use tropical countries for the preparation of traditional herbal remedies. Methods The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of hydroxychavicol were determined by using broth microdilution method following CLSI guidelines. Time kill curve studies, post-antifungal effects and mutation prevention concentrations were determined against Candida species and Aspergillus species "respectively". Hydroxychavicol was also tested for its potential to inhibit and reduce the formation of Candida albicans biofilms. The membrane permeability was measured by the uptake of propidium iodide. Results Hydroxychavicol exhibited inhibitory effect on fungal species of clinical significance, with the MICs ranging from 15.62 to 500 μg/ml for yeasts, 125 to 500 μg/ml for Aspergillus species, and 7.81 to 62.5 μg/ml for dermatophytes where as the MFCs were found to be similar or two fold greater than the MICs. There was concentration-dependent killing of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata up to 8 × MIC. Hydroxychavicol also exhibited an extended post antifungal effect of 6.25 to 8.70 h at 4 × MIC for Candida species and suppressed the emergence of mutants of the fungal species tested at 2 × to 8 × MIC concentration. Furthermore, it also inhibited the growth of biofilm generated by C. albicans and reduced the preformed biofilms. There was increased uptake of propidium iodide by C. albicans cells when exposed to hydroxychavicol thus indicating that the membrane disruption could be the probable mode of action of hydroxychavicol. Conclusions The antifungal activity exhibited by this compound warrants its use as an antifungal agent particularly for treating topical infections, as well as gargle

  17. Candida tropicalis BPU1, a novel isolate from the rumen of the Malabari goat, is a dual producer of biosurfactant and polyhydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Priji, Prakasan; Unni, K N; Sajith, S; Benjamin, Sailas

    2013-03-01

    This unique study reports a new strain (BPU1) of Candida tropicalis isolated from the rumen of the Malabari goat, showing dual production of biosurfactant and polyhydroxybutyrate. C. tropicalis strain BPU1, a facultative anaerobe, was tuned to become an aerobe in specially designed flask, the Benjamin flask. The puffy circular colonies were smooth, white-to-cream in colour, with pseudo-filaments. The strain fermented glucose, sucrose, maltose and dextrose, but not lactose and cellulose. It assimilated (NH4 )2 SO4 , peptone, glycine and arginine, but not NaNO3 , as the nitrogen source. Interestingly, it utilized groundnut oil (up to 0.3%) in a specially designed basal mineral salt medium (BSM). Its capability for dual production of a biosurfactant and a polyhydroxybutyarate (PHB) was explored by various methods from the BSM-oil medium. Extracted biosurfactant from 6 day-old culture was biochemically characterized as a complex of lipid and carbohydrate with an Rf value of 0.88 by thin layer chromatography. Its PHB production was confirmed by specific staining methods with Nile blue sulphate, Sudan black B and Sudan 3. Briefly, this first-ever report gives ample physical evidence for the dual production of a glycolipid (biosurfactant) and PHB by C. tropicalis strain BPU1 on a specially designed medium, which would open up elaborate research on this yeast. PMID:23447374

  18. Single cell oil production from a newly isolated Candida viswanathii Y-E4 and agro-industrial by-products valorization.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Ines; Kamoun, Omama; Trigui-Lahiani, Hèla; Hdiji, Anouar; Gargouri, Ali; Belghith, Hafedh; Guerfali, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Microbial lipids have drawn increasing attention in recent years as promising raw materials for biodiesel and added-value compounds production. To this end, new oleaginous yeast, Candida viswanathii Y-E4 was isolated, characterized and used for single cell oil (SCO) production. Physiologic and nutritional parameters optimization was carried out for improved biomass and lipid production. Y-E4 strain was able to use a wide range of substrates, especially C5 and C6 sugars as well as glycerol and hydrophobic substrates. The fatty acid profile analysis showed that oleic acid was the main component produced using different substrates. Batch and fed-bath fermentation were conducted using glucose as carbon source. Lipid production rate is twice higher in fed-batch culture providing a lipid content of 50 % (w/w). To minimize the SCO production cost, C. viswanathii Y-E4 was evaluated for its capacity to use different agro-industrial by-products for microbial oil production and changes in the fatty acid profile were monitored. PMID:27114386

  19. In vitro inhibition of adhesion of Candida albicans clinical isolates to human buccal epithelial cells by Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta-bearing complex carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Brassart, D; Woltz, A; Golliard, M; Neeser, J R

    1991-01-01

    The role of cell surface glycoconjugates as possible adhesion receptors for Candida albicans yeasts on human buccal epithelial cells was investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay involving 14C-metabolically labeled microorganisms. Various structurally defined soluble glycopeptides and oligosaccharides were tested at a low concentration (1 mg/ml) for their ability to competitively inhibit yeast adhesion to such exfoliated cells. Comparisons were also made with various molecular species previously proposed to act as adhesion molecules. A preparation of glycopeptides derived from pooled human newborn meconiums inhibited the attachment (up to 55%) of all three clinical isolates examined. The mild hydrolysis of fucosyl residues from the above mixture totally abolished its inhibitory potency. By using human milk oligosaccharide probes, the minimal structural requirement for activity was found to be the Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta determinant (the H sugar sequence found on all blood group substances of the ABO [H] system). By contrast, the fucosylated determinants of the Lewis blood group system were found to be totally inactive. Total adhesion inhibitions were never obtained in the present experiments, suggesting that H disaccharide-bearing cell surface glycoconjugates could act as host receptors for C. albicans on human buccal epithelial cells as a part of a mechanism involving multireceptor specificities. PMID:2019432

  20. Inhibitory activity in vitro of probiotic lactobacilli against oral Candida under different fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Q; Stamatova, I; Kari, K; Meurman, J H

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics positively affect oral health by decreasing gum bleeding and/or reducing salivary counts of certain oral pathogens. Our aim was to investigate the inhibitory effect of six probiotic lactobacilli against opportunistic oral Candida species. Sugar utilisation by both lactobacilli and Candida was also assessed. Agar overlay assay was utilised to study growth inhibition of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Lactobacillus reuteri SD2112, Lactobacillus brevis CD2, Lactobacillus bulgaricus LB86 and L. bulgaricus LB Lact. The inhibitory effect was measured at pH 5.5, 6.4, and 7.2, respectively, and in the presence of five different carbohydrates in growth medium (glucose, fructose, lactose, sucrose, and sorbitol). Growth and final pH values were measured at two-hour time points to 24 h. L. rhamnosus GG showed the strongest inhibitory activity in fructose and glucose medium against C. albicans, followed by L. casei Shirota, L. reuteri SD2112 and L. brevis CD2. None of the lactobacilli tested affected the growth of C. krusei. Only L. rhamnosus GG produced slight inhibitory effect on C. glabrata. The lower pH values led to larger inhibition zones. Sugar fermentation profiles varied between the strains. L. casei Shirota grew in the presence of all sugars tested, whereas L. brevis CD2 could utilise only glucose and fructose. All Candida species metabolised the available sugars but the most rapid growth was observed with C. glabrata. The results suggest that commercially available probiotics differ in their inhibitory activity and carbohydrate utilisation; the above properties are modified by different pH values and sugars with more pronounced inhibition at lower pH. PMID:25380800

