Science.gov

Sample records for candidate exoplanet companion

  1. Most sub-arcsecond companions of Kepler exoplanet candidate host stars are gravitationally bound

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Using the known detection limits for high-resolution imaging observations and the statistical properties of true binary and line-of-sight companions, we estimate the binary fraction of Kepler exoplanet host stars. Our speckle imaging programs at the WIYN 3.5 m and Gemini North 8.1 m telescopes have observed over 600 Kepler objects of interest and detected 49 stellar companions within ∼1 arcsec. Assuming binary stars follow a log-normal period distribution for an effective temperature range of 3000-10,000 K, then the model predicts that the vast majority of detected sub-arcsecond companions are long period (P > 50 yr), gravitationally bound companions. In comparing the model predictions to the number of real detections in both observational programs, we conclude that the overall binary fraction of host stars is similar to the 40%-50% rate observed for field stars.

  2. THE MASS OF THE CANDIDATE EXOPLANET COMPANION TO HD 136118 FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY AND HIGH-PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martioli, Eder; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Armstrong, Amber; Bean, Jacob L.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensor astrometry and high-cadence radial velocities for HD 136118 from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with archival data from Lick to determine the complete set of orbital parameters for HD 136118 b. We find an orbital inclination for the candidate exoplanet of i{sub b} = 163.{sup 0}1 +- 3.{sup 0}0. This establishes the actual mass of the object, M{sub b} = 42{sup +11}{sub -18} M{sub J} , in contrast to the minimum mass determined from the radial velocity data only, M{sub b} sin i approx 12 M{sub J} . Therefore, the low-mass companion to HD 136118 is now identified as a likely brown dwarf residing in the 'brown dwarf desert'.

  3. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    events by monitoring the brightness of a very large number of stars over extended time intervals. During the past years, it has also included a search for periodic, very shallow "dips" in the brightness of stars, caused by the regular transit of small orbiting objects (small stars, brown dwarfs [2] or Jupiter-size planets). The OGLE team has since announced 177 "planetary transit candidates" from their survey of several hundred thousand stars in three southern sky fields, one in the direction of the Galactic Centre, another within the Carina constellation and the third within the Centaurus/Musca constellations. The nature of the transiting object can however only be established by subsequent radial-velocity observations of the parent star. The size of the velocity variations (the amplitude) is directly related to the mass of the companion object and therefore allows discrimination between stars and planets as the cause of the observed brightness "dip". A Bonanza of Low-Mass Stars An international team of astronomers [3] has made use of the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope for this work. Profiting from the multiplex capacity of the FLAMES/UVES facility that permits to obtain high-resolution spectra of up to 8 objects simultaneously, they have looked at 60 OGLE transit candidate stars, measuring their radial velocities with an accuracy of about 50 m/s [4]. This ambitious programme has so far resulted in the discovery of five new transiting exoplanets (see, e.g., ESO PR 11/04 for the announcement of two of those). Most of the other transit candidates identified by OGLE have turned out to be eclipsing binaries, that is, in most cases common, small and low-mass stars passing in front of a solar-like star. This additional wealth of data on small and light stars is a real bonanza for the astronomers. Constraining the Relation Between Mass and Radius Low-mass stars are exceptionally interesting objects, also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with

  4. Spectroscopy of Kepler Candidate Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Currently the NASA Kepler Mission has identified 3449 exoplanet candidates, one third with estimated radii R_p<2.5R_oplus and orbiting faint (m_Kep>14.5) host stars. The NASA sponsored Kepler Follow-up Program is focusing on small exoplanet candidates (R_p<2.5R_oplus) and those in habitable zone orbits. Planet radii estimates depend on estimates of host star radii. Based on spectra previously obtained at the KPNO Mayall 4-m for 220 stars with candidate exoplanets, Everett et al. (2013) have shown that many host stars are larger than originally assumed (up to factor of 2). Therefore, the exoplanet candidates they host must be larger than originally assumed, which conversely reduces the number of known Earth- sized exoplanet candidates. Determination of the frequency of such Earth-sized planets is a cornerstone Kepler mission objective and of keen general interest. These Mayall spectra were also used to confirm the Buchhave et al. (2012) result that exoplanet candidates larger than 4R_oplus in short-period orbits are preferentially associated with host stars with solar or higher metallicity, using a fainter and larger sample of stars than Buchhave et al. In short, followup Mayall optical spectroscopy is critical to confirming the detection of Earth-sized exoplanets, a Kepler cornerstone goal, as well as characterizing the relationship between host star properties and planetary system properties. Here, we propose to continue our reconnaissance survey with a focus on the smallest (most rare) exoplanet candidates orbiting the faintest Kepler host stars.

  5. Speckle Imaging of Kepler Exo-planet Transit Candidate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Sherry, William

    2009-08-01

    The NASA Kepler mission was successfully launched on 6 March 2009 and will begin science operations near 1 May. At the present time, commissioning tests are being performed and all spacecraft and science instruments are nominal. Kepler's main science focus is to discover Earth-like exo-planets via photometric transit detection. ``Hot Jupiters" will be found by the hundreds (using current ground-based statistics) but Earth-sized planets (up to 2.5 Earth radii) will be more difficult, yet are the holy grail of the mission. To take the list of candidate transiting planets found by Kepler and move them to probable or certain exo-planet detections, a decision tree of false positive elimination will occur. While earth-sized exo-planets can not currently be confirmed from the ground, many of the false positive eliminations steps can be performed. This proposal aims to obtain high resolution speckle imaging to 1) finish the characterization of ~500 comparison sample stars in the Kepler field of view prior to any transit information as a sample to place planet host stars in context with and to 2) observe Kepler exo-planet transit candidates in order to eliminate the largest false positive contributor in any transit search - background eclipsing binary stars or faint companion stars.

  6. On the Stellar Companion to the Exoplanet Hosting Star 30 Arietis B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Barclay, Thomas; Hartmann, Michael; Hatzes, Artie P.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Ciardi, David R.; Huber, Daniel; Wright, Jason T.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2015-12-01

    A crucial aspect of understanding planet formation is determining the binarity of the host stars. Results from radial velocity (RV) surveys and the follow-up of Kepler exoplanet candidates have demonstrated that stellar binarity certainly does not exclude the presence of planets in stable orbits and the configuration may in fact be relatively common. Here we present new results for the 30 Arietis system which confirms that the B component hosts both planetary and stellar companions. Keck AO imaging provides direct detection of the stellar companion and additional RV data are consistent with an orbiting star. We present a revised orbit of the known planet along with photometry during predicted transit times. Finally, we provide constraints on the properties of the stellar companion based on orbital stability considerations.

  7. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF THREE PRE-LAUNCH EXOPLANET CANDIDATES: DISCOVERY OF TWO ECLIPSING BINARIES AND A NEW EXOPLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Sherry, William; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Feldmeier, John J.; Horch, Elliott; Van Belle, Gerard T.

    2010-12-20

    Three transiting exoplanet candidate stars were discovered in a ground-based photometric survey prior to the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler observations of them were obtained during Quarter 1 of the Kepler mission. All three stars are faint by radial velocity follow-up standards, so we have examined these candidates with regard to eliminating false positives and providing high confidence exoplanet selection. We present a first attempt to exclude false positives for this set of faint stars without high-resolution radial velocity analysis. This method of exoplanet confirmation will form a large part of the Kepler mission follow-up for Jupiter-sized exoplanet candidates orbiting faint stars. Using the Kepler light curves and pixel data, as well as medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy and speckle imaging, we find that two of our candidates are binary stars. One consists of a late-F star with an early M companion, while the other is a K0 star plus a late M-dwarf/brown dwarf in a 19 day elliptical orbit. The third candidate (BOKS-1) is an r = 15 G8V star hosting a newly discovered exoplanet with a radius of 1.12 R{sub Jupiter} in a 3.9 day orbit.

  8. MICROLENSING BINARIES WITH CANDIDATE BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Sumi, T.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Bozza, V.; Abe, F.; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing events discovered during the 2004-2011 observation seasons. Based on the low mass ratio criterion of q < 0.2, we found seven candidate events: OGLE-2004-BLG-035, OGLE-2004-BLG-039, OGLE-2007-BLG-006, OGLE-2007-BLG-399/MOA-2007-BLG-334, MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172, MOA-2011-BLG-149, and MOA-201-BLG-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 {+-} 0.01 M {sub Sun} and 0.019 {+-} 0.002 M {sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events with well-covered light curves increases with new-generation searches.

  9. Know the Star, Know the Planet. IV. A Stellar Companion to the Host Star of the Eccentric Exoplanet HD 8673b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Mason, Brian D.; Neyman, Christopher R.; Wu, Yanqin; Riddle, Reed L.; Shelton, J. Christopher; Angione, John; Baranec, Christoph; Bouchez, Antonin; Bui, Khanh; Burruss, Rick; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Croner, Ernest; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen; Hale, David; Henning, John; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas; McKenna, Dan; Milburn, Jennifer; Palmer, Dean; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Trinh, Thang; Troy, Mitchell; Truong, Tuan; Zolkower, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    HD 8673 hosts a massive exoplanet in a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.723). Based on two epochs of speckle interferometry a previous publication identified a candidate stellar companion. We observed HD 8673 multiple times with the 10 m Keck II telescope, the 5 m Hale telescope, the 3.63 m Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope, and the 1.5 m Palomar telescope in a variety of filters with the aim of confirming and characterizing the stellar companion. We did not detect the candidate companion, which we now conclude was a false detection, but we did detect a fainter companion. We collected astrometry and photometry of the companion on six epochs in a variety of filters. The measured differential photometry enabled us to determine that the companion is an early M dwarf with a mass estimate of 0.33-0.45 M⊙ . The companion has a projected separation of 10 AU, which is one of the smallest projected separations of an exoplanet host binary system. Based on the limited astrometry collected, we are able to constrain the orbit of the stellar companion to a semimajor axis of 35-60 AU, an eccentricity ≤slant 0.5, and an inclination of 75°-85°. The stellar companion has likely strongly influenced the orbit of the exoplanet and quite possibly explains its high eccentricity.

  10. Ground Based Astrometric Search for Substellar Companions in Stellar Multiple Systems, The Case of the Exoplanet Host System HD 19994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röll, T.; Seifahrt, A.; Neuhäuser, R.; Köhler, R.

    2010-12-01

    Due to the unknown inclination angle, radial velocity (RV) measurements only provide the minimum mass of companions. In combination with transit observations one can derive the true mass, but a transit is only observable for nearly edge-on systems. For all other systems, astrometry is the only method to get the true mass of an orbiting companion by measuring the reflex motion of the host star. In our ongoing astrometric search program we observe stellar multiple systems within a distance of 100 parsec in order to confirm RV exoplanet candidates and to search for unknown substellar companions. Here we present preliminary results of one of our targets, the binary HD 19994, which is known to harbour a RV planet candidate around the A component. From our astrometric observations over the last years, it seems that a high mass brown dwarf is orbiting the low-mass B component. Analysis of our data with speckle interferometry confirms the existence of an additional body.

  11. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  12. High-contrast imaging search for stellar and substellar companions of exoplanet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Ginski, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of our high-contrast imaging survey of close stellar and substellar companions of exoplanet host stars, carried out with the adaptive optics imager NACO at the ESO Paranal observatory, in Chile. In total, 33 exoplanet host stars were observed with NACO in the Ks-band. New comoving companions could be identified close to the stars HD 9578, HD 96167, and HD 142245. The newly detected companions exhibit masses between 0.21 and 0.56 M⊙ and are located at projected separations from their primaries between about 190 and 510 au. In the case of HD 142245, we found evidence that the detected companion is actually a close binary itself with a projected separation of only about 4 au, i.e. HD 142245 might be a hierarchical triple stellar system, which hosts an exoplanet, a new member in the short list of such systems, presently known. In our imaging campaign, a limiting magnitude of Ks = 18.5 mag is reached in average in the background noise limited region around our targets at projected separations beyond about 100 au, which allows the detection of substellar companions with masses down to about 60 MJup. With our NACO observations we can rule out additional stellar companions at projected separations between about 30 and 370 au around the observed exoplanet host stars.

  13. CANDID: Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzynski, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-05-01

    CANDID finds faint companion around star in interferometric data in the OIFITS format. It allows systematically searching for faint companions in OIFITS data, and if not found, estimates the detection limit. The tool is based on model fitting and Chi2 minimization, with a grid for the starting points of the companion position. It ensures all positions are explored by estimating a-posteriori if the grid is dense enough, and provides an estimate of the optimum grid density.

  14. Combing the Brown Dwarf Desert with the APOGEE Catalog of Stellar and Substellar Companion Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troup, Nicholas William; De Lee, Nathan M.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Nidever, David L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Stassun, Keivan; Covey, Kevin R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Hearty, Fred R.; APOGEE Substellar Companions Working Group

    2016-01-01

    While both exoplanets and stellar-mass companions have been found in extremely short-period orbits, there has been a paucity of brown dwarf (BD) companions orbiting Sun-like stars, a phenomenon known as the "Brown Dwarf Desert." However, more recent work has shown that this Desert might be limited in extent, only existing for small separation (a < 5-10 AU) companions, and may not be as "dry" as initially thought. It has been previously suggested that there may be an "F Dwarf Oasis," where the BD Desert observed for Solar-like stars ceases to exist for F dwarf stars. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has compiled a catalog of ~400 of its most compelling stellar and substellar companion candidates orbiting host stars of various spectral types and evolutionary states. Among these candidates, approximately 100 had a derived companion mass in the BD regime (13-80 MJup), which is a significant increase compared to the number of known small separation (a < 1 AU) BD companions. Our sample appears to manifest the BD desert, but only for seperations < 0.2 AU rather than the previously held 5 AU. This is explained by one of the unique qualities of our sample when compared to previous companions surveys: Two-thirds of the BD candidates in our sample are orbiting evolved stars, most of which were F dwarfs during their main sequence lifetime, consistent with the notion of an F Dwarf Oasis. Using this sample, we further test this hypothesis by constraining the formation mechanisms of BD companions, and exploring their orbital evolution as their host evolves off the main sequence.

  15. A Systematic Search for Exoplanet Candidates in K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Tarryn; Karnes, Katherine L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of 41 promising exoplanet candidates in 33 stellar systems from the K2 Campaign 3 data. The K2 Mission was developed upon the mechanical failure of the second of four reaction wheels, as the Kepler Spacecraft could not continue the original Kepler Mission. The Kepler Mission was a 4-year mission designed to determine the prevalence of exoplanets in our galaxy, and the configuration and diversity of those planetary systems discovered. The K2 Mission has a similar goal, though the spacecraft now points at fields along the ecliptic in ~75 day campaigns (Howell et al. 2014). Although the light curves in K2 data are noisier and have significant motion-induced systematics, it has been shown that there is success in finding exoplanets and exoplanet candidates (Foreman-Mackey et al. 2015; Montet et al. 2015). Utilizing the Transiting Planet Search and Data Validation from the Kepler Processing Pipeline, we systematically search K2 Campaign 3 for potential exoplanet candidates. Setting a 7.1s maximum folded statistic threshold minimum for a minimum of three transit events, we define our initial candidate list. Our list is further narrowed by the results from Data Validation, as it allows us to statistically identify false positives, such as eclipsing binaries or uncorrected roll-drift, in our sample. We further draw parallels between our results and other transit-searching pipeline results published for Campaign 3.

  16. Limits on Stellar Companions to Exoplanet Host Stars with Eccentric Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott P.; Feng, Ying; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.; Howard, Andrew W.; Wright, Jason T.

    2014-04-01

    Though there are now many hundreds of confirmed exoplanets known, the binarity of exoplanet host stars is not well understood. This is particularly true of host stars that harbor a giant planet in a highly eccentric orbit since these are more likely to have had a dramatic dynamical history that transferred angular momentum to the planet. Here we present observations of four exoplanet host stars that utilize the excellent resolving power of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument on the Gemini North telescope. Two of the stars are giants and two are dwarfs. Each star is host to a giant planet with an orbital eccentricity >0.5 and whose radial velocity (RV) data contain a trend in the residuals to the Keplerian orbit fit. These observations rule out stellar companions 4-8 mag fainter than the host star at passbands of 692 nm and 880 nm. The resolution and field of view of the instrument result in exclusion radii of 0.''05-1.''4, which excludes stellar companions within several AU of the host star in most cases. We further provide new RVs for the HD 4203 system that confirm that the linear trend previously observed in the residuals is due to an additional planet. These results place dynamical constraints on the source of the planet's eccentricities, place constraints on additional planetary companions, and inform the known distribution of multiplicity amongst exoplanet host stars.

  17. Limits on stellar companions to exoplanet host stars with eccentric planets

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott P.; Feng, Ying; Wright, Jason T.; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-04-20

    Though there are now many hundreds of confirmed exoplanets known, the binarity of exoplanet host stars is not well understood. This is particularly true of host stars that harbor a giant planet in a highly eccentric orbit since these are more likely to have had a dramatic dynamical history that transferred angular momentum to the planet. Here we present observations of four exoplanet host stars that utilize the excellent resolving power of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument on the Gemini North telescope. Two of the stars are giants and two are dwarfs. Each star is host to a giant planet with an orbital eccentricity >0.5 and whose radial velocity (RV) data contain a trend in the residuals to the Keplerian orbit fit. These observations rule out stellar companions 4-8 mag fainter than the host star at passbands of 692 nm and 880 nm. The resolution and field of view of the instrument result in exclusion radii of 0.''05-1.''4, which excludes stellar companions within several AU of the host star in most cases. We further provide new RVs for the HD 4203 system that confirm that the linear trend previously observed in the residuals is due to an additional planet. These results place dynamical constraints on the source of the planet's eccentricities, place constraints on additional planetary companions, and inform the known distribution of multiplicity amongst exoplanet host stars.

  18. WHICH RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANETS HAVE UNDETECTED OUTER COMPANIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2009-09-01

    The observed radial velocity (RV) eccentricity distribution for extrasolar planets in single-planet systems shows that a significant fraction of planets are eccentric (e > 0.1). However, an RV planet's eccentricity, which comes from the Keplerian fitting, can be biased by low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sampling. Here, we investigate the effects on eccentricity produced by undetected outer companions. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of mock RV data to understand this effect and predict its impact on the observed distribution. We first quantify the statistical bias of known RV planets' eccentricities produced by undetected zero-eccentricity wide-separation companions and show that this effect alone cannot explain the observed distribution. We then modify the simulations to consist of two populations, one of zero-eccentricity planets in double-planet systems and the other of single planets drawn from an eccentric distribution. Our simulations show that a good fit to the observed distribution is obtained with 45% zero-eccentricity double planets and 55% single eccentric planets. Assuming that our two simulated populations of planets are a good approximation for the true RV population, matching the observed distribution allows us to determine the probability that a known RV planet's orbital eccentricity has been biased by an undetected wide-separation companion. Averaged over eccentricity we calculate this probability to be {approx}4%, suggesting that a small fraction of systems may have a yet to be discovered outer companion. Our simulations show that moderately eccentric planets, with 0.1 < e < 0.3 and 0.1 < e < 0.2, have a {approx}13% and {approx}19% probability, respectively, of having an undetected outer companion. We encourage both high-contrast direct imaging and RV follow-up surveys of known RV planets with moderate eccentricities to test our predictions and look for previously undetected outer companions.

  19. Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seager, S.

    2010-12-01

    -mass planets and those further from the star. All in all, technology enables slow but sure progress, and this fuels ongoing discovery. Theory, like observations, also takes time to unfold and mature. We can anticipate an "ultimate" planet formation model similar to the "millenimum simulation" for galaxy formation and evolution. In time, incorporating detailed physics as well as being able to reproduce the generic outcome of planet populations (mass, radius, and orbital characteristics, including period) will enable a deeper understanding of planet formation and migration. Similarly, the ideal exoplanet atmosphere code of the future could be a three-dimensional Monte Carlo code that includes radiative transfer with inhomogeneous cloud coverage and surface features, a code that also solves for the temperature structure and combines with a hydrodynamical simulation to calculate the three-dimensional temperature and wind structure. Classical orbital mechanics, already reinvigorated by interesting exoplanet systems (e.g., planets in resonant orbits, hot Jupiter exoplanets that orbit in the direction opposite to the stellar rotation), also has a role to play in explaining fundamental mechanisms of how planetary system configurations came to be. Orbital dynamics modeling is driving the search for moons and other unseen planet companions by their perturbations on transiting planet signatures. Exoplanets is a unique science because it involves so many disciplines within and beyond planetary science and astrophysics. The other disciplines include geophysics, high-pressure mineral physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry, and even microbiology. While exoplanet observations clearly belong under the branch of astronomy, for many years the whole discipline of exoplanets lacked a true home. Physics departments have said "Exoplanets: It's interesting, but is it physics?" Planetary and Earth science departments used to collecting real data in their hands from Earth and in situ measurements from

  20. Follow-up of Candidate Companions to Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Quanz, Sascha; Carson, Joseph; Thalmann, Christian; Lafreniere, David; Amara, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Vega hosts one of the most nearby massive debris disks, with a morphology that may be indicative of wide giant planetary companions. Its proximity and relatively young age also make it an attractive target for direct imaging searches for such companions. We therefore observed Vega with Spitzer during cycle 9, which provides the best sensitivity to planets in wide orbits that is available with any existing facility. Three candidates were discovered in the data which are substantially brighter at 4.5 micron than at 3.6 micron, while typical background sources have much smaller brightness differences between these bands. We now propose to follow the system up in a second epoch to test the three candidates for common proper motion with the primary star. If real, physical companions, the candidates have separations of 265-335 AU and masses of 2-3 Mjup according to evolutionary models (regardless of initial entropy conditions), and would therefore constitute the coldest and lowest-mass planets ever imaged outside of the Solar System.

  1. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept. /NASA, Ames

    2010-06-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTV) due to gravitational interactions - though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  2. FIVE KEPLER TARGET STARS THAT SHOW MULTIPLE TRANSITING EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howell, Steve B.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-12-10

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities-two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  3. Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seager, S.

    2010-12-01

    -mass planets and those further from the star. All in all, technology enables slow but sure progress, and this fuels ongoing discovery. Theory, like observations, also takes time to unfold and mature. We can anticipate an "ultimate" planet formation model similar to the "millenimum simulation" for galaxy formation and evolution. In time, incorporating detailed physics as well as being able to reproduce the generic outcome of planet populations (mass, radius, and orbital characteristics, including period) will enable a deeper understanding of planet formation and migration. Similarly, the ideal exoplanet atmosphere code of the future could be a three-dimensional Monte Carlo code that includes radiative transfer with inhomogeneous cloud coverage and surface features, a code that also solves for the temperature structure and combines with a hydrodynamical simulation to calculate the three-dimensional temperature and wind structure. Classical orbital mechanics, already reinvigorated by interesting exoplanet systems (e.g., planets in resonant orbits, hot Jupiter exoplanets that orbit in the direction opposite to the stellar rotation), also has a role to play in explaining fundamental mechanisms of how planetary system configurations came to be. Orbital dynamics modeling is driving the search for moons and other unseen planet companions by their perturbations on transiting planet signatures. Exoplanets is a unique science because it involves so many disciplines within and beyond planetary science and astrophysics. The other disciplines include geophysics, high-pressure mineral physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry, and even microbiology. While exoplanet observations clearly belong under the branch of astronomy, for many years the whole discipline of exoplanets lacked a true home. Physics departments have said "Exoplanets: It's interesting, but is it physics?" Planetary and Earth science departments used to collecting real data in their hands from Earth and in situ measurements from

  4. Planet Hunters. VIII. Characterization of 41 Long-period Exoplanet Candidates from Kepler Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Barclay, Thomas; Picard, Alyssa; Ma, Bo; Bowler, Brendan P.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Jek, Kian J.; LaCourse, Daryll; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Simister, Dean Joseph; Grégoire, Boscher; Babin, Sean P.; Poile, Trevor; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; Jebson, Tony; Omohundro, Mark R.; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Sejpka, Johann; Terentev, Ivan A.; Gagliano, Robert; Paakkonen, Jari-Pekka; Otnes Berge, Hans Kristian; Winarski, Troy; Green, Gerald R.; Schmitt, Allan R.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; Hoekstra, Abe

    2015-12-01

    The census of exoplanets is incomplete for orbital distances larger than 1 AU. Here, we present 41 long-period planet candidates in 38 systems identified by Planet Hunters based on Kepler archival data (Q0-Q17). Among them, 17 exhibit only one transit, 14 have two visible transits, and 10 have more than three visible transits. For planet candidates with only one visible transit, we estimate their orbital periods based on transit duration and host star properties. The majority of the planet candidates in this work (75%) have orbital periods that correspond to distances of 1-3 AU from their host stars. We conduct follow-up imaging and spectroscopic observations to validate and characterize planet host stars. In total, we obtain adaptive optics images for 33 stars to search for possible blending sources. Six stars have stellar companions within 4″. We obtain high-resolution spectra for 6 stars to determine their physical properties. Stellar properties for other stars are obtained from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and the Kepler Stellar Catalog by Huber et al. We validate 7 planet candidates that have planet confidence over 0.997 (3σ level). These validated planets include 3 single-transit planets (KIC-3558849b, KIC-5951458b, and KIC-8540376c), 3 planets with double transits (KIC-8540376b, KIC-9663113b, and KIC-10525077b), and 1 planet with four transits (KIC-5437945b). This work provides assessment regarding the existence of planets at wide separations and the associated false positive rate for transiting observation (17%-33%). More than half of the long-period planets with at least three transits in this paper exhibit transit timing variations up to 41 hr, which suggest additional components that dynamically interact with the transiting planet candidates. The nature of these components can be determined by follow-up radial velocity and transit observations.

  5. SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT KEPLER MISSION EXOPLANET CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula

    2013-07-10

    Stellar properties are measured for a large set of Kepler mission exoplanet candidate host stars. Most of these stars are fainter than 14th magnitude, in contrast to other spectroscopic follow-up studies. This sample includes many high-priority Earth-sized candidate planets. A set of model spectra are fitted to R {approx} 3000 optical spectra of 268 stars to improve estimates of T{sub eff}, log (g), and [Fe/H] for the dwarfs in the range 4750 {<=} T{sub eff} {<=} 7200 K. These stellar properties are used to find new stellar radii and, in turn, new radius estimates for the candidate planets. The result of improved stellar characteristics is a more accurate representation of this Kepler exoplanet sample and identification of promising candidates for more detailed study. This stellar sample, particularly among stars with T{sub eff} {approx}> 5200 K, includes a greater number of relatively evolved stars with larger radii than assumed by the mission on the basis of multi-color broadband photometry. About 26% of the modeled stars require radii to be revised upward by a factor of 1.35 or greater, and modeling of 87% of the stars suggest some increase in radius. The sample presented here also exhibits a change in the incidence of planets larger than 3-4 R{sub Circled-Plus} as a function of metallicity. Once [Fe/H] increases to {>=} - 0.05, large planets suddenly appear in the sample while smaller planets are found orbiting stars with a wider range of metallicity. The modeled stellar spectra, as well as an additional 84 stars of mostly lower effective temperatures, are made available to the community.

  6. NICMOS Imaging Search for a Candidate Companion to Proxima Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstone, M. D.; Schneider, G.; Schultz, A. B.

    2001-05-01

    A candidate companion to Proxima Centauri (Prox Cen) was identified in Faint Object Spectrograph observations (Schultz, A.B. et al, 1998 AJ 115, 345). Subsequently, the field surrounding Prox Cen was observed at 3 epochs (UT 8 March, 1 July, and 13 October 1998) with NICMOS Camera 1 (0.043 arcsec/pix), in HST observing program GO/7847. At each epoch the field, which was oriented by the HST nominal roll, was observed in 4 dither positions in each of 3 filters (F160W, F165M, and F170M). The M5.5V star GL 905 was observed similarly at one epoch, to serve as a PSF reference for Prox Cen. This total survey covered approx. 300 square arcseconds near Prox Cen, of which about 80 square arcseconds was common to two epochs, and about 60 square arcseconds was imaged in all three epochs. We searched the PSF-subtracted images for common proper-motion and common parallax companions to this close (d ≈ 1.3 pc) primary. Background stars were identified by comparison to archival WFPC-2 images and differential astrometry between the epochs. We did not find multi-epoch evidence of candidate companions, though we have identified a number of single-epoch point-source like objects in the images. We derive upper limits for near-infrared flux densities from undetected companions as a function of projected distance. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant number GO-07847.01-96A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  7. AN EFFICIENT AUTOMATED VALIDATION PROCEDURE FOR EXOPLANET TRANSIT CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.

    2012-12-10

    Surveys searching for transiting exoplanets have found many more candidates than they have been able to confirm as true planets. This situation is especially acute with the Kepler survey, which has found over 2300 candidates but has to date confirmed only a small fraction of them as planets. I present here a general procedure that can quickly be applied to any planet candidate to calculate its false positive probability. This procedure takes into account the period, depth, duration, and shape of the signal; the colors of the target star; arbitrary spectroscopic or imaging follow-up observations; and informed assumptions about the populations and distributions of field stars and multiple-star properties. Applying these methods to a sample of known Kepler planets, I demonstrate that many signals can be validated with very limited follow-up observations: in most cases with only a spectrum and an adaptive optics image. Additionally, I demonstrate that this procedure can reliably identify false positive signals. Because of the computational efficiency of this analysis, it is feasible to apply it to all Kepler planet candidates in the near future, and it will streamline the follow-up efforts for Kepler and other current and future transit surveys.

  8. Know the Star, Know the Planet. III. Discovery of Late-Type Companions to Two Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Mason, Brian D.; Riddle, Reed L.; Hartkopf, William I.; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    We discuss two multiple star systems that host known exoplanets: HD 2638 and 30 Ari B. Adaptive optics imagery revealed an additional stellar companion to both stars. We collected multi-epoch images of the systems with Robo-AO and the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems at Palomar Observatory and provide relative photometry and astrometry. The astrometry indicates that the companions share common proper motion with their respective primaries. Both of the new companions have projected separations less than 30 AU from the exoplanet host star. Using the projected separations to compute orbital periods of the new stellar companions, HD 2638 has a period of 130 yr and 30 Ari B has a period of 80 yr. Previous studies have shown that the true period is most likely within a factor of three of these estimated values. The additional component to 30 Ari makes it the second confirmed quadruple system known to host an exoplanet. HD 2638 hosts a hot Jupiter and the discovery of a new companion strengthens the connection between hot Jupiters and binary stars. We place the systems on a color-magnitude diagram and derive masses for the companions which turn out to be roughly 0.5 solar mass stars.

  9. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_ȯ, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_ȯ, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  10. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. V. CANDIDATE SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Hartkopf, William I.; Boss, Alan P.; Williamson, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Six binaries are presented that show evidence of substellar companions orbiting either the primary or secondary star. Of these six systems, the likelihoods of two of the detected perturbations to represent real objects are considered to be 'high confidence', while the remaining four systems are less certain and will require continued observations for confirmation.

  11. Resolved Companions of Cepheids: Testing the Candidates with X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M⊙). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  12. Space weather: recovering the variation of the stellar EUV spectral Energy distribution from the companion exoplanet FUV transit observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Guo, Jianheng

    2016-07-01

    The stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation determines the atmospheric properties of exoplanets. Recently, by varying the profiles of the EUV spectral energy distribution (SED), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of the escaping atmosphere (Guo & Ben-Jaffel, 2015). One of our major results was that the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere could be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape rate, the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. For exoplanet HD 189733b, it was possible to explain the time variability observed during transit in the Lyman-α line by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K star. Our proposed technique provides a straightforward and easy-to-follow proxy to connect the EUV SED of the star with the planetary companion Lyman--α transit absorption, the monitoring of which may provide a direct measure of the stellar EUV flux. Here, we extend our study using new HST FUV observations.

  13. Transiting exoplanet candidates from K2 Campaigns 5 and 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin J. S.; Parviainen, Hannu; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a new transit search and vetting pipeline for observations from the K2 mission, and present the candidate transiting planets identified by this pipeline out of the targets in Campaigns 5 and 6. Our pipeline uses the Gaussian Process-based K2SC code to correct for the K2 pointing systematics and simultaneously model stellar variability. The systematics-corrected, variability-detrended light curves are searched for transits with the Box Least Squares method, and a period-dependent detection threshold is used to generate a preliminary candidate list. Two or three individuals vet each candidate manually to produce the final candidate list, using a set of automatically-generated transit fits and assorted diagnostic tests to inform the vetting. We detect 147 single-planet system candidates and 5 multi-planet systems, independently recovering the previously-published hot Jupiters EPIC 212110888b, WASP-55b (EPIC 212300977b) and Qatar-2b (EPIC 212756297b). We also report the outcome of reconnaissance spectroscopy carried out for all candidates with Kepler magnitude Kp ≤ 13, identifying 12 targets as likely false positives. We compare our results to those of other K2 transit search pipelines, noting that ours performs particularly well for variable and/or active stars, but that the results are very similar overall. All the light curves and code used in the transit search and vetting process are publicly available, as are the follow-up spectra.

  14. Two Suns in The Sky: Stellar Multiplicity in Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Mason, B. D.; Subasavage, J. P.; Jao, W. C.; Beaulieu, T. D.; Hambly, N. C.

