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Sample records for canine distemper vaccine

  1. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been...

  2. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been...

  3. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been...

  4. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been...

  5. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306 Section 113.306 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine...

  6. Recombinant canine distemper virus serves as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Feng, Na; Ge, Jinying; Shuai, Lei; Peng, Liyan; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2012-07-20

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Attenuated live vaccine has been widely used to protect carnivores from canine distemper. In this study, we generated a recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine strain, rCDV-RVG, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) by using reverse genetics. The recombinant virus rCDV-RVG retained growth properties similar to those of vector CDV in Vero cell culture. Animal studies demonstrated that rCDV-RVG was safe in mice and dogs. Mice inoculated intracerebrally or intramuscularly with rCDV-RVG showed no apparent signs of disease and developed a strong rabies virus (RABV) neutralizing antibody response, which completely protected mice from challenge with a lethal dose of street virus. Canine studies showed that vaccination with rCDV-RVG induced strong and long-lasting virus neutralizing antibody responses to RABV and CDV. This is the first study demonstrating that recombinant CDV has the potential to serve as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper in animals. PMID:22698451

  7. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of health information. Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. ...

  8. Measles vaccine in dogs: efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Strating, A

    1975-07-01

    Fifty young Beagle pups were used in studies on the efficacy of measles virus vaccine in providing protection against virulent canine distemper (CD) virus given intranasally. Among 29 dogs vaccinated with measles virus vaccine and subsequently exposed to virulent CD virus, 1 died, 7 developed relatively severe signs of CD, 15 had mild signs of distemper, and 6 remained clinically normal. Of 15 unvaccinated dogs similarly exposed to virulent CD virus, 11 succumbed to distemper. Six pups vaccinated with modified live-virus (MLV) CD virus vaccine remained clinically normal following immunity challenge. PMID:1150494

  9. Control of canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, G

    1995-05-01

    Control of canine distemper can realistically only be achieved by the use of vaccination. The types of vaccine in current use are described, together with some of the problems encountered such as interference by maternal antibodies, and usage in species other than dogs. Modified live viral vaccines, as used for more than thirty years, have proved very effective. Nevertheless there is scope for some improvement in vaccine efficacy and recent developments in genetic recombinant methods are described. PMID:8588329

  10. Effect of recombinant canine distemper vaccine on antibody titers in previously vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Hageny, T L; Haase, C J; Schultz, R D

    2006-01-01

    Two canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine types are currently commercially available: modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines and a canarypox recombinant CDV (rCDV) vaccine (Recombitek, Merial). This study compared the ability of the rCDV vaccine and MLV vaccines to significantly enhance (boost) the antibody response of previously immunized adult and juvenile dogs. A significant (fourfold or greater) increase in titer occurred in significantly more dogs revaccinated with Recombitek C-4 or Recombitek C-6 than with the MLV-CDV vaccines. This study demonstrates that Recombitek, the only vaccine for dogs containing rCDV, is more likely to significantly boost the CDV antibody response in previously vaccinated dogs than are the MLV-CDV vaccines. Because rCDV vaccine can boost the antibody titer of dogs previously vaccinated with an MLV vaccine, it can and should be used when core vaccines are readministered. PMID:16871492

  11. Fatal vaccine-induced canine distemper virus infection in black-footed ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Appel, M.J.G.; Erickson, R.C.; Novilla, M.N.

    1976-01-01

    Four black-footed ferrets that were live-trapped in South Dakota and transported to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center died within 21 days after vaccination with modified live canine distemper virus. Immunofluorescence, European ferret inoculation, virus isolation attempts, and serum-neutralization tests indicated insufficient attenuation of the vaccine for this species.

  12. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distemper to determine susceptibility. A constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture... neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. (i) The 20 dogs used as vaccinates shall be injected with one dose... neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product shall be tested for potency using...

  13. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distemper to determine susceptibility. A constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture... neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. (i) The 20 dogs used as vaccinates shall be injected with one dose... neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product shall be tested for potency using...

  14. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distemper to determine susceptibility. A constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture... neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. (i) The 20 dogs used as vaccinates shall be injected with one dose... neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product shall be tested for potency using...

  15. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distemper to determine susceptibility. A constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture... neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. (i) The 20 dogs used as vaccinates shall be injected with one dose... neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product shall be tested for potency using...

  16. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distemper to determine susceptibility. A constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture... neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. (i) The 20 dogs used as vaccinates shall be injected with one dose... neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product shall be tested for potency using...

  17. Efficacy of two canine distemper vaccines in wild Nearctic river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    PubMed

    Peper, Steven T; Peper, Randall L; Kollias, George V; Brooks, Robert P; Stevens, Sadie S; Serfass, Thomas L

    2014-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a contagious morbillivirus, infects families in the order Carnivora, including Nearctic river otters (Lontra canadensis). As a preventative measure, vaccinations against CDV are frequently given to mustelids in captive environments. The Pennsylvania River Otter Reintroduction Project (PRORP) used wild-caught river otters to evaluate the efficacy and need for vaccinations against CDV as part of any reintroduction project. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the prevalence of exposure to CDV in wild river otters, 2) determine the immunologic response of river otters (i.e., seroconversion) after vaccination with a single (primary) vaccine dose compared to a second (booster) dose of Galaxy-D, a modified live-virus canine distemper (CD) vaccine (MLV CDV), and 3) determine the immunologic response after being vaccinated with a primary vaccination compared to a booster dose of Fervac-D, an MLV CDV. River otters were injected subcutaneously in the nape of the neck with their designated vaccine. Timeframes for collection of blood samples and/or injection of booster vaccines varied depending on the parameters of PRORP. Ten of the 22 river otters had positive prevaccination titer levels to CD. Both vaccines, Galaxy-D and Fervac-D, produced sufficient seroconversion or rise of titer levels (86% and 57%, respectively) to recommend the use of vaccines in wild river otters. Future studies are recommended to evaluate currently produced CD vaccines. Future research should also focus on the number of days required between administration of primary and booster vaccines to achieve sufficient immune response. If only a primary dose is required, then hard-release reintroduction projects for river otters could be recommended. If primary and booster vaccines are required then soft-release reintroduction projects should be recommended. Soft-release projects should include captive management periods that allow for appropriate vaccination intervals

  18. Comparison of oral and intramuscular recombinant canine distemper vaccination in African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Connolly, Maren; Thomas, Patrick; Woodroffe, Rosie; Raphael, Bonnie L

    2013-12-01

    A series of three doses of recombinant canary-pox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine was administered at 1-mo intervals, orally (n = 8) or intramuscularly (n = 13), to 21 previously unvaccinated juvenile African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo. Titers were measured by serum neutralization at each vaccination and at intervals over a period of 3.5-21.5 mo after the initial vaccination. All postvaccination titers were negative for orally vaccinated animals at all sampling time points. Of the animals that received intramuscular vaccinations, 100% had presumed protective titers by the end of the course of vaccination, but only 50% of those sampled at 6.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers. None of the three animals sampled at 21.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers. PMID:24450046

  19. Three-year duration of immunity in dogs vaccinated with a canarypox-vectored recombinant canine distemper virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Schultz, R D