  1. A Real-Time PCR Assay Based on 5.8S rRNA Gene (5.8S rDNA) for Rapid Detection of Candida from Whole Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Yang, Jing-Xian; Liang, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of Candida in bloodstream infections (BSIs) has increased. To date, the identification of Candida in BSIs still mainly relies on blood culture and serological tests, but they have various limitations. Therefore, a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Candida from whole blood is presented. The unique primers/probe system was designed on 5.8S rRNA gene (5.8S rDNA) of Candida genus. The analytical sensitivity was determined by numbers of positive PCRs in 12 repetitions. At the concentration of 10(1) CFU/ml blood, positive PCR rates of 100 % were obtained for C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. The detection rate for C. glabrata was 75 % at 10(1) CFU/ml blood. The reaction specificity was 100 % when evaluating the assay using DNA samples from clinical isolates and human blood. The maximum CVs of intra-assay and inter-assay for the detection limit were 1.22 and 2.22 %, respectively. To assess the clinical applicability, 328 blood samples from 82 patients were prospectively tested and real-time PCR results were compared with results from blood culture. Diagnostic sensitivity of the PCR was 100 % using as gold standard blood culture, and specificity was 98.4 %. Our data suggest that the developed assay can be used in clinical laboratories as an accurate and rapid screening test for the Candida from whole blood. Although further evaluation is warranted, our assay holds promise for earlier diagnosis of candidemia. PMID:26687075

  2. Sensitive and rapid RT-qPCR quantification of pathogenic Candida species in human blood.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-10-01

    For accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of candidiasis, we developed a highly sensitive quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) system for five Candida species that have been reported to be the major causes of bloodstream fungal infection (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei), together with a system for all pathogenic Candida species. Cells of each fungal species spiked into human peripheral blood (PB) were specifically detected at a lower detection limit of 10(0) cell/1 mL PB by this system using the newly developed specific primer sets targeting 18S or 26S rRNA of the five Candida species, together with the existing group primer set. The total count of the five Candida spp. as the sum of those obtained by using the five species primer sets was equivalent to the count obtained by using the group primer set, indicating that the group set covered the major five Candida spp. in human blood with the same degree of accuracy as the species primer sets. The RT-qPCR counts of the Candida species were in good agreement with CFU counts obtained by their culture on CHROMagar™, with a lower detection limit of 10(0)cell/mL of PB. Candida rRNA molecules were stably stored for at least 7 days at 4°C by keeping the blood specimens in an RNA stabilizing reagent. These results strongly suggest that this sensitive system is useful for accurate and rapid diagnosis of Candida bloodstream infections. PMID:26232708

  3. Isolation, structure, and biological activity of Phaeofungin, a cyclic lipodepsipeptide from a Phaeosphaeria sp. Using the Genome-Wide Candida albicans Fitness Test.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Ondeyka, John; Harris, Guy; Herath, Kithsiri; Zink, Deborah; Vicente, Francisca; Bills, Gerald; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; González del Val, Antonio; Martin, Jesus; Reyes, Fernando; Wang, Hao; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Galuska, Stefan; Giacobbe, Robert; Abruzzo, George; Roemer, Terry; Xu, Deming

    2013-03-22

    Phaeofungin (1), a new cyclic depsipeptide isolated from Phaeosphaeria sp., was discovered by application of reverse genetics technology, using the Candida albicans fitness test (CaFT). Phaeofungin is comprised of seven amino acids and a β,γ-dihydroxy-γ-methylhexadecanoic acid arranged in a 25-membered cyclic depsipeptide. Five of the amino acids were assigned with d-configurations. The structure was elucidated by 2D-NMR and HRMS-MS analysis of the natural product and its hydrolyzed linear peptide. The absolute configuration of the amino acids was determined by Marfey's method by complete and partial hydrolysis of 1. The CaFT profile of the phaeofungin-containing extract overlapped with that of phomafungin (3), another structurally different cyclic lipodepsipeptide isolated from a Phoma sp. using the same approach. Comparative biological characterization further demonstrated that these two fungal lipodepsipeptides are functionally distinct. While phomafungin was potentiated by cyclosporin A (an inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway), phaeofungin was synergized with aureobasidin A (2) (an inhibitor of the sphingolipid biosynthesis) and to some extent caspofungin (an inhibitor of glucan synthase). Furthermore, phaeofungin caused ATP release in wild-type C. albicans strains but phomafungin did not. It showed modest antifungal activity against C. albicans (MIC 16-32 μg/mL) and better activity against Aspergillus fumigatus (MIC 8-16 μg/mL) and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (MIC 4 μg/mL). The linear peptide was inactive, suggesting that the macrocyclic depsipeptide ring is essential for target engagement and antifungal activity. PMID:23259972

  4. Typing Candida albicans oral isolates from healthy brazilian schoolchildren using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis reveals two highly polymorphic taxa

    PubMed Central

    Boriollo, Marcelo Fabiano Gomes; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Barros, Letizia Monteiro; Bassi, Rodrigo Carlos; Garcia, José Antonio Dias; Costa, Ana Maria Duarte Dias; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Höfling, José Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of C. albicans oral isolates from 75 healthy schoolchildren from eight schools located in different geographic areas of Piracicaba city, São Paulo state, Brazil, was established using isoenzymes marker (Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis – MLEE) and cluster analysis. Patterns of monoclonal and polyclonal oral colonization by C. albicans within and between groups of schoolchildren were identified. However, significant divergence between the observed and the expected genotypic frequencies (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test) was not detected in the geographically adjacent groups, suggesting the hypothesis that populations of healthy schoolchildren do not correspond to the selection factor (differential survival) of strains. Two highly polymorphic and distantly genetically related taxa (A and B) were identified within the total population of yeasts, each contained subgroups (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and B2) and clusters of moderately related strains (from I to X), suggesting the existence of strains restricted or not to certain groups of geographically limited, healthy students. However, the coexistence of identical strains in healthy schoolchildren from the same school (geographically related) reinforces the hypothesis of oral transmission, where the sources of propagation could be explored. Furthermore, this could also be used in current and retrospective analyses of C. albicans isolated from immunocompetent and immunocompromised people, in order to detect commensal or potentially pathogenic yeast groups, predominantly in candidiasis, and in the development of strategies to prevent transmission or human propagation. PMID:24031720