    2005-12-01

    We present results of a reconnaissance for stellar companions to all 131 radial-velocity-detected candidate extrasolar planetary systems known as of July 1, 2005. Common proper motion (CPM) companions were investigated using the multi-epoch STScI Digitized Sky Surveys (DSS), and confirmed by matching the trigonometric parallax distances of the primaries to companion distances estimated photometrically using SuperCOSMOS plate, CCD optical and 2MASS infrared photometry. We evaluate whether the ``companions" listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) are gravitationally bound to the primary or coincidental alignments in the sky. We also attempt to confirm or refute companions listed in the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS), Hipparcos, and Duquennoy & Mayor, 1991. Our findings indicate that a lower limit of 29 (22%) of the 131 exoplanet systems have stellar companions, and an additional 7 (5%) have candidate companions. We report a previously unknown stellar companion to planet host HD 38529, and identify a companion candidate to HD 188015. We confirm 16 previously reported stellar companions to exoplanet hosts, and report 8 additional companions --- these are known stellar companions, but previously not recognized to be in exoplanet systems. In addition, we have confirmed the gravitational connection for a WDS entry for HD 222582. We have also found evidence for 20 entries in WDS that are not gravitationally bound companions --- they do not show any related proper motion in the DSS plates. At least three, and possibly five of the exoplanet systems are contained within triple star systems, and of these, HD 38529 may have a fourth stellar companion as well. Two of the exoplanet systems contain white dwarf companions. These results indicate that solar systems are found in a variety of stellar multiplicity environments -- singles, binaries, triples, and possibly quadruples; and that planets survive post-main-sequence evolution of companion stars.

  15. Algol: An Early Candidate for a Transiting Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.; Stuart, I.

    2008-09-01

    Virtually every astronomy text credits John Goodricke (1764-1786) with the discovery of the period of variability of the star Algol (β Per) and with the explanation of its variation (eclipses by an unseen stellar companion). Today, Algol is considered a prototype of an eclipsing binary star. In actuality, John Goodricke worked in collaboration with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative, Edward Pigott. As observed by Hoskin1, the observing journals2 of the two clearly show that the eclipse explanation originated with Edward. Both originally used the term "planet” to describe the eclipsing body. However, in Goodricke's 1783 paper describing Algol, he writes: "....I should imagine it could hardly be accounted for otherwise than either by the interposition of a large body revolving round Algol, or some kind of motion of its own, whereby part of its body, covered with spots or such like matter...."3 Goodricke was later to soften his stance still further after the two discovered several other variable stars; his last published work4 mentions only starspots as an explanation for the light variation of Algol. Although the physics of the time would not have allowed Goodricke and Pigott to distinguish between a star and a planet as the unseen companion, the eighteenth-century astronomers showed great prescience in realizing that the eclipses of Algol were just that. Their mental leap, at a time when astronomers were just beginning to think seriously of discovering planets around other stars, should not go unremembered by modern planetary scientists. Footnotes 1 Hoskin, M. (1982). In Stellar Astronomy, Science History Publications Ltd., Chalfont St. Giles, England. 2 Goodricke and Pigott journals. York City Archives, York, England. 3 Goodricke, J. G. (1783). Phil. Soc. Roy. Soc. London 73, 474-482. 4 Goodricke, J. G. (1786). Phil. Soc. Roy. Soc. London 76, 48-61.

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Abundances in the Hot Jupiter Exoplanet Host Star XO-2B and Its Binary Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T eff, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars (~0.60 ± 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O ~ 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  17. CARBON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN THE HOT JUPITER EXOPLANET HOST STAR XO-2B AND ITS BINARY COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T{sub eff}, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars ({approx}0.60 {+-} 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O {approx} 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter.

  18. Transit, Secondary Eclipse, and Phase Curve Modeling to Characterize Kepler Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnas, Jesse; Redfield, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The high sensitivity and continuous coverage of Kepler allows for analysis of optical phase curves, which provide detailed exoplanet characterization by fitting photometric features caused by thermal emission, reflected light, Doppler boosting, and ellipsoidal variations. Combined with transit and secondary eclipse analysis to reduce model degeneracy, phase curves can resolve atmospheric characteristics, dayside-nightside temperatures, and even mass using single-band photometry. We will present an integrated phase curve, transit, and secondary eclipse analysis of Kepler exoplanet candidates, building on the phase curve model constructed by Serindag & Redfield (2015). Phase curves can also be present in non-transiting systems. We will explore the feasibility of detecting and characterizing these non-transiting exoplanets. We will also investigate the possibility of analyzing exoplanet phase curves in K2 data. We gratefully acknowledge support through a grant (14-K2GO1_2-0071) associated with the K2 Guest Observer — Cycle 1 program of Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES-2014; NNH14ZDA001N).

  19. Companions to APOGEE Stars. I. A Milky Way-spanning Catalog of Stellar and Substellar Companion Candidates and Their Diverse Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troup, Nicholas W.; Nidever, David L.; De Lee, Nathan; Carlberg, Joleen; Majewski, Steven R.; Fernandez, Martin; Covey, Kevin; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Pepper, Joshua; Nguyen, Duy T.; Stassun, Keivan; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Wisniewski, John P.; Fleming, Scott W.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ge, Jian; Hearty, Fred; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Schneider, Donald P.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wilson, John; Zamora, Olga

    2016-03-01

    In its three years of operation, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1) observed >14,000 stars with enough epochs over a sufficient temporal baseline for the fitting of Keplerian orbits. We present the custom orbit-fitting pipeline used to create this catalog, which includes novel quality metrics that account for the phase and velocity coverage of a fitted Keplerian orbit. With a typical radial velocity precision of ˜100-200 m s-1, APOGEE can probe systems with small separation companions down to a few Jupiter masses. Here we present initial results from a catalog of 382 of the most compelling stellar and substellar companion candidates detected by APOGEE, which orbit a variety of host stars in diverse Galactic environments. Of these, 376 have no previously known small separation companion. The distribution of companion candidates in this catalog shows evidence for an extremely truncated brown dwarf (BD) desert with a paucity of BD companions only for systems with a\\quad \\lt 0.1-0.2 AU, with no indication of a desert at larger orbital separation. We propose a few potential explanations of this result, some which invoke this catalog’s many small separation companion candidates found orbiting evolved stars. Furthermore, 16 BD and planet candidates have been identified around metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -0.5) stars in this catalog, which may challenge the core accretion model for companions \\gt 10{M}{Jup}. Finally, we find all types of companions are ubiquitous throughout the Galactic disk with candidate planetary-mass and BD companions to distances of ˜6 and ˜16 kpc, respectively.

  20. NICMOS Imaging of 2MASSWJ 1207334-393254 - A Planetary-Mass Companion Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.; Song, I.; Zuckerman, B.; Becklin, E.; Lowrance, P.; Macintosh, B.; Bessell, M.; Dumas, C.; Chauvin, G.

    2004-12-01

    2MASSWJ 1207334-393254, a likely member of the nearby TW Hya association (age app 10 Myr and app 70 pc from Earth), is an app 30 Mjupiter brown dwarf (M8V spectrum due to its youth) for which a putative candidate planetary-mass companion was identified by Chauvin et al (Astron. and Astroph. 425, L29) with VLT/NACO observations in April 2004. Earlier, 2MASSWJ 1207334-393254 had been scheduled for observation in HST cycle 13 in a NICMOS H-band coronagraphic companion detection survey (GO 10176), but was re-programmed as an early "follow-up" observation given the ground-based derived implications for shorter wavelength space-based detection and efficacious diagnostic photometric measurements. Here, we present NICMOS camera 1 imaging photometry observations of 2MASSWJ 1207334-393254 and its point-like companion candidate in three bands: F090M (0.80 - 1.00 microns; similar to I-band), F110M (1.00 - 1.20 microns) and F160W (1.40 - 1.60 microns; similar to H-band) obtained on 28 Aug 2004. For the 773.7 +/- 2.2 mas (app 55 AU projected separation) distant companion we find in-band magnitudes for the companion candidate of F090M = 22.34 +/- 0.35 (delta-F090M = +7.14), F110M = 20.61 +/- 0.15 and (delta-F110M = +7.02) F160W = 18.24 +/- 0.02 (delta-F160W = +5.62). The NICMOS [0.90] - [1.6] micron color index of +4.1 +/- 0.4 is consistent with expectations for the spectral energy distribution of a mid to late L-dwarf (e.g., I - H of app +4.4 for spectral type L4). At the likely age of this candidate, the NICMOS and longer wavelength VLT/NACO derived photometric measures may implicate an object of several Jupiter masses. If the candidate companion is (as is yet to be) demonstrated to exhibit common proper motion with 2MASSWJ 1207334-393254 then the first image of a gravitationally bound companion of planetary mass may have already been secured. This work is supported through grants to the GO 10176 and 10177 teams from STScI, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract

  1. Robotic laser adaptive optics imaging of 715 Kepler exoplanet candidates using Robo-AO

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Baranec, Christoph; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Johnson, John Asher; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2014-08-10

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are 'coincident multiple' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  2. Spitzer Meets K2: Spitzer Studies of Candidate Exoplanets Identified by K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Spitzer/K2 Study Team

    2016-01-01

    We are in the midst of a ~450 hr program of Spitzer photometry of candidate transiting planets orbiting M dwarf stars, identified in the K2 fields. Whereas the Kepler prime mission eschewed M stars, they have become a major focus of the community-driven target selection for K2. M stars are the most common stars in the galaxy, and planets orbiting M stars can be very attractive candidates for transit and eclipse atmospheric studies, including studies aimed at exploring potentially habitable exoplanets. We will review and show the results of the observations planned and executed to date, which total 21 transits of 16 planets orbiting 13 stars. Our results greatly improve on the characterization of the exoplanets and their orbits over what is possible from the K2 data alone. In addition, the improved ephemerides we generate will facilitate studies of interesting K2 targets from JWST. __________________________________________This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar companions of exoplanet host stars (Ginski+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.; Eisenbeiss, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our sample consists of stars with RV planet candidates discovered between 2008 and 2011. They are all observable from the Northern hemisphere with declinations down to -22° and a relatively even distribution in right ascension. All observations were carried out with the Calar Alto 2.2-m telescope in combination with the AstraLux instrument. (2 data files).

  4. Search for light curve modulations among Kepler candidates. Three very low-mass transiting companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Ribas, A.; Barrado, D.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Light curve modulations in the sample of Kepler planet candidates allows the disentangling of the nature of the transiting object by photometrically measuring its mass. This is possible by detecting the effects of the gravitational pull of the companion (ellipsoidal modulations) and in some cases, the photometric imprints of the Doppler effect when observing in a broad band (Doppler beaming). Aims: We aim to photometrically unveil the nature of some transiting objects showing clear light curve modulations in the phase-folded Kepler light curve. Methods: We selected a subsample among the large crop of Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) based on their chances to show detectable light curve modulations, i.e., close (a< 12 R⋆) and large (in terms of radius, according to their transit signal) candidates. We modeled their phase-folded light curves with consistent equations for the three effects, namely, reflection, ellipsoidal and beaming (known as REB modulations). Results: We provide detailed general equations for the fit of the REB modulations for the case of eccentric orbits. These equations are accurate to the photometric precisions achievable by current and forthcoming instruments and space missions. By using this mathematical apparatus, we find three close-in very low-mass companions (two of them in the brown dwarf mass domain) orbiting main-sequence stars (KOI-554, KOI-1074, and KOI-3728), and reject the planetary nature of the transiting objects (thus classifying them as false positives). In contrast, the detection of the REB modulations and transit/eclipse signal allows the measurement of their mass and radius that can provide important constraints for modeling their interiors since just a few cases of low-mass eclipsing binaries are known. Additionally, these new systems can help to constrain the similarities in the formation process of the more massive and close-in planets (hot Jupiters), brown dwarfs, and very low-mass companions.

  5. Presenting new exoplanet candidates for the CoRoT chromatic light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufleur, Rodrigo; Emilio, Marcelo; Andrade, Laerte; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; De La Reza, Ramiro

    2015-08-01

    One of the most promising topics of modern Astronomy is the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets due to its importance for the comprehension of planetary formation and evolution. Missions like MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars Telescope) (Walker et al., 2003) and especially the satellites dedicated to the search for exoplanets CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits) (Baglin et al., 1998) and Kepler (Borucki et al., 2003) produced a great amount of data and together account for hundreds of new discoveries. An important source of error in the search for planets with light curves obtained from space observatories are the displacements occuring in the data due to external causes. This artificial charge generation phenomenon associated with the data is mainly caused by the impact of high energy particles onto the CCD (Pinheiro da Silva et al. 2008), although other sources of error, not as well known also need to be taken into account. So, an effective analysis of the light curves depends a lot on the mechanisms employed to deal with these phenomena. To perform our research, we developed and applied a different method to fix the light curves, the CDAM (Corot Detrend Algorithm Modified), inspired by the work of Mislis et al. (2012). The paradigms were obtained using the BLS method (Kovács et al., 2002). After a semiautomatic pre-analysis associated with a visual inspection of the planetary transits signatures, we obtained dozens of exoplanet candidates in very good agreement with the literature and also new unpublished cases. We present the study results and characterization of the new cases for the chromatic channel public light curves of the CoRoT satellite.

  6. TWO NEARBY SUB-EARTH-SIZED EXOPLANET CANDIDATES IN THE GJ 436 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Kevin B.; Harrington, Joseph; Lust, Nate B.; Blecic, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A.; Cubillos, Patricio; Campo, Christopher J.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Montagnier, Guillaume; Moses, Julianne I.; Visscher, Channon

    2012-08-10

    We report the detection of UCF-1.01, a strong exoplanet candidate with a radius 0.66 {+-} 0.04 times that of Earth (R{sub Circled-Plus }). This sub-Earth-sized planet transits the nearby M-dwarf star GJ 436 with a period of 1.365862 {+-} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} days. We also report evidence of a 0.65 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Circled-Plus} exoplanet candidate (labeled UCF-1.02) orbiting the same star with an undetermined period. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure the dimming of light as the planets pass in front of their parent star to assess their sizes and orbital parameters. If confirmed today, UCF-1.01 and UCF-1.02 would be designated GJ 436c and GJ 436d, respectively, and would be part of the first multiple-transiting-planet system outside of the Kepler field. Assuming Earth-like densities of 5.515 g cm{sup -3}, we predict both candidates to have similar masses ({approx}0.28 Earth-masses, M{sub Circled-Plus }, 2.6 Mars-masses) and surface gravities of {approx}0.65 g (where g is the gravity on Earth). UCF-1.01's equilibrium temperature (T{sub eq}, where emitted and absorbed radiation balance for an equivalent blackbody) is 860 K, making the planet unlikely to harbor life as on Earth. Its weak gravitational field and close proximity to its host star imply that UCF-1.01 is unlikely to have retained its original atmosphere; however, a transient atmosphere is possible if recent impacts or tidal heating were to supply volatiles to the surface. We also present additional observations of GJ 436b during secondary eclipse. The 3.6 {mu}m light curve shows indications of stellar activity, making a reliable secondary eclipse measurement impossible. A second non-detection at 4.5 {mu}m supports our previous work in which we find a methane-deficient and carbon monoxide-rich dayside atmosphere.

  7. Using Kepler Candidates to Examine the Properties of Habitable Zone Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur D.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the currently known exoplanets in the habitable zones (HZs) of their host stars is of interest both in the wake of the NASA Kepler mission and with prospects for expanding the known planet population through future ground- and space-based projects. In this paper, we compare the empirical distributions of the properties of stellar systems with transiting planets to those with transiting HZ planets. This comparison includes two categories: confirmed/validated transiting planet systems, and Kepler planet and candidate planet systems. These two categories allow us to present quantitative analyses on both a conservative data set of known planets and a more optimistic and numerous sample of Kepler candidates. Both are subject to similar instrumental and detection biases, and are vetted against false positive detections. We examine whether the HZ distributions vary from the overall distributions in the Kepler sample with respect to planetary radius as well as stellar mass, effective temperature, and metallicity. We find that while the evidence is strongest in suggesting a difference between the size distributions of planets in the HZ and the overall size distribution, none of the statistical results provide strong empirical evidence for HZ planets or HZ planet-hosting stars being significantly different from the full Kepler sample with respect to these properties.

  8. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. VIII. Follow-up of ELODIE candidates: long-period brown-dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchy, F.; Ségransan, D.; Díaz, R. F.; Forveille, T.; Boisse, I.; Arnold, L.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Bonfils, X.; Borgniet, S.; Bourrier, V.; Courcol, B.; Delfosse, X.; Demangeon, O.; Delorme, P.; Ehrenreich, D.; Hébrard, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Mayor, M.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.; Naef, D.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Rey, J.; Sahlmann, J.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.; Sivan, J.-P.; Udry, S.; Wilson, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Long-period brown dwarf companions detected in radial velocity surveys are important targets for direct imaging and astrometry to calibrate the mass-luminosity relation of substellar objects. Through a 20-yr radial velocity monitoring of solar-type stars that began with ELODIE and was extended with SOPHIE spectrographs, giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs with orbital periods longer than ten years are discovered. We report the detection of five new potential brown dwarfs with minimum masses between 32 and 83 MJup orbiting solar-type stars with periods longer than ten years. An upper mass limit of these companions is provided using astrometric Hipparcos data, high-angular resolution imaging made with PUEO, and a deep analysis of the cross-correlation function of the main stellar spectra to search for blend effects or faint secondary components. These objects double the number of known brown dwarf companions with orbital periods longer than ten years and reinforce the conclusion that the occurrence of such objects increases with orbital separation. With a projected separation larger than 100 mas, all these brown dwarf candidates are appropriate targets for high-contrast and high angular resolution imaging. Based on observations made with ELODIE and SOPHIE spectrographs on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS/AMU), France.Tables 5-9 (RV data) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A46

  9. THE WIDEST-SEPARATION SUBSTELLAR COMPANION CANDIDATE TO A BINARY T TAURI STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Ishii, M.; Nishiyama, S.

    2011-04-15

    The results of near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of a substellar companion (SR12 C), with a possible planetary mass, of a binary T Tauri star (SR12 AB) in the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region are presented. The object is separated by {approx}8.''7, corresponding to {approx}1100 AU at 125 pc, and has an H-band brightness of 15.2 mag and infrared spectra suggesting a spectral type of M9.0 {+-} 0.5. It is confirmed that SR12 C is physically related to the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region from its common proper motion with SR12 AB and its youth is confirmed by a gravity-sensitive spectral feature. Furthermore, based on the number of known members of the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region in the area in which SR12 AB exists, the probability of a chance alignment is {approx}1% and it is therefore likely that SR12 C is physically associated with SR12 AB. The mass of SR12 C is estimated by comparing its estimated luminosity and assumed age with the theoretical age-luminosity relation. SR12 C is identified as an extremely low-mass (0.013 {+-} 0.007 M{sub sun}) object, but its separation from its parent star is the widest among planetary-mass companion (PMC) candidates imaged to date. In addition, SR12 C is the first PMC candidate directly imaged around a binary star. This discovery suggests that PMCs form via multiple star formation processes including disk gravitational instability and cloud core fragmentation.

  10. A PSF-based approach to Kepler/K2 data. II. Exoplanet candidates in Praesepe (M 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libralato, M.; Nardiello, D.; Bedin, L. R.; Borsato, L.; Granata, V.; Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Ochner, P.; Cunial, A.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we keep pushing K2 data to a high photometric precision, close to that of the Kepler main mission, using a PSF-based, neighbour-subtraction technique, which also overcome the dilution effects in crowded environments. We analyse the open cluster M 44 (NGC 2632), observed during the K2 Campaign 5, and extract light curves of stars imaged on module 14, where most of the cluster lies. We present two candidate exoplanets hosted by cluster members and five by field stars. As a by-product of our investigation, we find 1680 eclipsing binaries and variable stars, 1071 of which are new discoveries. Among them, we report the presence of a heartbeat binary star. Together with this work, we release to the community a catalogue with the variable stars and the candidate exoplanets found, as well as all our raw and detrended light curves.

  11. DIRECT IMAGING CONFIRMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED CANDIDATE EXOPLANET ORBITING FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Fukagawa, Misato; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kuchner, Marc; Matsumura, Soko

    2012-12-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J-band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004-2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally aligned, non-debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability cited as evidence for planet accretion or a semi-transient dust cloud. The new, combined optical spectral energy distribution and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust is most likely associated with a massive body. The Subaru and IRAC/4.5 {mu}m upper limits imply M < 2 M{sub J} , still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses needed to sculpt the disk. Fomalhaut b is very plausibly 'a planet identified from direct imaging' even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  12. Exoplanets Galore!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    : 800 x 483 pix - 184k] Caption : A representation of the sizes and shapes of the orbits of the eight new planetary and brown-dwarf candidates. The colours indicate the deduced minimum masses: about one Saturn mass or less (red); between 1 and 3 Jupiter masses (green); above 10 Jupiter masses (blue). The dashed line indicates the size of the Earth's orbit (radius 150 million km). The sizes and shapes of the orbits of the eight new planets and brown-dwarf candidates are illustrated in Photo 12/00 . More details about the individual objects are given below. A sub-saturnian planet in orbit around HD 168746 HD 168746 is a quiescent solar-like star of type G5 in the constellation Scutum (The Shield). It is slightly less massive than the Sun (0.92 solar mass) and is located at a distance of about 140 light-years. The visual magnitude is 7.9, i.e. about six times too faint to be seen with the unaided eye. The Swiss team found a new planet that orbits this star every 6.4 days, a fairly short period. The orbit is circular and the deduced minimum mass of the planet is only 80% of the mass of planet Saturn. This is only the third exoplanet detected so far with a possible sub-saturnian mass. Two planets slightly more massive than Saturn around HD 83443 and HD 108147 The planetary candidates detected around HD 83443 (visual magnitude 8.2; in the constellation Vela - the Sail) and HD 108147 (7.0 mag; Crux - the Cross) also have very low minimum masses, 0.35 and 0.34 times the mass of planet Jupiter, or 1.17 and 1.15 times that of Saturn, respectively. The companion of HD 83443 is particularly remarkable, not only by virtue of its low mass - it is also the exoplanet so far detected with the shortest period (2.986 days) and the smallest distance to the central star, only 5.7 million km (0.038 AU), i.e., 26 times smaller than the Sun-Earth distance. HD 83443 is of type K0V, it is at a distance of 141 light-years and is somewhat less massive than our Sun (0.8 solar mass). Most

  13. The Robo-AO KOI Survey: Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging of Every Kepler Exoplanet Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed L.

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that pollute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present approximately 3300 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, with ~500 observed nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 16.2±0.8%. With this large dataset, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host. We then use these clues for insight into the formation and evolution of these exotic systems. Several KOIs of particular interest will be discussed, including possible quadruple star systems hosting planets and updated properties for possible rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zone.

  14. Exoplanets Galore!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    : 800 x 483 pix - 184k] Caption : A representation of the sizes and shapes of the orbits of the eight new planetary and brown-dwarf candidates. The colours indicate the deduced minimum masses: about one Saturn mass or less (red); between 1 and 3 Jupiter masses (green); above 10 Jupiter masses (blue). The dashed line indicates the size of the Earth's orbit (radius 150 million km). The sizes and shapes of the orbits of the eight new planets and brown-dwarf candidates are illustrated in Photo 12/00 . More details about the individual objects are given below. A sub-saturnian planet in orbit around HD 168746 HD 168746 is a quiescent solar-like star of type G5 in the constellation Scutum (The Shield). It is slightly less massive than the Sun (0.92 solar mass) and is located at a distance of about 140 light-years. The visual magnitude is 7.9, i.e. about six times too faint to be seen with the unaided eye. The Swiss team found a new planet that orbits this star every 6.4 days, a fairly short period. The orbit is circular and the deduced minimum mass of the planet is only 80% of the mass of planet Saturn. This is only the third exoplanet detected so far with a possible sub-saturnian mass. Two planets slightly more massive than Saturn around HD 83443 and HD 108147 The planetary candidates detected around HD 83443 (visual magnitude 8.2; in the constellation Vela - the Sail) and HD 108147 (7.0 mag; Crux - the Cross) also have very low minimum masses, 0.35 and 0.34 times the mass of planet Jupiter, or 1.17 and 1.15 times that of Saturn, respectively. The companion of HD 83443 is particularly remarkable, not only by virtue of its low mass - it is also the exoplanet so far detected with the shortest period (2.986 days) and the smallest distance to the central star, only 5.7 million km (0.038 AU), i.e., 26 times smaller than the Sun-Earth distance. HD 83443 is of type K0V, it is at a distance of 141 light-years and is somewhat less massive than our Sun (0.8 solar mass). Most

  15. Robust high-contrast companion detection from interferometric observations. The CANDID algorithm and an application to six binary Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Mérand, A.; Kervella, P.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Breitfelder, J.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzyński, G.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Kraus, S.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars in a few hours of observations. Aims: We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. Methods: We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit using all interferometric observables, i.e., the squared visibilities, closure phases and bispectrum amplitudes. The search procedure is made on a N × N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3σ detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. Our injection method also allows us to analytically remove a detected component to 1) search for a second companion; and 2) set an unbiased detection limit. Results: We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at >25σ and >13σ, respectively. The astrometric positions and flux ratios provided by CANDID for these two stars are in good agreement with our previously published values. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15σ with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 ± 0.30%, and it is located at ρ = 32.16 ± 0.29 mas and PA = 67.1 ± 0.3°. We made a

  16. A Candidate Substellar Companion to CoD -33(deg) 7795 (TWA 5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, P. J.; McCarthy, C. M.; Becklin, E. E.; Zuckerman, B.; Schneider, G.; Webb, R. A.; Hines, D. C.; Low, F. J.; Rieke, M. J.; Thompson, R. I.; Smith, B. A.; Meier, R.; Terrile, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Koerner, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    We present the discovery of a candidate substellar object as part of the NICMOS Instrument Design Team's survey of young stars in the solar vicinity using the sensitivity and spatial resolution afforded by the NICMOS coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The H=12.1 mag object was discovered approximately 2'' from the TW Hydrae Association member CoD -33(deg) 7795 (TWA 5), and the infrared photometry implies a spectral type M8-M8.5, with a temperature of ~ 2650K. We estimate that the probability of a chance alignment with a background object of this nature is < 2 x 10(-5) , and therefore postulate the object (TWA 5B) is physically associated at a projected separation of 100 AU. Given the youth of the primary ( ~ 10 Myr), current brown dwarf cooling models predict a mass of approximately 20 Jupiter masses for the companion. This work is supported in part by NASA grant NAG 5-3042 to the University of Arizona NICMOS Instrument Design Team. This poster is based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  17. Direct Detection of Exoplanet Host Star Companion Gamma Cep B Using CIAO at the 8-m Telescope Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.

    2007-06-01

    Gamma Cep is known as a single-lined spectroscopic triple system at a distance of 13.8 pc, composed of a K1 III-IV primary star with V= 3.2 mag, a stellar-mass companion in a 66-67 year orbit (Torres 2007) and a sub-stellar companion with mass times sin(i) = 1.7 Jupiter masses, that is most likely a planet (Hatzes et al. 2003). We used the Adaptive Optics camera CIAO at the Japanese 8m telescope Subaru on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, with the semi-transparent coronograph to block most of the light from the primary to be able to image Gamma Cep B directly. We could clearly detect Gamma Cep B and used a photometric standard to determine the magnitude of B after PSF subtraction of K = 7.3 +- 0.2 mag. With the data the orbit of the two stars could be refined and thus we were able to determine the dynamical masses of these two stars in the Gamma Cep system, namely 1.40 +- 0.12 solar masses for the primary and 0.409 +-0.018 solar masses for the secondary (consistent with a M4 dwarf) as well as a new minimum mass of the sub-stellar companion of mass times sin(i) = 1.60 +- 0.13 Jupiter masses.

  18. A lucky imaging multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.; Buder, S.; Errmann, R.; Avenhaus, H.; Mouillet, D.; Maire, A.-L.; Raetz, S.

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of extrasolar planets are detected by indirect detection methods such as transit monitoring and radial velocity measurements. While these methods are very successful in detecting short-periodic planets, they are mostly blind to wide sub-stellar or even stellar companions on long orbits. In our study, we present high-resolution imaging observations of 60 exoplanet hosts carried out with the lucky imaging instrument AstraLux at the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope as well as with the new Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) high-resolution adaptive optics imager at the ESO/VLT in the case of a known companion of specific interest. Our goal is to study the influence of stellar multiplicity on the planet formation process. We detected and confirmed four previously unknown stellar companions to the exoplanet hosts HD 197037, HD 217786, Kepler-21 and Kepler-68. In addition, we detected 11 new low-mass stellar companion candidates which must still be confirmed as bound companions. We also provide new astrometric and photometric data points for the recently discovered very close binary systems WASP-76 and HD 2638. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the previously detected stellar companion to the HD 185269 system is a very low mass binary. Finally, we provide precise constraints on additional companions for all observed stars in our sample.

  19. AN ALMA DISK MASS FOR THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANETARY COMPANION TO FW TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam L.; Andrews, Sean M.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Herczeg, Gregory; Ireland, Michael J.; Liu, Michael C.; Metchev, Stanimir; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA observations of the FW Tau system, a close binary pair of M5 stars with a wide-orbit (300 AU projected separation) substellar companion. The companion is extremely faint and red in the optical and near-infrared, but boasts a weak far-infrared excess and optical/near-infrared emission lines indicative of a primordial accretion disk of gas and dust. The component-resolved 1.3 mm continuum emission is found to be associated only with the companion, with a flux (1.78 ± 0.03 mJy) that indicates a dust mass of 1-2 M {sub ⊕}. While this mass reservoir is insufficient to form a giant planet, it is more than sufficient to produce an analog of the Kepler-42 exoplanetary system or the Galilean satellites. The mass and geometry of the disk-bearing FW Tau companion remains unclear. Near-infrared spectroscopy shows deep water bands that indicate a spectral type later than M5, but substantial veiling prevents a more accurate determination of the effective temperature (and hence mass). Both a disk-bearing ''planetary-mass'' companion seen in direct light or a brown dwarf tertiary viewed in light scattered by an edge-on disk or envelope remain possibilities.

  20. Candidate Very-Low-Mass Companions to Nearby Stars Found in the WISE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennen, Anne; Dutcher, D.; Lepine, S.; Faherty, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the identification in the Wide-Field Survey Explorer (WISE) preliminary release of 36 probable very-low-mass companions to nearby stars from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalogue. We examined all WISE sources within one arcminute of a subset of 156,000 SUPERBLINK stars with proper motions between 0.040 and 0.015 seconds of arc per year, photometric distances within 100 parsecs, and positions at least seven degrees from the galactic plane. Using proper motions calculated by comparing the WISE positions of the sources to those of their counterparts in the 2MASS Catalogue, we identified all WISE sources sharing a common proper motion with the SUPERBLINK star. We eliminated all sources detected in the Palomar Sky Survey blue plates, keeping only those red enough to be low-mass or brown dwarf companions. We used WISE and 2MASS colors to select only objects consistent with being M, L, or T dwarfs, leaving only 36 likely companions. Based on their color and assumed distances, we estimate the 36 low-mass companions to be either late M or early L dwarfs. Follow-up spectroscopic observations will be required for confirmation and formal spectral classification of the companions. We acknowledge the American Museum of Natural History and the National Science Foundation for their support.

  1. Discovery of a Companion Candidate in the HD 169142 Transition Disk and the Possibility of Multiple Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Maddalena; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Pueyo, Laurent; Absil, Olivier; Amara, Adam; Anglada, Guillem; Avenhaus, Henning; Girard, Julien H.; Carrasco Gonzalez, Carlos; Graham, James; Mawet, Dimitri; Meru, Farzana; Milli, Julien; Osorio, Mayra; Wolff, Schuyler; Torrelles, Jose-Maria

    2014-09-01

    We present L'- and J-band high-contrast observations of HD 169142, obtained with the Very Large Telescope/NACO AGPM vector vortex coronagraph and the Gemini Planet Imager, respectively. A source located at 0.''156 ± 0.''032 north of the host star (P.A. = 7.°4 ± 11.°3) appears in the final reduced L' image. At the distance of the star (~145 pc), this angular separation corresponds to a physical separation of 22.7 ± 4.7 AU, locating the source within the recently resolved inner cavity of the transition disk. The source has a brightness of L' = 12.2 ± 0.5 mag, whereas it is not detected in the J band (J >13.8 mag). If its L' brightness arose solely from the photosphere of a companion and given the J - L' color constraints, it would correspond to a 28-32 M Jupiter object at the age of the star, according to the COND models. Ongoing accretion activity of the star suggests, however, that gas is left in the inner disk cavity from which the companion could also be accreting. In this case, the object could be lower in mass and its luminosity enhanced by the accretion process and by a circumplanetary disk. A lower-mass object is more consistent with the observed cavity width. Finally, the observations enable us to place an upper limit on the L'-band flux of a second companion candidate orbiting in the disk annular gap at ~50 AU, as suggested by millimeter observations. If the second companion is also confirmed, HD 169142 might be forming a planetary system, with at least two companions opening gaps and possibly interacting with each other.