    2007-01-01

    Two studies evaluated the duration of serologic response to the recombinant, canarypox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine (Recombitek, Merial). Serologic duration of immunity was shown to be at least 36 months. Thus, Recombitek provides protection when administered less frequently than the manufacturer's label. After the initial vaccination protocol of two or more doses administered approximately 4 weeks apart, with the last dose given at 12 to 16 weeks of age or older, and re-vaccination at 1 year of age, Recombitek can confidently be readministered every 3 years with assurance of protection in immunocompetent dogs. This allows the vaccine to be administered in accordance with the recommendations of the American Animal Hospital Association Canine Vaccine Task Force and others. PMID:17616944

  20. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life. PMID:25637861

  1. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats. PMID:27468028

  2. Measles Vaccination of Nonhuman Primates Provides Partial Protection against Infection with Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Ludlow, Martin; Verburgh, R. Joyce; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Nguyen, D. Tien; McQuaid, Stephen; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) is being considered for global eradication, which would likely reduce compliance with MV vaccination. As a result, children will grow up without MV-specific immunity, creating a potential niche for closely related animal morbilliviruses such as canine distemper virus (CDV). Natural CDV infection causing clinical signs has never been reported in humans, but recent outbreaks in captive macaques have shown that CDV can cause disease in primates. We studied the virulence and tropism of recombinant CDV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in naive and measles-vaccinated cynomolgus macaques. In naive animals CDV caused viremia and fever and predominantly infected CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Virus was reisolated from the upper and lower respiratory tracts, but infection of epithelial or neuronal cells was not detectable at the time points examined, and the infections were self-limiting. This demonstrates that CDV readily infects nonhuman primates but suggests that additional mutations are necessary to achieve full virulence in nonnatural hosts. Partial protection against CDV was observed in measles-vaccinated macaques, as demonstrated by accelerated control of virus replication and limited shedding from the upper respiratory tract. While neither CDV infection nor MV vaccination induced detectable cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, MV-specific neutralizing antibody levels of MV-vaccinated macaques were boosted by CDV challenge infection, suggesting that cross-reactive VN epitopes exist. Rapid increases in white blood cell counts in MV-vaccinated macaques following CDV challenge suggested that cross-reactive cellular immune responses were also present. This study demonstrates that zoonotic morbillivirus infections can be controlled by measles vaccination. IMPORTANCE Throughout history viral zoonoses have had a substantial impact on human health. Given the drive toward global eradication of measles, it is essential to

  3. EVALUATION OF TWO CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS VACCINES IN CAPTIVE TIGERS (PANTHERA TIGRIS).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Ramsay, Edward; McAloose, Denise; Rush, Robert; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has caused clinical disease and death in nondomestic felids in both captive settings and in the wild. Outbreaks resulting in high mortality rates in tigers (Panthera tigris) have prompted some zoos to vaccinate tigers for CDV. In this study, six tigers received a recombinant canarypox-vectored CDV vaccine (1 ml s.c.) and were revaccinated with 3 ml s.c. (mean) 39 days later. Blood collection for CDV antibody detection via serum neutralization was performed on (mean) days 0, 26, and 66 post-initial vaccination. No tigers had detectable antibodies at days 0 or 26, and only two tigers had low (16 and 32) antibody titers at day 66. Eight additional tigers received a live, attenuated CDV vaccine (1 ml s.c.) on day 0 and were revaccinated with 1 ml s.c. (mean) 171 days later. Blood collection for CDV antibody detection via serum neutralization was performed on (mean) days 0, 26, 171, and 196. Seven of eight tigers receiving the live, attenuated vaccine had no detectable titers prior to vaccination, but all animals had titers of >128 (range 128-1,024) at day 26. At 171 days, all tigers still had detectable titers (geometric mean 69.8, range 16-256), and at 196 days (2 wk post-revaccination) all but two showed an increase to >128 (range 32-512). To determine safety, an additional 41 tigers were vaccinated with 2 ml of a recombinant vaccine containing only CDV components, and an additional 38 tigers received 1 ml of the live, attenuated vaccine, administered either subcutaneously or intramuscularly; no serious adverse effects were noted. Although both vaccines appear safe, the live, attenuated vaccine produced a stronger and more consistent serologic response in tigers. PMID:27468029

  4. Effect of vaccination with recombinant canine distemper virus vaccine immediately before exposure under shelter-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Schultz, R D

    2006-01-01

    Vaccination with modified-live virus (MLV) canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine has historically been recommended for animals in high-risk environments because of the rapid onset of immunity following vaccination. Recombinant CDV (rCDV) vaccine was deemed a suitable alternative to MLV-CDV vaccination in pet dogs, but insufficient data precluded its use where CDV was a serious threat to puppies, such as in shelters, kennels, and pet stores. In this study, dogs experimentally challenged hours after a single dose of rCDV or MLV vaccine became sick but recovered, whereas unvaccinated dogs became sick and died. Dogs vaccinated with a single dose of rCDV or MLV vaccine 1 week before being experimentally challenged remained healthy and showed no clinical signs. Dogs given one dose of rCDV vaccine hours before being placed in a CDV-contaminated environment did not become sick. These findings support the hypothesis that rCDV vaccine has a similar time-to-immunity as MLV-CDV vaccines and can likewise protect dogs in high-risk environments after one dose. PMID:16871493

  5. 'Saving the lives of our dogs': the development of canine distemper vaccine in interwar Britain.

    PubMed

    Bresalier, Michael; Worboys, Michael

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines the successful campaign in Britain to develop canine distemper vaccine between 1922 and 1933. The campaign mobilized disparate groups around the common cause of using modern science to save the nation's dogs from a deadly disease. Spearheaded by landed patricians associated with the country journal The Field, and funded by dog owners and associations, it relied on collaborations with veterinary professionals, government scientists, the Medical Research Council (MRC) and the commercial pharmaceutical house the Burroughs Wellcome Company (BWC). The social organization of the campaign reveals a number of important, yet previously unexplored, features of interwar science and medicine in Britain. It depended on a patronage system that drew upon a large base of influential benefactors and public subscriptions. Coordinated by the Field Distemper Fund, this system was characterized by close relationships between landed elites and their social networks with senior science administrators and researchers. Relations between experts and non-experts were crucial, with high levels of public engagement in all aspects of research and vaccine development. At the same time, experimental and commercial research supported under the campaign saw dynamic interactions between animal and human medicine, which shaped the organization of the MRC's research programme and demonstrated the value of close collaboration between veterinary and medical science, with the dog as a shared object and resource. Finally, the campaign made possible the translation of 'laboratory' findings into field conditions and commercial products. Rather than a unidirectional process, translation involved negotiations over the very boundaries of the 'laboratory' and the 'field', and what constituted a viable vaccine. This paper suggests that historians reconsider standard historical accounts of the nature of patronage, the role of animals, and the interests of landed elites in interwar British

  6. Vaccination of puppies born to immune dams with a canine adenovirus-based vaccine protects against a canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Laurent; Tronel, Jean Phillipe; Pardo-David, Camilla; Tanner, Patrick; Colombet, Guy; Minke, Jules; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe

    2002-10-01

    None of the currently available distemper vaccines provides a satisfactory solution for the immunization of very young carnivores in the face of maternal-derived immunity. Since mucosal immunization with replication-competent adenovirus-based vaccines has been proven effective in the face of passive immunity against the vector, it has the potential to provide a solution for the vaccination of young puppies born to canine distemper virus (CDV)-immune dams. We report the engineering and the characterization of two replication-competent canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2)-based vaccines expressing, respectively, the CDV hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) antigens. We first demonstrated that the intranasal vaccination with a mixture of both recombinant CAV2s provides an excellent level of protection in seronegative puppies, confirming the value of replication-competent adenovirus-based vectors for mucosal vaccination. In contrast, intranasal immunization with the same vaccine of puppies born to CDV- and CAV2-immune dams, failed to activate specific and protective immune responses. We hypothesized that an active CAV2 infection occurred while puppies were in close contact with the vaccinated dams in the breeding units and that the resulting active mucosal immunity interfered with the intranasal administration of CAV2-based CDV vaccine. However, when puppies born to CDV- and CAV2-immune dams were vaccinated subcutaneously with the CAV2-based CDV vaccine, significant seroconversion and solid protective immunity were triggered despite pre-existing systemic immunity to the vector. This latter result is surprising and suggests that subcutaneous vaccination with a replication-competent recombinant CAV2 may be an efficient strategy to overcome both passive and active adenovirus specific immunity in the dog. From a practical point of view, this could pave the way for an original strategy to vaccinate young puppies in the face of maternal-derived immunity. PMID:12297394

  7. Encephalitis in dogs associated with a batch of canine distemper (Rockborn) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, H J; Thompson, H; McCandlish, I A; Macartney, L; Nash, A S

    1988-01-16

    During a period of seven months in 1982-83 cases of postvaccinal encephalitis were recorded in dogs in various parts of Britain after the administration of a particular batch of combined distemper/hepatitis vaccine. Detailed investigations of one of these cases revealed that the distemper component was responsible and the vaccine virus was recovered from the brain of an affected dog. PMID:2895528

  8. Vaccination of mice against canine distemper virus-induced encephalitis with vaccinia virus recombinants encoding measles or canine distemper virus antigens.

    PubMed

    Wild, T F; Bernard, A; Spehner, D; Villeval, D; Drillien, R

    1993-01-01

    Measles and canine distemper are caused by serologically related viruses. Although dogs immunized with measles virus (MV) do not elicit canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibodies, they are protected against the fatal disease. To investigate the potential role of the MV antigens in protection against CDV, we have immunized mice with vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants expressing the MV haemagglutinin (HA), fusion (F), nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix (M) antigens and challenged them with CDV. A partial protection was observed with the VV recombinants expressing the F, NP and M antigens, but not the HA. In contrast, immunization with a VV recombinant expressing the CDV F protein completely protected mice from CDV. PMID:8470428

  9. Design of different strategies of multivalent DNA-based vaccination against rabies and canine distemper in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the vaccination campaigns, puppies younger than 3 months old are not targeted and remain unvaccinated for at least the first year of their lives. Almost half of the reported rabid dogs are 6 months or younger. Hence, we should recommend the vaccination against rabies of young puppies. Unfortunately, owing to the exposure of puppies to infections with either canine parvovirus (CPV) or distemper virus (CDV) after the intervention of the vaccinators, owners are reluctant to vaccinate puppies against rabies. Therefore, it is necessary to include the CPV and CDV valences in the vaccine against rabies. Multivalent DNA-based vaccination in dogs, including rabies and distemper valences, could help in raising vaccine coverage. Methods We have designed monovalent and multivalent DNA-based vaccine candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays. These plasmids encode to the rabies virus glycoprotein and/or the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin. The first strategy of multivalent DNA-based vaccination is by mixing plasmids encoding to a single antigen each. The second is by simply fusing the genes of the antigens together. The third is by adding the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A oligopeptide gene into the antigen genes. The last strategy is by the design and use of a bicistronic plasmid with an “Internal Ribosome Entry Site” (IRES) domain. Results The monovalent construct against canine distemper was efficiently validated by inducing higher humoral immune responses compared to cell-culture-derived vaccine both in mice and dogs. All multivalent plasmids efficiently expressed both valences after in vitro transfection of BHK-21 cells. In BALB/c mice, the bicistronic IRES-dependant construct was the most efficient inducer of virus-neutralizing antibodies against both valences. It was able to induce better humoral immune responses compared to the administration of either cell-culture-derived vaccines or monovalent plasmids. The FMDV 2A was also efficient

  10. Establishment of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection and differentiation of canine distemper virus infected and vaccinated animals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Fei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Tian, Jin; Jiang, Yi-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Zhan; Chai, Hong-Liang; Yang, Tian-Kuo; Yin, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Liu, Ming; Hua, Yu-Ping; Qu, Lian-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Although widespread vaccination against canine distemper virus (CDV) has been conducted for many decades, several canine distemper outbreaks in vaccinated animals have been reported frequently. In order to detect and differentiate the wild-type and vaccine strains of the CDV from the vaccinated animals, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method was developed. A set of four primers-two internal and two external-were designed to target the H gene for the specific detection of wild-type CDV variants. The CDV-H RT-LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene, within 60 min, using a water bath held at a constant temperature of 65°C. The assay was 100-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 10(-1)TCID50ml(-1). The system showed a preference for wild-type CDV, and exhibited less sensitivity to canine parvovirus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2, canine coronavirus, and canine parainfluenza virus. The assay was validated using 102 clinical samples obtained from vaccinated dog farms, and the results were comparable to a multiplex nested RT-PCR assay. The specific CDV-H RT-LAMP assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for the detection of canines infected with wild-type CDV from canines vaccinated with attenuated vaccine. PMID:25769803

  11. Serologic responses after vaccination of fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) and meerkats (Suricata suricatta) with a live, canarypox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Coke, Rob L; Backues, Kay A; Hoover, John P; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Ritchey, Jerry W; West, Gary D

    2005-06-01

    Fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) and meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are considered to be susceptible to canine distemper virus (CDV) infection. Although no definitive clinical cases of natural CDV infections have been reported, mortalities due to CDV have been suspected and are reported in other closely related species. A commercially available monovalent, live, canarypox-vectored CDV vaccine induced neutralizing antibody titers that were maintained for at least a year in both fennec foxes and meerkats. PMID:17323579

  12. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  13. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice with these constructs, or with an attenuated live-virus vaccine, while controls received saline or the NYVAC and ALVAC vectors expressing rabies virus glycoprotein. Control animals did not develop neutralizing antibody and succumbed to distemper after developing fever, weight loss, leukocytopenia, decreased activity, conjunctivitis, an erythematous rash typical of distemper, CNS signs, and viremia in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (as measured by reverse transcription-PCR). All three CDV vaccines elicited neutralizing titers of at least 1:96. All vaccinated ferrets survived, and none developed viremia. Both recombinant vaccines also protected against the development of symptomatic distemper. However, ferrets receiving the live-virus vaccine lost weight, became lymphocytopenic, and developed the erythematous rash typical of CDV. These data show that ferrets are an excellent model for evaluating the ability of CDV vaccines to protect against symptomatic infection. Because the pathogenesis and clinical course of CDV infection of ferrets is quite similar to that of other Morbillivirus infections, including measles, this model will be useful in testing new candidate Morbillivirus vaccines. PMID:8995676

  14. Vaccination against canine distemper virus infection in infant ferrets with and without maternal antibody protection, using recombinant attenuated poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    2000-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log(10) inverse mean titer +/- standard deviation of 2.30 +/- 0.12 and 2.20 +/- 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 +/- 0.57 versus 0.40 +/- 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 +/- 0. 54 and 1.28 +/- 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 +/- 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 +/- 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 x 10(-6)). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1

  15. Vaccination against Canine Distemper Virus Infection in Infant Ferrets with and without Maternal Antibody Protection, Using Recombinant Attenuated Poxvirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Janet; Taylor, Jill; Tartaglia, James; Paoletti, Enzo; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log10 inverse mean titer ± standard deviation of 2.30 ± 0.12 and 2.20 ± 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 ± 0.57 versus 0.40 ± 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 ± 0.54 and 1.28 ± 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 ± 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 ± 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 × 10−6). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1.63 ± 0