  5. Assessment of Antifungal Activity of Bakuchiol on Oral-Associated Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Mohd-Al-Faisal; Abdul Razak, Fathilah; Himratul-Aznita, Wan Harun

    2015-01-01

    Bakuchiol is an active component of Psoralea glandulosa and Psoralea corylifolia, used in traditional Chinese medicine. The study aimed at investigating the antifungal activity of bakuchiol on planktonic and biofilm forms of orally associated Candida species. The antifungal susceptibility testing was determined by the broth micro dilution technique. Growth kinetics and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Candida were measured to assess the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. Biofilm biomass and cellular metabolic activity were quantitatively estimated by the crystal violet (CV) and the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assays. All Candida strains have been shown to be susceptible to bakuchiol with the MIC ranges from 12.5 to 100 μg/mL. Significant decrease in specific growth rates and viable counts demonstrates the inhibitory effect of bakuchiol on Candida planktonic cells. A brief exposure to bakuchiol also reduced CSH of Candida (P < 0.05), indicating altered surface properties of yeast cells towards hydrophobic interfaces. Biofilm biomass and cell metabolic activity were mostly decreased, except for C. glabrata (P = 0.29). The antifungal properties of bakuchiol on Candida species in this in vitro study may give insights into the application in therapeutic strategy against Candida infections. PMID:26633986

  6. In vitro interactions between anidulafungin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biofilms of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for many biomaterial-related infections; they give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently reported that the echinocandin anidulafungin (ANF) showed a strong in vitro activity against both planktonic and biofilms cells. Herein, we report the antifungal activities of ANF alone and in association with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against nine Candida strain biofilms: four Candida albicans, two Candida glabrata and three Candida guilliermondii. The activity of ANF was assessed using an in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. ANF proved oneself to be active against biofilms cells, and a clear-cut synergism was found against Candida species biofilms when ANF was used in combination with three NSAIDs: aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen. The positive synergism against Candida spp. of ANF in association with aspirin or the other NSAIDs proved to be a very effective antifungal treatment (FICI<0.5). These results may provide the starting point for new combination therapies of ANF with NSAIDs against Candida biofilm pathologies. PMID:26833243

  7. Determination of biofilm production by Candida tropicalis isolated from hospitalized patients and its relation to cellular surface hydrophobicity, plastic adherence and filamentation ability.

    PubMed

    Galán-Ladero, M A; Blanco-Blanco, M T; Hurtado, C; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Blanco, M T; Gómez-García, A C

    2013-09-01

    Candida tropicalis is an emerging virulent species. The aim of this study is to determine the biofilm-forming ability of 29 strains of C. tropicalis isolated from inpatients, and to examine its relation with other virulence factors such as cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH), immediate (15 min, IA) and late (24 h, LA) plastic adherence and filamentation ability. The study was performed in parallel using two incubation temperatures - 37 and 22 °C - to determine the effect of growth temperature variations on these pathogenic attributes of C. tropicalis. Biofilm formation (BF) was measured by optical density (OD) and by XTT reduction (XTT); Slime index (SI), which includes growth as a correction factor in BF, was calculated in both methods. All strains were hydrophobic and adherent - at 15 min and 24 h - at both temperatures, with higher values for 22 °C; the adhered basal yeast layer appears to be necessary to achieve subsequent development of biofilm. Filamentation ability varied from 76.2% of strains at 37 °C to 26.6% at 22 °C. All C. tropicalis strains were biofilm producers, with similar results obtained using OD determination and XTT measurement to evaluation methods; SI is useful when good growth is not presented. BF at 37 °C was similar at 24 h and 96 h incubation; conversely, at 22 °C, the highest number of biofilm-producing strains was detected at 96 h. CSH is an important pathogenic factor which is involved in adherence, is influenced by the filamentation of yeast, and plays a critical role in BF. PMID:23775541

  8. Evidence of genotypic diversity among Candida auris isolates by multilocus sequence typing, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and amplified fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Sharma, C; Singh, A; Kumar Singh, P; Kumar, A; Hagen, F; Govender, N P; Colombo, A L; Meis, J F; Chowdhary, A

    2016-03-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant nosocomial bloodstream pathogen that has been reported from Asian countries and South Africa. Herein, we studied the population structure and genetic relatedness among 104 global C. auris isolates from India, South Africa and Brazil using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). RPB1, RPB2 and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and D1/D2 regions of the ribosomal DNA were sequenced for MLST. Further, genetic variation and proteomic assessment was carried out using AFLP and MALDI-TOF MS, respectively. Both MLST and AFLP typing clearly demarcated two major clusters comprising Indian and Brazilian isolates. However, the South African isolates were randomly distributed, suggesting different genotypes. MALDI-TOF MS spectral profiling also revealed evidence of geographical clustering but did not correlate fully with the genotyping methods. Notably, overall the population structure of C. auris showed evidence of geographical clustering by all the three techniques analysed. Antifungal susceptibility testing by the CLSI microbroth dilution method revealed that fluconazole had limited activity against 87% of isolates (MIC90, 64 mg/L). Also, MIC90 of AMB was 4 mg/L. Candida auris is emerging as an important yeast pathogen globally and requires reproducible laboratory methods for identification and typing. Evaluation of MALDI-TOF MS as a typing method for this yeast is warranted. PMID:26548511

  9. Biocatalytic reduction of racemic 2-arenoxycycloalkanones by yeasts P. glucozyma and C. glabrata: one way of achieving chiral 2-arenoxycycloalcohols.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Cecilia; Peña, Miguel; Del Olmo, Marcel Lí