  2. DISCOVERY OF A COMPANION CANDIDATE IN THE HD 169142 TRANSITION DISK AND THE POSSIBILITY OF MULTIPLE PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Reggiani, Maddalena; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Amara, Adam; Avenhaus, Henning; Meru, Farzana; Pueyo, Laurent; Wolff, Schuyler; Absil, Olivier; Anglada, Guillem; Osorio, Mayra; Gonzalez, Carlos Carrasco; Graham, James; Torrelles, Jose-Maria

    2014-09-01

    We present L'- and J-band high-contrast observations of HD 169142, obtained with the Very Large Telescope/NACO AGPM vector vortex coronagraph and the Gemini Planet Imager, respectively. A source located at 0.''156 ± 0.''032 north of the host star (P.A. = 7.°4 ± 11.°3) appears in the final reduced L' image. At the distance of the star (∼145 pc), this angular separation corresponds to a physical separation of 22.7 ± 4.7 AU, locating the source within the recently resolved inner cavity of the transition disk. The source has a brightness of L' = 12.2 ± 0.5 mag, whereas it is not detected in the J band (J >13.8 mag). If its L' brightness arose solely from the photosphere of a companion and given the J – L' color constraints, it would correspond to a 28-32 M {sub Jupiter} object at the age of the star, according to the COND models. Ongoing accretion activity of the star suggests, however, that gas is left in the inner disk cavity from which the companion could also be accreting. In this case, the object could be lower in mass and its luminosity enhanced by the accretion process and by a circumplanetary disk. A lower-mass object is more consistent with the observed cavity width. Finally, the observations enable us to place an upper limit on the L'-band flux of a second companion candidate orbiting in the disk annular gap at ∼50 AU, as suggested by millimeter observations. If the second companion is also confirmed, HD 169142 might be forming a planetary system, with at least two companions opening gaps and possibly interacting with each other.

  3. SPLAT: Using Spectral Indices to Identify and Characterize Ultracool Stars, Brown Dwarfs and Exoplanets in Deep Surveys and as Companions to Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganze, Christian; Burgasser, Adam J.; Martin, Eduardo; Konopacky, Quinn; Masters, Daniel C.

    2016-06-01

    The majority of ultracool dwarf stars and brown dwarfs currently known were identified in wide-field red optical and infrared surveys, enabling measures of the local, typically isolated, population in a relatively shallow (<100 pc radius) volume. Constraining the properties of the wider Galactic population (scale height, radial distribution, Population II sources), and close brown dwarf and exoplanet companions to nearby stars, requires specialized instrumentation, such as high-contrast, coronagraphic spectrometers (e.g., Gemini/GPI, VLT/Sphere, Project 1640); and deep spectral surveys (e.g., HST/WFC3 parallel fields, Euclid). We present a set of quantitative methodologies to identify and robustly characterize sources for these specific populations, based on templates and tools developed as part of the SpeX Prism Library Analysis Toolkit. In particular, we define and characterize specifically-tuned sets spectral indices that optimize selection of cool dwarfs and distinguish rare populations (subdwarfs, young planetary-mass objects) based on low-resolution, limited-wavelength-coverage spectral data; and present a template-matching classification method for these instruments. We apply these techniques to HST/WFC3 parallel fields data in the WISPS and HST-3D programs, where our spectral index set allows high completeness and low contamination for searches of late M, L and T dwarfs to distances out to ~3 kpc.The material presented here is based on work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX15AI75G.

  4. Search for Exoplanets around Young Stellar Objects by Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyama, Taichi; Tamura, Motohide; Hashimoto, Jun; Kuzuhara, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    SEEDS project, exploring exoplanets and protoplanetary disks with Subaru/HiCIAO, has observed about 500 stars by Direct Imaging from 2009 Dec to 2015 Apr. Among these targets we explore around Young Stellar Objects (YSOs; age ≦ 10Myr) which often have the protoplanetary disks where planets are being formed in order to detect young exoplanets and to understand the formation process. We analyzed 66 YSOs (about 100 data in total) with LOCI data reduction. We will report the results (companion candidates and detection limit) of our exploration.

  5. Exoplanet habitability.

    PubMed

    Seager, Sara

    2013-05-01

    The search for exoplanets includes the promise to eventually find and identify habitable worlds. The thousands of known exoplanets and planet candidates are extremely diverse in terms of their masses or sizes, orbits, and host star type. The diversity extends to new kinds of planets, which are very common yet have no solar system counterparts. Even with the requirement that a planet's surface temperature must be compatible with liquid water (because all life on Earth requires liquid water), a new emerging view is that planets very different from Earth may have the right conditions for life. The broadened possibilities will increase the future chances of discovering an inhabited world. PMID:23641111

  6. The EXOTIME Monitoring Program Discovers Substellar Companion Candidates around the Rapidly Pulsating Subdwarf B Stars V1636 Ori and DW Lyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, S.; Silvotti, R.; Lutz, R.; Kim, S.-L.; Exotime Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The EXOTIME monitoring program has discovered sub-stellar companion candidates around the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars V1636 Ori and DW Lyn using the timing method. Here we motivate our continuing search, and refer to descriptions of the photometric data collected, the data analysis and the characteristics of the O-C diagrams obtained. We also discuss our on-going efforts to consolidate the candidate discoveries with additional simulations and confirm them with independent methods.

  7. Validation and Characterization of K2 Exoplanet Candidates with NIR Transit Photometry from the 4m Mayall and 3.5m WIYN Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Knicole D.; Barclay, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We present new ground-based near-infrared (NIR) transit photometry of exoplanet candidates recently discovered by the NASA K2 mission. These observations support the confirmation and characterization of these newly discovered transiting exoplanets, many which are in the super-Earth to mini-Neptune size regime and orbit cool, nearby stars. We specifically used NEWFIRM on the 4m Mayall telescope and WHIRC on the 3.5m WIYN telescope, both located at Kitt Peak National Observatory, to observe several K2 exoplanet candidates in transit. To our knowledge, these facilities have not been tested for such high-precision differential transit photometry before. Follow-up transit photometry with the high spatial resolution NIR cameras installed on the Mayall and WIYN telescopes allows us to confirm the transit host, which is critical given the large pixel scale of the Kepler spacecraft. NIR transit photometry in particular allows us to verify that the transit is achromatic, after comparing the NIR transit depth to the transit depth measured in the optical from K2. Finding a different depth in different bandpasses indicates that the candidate is instead an eclipsing binary false positive. Furthermore, NIR transit photometry provides robust constraints on the measured planet radius, since stellar limb darkening is minimized in the NIR. Finally, the high-precision and high-cadence photometry we achieve allows us to refine the transit ephemeris, which is crucial for future follow-up efforts with other facilities like NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The capabilities of these ground-based facilities therefore approach those of space telescopes, since we are able use these ground-based observatories to refine transit parameters and constrain properties for the exoplanets that K2 is discovering, all the way down to super-Earth-size planets.

  8. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. XVII. The physical properties of giant exoplanets within 400 days of period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Tsantaki, M.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Almenara, J.-M.; Amard, L.; Barros, S. C. C.; Boisse, I.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bruno, G.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Demangeon, O.; Díaz, R. F.; Guillot, T.; Havel, M.; Montagnier, G.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Rey, J.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-03-01

    While giant extrasolar planets have been studied for more than two decades now, there are still some open questions as to their dominant formation and migration processes, as well as to their atmospheric evolution in different stellar environments. In this paper, we study a sample of giant transiting exoplanets detected by the Kepler telescope with orbital periods up to 400 days. We first defined a sample of 129 giant-planet candidates that we followed up with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France) in a 6-year radial velocity campaign. This allowed us to unveil the nature of these candidates and to measure a false-positive rate of 54.6 ± 6.5% for giant-planet candidates orbiting within 400 days of period. Based on a sample of confirmed or likely planets, we then derived the occurrence rates of giant planets in different ranges of orbital periods. The overall occurrence rate of giant planets within 400 days is 4.6 ± 0.6%. We recovered, for the first time in the Kepler data, the different populations of giant planets reported by radial velocity surveys. Comparing these rates with other yields, we find that the occurrence rate of giant planets is lower only for hot Jupiters but not for the longer-period planets. We also derive a first measurement of the occurrence rate of brown dwarfs in the brown-dwarf desert with a value of 0.29 ± 0.17%. Finally, we discuss the physical properties of the giant planets in our sample. We confirm that giant planets receiving moderate irradiation are not inflated, but we find that they are on average smaller than predicted by formation and evolution models. In this regime of low-irradiated giant planets, we find a possible correlation between their bulk density and the iron abundance of the host star, which needs more detections to be confirmed. Based on observations made with SOPHIE on the 1.93 m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.RV data (Appendices C and D) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to

  9. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. I. ADAPTIVE OPTICS OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Turner, Nils H.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I. E-mail: nils@chara-array.org E-mail: bdm@usno.navy.mil

    2011-11-15

    The results of an adaptive optics survey of exoplanet host stars for stellar companions are presented. We used the Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope and its adaptive optics system to collect deep images of the stars in the I band. Sixty-two exoplanet host stars were observed and fifteen multiple star systems were resolved. Of these eight are known multiples, while seven are new candidate binaries. For all binaries, we measured the relative astrometry of the pair and the differential magnitude in the I band. We improved the orbits of HD 19994 and {tau} Boo. These observations will provide improved statistics on the duplicity of exoplanet host stars and provide an increased understanding of the dynamics of known binary star exoplanet hosts.

  10. A Discovery of a Candidate Companion to a Transiting System KOI-94: A Direct Imaging Study for a Possibility of a False Positive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Sato, Bun'ei; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; McElwain, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    We report a discovery of a companion candidate around one of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), KOI-94, and results of our quantitative investigation of the possibility that planetary candidates around KOI-94 are false positives. KOI-94 has a planetary system in which four planetary detections have been reported by Kepler, suggesting that this system is intriguing to study the dynamical evolutions of planets. However, while two of those detections (KOI-94.01 and 03) have been made robust by previous observations, the others (KOI-94.02 and 04) are marginal detections, for which future confirmations with various techniques are required. We have conducted high-contrast direct imaging observations with Subaru/HiCIAO in H band and detected a faint object located at a separation of approximately 0.6 sec from KOI-94. The object has a contrast of approximately 1 × 10(exp -3) in H band, and corresponds to an M type star on the assumption that the object is at the same distance of KOI-94. Based on our analysis, KOI-94.02 is likely to be a real planet because of its transit depth, while KOI-94.04 can be a false positive due to the companion candidate. The success in detecting the companion candidate suggests that high-contrast direct imaging observations are important keys to examine false positives of KOIs. On the other hand, our transit light curve reanalyses lead to a better period estimate of KOI-94.04 than that on the KOI catalogue and show that the planetary candidate has the same limb darkening parameter value as the other planetary candidates in the KOI-94 system, suggesting that KOI-94.04 is also a real planet in the system.

  11. Detecting the Companions and Ellipsoidal Variations of RS CVn Primaries. II. o Draconis, a Candidate for Recent Low-mass Companion Ingestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Monnier, John D.; Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Korhonen, Heidi; Latham, David W.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Williamson, Michael H.; Baron, Fabien; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Che, Xiao; Harmon, Robert O.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Scott, Nicholas J.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Turner, Nils H.

    2015-08-01

    To measure the stellar and orbital properties of the metal-poor RS CVn binary o Draconis (o Dra), we directly detect the companion using interferometric observations obtained with the Michigan InfraRed Combiner at Georgia State University's Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) Array. The H-band flux ratio between the primary and secondary stars is the highest confirmed flux ratio (370 ± 40) observed with long-baseline optical interferometry. These detections are combined with radial velocity data of both the primary and secondary stars, including new data obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph on the Tillinghast Reflector at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory and the 2 m Tennessee State University Automated Spectroscopic Telescope at Fairborn Observatory. We determine an orbit from which we find model-independent masses and ages of the components ({M}A=1.35+/- 0.05 {M}⊙ , {M}B=0.99+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ , system age = 3.0\\mp 0.5 Gyr). An average of a 23-year light curve of o Dra from the Tennessee State University Automated Photometric Telescope folded over the orbital period newly reveals eclipses and the quasi-sinusoidal signature of ellipsoidal variations. The modeled light curve for our system's stellar and orbital parameters confirm these ellipsoidal variations due to the primary star partially filling its Roche lobe potential, suggesting most of the photometric variations are not due to stellar activity (starspots). Measuring gravity darkening from the average light curve gives a best-fit of β =0.07+/- 0.03, a value consistent with conventional theory for convective envelope stars. The primary star also exhibits an anomalously short rotation period, which, when taken with other system parameters, suggests the star likely engulfed a low-mass companion that had recently spun-up the star.

  12. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  13. Statistical properties of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, Stéphane

    Since the detection a decade ago of the planetary companion of 51 Peg, more than 165 extrasolar planets have been unveiled by radial-velocity measurements. They present a wide variety of characteristics such as large masses with small orbital separations, high eccentricities, period resonances in multi-planet systems, etc. Meaningful features of the statistical distributions of the orbital parameters or parent stellar properties have emerged. We discuss them in the context of the constraints they provide for planet-formation models and in comparison to Neptune-mass planets in short-period orbits recently detected by radial-velocity surveys, thanks to new instrumental developments and adequate observing strategy. We expect continued improvement in velocity precision and anticipate the detection of Neptune-mass planets in longer-period orbits and even lower-mass planets in short-period orbits, giving us new information on the mass distribution function of exoplanets. Finally, the role of radial-velocity follow-up measurements of transit candidates is emphasized.

  14. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates. X. KOI-142 c: first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting exoplanet discovered by transit timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, S. C. C.; Díaz, R. F.; Santerne, A.; Bruno, G.; Deleuil, M.; Almenara, J.-M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Damiani, C.; Hébrard, G.; Montagnier, G.; Moutou, C.

    2014-01-01

    The exoplanet KOI-142b (Kepler-88b) shows transit timing variations (TTVs) with a semi-amplitude of ~12 h, which earned it the nickname "king of transit variations". Only the transit of planet b was detected in the Kepler data with an orbital period of ~10.92 days and a radius of ~0.36 RJup. The TTVs together with the transit duration variations of KOI-142b were analysed recently, finding a unique solution for a companion-perturbing planet. An outer non-transiting companion was predicted, KOI-142c, with a mass of 0.626 ± 0.03 MJup and a period of 22.3397-0.0018+0.0021 days, which is close to the 2:1 mean-motion resonance with the inner transiting planet. We report an independent confirmation of KOI-142c using radial velocity observations with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. We derive an orbital period of 22.10 ± 0.25 days and a minimum planetary mass of 0.760.16+0.32 MJup, both in good agreement with the predictions by previous transit timing analysis. Therefore, this is the first radial velocity confirmation of a non-transiting planet discovered with TTVs, providing an independent validation of the TTVs technique. Based on observations collected with the NASA Kepler satellite and with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France.Tables 2 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Direct detection of exoplanet host star companion γ Cep B and revised masses for both stars and the sub-stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Mugrauer, M.; Fukagawa, M.; Torres, G.; Schmidt, T.

    2007-02-01

    Context: The star γ Cep is known as a single-lined spectroscopic triple system at a distance of 13.8 pc, composed of a K1 III-IV primary star with V = 3.2 mag, a stellar-mass companion in a 66-67 year orbit (Torres 2007, ApJ, 654, 1095), and a substellar companion with Mp sin i = 1.7 M_Jup that is most likely a planet (Hatzes et al. 2003, ApJ, 599, 1383). Aims: We aim to obtain a first direct detection of the stellar companion, to determine its current orbital position (for comparison with the spectroscopic and astrometric data), its infrared magnitude and, hence, mass. Methods: We use the Adaptive Optics camera CIAO at the Japanese 8 m telescope Subaru on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, with the semi-transparent coronograph to block most of the light from the bright primary γ Cep A, and to detect at the same time the faint companion B. In addition, we also used the IR camera Ω Cass at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope, Spain, to image γ Cep A and B by adding up many very short integrations (without AO). Results: γ Cep B is clearly detected on our CIAO and Ω Cass images. We use a photometric standard star to determine the magnitude of B after PSF subtraction in the Subaru image, and the magnitude difference between A and B in the Calar Alto images, and find an average value of K = 7.3 ± 0.2 mag. The separations and position angles between A and B are measured on 15 July 2006 and 11 and 12 Sept. 2006, B is slightly south of west of A. Conclusions: .By combining the radial velocity, astrometric, and imaging data, we have refined the binary orbit and determined the dynamical masses of the two stars in the γ Cep system, namely 1.40 ± 0.12 M⊙ for the primary and 0.409 ± 0.018 M⊙ for the secondary (consistent with being a M4 dwarf). We also determine the minimum mass of the sub-stellar companion to be Mp sin i = 1.60 ± 0.13 M_Jup.

  16. DIRECT IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF A CANDIDATE COMPANION BELOW/NEAR THE DEUTERIUM-BURNING LIMIT IN THE YOUNG BINARY STAR SYSTEM, ROXs 42B

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Daemgen, Sebastian; Jayawardhana, Ray; Debes, John; Lafreniere, David; Itoh, Yoichi; Ratzka, Thorsten; Correia, Serge

    2014-01-10

    We present near-infrared high-contrast imaging photometry and integral field spectroscopy of ROXs 42B, a binary M0 member of the 1-3 Myr old ρ Ophiuchus star-forming region, from data collected over 7 years. Each data set reveals a faint companion—ROXs 42Bb—located ∼1.''16 (r {sub proj} ≈ 150 AU) from the primaries at a position angle consistent with a point source identified earlier by Ratzka et al.. ROXs 42Bb's astrometry is inconsistent with a background star but consistent with a bound companion, possibly one with detected orbital motion. The most recent data set reveals a second candidate companion at ∼0.''5 of roughly equal brightness, though preliminary analysis indicates it is a background object. ROXs 42Bb's H and K{sub s} band photometry is similar to dusty/cloudy young, low-mass late M/early L dwarfs. K band VLT/SINFONI spectroscopy shows ROXs 42Bb to be a cool substellar object (M8-L0; T {sub eff} ≈ 1800-2600 K), not a background dwarf star, with a spectral shape indicative of young, low surface gravity planet-mass companions. We estimate ROXs 42Bb's mass to be 6-15 M{sub J} , either below the deuterium-burning limit and thus planet mass or straddling the deuterium-burning limit nominally separating planet-mass companions from other substellar objects. Given ROXs 42b's projected separation and mass with respect to the primaries, it may represent the lowest mass objects formed like binary stars or a class of planet-mass objects formed by protostellar disk fragmentation/disk instability, the latter slightly blurring the distinction between non-deuterium-burning planets like HR 8799 bcde and low-mass, deuterium-burning brown dwarfs.

  17. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission Resolving the nature of transit candidates for the LRa03 and SRa03 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavarroc, C.; Moutou, C.; Gandolfi, D.; Tingley, B.; Ollivier, M.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Carpano, S.; Carone, L.; Cochran, W. D.; Csizmadia, S.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Dvorak, R.; Endl, M.; Erikson, A.; Fridlund, M.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Lammer, H.; Lev, T.-O.; Lovis, C.; MacQueen, P. J.; Mazeh, T.; Ofir, A.; Parviainen, H.; Pasternacki, T.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Samuel, B.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Weingrill, J.; Wuchterl, G.

    2012-02-01

    CoRoT is a space telescope which aims at studying internal structure of stars and detecting extrasolar planets. We present here a list of transits detected in the light curves of stars observed by CoRoT in two fields in the anti-center direction: the LRa03 one observed during 148 days from 3 October 2009 to 1 March 2010 followed by the SRa03 one from the 5 March 2010 to the 29 March 2010 during 25 days. 5329 light curves for the LRa03 field and 4169 for the SRa03 field were analyzed by the detection team of CoRoT. Then some of the selected exoplanetary candidates have been followed up from the ground. In the LRa03 field, 19 exoplanet candidates have been found, 8 remain unsolved. No secured planet has been found yet. In the SRa03 field, there were 11 exoplanetary candidates among which 6 cases remain unsolved and 3 planets have been found: CoRoT-18b, CoRoT-19b, CoRoT-20b.

  18. Dynamical Masses of Young M Dwarfs: Masses and Orbital Parameters of GJ 3305 AB, the Wide Binary Companion to the Imaged Exoplanet Host 51 Eri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Deck, Katherine M.; Wang, Ji; Horch, Elliott P.; Liu, Michael C.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Charbonneau, David

    2015-11-01

    We combine new high resolution imaging and spectroscopy from Keck/NIRC2, Discovery Channel Telescope/DSSI, and Keck/HIRES with published astrometry and radial velocities to measure individual masses and orbital elements of the GJ 3305 AB system, a young (˜20 Myr) M+M binary (unresolved spectral type M0) member of the β Pictoris moving group comoving with the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. We measure a total system mass of 1.11 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ , a period of 29.03 ± 0.50 year, a semimajor axis of 9.78 ± 0.14 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.19 ± 0.02. The primary component has a dynamical mass of 0.67 ± 0.05 {M}⊙ and the secondary has a mass of 0.44 ± 0.05 {M}⊙ . The recently updated BHAC15 models are consistent with the masses of both stars to within 1.5σ . Given the observed masses the models predict an age of the GJ 3305 AB system of 37 ± 9 Myr. Based on the observed system architecture and our dynamical mass measurement, it is unlikely that the orbit of 51 Eri b has been significantly altered by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Dynamical Masses of Young M Dwarfs: Masses and Orbital Parameters of GJ 3305 AB, the Wide Binary Companion to the Imaged Exoplanet Host 51 Eri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Deck, Katherine M.; Wang, Ji; Horch, Elliott P.; Liu, Michael C.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Charbonneau, David

    2015-11-01

    We combine new high resolution imaging and spectroscopy from Keck/NIRC2, Discovery Channel Telescope/DSSI, and Keck/HIRES with published astrometry and radial velocities to measure individual masses and orbital elements of the GJ 3305 AB system, a young (∼20 Myr) M+M binary (unresolved spectral type M0) member of the β Pictoris moving group comoving with the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. We measure a total system mass of 1.11 ± 0.04 {M}ȯ , a period of 29.03 ± 0.50 year, a semimajor axis of 9.78 ± 0.14 AU, and an eccentricity of 0.19 ± 0.02. The primary component has a dynamical mass of 0.67 ± 0.05 {M}ȯ and the secondary has a mass of 0.44 ± 0.05 {M}ȯ . The recently updated BHAC15 models are consistent with the masses of both stars to within 1.5σ . Given the observed masses the models predict an age of the GJ 3305 AB system of 37 ± 9 Myr. Based on the observed system architecture and our dynamical mass measurement, it is unlikely that the orbit of 51 Eri b has been significantly altered by the Kozai–Lidov mechanism. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-03-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (≳2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form {d}2{N}{{pl}}/(d{log} {m}p d{log} a)={ A }{({m}p/{M}{{Sat}})}α {(a/2.5{{AU}})}β with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of aout. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters \\{α ,β ,{ A },{a}{{out}}\\} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent with the results of microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find median and 68% confindence intervals of α =-{0.86}-0.19+0.21 (-{0.85}-0.19+0.21), β ={1.1}-1.4+1.9 ({1.1}-1.3+1.9), { A }={0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2 ({0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2), and {a}{{out}}={10}-4.7+26 AU ({12}-6.2+50 AU) assuming “hot-start” (“cold-start”) planet evolutionary models. These values are consistent with all current knowledge of planets on orbits beyond ∼2 AU around single M dwarfs.

  1. The search for substellar companions to subdwarf B stars in connection with evolutionary aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Ronny

    2011-09-01

    The formation and evolution of single hot subdwarf B stars is not entirely understood. Enhanced mass loss during the red giant phase is a prerequisite to explain the very existence of these stars, yet its cause is a matter of debate. One hypothesis predicts that substellar companions like brown dwarfs and exoplanets may be able to have a decisive influence on the formation and evolution of single subdwarf B stars. This dissertation investigates two pulsating subdwarf B stars with the goal to search for substellar companions and to directly measure the evolutionary timescales. The long-term multi-site photometric data were taken in the framework of the EXOTIME (EXOplanet search with the TIming MEthod) program and cover a baseline of several tens of months. The secular behaviour of several pulsations in each target is investigated by applying a timing method and constructing O-C (Observed minus Calculated) diagrams. The analysis results in the fundamental insight that both targets are in a phase of global expansion, that their pulsation periods increase on a timescale of several million years and that the two target stars have probably already undergone core Helium exhaustion. Furthermore, the O-C diagrams show evidence for the presence of substellar companions. The star HS0444+0458 has a brown dwarf companion candidate of roughly 31 Jupiter masses in an orbit of 0.27 astronomical units. An exoplanet candidate of 5.6 Jupiter masses is found to orbit its host star HS0702+6043 at a distance of 1.15 astronomical units. These detections provide a direct support for a formation channel of single subdwarf B stars that includes substellar companions as the mass loss trigger.

  2. The NASA Exoplanet Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Solange; Akeson, R. L.; Ciardi, D.; Kane, S. R.; Plavchan, P.; von Braun, K.; NASA Exoplanet Archive Team

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Archive is an online service that compiles and correlates astronomical information on extra solar planets and their host stars. The data in the archive include exoplanet parameters (such as orbits, masses, and radii), associated data (such as published radial velocity curves, photometric light curves, images, and spectra), and stellar parameters (such as magnitudes, positions, and temperatures). All the archived data are linked to the original literature reference.The archive provides tools to work with these data, including interactive tables (with plotting capabilities), interactive light curve viewer, periodogram service, transit and ephemeris calculator, and application program interface.The NASA Exoplanet Archive is the U.S. portal to the public CoRoT mission data for both the Exoplanet and Asteroseismology data sets. The NASA Exoplanet Archive also serves data related to Kepler Objects of Interest (Planet Candidates and the Kepler False Positives, KOI) in an integrated and interactive table containing stellar and transit parameters. In support of the Kepler Extended Mission, the NASA Exoplanet Archive will host transit modeling parameters, centroid results, several statistical values, and summary and detailed reports for all transit-like events identified by the Kepler Pipeline. To access this information visit us at: http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu

  3. Wide Cool and Ultracool Companions to Nearby Stars from Pan-STARRS 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Dupuy, Trent; Bowler, Brendan P.; Mann, Andrew W.; Redstone, Joshua A.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Morgan, Jeff S.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    We present the discovery of 57 wide (>5'') separation, low-mass (stellar and substellar) companions to stars in the solar neighborhood identified from Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) data and the spectral classification of 31 previously known companions. Our companions represent a selective subsample of promising candidates and span a range in spectral type of K7-L9 with the addition of one DA white dwarf. These were identified primarily from a dedicated common proper motion search around nearby stars, along with a few as serendipitous discoveries from our Pan-STARRS 1 brown dwarf search. Our discoveries include 23 new L dwarf companions and one known L dwarf not previously identified as a companion. The primary stars around which we searched for companions come from a list of bright stars with well-measured parallaxes and large proper motions from the Hipparcos catalog (8583 stars, mostly A-K dwarfs) and fainter stars from other proper motion catalogs (79170 stars, mostly M dwarfs). We examine the likelihood that our companions are chance alignments between unrelated stars and conclude that this is unlikely for the majority of the objects that we have followed-up spectroscopically. We also examine the entire population of ultracool (>M7) dwarf companions and conclude that while some are loosely bound, most are unlikely to be disrupted over the course of ~10 Gyr. Our search increases the number of ultracool M dwarf companions wider than 300 AU by 88% and increases the number of L dwarf companions in the same separation range by 82%. Finally, we resolve our new L dwarf companion to HIP 6407 into a tight (0.''13, 7.4 AU) L1+T3 binary, making the system a hierarchical triple. Our search for these key benchmarks against which brown dwarf and exoplanet atmosphere models are tested has yielded the largest number of discoveries to date.

  4. Wide cool and ultracool companions to nearby stars from Pan-STARRS 1

    SciTech Connect

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Morgan, Jeff S.; Tonry, John L.; Dupuy, Trent; Mann, Andrew W.; Redstone, Joshua A.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2014-09-10

    We present the discovery of 57 wide (>5'') separation, low-mass (stellar and substellar) companions to stars in the solar neighborhood identified from Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) data and the spectral classification of 31 previously known companions. Our companions represent a selective subsample of promising candidates and span a range in spectral type of K7-L9 with the addition of one DA white dwarf. These were identified primarily from a dedicated common proper motion search around nearby stars, along with a few as serendipitous discoveries from our Pan-STARRS 1 brown dwarf search. Our discoveries include 23 new L dwarf companions and one known L dwarf not previously identified as a companion. The primary stars around which we searched for companions come from a list of bright stars with well-measured parallaxes and large proper motions from the Hipparcos catalog (8583 stars, mostly A-K dwarfs) and fainter stars from other proper motion catalogs (79170 stars, mostly M dwarfs). We examine the likelihood that our companions are chance alignments between unrelated stars and conclude that this is unlikely for the majority of the objects that we have followed-up spectroscopically. We also examine the entire population of ultracool (>M7) dwarf companions and conclude that while some are loosely bound, most are unlikely to be disrupted over the course of ∼10 Gyr. Our search increases the number of ultracool M dwarf companions wider than 300 AU by 88% and increases the number of L dwarf companions in the same separation range by 82%. Finally, we resolve our new L dwarf companion to HIP 6407 into a tight (0.''13, 7.4 AU) L1+T3 binary, making the system a hierarchical triple. Our search for these key benchmarks against which brown dwarf and exoplanet atmosphere models are tested has yielded the largest number of discoveries to date.

  5. Are isolated planetary-mass objects really isolated?. A brown dwarf-exoplanet system candidate in the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Martín, E. L.; Dobbie, P. D.; Barrado Y Navascués, D.

    2006-12-01

    Context: .Free-floating planetary-mass objects have masses below the deuterium burning mass limit at about 13 Jupiter masses, and have mostly been found in very young open clusters. Their origin and relationship to stars and brown dwarfs are still a mystery. Aims: .The recent detection by direct imaging of three giant planets at wide separation (50-250 AU) from their primaries has raised the question about the true "isolation" of planetary-mass objects in clusters. Our goal was to test the possibility that some free-floating planetary-mass objects could in fact be part of wide planetary systems. Methods: .We searched in the literature for stellar and brown-dwarf candidates members of the σ Orionis cluster (~3 Ma, ~360 pc) at small angular separations from published candidate planetary-mass objects. We found one candidate planetary system composed of an X-ray source, SE 70, and a planetary-mass object, S Ori 68, separated by only 4.6 arcsec. In order to assess the cluster membership of the X-ray source, we obtained mid-resolution optical spectroscopy using ISIS on the William Herschel Telescope. We also compiled additional data on the target from available astronomical catalogues. Results: .We have found that SE 70 follows the spectrophotometric sequence of the cluster and displays spectroscopic features of youth, such as lithium in absorption and chromospheric Hα emission. The radial velocity is consistent with cluster membership. Hence, SE 70 is very probably a member of the σ Orionis cluster. The projected physical separation between SE 70 and S Ori 68 is 1700~± 300 AU at the distance of the cluster. If a common proper motion is confirmed in the near future, the system would be composed of an M5-6 brown dwarf with an estimated mass of ~45 M_Jup and an L5 ± 2 giant planet with an estimated mass of ~5 M_Jup. It would be the widest and one of the lowest-mass planetary systems known so far.

  6. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto-hot Jupiters. II. KOI-1474.01, a Candidate Eccentric Planet Perturbed by an Unseen Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-12-01

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters—Jupiter-sized planets with periods of less than 10 days—likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto-hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed-hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the "photoeccentric effect"), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto- and failed-hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here, we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e = 0.81+0.10 -0.07, skirting the proto-hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Kepler photometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolution models, we characterize host KOI-1474 as a rapidly rotating F star. Statistical arguments reveal that the transiting candidate has a low false-positive probability of 3.1%. KOI-1474.01 also exhibits transit-timing variations of the order of an hour. We explore characteristics of the third-body perturber, which is possibly the "smoking-gun" cause of KOI-1474.01's large eccentricity. We use the host star's period, radius, and projected rotational velocity to measure the inclination of the stellar spin. Comparing KOI 1474.01's inclination, we find that its orbit is marginally consistent with being aligned with the stellar spin axis, although a reanalysis is warranted with future additional data. Finally, we discuss how the number and existence of proto-hot Jupiters will not only demonstrate that hot Jupiters migrate via HEM, but also shed light on the typical timescale for the mechanism.

  7. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. II. KOI-1474.01, A CANDIDATE ECCENTRIC PLANET PERTURBED BY AN UNSEEN COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Crepp, Justin R.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2012-12-20

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters-Jupiter-sized planets with periods of less than 10 days-likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto-hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed-hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the ''photoeccentric effect''), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto- and failed-hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here, we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e 0.81{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07}, skirting the proto-hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Kepler photometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolution models, we characterize host KOI-1474 as a rapidly rotating F star. Statistical arguments reveal that the transiting candidate has a low false-positive probability of 3.1%. KOI-1474.01 also exhibits transit-timing variations of the order of an hour. We explore characteristics of the third-body perturber, which is possibly the ''smoking-gun'' cause of KOI-1474.01's large eccentricity. We use the host star's period, radius, and projected rotational velocity to measure the inclination of the stellar spin. Comparing KOI 1474.01's inclination, we find that its orbit is marginally consistent with being aligned with the stellar spin axis, although a reanalysis is warranted with future additional data. Finally, we discuss how the number and existence of proto-hot Jupiters will not only demonstrate that hot Jupiters migrate via HEM, but also shed light on the typical timescale for the mechanism.