  16. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  17. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Y.; Li, W. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, W. J.; Zhao, M. Q.; Luo, Y. W.; Chen, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  18. Use of serologic tests to predict resistance to Canine distemper virus-induced disease in vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Wayne A; Totten, Janet S; Lappin, Michael R; Schultz, Ronald D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether detection of Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific serum antibodies correlates with resistance to challenge with virulent virus. Virus neutralization (VN) assay results were compared with resistance to viral challenge in 2 unvaccinated Beagle puppies, 9 unvaccinated Beagle dogs (4.4-7.2 years of age), and 9 vaccinated Beagle dogs (3.7-4.7 years of age). Eight of 9 (89%) unvaccinated adult dogs exhibited clinical signs after virus challenge, and 1 (13%) dog died. As compared to adult dogs, the 2 unvaccinated puppies developed more severe clinical signs and either died or were euthanized after challenge. In contrast, no clinical signs were detected after challenge of the 9 adult vaccinated dogs with post-vaccination intervals of up to 4.4 years. In vaccinated dogs, the positive and negative predictive values of VN assay results for resistance to challenge were 100% and 0%, respectively. Results indicate that dogs vaccinated with modified live CDV can be protected from challenge for ≤4.4 years postvaccination and that detection of virus-specific antibodies is predictive of whether dogs are resistant to challenge with virulent virus. Results also indicate that CDV infection in unvaccinated dogs results in age-dependent morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of age-dependent morbidity and mortality, duration of vaccine-induced immunity, and the positive and negative predictive values of detection of virus-specific serum antibodies are useful in development of rational booster vaccination intervals for the prevention of CDV-mediated disease in adult dogs. PMID:26330396

  19. Adjuvant effects of recombinant giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 on the canine distemper disease vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yue; Niu, Lili; Deng, Jiabo; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Jianxi; Chen, Jiao; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a morbillivirus known to cause morbidity and mortality in a broad range of animals. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially captive ones, are susceptible to natural infection with CDV. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a powerful adjuvant molecule that can enhance the development of antigen-specific immunity and vaccine efficacy. In this study, a giant panda IL-18 gene eukaryotic expression plasmid (pcAmIL-18) was constructed. Female BALB/c mice were muscularly inoculated with the plasmids pcAmIL-18, pcDNA3.1 and PBS, respectively. They were subsequently injected with an attenuated CDV vaccine for dogs, and the induced humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. The results showed that pcAmIL-18 remarkably improved the level of specific antibody, IFN-γ and IL-2 in mice sera, the T lymphocyte proliferation index and the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. These data indicated that pcAmIL-18 is a potential adjuvant that promotes specific immunity. PMID:25399820

  20. Adjuvant effects of recombinant giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) IL-18 on the canine distemper disease vaccine in mice

    PubMed Central

    YAN, Yue; NIU, Lili; DENG, Jiabo; WANG, Qiang; YU, Jianqiu; ZHANG, Yizheng; WANG, Jianxi; CHEN, Jiao; WEI, Changhe; TAN, Xuemei

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a morbillivirus known to cause morbidity and mortality in a broad range of animals. Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), especially captive ones, are susceptible to natural infection with CDV. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a powerful adjuvant molecule that can enhance the development of antigen-specific immunity and vaccine efficacy. In this study, a giant panda IL-18 gene eukaryotic expression plasmid (pcAmIL-18) was constructed. Female BALB/c mice were muscularly inoculated with the plasmids pcAmIL-18, pcDNA3.1 and PBS, respectively. They were subsequently injected with an attenuated CDV vaccine for dogs, and the induced humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. The results showed that pcAmIL-18 remarkably improved the level of specific antibody, IFN-γ and IL-2 in mice sera, the T lymphocyte proliferation index and the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These data indicated that pcAmIL-18 is a potential adjuvant that promotes specific immunity. PMID:25399820

  1. Display of neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus and a T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus on chimeric tymovirus-like particles and its use as a vaccine candidate both against Canine parvo and Canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Shahana, Pallichera Vijayan; Rani, Gudavelli Sudha; Sugumar, Parthasarthy; Shankar, Chinchkar Ramchandra; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2009-12-10

    Expression of Physalis mottle tymovirus coat protein in Escherichia coli was earlier shown to self-assemble into empty capsids that were nearly identical to the capsids formed in vivo. Amino acid substitutions were made at the N-terminus of wild-type Physalis mottle virus coat protein with neutralizing epitopes of Canine parvovirus containing the antigenic sites 1-2, 4 and 6-7 and T-cell epitope of the fusion protein of Canine distemper virus in various combinations to yield PhMV1, PhMV2, PhMV3, PhMV4 and PhMV5. These constructs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The chimeric proteins self-assembled into chimeric tymovirus-like particles (TVLPs) as determined by electron microscopy. The TVLPs were purified by ultracentrifugation and injected into guinea pigs and dogs to determine their immunogenicity. Initial immunogenicity studies in guinea pigs indicated that PhMV3 gave a higher response in comparison to the other TVLPs for both CPV and CDV and hence all further experiments in dogs were done with PhMV3. HI was done against different isolates obtained from various parts of the country. Protective titres indicated the broad spectrum of the vaccine. In conclusion the study indicated that the above chimeric VLP based vaccine could be used in dogs to generate a protective immune response against diseases caused by both Canine parvo and Canine distemper virus. PMID:19818723

  2. Canine distemper spillover in domestic dogs from urban wildlife.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Sanjay; Yeary, Teresa J

    2011-11-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a major disease of domestic dogs that develops as a serious systemic infection in unvaccinated or improperly vaccinated dogs. Domesticated dogs are the main reservoir of CDV, a multihost pathogen. This virus of the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae occurs in other carnivorous species including all members of the Canidae and Mustelidae families and in some members of the Procyonidae, Hyaenidae, Ursidae, and Viverridae families. Canine distemper also has been reported in the Felidae family and marine mammals. The spread and incidences of CDV epidemics in dogs and wildlife here and worldwide are increasing. PMID:22041204

  3. Immunopathogenic and Neurological Mechanisms of Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Otávio Valério; Botelho, Clarisse Vieira; Ferreira, Caroline Gracielle Torres; Scherer, Paulo Oldemar; Soares-Martins, Jamária Adriana Pinheiro; Almeida, Márcia Rogéria; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV), which is a member of the Morbillivirus genus, Paramyxoviridae family. Animals that most commonly suffer from this disease belong to the Canidae family; however, the spectrum of natural hosts for CDV also includes several other families of the order Carnivora. The infectious disease presents worldwide distribution and maintains a high incidence and high levels of lethality, despite the availability of effective vaccines, and no specific treatment. CDV infection in dogs is characterized by the presentation of systemic and/or neurological courses, and viral persistence in some organs, including the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissues. An elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in canine distemper disease will lead to a better understanding of the injuries and clinical manifestations caused by CDV. Ultimately, further insight about this disease will enable the improvement of diagnostic methods as well as therapeutic studies. PMID:23193403