    2016-06-01

    Chiral β-aryloxy alcohols are interesting building blocks that form part of drugs like β adrenergic antagonists. Acquiring cyclic rigid analogs to obtain more selective drugs is interesting. Thus, we used whole cells of yeast strains Pichia glucozyma and Candida glabrata to catalyze the reduction of several 2-arenoxycycloalkanones to produce chiral 2-arenoxycycloalcohols with good/excellent enantioselectivity. In both cases, the alcohol configuration that resulted from the carbonyl group reduction was S. Yeast P. glucozyma allowed the conversion of both enantiomers of the starting material to produce 2-arenoxycycloalcohols with configuration (1S, 2R) and (1S, 2S). The reaction with C. glabrata nearly always allowed the kinetic resolution of the starting ketone, recovering 2-arenoxycycloalkanone with configuration S and (1S, 2R)-2-arenoxycycloalcohol.All the four possible stereoisomers of 2-phenoxycyclohexanol and the two enantiomers of 2-phenoxycyclohexanone were obtained by combining the biocatalyzed reaction with the oxidation/reduction of the chiral compounds with standard reagents. This is a simple approach for the synthesis of the rigid chiral moiety 2-arenoxycycloalcohols contained in putative β-blockers 2-arenoxycycloalkanepropanolamines. PMID:26754816

  10. Usnic Acid Potassium Salt: An Alternative for the Control of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Vera L. M.; Pereira, Eugênia C.; Falcão, Emerson P. S.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the most important vector of schistosomiasis due to its wide geographical distribution, high infection rate and efficient disease transmission. Among the methods of schistosomiasis control, the World Health Organization recommends the use of synthetic molluscicides, such as niclosamide. However, different substances of natural origin have been tested as alternatives for the control or eradication of mollusks. The literature describes the antitumor, antimicrobial and antiviral properties of usnic acid as well as other important activities of common interest between medicine and the environment. However, usnic acid has a low degree of water solubility, which can be a limiting factor for its use, especially in aquatic environments, since the organic solvents commonly used to solubilize this substance can have toxic effects on aquatic biota. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the potassium salt of usnic acid (potassium usnate) with regard to molluscicidal activity and toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina). To obtain potassium usnate, usnic acid was extracted with diethyl ether isolated and purified from the lichen Cladonia substellata. Biological assays were performed with embryos and adult snails of B. glabrata exposed for 24 h to the usnate solution solubilized in dechlorinated water at 2.5; 5 and 10 µg/ml for embryos, 0.5; 0.9; 1;5 and 10 µg/ml for mollusks and 0.5; 1; 5; 10 µg/ml for A. salina. The lowest lethal concentration for the embryos and adult snails was 10 and 1 µg/ml, respectively. No toxicity to A. salina was found. The results show that modified usnic acid has increased solubility (100%) without losing its biological activity and may be a viable alternative for the control of B. glabrata. PMID:25375098

  11. Schistosomiasis Control Using Piplartine against Biomphalaria glabrata at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Pinheiro, Alessandro de Sá; Lopes, Priscila Orechio de Moraes Victor; Fokoue, Harold Hilarion; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Marques, Joaquim Vogt; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Nakano, Eliana; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most significant diseases in tropical countries and affects almost 200 million people worldwide. The application of molluscicides to eliminate the parasite's intermediate host, Biomphalaria glabrata, from infected water supplies is one strategy currently being used to control the disease. Previous studies have shown a potent molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from Piper species, with extracts from Piper tuberculatum being among the most active. Methods and Findings The molluscicidal activity of P. tuberculatum was monitored on methanolic extracts from different organs (roots, leaves, fruit and stems). The compounds responsible for the molluscicidal activity were identified using 1H NMR and ESIMS data and multivariate analyses, including principal component analysis and partial least squares. These results indicated that the high molluscicidal activity displayed by root extracts (LC50 20.28 µg/ml) was due to the presence of piplartine, a well-known biologically-active amide. Piplartine was isolated from P. tuberculatum root extracts, and the molluscicidal activity of this compound on adults and embryos of B. glabrata was determined. The compound displayed potent activity against all developmental stages of B. glabrata. Next, the environmental toxicity of piplartine was evaluated using the microcrustacean Daphnia similis (LC50 7.32 µg/ml) and the fish Danio rerio (1.69 µg/ml). The toxicity to these organisms was less compared with the toxicity of niclosamide, a commercial molluscicide. Conclusions The development of a new, natural molluscicide is highly desirable, particularly because the commercially available molluscicide niclosamide is highly toxic to some organisms in the environment (LC50 0.25 µg/ml to D. similis and 0.12 µg/ml to D. rerio). Thus, piplartine is a potential candidate for a natural molluscicide that has been extracted from a tropical plant species and showed less toxic to environment. PMID

  12. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  13. Description of Kuraishia piskuri f.a., sp. nov., a new methanol assimilating yeast and transfer of phylogenetically related Candida species to the genera Kuraishia and Nakazawaea as new combinations.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Cletus P; Robnett, Christie J

    2014-11-01

    The new anamorphic yeast Kuraishia piskuri, f.a., sp. nov. is described for three strains that were isolated from insect frass from trees growing in Florida, USA (type strain, NRRL YB-2544, CBS 13714). Species placement was based on phylogenetic analysis of nuclear gene sequences for the D1/D2 domains of large subunit rRNA, small subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor-1α, and subunits B1 and B2 of RNA polymerase II B. From this analysis, the anamorphic species Candida borneana, Candida cidri, Candida floccosa, Candida hungarica, and Candida ogatae were transferred to the genus Kuraishia as new combinations and Candida anatomiae, Candida ernobii, Candida ishiwadae, Candida laoshanensis, Candida molendini-olei, Candida peltata, Candida pomicola, Candida populi, Candida wickerhamii, and Candida wyomingensis were transferred to the genus Nakazawaea. PMID:25132542

  14. Uncommon Candida Species Fungemia among Cancer Patients, Houston, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dong Sik; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Jiang, Ying; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2015-11-01

    Many uncommon Candida species that cause bloodstream infections (BSIs) are not well-characterized. We investigated the epidemiology, antifungal use, susceptibility patterns, and factors associated with all-cause death among cancer patients in whom uncommon Candida spp. BSIs were diagnosed at a cancer treatment center during January 1998–September 2013. Of 1,395 Candida bloodstream isolates, 79 from 68 patients were uncommon Candida spp. The incidence density of uncommon Candida spp. BSIs and their proportion to all candidemia episodes substantively increased during the study period, and the rise was associated with increasing use of echinocandin antifungal drugs. Thirty-seven patients had breakthrough infections during therapy or prophylaxis with various systemic antifungal drugs for >7 consecutive days; 21 were receiving an echinocandin. C. kefyr (82%), and C. lusitaniae (21%) isolates frequently showed caspofungin MICs above the epidemiologic cutoff values. These findings support the need for institutional surveillance for uncommon Candida spp. among cancer patients. PMID:26488845