  8. KEPLER-20: A SUN-LIKE STAR WITH THREE SUB-NEPTUNE EXOPLANETS AND TWO EARTH-SIZE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, Thomas N. III; Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Rogers, Leslie A.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the discovery of the Kepler-20 planetary system, which we initially identified through the detection of five distinct periodic transit signals in the Kepler light curve of the host star 2MASS J19104752+4220194. From high-resolution spectroscopy of the star, we find a stellar effective temperature T{sub eff} = 5455 {+-} 100 K, a metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.01 {+-} 0.04, and a surface gravity of log g = 4.4 {+-} 0.1. We combine these estimates with an estimate of the stellar density derived from the transit light curves to deduce a stellar mass of M{sub *} = 0.912 {+-} 0.034 M{sub Sun} and a stellar radius of R{sub *} = 0.944{sup +0.060}{sub -0.095} R{sub Sun }. For three of the transit signals, we demonstrate that our results strongly disfavor the possibility that these result from astrophysical false positives. We accomplish this by first identifying the subset of stellar blends that reproduce the precise shape of the light curve and then using the constraints on the presence of additional stars from high angular resolution imaging, photometric colors, and the absence of a secondary component in our spectroscopic observations. We conclude that the planetary scenario is more likely than that of an astrophysical false positive by a factor of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} (Kepler-20b), 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} (Kepler-20c), and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} (Kepler-20d), sufficient to validate these objects as planetary companions. For Kepler-20c and Kepler-20d, the blend scenario is independently disfavored by the achromaticity of the transit: from Spitzer data gathered at 4.5 {mu}m, we infer a ratio of the planetary to stellar radii of 0.075 {+-} 0.015 (Kepler-20c) and 0.065 {+-} 0.011 (Kepler-20d), consistent with each of the depths measured in the Kepler optical bandpass. We determine the orbital periods and physical radii of the three confirmed planets to be 3.70 days and 1.91{sup +0.12}{sub -0.21} R{sub Circled-Plus} for Kepler-20b, 10

  9. WIDE COMPANIONS TO HIPPARCOS STARS WITHIN 67 pc OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Lepine, Sebastien E-mail: lepine@amnh.org

    2012-10-01

    A catalog of common-proper-motion (CPM) companions to stars within 67 pc of the Sun is constructed based on the SUPERBLINK proper-motion survey. It contains 1392 CPM pairs with angular separations 30'' < {rho} < 1800'', relative proper motion between the two components less than 25 mas yr{sup -1}, and magnitudes and colors of the secondaries consistent with those of dwarfs in the (M{sub V} , V - J) diagram. In addition, we list 21 candidate white dwarf CPM companions with separations under 300'', about half of which should be physical. We estimate a 0.31 fraction of pairs with red dwarf companions to be physical systems (about 425 objects), while the rest (mostly wide pairs) are chance alignments. For each candidate companion, the probability of a physical association is evaluated. The distribution of projected separations s of the physical pairs between 2 kAU and 64 kAU follows f(s){proportional_to}s {sup -1.5}, which decreases faster than Oepik's law. We find that solar-mass dwarfs have no less than 4.4% {+-} 0.3% companions with separations larger than 2 kAU, or 3.8% {+-} 0.3% per decade of orbital separation in the 2-16 kAU range. The distribution of mass ratio of those wide companions is approximately uniform in the 0.1 < q < 1.0 range, although we observe a dip at q {approx_equal} 0.5 which, if confirmed, could be evidence of bimodal distribution of companion masses. New physical CPM companions to two exoplanet host stars are discovered.

  10. Wide Companions to Hipparcos Stars within 67 pc of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Lépine, Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    A catalog of common-proper-motion (CPM) companions to stars within 67 pc of the Sun is constructed based on the SUPERBLINK proper-motion survey. It contains 1392 CPM pairs with angular separations 30'' < ρ < 1800'', relative proper motion between the two components less than 25 mas yr-1, and magnitudes and colors of the secondaries consistent with those of dwarfs in the (MV , V - J) diagram. In addition, we list 21 candidate white dwarf CPM companions with separations under 300'', about half of which should be physical. We estimate a 0.31 fraction of pairs with red dwarf companions to be physical systems (about 425 objects), while the rest (mostly wide pairs) are chance alignments. For each candidate companion, the probability of a physical association is evaluated. The distribution of projected separations s of the physical pairs between 2 kAU and 64 kAU follows f(s)vprops -1.5, which decreases faster than Öpik's law. We find that solar-mass dwarfs have no less than 4.4% ± 0.3% companions with separations larger than 2 kAU, or 3.8% ± 0.3% per decade of orbital separation in the 2-16 kAU range. The distribution of mass ratio of those wide companions is approximately uniform in the 0.1 < q < 1.0 range, although we observe a dip at q ~= 0.5 which, if confirmed, could be evidence of bimodal distribution of companion masses. New physical CPM companions to two exoplanet host stars are discovered.

  11. SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Deleuil, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonomo, A. S.; Almenara, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    As CoRoT, the Kepler space mission found a large amount of planetary transit candidates for which radial velocity follow-up is necessary in order to establish the planetary nature and then, to characterize the mass of the transiting companion. We are following up some interesting Kepler candidates with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted at the 1.93-m telescope in Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). More than one year after the first Kepler release, we will present the strategy used to select the most promising Kepler candidates, within reach of a detection with SOPHIE, using the experience of more than 4 years of CoRoT, SWASP and HAT radial velocity follow-up. We will also highlight the results of the first year of observations that led to the discovery of several new transiting exoplanets and help the understanding of the false positive rate of the Kepler mission.

  12. Mass constraints on substellar companion candidates from the re-reduced Hipparcos intermediate astrometric data: nine confirmed planets and two confirmed brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffert, S.; Quirrenbach, A.

    2011-03-01

    Context. The recently completed re-reduction of the Hipparcos data by van Leeuwen (2007a, Astrophysics and Space Science Library, 350) makes it possible to search for the astrometric signatures of planets and brown dwarfs known from radial velocity surveys in the improved Hipparcos intermediate astrometric data. Aims: Our aim is to put more significant constraints on the orbital parameters which cannot be derived from radial velocities alone, i.e. the inclination and the longitude of the ascending node, than was possible before. The determination of the inclination in particular allows to calculate an unambiguous companion mass, rather than the lower mass limit which can be obtained from radial velocity measurements. Methods: We fitted the astrometric orbits of 310 substellar companions around 258 stars, which were all discovered via the radial velocity method, to the Hipparcos intermediate astrometric data provided by van Leeuwen. Results: Even though the astrometric signatures of the companions cannot be detected in most cases, the Hipparcos data still provide lower limits on the inclination for all but 67 of the investigated companions, which translates into upper limits on the masses of the unseen companions. For nine companions the derived upper mass limit lies in the planetary and for 75 companions in the brown dwarf mass regime, proving the substellar nature of those objects. Two of those objects have minimum masses also in the brown dwarf regime and are thus proven to be brown dwarfs. The confirmed planets are the ones around Pollux (β Gem b), ɛ Eri b, ɛ Ret b, μ Ara b, υ And c and d, 47 UMa b, HD 10647 b and HD 147513 b. The confirmed brown dwarfs are HD 137510 b and HD 168443 c. In 20 cases, the astrometric signature of the substellar companion was detected in the Hipparcos data, resulting in reasonable constraints on inclination and ascending node. Of these 20 companions, three are confirmed as planets or lightweight brown dwarfs (HD 87833 b, ι Dra

  13. Exoplanets: The Hunt Continues!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-04-01

    Swiss Telescope at La Silla Very Successful Summary The intensive and exciting hunt for planets around other stars ( "exoplanets" ) is continuing with great success in both hemispheres. Today, an international team of astronomers from the Geneva Observatory and other research institutes [1] is announcing the discovery of no less than eleven new, planetary companions to solar-type stars, HD 8574, HD 28185, HD 50554, HD 74156, HD 80606, HD 82943, HD 106252, HD 141937, HD 178911B, HD 141937, among which two new multi-planet systems . The masses of these new objects range from slightly less than to about 10 times the mass of the planet Jupiter [2]. The new detections are based on measured velocity changes of the stars [3], performed with the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory , as well as with instruments on telescopes at the Haute-Provence Observatory and on the Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea (Hawaii, USA). Some of the new planets are unusual: * a two-planet system (around the star HD 82943) in which one orbital period is nearly exactly twice as long as the other - cases like this (refered to as "orbital resonance") are well known in our own solar system; * another two-planet system (HD 74156), with a Jupiter-like planet and a more massive planet further out; * a planet with the most elongated orbit detected so far (HD 80606), moving between 5 and 127 million kilometers from the central star; * a giant planet moving in an orbit around its Sun-like central star that is very similar to the one of the Earth and whose potential satellites (in theory, at least) might be "habitable". At this moment, there are 63 know exoplanet candidates with minimum masses below 10 Jupiter masses, and 67 known objects with minimum masses below 17 Jupiter masses. The present team of astronomers has detected about half of these. PR Photo 13a/01 : Radial-velocity measurements of HD 82943, a two-planet system . PR Photo 13b/01 : Radial

  14. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits . III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Chauvin, G.; Vigan, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Biller, B.; Bonavita, M.; Desidera, S.; Delorme, P.; Hagelberg, J.; Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Buenzli, E.; Carson, J.; Covino, E.; Feldt, M.; Girard, J.; Gratton, R.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Mesa, D.; Messina, S.; Montagnier, G.; Mordasini, C.; Mouillet, D.; Schlieder, J. E.; Segransan, D.; Thalmann, C.; Zurlo, A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence and distribution of stellar, brown dwarf (BD), and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From radial velocity observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJupiter has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. Aims: We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). This model consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the radial velocity measured CMF for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program (NaCo-LP) and the complementary archive datasets, which probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. Methods: We developed a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the outcome of a given survey, depending on the shape of the orbital parameter distributions (mass, semimajor axis, eccentricity, and inclination). Comparing the predictions with the results of the observations, we calculate the likelihood of different models and which models can be ruled out. Results: Current observations are consistent with the proposed model for the CMF, as long as a sufficiently small outer truncation radius (≲100 AU) is introduced for the planet separation distribution. Some regions of parameter space can be excluded by the observations. Conclusions: We conclude that the results of the direct imaging surveys searching for substellar companions around Sun-like stars are consistent with a combined substellar mass spectrum of planets and BDs. This mass distribution has a minimum between 10 and 50 MJupiter, in agreement

  15. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K{sub P} < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  16. GRO source candidates: (A) Nearby modest-size molecular clouds; (B) Pulsar with Wolf-Rayet companion that has lost its H-envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Murphy, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Within 100 pc of the sun there are over a hundred cirrus clouds with masses of approx. 60 solar mass and dense molecular clouds with masses of approx. 4 solar mass. If the local interstellar density of cosmic rays is also present in these clouds, the flux of neutral pion from the decay of gamma rays from the core of a cloud at a distance of 20 pc is approx. 13 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm/s. The flux from the more extensive cirrus cloud is approx 4 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm/s. A relativistic beam of particles generated by a compact stellar object and incident upon a large, close companion can be a strong gamma ray line source if more of the beam energy is used in interactions with C and O and heavier nuclei and less with H and He. This would be the case if the companion has lost its hydrogen envelope and nucleosynthesized much of its He into C, O, and Ne. Such objects are Wolf-Rayet stars and it is believed that some Wolf-Rayet stars do, in fact, have compact companions. For a beam of protons of 10(exp 37) erg/s, the flux at 1 kpc of the 4.4 MeV C-12 line could be as high as 5 x 10(exp -6) photons/sq cm/s. The fluxes of the deexcitation lines from the spallation products of O-16 are also presented.

  17. Two Extremely Hot Exoplanets Caught in Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    VLT Measures Properties of New Jupiter-Size Objects in Very Close Orbits Summary A European team of astronomers [1] are announcing the discovery and study of two new extra-solar planets (exoplanets). They belong to the OGLE transit candidate objects and could be characterized in detail. This trebles the number of exoplanets discovered by the transit method; three such objects are now known. The observations were performed in March 2004 with the FLAMES multi-fiber spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT Kueyen telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). They enabled the astronomers to measure accurate radial velocities for forty-one stars for which a temporary brightness "dip" had been detected by the OGLE survey. This effect might be the signature of the transit in front of the star of an orbiting planet, but may also be caused by a small stellar companion. For two of the stars (OGLE-TR-113 and OGLE-TR-132), the measured velocity changes revealed the presence of planetary-mass companions in extremely short-period orbits. This result confirms the existence of a new class of giant planets, designated "very hot Jupiters" because of their size and very high surface temperature. They are extremely close to their host stars, orbiting them in less than 2 (Earth) days. The transit method for detecting exoplanets will be "demonstrated" for a wide public on June 8, 2004, when planet Venus passes in front of the solar disc, cf. the VT-2004 programme. PR Photo 14a/04: Sky Field with OGLE-TR-113 PR Photo 14b/04: Sky Field with OGLE-TR-132 PR Photo 14c/04: Brightness "Dips" Caused by Two Transiting Exoplanets PR Photo 14d/04: Velocity Variations Caused by Two Transiting Exoplanets PR Photo 14e/04: Properties of Known Transiting Exoplanets Discovering other Worlds During the past decade, astronomers have learned that our Solar System is not unique, as more than 120 giant planets orbiting other stars were discovered by radial-velocity surveys (cf. ESO PR 13/00, ESO PR 07/01, and ESO

  18. Masses of Exoplanets from Doppler Spectroscopy and HST Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jacob; McArthur, B. E.; Benedict, G. F.

    2006-12-01

    Mass is the most important physical property to know for extrasolar planets because it is the one property that distinguishes a star's companion as a bona-fide planet rather than a brown dwarf or even a low-mass star. Additionally, planetary masses provide useful boundary conditions for models of planetary formation and evolution as mass is a critical component in determining a planet's instantaneous characteristics and past and future evolution. In order to determine exoplanets' true masses, we currently use the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors to obtain measurements of the astrometric elements (perturbation semi-major axis and inclination) of nearby stars that host candidate planets. Because of the long perturbation period of our targets, these mass determinations rely on Doppler velocity measurements to establish the planetary orbital parameters. Unknown shorter-period planets can introduce velocity changes that could be misconstrued as noise and lead to deriving incorrect orbital parameters for the known planets. Consequently, we carry out high-cadence Doppler spectroscopy observations subset of our targets with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present here refined orbital parameters and limits on undetected planets for a subset of our target systems from combining our new data with legacy velocities from planet search programs. We also present preliminary three dimensional models and exoplanet masses for some of our targets from combining the astrometric and spectroscopic data. This research is a technique demonstration of direct relevance to the Space Interferometry Mission, which will be able to discover new exoplanets and precisely measure their masses using astrometry alone. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grants GO-10610 and GO-10989 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. Direct Imaging of Faint Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, Riccardo

    The exoplanets around stars in the solar neighborhood are expected to be bright enough for us to characterize them with direct imaging; however, they are much fainter than their parent stars, and separated by very small angles, so conventional imaging techniques are totally inadequate, and new methods are needed. The direct imaging of exoplanets is extremely challenging. Jupiter is 109 times fainter than our Sun in reflected visible light. A direct imaging instrument for exoplanets must suppress (1) the bright star image and diffraction pattern and (2) the stellar scattered light from imperfections in the telescope. The main goal of high-contrast imaging is primarily to discover and characterize extrasolar planetary systems. High-contrast observations, in optical and infrared astronomy, are defined as any observation requiring a technique to reveal a low mass companion that is so close to the primary, brighter by a factor of at least 105, that optical effects hinder or prevent the collection of photons directly from the target of observation. To overcome this, astronomers combined large telescopes (to reduce the impact of diffraction), adaptive optics (to correct for phase errors induced by atmospheric turbulence), and sophisticated image processing.

  20. 32 New Exoplanets Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    oday, at an international ESO/CAUP exoplanet conference in Porto, the team who built the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher, better known as HARPS, the spectrograph for ESO's 3.6-metre telescope, reports on the incredible discovery of some 32 new exoplanets, cementing HARPS's position as the world's foremost exoplanet hunter. This result also increases the number of known low-mass planets by an impressive 30%. Over the past five years HARPS has spotted more than 75 of the roughly 400 or so exoplanets now known. "HARPS is a unique, extremely high precision instrument that is ideal for discovering alien worlds," says Stéphane Udry, who made the announcement. "We have now completed our initial five-year programme, which has succeeded well beyond our expectations." The latest batch of exoplanets announced today comprises no less than 32 new discoveries. Including these new results, data from HARPS have led to the discovery of more than 75 exoplanets in 30 different planetary systems. In particular, thanks to its amazing precision, the search for small planets, those with a mass of a few times that of the Earth - known as super-Earths and Neptune-like planets - has been given a dramatic boost. HARPS has facilitated the discovery of 24 of the 28 planets known with masses below 20 Earth masses. As with the previously detected super-Earths, most of the new low-mass candidates reside in multi-planet systems, with up to five planets per system. In 1999, ESO launched a call for opportunities to build a high resolution, extremely precise spectrograph for the ESO 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile. Michel Mayor, from the Geneva Observatory, led a consortium to build HARPS, which was installed in 2003 and was soon able to measure the back-and-forward motions of stars by detecting small changes in a star's radial velocity - as small as 3.5 km/hour, a steady walking pace. Such a precision is crucial for the discovery of exoplanets and the radial velocity method

  1. Search for exoplanet around northern circumpolar stars. Four planets around HD 11755, HD 12648, HD 24064, and 8 Ursae Minoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.-C.; Park, M.-G.; Lee, S.-M.; Jeong, G.; Oh, H.-I.; Han, I.; Lee, J. W.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Kim, K.-M.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: This program originated as the north pole region extension of the established exoplanet survey using the 1.8 m telescope at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO). The aim of our paper is to find exoplanets in northern circumpolar stars with a precise radial velocity (RV) survey. Methods: We selected about 200 northern circumpolar stars with the following criteria: δ ≥ 70°, 0.6 < B - V < 1.6, Hipparcosscat < 0.05 mag, and 5.0 < mv < 7.0. The high-resolution, fiber-fed Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) was used for the RV survey. Chromospheric activities, the Hipparcos photometry, and line bisectors were analyzed to exclude other causes for the RV variations. Results: In 2010, we started to monitor the candidates and have completed initial screening for all stars for the past five years. We present the detection of four new exoplanets. Stars HD 11755, HD 12648, HD 24064, and 8 UMi all show evidence of giant planets in Keplerian motion. The companion to HD 11755 has a minimum mass of 6.5 MJup in a 433-day orbit with an eccentricity of 0.19. HD 12648 is orbited by a companion with a minimum mass of 2.9 MJup, a period of 133 days, and an eccentricity of 0.04. Weak surface activity was suspected in HD 24064. However, no evidence was found to be associated with the RV variations. Its companion has a minimum mass of 9.4 MJup, a period of 535 days, and an eccentricity of 0.35. Finally, 8 UMi has a minimum mass of 1.5 MJup and a period of 93 days with an eccentricity of 0.06. Based on observations made with the BOES instrument on the 1.8 m telescope at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea.

  2. Chandra Pilot Survey of Extrasolar Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yohko

    2012-09-01

    We propose to detect planetary-mass companion around young nearby stars by X-ray direct imaging observations with Chandra. Our goals are to determine I. if the X-ray band can be a new probe to the exo-planet search, and II. if a planet emit detectable X-rays with a magnetic origin at a young age. This should be a challenging observation but a brand-new discovery space unique to Chandra. The abundant population of YSOs in the same field of view will enable us to obtain complete X-ray catalogues of YSOs with all categories of masses. We will also execute simultaneous deep NIR observations with IRSF/SIRIUS and Nishiharima 2m telescope to search for the other X-ray-emitting very low-mass objects near our aiming planet candidates.

  3. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. II. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Raghavan, Deepak; Subasavage, John P.; Roberts, Lewis C.; Turner, Nils H.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu E-mail: nils@chara-array.org

    2011-11-15

    A study of the host stars to exoplanets is important for understanding their environment. To that end, we report new speckle observations of a sample of exoplanet host primaries. The bright exoplanet host HD 8673 (= HIP 6702) is revealed to have a companion, although at this time we cannot definitively establish the companion as physical or optical. The observing lists for planet searches and for these observations have for the most part been pre-screened for known duplicity, so the detected binary fraction is lower than what would otherwise be expected. Therefore, a large number of double stars were observed contemporaneously for verification and quality control purposes, to ensure that the lack of detection of companions for exoplanet hosts was valid. In these additional observations, 10 pairs are resolved for the first time and 60 pairs are confirmed. These observations were obtained with the USNO speckle camera on the NOAO 4 m telescopes at both KPNO and CTIO from 2001 to 2010.

  4. Lightest exoplanet yet discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    at ESO's La Silla Observatory and announced two years ago -- this star was known to harbour a system with a Neptune-sized planet (ESO 30/05) and two super-Earths (ESO 22/07). With the discovery of Gliese 581 e, the planetary system now has four known planets, with masses of about 1.9 (planet e), 16 (planet b), 5 (planet c), and 7 Earth-masses (planet d). The planet furthest out, Gliese 581 d, orbits its host star in 66.8 days. "Gliese 581 d is probably too massive to be made only of rocky material, but we can speculate that it is an icy planet that has migrated closer to the star," says team member Stephane Udry. The new observations have revealed that this planet is in the habitable zone, where liquid water could exist. "‘d' could even be covered by a large and deep ocean -- it is the first serious 'water world' candidate," continued Udry. The gentle pull of an exoplanet as it orbits the host star introduces a tiny wobble in the star's motion -- only about 7 km/hour, corresponding to brisk walking speed -- that can just be detected on Earth with today's most sophisticated technology. Low-mass red dwarf stars such as Gliese 581 are potentially fruitful hunting grounds for low-mass exoplanets in the habitable zone. Such cool stars are relatively faint and their habitable zones lie close in, where the gravitational tug of any orbiting planet found there would be stronger, making the telltale wobble more pronounced. Even so, detecting these tiny signals is still a challenge, and the discovery of Gliese 581 e and the refinement of Gliese 581 d's orbit were only possible due to HARPS's unique precision and stability. "It is amazing to see how far we have come since we discovered the first exoplanet around a normal star in 1995 -- the one around 51 Pegasi," says Mayor. "The mass of Gliese 581 e is 80 times less than that of 51 Pegasi b. This is tremendous progress in just 14 years." The astronomers are confident that they can still do better. "With similar observing

  5. Planet Hunters. X. Searching for Nearby Neighbors of 75 Planet and Eclipsing Binary Candidates from the K2 Kepler extended mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph R.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Kristiansen, Martti H.; LaCourse, Daryll M.; Gagliano, Robert; Tan, Arvin Joseff V.; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Omohundro, Mark R.; Venner, Alexander; Terentev, Ivan; Schmitt, Allan R.; Jacobs, Thomas L.; Winarski, Troy; Sejpka, Johann; Jek, Kian J.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Brewer, John M.; Ishikawa, Sascha T.; Lintott, Chris; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; Schwamb, Megan E.; Weiksnar, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We present high-resolution observations of a sample of 75 K2 targets from Campaigns 1–3 using speckle interferometry on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope and adaptive optics imaging at the Keck II telescope. The median SOAR I-band and Keck Ks-band detection limits at 1\\prime\\prime were {{Δ }}{m}I=4.4 mag and {{Δ }}{m}{Ks}=6.1 mag, respectively. This sample includes 37 stars likely to host planets, 32 targets likely to be eclipsing binaries (EBs), and 6 other targets previously labeled as likely planetary false positives. We find nine likely physically bound companion stars within 3\\prime\\prime of three candidate transiting exoplanet host stars and six likely EBs. Six of the nine detected companions are new discoveries. One of these new discoveries, EPIC 206061524, is associated with a planet candidate. Among the EB candidates, companions were only found near the shortest period ones (P\\lt 3 days), which is in line with previous results showing high multiplicity near short-period binary stars. This high-resolution data, including both the detected companions and the limits on potential unseen companions, will be useful in future planet vetting and stellar multiplicity rate studies for planets and binaries.

  6. Molecular opacities for exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Bernath, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  7. Molecular opacities for exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Bernath, Peter F

    2014-04-28

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are now possible by transit methods and direct emission. Spectroscopic requirements for exoplanets are reviewed based on existing measurements and model predictions for hot Jupiters and super-Earths. Molecular opacities needed to simulate astronomical observations can be obtained from laboratory measurements, ab initio calculations or a combination of the two approaches. This discussion article focuses mainly on laboratory measurements of hot molecules as needed for exoplanet spectroscopy. PMID:24664921

  8. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  9. ExELS: an exoplanet legacy science proposal for the ESA Euclid mission - I. Cold exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, M. T.; Kerins, E.; Rattenbury, N.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Robin, A. C.; Mao, S.; Batista, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Cassan, A.; Fouqué, P.; McDonald, I.; Marquette, J. B.; Tisserand, P.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2013-09-01

    to infinity (i.e. the free-floating regime). Recent ground-based microlensing measurements indicate a significant population of free-floating Jupiters, in which case ExELS will detect hundreds of free-floating planets. ExELS will also be sensitive to hot exoplanets and sub-stellar companions through their transit signatures and this is explored in a companion paper.

  10. Dispersed interferometry for infrared exoplanet velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Jerry; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Erskine, David; Marckwordt, Mario; Feuerstein, W. Michael; Mercer, Tony; Czeszumska, Agnieszka; Schwer, Jaclyn; Halverson, Sam; Lloyd, James P.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Wright, Jason T.; Herter, Terry

    2008-07-01

    The TEDI (TripleSpec - Exoplanet Discovery Instrument) is the first instrument dedicated to the near infrared radial velocity search for planetary companions to low-mass stars. The TEDI uses Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI), a combination of interferometry and multichannel dispersive spectroscopy. We have joined a white-light interferometer with the Cornell TripleSpec (0.9 - 2.4 μm) spectrograph at the Palomar Observatory 200" telescope and begun an experimental program to establish both the experimental and analytical techniques required for precision IR velocimetry and the Doppler-search for planets orbiting low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  11. Comparative Habitability of Transiting Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Rory; Meadows, Victoria S.; Evans, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanet habitability is traditionally assessed by comparing a planet’s semimajor axis to the location of its host star’s “habitable zone,” the shell around a star for which Earth-like planets can possess liquid surface water. The Kepler space telescope has discovered numerous planet candidates near the habitable zone, and many more are expected from missions such as K2, TESS, and PLATO. These candidates often require significant follow-up observations for validation, so prioritizing planets for habitability from transit data has become an important aspect of the search for life in the universe. We propose a method to compare transiting planets for their potential to support life based on transit data, stellar properties and previously reported limits on planetary emitted flux. For a planet in radiative equilibrium, the emitted flux increases with eccentricity, but decreases with albedo. As these parameters are often unconstrained, there is an “eccentricity-albedo degeneracy” for the habitability of transiting exoplanets. Our method mitigates this degeneracy, includes a penalty for large-radius planets, uses terrestrial mass-radius relationships, and, when available, constraints on eccentricity to compute a number we call the “habitability index for transiting exoplanets” that represents the relative probability that an exoplanet could support liquid surface water. We calculate it for Kepler objects of interest and find that planets that receive between 60% and 90% of the Earth’s incident radiation, assuming circular orbits, are most likely to be habitable. Finally, we make predictions for the upcoming TESS and James Webb Space Telescope missions.

  12. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. III. LIMITS TO TERTIARY COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Twenty-one of those systems were observed 10 or more times and show no evidence of additional companions. A new algorithm is presented for identifying astrometric companions and establishing the (companion mass)-(orbital period) combinations that can be excluded from existence with high confidence based on the PHASES observations, and the regions of mass-period phase space being excluded are presented for 21 PHASES binaries.

  13. Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of the Czech Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brát, L.; Zejda, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present activities of Czech variable star observers organized in the Variable Star and Exoplanet Section of the Czech Astronomical Society. We work in four observing projects: B.R.N.O. - eclipsing binaries, MEDUZA - intrinsic variable stars, TRESCA - transiting exoplanets and candidates, HERO - objects of high energy astrophysics. Detailed information together with O-C gate (database of eclipsing binaries minima timings) and OEJV (Open European Journal on Variable stars) are available on our internet portal http://var.astro.cz.

  14. Observing Exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin Mark

    2011-01-01

    The search for exoplanets and characterization of their properties has seen increasing success over the last few years. In excess of 500 exoplanets are known and Kepler has approx. 1000 additional candidates. Recently, progress has been made in direct imaging planets, both from the ground and in space. This presentation will discuss the history and current state of technology used for such discoveries, and highlight the new capabilities that will be enabled by the James Webb Space Telescope.

  15. Discovery of Low Mass Binary with Super Jupiter Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthes Rich, Evan; Wisniewski, John P.; Hashimoto, Jun; Brandt, Timothy; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-12-01

    Transit and radial velocity surveys have been prolific in detecting ~2000 confirmed planets to date. While few directly imaged planets have detected, such systems provide a unique scientific opportunity to probe exoplanets at larger angular separation, younger ages, and study their atmospheres. We present new L- and M-band AO observations, obtained with IRCS on Subaru, of a super Jupiter companion orbiting a cool dwarf. We show that the central object is likely a binary, thereby making this system the first likely directly imaged planetary mass companion surrounding a low mass binary system.

  16. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of thousands of exoplanets has revealed a large diversity of systems, the majority of which look nothing like our own. On the theoretical side, we are able to make ab initio calculations that make predictions about the properties of exoplanets. However, in order to link these predictions with observations, we must construct a statistical census of exoplanet demographics over as broad a range of parameters as possible. Current constraints on exoplanet demographics are typically constructed using the results of individual surveys using a single detection technique, and thus are incomplete. The only way to derive a statistically-complete census that samples a wide region of exoplanet parameter space is to synthesize the results from surveys employing all of the different discovery methods at our disposal. I present the first studies to demonstrate that this is actually possible, and describe a (mostly) de-biased exoplanet census that is constructed from the synthesis of results from microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. I will also discuss future work that will include the results of transit surveys (in particular, Kepler discoveries) to complete the census of exoplanets in our Galaxy, and describe the application of this census to develop the most comprehensive, observationally-constrained models of planet formation and evolution that have been derived to date.

  17. Glowing Hot Transiting Exoplanet Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    and the fully drawn curve represents a model fit, with the stellar parameters from the analysis of the UVES spectra (1 solar radius and 1 solar mass) and the planetary parameters from the velocity analysis (0.6 Jupiter mass). The best fit allows determination of the planet's size as about 200,000 km (1.4 times the size of Jupiter). The 2 per cent dip in the brightness of OGLE-TR-3 , as observed during the OGLE programme, occurs every 28 hours 33 minutes (1.1899 days), cf. PR Photo 10e/03 . The UVES velocity measurements ( PR Photo 10d/03 ) fit this period well and reveal, with high probability, the presence of an exoplanet orbiting OGLE-TR-3 with this period. In any case, the observations firmly exclude that the well observed brightness variations could be due to a small stellar companion. A red dwarf star would have caused velocity variations of 15 km/s and a brown dwarf star 2.5 km/s; both would have been easy to observe with UVES, and it is clear that such variations can be excluded. Although the available observations are still insufficient to allow an accurate determination of the planetary properties, the astronomers provisionally deduce a true mass of the planet of the order of one half of that of Jupiter . The density is found to be about 250 kg/m 3 , only one-quarter of that of water or one-fifth of that of Jupiter, so the planet is quite big for this mass - a bit "blown up". It is obviously a planet of the gaseous type . A very hot planet The orbital period, 28 hours 33 minutes (1.1899 days), is the shortest known for any exoplanet and the distance between the star and the planet is correspondingly small, only 3.5 million kilometres . The temperature of the side of the planet facing the star must therefore be very high, of the order of 2000 °C . Clearly, the planet must be losing its atmosphere by evaporation. The astronomers also conclude that it might in fact be possible to observe this exoplanet directly because of its comparatively strong infrared

  18. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. II. Survey description, results, and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.; Vigan, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Desidera, S.; Bonavita, M.; Mesa, D.; Boccaletti, A.; Buenzli, E.; Carson, J.; Delorme, P.; Hagelberg, J.; Montagnier, G.; Mordasini, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Segransan, D.; Thalmann, C.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Biller, B.; Covino, E.; Feldt, M.; Girard, J.; Gratton, R.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Messina, S.; Meyer, M.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Reggiani, M.; Schlieder, J. E.; Zurlo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Young, nearby stars are ideal targets for direct imaging searches for giant planets and brown dwarf companions. After the first-imaged planet discoveries, vast efforts have been devoted to the statistical analysis of the occurence and orbital distributions of giant planets and brown dwarf companions at wide (≥5-6 AU) orbits. Aims: In anticipation of the VLT/SPHERE planet-imager, guaranteed-time programs, we have conducted a preparatory survey of 86 stars between 2009 and 2013 to identify new faint comoving companions to ultimately analyze the occurence of giant planets and brown dwarf companions at wide (10-2000 AU) orbits around young, solar-type stars. Methods: We used NaCo at VLT to explore the occurrence rate of giant planets and brown dwarfs between typically 0.1 and 8''. Diffraction-limited observations in H-band combined with angular differential imaging enabled us to reach primary star-companion brightness ratios as small as 10-6 at 1.5''. Repeated observations at several epochs enabled us to discriminate comoving companions from background objects. Results: During our survey, twelve systems were resolved as new binaries, including the discovery of a new white dwarf companion to the star HD 8049. Around 34 stars, at least one companion candidate was detected in the observed field of view. More than 400 faint sources were detected; 90% of them were in four crowded fields. With the exception of HD 8049 B, we did not identify any new comoving companions. The survey also led to spatially resolved images of the thin debris disk around HD 61005 that have been published earlier. Finally, considering the survey detection limits, we derive a preliminary upper limit on the frequency of giant planets for the semi-major axes of [10, 2000] AU: typically less than 15% between 100 and 500 AU and less than 10% between 50 and 500 AU for exoplanets that are more massive than 5 MJup and 10 MJup respectively, if we consider a uniform input distribution and a

  19. Overlooked wide companions of nearby F stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.-D.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We checked a sample of 545 F stars within 50 pc for wide companions using existing near-infrared and optical sky surveys. Methods: Applying the common proper motion (CPM) criterion, we detected wide companion candidates with 6-120 arcsec angular separations by visual inspection of multi-epoch finder charts and by searching in proper motion catalogues. Final proper motions were measured by involving positional measurements from up to eleven surveys. Spectral types of red CPM companions were estimated from their absolute J-band magnitudes based on the Hipparcos distances of the primaries. Results: In addition to about 100 known CPM objects, we found 19 new CPM companions and confirmed 31 previously known candidates. A few CPM objects are still considered as candidates according to their level of proper motion agreement. Among the new objects there are nine M0-M4, eight M5-M6, one ≈L3.5 dwarf (HD 3861B), and one white dwarf (WD) (HD 2726B), whereas we confirmed two K, 19 M0-M4, six M5-M6, two early-L dwarfs, and two DA WDs as CPM companions. In a few cases, previous spectral types were available that all agree well with our estimates. Two companions (HD 22879B and HD 49933B) are associated with moderately metal-poor Gaia benchmark stars. One doubtful CPM companion, spectroscopically classified as WD but found to be very bright (J = 11.1) by others, should either be a very nearby foreground WD or a different kind of object associated with HD 165670. Tables A.1, B.1, and C.1 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A51

  20. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.; Fakhouri, O.; Marcy, G. W.; Han, E.; Feng, Y.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, A. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Valenti, J. A.; Anderson, J.; Piskunov, N.