  4. A comparison of the immune responses of dogs exposed to canine distemper virus (CDV) — Differences between vaccinated and wild-type virus exposed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Danielle; Bender, Scott; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific immune response was measured in different dog populations. Three groups of vaccinated or wild-type virus exposed dogs were tested: dogs with a known vaccination history, dogs without a known vaccination history (shelter dogs), and dogs with potential exposure to wild-type CDV. The use of a T-cell proliferation assay demonstrated a detectable CDV-specific T-cell response from both spleen and blood lymphocytes of dogs. Qualitatively, antibody assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assay] predicted the presence of a T-cell response well, although quantitatively neither antibody assays nor the T-cell assay correlated well with each other. An interesting finding from our study was that half of the dogs in shelters were not vaccinated (potentially posing a public veterinary health problem) and that antibody levels in dogs living in an environment with endemic CDV were lower than in vaccinated animals. PMID:20885846

  5. Detection by RT-PCR and genetic characterization of canine distemper virus from vaccinated and non-vaccinated dogs in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Marina Gallo; Remorini, Patricia; Periolo, Osvaldo; Iglesias, Marcela; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2007-12-15

    RT-PCR was used to detect canine distemper virus (CDV) RNA in clotted blood from Argentine domestic dogs. The NP gene was detected in 73 out of 99 blood samples analyzed. The deduced amino acid sequence of these gene fragments showed 100% identity with the sequence of other wild-type and vaccine strains. A fragment of the hemagglutinin gene was amplified from 24 (32.9%) of the NP-RNA-positive clinical specimens. These H fragments were further analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing. A single NdeI site was detected in all 24 wild-type strains but was absent in the vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial hemagglutinin amino acid sequences showed close clustering for local strains, clearly distinct from vaccine strains and other wild-type foreign CDV strains. One of the local strains, Arg 23, branched out of the root of the Argentine clade, close to the European strains, suggesting that two different pathogenic CDV genotypes are currently circulating in Argentina, one of them clearly predominant. PMID:17628358

  6. Severe canine distemper outbreak in unvaccinated dogs in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Zacarias, Julieta; Dimande, Alberto; Achá, Sara; Dias, Paula T; Leonel, Elisa M; Messa, Aurora; Macucule, Baltazar; Júnior, José L; Bila, Custódio G

    2016-01-01

    Although significant animal suffering caused by preventable diseases is frequently seen in developing countries, reports of this are scarce. This report describes avoidable animal suffering owing to a suspected canine distemper (CD) outbreak in unvaccinated dogs owned by low-income families in Mozambique that killed approximately 200 animals. Affected dogs exhibited clinical signs, and gross and microscopic lesions compatible with CD. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of canine distemper virus (CDV) in the kidney of one dog from the cohort. This brief communication again illustrates that large outbreaks of CDV in unvaccinated dogs occur and that large-scale avoidable suffering and threats to the health of dogs and wild canines continue. Mass vaccination supported by government and non-government organisations is recommended. PMID:27543040

  7. The humoral immune response to recombinant nucleocapsid antigen of canine distemper virus in dogs vaccinated with attenuated distemper virus or DNA encoding the nucleocapsid of wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M E; Cherpillod, P; Koch, A; Zurbriggen, R; Bruckner, L; Wittek, R; Zurbriggen, A

    2001-06-01

    This study compared the humoral immune response against the nucleocapsid-(N) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) of dogs vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine against parvo-, adeno-, and parainfluenza virus and leptospira combined with either the attenuated CDV Onderstepoort strain (n = 15) or an expression plasmid containing the N-gene of CDV (n = 30). The vaccinations were applied intramuscularly three times at 2-week intervals beginning at the age of 6 weeks. None of the pre-immune sera recognized the recombinant N-protein, confirming the lack of maternal antibodies at this age. Immunization with DNA vaccine for CDV resulted in positive serum N-specific IgG response. However, their IgG (and IgA) titres were lower than those of CDV-vaccinated dogs. Likewise, DNA-vaccinated dogs did not show an IgM peak. There was no increase in N-specific serum IgE titres in either group. Serum titres to the other multivalent vaccine components were similar in both groups. PMID:11475904

  8. Characterization of two recent Japanese field isolates of canine distemper virus and examination of the avirulent strain utility as an attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Akiko; Yoneda, Misako; Seki, Takahiro; Uema, Masashi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Nishi, Toshiya; Fujita, Kentaro; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2014-12-01

    Recently, several new strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) have been isolated in Japan. To investigate their pathogenesis in dogs, the Yanaka and Bunkyo-K strains were investigated by infecting dogs and determining clinical signs, amount of virus, and antibody responses. The Yanaka strain is avirulent and induced an antibody response. The Bunkyo-K strain induced typical CDV clinical signs in infected dogs and virulence was enhanced by brain passage. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of H genes demonstrated the Bunkyo-K strains were of a different lineage from Asia-1 group including the Yanaka strain and Asia-2 group that contain recent Japanese isolates, which were recently identified as major prevalent strains worldwide but distinct from old vaccine strains. Based on these data, we tested the ability of the Yanaka strain for vaccination. Inoculation with the Yanaka strain efficiently induced CDV neutralizing antibodies with no clinical signs, and the protection effects against challenge with either old virulent strain or Bunkyo-K strain were equal or greater when compared with vaccination by an original vaccine strain. Thus, the Yanaka strain is a potential vaccine candidate against recent prevalent CDV strains. PMID:25465179

  9. Effects of vaccines on the canine immune system.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, T R; Jensen, J L; Rubino, M J; Yang, W C; Schultz, R D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of several commercially available polyvalent canine vaccines on the immune system of the dog were examined. The results demonstrated that the polyvalent vaccines used in this study significantly suppressed the absolute lymphocyte count and that most of the polyvalent vaccines significantly suppressed lymphocyte response to mitogen, but had no effect on natural effector cell activity, neutrophil chemiluminescence, nor antibody response to canine distemper virus. The individual vaccine components from the polyvalent vaccines when inoculated alone did not significantly suppress the lymphocyte response to mitogen. However, when canine distemper virus was combined with canine adenovirus type 1 or canine adenovirus type 2, significant suppression in lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen occurred. The results indicate that interactions between canine distemper virus and canine adenovirus type 1 or canine adenovirus type 2 are responsible for the polyvalent vaccine induced suppression of lymphocyte responsiveness. PMID:2540897

  10. Canine distemper virus antigen detection in external epithelia of recently vaccinated, sick dogs by fluorescence microscopy is a valuable prognostic indicator.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Sanjay; Neel, Tina

    2015-02-01

    Currently, there are no reliable predictors of the clinical outcomes of domesticated dogs that have been recently vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) and develop respiratory disease. In this study, vaccinated dogs from Oklahoma City that were showing clinical signs of respiratory disease were evaluated for CDV antigen using a direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT). Clinical outcomes after standard symptomatic therapy for respiratory disease were recorded, and a statistical analysis of the results was performed. We present our study showing that CDV FAT results were predictive of clinical recovery (prognostic indicator, prospects of clinical recovery) among vaccinated dogs showing clinical signs of respiratory disease. Negative CDV FAT results equated to 80% chances of recovery after symptomatic therapy, compared to 55% chances of recovery when the CDV FAT results were positive. Based on the results of this study, we show that veterinarians can make better informed decisions about the clinical outcomes of suspected CDV cases, with 2-h turnaround times, by using the CDV FAT. Thus, antemortem examination with the CDV FAT on external epithelia of recently vaccinated, sick dogs is a clinically useful diagnostic test and valuable prognostic indicator for veterinarians. Application of the CDV FAT to these samples avoids unnecessary euthanasia of dogs with suspected CDV. PMID:25428156

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Antigen Detection in External Epithelia of Recently Vaccinated, Sick Dogs by Fluorescence Microscopy Is a Valuable Prognostic Indicator