  15. Uncommon Candida Species Fungemia among Cancer Patients, Houston, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong Sik; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Jiang, Ying; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Many uncommon Candida species that cause bloodstream infections (BSIs) are not well-characterized. We investigated the epidemiology, antifungal use, susceptibility patterns, and factors associated with all-cause death among cancer patients in whom uncommon Candida spp. BSIs were diagnosed at a cancer treatment center during January 1998–September 2013. Of 1,395 Candida bloodstream isolates, 79 from 68 patients were uncommon Candida spp. The incidence density of uncommon Candida spp. BSIs and their proportion to all candidemia episodes substantively increased during the study period, and the rise was associated with increasing use of echinocandin antifungal drugs. Thirty-seven patients had breakthrough infections during therapy or prophylaxis with various systemic antifungal drugs for >7 consecutive days; 21 were receiving an echinocandin. C. kefyr (82%), and C. lusitaniae (21%) isolates frequently showed caspofungin MICs above the epidemiologic cutoff values. These findings support the need for institutional surveillance for uncommon Candida spp. among cancer patients. PMID:26488845

  16. Four pathogenic Candida species differ in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Krauke, Yannick; Sychrova, Hana

    2010-10-01

    The virulence of Candida species depends on many environmental conditions, including extracellular pH and concentration of alkali metal cations. Tests of the tolerance/sensitivity of four pathogenic Candida species (C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis) to alkali metal cations under various growth conditions revealed significant differences among these species. Though all of them can be classified as rather osmotolerant yeast species, they exhibit different levels of tolerance to different salts. C. parapsilosis and C. albicans are the most salt-tolerant in general; C. dubliniensis is the least tolerant on rich YPD media and C. glabrata on acidic (pH 3.5) minimal YNB medium. C. dubliniensis is relatively salt-sensitive in spite of its ability to maintain as high intracellular K(+)/Na(+) ratio as its highly salt-tolerant relative C. albicans. On the other hand, C. parapsilosis can grow in the presence of very high external NaCl concentrations in spite of its high intracellular Na(+) concentrations (and thus lower K(+)/Na(+) ratio) and thus resembles salt-tolerant (halophilic) Debaryomyces hansenii. PMID:20300937

  17. Screening for amino acid substitutions in the Candida albicans Erg11 protein of azole-susceptible and azole-resistant clinical isolates: new substitutions and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Morio, Florent; Loge, Cedric; Besse, Bernard; Hennequin, Christophe; Le Pape, Patrice

    2010-04-01

    For several years, azole antifungal drugs have been a treatment option for potentially life-threatening Candida infections. However, azole resistance can occur through various mechanisms such as alterations in ERG11, encoding lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51). In this study, we investigated the antifungal susceptibility to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole of 73 clinical isolates of Candida albicans. Screening for amino acid substitutions in Erg11 was performed on each of the 73 isolates. Twenty isolates displayed a marked decrease in azole susceptibility. Amino acid substitutions were detected in more than two-thirds of the strains. In all, 23 distinct substitutions were identified. Four have not been described previously, among which N136Y and Y447H are suspected to be involved in azole resistance. We suggest that the high genetic polymorphism of ERG11 must be considered in the rationale design of new azole compounds targeting lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase. A review of all Erg11 amino acid polymorphisms described to date is given. PMID:20226328

  18. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51), but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS) which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy)-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene) (WSP1267) had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a) loss of cell wall integrity, (b) detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c) accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d) presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e) significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new antifungal drugs. PMID

  19. Fluorescence assay for the detection of adherent Candida yeasts to target cells in microtest plates.

    PubMed

    Borg-von Zepelin, M; Wagner, T

    1995-01-01

    We describe an assay based on photometric analysis for the measurement of adherence of Candida species to epithelial target cells (Vero cell line). Adherent Candida cells were detected by staining the cells with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white (CFW), which binds to chitin and glucan in the yeasts. The tests were performed on microtest plates, which were analysed automatically by fluorescence plate readers. The assay is based on the following steps: (i) coating of the microtest plates with target cells (e.g. Vero cells); (ii) infection with Candida: (iii) staining of Candida with CFW; (iv) rinsing to remove non-adherent Candida cells and unbound dye; (v) detection of adherent fluorescent Candida cells. The test was able to detect 4 x 10(4) cells ml-1. The standard deviation was +/- 8%. Day-to-day variation was +/- 10% at most. The adherence of strains of different Candida species was assayed by a standard procedure. The results confirmed the order of adherence, with C. albicans ranking first, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. PMID:8569807

  20. Delicate Metabolic Control and Coordinated Stress Response Critically Determine Antifungal Tolerance of Candida albicans Biofilm Persisters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Alpi, Emanuele; Vizcaino, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida infection has emerged as a critical health care burden worldwide, owing to the formation of robust biofilms against common antifungals. Recent evidence shows that multidrug-tolerant persisters critically account for biofilm recalcitrance, but their underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we first investigated the phenotypic characteristics of Candida biofilm persisters under consecutive harsh treatments of amphotericin B. The prolonged treatments effectively killed the majority of the cells of biofilms derived from representative strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis but failed to eradicate a small fraction of persisters. Next, we explored the tolerance mechanisms of the persisters through an investigation of the proteomic profiles of C. albicans biofilm persister fractions by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The C. albicans biofilm persisters displayed a specific proteomic signature, with an array of 205 differentially expressed proteins. The crucial enzymes involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and protein synthesis were markedly downregulated, indicating that major metabolic activities are subdued in the persisters. It is noteworthy that certain metabolic pathways, such as the glyoxylate cycle, were able to be activated with significantly increased levels of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase. Moreover, a number of important proteins responsible for Candida growth, virulence, and the stress response were greatly upregulated. Interestingly, the persisters were tolerant to oxidative stress, despite highly induced intracellular superoxide. The current findings suggest that delicate metabolic control and a coordinated stress response may play a crucial role in mediating the survival and antifungal tolerance of Candida biofilm persisters. PMID:26195524

  1. Candida africana and its closest relatives.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Candida africana is a recently described opportunistic yeast pathogen that has been linked to vaginal candidiasis. This yeast was first described, in 1995, as atypical chlamydospore-negative Candida albicans strain, and subsequently proposed as a new Candida species on the basis of morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics clearly different from those of typical C. albicans isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on the comparison of ribosomal DNA sequences demonstrated that C. africana and C. albicans isolates are too closely related to draw any conclusions regarding the status of a new species. Therefore, on the basis of these studies, some authors considered C. africana as a biovar of C. albicans even if genetic differences may be found if additional regions of genomic DNA are sequenced. The taxonomic situation of C. africana and its phylogenetic relationship with other Candida species is still controversial and remains, at present, a matter of debate. Our goal is to review the current knowledge about C. africana and highlight the development of rapid and accurate tests for its discrimination from C. albicans, Candida dubliniensis and Candida stellatoidea. Furthermore, through the analysis of literature data, we have found that C. africana has a worldwide distribution and a considerable number of features making its study particularly interesting. PMID:20667001