    2011-04-01

    We present a database of well-determined orbital parameters of exoplanets, and their host stars' properties. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 427 planets orbiting 363 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form online through the Exoplanets Data Explorer table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanet Data Explorer plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots, giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the different selection biases between radial velocity and transit surveys, and that the multiplanet systems show a distinct semimajor-axis distribution from apparently singleton systems.

  1. A search for companions to irregular variables of type S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peery, B. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    IUE archival spectra of S-type stars that may be cool analogues of Ba II stars have been inspected for evidence of hot companions. Although the currently accessible data for 9 stars are of marginal quality, spectra of the brightest candidate, HR 1105, show strong evidence for the presence of a hot companion of low luminosity.

  2. Planets and Brown Dwarfs and Stars, Oh My! --- Companions Along the Road to the Nearest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Davison, C. L.; Dieterich, S. B.; Ianna, P. A.; Jao, W. C.; Koerner, D. W.; Subasavage, J. P.; Tanner, A. M.; White, R. J.; RECONS

    2012-01-01

    RECONS (www.recons.org, REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars) has been using astrometric techniques since 1999 to search for massive planets orbiting more than 130 nearby red and white dwarfs. Because of their proximity, nearby stars are natural locations to search for other solar systems --- the stars provide increased fluxes, larger astrometric perturbations, and higher probabilities for eventual resolution of planets than similar stars at larger distances. Unlike radial velocity searches, our astrometric effort is most sensitive to Jovian planets in Jovian orbits, i.e. those that span decades. We have discovered stellar companions with masses of a few hundred Jupiters, brown dwarf companions with masses of a few tens of Jupiters, and are now pushing into the realm of planets with masses of a few Jupiters around the nearest red dwarfs. Several previously unknown companions have been imaged via Gemini-AO observations, but we have also detected perturbations caused by enigmatic companions that elude direct detection. As we sweep through the mass regimes of stars to exoplanets for companions, we are now able to assess the various populations --- stars are common as companions, whereas brown dwarfs and massive planets are rare. We outline what we have discovered so far and place our exoplanet search results in context with an overview of the census of more than 60 stars with exoplanets known within 25 pc. This effort is supported by the NSF through grant AST-0908402 and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  3. DETECTABILITY OF EXOPLANETS IN THE {beta} PIC MOVING GROUP WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Kataria, Tiffany; Simon, Michal

    2010-07-15

    We model the detectability of exoplanets around stars in the {beta} Pic Moving Group (BPMG) using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), a coronagraphic instrument designed to detect companions by imaging. Members of the BPMG are considered promising targets for exoplanet searches because of their youth ({approx}12 Myr) and proximity (median distance {approx}35 pc). We wrote a modeling procedure to generate hypothetical companions of given mass, age, eccentricity, and semi-major axis, and place them around BPMG members that fall within the V-band range of the GPI. We count companions lying within the GPI's field of view and H-band fluxes that have a host-companion flux ratio placing them within its sensitivity as possible detections. The fraction of companions that could be detected depends on their brightness at 12 Myr, and hence formation mechanism, and on their distribution of semi-major axes. We used brightness models for formation by disk instability and core-accretion. We considered the two extreme cases of the semi-major axis distribution-the log-normal distribution of the nearby F- and G-type stars and a power-law distribution indicated by the exoplanets detected by the radial velocity technique. We find that the GPI could detect exoplanets of all the F and G spectral type stars in the BPMG sample with a probability that depends on the brightness model and semi-major axis distribution. At spectral type K-M1, exoplanet detectability depends on brightness and hence distance of the host star. GPI will be able to detect the companions of M stars later than M1 only if they are closer than 10 pc. Of the four A stars in the BPMG sample, only one has a V-band brightness in the range of GPI; the others are too bright.

  4. Is This Speck of Light an Exoplanet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    nature of this intriguing object. Thus, the astronomers refer to it as a "Giant Planet Candidate Companion (GPCC)" [4]. Observations will now be made to ascertain whether the motion in the sky of GPCC is compatible with that of a planet orbiting 2M1207. This should become evident within 1-2 years at the most. PR Photo 26a/04: NACO image of the brown dwarf object 2M1207 and GPCC PR Photo 26b/04: Near-infrared spectrum of the brown dwarf object 2M1207 and GPCC PR Photo 26c/04: Comparison between the possible 2M1207 system and the solar system Just a speck of light ESO PR Photo 26a/04 ESO PR Photo 26a/04 The Brown Dwarf Object 2M1207 and GPCC [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 471 pix - 65k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 942 pix - 158k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 26a/04 is a composite image of the brown dwarf object 2M1207 (centre) and the fainter object seen near it, at an angular distance of 778 milliarcsec. Designated "Giant Planet Candidate Companion" by the discoverers, it may represent the first image of an exoplanet. Further observations, in particular of its motion in the sky relative to 2M1207 are needed to ascertain its true nature. The photo is based on three near-infrared exposures (in the H, K and L' wavebands) with the NACO adaptive-optics facility at the 8.2-m VLT Yepun telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. Since 1998, a team of European and American astronomers [2] is studying the environment of young, nearby "stellar associations", i.e., large conglomerates of mostly young stars and the dust and gas clouds from which they were recently formed. The stars in these associations are ideal targets for the direct imaging of sub-stellar companions (planets or brown dwarf objects). The leader of the team, ESO astronomer Gael Chauvin notes that "whatever their nature, sub-stellar objects are much hotter and brighter when young - tens of millions of years - and therefore can be more easily detected than older objects of similar mass". The team especially focused on the study of the TW

  5. The history of exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Michael

    2012-10-01

    I summarize the early developments of the more quantitative aspects of exoplanet detection. After a brief overview of the observational methods currently applied to exoplanet searches and a summary of the first true exoplanet detections resulting from these various techniques, the more relevant historical background is organized according to the observational techniques that are currently most relevant. PMID:23013272

  6. Validating the First Habitable-Zone Planet Candidates Identified by the NASA Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fressin, Francois; Ballard, Sarah; Borucki, William; Latham, David; Gilliland, Ronald; Seager, Sara; Knutson, Heather; Fortney, Jonathan; Brown, Timothy; Ford, Eric; Deming, Drake; Torres, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    At the beginning of Cycle 8, the NASA Kepler Mission will have completed two years of science observations, the minimum baseline sufficient to identify candidate transiting exoplanets orbiting within the habitable-zones of Sun-like stars. The principal task that lies ahead is to reject from this sample the false positives (blends of eclipsing binaries that precisely mimic the signal of a transiting exoplanet), and to confirm the planetary nature of the remaining candidates. For planets more massive than Neptune, the direct confirmation of their planetary status can be accomplished by radial-velocity measurements. However, such planets possess primordial envelopes of hydrogen and helium that make them unsuitable to life as we know it. The most exciting candidates -- and the ones that Kepler is specifically tasked with finding -- are super-Earth and Earth-sized planets orbiting within their stellar habitable zones. Kepler has just begun to identify such planet candidates, and it will identify many more as its baseline increases throughout the coming year. While the Kepler team has developed powerful tools to weed out the impostors, Spitzer possesses the unique ability to provide the final validation of these candidates as planets, namely by measuring the depth of the transit at infrared wavelengths. By combining the infrared and optical measurements of the transit depth with models of hypothetical stellar blends, we can definitively test the stellar-blend hypothesis. We propose to observe the transits of 20 candidate habitable-zone super-Earths to be identified by the Kepler Mission. The results from this Exploration Science Program will be twofold: First, we will definitively validate the first potentially habitable planets ever identified. Second, we will determine the rate of occurrence of impostors. This rate of false positives can then be applied to the much larger sample of candidates identified by Kepler, to deduce the true rate of planetary companions.

  7. Asteroseismology and Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology is among the most powerful observational tools to determine fundamental properties of stars. Space-based photometry has recently enabled the systematic detection of oscillations in exoplanet host stars, allowing a combination of asteroseismology with transit and radial-velocity measurements to precisely characterize planetary systems. In this talk I will review the latest asteroseismic detections in exoplanet host stars spanning from the main sequence to the red-giant branch, focusing in particular on radii and ages of stars hosting small (sub-Neptune sized) planets discovered by the Kepler mission. I will furthermore discuss applications of asteroseismology to measure spin-orbit inclinations in multiplanet systems, and their implications for formation theories of hot Jupiters. Finally I will give an outlook on asteroseismic studies of exoplanet hosts with current and future space- and ground-based facilities such as K2, SONG, TESS, and PLATO.

  8. Uncovering Exoplanets using Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first discovery of a planet around a solar-type star by Mayor & Queloz in 1995, more than 700 of these exoplanets have been detected. Most of these are giant, gaseous planets, but small, presumably solid, exoplanets, that are much harder to detect, have also been found. Among the latter are even some that orbit in their star's habitable zone, where temperatures could be just right to allow liquid water on a planet's surface. Liquid water is generally considered to be essential for the existence of life. Whether liquid water actually exists on a planet depends strongly on the atmosphere's thickness and characteristics, such as the surface pressure and composition. Famous examples in the Solar System are Venus and the Earth, with similar sizes, inner compositions and orbital radii, but wildly different surface conditions. The characterization of the atmospheres of giant, gaseous exoplanets, and of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of small, solid exoplanets will allow a comparison with Solar System planets and it will open up a treasure trove of knowledge about the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, thanks to the vast range of orbital distances, planet sizes and ages that can be studied. Characterization will also allow studying conditions for life and ultimately the existence of life around other stars. Some information about the upper atmospheric properties has already been derived for a few close-in, hot, giant exoplanets, whose thermal flux can be derived from measurements of the combined flux of the star and the planet. This method has also provided traces of an atmosphere around a large solid planet orbiting red dwarf star GJ1214. Characterization of the atmosphere and/or surface of exoplanets in wide orbits, resembling the cool planets in our Solar System, and in particular of small, solid, Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars, is virtually impossible with transit observations. Indeed, polarimetry

  9. NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devirian, Michael

    2009-01-01

    September 24, 2008 NASA has established the Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) to conduct scientific investigations in one of the most exciting new fields of astronomy, the exploration and characterization of planets around other stars in search of those that might show signs of harboring life. In this paper, we will describe that program and how it is expected to work. Key to success in this field is the advancement of optical capabilities to unprecedented levels of precision and stability. The technology program conducted by ExEP will strive to achieve these advancements to enable near-term moderate scale missions and eventually lead to large flagship-class missions that will deeply probe the most promising earth-like planets for signs of biogenic activity. Significant opportunities for community participation in technology development will be available through NASA research solicitations that will call for technology advancements in specific areas. These developments will focus on challenges posed by a strategy for the progression of scientific investigations developed by the science community through bodies such as the Exoplanet Task Force, the Exoplanet Science Forum and ultimately the NRC Decadal Survey. ExEP will be advised in its tactical implementation of this strategy by Exoplanet Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG), which will engage a broad segment of the community in deliberation and then focus its reports through a core group appointed by NASA HQ. The coming decade offers opportunities for continued exoplanet investigations through ground observations, sub-orbital platforms and moderate scale space missions, and the anticipated process and timing of these opportunities will be described. The Exoplanet Exploration Program is managed for NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  10. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Ciardi, David R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  11. Astronomy: Tycho's mystery companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, David

    2004-10-01

    A famous sixteenth century supernova, seen by Tycho Brahe, is still a hot topic. The stellar explosion might have been initiated by a companion star -- and modern astronomers have at last identified it.

  12. Exoplanet's Atmospheres Characteristics vs. Exoplanet's Orbital Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaverdikhani, Karan

    2009-10-01

    400 years after Galileo Galilei was detected Jovian system, we know about 400 exoplanets in other stellar systems. But we identify just about their major properties like some of orbital elements, planet's radii or density. Also, there are many scientists who interested in searching for life or habitability on these planets. They are working in different ways such as planetary formation, planetary orbital stability or immigration, HabStars, composition of atmospheres, most probable zone in sky for exoplanets detection, etc. In this research we distinct and defined some main characteristics of terrestrial planet's atmospheres with surveying on solar system's planets and matching with current theorems on atmosphere formation. On the other hand, we were modeled Mars, Venus, Titan, single Hadley Earth and virtual Venus with different tilt angel (applying Global Circulation Modeling) to finding a critical limit on Polar Vortex formation in our last research. With extension this method on hypothetical terrestrial planets in constraint mass between 0.7 to 2.5 Earth's mass on Green Belt and applying host stars from 0.5 to 1.5 Sun's mass, we found some limitations on planet's atmosphere formation and estimation values of atmosphere's main characteristics.

  13. Subaru SEEDS Survey of Exoplanets and Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks at Subaru (SEEDS) is the first strategic observing program (SSOPs) awarded by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). SEEDS targets a broad sample of stars that span a wide range of masses and ages to explore the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This survey has been awarded 120 nights over five years time to observe nearly 500 stars. Currently in the second year, SEEDS has already produced exciting new results for the protoplanetary disk AB Aur, transitional disk LkCa15, and nearby companion to GJ 758. We present the survey architecture, performance, recent results, and the projected sample. Finally, we will discuss planned upgrades to the high contrast instrumentation at the Subaru Telescope

  14. Development of Companion Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mankoff, David A.; Edmonds, Christine E.; Farwell, Michael D.; Pryma, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of individualized and targeted treatment and precision medicine requires the assessment of potential therapeutic targets to direct treatment selection. The biomarkers used to direct precision medicine, often termed companion diagnostics, for highly targeted drugs have thus far been almost entirely based on in vitro assay of biopsy material. Molecular imaging companion diagnostics offer a number of features complementary to those from in vitro assay, including the ability to measure the heterogeneity of each patient’s cancer across the entire disease burden and to measure early changes in response to treatment. We discuss the use of molecular imaging methods as companion diagnostics for cancer therapy with the goal of predicting response to targeted therapy and measuring early (pharmacodynamic) response as an indication of whether the treatment has “hit” the target. We also discuss considerations for probe development for molecular imaging companion diagnostics, including both small-molecule probes and larger molecules such as labeled antibodies and related constructs. We then describe two examples where both predictive and pharmacodynamic molecular imaging markers have been tested in humans: endocrine therapy for breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2–targeted therapy. The review closes with a summary of the items needed to move molecular imaging companion diagnostics from early studies into multicenter trials and into the clinic. PMID:26687857

  15. Companion animal adoption study.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Laura; Boyd, Renee

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the outcomes of companion animal adoptions, Bardsley & Neidhart Inc. conducted a series of 3 surveys over a 1-year period with dog and cat owners who had adopted their pet through either a (a) Luv-A-Pet location, (b) Adopt-a-thon, or (c) traditional shelter. This article suggests opportunities to improve owners' perceptions of their pets and the adoption process through (a) providing more information before adoption about pet health and behaviors, (b) providing counseling to potential adopters to place pets appropriately, and (c) educating adopters to promote companion animal health and retention. Results demonstrate that the pet's relationship to the family unit, such as where the pet sleeps and how much time is spent with the pet, is related to the amount of veterinary care the companion animal receives, and to long-term retention. Satisfaction and retention are attributed to the pet's personality, compatibility, and behavior, rather than demographic differences among adopters or between adoption settings. The age of the companion animal at adoption, the intended recipient, and presence of children in the home also play a role. Health problems were an issue initially for half of all adopted pets, but most were resolved within 12 months. Roughly one fourth of adopters who no longer have their companion animal said their pet died. Characteristics of pets that died support the contention that spaying and neutering profoundly affects a companion animal's life span. Although retention is similar for dogs and cats, mortality is higher among cats in the first year after adoption. PMID:12578739

  16. Understanding Young Exoplanet Analogs with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily

    We propose to tackle outstanding questions about the fundamental properties of young brown dwarfs, which are atmospheric analogs to massive gas giant exoplanets, using public archive data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) combined with our extensive dataset of optical and near-infrared observations, including spectra, proper motions, and parallaxes. Using WISE data we will construct color-color diagrams, color- magnitude diagrams, and spectral energy distributions for our sample of candidate young brown dwarfs. We will fully characterize the spectral properties of the candidates and evaluate their membership in nearby young moving groups in order to obtain independent age estimates. The practical outcomes of this project will allow the research community to use observed colors and spectra to reliably constrain the properties - including effective temperature, gravity, and dust/cloud properties - of both brown dwarfs and gas giant exoplanets. We will also search for new young brown dwarfs in the WISE archive using colors and proper motions. The expanded sample of young brown dwarfs will be used to create a self-contained feedback loop to identify and address the shortcomings of cool atmosphere models and low-mass evolutionary tracks, both of which are already being used to infer the properties of massive exoplanets. Disentangling the effects of physical parameters on the observed properties of young brown dwarfs is directly relevant to studies of exoplanets. Direct observations of exoplanets are currently very limited, and young brown dwarfs are the laboratories in which we can solve existing problems before the onslaught of new observations from instruments capable of directly imaging exoplanets, including the Gemini Planet Imager, Project 1640 at the Palomar Observatory, SPHERE on the VLT, and the James Webb Space Telescope. This project addresses the goal of the NASA Science Mission Directorate to discover how the universe works; in particular

  17. Harnessing the Power of the WFIRST-Coronagraph: A Coordinated Plan for Exoplanet and Disk Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Margaret

    We propose to form a WFIRST Coronagraph Science Investigation Team (WFIRST-C SIT) for the purpose of defining the coronagraph scientific performance requirements, designing an exoplanet and debris disk observing program, and developing data analysis techniques including faint source detection and spectral retrieval. Our team will accomplish these tasks by: 1. Providing detailed characterization of the candidate target stars in terms of stellar/substeller companions, circumstellar debris, and astrophysical background in order to inform the final target selection by the community. As part of this effort, we will make a plan for coordination between WFIRST and Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) target selection, to obtain both scattered light and thermal emission observations of exozodiacal dust in the same systems. This will be important precursor science for future exoEarth direct imaging missions. 2. Creating simulated spatial-spectral data cubes representative of what the WFIRST coronagraph may see around the candidate targets, including known and hypothetical exoplanets, dynamically consistent interplanetary dust distributions, and astrophysical background contamination. The code framework to make the high-fidelity input models exists within our team, and we currently have a complete spectral data cube that allows us to generate images at any wavelength between 0.3 microns and 2.5 microns. To generate the simulated datasets for WFIRST, we will make use of instrument simulation tools provided by the coronagraph design team, spanning the range of expected coronagraph performance characteristics. We will also add functionality to these tools, or build our own, as required. 3. Designing and conducting a â€oeblind retrieval challenge― study to distribute these data amongst source detection and spectral modeling teams in the exoplanet and wider astrophysics community. Given the variety of sources expected in each planet-finding field, we expect

  18. Is this a Brown Dwarf or an Exoplanet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Since the discovery in 1995 of the first planet orbiting a normal star other than the Sun, there are now more than 150 candidates of these so-called exoplanets known. Most of them are detected by indirect methods, based either on variations of the radial velocity or the dimming of the star as the planet passes in front of it (see ESO PR 06/03, ESO PR 11/04 and ESO PR 22/04). Astronomers would, however, prefer to obtain a direct image of an exoplanet, allowing them to better characterize the object's physical nature. This is an exceedingly difficult task, as the planet is generally hidden in the "glare" of its host star. To partly overcome this problem, astronomers study very young objects. Indeed, sub-stellar objects are much hotter and brighter when young and therefore can be more easily detected than older objects of similar mass. Based on this approach, it might well be that last year's detection of a feeble speck of light next to the young brown dwarf 2M1207 by an international team of astronomers using the ESO Very Large Telescope (ESO PR 23/04) is the long-sought bona-fide image of an exoplanet. A recent report based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope seems to confirm this result. The even more recent observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope of the warm infrared glows of two previously detected "hot Jupiter" planets is another interesting result in this context. This wealth of new results, obtained in the time span of a few months, illustrates perfectly the dynamic of this field of research. Tiny Companion ESO PR Photo 10a/05 ESO PR Photo 10a/05 The Sub-Stellar Companion to GQ Lupi (NACO/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 429 pix - 22k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 875 pix - 132k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1042 x 1116 pix - 241k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 10a/05 shows the VLT NACO image, taken in the Ks-band, of GQ Lupi. The feeble point of light to the right of the star is the newly found cold companion. It is 250 times fainter than the star itself and it located 0

  19. Exoplanets, extremophiles and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot Pacheco, E.; Bernardes, L.

    2012-09-01

    Estimates of the average surface temperature and CO2 partial atmospheric pressure of already discovered exoplanets supposed to be in their Habitable Zone of their stars were surveyed from the Exoplanet Encyclopedia database. Moreover, since planetary surface temperature strongly depends on its albedo and geodynamic conditions, we have been feeding exoplanetary data into a comprehensive model of Earth's atmosphere to get better estimations. We also investigated the possible presence of "exomoons" belonging to giant planets capable of harbour dynamic stability and to retain atmospheric layers and keep geodynamic activity for long time spans. Collected information on biological data of micro-organisms classified as "extremophiles" indicate that such kind of microbial species could dwell in many of them. We thus propose an extension of the more astronomically defined "Habitable Zone" concept into the more astrobiologically "Extremophile Zone", taking into account other refined parameters allowing survival of more robust life forms.

  20. Exoplanet observations with GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallé, Enric

    2015-12-01

    Our group is presently conducting an observational campaign, using the 10-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), to obtain the transmission spectrum of several exoplanets during a transit event. The GTC instrument OSIRIS is used in its long-slit spectroscopic mode, covering the spectral range of 520-1040 nm, and observations are taken using a set of custom-built slits of various, broad, widths. We integrate the stellar flux of both stars in different wavelength regions producing several light curves and fit transit models in order to obtain the star-to-planet radius ratio Rp/Rs across wavelength. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Bayesian approach is used for the transit fitting. We will show that with our instrumental setup, OSIRIS has been able to reach precisions down to 250 ppm (WASP-48b, V=11.06 mag) for each color light curve 10 nm wide, in a single transit. And accuracies of the order of 500ppm can be obtained for objects with V=16. Central transit timing accuracies have been measured down to 6 seconds.Here, we will present refined planet parameters, the detection of planet color signatures, and the transmission spectra of a set of know and unpublished transiting exoplanets. We will also discuss the capabilities and limitations of GTC with current and future instrumentation, and the role of GTC as tool for the follow up of faint exoplanet targets.

  1. Companion Animals. [Information Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    This collection of articles reprinted from other National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) publications was compiled to educate the public on issues of importance to NAVS concerning companion animals. Topics covered include spaying and neutering, animal safety, pet theft, and the use of cats and dogs in research. The article on spaying and…

  2. The Direct Imaging Search of Exoplanets from Ground and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian

    2015-08-01

    Exoplanets search is one of the hottest topics in both modern astronomy and public domain. Until now over 1990 exoplanets have been confirmed mostly by the indirect radial velocity and transiting approaches, yielding several important physical information such as masses and radius. The study of the physics of planet formation and evolution will focus on giant planets through the direct imaging.However, the direct imaging of exoplanets remains challenging, due to the large flux ratio difference and the nearby angular distance. In recent years, the extreme adaptive optics (Ex-AO) coronagraphic instrumentation has been proposed and developed on 8-meter class telescopes, which is optimized for the high-contrast imaging observation from ground, for the giant exoplanets and other faint stellar companions. Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) has recently come to its first light, with a development period over 10 years. The contrast level has been pushed to 10-6. Due to the space limitation or this or other reasons, none professional adaptive optics is available for most of current 3~4 meter class telescopes, which will limit its observation power to some extent, especially in the research of high-contrast imaging of exoplanets.In this presentation, we will report the latest observation results by using our Extreme Adaptive Optics (Ex-AO) as a visiting instrument for high-contrast imaging on ESO’s 3.58-meter NTT telescope at LSO, and on 3.5-meter ARC telescope at Apache Point Observatory, respectively. It has demonstrated the Ex-AO can be used for the scientific research of exoplanets and brown dwarfs. With a update of the currect configuration with critical hardware, the dedicated instrument called as EDICT for imaging research of young giant exoplanets will be presented. Meanwhile, we have fully demonstrated in the lab a contrast on the order of 10-9 in a large detection area, which is a critical technique for future Earth-like exoplanets imaging space missions. And a space

  3. Confirmation of an exoplanet using the transit color signature: Kepler-418b, a blended giant planet in a multiplanet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, B.; Parviainen, H.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.; Palle, E.; Montañés Rodriguez, P.; Murgas, F.; Alonso, R.; Bruntt, H.; Fridlund, M.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We announce confirmation of Kepler-418b, one of two proposed planets in this system. This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet based primarily on the transit color signature technique. Methods: We used the Kepler public data archive combined with multicolor photometry from the Gran Telescopio de Canarias and radial velocity follow-up using FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope for confirmation. Results: We report a confident detection of a transit color signature that can only be explained by a compact occulting body, entirely ruling out a contaminating eclipsing binary, a hierarchical triple, or a grazing eclipsing binary. Those findings are corroborated by our radial velocity measurements, which put an upper limit of ~1 MJup on the mass of Kepler-418b. We also report that the host star is significantly blended, confirming the ~10% light contamination suspected from the crowding metric in the Kepler light curve measured by the Kepler team. We report detection of an unresolved light source that contributes an additional ~30% to the target star, which would not have been detected without multicolor photometric analysis. The resulting planet-star radius ratio is 0.110 ± 0.0025, more than 25% more than the 0.087 measured by Kepler leading to a radius of 1.20 ± 0.16 RJup instead of the 0.94 RJup measured by the Kepler team. Conclusions: This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet candidate based primarily on the transit color signature, demonstrating that this technique is viable from ground for giant planets. It is particularly useful for planets with long periods such as Kepler-418b, which tend to have long transit durations. While this technique is limited to candidates with deep transits from the ground, it may be possible to confirm earth-like exoplanet candidates with a few hours of observing time with an instrument like the James Webb Space Telescope. Additionally, multicolor photometric analysis of transits can reveal unknown stellar neighbors

  4. SEEDS - Strategic explorations of exoplanets and disks with the Subaru Telescope -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    The first convincing detection of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun, or exoplanets, was made in 1995. In only 20 years, the number of the exoplanets including promising candidates has already accumulated to more than 5000. Most of the exoplanets discovered so far are detected by indirect methods because the direct imaging of exoplanets needs to overcome the extreme contrast between the bright central star and the faint planets. Using the large Subaru 8.2-m Telescope, a new high-contrast imager, HiCIAO, and second-generation adaptive optics (AO188), the most ambitious high-contrast direct imaging survey to date for giant planets and planet-forming disks has been conducted, the SEEDS project. In this review, we describe the aims and results of the SEEDS project for exoplanet/disk science. The completeness and uniformity of this systematic survey mean that the resulting data set will dominate this field of research for many years.

  5. A Decade of Radial-Velocity Discoveries in the Exoplanet Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, S.; Fischer, D.; Queloz, D.

    Since the detection of a planetary companion orbiting 51 Peg one decade ago, close to 200 extrasolar planets have been unveiled by radial-velocity measurements. They exhibit a wide variety of characteristics, including large masses with small orbital separations, high eccentricities, multiplanet architectures, and orbital period resonances. Here, we discuss the statistical distributions of orbital parameters and host star properties in the context of constraints they provide for planet-formation models. We expect that radial-velocity surveys will continue to provide important discoveries. Thanks to ongoing instrumental developments and improved observing strategies, Neptune-mass planets in short-period orbits have recently been detected. We foresee continued improvement in radial-velocity precision that will reveal Neptune-mass planets in longer-period orbits and planets down to a few Earth masses in short-period orbits. The next decade of Doppler observations should expand the mass distribution function of exoplanets to lower masses. Finally, the role of radial-velocity followup measurements of transit candidates is emphasized.

  6. Diagnostics of models and observations in the contexts of exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and very low-mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytova, Taisiya

    2016-01-01

    When studying isolated brown dwarfs and directly imaged exoplanets with insignificant orbital motion,we have to rely on theoretical models to determine basic parameters such as mass, age, effective temperature, and surface gravity.While stellar and atmospheric models are rapidly evolving, we need a powerful tool to test and calibrate them.In my thesis, I focussed on comparing interior and atmospheric models with observational data, in the effort of taking into account various systematic effects that can significantly influence the data analysis.As a first step, about 460 candidate member os the Hyades were screened for companions using diffraction limited imaging observation (both our own data and archival data). As a result I could establish the single star sequence for the Hyades comprising about 250 stars (Kopytova et al. 2015, accepted to A&A). Open clusters contain many coeval objects of the same chemical composition and age, and spanning a range of masses. We compare the obtained sequence with a set of theoretical isochrones identifying systematic offsets and revealing probable issues in the models.However, there are many cases when it is impossible to test models before comparing them with observations.As a second step, we apply atmospheric models for constraining parameters of WISE 0855-07, the coolest known Y dwarf(Kopytova et al. 2014, ApJ 797, 3). We demonstrate the limits of constraining effective temperature and the presence/absence of water clouds.As a third step, we introduce a novel method to take into account the above-mentioned systematics. We construct a "systematics vector" that allows us to reveal problematic wavelength ranges when fitting atmospheric models to observed near-infrared spectraof brown dwarfs and exoplanets (Kopytova et al., in prep.). This approach plays a crucial role when retrieving abundances for these objects, in particularly, a C/O ratio. The latter parameter is an important key to formation scenarios of brown dwarf and

  7. Direct Imaging of Exoplanets Living an Exciting Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.

    2016-01-01

    With the development of high contrast imaging techniques and instruments, vast efforts have been devoted during the past decades to detect and characterize lighter, cooler and closer companions to nearby stars, and ultimately image new planetary systems. Complementary to other planet-hunting techniques, this approach has opened a new astrophysical window to study the physical properties and the formation mechanisms of brown dwarfs and planets. In this review, I will briefly describe the different observing techniques and strategies used, the main samples of targeted nearby stars, finally the main results obtained so far about exoplanet discoveries characterization of their physical properties, and study of their occurrence and possible formation and evolution mechanisms.

  8. The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce

    artifacts and provides accurate and calibrated recovery of exoplanet spectra. We will produce a complete archive of all reduced GPI data products (supplementing the existing Gemini archive of raw data) for use by our collaboration, and release that archive to the public on an 18-month cycle. Most importantly, we will execute the GPI observations, initially through classical telescope visits, transitioning to remote and queue modes as our techniques are refined. As the first direct-imaging planet search with statistical depth comparable to Doppler planet detection and the first to probe into the snow line, the GPI Exoplanet Survey will provide strong constraints on paradigms for planet formation, completing the picture of the giant planet distribution throughout other solar systems, and also illuminating its evolution with stellar age and mass. We will deliver a catalog of detected exoplanets— the principal legacy of this campaign—released for follow-up by the astronomical community within 18 months of observation, as well as searchable archive of fully reduced images and detection limits for all stars surveyed. For each detected planet, we will produce estimated effective temperatures, luminosities, and semi-major axes: for a subset, high-SNR fiducial spectra, orbital eccentricities, and dynamical characterization through polarimetric imaging of attendant debris disks. GPI will complete final acceptance testing this month (May 2013) and is now ready to ship to Chile for first light in September 2013. The GPI survey will provide the best-yet view of the nature of wide-orbit planetary companions, informing our knowledge of solar system formation to guide future NASA planet hunting missions, while simultaneously offering a real- world program using the techniques - from integral field spectroscopy to advanced coronagraphy - that will someday be used to directly image Earthlike planets from space.

  9. Eccentricity of small exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Solar system planets move on almost circular orbits. In strong contrast, many massive gas giant exoplanets travel on highly elliptical orbits, whereas the shape of the orbits of smaller, more terrestrial, exoplanets remained largely elusive. This is because the stellar radial velocity caused by these small planets is extremely challenging to measure. Knowing the eccentricity distribution in systems of small planets would be important as it holds information about the planet's formation and evolution. Furthermore the location of the habitable zone depends on eccentricity, and eccentricity also influences occurrence rates inferred for these planets because planets on circular orbits are less likely to transit. We make these eccentricity measurements of small planets using photometry from the Kepler satellite and utilizing a method relying on Kepler's second law, which relates the duration of a planetary transit to its orbital eccentricity, if the stellar density is known.I present a sample of 28 multi-planet systems with precise asteroseismic density measurements, which host 74 planets with an average radius of 2.6 R_earth. We find that the eccentricity of planets in these systems is low and can be described by a Rayleigh distribution with sigma = 0.049 +- 0.013. This is in full agreement with solar system eccentricities, but in contrast to the eccentricity distributions previously derived for exoplanets from radial velocity studies. I further report the first results on the eccentricities of over 50 Kepler single-planet systems, and compare them with the multi-planet systems. I close the talk by showing how transit durations help distinguish between false positives and true planets, and present six new planets.