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no reliable predictors of the clinical outcomes of domesticated dogs that have been recently vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) and develop respiratory disease. In this study, vaccinated dogs from Oklahoma City that were showing clinical signs of respiratory disease were evaluated for CDV antigen using a direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT). Clinical outcomes after standard symptomatic therapy for respiratory disease were recorded, and a statistical analysis of the results was performed. We present our study showing that CDV FAT results were predictive of clinical recovery (prognostic indicator, prospects of clinical recovery) among vaccinated dogs showing clinical signs of respiratory disease. Negative CDV FAT results equated to 80% chances of recovery after symptomatic therapy, compared to 55% chances of recovery when the CDV FAT results were positive. Based on the results of this study, we show that veterinarians can make better informed decisions about the clinical outcomes of suspected CDV cases, with 2-h turnaround times, by using the CDV FAT. Thus, antemortem examination with the CDV FAT on external epithelia of recently vaccinated, sick dogs is a clinically useful diagnostic test and valuable prognostic indicator for veterinarians. Application of the CDV FAT to these samples avoids unnecessary euthanasia of dogs with suspected CDV. PMID:25428156

  12. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    PubMed

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  13. Complement-mediated neutralization of canine distemper virus in vitro: cross-reaction between vaccine Onderstepoort and field KDK-1 strains with different hemagglutinin gene characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Masami; Motoyoshi, Megumi; Maeda, Ken; Kai, Kazunari

    2002-07-01

    The properties of neutralization of antigens of canine distemper virus Onderstepoort and a recent field isolate, KDK-1, were investigated with strain-specific dog sera. A conventional neutralization assay indicated antigenic dissimilarity between the strains; however, when guinea pig complement was included in the reaction mixture, the strains were neutralized with not only the homologous but also the heterologous antibodies. PMID:12093697

  14. Development of a challenge-protective vaccine concept by modification of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Silin, D; Lyubomska, O; Ludlow, M; Duprex, W P; Rima, B K

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate that insertion of the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the coding sequence for the second hinge region of the viral L (large) protein (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase) attenuates a wild-type canine distemper virus. Moreover, we show that single intranasal immunization with this recombinant virus provides significant protection against challenge with the virulent parental virus. Protection against wild-type challenge was gained either after recovery of cellular immunity postimmunization or after development of neutralizing antibodies. Insertion of EGFP seems to result in overattenuation of the virus, while our previous experiments demonstrated that the insertion of an epitope tag into a similar position did not affect L protein function. Thus, a desirable level of attenuation could be reached by manipulating the length of the insert (in the second hinge region of the L protein), providing additional tools for optimization of controlled attenuation. This strategy for controlled attenuation may be useful for a "quick response" in vaccine development against well-known and "new" viral infections and could be combined efficiently with other strategies of vaccine development and delivery systems. PMID:17898047

  15. Development of a Challenge-Protective Vaccine Concept by Modification of the Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of Canine Distemper Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Silin, D.; Lyubomska, O.; Ludlow, M.; Duprex, W. P.; Rima, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that insertion of the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the coding sequence for the second hinge region of the viral L (large) protein (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase) attenuates a wild-type canine distemper virus. Moreover, we show that single intranasal immunization with this recombinant virus provides significant protection against challenge with the virulent parental virus. Protection against wild-type challenge was gained either after recovery of cellular immunity postimmunization or after development of neutralizing antibodies. Insertion of EGFP seems to result in overattenuation of the virus, while our previous experiments demonstrated that the insertion of an epitope tag into a similar position did not affect L protein function. Thus, a desirable level of attenuation could be reached by manipulating the length of the insert (in the second hinge region of the L protein), providing additional tools for optimization of controlled attenuation. This strategy for controlled attenuation may be useful for a “quick response” in vaccine development against well-known and “new” viral infections and could be combined efficiently with other strategies of vaccine development and delivery systems. PMID:17898047

  16. Genetic analysis of the central untranslated genome region and the proximal coding part of the F gene of wild-type and vaccine canine distemper morbilliviruses.

    PubMed

    Liermann, H; Harder, T C; Löchelt, M; von Messling, V; Baumgärtner, W; Moennig, V; Haas, L

    1998-01-01

    Located between the open reading frames encoding the matrix (M) and the fusion (F) protein the morbillivirus genome contains an unusually large non-coding intercistronic region (M-F UTR) of up to 5.6% of the full length genome. Any function(s) of this region have largely remained obscure. Here, we analyze the M-F UTR and the proximal coding part of the downstream F gene of several recent canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) wild-type (wt) isolates and vaccine strains. While the F gene coding part appeared to be highly conserved (about 93% homology), a considerable degree of strain-specific variation of up to 21.4% was evident when comparing the M-F UTR. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a co-circulation of several contemporary CDV genotypes within a close geographic range (central Europe). A remarkably distinct CDV wt lineage, so far detected only in mustelids, is displayed. A rather non-scattered pattern of mutations within the M-F UTR suggested superimposition of RNA sequence and/or secondary structure constraints. Extensive folding in the long (460 nt) and moderately GC-rich 5'-UTR of the F mRNA was evident, particularly around the putative F protein translation initiation codon (AUG461 of the Onderstepoort vaccine strain). The region immediately preceding the putative F initiation site also harbored the only mutation unique to both vaccine strains within the F-5'UTR (position 455: Awt vs. Cvac). The putative F protein start codon, AUG461, was found to be mutated to AUA or GUA in all wt isolates analyzed and in another vaccine strain (Rockborn). Possible consequences for F protein translation initiation in wt CDV are discussed. PMID:9926401

  17. Canine Distemper Virus Strains Circulating among North American Dogs▿

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Sanjay; Allison, Robin W.; Johnston, Larry; Murray, Brandy L.; Holland, Steven; Meinkoth, Jim; Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious virus that causes multisystemic disease in dogs. We received seven samples from dogs with CD from the United States during 2007. CDV isolates from these samples formed large, multinucleated syncytia in a Vero cell line expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). Based on the hemagglutinin gene sequences, the CDV isolates from three states (California, Missouri, and Oklahoma) formed two CDV genetic groups: group I (major; six of seven isolates) consisted of CDV isolates closely related to the European wildlife lineage of CDV, and group II (minor; one of seven isolates) was genetically related to the Arctic-like lineage of CDV. However, both CDV groups were genetically different from the current vaccine strains that belong to the American-1 lineage of the old (1930 to 1950) CDV isolates. PMID:18256210

  18. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  19. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  20. Canine Distemper in Endangered Ethiopian Wolves

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Christopher H.; Hussein, Alo; Laurenson, M. Karen; Malcolm, James R.; Marino, Jorgelina; Regassa, Fekede; Stewart, Anne-Marie E.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) is the world’s rarest canid; ≈500 wolves remain. The largest population is found within the Bale Mountains National Park (BMNP) in southeastern Ethiopia, where conservation efforts have demonstrated the negative effect of rabies virus on wolf populations. We describe previously unreported infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) among these wolves during 2005–2006 and 2010. Death rates ranged from 43% to 68% in affected subpopulations and were higher for subadult than adult wolves (83%–87% vs. 34%–39%). The 2010 CDV outbreak started 20 months after a rabies outbreak, before the population had fully recovered, and led to the eradication of several focal packs in BMNP’s Web Valley. The combined effect of rabies and CDV increases the chance of pack extinction, exacerbating the typically slow recovery of wolf populations, and represents a key extinction threat to populations of this highly endangered carnivore. PMID:25898177