  2. Candida nivariensis as a New Emergent Agent of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Description of Cases and Review of Published Studies.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Marin, Pilar; Galan-Sanchez, Fátima; Marin-Casanova, Pilar; García-Martos, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Candida nivariensis is a new emergent agent related to human infections in the vaginal tract and other localizations, but the phenotypic characteristics are very similar to Candida glabrata and can be misidentified and underdiagnosed. We described four cases of vulvovaginitis identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and confirmed the results with PCR amplification and sequencing of the entire ITS genomic region (ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8 rRNA). We reinforce the need for new diagnostic tools for the correct identification of yeast infections. PMID:26708316

  3. Candida and cardiovascular implantable electronic devices: a case of lead and native aortic valve endocarditis and literature review.

    PubMed

    Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Vasher, Scott; Marmor, Meghan; Fine, Antonella B; Chan, Philip A; Tashima, Karen T; Lonks, John R; Kojic, Erna M

    2015-11-01

    Use of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED), including permanent pacemakers (PPM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), has increased dramatically over the past two decades. Most CIED infections are caused by staphylococci. Fungal causes are rare and their prognosis is poor. To our knowledge, there has not been a previously reported case of multifocal Candida endocarditis involving both a native left-sided heart valve and a CIED lead. Here, we report the case of a 70-year-old patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, and generalised fatigue, and was found to have Candida glabrata endocarditis involving both a native aortic valve and right atrial ICD lead. We review the literature and summarise four additional cases of CIED-associated Candida endocarditis published from 2009 to 2014, updating a previously published review of cases prior to 2009. We additionally review treatment guidelines and discuss management of CIED-associated Candida endocarditis. PMID:26403965

  4. Evaluation of a Reformulated CHROMagar Candida

    PubMed Central

    Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Brenner, Troy M.; Romagnoli, Mark; Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Merz, William G.; Falkler, William A.; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a differential culture medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of clinically important yeasts. Recently the medium was reformulated by Becton Dickinson. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of the new formula of CHROMagar against the original CHROMagar Candida for recovery, growth, and colony color with stock cultures and with direct plating of clinical specimens. A total of 90 stock yeast isolates representing nine yeast species, including Candida dubliniensis, as well as 522 clinical specimens were included in this study. No major differences were noted in growth rate or colony size between the two media for most of the species. However, all 10 Candida albicans isolates evaluated consistently gave a lighter shade of green on the new CHROMagar formulation. In contrast, all 26 C. dubliniensis isolates gave the same typical dark green color on both media. A total of 173 of the 522 clinical specimens were positive for yeast, with eight yeast species recovered. The recovery rates for each species were equivalent on both media, with no consistent species-associated differences in colony size or color. Although both media were comparable in performance, the lighter green colonies of C. albicans isolates on the new CHROMagar made it easier to differentiate between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis isolates. In conclusion, the newly formulated Becton Dickinson CHROMagar Candida medium is as equally suited as a differential medium for the presumptive identification of yeast species and for the detection of multiple yeast species in clinical specimens as the original CHROMagar Candida medium. PMID:11326038

  5. Screening of Tanzanian medicinal plants for anti-Candida activity

    PubMed Central

    Runyoro, Deborah KB; Matee, Mecky IN; Ngassapa, Olipa D; Joseph, Cosam C; Mbwambo, Zakaria H

    2006-01-01

    Background Candida albicans has become resistant to the already limited, toxic and expensive anti-Candida agents available in the market. These factors necessitate the search for new anti-fungal agents. Methods Sixty-three plant extracts, from 56 Tanzanian plant species obtained through the literature and interviews with traditional healers, were evaluated for anti-Candida activity. Aqueous methanolic extracts were screened for anti-Candida activity by bioautography agar overlay method, using a standard strain of Candida albicans (ATCC 90028). Results Twenty- seven (48%) out of the 56 plants were found to be active. Extracts of the root barks of Albizia anthelmintica and Balanites aegyptiaca, and roots of Plectranthus barbatus showed strong activity. Conclusion The extracts that showed strong anti-Candida activity are worth of further investigation in order to isolate and identify the active compounds. PMID:16571139

  6. Use of CHROMagar Candida for the presumptive identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Sayyada Ghufrana; Hakim, Shazia Tabassum; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of yeast isolated from clinical specimens to the species level has become increasingly important. Ever-increasing numbers of immuno-suppressed patients, a widening range of recognized pathogens, and the discovery of resistance to antifungal drugs are contributing factors to this necessity. Material and methods A total of 487 yeast strains were studied for the primary isolation and presumptive identification, directly from clinical specimen. Efficacy of CHROMagar Candida has been evaluated with conventional methods including morphology on Corn meal–tween 80 agar and biochemical methods by using API 20 C AUX. Results The result of this study shows that CHROMagar Candida can easily identify three species of Candida on the basis of colonial color and morphology, and accurately differentiate between them i.e. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. The specificity and sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida for C. albicans calculated as 99%, for C. tropicalis calculated as 98%, and C. krusei it is 100%. Conclusion The data presented supports the use of CHROMagar Candida for the rapid identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings, which could be very helpful in developing appropriate therapeutic strategy and management of patients. PMID:21483597

  7. Casein Agar: a Useful Medium for Differentiating Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Christian O.; Moragues, María D.; Llovo, José; Al Mosaid, Asmaa; Coleman, David C.; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Production of chlamydospores on casein agar at 24°C for 48 h provides a simple means for differentiating Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans based on chlamydospore production. Of 109 C. dubliniensis isolates tested on this medium, 106 (97.2%) produced abundant chlamydospores and three produced few chlamydospores. In contrast, of the 120 C. albicans isolates tested, 111 (92.5%) failed to produce any chlamydospores, whereas the remaining nine isolates produced few chlamydospores. These findings indicate that abundant chlamydospore production on casein agar is a useful test for discriminating between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans. PMID:12624062