  10. Exoplanet Orbit Database. II. Updates to Exoplanets.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Eunkyu; Wang, Sharon X.; Wright, Jason T.; Feng, Y. Katherina; Zhao, Ming; Fakhouri, Onsi; Brown, Jacob I.; Hancock, Colin

    2014-09-01

    The Exoplanet Orbit Database (EOD) compiles orbital, transit, host star, and other parameters of robustly-detected exoplanets reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The EOD can be navigated through the Exoplanet Data Explorer (EDE) plotter and table, available on the World Wide Web at exoplanets.org. The EOD contains data for 1492 confirmed exoplanets as of 2014 July. The EOD descends from a table provided by Butler and coworkers in 2002 and the Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets (Butler and coworkers in 2006), and the first complete documentation for the EOD and the EDE was presented by Wright and coworkers in 2011. In this work, we describe our work since then. We have expanded the scope of the EOD to include secondary eclipse parameters and asymmetric uncertainties and expanded the EDE to include the sample of over 3000 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) and other real planets without good orbital parameters (such as many of those detected by microlensing and imaging). Users can download the latest version of the entire EOD as a single comma separated value file from the front page of exoplanets.org.

  11. Automatic Classification of Kepler Planetary Transit Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauliff, Sean D.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Burke, Christopher J.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Seader, Shawn; Li, Jie; Cote, Miles

    2015-06-01

    In the first three years of operation, the Kepler mission found 3697 planet candidates (PCs) from a set of 18,406 transit-like features detected on more than 200,000 distinct stars. Vetting candidate signals manually by inspecting light curves and other diagnostic information is a labor intensive effort. Additionally, this classification methodology does not yield any information about the quality of PCs; all candidates are as credible as any other. The torrent of exoplanet discoveries will continue after Kepler, because a number of exoplanet surveys will have an even broader search area. This paper presents the application of machine-learning techniques to the classification of the exoplanet transit-like signals present in the Kepler light curve data. Transit-like detections are transformed into a uniform set of real-numbered attributes, the most important of which are described in this paper. Each of the known transit-like detections is assigned a class of PC; astrophysical false positive; or systematic, instrumental noise. We use a random forest algorithm to learn the mapping from attributes to classes on this training set. The random forest algorithm has been used previously to classify variable stars; this is the first time it has been used for exoplanet classification. We are able to achieve an overall error rate of 5.85% and an error rate for classifying exoplanets candidates of 2.81%.

  12. E+A and companion galaxies - I. A catalogue and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Chisato; Yagi, Masafumi; Goto, Tomotsugu

    2008-10-01

    Based on our intensive spectroscopic campaign with the GoldCam spectrograph on the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 2.1-m telescope, we have constructed the first catalogue of E+A galaxies with spectroscopic companion galaxies, and investigated a probability that an E+A galaxy has close companion galaxies. We selected 660 E+A galaxies with 4.0 Å < Hδ EW at a redshift of <0.167 from the Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We selected their companion candidates from the SDSS imaging data, and classified them into true companions, fore/background galaxies and companion candidates using the SDSS and our KPNO spectra. We observed 26 companion candidates of E+A galaxies at the KPNO to measure their redshifts. Their spectra showed that 17 targets are true companion galaxies. The number of spectroscopically confirmed E+A's companions is now 34. This becomes the first catalogue of E+A galaxies with spectroscopic companion systems. We found that E+A galaxies have 54 per cent larger probability of having companion galaxies (7.88 per cent) as compared to the comparison sample of normal galaxies (5.12 per cent). A statistical test shows that the probabilities are different with 99.7 per cent significance. Our results based on spectroscopy tighten the connection between the dynamical merger/interaction and the origin of E+A galaxies.

  13. Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venot, O.; Agúndez, M.

    2015-12-01

    The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which are one of the main targets of EChO. Finally we will present the ongoing developments that are necessary for the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres.

  14. Saturn as a Transiting Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Veyette, Mark J.

    2015-11-01

    Previous investigations of exoplanet atmospheres have not targeted those resembling the gas giant planets in our solar system. These types of exoplanets are too cold to be directly imaged or observed in emission, and their low transit probabilities and frequencies make characterization via transmission spectroscopy a challenging endeavor. However, studies of cold giant exoplanets would be highly valuable to our understanding of planet formation and migration and could place the gas giant members of our own solar system in a greater context. Here, we use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1 to 5 μm transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption features from several molecules despite the presence of ammonia clouds. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn's transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce the largest feature in the spectrum. We also find that atmospheric refraction determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit of a Saturn-twin exoplanet around a Sun-like star. These results suggest that transmission spectroscopy of cold, long-period gaseous exoplanets should be possible with current and future observatories.

  15. NASA's Missions for Exoplanet Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Exoplanets are detected and characterized using a range of observational techniques - including direct imaging, astrometry, transits, microlensing, and radial velocities. Each technique illuminates a different aspect of exoplanet properties and statistics. This diversity of approach has contributed to the rapid growth of the field into a major research area in only two decades. In parallel with exoplanet observations, major efforts are now underway to interpret the physical and atmospheric properties of exoplanets for which spectroscopy is now possible. In addition, comparative planetology probes questions of interest to both exoplanets and solar system studies. In this talk I describe NASA's activities in exoplanet research, and discuss plans for near-future missions that have reflected-light spectroscopy as a key goal. The WFIRST-AFTA concept currently under active study includes a major microlensing survey, and now includes a visible light coronagraph for exoplanet spectroscopy and debris disk imaging. Two NASA-selected community-led teams are studying probe-scale (< 1B) mission concepts for imaging and spectroscopy. These concepts complement existing NASA missions that do exoplanet science (such as transit spectroscopy and debris disk imaging with HST and Spitzer) or are under development (survey of nearby transiting exoplanets with TESS, and followup of the most important targets with transit spectroscopy on JWST), and build on the work of ground-based instruments such as LBTI and observing with HIRES on Keck. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2014. California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  16. Search of Exoplanets - Phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodniza, Alberto Q.; Pereira, M. R.; Lopez, J. P.; Reyes, K.; Chaves, L.

    2008-09-01

    From the Astronomical Observatory at the University of Nariño-COLOMBIA, we have begun a systematic search for exoplanets. Initially we made differential photometry on variable stars weaker than the tenth magnitude to get enough experience on the establishment of stellar transits, so then we could undertake the work with exoplanets. We have already confirmed the transits of two exoplanets with good photometry data: At the exoplanet HAT-P-5b, discovered by Bakos and other investigators and which turns around the GSC 02634-01087, with an orbital period of 2.788491 days according to measurements of the discoverers, and also at the exoplanet TrES-3, discovered by O'Donovan and other investigators and which turns around the GSC 03089-00929, with an orbital period of 1.30619 days, established by its discoverers. Both exoplanets are quite interesting because they have one of the smallest periods found on exoplanets. The TrES-3 also provides a big opportunity for studying the orbital decay and mass loss due to evaporation, caused by the great closeness to its star. We have captured a lot of data to elaborate the lightcurves so we can estimate physical parameters of the bodies. We are getting data on various dates. Actually we are preparing the equipment to develop observations of radial velocities through spectrometry. In a later phase, we expect to verify the presence of other exoplanets which cause less deep transits, and then we can investigate stars with possible exoplanets around them. Besides we hope to design a mathematical model of the studied systems. The equipment we employed is: 14"LX200 GPS MEADE telescope, ST-7XME SBIG camera, STL-1001 SBIG camera, LHIRES III Spectrograph, and SGS-SBIG Spectrograph. On the poster it is explained at length the methodology followed over the search, the data we obtained and the physical- mathematical analysis that was carried out.

  17. PynPoint code for exoplanet imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amara, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Akeret, J.

    2015-04-01

    We announce the public release of PynPoint, a Python package that we have developed for analysing exoplanet data taken with the angular differential imaging observing technique. In particular, PynPoint is designed to model the point spread function of the central star and to subtract its flux contribution to reveal nearby faint companion planets. The current version of the package does this correction by using a principal component analysis method to build a basis set for modelling the point spread function of the observations. We demonstrate the performance of the package by reanalysing publicly available data on the exoplanet β Pictoris b, which consists of close to 24,000 individual image frames. We show that PynPoint is able to analyse this typical data in roughly 1.5 min on a Mac Pro, when the number of images is reduced by co-adding in sets of 5. The main computational work, the calculation of the Singular-Value-Decomposition, parallelises well as a result of a reliance on the SciPy and NumPy packages. For this calculation the peak memory load is 6 GB, which can be run comfortably on most workstations. A simpler calculation, by co-adding over 50, takes 3 s with a peak memory usage of 600 MB. This can be performed easily on a laptop. In developing the package we have modularised the code so that we will be able to extend functionality in future releases, through the inclusion of more modules, without it affecting the users application programming interface. We distribute the PynPoint package under GPLv3 licence through the central PyPI server, and the documentation is available online (http://pynpoint.ethz.ch).

  18. VIP: Vortex Image Processing pipeline for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos Alberto; Wertz, Olivier; Christiaens, Valentin; Absil, Olivier; Mawet, Dimitri

    2016-03-01

    VIP (Vortex Image Processing pipeline) provides pre- and post-processing algorithms for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Written in Python, VIP provides a very flexible framework for data exploration and image processing and supports high-contrast imaging observational techniques, including angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. Several post-processing algorithms for PSF subtraction based on principal component analysis are available as well as the LLSG (Local Low-rank plus Sparse plus Gaussian-noise decomposition) algorithm for angular differential imaging. VIP also implements the negative fake companion technique coupled with MCMC sampling for rigorous estimation of the flux and position of potential companions.

  19. The First Thousand Exoplanets: Twenty Years of Excitement and Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Chris

    The recent "explosion" in the number of extrasolar planets, or exoplanets, is perhaps the most exciting phenomenon in all of science. Two decades ago, no planets were known beyond the Solar System, and now there are more than 770 confirmed exoplanets and several thousand more candidates, while the mass detection limit has marched steadily downwards from Jupiter mass in 1995 to Neptune mass in the early 2000s to Earth mass now. The vast majority of these exoplanets are detected indirectly, by their gravitational influence on the parent star or the partial eclipse they cause when they periodically pass in front of it. Doppler detection of the planet's reflex motion yields a period and an estimate of the mass, while transits or eclipses yield the size. Exoplanet detection taxes the best observatories in space, yet useful contributions can be made by amateur astronomers armed with 6-inch telescopes. The early discoveries were surprising; no one predicted "hot Jupiters" or the wild diversity of exoplanet properties that has been seen. It is still unclear if the Solar System is "typical" or not, but at current detection limits at least 10 % of Sun-like stars harbor planets and architectures similar to the Solar System are now being found. Over a hundred multiple planet systems are known and the data are consistent with every star in the Milky Way having at least one planet, with an implication of millions of habitable, Earth-like planets, and of which could harbor life. Doppler and transit data can be combined to give average density, and additional methods are beginning to give diagnostics of atmospheric composition. When this work can be extended to rocky and low mass exoplanets, and the imprint of biology on a global atmosphere can be measured, this might be the way that life beyond Earth is finally detected for the first time.

  20. The Architecture of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    2016-05-01

    Prior to the discovery of exoplanets our expectations of their architecture were largely driven by the properties of our solar system. We expected giant planets to lie in the outer regions and rocky planets in the inner regions. Planets should probably only occupy orbital distances 0.3-30 AU from the star. Planetary orbits should be circular, prograde and in the same plane. The reality of exoplanets have shattered these expectations. Jupiter-mass, Neptune-mass, Superearths, and even Earth-mass planets can orbit within 0.05 AU of the stars, sometimes with orbital periods of less than one day. Exoplanetary orbits can be eccentric, misaligned, and even in retrograde orbits. Radial velocity surveys gave the first hints that the occurrence rate increases with decreasing mass. This was put on a firm statistical basis with the Kepler mission that clearly demonstrated that there were more Neptune- and Superearth-sized planets than Jupiter-sized planets. These are often in multiple, densely packed systems where the planets all orbit within 0.3 AU of the star, a result also suggested by radial velocity surveys. Exoplanets also exhibit diversity along the main sequence. Massive stars tend to have a higher frequency of planets ( ≈ 20-25 %) that tend to be more massive ( M≈ 5-10 M_{Jup}). Giant planets around low mass stars are rare, but these stars show an abundance of small (Neptune and Superearth) planets in multiple systems. Planet formation is also not restricted to single stars as the Kepler mission has discovered several circumbinary planets. Although we have learned much about the architecture of planets over the past 20 years, we know little about the census of small planets at relatively large ( a>1 AU) orbital distances. We have yet to find a planetary system that is analogous to our own solar system. The question of how unique are the properties of our own solar system remains unanswered. Advancements in the detection methods of small planets over a wide range

  1. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  2. A Cloudy View of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake

    2010-01-01

    The lack of absorption features in the transmission spectrum of exoplanet GJ1214b rules out a hydrogen-rich atmosphere for the planet. It is consistent with an atmosphere rich in water vapour or abundant in clouds.

  3. Exoplanet Clouds in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alexandria; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Seager, Sara; Charbonneau, David; Bauer, Amy J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of strong spectral features of some exoplanet atmospheres may suggest the presence of a cloud layer and poses great challenges for atmospheric characterization. We aim to address these observations and the challenges by leveraging lab-based terrestrial cloud particle instrumentation as a means of investigating how particles representative of those in exoplanet atmospheres interact with incoming radiation. In the end we hope to achieve two goals - First, to better understand the observable properties of cloud particles in exoplanet atmospheres. Second, to determine how these clouds might directly limit our ability to observe and characterize the atmosphere below.In this presentation I will discuss the cloud chamber used for this work, how we leverage terrestrial based cloud knowledge, our initial investigation of the light scattered by ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) across temperature and relative humidity dependent phase changes, and future work with suspected exoplanet atmospheric condensates under various atmospheric compositions, pressures, and temperatures.

  4. DEBRIS DISKS IN KEPLER EXOPLANET SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, S. M.; Gladman, B.

    2012-06-10

    The Kepler mission recently identified 997 systems hosting candidate extrasolar planets, many of which are super-Earths. Realizing these planetary systems are candidates to host extrasolar asteroid belts, we use mid-infrared data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to search for emission from dust in these systems. We find excesses around eight stars, indicating the presence of warm to hot dust ({approx}100-500 K), corresponding to orbital distances of 0.1-10 AU for these solar-type stars. The strongest detection, KOI 1099, demands {approx}500 K dust interior to the orbit of its exoplanet candidate. One star, KOI 904, may host very hot dust ({approx}1200 K, corresponding to 0.02 AU). Although the fraction of these exoplanet-bearing stars with detectable warm excesses ({approx}3%) is similar to that found by Spitzer surveys of solar-type field stars, the excesses detectable in the WISE data have much higher fractional luminosities (L{sub dust}/L{sub *}) than most known debris disks, implying that the fraction with debris disks of comparable luminosity may actually be significantly higher. It is difficult to explain the presence of dust so close to the host stars, generally corresponding to dust rings at radii <0.3 AU; both the collisional and Poynting-Robertson drag timescales to remove dust from the system are hundreds of years or less at these distances. Assuming a steady state for these systems implies large mass consumption rates with these short removal timescales, meaning that the dust production mechanism in these systems must almost certainly be episodic in nature.

  5. Visualising Astronomy: Visualising Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R.

    2012-05-01

    In my previous column1, I described some of the varied means of diagramming the data about exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Frankly, however, those methods don't do justice to the bigger picture: we need a wider range of tools to help people grok2 (to understand intuitively) what astronomical observations have revealed. (Normally, I use the term "visualisation" to refer to the visual representation of data, but I'm going to relax that a little in this context; instead, I'll interpret the word in its more commonplace usage of creating a mental image.) How can we help people comprehend the scope, the breadth, and the impact of the spectacular observations of planets around other stars?

  6. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics and circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress, while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  7. Structure of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The hundreds of exoplanets that have been discovered in the past two decades offer a new perspective on planetary structure. Instead of being the archetypal examples of planets, those of our solar system are merely possible outcomes of planetary system formation and evolution, and conceivably not even especially common outcomes (although this remains an open question). Here, we review the diverse range of interior structures that are both known and speculated to exist in exoplanetary systems--from mostly degenerate objects that are more than 10× as massive as Jupiter, to intermediate-mass Neptune-like objects with large cores and moderate hydrogen/helium envelopes, to rocky objects with roughly the mass of Earth. PMID:24379369

  8. Geoengineering on exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockley, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering can be used to deliberately alter the Earth's radiation budget, by reflecting sunlight to space. SRM has been suggested as a response to Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW), to partly or fully balance radiative forcing from AGW [1]. Approximately 22% of sun-like stars have Earth-like exoplanets[2]. Advanced civilisations may exist on these, and may use geoengineering for positive or negative radiative forcing. Additionally, terraforming projects [e.g. 3], may be used to expand alien habitable territory, or for resource management or military operations on non-home planets. Potential observations of alien geoengineering and terraforming may enable detection of technologically advanced alien civilisations, and may help identify widely-used and stable geoengineering technologies. This knowledge may assist the development of safe and stable geoengineering methods for Earth. The potential risks and benefits of possible alien detection of Earth-bound geoengineering schemes must be considered before deployment of terrestrial geoengineering schemes.

  9. Structure of exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, David S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The hundreds of exoplanets that have been discovered in the past two decades offer a new perspective on planetary structure. Instead of being the archetypal examples of planets, those of our solar system are merely possible outcomes of planetary system formation and evolution, and conceivably not even especially common outcomes (although this remains an open question). Here, we review the diverse range of interior structures that are both known and speculated to exist in exoplanetary systems—from mostly degenerate objects that are more than 10× as massive as Jupiter, to intermediate-mass Neptune-like objects with large cores and moderate hydrogen/helium envelopes, to rocky objects with roughly the mass of Earth. PMID:24379369

  10. Kepler mission exoplanet transit data analysis using fractal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehipawala, S.; Tremberger, G.; Majid, Y.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-10-01

    The Kepler mission is designed to survey a fist-sized patch of the sky within the Milky Way galaxy for the discovery of exoplanets, with emphasis on near Earth-size exoplanets in or near the habitable zone. The Kepler space telescope would detect the brightness fluctuation of a host star and extract periodic dimming in the lightcurve caused by exoplanets that cross in front of their host star. The photometric data of a host star could be interpreted as an image where fractal imaging would be applicable. Fractal analysis could elucidate the incomplete data limitation posed by the data integration window. The fractal dimension difference between the lower and upper halves of the image could be used to identify anomalies associated with transits and stellar activity as the buried signals are expected to be in the lower half of such an image. Using an image fractal dimension resolution of 0.04 and defining the whole image fractal dimension as the Chi-square expected value of the fractal dimension, a p-value can be computed and used to establish a numerical threshold for decision making that may be useful in further studies of lightcurves of stars with candidate exoplanets. Similar fractal dimension difference approaches would be applicable to the study of photometric time series data via the Higuchi method. The correlated randomness of the brightness data series could be used to support inferences based on image fractal dimension differences. Fractal compression techniques could be used to transform a lightcurve image, resulting in a new image with a new fractal dimension value, but this method has been found to be ineffective for images with high information capacity. The three studied criteria could be used together to further constrain the Kepler list of candidate lightcurves of stars with possible exoplanets that may be planned for ground-based telescope confirmation.

  11. Search for wide, ultracool companions of nearby T dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, M. R. Zapatero; Béjar, V. J. S.; Goldman, B.; Rebolo, R.; Bihain, G.; Bouy, H.

    2009-02-01

    We report on our on-going proper motion survey of very low-mass (>=5 MJup), ultracool (Teff>=350 K) companions of nearby, field T-type brown dwarfs in the Solar neighborhood. Our project is intended to provide seeing-limited images of the targets to find companion candidates at wide separations (>=15 AU) and within an area of 3'×3' around the primaries, thus complementing previous searches that explored the inner-most regions. Data are collected in the J-band with 2-4-m class telescopes; the completeness magnitude of our survey goes from ~19.5 to ~21 mag (depending on seeing and transparency conditions). So far we have studied 11 late-L and T-type brown dwarfs located at d<=16 pc of the Sun. Only one faint, proper motion companion candidate is found; its definitive confirmation highly requires third epoch data.

  12. The Unseen Companion of HD 114762

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.

    2014-01-01

    I have told the story of the discovery of the unseen companion of HD114762 (Latham et al. 1989, Nature, 389, 38-40) in a recent publication (Latham 2012, New Astronomy Reviews 56, 16-18). The discovery was enabled by a happy combination of some thinking outside the box by Tsevi Mazeh at Tel Aviv University and the development of new technology for measuring stellar spectra at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Tsevi's unconventional idea was that giant exoplanets might be found much closer to their host stars than Jupiter and Saturn are to the Sun, well inside the snow line. Our instrument was a high-resolution echelle spectrograph optimized for measuring radial velocities of stars similar to the Sun. The key technological developments were an intensified Reticon photon-counting detector under computer control combined with sophisticated analysis of the digital spectra. The detector signal-processing electronics eliminated persistence, which had plagued other intensified systems. This allowed bright Th-Ar calibration exposures before and after every stellar observation, which in turn enabled careful correction for spectrograph drifts. We built three of these systems for telescopes in Massachusetts and Arizona and christened them the "CfA Digital Speedometers". The discovery of HD 114762-b was serendipitous, but not accidental.

  13. Exoplanet Caught on the Move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    observations, taken during autumn 2009, revealed the object on the other side of the disc after a period of hiding either behind or in front of the star (in which case it is hidden in the glare of the star). This confirmed that the source indeed was an exoplanet and that it was orbiting its host star. It also provided insights into the size of its orbit around the star. Images are available for approximately ten exoplanets, and the planet around Beta Pictoris (designated "Beta Pictoris b") has the smallest orbit known so far. It is located at a distance between 8 and 15 times the Earth-Sun separation - or 8-15 Astronomical Units - which is about the distance of Saturn from the Sun. "The short period of the planet will allow us to record the full orbit within maybe 15-20 years, and further studies of Beta Pictoris b will provide invaluable insights into the physics and chemistry of a young giant planet's atmosphere," says student researcher Mickael Bonnefoy. The planet has a mass of about nine Jupiter masses and the right mass and location to explain the observed warp in the inner parts of the disc. This discovery therefore bears some similarity to the prediction of the existence of Neptune by astronomers Adams and Le Verrier in the 19th century, based on observations of the orbit of Uranus. "Together with the planets found around the young, massive stars Fomalhaut and HR8799, the existence of Beta Pictoris b suggests that super-Jupiters could be frequent byproducts of planet formation around more massive stars," explains Gael Chauvin, a member of the team. Such planets disturb the discs around their stars, creating structures that should be readily observable with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the revolutionary telescope being built by ESO together with international partners. A few other planetary candidates have been imaged, but they are all located further from their host star than Beta Pictoris b. If located in the Solar System, they all would

  14. Clandestine Companions of Nearby Red Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Koerner, D. W.; Jao, W. C.; Subasavage, J. P.; Ianna, P. A.; RECONS

    2006-12-01

    During the RECONS parallax program at the CTIO 0.9m, we have accumulated more than six years of astrometric data on red dwarfs in the southern sky. Eighty red dwarfs within 10 pc, including more than two dozen new discoveries by our team, are being followed to reveal the telltale perturbations caused by unseen companions. The advent of modern CCD technology yields substantial improvement in the detection of low mass companions over the classic studies done using photographic plates. The current ASPENS (Astrometric Search for Planets Encircling Nearby Stars) program is capable of finding hidden companions with masses as low as 10 Jupiters. Here we report the first results of the ASPENS effort, including a few intriguing systems with orbital periods of several years. Nearby red dwarfs are prime candidates for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) because the astrometric perturbations are largest for planets orbiting nearby stars of low mass. In addition, new multiple red dwarf systems can be targeted for mass determinations, thereby providing points on a comprehensive mass-luminosity relation for the most populous members of the Galaxy. These long-term observations began in 1999 as an NOAO Surveys program, and are continuing via the SMARTS Consortium. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation (AST 98-20711 and 05-07711), NASA's Space Interferometry Mission, Georgia State University, and Northern Arizona University.

  15. Immunocontraception in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Purswell, B J; Kolster, Kara A

    2006-08-01

    There is real need worldwide to control the population growth of companion animals. Throughout the world and particularly in the United States, overpopulation of unwanted dogs and cats is a concern for many reasons. Feral populations pose risk to native species by spread of disease and predation. That unwanted animals are humanely eradicated is of concern to many persons. The need to control population growth has led to various approaches to contraception, including immunocontraception. Concerns regarding efficacy, duration of action, harm to the individual, and species specificity are among the issues being addressed. As new technologies emerge, ethical, political, and safety issues evoke differing opinions. It is hoped that in the near future, different strategies will be developed to solve this disturbing problem. PMID:16837035

  16. Exoplanet Yield Estimation for Decadal Study Concepts using EXOSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Rhonda; Lowrance, Patrick; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The anticipated upcoming large mission study concepts for the direct imaging of exo-earths present an exciting opportunity for exoplanet discovery and characterization. While these telescope concepts would also be capable of conducting a broad range of astrophysical investigations, the most difficult technology challenges are driven by the requirements for imaging exo-earths. The exoplanet science yield for these mission concepts will drive design trades and mission concept comparisons.To assist in these trade studies, the Exoplanet Exploration Program Office (ExEP) is developing a yield estimation tool that emphasizes transparency and consistent comparison of various design concepts. The tool will provide a parametric estimate of science yield of various mission concepts using contrast curves from physics-based model codes and Monte Carlo simulations of design reference missions using realistic constraints, such as solar avoidance angles, the observatory orbit, propulsion limitations of star shades, the accessibility of candidate targets, local and background zodiacal light levels, and background confusion by stars and galaxies. The python tool utilizes Dmitry Savransky's EXOSIMS (Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator) design reference mission simulator that is being developed for the WFIRST Preliminary Science program. ExEP is extending and validating the tool for future mission concepts under consideration for the upcoming 2020 decadal review. We present a validation plan and preliminary yield results for a point design.

  17. The Kepler-454 System: A Small, Not-rocky Inner Planet, a Jovian World, and a Distant Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettel, Sara; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Vanderburg, Andrew; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Malavolta, Luca; Pepe, Francesco; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Latham, David W.; Udry, Stéphane; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.; Davies, Guy R.; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Kjeldsen, Hans; Bedding, Timothy R.; Lopez, Eric; Affer, Laura; Cosentino, Rosario; Figueira, Pedro; Fiorenzano, Aldo F. M.; Harutyunyan, Avet; Johnson, John Asher; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Micela, Giusi; Molinari, Emilio; Motalebi, Fatemeh; Phillips, David F.; Piotto, Giampaolo; Queloz, Didier; Rice, Ken; Sasselov, Dimitar; Ségransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Watson, Chris; Basu, Sarbani; Campante, Tiago L.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kawaler, Steven D.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Handberg, Rasmus; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia S.; Huber, Daniel; Chaplin, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Kepler-454 (KOI-273) is a relatively bright (V = 11.69 mag), Sun-like star that hosts a transiting planet candidate in a 10.6 day orbit. From spectroscopy, we estimate the stellar temperature to be 5687 ± 50 K, its metallicity to be [m/H] = 0.32 ± 0.08, and the projected rotational velocity to be v sin i < 2.4 km s-1. We combine these values with a study of the asteroseismic frequencies from short cadence Kepler data to estimate the stellar mass to be {1.028}-0.03+0.04{M}⊙ , the radius to be 1.066 ± 0.012 R⊙, and the age to be {5.25}-1.39+1.41 Gyr. We estimate the radius of the 10.6 day planet as 2.37 ± 0.13 R⊕. Using 63 radial velocity observations obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and 36 observations made with the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory, we measure the mass of this planet to be 6.8 ± 1.4 M⊕. We also detect two additional non-transiting companions, a planet with a minimum mass of 4.46 ± 0.12 MJ in a nearly circular 524 day orbit and a massive companion with a period >10 years and mass >12.1 MJ. The 12 exoplanets with radii <2.7 R⊕ and precise mass measurements appear to fall into two populations, with those <1.6 R⊕ following an Earth-like composition curve and larger planets requiring a significant fraction of volatiles. With a density of 2.76 ± 0.73 g cm-3, Kepler-454b lies near the mass transition between these two populations and requires the presence of volatiles and/or H/He gas.

  18. Imaginary Companions of Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Tracy R.; Sebanc, Anne M.; Hartup, Willard W.

    2000-01-01

    Interviewed mothers to examine the developmental significance of preschoolers' imaginary companions. Found that relationships with invisible companions were described as sociable and friendly, whereas personified objects were usually nurtured. Object personification frequently occurred as a result of acquiring a toy; invisible friends were viewed…

  19. Exoplanet Caught on the Move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-06-01

    observations, taken during autumn 2009, revealed the object on the other side of the disc after a period of hiding either behind or in front of the star (in which case it is hidden in the glare of the star). This confirmed that the source indeed was an exoplanet and that it was orbiting its host star. It also provided insights into the size of its orbit around the star. Images are available for approximately ten exoplanets, and the planet around Beta Pictoris (designated "Beta Pictoris b") has the smallest orbit known so far. It is located at a distance between 8 and 15 times the Earth-Sun separation - or 8-15 Astronomical Units - which is about the distance of Saturn from the Sun. "The short period of the planet will allow us to record the full orbit within maybe 15-20 years, and further studies of Beta Pictoris b will provide invaluable insights into the physics and chemistry of a young giant planet's atmosphere," says student researcher Mickael Bonnefoy. The planet has a mass of about nine Jupiter masses and the right mass and location to explain the observed warp in the inner parts of the disc. This discovery therefore bears some similarity to the prediction of the existence of Neptune by astronomers Adams and Le Verrier in the 19th century, based on observations of the orbit of Uranus. "Together with the planets found around the young, massive stars Fomalhaut and HR8799, the existence of Beta Pictoris b suggests that super-Jupiters could be frequent byproducts of planet formation around more massive stars," explains Gael Chauvin, a member of the team. Such planets disturb the discs around their stars, creating structures that should be readily observable with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the revolutionary telescope being built by ESO together with international partners. A few other planetary candidates have been imaged, but they are all located further from their host star than Beta Pictoris b. If located in the Solar System, they all would

  20. The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Blackwood, Gary H.; Gagosian, John S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) is chartered to implement the NASA space science goals of detecting and characterizing exoplanets and to search for signs of life. The ExEP manages space missions, future studies, technology investments, and ground-based science that either enables future missions or completes mission science. The exoplanet science community is engaged by the Program through Science Definition Teams and through the Exoplanet Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG). The ExEP includes the space science missions of Kepler, K2 , and the proposed WFIRST-AFTA that includes dark energy science, a widefield infrared survey, a microlensing survey for outer-exoplanet demographics, and a coronagraph for direct imaging of cool outer gas- and ice-giants around nearby stars. Studies of probe-scale (medium class) missions for a coronagraph (internal occulter) and starshade (external occulter) explore the trades of cost and science and provide motivation for a technology investment program to enable consideration of missions at the next decadal survey for NASA Astrophysics. Program elements include follow-up observations using the Keck Observatory, which contribute to the science yield of Kepler and K2, and include mid-infrared observations of exo-zodiacal dust by the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer which provide parameters critical to the design and predicted science yield of the next generation of direct imaging missions. ExEP includes the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute which provides archives, tools, and professional education for the exoplanet community. Each of these program elements contribute to the goal of detecting and characterizing earth-like planets orbiting other stars, and seeks to respond to rapid evolution in this discovery-driven field and to ongoing programmatic challenges through engagement of the scientific and technical communities.

  1. The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Blackwood, Gary; Gagosian, John

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) is chartered to implement the NASA space science goals of detecting and characterizing exoplanets and to search for signs of life. The ExEP manages space missions, future studies, technology investments, and ground-based science that either enables future missions or completes mission science. The exoplanet science community is engaged by the Program through Science Definition Teams and through the Exoplanet Program Analysis Group. The ExEP includes the space science missions of Kepler, K2, and the proposed WFIRST-AFTA that includes dark energy science, a widefield infrared survey, a microlensing survey for outer-exoplanet demographics, and a coronagraph for direct imaging of cool outer gas- and ice-giants around nearby stars. Studies of probe-scale (medium class) missions for a coronagraph (internal occulter) and starshade (external occulter) explore the trades of cost and science and provide motivation for a technology investment program to enable consideration of missions at the next decadal survey for NASA Astrophysics. Program elements include follow-up observations using the Keck Observatory which contribute to the science yield of Kepler and K2, and include mid-infrared observations of exo-zodiacal dust by the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer which provide parameters critical to the design and predicted science yield of the next generation of direct imaging missions. ExEP includes the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute which provides archives, tools, and professional education for the exoplanet community. Each of these program elements contribute to the goal of detecting and characterizing earth-like planets orbiting other stars, and seeks to respond to rapid evolution in this discovery-driven field and to ongoing programmatic challenges through engagement of the scientific and technical communities.