  1. Canine distemper in endangered Ethiopian wolves.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher H; Banyard, Ashley C; Hussein, Alo; Laurenson, M Karen; Malcolm, James R; Marino, Jorgelina; Regassa, Fekede; Stewart, Anne-Marie E; Fooks, Anthony R; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) is the world's rarest canid; ≈500 wolves remain. The largest population is found within the Bale Mountains National Park (BMNP) in southeastern Ethiopia, where conservation efforts have demonstrated the negative effect of rabies virus on wolf populations. We describe previously unreported infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) among these wolves during 2005-2006 and 2010. Death rates ranged from 43% to 68% in affected subpopulations and were higher for subadult than adult wolves (83%-87% vs. 34%-39%). The 2010 CDV outbreak started 20 months after a rabies outbreak, before the population had fully recovered, and led to the eradication of several focal packs in BMNP's Web Valley. The combined effect of rabies and CDV increases the chance of pack extinction, exacerbating the typically slow recovery of wolf populations, and represents a key extinction threat to populations of this highly endangered carnivore. PMID:25898177

  2. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  3. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  4. Establishment of a Rescue System for Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gassen, Uta; Collins, Fergal M.; Duprex, W. Paul; Rima, Bert K.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has been rescued from a full-length cDNA clone. Besides Measles virus (MV) and Rinderpest virus, a third morbillivirus is now available for genetic analysis using reverse genetics. A plasmid p(+)CDV was constructed by sequential cloning using the Onderstepoort vaccine strain large-plaque-forming variant. The presence of a T7 promoter allowed transcription of full-length antigenomic RNA by a T7 RNA polymerase, which was provided by a host range mutant of vaccinia virus (MVA-T7). Plasmids expressing the nucleocapsid protein, the phosphoprotein, and the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, also under control of a T7 promoter, have been generated. Infection of HeLa cells with MVA-T7 and subsequent transfection of p(+)CDV plus the helper plasmids led to syncytium formation and release of infectious recombinant (r) CDV. Comparison of the rescued virus with the parental virus revealed no major differences in the progression of infection or in the shape and size of syncytia. A genetic tag, consisting of two nucleotide changes within the coding region of the L protein, has been identified in the rCDV genome. Expression by rCDV of all the major viral structural proteins has been demonstrated by immunofluorescence. PMID:11044118

  5. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV), a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N) gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively. PMID:21352564

  6. The Hemagglutinin of Canine Distemper Virus Determines Tropism and Cytopathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    von Messling, Veronika; Zimmer, Gert; Herrler, Georg; Haas, Ludwig; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and measles virus (MV) cause severe illnesses in their respective hosts. The viruses display a characteristic cytopathic effect by forming syncytia in susceptible cells. For CDV, the proficiency of syncytium formation varies among different strains and correlates with the degree of viral attenuation. In this study, we examined the determinants for the differential fusogenicity of the wild-type CDV isolate 5804Han89 (CDV5804), the small- and large-plaque-forming variants of the CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort (CDVOS and CDVOL, respectively), and the MV vaccine strain Edmonston B (MVEdm). The cotransfection of different combinations of fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) genes in Vero cells indicated that the H protein is the main determinant of fusion efficiency. To verify the significance of this observation in the viral context, a reverse genetic system to generate recombinant CDVs was established. This system is based on a plasmid containing the full-length antigenomic sequence of CDVOS. The coding regions of the H proteins of all CDV strains and MVEdm were introduced into the CDV and MV genetic backgrounds, and recombinant viruses rCDV-H5804, rCDV-HOL, rCDV-HEdm, rMV-H5804, rMV-HOL, and rMV-HOS were recovered. Thus, the H proteins of the two morbilliviruses are interchangeable and fully functional in a heterologous complex. This is in contrast with the glycoproteins of other members of the family Paramyxoviridae, which do not function efficiently with heterologous partners. The fusogenicity, growth characteristics, and tropism of the recombinant viruses were examined and compared with those of the parental strains. All these characteristics were found to be predominantly mediated by the H protein regardless of the viral backbone used. PMID:11413309

  7. 9 CFR 113.302 - Distemper Vaccine-Mink.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.302 Distemper Vaccine—Mink. Distemper Vaccine—Mink shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure, safe,...

  8. 9 CFR 113.302 - Distemper Vaccine-Mink.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.302 Distemper Vaccine—Mink. Distemper Vaccine—Mink shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure, safe,...

  9. 9 CFR 113.302 - Distemper Vaccine-Mink.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.302 Distemper Vaccine—Mink. Distemper Vaccine—Mink shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure, safe,...

  10. 9 CFR 113.302 - Distemper Vaccine-Mink.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.302 Distemper Vaccine—Mink. Distemper Vaccine—Mink shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure, safe,...

  11. Characteristics of a Canine Distemper Virus Outbreak in Dichato, Chile Following the February 2010 Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Garde, Elena; Pérez, Guillermo; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Bronsvoort, Barend Mark

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary A disease outbreak in domestic dogs was reported by a coastal Chilean community following the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami. Using clinical exams and diagnostic testing, canine distemper virus was confirmed. Most dogs seen had never been vaccinated, and the majority of those with positive results were recorded in dogs less than two years of age. There were no facilities to contain or treat dogs locally, and no plan to shelter free-roaming dogs. This observational study demonstrates the great need for disaster preparedness planning in developing countries that includes companion animals. Abstract Following the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Chile in February 2010, residents of Dichato reported high morbidity and mortality in dogs, descriptions of which resembled canine distemper virus (CDV). To assess the situation, free vaccine clinics were offered in April and May. Owner information, dog history and signalment were gathered; dogs received physical examinations and vaccines protecting against CDV, and other common canine pathogens. Blood was collected to screen for IgM antibodies to CDV. In total, 208 dogs received physical exams and vaccines were given to 177. IgM antibody titres to CDV were obtained for 104 dogs. Fifty-four dogs (51.9%) tested positive for CDV at the cut off titre of >1:50, but a total of 91.4% of dogs had a detectable titre >1:10. Most of the positive test results were in dogs less than 2 years of age; 33.5% had been previously vaccinated against CDV, and owners of 84 dogs (42.2%) reported clinical signs characteristic of CDV in their dogs following the disaster. The presence of endemic diseases in dog populations together with poor pre-disaster free-roaming dog management results in a potential for widespread negative effects following disasters. Creation of preparedness plans that include animal welfare, disease prevention and mitigation should be developed. PMID:26479537

  12. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  13. Detection of Arctic and European cluster of canine distemper virus in north and center of Iran.