  8. Pathogenesis of Candida vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of candida vulvovaginitis (CVV) has been estimated based on statistical data from Great Britain to be an increase to 200/100,000 over 10 years to 1984. CVV in the US is the 2nd commonest cause of vaginal infection, with bacterial vaginosis occurring twice as often. 85-90% of the yeasts isolated from the vagina are candida albicans, based on biotyping rather that the newer methods of DNA hybridization. The pathogenesis of CVV is discussed in terms of the microbiology (virulence factors, adherence, germ tube and mycelium formation, proteinase secretion, and switching colonies), asymptomatic vaginal colonization, transformation to symptomatic vaginitis, host predisposing factors (pregnancy, oral contraceptives, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobes, and other), vaginal defense mechanisms (humoral system, phagocytic system, cell mediated immunity, vaginal flora, other), and pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic CVV (internal reservoir, sexual transmission, vaginal relapse, and experimental models) The discussion of the development of virulent symptoms is capsuled in the following comments. Vaginal cell receptivity varies among individuals, but all strains of C. Albicans adhere to both exfoliated vaginal and buccal epithelial cells, or mucosal surfaces, through the yeast surface mannoprotein. It is suggested from in vitro studies that germ tube and mycelium formation facilitates vaginal mucosal invasion. Exogenous and endogenous factors may enhance germination and precipitate symptomatic vaginitis, or inhibit germination. Increased proteinase secretion may be a result of the transformation from the blastoconidium/colonization phase to the germinated invasive vaginitis stage or an independent virulence factor. It is reported that hereditable spontaneous switching may occur spontaneously in vivo also. Colonizing yeasts with a change in environment can transform to a more virulent phase. Colonization rates vary from 10-25%, and the critical issue is understanding

  9. [Candida catheter related-blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masako; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Candida catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a biofilm-related disease, which is usually refractory because antifungals show limited effect. With medical development and increase in number of compromised hosts, CRBSI became more frequent. Candida, which is one of the opportunistic pathogens, ranks the fourth causative organism of bacteremia. The onset of bacteremia is greatly associated with the presence of catheter. Repeated blood cultures and the central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture are done for the definitive diagnosis of Candida CRBSI. Additionally serological examinations such as (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan and mannan antigen are also useful for early diagnosis. It is important for the appropriate treatment to remove CVC, which is an artificial contaminated material, and administer antifungals promptly. As to the choice of antifungals, we should also take into account the ability of antibiofilm effect of antifungals as well as immunological state of host including neutropenia, prior administration of azoles, isolated or estimated Candida species, sensitivity against antifungals, administration route, pharmacokinetics (bioavailability, metabolic and excretion pathway, distribution) and drug interaction. As to complication of Candida bacteremia, first we should check endophthalmitis, which occurs frequently and leads to the loss of eyesight, as well as infective endocarditis, arthritis, metastatic infections such as embolic pneumonia and suppurative thrombotic phlebitis of catheter insertion site. Lastly we emphasize that the appropriate treatment based on the character of Candida bacteremia and biofilm leads to favorable prognosis. PMID:24809204

  10. Three novel species of the anamorphic yeast genus Candida in the Candida intermedia clade found in Japan, Thailand and Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Takashi; Jindamorakot, Sasitorn; Am-In, Somit; Lee, Ching-Fu; Imanishi, Yumi; Limtong, Savitree

    2011-01-01

    Four strains of yeasts isolated in Japan, Thailand and Taiwan were found to represent three novel species of the genus Candida. The three species are located in a clade including Candida tsuchiyae, Candida thailandica and Candida akabanensis in a tree based on the D1/D2 domain sequences of the large subunit rRNA genes but clearly differentiated from these relative species. Three novel species are proposed for these strains, i. e., Candida berkhoutiae sp. nov., for strains ST-49(T) (=BCC 7749(T)=NBRC 106733(T)=CBS 11722(T)) isolated from insect frass in Thailand and SA13S01 (=NBRC 106053) isolated from soil in Taiwan, Candida ezoensis sp. nov., for strain Y07-1601-2(T) (=NBRC 105019(T)=CBS 11753(T)) isolated from forest soil in Japan, and Candida inulinophila sp. nov., for ST-369(T) (=BCC 15081(T)=NBRC 106735(T)=CBS 11725(T)) isolated from an unidentified wild mushroom from Thailand. PMID:21606608

  11. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility Profile of Candida guilliermondii and Candida fermentati from a Multicenter Study in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Yu, Shu-Ying; Xiao, Meng; Wang, He; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-08-01

    With molecular sequencing as a gold standard, the Vitek MS, Bruker Biotyper MS, and Vitek-2 Compact systems correctly identified 92.7%, 97.0%, and 15.2% of 164 Candida guillermondii isolates, respectively, and none of 8 C. fermentati isolates. All of the isolates showed high susceptibility to echinocandins, but some C. guilliermondii isolates showed low azole susceptibility. PMID:27252461

  12. Identification of yeast isolated from dermatological patients by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seyfarth, Florian; Wiegand, Cornelia; Erhard, Marcel; Gräser, Yvonne; Elsner, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2012-05-01

    Species identification of yeasts is based on biochemical (e.g. API ID 32 C®, bioMérieux) and molecular biological approaches. As an alternative to DNA-dependent methods, mass spectral analysis based identification of micro-organisms has become increasingly recognized. In a number of studies, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been applied for the rapid classification and identification of micro-organisms. In this study, the applicability of MALDI-TOF MS for identifying yeasts isolated from dermatological patients was analysed and compared with the results from the API ID 32 C® system. Furthermore, sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the ribosomal DNA was employed as reference method. Candida (C.) albicans was isolated in 41.9% of all cases, C. parapsilosis in 20.3%, C. glabrata in 10.8%, and C. krusei in 6, 8.1%. Rarely isolated yeasts were Candida colliculosa, famata, guilliermondii, lusitaniae, and tropicalis as well as Geotrichum candidum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Trichosporon mucoides. The MALDI TOF results were equal to the results gained by ITS sequence analysis in 94%, whereas API ID 32 C® provided the correct diagnosis in 84.3% (of all cases). This lower identification rate is mostly referable to frequent misidentifications of C. krusei as C. inconspicua/norvegensis,Candida tropicalis, or Geotrichum capitatum. In contrast, all C. krusei strains were correctly identified by MALDI TOF MS. In conclusion, species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was proven to be consistent with ITS sequence analysis; the technique has a resolving power comparatively as high as ITS sequence analysis. PMID:21848605

  13. A gain-of-function mutation in the transcription factor Upc2p causes upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and increased fluconazole resistance in a clinical Candida albicans isolate.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Nico; Liu, Teresa T; Barker, Katherine S; Homayouni, Ramin; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Rogers, P David