  2. Exceptional Stars Origins, Companions, Masses and Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Phinney, Sterl; vanKerkwijk, Martin H.; Vasisht, Gautam

    2004-01-01

    As SIM Interdisciplinary Scientist, we will study the formation, nature and planetary companions of the exotic endpoints of stellar evolution. Our science begins with stars evolving from asymptotic branch giants into white dwarfs. We will determine the parallax and orbital inclination of several iron-deficient post-AGB stars, who peculiar abundances and infrared excesses are evidence that they are accreting gas depleted of dust from a circumbinary disk. Measurement of the orbital inclination, companion mass arid parallax will provide critical constraints. One of these stars is a prime candidate for trying nulling observations, which should reveal light reflected from both the circumbinary and Roche disks. The circumbinary disks seem favorable sites for planet formation. Next, we will search for planets around white dwarfs, both survivors froni the main-sequence stage, and ones newly formed from the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or in white dwarf mergers. Moving up in mass, we will measure the orbital reflex of OB/Be companions to pulsars, determine natal kicks and presupernova orbits, and expand the sample of well-determined neutron star masses. We will obtain the parallax of a transient X-ray binary, whose quiescent emission may be thermal emission from the neutron star, aiming for precise measurement of the neutron star radius. Finally, black holes. We will measure the reflex motions of the companion of what appear to be the most massive stellar black holes. The visual orbits will determine natal kicks, and test the assumptions underlying mass estimates made from the radial velocity curves, projected rotation, and ellipsoidal variations. In addition, we will attempt to observe the visual orbit of SS 433, as well as the proper motion of the emission line clumps in its relativistic jets. Additional information is included in the original document.

  3. Imaging exoplanets with the WFIRST Coronagraph: A background check of high priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangwei; Turnbull, Margaret C.; Gallagher, John S.; Kotulla, Ralf C.; Merrelli, Aronne; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Hu, Renyu

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST coronagraph is envisioned to achieve a limiting contrast for exoplanet detection of 10e-9. This revolutionary mission will enable the direct detection of known and newly discovered exoplanets amongst the nearest stars, from super-Earths to giants. However, at this contrast the coronagraph will essentially see a Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) in every image. For targets near the Galactic Plane on the sky, distant stars with varying levels of extinction and reddening will dominate the background. Away from the plane, we then expect extragalactic sources to dominate. What impact will these background sources have on the WFIRST exoplanet imaging program? How can we efficiently distinguish background sources from exoplanet targets in a single image? To have a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of background sources across the sky, we have used the HUDF to model extragalactic faint sources, and "Trilegal" simulations to model galactic background sources. Through some preliminary color and point source analysis, we offer a statistical estimation of expected background contamination and the probability of false positive background sources. In this poster we show plots relating number of extragalactic sources versus magnitude in HUDF and "Trilegal" simulation. We present a table of high priority WFIRST exoplanet imaging targets, with an assessment of the "background threat" due to background stars, galaxies, and binary companions.

  4. Minerva: Big Exoplanet Science from Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrady, Nate

    2012-10-01

    The Kepler mission has identified over 2300 candidate planets in the past two years, adding to the over 500 confirmed exoplanets from radial velocity (RV) surveys. One of the most striking results of these surveys is that the number of planets increases rapidly with decreasing size. There may in fact be more Earth-like planets in the Galaxy than stars. There must be terrestrial planets around nearby stars, though few have yet been discovered. Finding these planets requires high precision RV observations and high cadence transit observing to densely sample the orbital phase. Minerva will surmount these obstacles with a dedicated observatory for detection of super-Earths and close-in Earth-like planets. Our array of four 0.7-m telescopes will operate in two modes: jointly with a high precision fiber-fed spectrometer capable of detecting the RV signal of an Earth orbiting a low mass star, and independently for photometric transit detection surveys.

  5. Taking the Galactic Exoplanet Census with K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie; CHAI (California/Hawaii/Arizona/Indiana) K2 Follow-up Consortium

    2016-06-01

    The NASA Kepler mission was designed and executed with the goal of measuring planet occurrence rates. The stellar sample, the science pipeline, and the planet candidate sample have all been chosen and characterised with an eye to generating uniform, robust statistical measurements. The subsequent K2 mission, however, has been much more open to all science goals, and subsequently the target selection, planet candidate generation and catalogue assembly have been substantially more ad hoc. Here we discuss the pathway forward to using the Galactic latitude coverage of K2 to begin the Galactic exoplanet census that will be continued by the NASA TESS mission.

  6. "Some Like it Hot” - Evidence for the Shrinking Orbit of the 2.2-day Transiting Hot Jupiter Exoplanet HD 189733b - Evidence of Transfer of Planet Orbital Momentum to its Host Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapaga, Thomas; Guinan, E. F.; Ballouz, R.; Engle, S. G.; Dewarf, L.

    2011-01-01

    HD189733A is a K2V star that has attracted much attention because it hosts a transiting, hot Jupiter-exoplanet. HD189733b has one of the shortest known orbital-periods (P = 2.22-days) and is only 0.031AU from its host star (Buchy et al. 2005). Based on measurements of the K2V star's P(rot) from starspot-modulations of 12-d, coronal Lx 1028 ergs/s, and chromospheric Ca II-HK emission, indicate an age 0.6 -1.0 Gyr - inferred from our rotation-age-activity relations. However, this age is discrepant with an older-age inferred from the star's low Lithium-abundance ( 1/10 Solar.). However, the age-rotation-activity determination assumes no tidal-effects from close companions- such as close planet. Recently Gaspar et al. (2006) discovered a dM4 companion star (HD 189733 B: 12'' distance to the K-dwarf). X MM-Newton observations of the HD 189733 A&B carried out recently by Pilliteri et al. (2010), surprisingly revealed that HD 189733B shows no X-ray emission, with an upper limit of 9*1026 ergs/s. Using activity-age relationships for dM-stars, we expected a Lx of an order of magnitude higher for age <1.0 Ga. This apparent discrepancy can be resolved by the supposition that the K2V-star has been spun-up by its nearby planetary companion, and that its age determined from activity-rotation relationships is invalid. This supposition is supported by the recent photometry by the Kepler for 300+ exoplanet candidate systems discovered thus far (Borucki et al. 2010). The analysis these data have reveal that tidal locking between the planet and host star has occurred for a significant number of exoplanet with short orbital periods. We explain the fast rotation of the K2 star via the transfer of the planet's orbital angular momentum to the star via tidal interactions. The significance of these finding with respect to the evolution of planetary systems is discussed. This work is partially supported by NSF/RUI grant AST-1009903.

  7. Direct imaging of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-28

    Most of the exoplanets known today have been discovered by indirect techniques, based on the study of the host star radial velocity or photometric temporal variations. These detections allowed the study of the planet populations in the first 5-8 AU from the central stars and have provided precious information on the way planets form and evolve at such separations. Direct imaging on 8-10 m class telescopes allows the detection of giant planets at larger separations (currently typically more than 5-10 AU) complementing the indirect techniques. So far, only a few planets have been imaged around young stars, but each of them provides an opportunity for unique dedicated studies of their orbital, physical and atmospheric properties and sometimes also on the interaction with the 'second-generation', debris discs. These few detections already challenge formation theories. In this paper, I present the results of direct imaging surveys obtained so far, and what they already tell us about giant planet (GP) formation and evolution. Individual and emblematic cases are detailed; they illustrate what future instruments will routinely deliver for a much larger number of stars. I also point out the limitations of this approach, as well as the needs for further work in terms of planet formation modelling. I finally present the progress expected in direct imaging in the near future, thanks in particular to forthcoming planet imagers on 8-10 m class telescopes. PMID:24664924

  8. Exoplanet Equilibrium Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, J.; Bowman, M.; Blecic, J.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, Agundez et al. (2012, A&A 548, A73) used a chemical kinetics code to study a model HD 209458b (equilibrium temperature of 1450 K, assuming full redistribution and 0 albedo). They found that thermochemistry dominates most of the dayside, but that significant compositional gradients may exist across the dayside. We calculate equilibrium-chemistry molecular abundances for several model exoplanets, using NASA's open-source Chemical Equilibrium Abundances code (McBride and Gordon 1996). We vary the degree of radiation redistribution to the dark side, ranging from total redistribution to instantaneous reradiation. Atomically, both the solar abundance multiple and the carbon fraction vary. Planet substellar temperatures range from just above 1200 K, where photochemistry should no longer be important, to those of hot planets (3000 K). We present synthetic abundance images for the key spectroscopic molecules CO, CH4, and H2O for several hot-Jupiter model planets. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  9. Exoplanet Science with TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, Ian

    2014-07-01

    TMT will have unparalleled capabilities for characterizing the composition of extrasolar planets and their atmospheres, and for probing the complex interplay between planet formation, evolution, and migration. In this plenary talk I will summarize these science cases and discuss their synergy with other observing facilities. High-resolution imaging with IRIS and PFI/SEIT will study young, hot planets in nearby star-forming regions, complementing JWST and WFIRST/AFTA coronagraphic efforts at larger semimajor axes. The same instruments will flesh out planets detected by radial velocity (RV) by measuring the albedos and bolometric radii of old, cold Jovian planets and a few ~300 K super-Earths. Complementing JWST and HST studies of short-period transiting planets, NIRES and IRMS spectroscopy will reveal atmospheric composition, dynamics, and thermal structure for dozens of hot Jupiters and Neptunes; NIRES will also produce 2D global maps and movies of a few exoplanets and dozens of brown dwarfs. HROS high-dispersion spectroscopy will precisely measure the composition of extrasolar planetesimals in polluted white dwarfs, and RV followup will continue to exploit the legacies of Kepler, K2, TESS, and PLATO to measure the masses, orbits, and bulk compositions of Earth analogues. Most exciting of all, TMT may facilitate the next major step in the study of exobiology by allowing the detection of biosignature gases around the closest habitable transiting planets.

  10. The Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) Campaign Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patience, Jennifer; Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James R.; Barman, Travis; De Rosa, Robert; Konopacky, Quinn; Marley, Mark; Marois, Christian; Nielsen, Eric Ludwig; Pueyo, Laurent; Rajan, Abhijith; Rameau, Julien; Saumon, Didier; Wang, Jason

    2015-12-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a next-generation coronagraphic integral field unit with the sensitivity and resolution to detect planetary companions with separations of 0”.2 to 1”.0 around a large set of stars. An 890-hour GPI survey of 600 young, nearby stars commenced in late-2014, and approximately 100 stars have been observed thus far. The central aims of the program are: (1) the discovery of a population of giant planets with orbital radii of 5-50 AU comparable to Solar System gas giant orbits, (2) the characterization of the atmospheric properties of young planetary companions, and (3) the exploration of planet-disk interactions. Initial results from GPI exoplanet observations include the discovery of a new planetary companion to a young F-star; the planet spectrum shows a strong signature of methane absorption, indicating a cooler temperature than previously imaged young planets. An overview of the survey scope, current detection limits, and initial results will be presented.

  11. The Close Stellar Companions to Intermediate-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, but also tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct N-body simulations. We study clusters initially composed of 105 or 2 × 105 stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and we follow their evolution for 6-10 Gyr. A tight, innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with an orbital semimajor axis at least three times tighter than the second-most-bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods on the order of years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for ˜107 years. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse: they include both main-sequence, giant stars and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. The most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. The stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects occur with promising frequency.

  12. Asteroseismology of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Cenk; Çelik Orhan, Zeynep; Yildiz, Mutlu

    2016-07-01

    Exoplanet studies are one of the most interesting and attractive topics in astrophysics. Besides of ground-based observations, Kepler and CoRoT space missions improved our knowledge by providing unprecedented data of exoplanets and host stars. Precise determination of basic properties of planets depends on how we accurately determine fundamental properties of host stars. Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to study stellar structure and evolution and provides us radius, mass and age of the host stars. In this study, we construct stellar interior models of these stars with the MESA evolution code and compare model frequencies with the oscillation frequencies derived from Kepler data. Then, we obtain fundamental parameters of the host stars. Finally, fundamental parameters of exoplanets are reevaluated.

  13. A SEARCH FOR ADDITIONAL PLANETS IN THE NASA EPOXI OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM GJ 436

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sarah; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Deming, Drake; Barry, Richard K.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Wellnitz, Dennis D.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Hampton, Don L.; Lisse, Carey M.; Seager, Sara; Veverka, Joseph F.

    2010-06-20

    We present time series photometry of the M dwarf transiting exoplanet system GJ 436 obtained with the Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) component of the NASA EPOXI mission. We conduct a search of the high-precision time series for additional planets around GJ 436, which could be revealed either directly through their photometric transits or indirectly through the variations these second planets induce on the transits of the previously known planet. In the case of GJ 436, the presence of a second planet is perhaps indicated by the residual orbital eccentricity of the known hot Neptune companion. We find no candidate transits with significance higher than our detection limit. From Monte Carlo tests of the time series, we rule out transiting planets larger than 1.5 R{sub +} interior to GJ 436b with 95% confidence and larger than 1.25 R{sub +} with 80% confidence. Assuming coplanarity of additional planets with the orbit of GJ 436b, we cannot expect that putative planets with orbital periods longer than about 3.4 days will transit. However, if such a planet were to transit, we would rule out planets larger than 2.0 R{sub +} with orbital periods less than 8.5 days with 95% confidence. We also place dynamical constraints on additional bodies in the GJ 436 system, independent of radial velocity measurements. Our analysis should serve as a useful guide for similar analyses of transiting exoplanets for which radial velocity measurements are not available, such as those discovered by the Kepler mission. From the lack of observed secular perturbations, we set upper limits on the mass of a second planet as small as 10 M{sub +} in coplanar orbits and 1 M{sub +} in non-coplanar orbits close to GJ 436b. We present refined estimates of the system parameters for GJ 436. We find P = 2.64389579 {+-} 0.00000080 d, R{sub *} = 0.437 {+-} 0.016 R{sub sun}, and R{sub p} = 3.880 {+-} 0.147 R{sub +}. We also report a sinusoidal modulation in the GJ 436 light curve

  14. The Orbital Design of Alpha Centauri Exoplanet Satellite (ACESat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, Sasha; Belikov, Rus; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Exoplanet candidates discovered by Kepler are too distant for biomarkers to be detected with foreseeable technology. Alpha Centauri has high separation from other stars and is of close proximity to Earth, which makes the binary star system 'low hanging fruit' for scientists. Alpha Centauri Exoplanet Satellite (ACESat) is a mission proposed to Small Explorer Program (SMEX) that will use a coronagraph to search for an orbiting planet around one of the stars of Alpha Centauri. The trajectory design for this mission is presented here where three different trajectories are considered: Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) and a Heliocentric Orbit. Uninterrupted stare time to Alpha Centauri is desirable for meeting science requirements, or an orbit that provides 90% stare time to the science target. The instrument thermal stability also has stringent requirements for proper function, influencing trajectory design.

  15. A Statistical Analysis of Exoplanets in Their Habitable Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Arthur; Kane, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler mission has detected a wealth of planets through planetary transits since its launch in 2009. An important step in the continued study of exoplanets is to characterize planets based on their orbital properties and compositions. As the Kepler mission has progressed the data sensitivity to planetary transits at longer orbital periods has increased. This allows for an enhanced probability of detecting planets which lie in the Habitable Zones (HZs) of their host stars. We present the results of statistical analyses of Kepler planetary candidates to study the percentage of orbital time spent in the HZ as a function of planetary parameters, including planetary mass, radius, and orbital eccentricity. We compare these results to the confirmed exoplanet population.

  16. Habitable zone lifetimes of exoplanets around main sequence stars.

    PubMed

    Rushby, Andrew J; Claire, Mark W; Osborn, Hugh; Watson, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The potential habitability of newly discovered exoplanets is initially assessed by determining whether their orbits fall within the circumstellar habitable zone of their star. However, the habitable zone (HZ) is not static in time or space, and its boundaries migrate outward at a rate proportional to the increase in luminosity of a star undergoing stellar evolution, possibly including or excluding planets over the course of the star's main sequence lifetime. We describe the time that a planet spends within the HZ as its "habitable zone lifetime." The HZ lifetime of a planet has strong astrobiological implications and is especially important when considering the evolution of complex life, which is likely to require a longer residence time within the HZ. Here, we present results from a simple model built to investigate the evolution of the "classic" HZ over time, while also providing estimates for the evolution of stellar luminosity over time in order to develop a "hybrid" HZ model. These models return estimates for the HZ lifetimes of Earth and 7 confirmed HZ exoplanets and 27 unconfirmed Kepler candidates. The HZ lifetime for Earth ranges between 6.29 and 7.79×10⁹ years (Gyr). The 7 exoplanets fall in a range between ∼1 and 54.72 Gyr, while the 27 Kepler candidate planets' HZ lifetimes range between 0.43 and 18.8 Gyr. Our results show that exoplanet HD 85512b is no longer within the HZ, assuming it has an Earth analog atmosphere. The HZ lifetime should be considered in future models of planetary habitability as setting an upper limit on the lifetime of any potential exoplanetary biosphere, and also for identifying planets of high astrobiological potential for continued observational or modeling campaigns. PMID:24047111

  17. Infrared spectrum and proper motion of the brown dwarf companion of HR 7329 in Tucanae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Neuhäuser, R.; Huélamo, N.; Brandner, W.; Alves, J.

    2001-01-01

    Up to now only four brown dwarf companions to normal stars have been found and confirmed by both spectroscopy and proper motion (namely Gl 229 B, G 196-3 B, Gl 570 D, and CoD-33 deg 7795 B). On the basis of an optical spectrum taken with HST/STIS Lowrance et al. (2000) recently pointed out another possible candidate companion. The companion candidate is located at a distance of 4{' '} from the A0-star HR 7329, which is considered as a member of a moving group of young stars in Tucanae located at a distance of only ~ 48 pc. In order to confirm or disregard the companion nature of the candidate, we have determined the proper motion of the brown dwarf candidate with an epoch difference of 1.8 years, and found that it is consistent with a co-moving companion of HR 7329. Additional to the proper motion measurement, we have also taken an H-band spectrum using ISAAC on the ESO-VLT. From this spectrum, we conclude that the companion candidate has spectral type M 7 to M 8, which is in agreement with the optical spectrum. We thus conclude that HR 7329 B is most likely a brown dwarf companion. The mass ratio of this pair (A0 to M 7-8, i.e. ~ 100:1) is the largest known among brown dwarf companions, which is relevant for studying the formation of brown dwarfs as companions. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory on Cerro Paranal and La Silla in program\\break 65.L-0144.

  18. Point Source Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager: Sensitivity Characterization with T5.5 Dwarf Companion HD 19467 B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Mawet, Dimitri; Graham, James R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Macintosh, Bruce; Hinkley, Sasha; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Marley, Mark S.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Ammons, S. Mark; Rantakyro, Fredrik T.; Marchis, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Detecting polarized light from self-luminous exoplanets has the potential to provide key information about rotation, surface gravity, cloud grain size, and cloud coverage. While field brown dwarfs with detected polarized emission are common, no exoplanet or substellar companion has yet been detected in polarized light. With the advent of high contrast imaging spectro-polarimeters such as GPI and SPHERE, such a detection may now be possible with careful treatment of instrumental polarization. In this paper, we present 28 minutes of H-band GPI polarimetric observations of the benchmark T5.5 companion HD 19467 B. We detect no polarization signal from the target, and place an upper limit on the degree of linear polarization of pCL99:73% less than 1:7%. We discuss our results in the context of T dwarf cloud models and photometric variability.

  19. Point Source Polarimetry with the Gemini Planet Imager: Sensitivity Characterization with T5.5 Dwarf Companion HD 19467 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Mawet, Dimitri; Graham, James R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Macintosh, Bruce; Hinkley, Sasha; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Marley, Mark S.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Ammons, S. Mark; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Marchis, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Detecting polarized light from self-luminous exoplanets has the potential to provide key information about rotation, surface gravity, cloud grain size, and cloud coverage. While field brown dwarfs with detected polarized emission are common, no exoplanet or substellar companion has yet been detected in polarized light. With the advent of high contrast imaging spectro-polarimeters such as GPI and SPHERE, such a detection may now be possible with careful treatment of instrumental polarization. In this paper, we present 28 minutes of H-band GPI polarimetric observations of the benchmark T5.5 companion HD 19467 B. We detect no polarization signal from the target, and place an upper limit on the degree of linear polarization of {p}{CL99.73%}≤slant 2.4%. We discuss our results in the context of T dwarf cloud models and photometric variability.

  20. The LEECH Exoplanet Imaging Survey: Characterization of the Coldest Directly Imaged Exoplanet, GJ 504 b, and Evidence for Superstellar Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Morley, Caroline V.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Leisenring, Jarron; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Esposito, Simone; Apai, Dániel; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin R.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Fortney, Jonathan; Freedman, Richard; Henning, Thomas; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kopytova, Taisiya; Lupu, Roxana; Maire, Anne-Lise; Males, Jared R.; Marley, Mark; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Patience, Jenny; Rajan, Abhijith; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Stone, Jordan; Su, Kate; Vaz, Amali; Visscher, Channon; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ˜500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (˜1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (˜130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: Teff = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s-2, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of fsed = 2-5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 RJup, and log(L) = -6.13 ± 0.03 L⊙, implying a hot start mass of 3-30 Mjup for a conservative age range of 0.1-6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrophisica, Italy; LBT

  1. Polarimetry for rocky exoplanet characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Daphne; Karalidi, Theodora

    2013-04-01

    Since the first discovery of a planet around a solar-type star by Mayor & Queloz in 1995, several hundreds of exoplanets have been detected. Indeed, it appears that practically all Sun-like stars have planets. Inevitable, Earth-sized, rocky planets that orbit in their star's habitable zone, where temperatures could be just right to allow liquid water on a planet's surface, will be found. Liquid water is generally considered to be essential for the existence of life. Whether liquid water actually exists on a planet depends strongly on the atmosphere's thickness and characteristics, such as the surface pressure and composition. Famous examples in the Solar System are Venus and the Earth, with similar sizes, inner compositions and orbital radii, but wildly different surface conditions. The characterization of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of exoplanets will allow a comparison with Solar System planets and it will open up a treasure trove of knowledge about the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, thanks to the vast range of orbital distances, planet sizes and ages that can be studied. Characterization will also allow studying conditions for life and ultimately the existence of life around other stars. Information about the upper atmospheres of close-in, hot, giant exoplanets, can be derived from measurements of the combined flux of the star and the planet, in particular when the planet is transiting its star. This method has also provided traces of an atmosphere around a large solid planet orbiting red dwarf star GJ1214. Detection and characterization of the atmospheres and/or surfaces of small, solid, Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars, is virtually impossible with transit observations. For these exiting planets, polarimetry appears to be a strong tool. Polarimetry helps the detection of exoplanets, because direct starlight is usually unpolarized, while starlight that has been reflected by a planet is usually

  2. Dynamical Measurements of the Interior Structure of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Batygin, K.

    2013-10-01

    Giant gaseous planets often reside on orbits in sufficient proximity to their host stars for the planetary quadrupole gravitational field to become non-negligible. In presence of an additional planetary companion, a precise characterization of the system’s orbital state can yield meaningful constraints on the transiting planet’s interior structure. However, the applicability of this type of analysis can be limited by the configuration of the target system. Here, we explore the dynamical range in which these methods are valid while using HAT-P-13 as a case study. We determine that the interior structure determination method, despite being indirect, is surprisingly robust. As a result, we conclude that future efforts aimed at characterizing the interiors of giant exoplanets are likely to be fruitful.

  3. NPOI Observations of the Exoplanet Host Kappa Coronae Borealis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. T.; van Belle, G.

    2014-01-01

    Kappa Coronae Borealis is a "retired A star", otherwise known as a former A-type dwarf that is now a K-type subgiant. It is a particularly fascinating target because of its unusual configuration of companions and dust rings. It hosts at least one exoplanet and perhaps two, and features a single wide dust ring or two narrow ones. We observed the star interferometrically in order to characterize the main star and the environment in which the planet(s) and dust ring(s) reside. We determined a variety of fundamental parameters for kappa CrB: the limb-darkened angular diameter, physical size, effective temperature, luminosity, mass, age, and the extent of the habitable zone range. We combined our mass with the orbital parameters from four sources from the literature to calculate the planet's mass as well.

  4. Cloud Driven Variability on Young Brown Dwarfs and Giant Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Variability has now been robustly observed in a range of L and T type field brown dwarfs, primarily at near-IR and mid-IR wavelengths. The probable cause of this variability is surface inhomogeneities in the clouds of these objects, causing a semi-periodic variability signal when combined with the rotational modulation from the 3-12 hour period expected for these objects. Variability at similar or even higher amplitudes may be expected for young brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets, which share similar Teff as field brown dwarfs, but have considerably lower surface gravities. Variability studies of these objects relative to old field objects is then a direct probe of the effects of surface gravity on atmospheric structure. Here I discuss ongoing efforts to detect variability from these young objects, both for free-floating objects and companions to stars, including preliminary results from an ongoing survey of young, low surface gravity objects with NTT SOFI.

  5. [Companion diagnostics and reimbursement system].

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Yoshiaki

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Companion Diagnostics (CoDx) have been gaining importance to promote personalized medicine in order to improve the safety and cost effectiveness of therapy. In July 2011, the FDA published draft guidance for the development of CoDx, which recommends the co-development of CoDx and new drugs as the best practice, and then the FDA approved vemurafenib and the BRAF-V600-E gene mutation assay simultaneously as a typical example of the co-development of a new drug and its CoDx. Considering medical needs for multiple biomarker assays to select the right assay from various therapeutic candidates, more complicated assay technologies such as DNA sequencing will be required for CoDx in the near future. However, since it is quite difficult to standardize the validation process and manage test quality under the current regulatory criteria of in-vitro diagnostics using advanced and/or complicated assay technologies, the clinical use of laboratory-developed tests (LDT) should be recommended in order to avoid biomarker test lag. On the other hand, the current reimbursement system is not always suitable to assess the clinical and technological value of CoDx and it should be revised to encourage the development of CoDx. Although Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a potential method to assess the value of CoDx, it is not easy to define appropriate indicators for CoDx because its clinical utility and cost effectiveness are completely dependent on the performance and value of available therapy. It is also suggested that the price and/or insurance rate of CoDx should be included in the price of the drug; however, there is no good solution to how to pay for CoDx with negative results for all therapies. It is said that the concept of personalized medicine with advanced technologies is a destructive innovation that could markedly change the current structure and system of medications; therefore, it is essential to create a quite new regulatory and reimbursement system to

  6. Faint Companions in the Close Environment of Starforming Dwarf Galaxies: possible overlooked starburst triggers? (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, K. G.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Fricke, K. J.

    Using the NASA Extragalactic Database, we have searched the close environment of 98 star-forming dwarf galaxies (SFDGs) from field- and low density environments for companion galaxies. Most of the found companions are dwarf galaxies, previously disregarded in environmental studies of SFDGs. Using a subsample at low redshifts, cz < 2000 km/s, i.e. less biased against dwarf companions, we find that 30% of the SFDGs have close companions within a projected linear separation s_p < 100 kpc and a redshift difference of (Delta cz) < 500 km/s. This fraction must be considered a lower limit, given the incompleteness of the available data sets and the non-negligible frequency of HI clouds in the vicinity of SFDGs, so that the majority of SFDGs should not be considered isolated. The redshift differences between companion candidates and sample SFDGs are typically smaller than ~250 km/s and concentrated towards lower values. This is similarly observed for dwarf satellites of spiral galaxies and suggests a physical association between the companion candidates and the sample SFDGs. SFDGs with a close companion do not show significant differences in their H(beta) equivalent widths and B-V colours as compared to isolated ones. However, the available data do not allow to rule out close dwarf companions as an influencing factor for star formation activity.

  7. Climates of Oblique Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    A previous paper (Dobrovolskis 2007; Icarus 192, 1-23) showed that eccentricity can have profound effects on the climate, habitability, and detectability of extrasolar planets. This complementary study shows that obliquity can have comparable effects. The known exoplanets exhibit a wide range of orbital eccentricities, but those within several million km of their suns are generally in near-circular orbits. This fact is widely attributed to the dissipation of tides in the planets, which is particularly effective for solid/liquid bodies like "Super-Earths". Along with friction between a solid mantle and a liquid core, tides also are expected to despin a planet until it is captured in the synchronous resonance, so that its rotation period is identical to its orbital period. The canonical example of synchronous spin is the way that our Moon always keeps nearly the same hemisphere facing the Earth. Tides also tend to reduce the planet's obliquity (the angle between its spin and orbital angular velocities). However, orbit precession can cause the rotation to become locked in a "Cassini state", where it retains a nearly constant non-zero obliquity. For example, our Moon maintains an obliquity of about 6.7° with respect to its orbit about the Earth. For comparison, stable Cassini states can exist for practically any obliquity up to 180° for planets of binary stars, or in multi-planet systems with high mutual inclinations, such as are produced by scattering or by the Kozai mechanism. This work considers planets in synchronous rotation with circular orbits. For obliquities greater than 90°, the ground track of the sub-solar point wraps around all longitudes on the surface of such a planet. For smaller obliquities, the sub-solar track takes the figure-8 shape of an analemma. This can be visualized as the intersection of the planet's spherical surface with a right circular cylinder, parallel to the spin axis and tangent to the equator from the inside. The excursion of the

  8. Be stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. Recently, we have clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can prove that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems

  9. First Estimate of the Exoplanet Population from Kepler Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, D. G.; Batalha, N.; Caldwell, D.; Dunham, E. W.; Gautier, T. N., III; Howell, S. B.; Jenkins, J. M.; Marcy, G. W.; Rowe, J.; Charbonneau, D.; Ciardi, D.; Ford, E. B.; Christiansen, J. L.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Prsa, A.

    2011-05-01

    William J. Borucki, David G. Koch, Natalie Batalha, Derek Buzasi , Doug Caldwell, David Charbonneau, Jessie L. Christiansen, David R. Ciardi, Edward Dunham, Eric B. Ford, Steve Thomas N. Gautier III, Steve Howell, Jon M. Jenkins, Jeffery Kolodziejczak, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Jason Rowe, and Andrej Prsa A model was developed to provide a first estimate of the intrinsic frequency of planetary candidates based on the number of detected planetary candidates and the measured noise for each of the 156,000 observed stars. The estimated distributions for the exoplanet frequency are presented with respect to the semi-major axis and the stellar effective temperature and represent values appropriate only to short-period candidates. Improved estimates are expected after a Monte Carlo study of the sensitivity of the data analysis pipeline to transit signals injected at the pixel level is completed.

  10. Stable regions around Exoplanets: the search for Exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Guimaraes, Ana Helena; Moretto Tusnski, Luis Ricardo; Vieira-Neto, Ernesto; Silva Valio, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    There are hundreds of exoplanets which the data are available to a dynamical investigation. We extracted from the data base (exoplanets.org) all planets and candidates which have the necessary data available for the numerical investigation of the orbital stability of a body around a exoplanet in a total of 2749 of those.There is a wealth diversity of exoplanets types and the expectation in find our Earth-living conditions in another planet motivates the search for extra-solar planets, and a satellite around a planet would, in addiction, help to keep a favorable climate.Using the planets class according to PHL@Arecibo, those planets were sorted out in groups. Analyses of density, distance from the primary body, and mass ratios were done beside the suggested classification to fit some no-classified planets into one of the groups.The aim of this work is to derive the upper stability limit (or upper critical orbit) of fictitious direct satellites around exoplanets of any density, or size, orbiting single stars. Our search is for stable regions around the planet, the called S-type orbits. This orbit type determines if there is any chance to exist (or not) bodies around the planets. The investigation is limited to single stars, excluding binaries.We derived such limit purely through numerical simulations. Our proposal involved long-term integration of the circular restricted three bodies problem . Basically, the cut off of the stability zone determined in the previous work by Domingos et al. (2006) were confirmed for any planet type. However, the limitation due the Roche limit of the own satellite showed to be lower. We used this to determined possible size and to adjust orbital range were a third body could orbit the exoplanet.Independently of densities, distance, and sizes of the objects involved, the idea was to delimit where to find celestial bodies in any given system around single stars. Furthermore, we aim to provide tracks to the search for exomoons using

  11. Enabling Technologies for Characterizing Exoplanet Systems with Exo-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri Lynn; Belikov, Ruslan; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Trauger, John T.; Serabyn, Eugene; McElwain, Michael W.; Pong, Christopher M.; Brugarolas, Paul

    2015-01-01

    requirements) and to integrate these subsystems together for a hardware-in-the-loop end-to-end demonstration, the overall readiness of the suite of enabling technologies makes a compelling case for Exo-C among the exoplanet direct imaging mission candidates.

  12. LOW-MASS TERTIARY COMPANIONS TO SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES. I. COMMON PROPER MOTION SURVEY FOR WIDE COMPANIONS USING 2MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Peter R.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2012-08-15

    We report the first results of a multi-epoch search for wide (separations greater than a few tens of AU), low-mass tertiary companions of a volume-limited sample of 118 known spectroscopic binaries within 30 pc of the Sun, using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog and follow-up observations with the KPNO and CTIO 4 m telescopes. Note that this sample is not volume complete but volume limited, and, thus, there is incompleteness in our reported companion rates. We are sensitive to common proper motion companions with separations from roughly 200 AU to 10,000 AU ({approx}10'' {yields} {approx} 10'). From 77 sources followed-up to date, we recover 11 previously known tertiaries, 3 previously known candidate tertiaries, of which 2 are spectroscopically confirmed and 1 rejected, and 3 new candidates, of which 2 are confirmed and 1 rejected. This yields an estimated wide tertiary fraction of 19.5{sup +5.2}{sub -3.7}%. This observed fraction is consistent with predictions set out in star formation simulations where the fraction of wide, low-mass companions to spectroscopic binaries is >10%.