    2008-07-01

    In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, the zinc cluster transcription factor Upc2p has been shown to regulate the expression of ERG11 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis upon exposure to azole antifungals. ERG11 encodes lanosterol demethylase, the target enzyme of this antifungal class. Overexpression of UPC2 reduces azole susceptibility, whereas its disruption results in hypersusceptibility to azoles and reduced accumulation of exogenous sterols. Overexpression of ERG11 leads to the increased production of lanosterol demethylase, which contributes to azole resistance in clinical isolates of C. albicans, but the mechanism for this has yet to be determined. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we found UPC2 and other genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis to be coordinately upregulated with ERG11 in a fluconazole-resistant clinical isolate compared with a matched susceptible isolate from the same patient. Sequence analysis of the UPC2 alleles of these isolates revealed that the resistant isolate contained a single-nucleotide substitution in one UPC2 allele that resulted in a G648D exchange in the encoded protein. Introduction of the mutated allele into a drug-susceptible strain resulted in constitutive upregulation of ERG11 and increased resistance to fluconazole. By comparing the gene expression profiles of the fluconazole-resistant isolate and of strains carrying wild-type and mutated UPC2 alleles, we identified target genes that are controlled by Upc2p. Here we show for the first time that a gain-of-function mutation in UPC2 leads to the increased expression of ERG11 and imparts resistance to fluconazole in clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:18487346

  14. Candida Berkhout (1923)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the 314 species assigned to the genus Candida and is to be published in the Yeasts, A Taxonomic Study, 5th edition. Ascomycete yeasts that do not form ascosporic state are assigned to the genus Candida, which is a highly polyphyletic taxonomic form genus. Assigned species in...

  15. Use of immunoblotting to identify antigenic differences between the yeast and mycelial phases of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Burnie, J P; Matthews, R C; Fox, A; Tabaqchali, S

    1985-01-01

    Western blotting was applied to the analysis of Candida albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases in an attempt to recognise mycelial specific antigens which might be of serodiagnostic value. The antisera were prepared in rabbits by immunising them with pressates of C albicans type A NCTC 3153 in the yeast phase or the mycelial phase. These were blotted against C albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases and the yeast phase of C parapsilosis, C krusei, C tropicalis, and Torulopsis glabrata. Cross reactivity was greatest against C parapsilosis. One yeast specific mannoprotein was identified with a molecular weight of 49 000. No mycelial specific antigens could be identified. Images PMID:3891792

  16. Deciphering azole resistance mechanisms with a focus on transcription factor-encoding genes TAC1, MRR1 and UPC2 in a set of fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Morio, Florent; Pagniez, Fabrice; Besse, Myriam; Gay-andrieu, Françoise; Miegeville, Michel; Le Pape, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    Several and often combined mechanisms can lead to acquired azole resistance in Candida albicans and subsequent therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to provide a complete overview of the molecular basis of azole resistance in a set of six C. albicans clinical isolates recovered from patients who failed azole therapy. For this purpose, expression levels of CDR1, MDR1 and ERG11 were investigated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) together with amplification and sequencing of the genes encoding their transcription factors TAC1, MRR1 and UPC2. In all, the data underline that azole resistance in this set of clinical isolates results from distinct, often combined, mechanisms, being mostly driven by CDR1 and/or MDR1 active efflux. We show that gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the transcription-factor-encoding genes TAC1, MRR1 and UPC2 are a common event in azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates. In addition, together with the finding that these genes are highly permissive to nucleotide changes, we describe several novel mutations that could act as putative GOF mutations involved in fluconazole resistance. PMID:24051054

  17. A clinical isolate of Candida albicans with mutations in ERG11 (encoding sterol 14alpha-demethylase) and ERG5 (encoding C22 desaturase) is cross resistant to azoles and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Martel, Claire M; Parker, Josie E; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    A clinical isolate of Candida albicans was identified as an erg5 (encoding sterol C22 desaturase) mutant in which ergosterol was not detectable and ergosta 5,7-dienol comprised >80% of the total sterol fraction. The mutant isolate (CA108) was resistant to fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and clotrimazole (MIC values, 64, 8, 2, 1, and 2 microg ml(-1), respectively); azole resistance could not be fully explained by the activity of multidrug resistance pumps. When susceptibility tests were performed in the presence of a multidrug efflux inhibitor (tacrolimus; FK506), CA108 remained resistant to azole concentrations higher than suggested clinical breakpoints for C. albicans (efflux-inhibited MIC values, 16 and 4 microg ml(-1) for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively). Gene sequencing revealed that CA108 was an erg11 erg5 double mutant harboring a single amino acid substitution (A114S) in sterol 14alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) and sequence repetition (10 duplicated amino acids), which nullified C22 desaturase (Erg5p) function. Owing to a lack of ergosterol, CA108 was also resistant to amphotericin B (MIC, 2 microg ml(-1)). This constitutes the first report of a C. albicans erg5 mutant isolated from the clinic. PMID:20547793

  18. Bacterial flora of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed Central

    Ducklow, H W; Boyle, P J; Maugel, P W; Strong, C; Mitchell, R

    1979-01-01

    The aerobic heterotrophic bacterial flora in over 200 individuals from 10 wild populations and 3 laboratory colonies of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata was examined. Internal bacterial densities were inversely proportional to snail size and were higher in stressed and laboratory-reared snails. The numerically predominant bacterial genera in individual snails included Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Vibrio, and several members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Enterobacteriaceae seldom predominated in laboratory colonies. Our data suggest that Vibrio extorquens and a Pasteurella sp. tend to predominate in high-bacterial-density snails. These snails may be compromised and may harbor opportunistic snail pathogens. PMID:539821

  19. Bacterial flora of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ducklow, H W; Boyle, P J; Maugel, P W; Strong, C; Mitchell, R

    1979-10-01

    The aerobic heterotrophic bacterial flora in over 200 individuals from 10 wild populations and 3 laboratory colonies of the schistosome vector snail Biomphalaria glabrata was examined. Internal bacterial densities were inversely proportional to snail size and were higher in stressed and laboratory-reared snails. The numerically predominant bacterial genera in individual snails included Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Vibrio, and several members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Enterobacteriaceae seldom predominated in laboratory colonies. Our data suggest that Vibrio extorquens and a Pasteurella sp. tend to predominate in high-bacterial-density snails. These snails may be compromised and may harbor opportunistic snail pathogens. PMID:539821

  20. 2-hydroxyisocaproic acid is fungicidal for Candida and Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Sakko, M; Moore, C; Novak-Frazer, L; Rautemaa, V; Sorsa, T; Hietala, P