  13. Variability of Kepler Solar-like Stars Harboring Small Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Giampapa, Mark S.; Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2016-02-01

    We examine Kepler light-curve variability on habitable zone transit timescales for a large uniform sample of spectroscopically studied Kepler exoplanet host stars. The stars, taken from Everett et al., are solar-like in their properties and each harbors at least one exoplanet (or candidate) of radius ≤2.5 {R}{{e}}. The variability timescale examined is typical for habitable zone planets orbiting solar-like stars and we note that the discovery of the smallest exoplanets (≤1.2 {R}{{e}}) with corresponding transit depths of less than ∼0.18 mmag occur for the brightest and photometrically quietest stars. Thus, these detections are quite rare in Kepler observations. Some brighter and more evolved stars (subgiants), the latter of which often show large radial velocity jitter, are found to be among the photometrically quietest solar-like stars in our sample and the most likely small planet transit hunting grounds. The Sun is discussed as a solar-like star proxy to provide insight into the nature and cause of photometric variability. It is shown that Kepler’s broad, visible light observations are insensitive to variability caused by chromospheric activity that may be present in the observed stars.

  14. Polarimetry, Exoplanets and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    A fundamental topic in astronomy is the study of extrasolar planets, the ultimate goal of which is to image and characterize Earth-like planets around other stars and determine whether they host life. Polarization and spectropolarization observations provide unique diagnostic information and can contribute to both the detection and characterization phases of extasolar planet astronomy. Ultimately polarization may even be able to help us to determine whether life is present. Polarimetry can be used in several ways to facilitate planetary detection, and can influence mission design by providing an effective discriminant for true companions shining by reflected light against background objects. This may be particularly effective when coupled to other differential methods such as integral field spectroscopy (Sparks and Ford 2002). Spectropolarimetry can play an important role in the characterization phase of extrasolar planets in general, probing aerosols and surface and atmospheric scattering. In the search for life, time resolved spectropolarimetry can be used to seek evidence of special features such as a strongly polarized specular reflection, "glint", that would arise from the liquid surface of an extrasolar ocean, or rainbows from liquid droplets (Bailey 2007; Zugger et al 2010; Karalidi et al 2011). Looking further into the future, precision circular spectropolarimetry may offer a direct probe of the presence of microbial photosynthesis or vegetation. The unique homochirality of biological material coupled to the optical activity of biological compounds means that biological matter can influence the polarization, circular polarization in particular, of reflected light. Homochirality arises as a consequence of self-replication hence is likely to be generic to all forms of biological life and has the potential to produce a macroscopic signature. We have shown that a variety of photosynthetic microbial organisms, as well as macroscopic vegetation, yield significant

  15. A SEARCH FOR GIANT PLANET COMPANIONS TO T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Prato, L.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present results from an ongoing multiwavelength radial velocity (RV) survey of the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region as part of our effort to identify pre-main-sequence giant planet hosts. These 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars present significant challenges to traditional RV surveys. The presence of strong magnetic fields gives rise to large, cool star spots. These spots introduce significant RV jitter which can mimic the velocity modulation from a planet-mass companion. To distinguish between spot-induced and planet-induced RV modulation, we conduct observations at {approx}6700 A and {approx}2.3 {mu}m and measure the wavelength dependence (if any) in the RV amplitude. CSHELL observations of the known exoplanet host Gl 86 demonstrate our ability to detect not only hot Jupiters in the near-infrared but also secular trends from more distant companions. Observations of nine very young stars reveal a typical reduction in RV amplitude at the longer wavelengths by a factor of {approx}2-3. While we cannot confirm the presence of planets in this sample, three targets show different periodicities in the two wavelength regions. This suggests different physical mechanisms underlying the optical and the K-band variability.

  16. Hot subdwarfs with degenerate companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro

    2010-10-01

    Stellar evolutionary models predict that most of the hot sub-dwarfs in close binary systems have white dwarf companions. In a few cases even more massive compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) are suggested by the optical mass functions. The X-ray emission expected from accretion of the sub-dwarf's wind can reveal the nature of the compact companions and be used to derive other important information on these post-common envelope systems, as recently demonstrated by the discovery of a massive WD in HD 49798. We selected 3 promising targets from a sample of hot subdwarfs suspected to have degenerate companions. This proposal was accepted in AO9 with C priority.

  17. Glowing Hot Transiting Exoplanet Discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    VLT Spectra Indicate Shortest-Known-Period Planet Orbiting OGLE-TR-3 Summary More than 100 exoplanets in orbit around stars other than the Sun have been found so far. But while their orbital periods and distances from their central stars are well known, their true masses cannot be determined with certainty, only lower limits. This fundamental limitation is inherent in the common observational method to discover exoplanets - the measurements of small and regular changes in the central star's velocity, caused by the planet's gravitational pull as it orbits the star. However, in two cases so far, it has been found that the exoplanet's orbit happens to be positioned in such a way that the planet moves in front of the stellar disk, as seen from the Earth. This "transit" event causes a small and temporary dip in the star's brightness, as the planet covers a small part of its surface, which can be observed. The additional knowledge of the spatial orientation of the planetary orbit then permits a direct determination of the planet's true mass. Now, a group of German astronomers [1] have found a third star in which a planet, somewhat larger than Jupiter, but only half as massive, moves in front of the central star every 28.5 hours . The crucial observation of this solar-type star, designated OGLE-TR-3 [2] was made with the high-dispersion UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It is the exoplanet with the shortest period found so far and it is very close to the star, only 3.5 million km away. The hemisphere that faces the star must be extremely hot, about 2000 °C and the planet is obviously losing its atmosphere at high rate . PR Photo 10a/03 : The star OGLE-TR-3 . PR Photo 10b/03 : VLT UVES spectrum of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10c/03 : Relation between stellar brightness and velocity (diagram). PR Photo 10d/03 : Observed velocity variation of OGLE-TR-3. PR Photo 10e/03 : Observed brightness variation of OGLE-TR-3. The search

  18. Exoplanet Science from NASA’s Kepler Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason

    2012-09-12

    NASA's exoplanet mission is the world's premier instrument for the discovery and study of planets orbiting distant stars. As the nominal mission comes to a close, Kepler has discovered nearly 2500 planet candidates, confirmed dozens of multi-planet systems, provided important insights into the orbital architectures of planetary systems, identified specific systems that challenge theories of planet formation and dynamical evolution, has revolutionized our understanding of stellar interiors, and is gearing to measure the frequency of Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars in its extended mission phase. I present the most recent results from the Kepler mission.

  19. OPTICAL PHASE CURVES OF KEPLER EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca

    2013-07-20

    We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R{sub *} < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 {+-} 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

  20. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  1. Discriminating between Cloudy, Hazy, and Clear Sky Exoplanets Using Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  2. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  3. ARIEL: Atmospheric Remote-Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2015-11-01

    More than 1,000 extrasolar systems have been discovered, hosting nearly 2,000 exoplanets. Ongoing and planned ESA and NASA missions from space such as GAIA, Cheops, PLATO, K2 and TESS will increase the number of known systems to tens of thousands.Of all these exoplanets we know very little, i.e. their orbital data and, for some of these, their physical parameters such as their size and mass. In the past decade, pioneering results have been obtained using transit spectroscopy with Hubble, Spitzer and ground-based facilities, enabling the detection of a few of the most abundant ionic, atomic and molecular species and to constrain the planet’s thermal structure. Future general purpose facilities with large collecting areas will allow the acquisition of better exoplanet spectra, compared to the currently available, especially from fainter targets. A few tens of planets will be observed with JWST and E-ELT in great detail.A breakthrough in our understanding of planet formation and evolution mechanisms will only happen through the observation of the planetary bulk and atmospheric composition of a statistically large sample of planets. This requires conducting spectroscopic observations covering simultaneously a broad spectral region from the visible to the mid-IR. It also requires a dedicated space mission with the necessary photometric stability to perform these challenging measurements and sufficient agility to observe multiple times ~500 exoplanets over mission life-time.The ESA-M4 mission candidate ARIEL is designed to accomplish this goal and will provide a complete, statistically significant sample of gas-giants, Neptunes and super-Earths with temperatures hotter than 600K, as these types of planets will allow direct observation of their bulk properties, enabling us to constrain models of planet formation and evolution.The ARIEL consortium currently includes academic institutes and industry from eleven countries in Europe; the consortium is open and invites new

  4. Galactic cosmic ray-induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Atri, Dimitra; Hariharan, B; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-10-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground- and space-based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets that reside in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Planetary systems around M dwarfs are considered to be prime candidates to search for life beyond the Solar System. Such planets are likely to be tidally locked and have close-in habitable zones. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in the case of super-Earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin that strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another factor governing the radiation dose is the depth of the planetary atmosphere. The higher the depth of the planetary atmosphere, the lower the flux of secondary particles will be on the surface. If the secondary particles are energetic enough, and their flux is sufficiently high, the radiation from muons can also impact the subsurface regions, such as in the case of Mars. If the radiation dose is too high, the chances of sustaining a long-term biosphere on the planet are very low. We have examined the dependence of the GCR-induced radiation dose on the strength of the planetary magnetic field and its atmospheric depth, and found that the latter is the decisive factor for the protection of a planetary biosphere. PMID:24143867

  5. In the Search of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Luis Cuesta

    The Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial has a network of three telescopes located in some of the best places for Astronomy in Spain: the Observatory of Calar Alto, in Almería, near Calatayud, in Zaragoza, at the summit of a 1,400m high mountain, and at the campus of INTA, in Madrid. The three telescopes have diameters between 40 and 50cm, and are equipped with instrumentation very adequate to identify exoplanets.

  6. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  7. Phase Curves of Eccentric Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien; Laughlin, Gregory P.; Knutson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 15% of the known exoplanet population have significantly eccentric orbits (e > 0.25). Systems with planets on highly eccentric orbits provide natural laboratories to test theories of orbital evolution, tidal forcing, and atmospheric response. The two best studied eccentric exoplanets are HAT-P-2b (e~0.5) and HD 80606 b (e~0.9). Both of these eccentric planets have full or partial orbit phase curve observations taken with the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 micron channels of the Spitzer IRAC instrument. These phase-curve observations of HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b have given us important insights into atmospheric radiative timescales, planetary rotation rates and orbital evolution, and planet-star tidal interactions. Here I will overview the key results from the Spitzer observational campaigns for HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b and look toward the future of phase curve observations of eccentric exoplanets in the era of JWST.

  8. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Clampin, M.; Latham, D. W.; Seager, S.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Villasenor, J. S.; Winn, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In a two-year survey, TESS will monitor more than 500,000 stars for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. No ground-based survey can achieve this feat. A large fraction of TESS target stars will be 30-100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler satellite, and therefore TESS . planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS will make it possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars. TESS will provide prime targets for observation with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future. TESS data will be released with minimal delay (no proprietary period), inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the very nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets, thus providing future observers with the most favorable targets for detailed investigations.

  9. Overcoming Degeneracies in Exoplanet Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benneke, Björn

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets can provide invaluable insights into the planets’ compositions, their formation and evolution histories, and even their habitability. Obtaining exoplanet spectra is observationally challenging; however, and we are generally limited to relatively low signal-to-noise, low spectral resolution, disk-integrated observations , often with relatively narrow wavelength coverage. This low data situation results in strong correlations and degeneracies between the different planet and atmospheric parameters of interest. In this talk, I will present a conceptual picture of how vital information about the planet is encoded in its observable spectrum. I will then give an overview about the wide range of correlations and degeneracies relevant to today’s exoplanet observations. Finally, I will demonstrate how some degeneracies can be overcome and improved constraints can be obtained by including prior knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and physics in the retrieval. I present a new atmospheric retrieval framework, SCARLET, that combines observational data and our prior (limited) knowledge of atmospheric processes in a statistical robust Bayesian framework. New results for hot Jupiters will be presented.

  10. Astrometric exoplanet detection with Gaia

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, Michael; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Lindegren, Lennart

    2014-12-10

    We provide a revised assessment of the number of exoplanets that should be discovered by Gaia astrometry, extending previous studies to a broader range of spectral types, distances, and magnitudes. Our assessment is based on a large representative sample of host stars from the TRILEGAL Galaxy population synthesis model, recent estimates of the exoplanet frequency distributions as a function of stellar type, and detailed simulation of the Gaia observations using the updated instrument performance and scanning law. We use two approaches to estimate detectable planetary systems: one based on the signal-to-noise ratio of the astrometric signature per field crossing, easily reproducible and allowing comparisons with previous estimates, and a new and more robust metric based on orbit fitting to the simulated satellite data. With some plausible assumptions on planet occurrences, we find that some 21,000 (±6000) high-mass (∼1-15M {sub J}) long-period planets should be discovered out to distances of ∼500 pc for the nominal 5 yr mission (including at least 1000-1500 around M dwarfs out to 100 pc), rising to some 70,000 (±20, 000) for a 10 yr mission. We indicate some of the expected features of this exoplanet population, amongst them ∼25-50 intermediate-period (P ∼ 2-3 yr) transiting systems.

  11. The Routledge Companion to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, James, Ed.; Peterson, Andrew, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Routledge Companion to Education" presents the most comprehensive, up-to-date guide available to the key theories, themes and topics in education. Forty specially commissioned chapters, covering all aspects of education, introduce you to the ideas, research and issues that have shaped this most diverse, dynamic and fluid field. Part one…

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Snapshot Survey for Resolved Companions of Galactic Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.; Tingle, Evan; Karovska, Margarita; Pillitteri, Ignazio

    2016-05-01

    We have conducted an imaging survey with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of 70 Galactic Cepheids, typically within 1 kpc, with the aim of finding resolved physical companions. The WFC3 field typically covers the 0.1 pc area where companions are expected. In this paper, we identify 39 Cepheids having candidate companions, based on their positions in color-magnitude diagrams, and having separations ⩾ 5'' from the Cepheids. We use follow-up observations of 14 of these candidates with XMM-Newton, and of one of them with ROSAT, to separate X-ray-active young stars (probable physical companions) from field stars (chance alignments). Our preliminary estimate, based on the optical and X-ray observations, is that only 3% of the Cepheids in the sample have wide companions. Our survey easily detects resolved main-sequence companions as faint as spectral type K. Thus the fact that the two most probable companions (those of FF Aql and RV Sco) are earlier than type K is not simply a function of the detection limit. We find no physical companions having separations larger than 4000 au in the X-ray survey. Two Cepheids are exceptions in that they do have young companions at significantly larger separations (δ Cep and S Nor), but both belong to a cluster or a loose association, so our working model is that they are not gravitationally bound binary members, but rather cluster/association members. All of these properties provide constraints on both star formation and subsequent dynamical evolution. The low frequency of true physical companions at separations > 5'' is confirmed by examination of the subset of the nearest Cepheids and also the density of the fields. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  13. Search for transiting exoplanets and variable stars in the open cluster NGC 7243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Z.; Pribulla, T.; Hambálek, Ľ.; Errmann, R.; Adam, Ch.; Buder, S.; Butterley, T.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dincel, B.; Gilbert, H.; Ginski, Ch.; Hardy, L. K.; Kellerer, A.; Kitze, M.; Kundra, E.; Littlefair, S. P.; Mugrauer, M.; Nedoroščík, J.; Neuhäuser, R.; Pannicke, A.; Raetz, S.; Schmidt, J. G.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Vaňko, M.; Wilson, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report results of the first five observing campaigns for the open stellar cluster NGC 7243 in the frame of project Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (YETI). The project focuses on the monitoring of young and nearby stellar clusters, with the aim to detect young transiting exoplanets and to study other variability phenomena on time-scales from minutes to years. After five observing campaigns and additional observations during 2013 and 2014, a clear and repeating transit-like signal was detected in the light curve of J221550.6+495611. Furthermore, we detected and analysed 37 new eclipsing binary stars in the studied region. The best fit parameters and light curves of all systems are given. Finally, we detected and analysed 26 new, presumably pulsating variable stars in the studied region. The follow-up investigation of these objects, including spectroscopic measurements of the exoplanet candidate, is currently planned.

  14. Memory for Companions in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfosse, Patricia; Smith, Peter K.

    1979-01-01

    Memory of preschool children (four years of age) for companions was investigated by comparing interview data using a picture sociometric technique with observational data on actual play companions. Subjects were 15 boys and girls. (Author/MP)

  15. Extreme Planet-Like Systems: Brown Dwarfs at the Exoplanet Mass Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline Kelly

    2015-12-01

    Brown dwarfs have long been the observational anchors for our theoretical understanding of giant gas planets. Recent studies have uncovered a population of nearby young sources that rival the age and mass of many planetary mass companions. From detailed observations, we postulate that objects in this young population have dynamic atmospheres ripe with exotic, thick condensate cloud species that drive extreme photometric and spectroscopic characteristics. In this talk I will review how we are using these so-called exoplanet analogs to establish luminosity, temperature, age, and mass relations for brown dwarf into planetary mass objects.

  16. Exoplanet Community Report on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Direct infrared imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets will allow for detailed characterization of the atmospheric constituents of more than 200 nearby Earth-like planets, more than is possible with any other method under consideration. A flagship mission based on larger passively cooled infrared telescopes and formation flying technologies would have the highest angular resolution of any concept under consideration. The 2008 Exoplanet Forum committee on Direct Infrared Imaging of Exoplanets recommends: (1) a vigorous technology program including component development, integrated testbeds, and end-to-end modeling in the areas of formation flying and mid-infrared nulling; (2) a probe-scale mission based on a passively cooled structurally connected interferometer to be started within the next two to five years, for exoplanetary system characterization that is not accessible from the ground, and which would provide transformative science and lay the engineering groundwork for the flagship mission with formation flying elements. Such a mission would enable a complete exozodiacal dust survey (<1 solar system zodi) in the habitable zone of all nearby stars. This information will allow for a more efficient strategy of spectral characterization of Earth-sized planets for the flagship missions, and also will allow for optimization of the search strategy of an astrometric mission if such a mission were delayed due to cost or technology reasons. (3) Both the flagship and probe missions should be pursued with international partners if possible. Fruitful collaboration with international partners on mission concepts and relevant technology should be continued. (4) Research and Analysis (R&A) should be supported for the development of preliminary science and mission designs. Ongoing efforts to characterize the the typical level of exozodiacal light around Sun-like stars with ground-based nulling technology should be continued.

  17. SEEDS - Strategic explorations of exoplanets and disks with the Subaru Telescope.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motohide

    2016-01-01

    The first convincing detection of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun, or exoplanets, was made in 1995. In only 20 years, the number of the exoplanets including promising candidates has already accumulated to more than 5000. Most of the exoplanets discovered so far are detected by indirect methods because the direct imaging of exoplanets needs to overcome the extreme contrast between the bright central star and the faint planets. Using the large Subaru 8.2-m Telescope, a new high-contrast imager, HiCIAO, and second-generation adaptive optics (AO188), the most ambitious high-contrast direct imaging survey to date for giant planets and planet-forming disks has been conducted, the SEEDS project. In this review, we describe the aims and results of the SEEDS project for exoplanet/disk science. The completeness and uniformity of this systematic survey mean that the resulting data set will dominate this field of research for many years. PMID:26860453

  18. SEEDS — Strategic explorations of exoplanets and disks with the Subaru Telescope —

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Motohide

    2016-01-01

    The first convincing detection of planets orbiting stars other than the Sun, or exoplanets, was made in 1995. In only 20 years, the number of the exoplanets including promising candidates has already accumulated to more than 5000. Most of the exoplanets discovered so far are detected by indirect methods because the direct imaging of exoplanets needs to overcome the extreme contrast between the bright central star and the faint planets. Using the large Subaru 8.2-m Telescope, a new high-contrast imager, HiCIAO, and second-generation adaptive optics (AO188), the most ambitious high-contrast direct imaging survey to date for giant planets and planet-forming disks has been conducted, the SEEDS project. In this review, we describe the aims and results of the SEEDS project for exoplanet/disk science. The completeness and uniformity of this systematic survey mean that the resulting data set will dominate this field of research for many years. PMID:26860453

  19. Biosignature Gases in H2-dominated Atmospheres on Rocky Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seager, S.; Bains, W.; Hu, R.

    2013-11-01

    Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, using a model atmosphere with photochemistry and a biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibility of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H2 atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO2 levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In Sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV-quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to accumulate detectable biosignature gases in an H2 atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmospheres, where photochemically produced OH is the major destructive species. Most potential biosignature gases, such as dimethylsulfide and CH3Cl, are therefore more favorable in low-UV, as compared with solar-like UV, environments. A few promising biosignature gas candidates, including NH3 and N2O, are favorable even in solar-like UV environments, as these gases are destroyed directly by photolysis and not by H (or O). A more subtle finding is that most gases produced by life that are fully hydrogenated forms of an element, such as CH4 and H2S, are not effective signs of life in an H2-rich atmosphere because the dominant atmospheric chemistry will generate such gases abiologically, through photochemistry or geochemistry. Suitable biosignature gases in H2-rich atmospheres for super-Earth exoplanets transiting M stars could potentially be detected in transmission spectra with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. First Temperate Exoplanet Sized Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Combining observations from the CoRoT satellite and the ESO HARPS instrument, astronomers have discovered the first "normal" exoplanet that can be studied in great detail. Designated Corot-9b, the planet regularly passes in front of a star similar to the Sun located 1500 light-years away from Earth towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake). "This is a normal, temperate exoplanet just like dozens we already know, but this is the first whose properties we can study in depth," says Claire Moutou, who is part of the international team of 60 astronomers that made the discovery. "It is bound to become a Rosetta stone in exoplanet research." "Corot-9b is the first exoplanet that really does resemble planets in our solar system," adds lead author Hans Deeg. "It has the size of Jupiter and an orbit similar to that of Mercury." "Like our own giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, the planet is mostly made of hydrogen and helium," says team member Tristan Guillot, "and it may contain up to 20 Earth masses of other elements, including water and rock at high temperatures and pressures." Corot-9b passes in front of its host star every 95 days, as seen from Earth [1]. This "transit" lasts for about 8 hours, and provides astronomers with much additional information on the planet. This is fortunate as the gas giant shares many features with the majority of exoplanets discovered so far [2]. "Our analysis has provided more information on Corot-9b than for other exoplanets of the same type," says co-author Didier Queloz. "It may open up a new field of research to understand the atmospheres of moderate- and low-temperature planets, and in particular a completely new window in our understanding of low-temperature chemistry." More than 400 exoplanets have been discovered so far, 70 of them through the transit method. Corot-9b is special in that its distance from its host star is about ten times larger than that of any planet previously discovered by this method. And unlike all such

  1. DISCOVERY OF A PLANETARY-MASS COMPANION TO A BROWN DWARF IN TAURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, K.; Luhman, K. L.; McLeod, K. K.

    2010-05-01

    We have performed a survey for substellar companions to young brown dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. In these data, we have discovered a candidate companion at a projected separation of 0.''105 from one of the brown dwarfs, corresponding to 15 AU at the distance of Taurus. To determine if this object is a companion, we have obtained images of the pair at a second epoch with the adaptive optics system at Gemini Observatory. The astrometry from the Hubble and Gemini data indicates that the two objects share similar proper motions and thus are likely companions. We estimate a mass of 5-10 M {sub Jup} for the secondary based on a comparison of its bolometric luminosity to the predictions of theoretical evolutionary models. This object demonstrates that planetary-mass companions to brown dwarfs can form on a timescale of {tau} {approx}< 1 Myr. Companion formation on such a rapid timescale is more likely to occur via gravitational instability in a disk or fragmentation of a cloud core than through core accretion. The Gemini images also reveal a possible substellar companion ({rho} = 0.''23) to a young low-mass star that is 12.''4 from the brown dwarf targeted by Hubble. If these four objects comprise a quadruple system, then its hierarchical configuration would suggest that the fragmentation of molecular cloud cores can produce companions below 10 M {sub Jup}.

  2. Direct Exoplanet Imaging around Sun-like Stars: Beating the Speckle Noise with Innovative Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian; Doyon, R.; Racine, R.; Nadeau, D.; Lafreniere, D.; Vallee, P.; Riopel, M.; Macintosh, B.

    2005-08-01

    Indirect surveys have now uncovered more than 150 exoplanets, but are limited to planets close to the star and measure only the projected mass and orbital parameters. Both photometry and spectroscopy of exoplanets are required to derive their physical characteristics. The star to exoplanet intensity ratio (>108 in the near infrared) and the relative separation (< 0.5 arcseconds) significantly complicate this endeavour. Current ground- and space-based direct imaging surveys achieve an intensity ratio up to 104 at 0.5. separation, a factor 10,000 from the desired goal. These surveys are limited by uncorrected atmospheric turbulence and optical surface imperfections that produce quasi-static speckles that look like exoplanets, but much brighter. Two techniques will be discussed to attenuate this speckle noise. The first is the Simultaneous Spectral Differential Imaging technique (SSDI), acquiring a number of images simultaneously at different adjacent narrowband wavelengths and combining them to attenuate speckles. The second is the Angular Differential Imaging technique (ADI), taking multiple observations while rotating the telescope or waiting for sufficient field rotation to subtract static speckles and to preserve the companion flux. Results from a dedicated SSDI camera "TRIDENT" that was mounted under PUEO/CFHT and from an ongoing ADI survey at Gemini with Altair/NIRI will be presented. Future work involving a new type of detector, the Multi-Color Detector Assembly (MCDA), will also be discussed. Combining these observation strategies and new detectors are of particular interest for specialized exoplanet finder instruments for 10-m telescopes that are currently under study, like ExAOC at Gemini, and future space-based observatories like TPF.

  3. The Companion's Role in the Doctor-Elderly Patient-Companion Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; Fuemmeler, Elizabeth F.

    Based on Beisecker's earlier finding that patients over age 60 brought companions to their medical appointments more often than did patients aged 25-59, a study was conducted to examine the role of the companion. Eleven of 21 patients aged 60-85 brought companions. Companions were either spouses or adult children of the patients. Within this…

  4. Wide Low-Mass Tertiary Companions of Binary Star Systems as a Test of Star Formation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the status of a common proper motion search for wide low-mass stellar and sub-stellar companions to known white dwarf-M dwarf binary systems. I-band observations were made using the 31" NURO telescope at Lowell Observatory. Candidate companions are selected using astrometry from our own data and 2MASS photometry. We have begun to spectroscopically confirm candidates that pass our selection criteria. The ultimate goal of the search is to test star formation theories which predict that close binary systems form by transferring angular momentum to a third companion. To this end, we will model the physical companion population and perform Bayesian statistical analysis to determine the best-fit population model to our data. Here we will present our spectroscopically confirmed companions as well as the preliminary results of our population models and statistical analysis.

  5. Insolation patterns on eccentric exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have found that synchronously-rotating Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars should exhibit an "eyeball" climate pattern, with a pupil of open ocean facing the parent star, and ice everywhere else. Recent work on eccentric exoplanets by Wang et al. (Wang, Y., Tian, F., Hu, Y. [2014b] Astrophys. J. 791, L12) has extended this conclusion to the 2:1 spin-orbit resonance as well, where the planet rotates twice during one orbital period. However, Wang et al. also found that the 3:2 and 5:2 half-odd resonances produce a zonally-striped climate pattern with polar icecaps instead. Unfortunately, they used incorrect insolation functions for the 3:2 and 5:2 resonances whose long-term time averages are essentially independent of longitude. This paper presents the correct insolation patterns for eccentric exoplanets with negligible obliquities in the 0:1, 1:2, 1:1, 3:2, 2:1, 5:2, 3:1, 7:2, and 4:1 spin-orbit resonances. I confirm that the mean insolation is distributed in an eyeball pattern for integer resonances; but for half-odd resonances, the mean insolation takes a "double-eyeball" pattern, identical over the "eastern" and "western" hemispheres. Presuming that liquids, ices, clouds, albedo, and thermal emission are similarly distributed, this has significant implications for the observation and interpretation of potentially habitable exoplanets. Finally, whether a striped ball, eyeball, or double-eyeball pattern emerges, the possibility exists that long-term build-up of ice (or liquid) away from the hot spots may alter the planet's inertia tensor and quadrupole moments enough to re-orient the planet, ultimately changing the distribution of liquid and ice.

  6. Time Domain Challenges for Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah Ilene

    2016-01-01

    Over the past couple decades, thousands of extra-solar planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. Most have been detected and characterized using transit and/or radial velocity time series, and these techniques have undergone huge improvements in instrumental precision. However, the improvements in precision have brought to light new statistical challenges in detecting and characterizing exoplanets in the presence of correlated noise caused by stellar activity (transits and radial velocities) and gaps in the time sampling (radial velocities). These challenges have afflicted many of the most interesting exoplanets, from Earth-like planets to planetary systems whose orbital dynamics place important constraints on how planetary systems form and evolve. In the first part of the talk, I will focus on the problem of correlated noise for characterizing transiting exoplanets using transit timing variations. I will present a comparison of several techniques using wavelets, Gaussian processes, and polynomial splines to account for correlated noise in the likelihood function when inferring planetary parameters. I will also present results on the characteristics of correlated noise that cause planets to be missed by the Kepler and homegrown pipelines despite high nominal signal-to-noise. In the second part of the talk, I will focus on the problem of aliasing caused by gaps in the radial-velocity time series on yearly, daily, and monthly timescales. I will present results on identifying aliases in the Fourier domain by taking advantage of aliasing on multiple timescales and discuss the interplay between aliasing and stellar activity for several habitable-zone "planets" that have recently been called into question as possible spurious signals caused by activity. As we push toward detecting and characterizing lower mass planets, it is essential that astrostatistical advances keep pace with advances in instrumentation.

  7. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  8. Validation of Kepler's multiple planet candidates. II. Refined statistical framework and descriptions of systems of special interest

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Rowe, Jason F.; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Borucki, William J.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Kolbl, Rea; Agol, Eric; Carter, Joshua A.; Torres, Guillermo; Ford, Eric B.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Star, Kimberly M.; Steffen, Jason H.

    2014-03-20

    We extend the statistical analysis performed by Lissauer et al. in 2012, which demonstrates that the overwhelming majority of Kepler candidate multiple transiting systems (multis) represents true transiting planets, and we develop therefrom a procedure to validate large numbers of planet candidates in multis as bona fide exoplanets. We show that this statistical framework correctly estimates the abundance of false positives already identified around Kepler targets with multiple sets of transit-like signatures based on their abundance around targets with single sets of transit-like signatures. We estimate the number of multis that represent split systems of one or more planets orbiting each component of a binary star system. We use the high reliability rate for multis to validate more than one dozen particularly interesting multi-planet systems herein. Hundreds of additional multi-planet systems are validated in a companion paper by Rowe et al. We note that few very short period (P < 1.6 days) planets orbit within multiple transiting planet systems and discuss possible reasons for their absence. There also appears to be a shortage of planets with periods exceeding a few months in multis.

  9. Hidden in Starlight: A Search for Widely Separated Substellar-Mass Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulsebus, Alan; Marengo, Massimo; Carson, Joseph; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2014-06-01

    Relatively few widely separated substellar-mass companions of planetary systems are known. These companions can alter the dynamics of planets through Kozai-mechanism-style secular perturbations, and may be a cause of the high mean eccentricity of exoplanets. The orbital periods of such companions are expected to be of the order of tens to thousands of years, making them undetectable by time-domain observations such as transit- and radial velocity searches. We have conducted a Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 and 4.5 µm imaging search for widely separated substellar-mass companions with projected separation between 5 to 40 arcsec from their parent star. The 36 stars in my sample range from 4 to 15 pc from the sun, giving a typical sensitivity of 10 MJ for objects with an orbital radius in the range of 50 to 300 au. This search required advanced PSF-subtraction techniques in order to minimize the inner working angle and increase sensitivity. In this talk I present the results of this search and discuss the data analysis methods we developed for it.

  10. SUB-STELLAR COMPANIONS AND STELLAR MULTIPLICITY IN THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Bonavita, Mariangela; Jayawardhana, Ray; Lafrenière, David; Janson, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We present results from a large, high-spatial-resolution near-infrared imaging search for stellar and sub-stellar companions in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The sample covers 64 stars with masses between those of the most massive Taurus members at ∼3 M {sub ☉} and low-mass stars at ∼0.2 M {sub ☉}. We detected 74 companion candidates, 34 of these reported for the first time. Twenty-five companions are likely physically bound, partly confirmed by follow-up observations. Four candidate companions are likely unrelated field stars. Assuming physical association with their host star, estimated companion masses are as low as ∼2 M {sub Jup}. The inferred multiplicity frequency within our sensitivity limits between ∼10-1500 AU is 26.3{sub −4.9}{sup +6.6}%. Applying a completeness correction, 62% ± 14% of all Taurus stars between 0.7 and 1.4 M {sub ☉} appear to be multiple. Higher order multiples were found in 1.8{sub −1.5}{sup +4.2}% of the cases, in agreement with previous observations of the field. We estimate a sub-stellar companion frequency of ∼3.5%-8.8% within our sensitivity limits from the discovery of two likely bound and three other tentative very low-mass companions. This frequency appears to be in agreement with what is expected from the tail of the stellar companion mass ratio distribution, suggesting that stellar and brown dwarf companions share the same dominant formation mechanism. Further, we find evidence for possible evolution of binary parameters between two identified sub-populations in Taurus with ages of ∼2 Myr and ∼20 Myr, respectively.