    PubMed

    Namroodi, Somayeh; Rostami, Amir; Majidzadeh-Ardebili, Keyvan; Ghalyanchi Langroudi, Arash; Morovvati, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) creates a very contagious viral multi-systemic canine distemper (CD) disease that affects most species of Carnivora order. The virus is genetically heterogeneous, particularly in section of the hemagglutinin (H) gene. Sequence analysis of the H gene can be useful to investigate distinction of various lineages related to geographical distribution and CDV molecular epidemiology. Since vaccination program is conducted only in large cities of Iran, CD still remains as one of the major causes of death in dogs in this country. In order to monitor H gene, CDV has been detected in 14 out of 19 sampled dogs through the amplification of nucleoprotein (NP) gene in nested-PCR assay. In the next step 665 bp of H gene was amplified in 9 out of 14 NP-gene positive dogs. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct CDV genotypes in Iran. JN941238 has been embedded in European cluster and JN941239 has been embedded in Arctic cluster. Nucleic analysis has been shown high difference among both Iranian CDV lineages with CDV vaccine strains. PMID:26893808

  14. Detection of Arctic and European cluster of canine distemper virus in north and center of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Namroodi, Somayeh; Rostami, Amir; Majidzadeh-Ardebili, Keyvan; Ghalyanchi Langroudi, Arash; Morovvati, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) creates a very contagious viral multi-systemic canine distemper (CD) disease that affects most species of Carnivora order. The virus is genetically heterogeneous, particularly in section of the hemagglutinin (H) gene. Sequence analysis of the H gene can be useful to investigate distinction of various lineages related to geographical distribution and CDV molecular epidemiology. Since vaccination program is conducted only in large cities of Iran, CD still remains as one of the major causes of death in dogs in this country. In order to monitor H gene, CDV has been detected in 14 out of 19 sampled dogs through the amplification of nucleoprotein (NP) gene in nested-PCR assay. In the next step 665 bp of H gene was amplified in 9 out of 14 NP-gene positive dogs. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct CDV genotypes in Iran. JN941238 has been embedded in European cluster and JN941239 has been embedded in Arctic cluster. Nucleic analysis has been shown high difference among both Iranian CDV lineages with CDV vaccine strains. PMID:26893808

  15. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  16. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals. PMID:25764477

  17. Characterization of a novel Canine distemper virus causing disease in wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pope, Jenny P; Miller, Debra L; Riley, Matthew C; Anis, Eman; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a common cause of a multisystemic disease in both domestic dogs and wildlife species, including raccoons and foxes. Outbreaks of CDV in domestic dogs in eastern Tennessee have occurred since 2012, and it was determined that these outbreaks resulted from a novel genotype of CDV. We hypothesized that this virus is also infecting area wildlife and may be a source of the virus for these outbreaks in dogs. From 2013 to 2014, autopsies were performed and tissues collected from raccoons (Procyon lotor; n = 50) and gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus; n = 8) for CDV testing. A real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to document the presence of CDV in tissue samples, and a portion of the virus was subsequently sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. A high percentage of wildlife, both with (86%) and without (55%) clinical signs, tested positive for CDV, with the majority (77%) testing positive for the novel genotype. Microscopic findings, including syncytia in the lungs and viral inclusion bodies in urothelium, astrocytes, neurons, and bronchiolar epithelium, were also consistent with canine distemper. Minimal inflammation in the central nervous system of affected animals was indicative of the acute neurologic form of the disease. Pneumonia and parasitism were also commonly found in CDV-infected animals. Based on these results, CDV appears to be prevalent in eastern Tennessee wildlife. Subclinical or clinically recovered shedders are a potential source of this novel genotype for domestic dogs, and this genotype is genetically distinct from vaccine strains. PMID:27400957

  18. Recombinant rabies virus expressing the H protein of canine distemper virus protects dogs from the lethal distemper challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Tan, Bin; Li, Zhen-Guang; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Fu, Zhen F; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-12-01

    The rabies virus (RV) vector LBNSE expressing foreign antigens have shown considerable promise as vaccines against viral and bacteria diseases, which is effective and safe. We produced a new RV-based vaccine vehicle expressing 1.824 kb hemagglutinin (H) gene of the canine distemper virus (CDV) by reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus LBNSE-CDV-H retained growth properties similar to those of vector LBNSE both in BSR and mNA cell culture. The H gene of CDV was expressed and detected by immunostaining. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-CDV-H, dogs were immunized with each of these recombinant viruses by intramuscular (i.m.). The dogs were bled at third weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with virulent virus (ZJ 7) at fourth weeks. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. Dogs inoculated with LBNSE-CDV-H showed no any signs of disease and exhibited seroconversion against both RV and CDV H protein. The LBNSE-CDV-H did not cause disease in dogs and conferred protection from challenge with a lethal wild type CDV strain, demonstrating its potential value for wildlife conservation efforts. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RV expressing H protein from CDV stimulated high levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected all dogs challenge infection. PMID:25465178

  19. Retrospective differentiation of canine distemper virus and phocine distemper virus in phocids.

    PubMed

    Stanton, James B; Brown, Corrie C; Poet, Steven; Lipscomb, Thomas P; Saliki, Jeremiah; Frasca, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from one Caspian seal (Phoca caspica), one harp seal (Phoca groenlandica), one hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), and one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina vitulina) were used to compare the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) versus that of a novel seminested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect and differentiate canine distemper virus (CDV) and phocine distemper virus (PDV). Four antibodies made against PDV were able to detect both viruses. Two antibodies made against cetacean morbillivirus (CMV) did not label antigens from either CDV or PDV. A third anti-CMV antibody inconsistently stained CDV antigens but did not label PDV antigens. The seminested RT-PCR was able to detect RNA of the phosphoprotein gene in all positive cases. Nucleotide sequence analyses of seminested RT-PCR products were used to differentiate CDV RNA from PDV RNA. From these data, it was determined that IHC using antibodies generated against PDV provided a rapid means of detection for both CDV and PDV antigens; however, differentiation between CDV and PDV was achieved only with the RT-PCR assay. PMID:15137488

  20. Characteristics of a Canine Distemper Virus Outbreak in Dichato, Chile Following the February 2010 Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Garde, Elena; Pérez, Guillermo; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Bronsvoort, Barend Mark

    2013-01-01

    Following the earthquake and tsunami disaster in Chile in February 2010, residents of Dichato reported high morbidity and mortality in dogs, descriptions of which resembled canine distemper virus (CDV). To assess the situation, free vaccine clinics were offered in April and May. Owner information, dog history and signalment were gathered; dogs received physical examinations and vaccines protecting against CDV, and other common canine pathogens. Blood was collected to screen for IgM antibodies to CDV. In total, 208 dogs received physical exams and vaccines were given to 177. IgM antibody titres to CDV were obtained for 104 dogs. Fifty-four dogs (51.9%) tested positive for CDV at the cut off titre of >1:50, but a total of 91.4% of dogs had a detectable titre >1:10. Most of the positive test results were in dogs less than 2 years of age; 33.5% had been previously vaccinated against CDV, and owners of 84 dogs (42.2%) reported clinical signs characteristic of CDV in their dogs following the disaster. The presence of endemic diseases in dog populations together with poor pre-disaster free-roaming dog management results in a potential for widespread negative effects following disasters. Creation of preparedness plans that include animal welfare, disease prevention and mitigation should be developed. PMID:26479537

  1. 9 CFR 113.302 - Distemper Vaccine-Mink.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distemper Vaccine-Mink. 113.302 Section 113.302 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.302...

  2. Genotypes of Canine Distemper Virus Determined by Analysis of the Hemagglutinin Genes of Recent Isolates from Dogs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Masami; Hashimoto, Michiru; Hagiwara, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Yoshio; Ishiguro, Shinryo

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper of domestic dogs is caused by canine distemper virus (CDV), a member of the morbilliviruses. It has been a highly contagious disease of great veterinary importance for centuries, but for the last several decades it has been controlled satisfactorily by modified live vaccines. In the 1990s, however, it was described that CDV strains genetically different from vaccine strains may have caused the disease in vaccinated dogs. The highest antigenic variation is found in the H protein. Therefore, in the present study, hemagglutinin (H) genes obtained from current vaccines and field isolates and amplified directly from clinical specimens were genetically analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism assay and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the H-gene amino acid sequences revealed that at least two CDV genotypes are circulating among dogs in Japan; one is a genotype to which almost all Japanese CDV isolates belong and the other has not been previously described. Both are separate and independent from the other lineages or genotypes of vaccine strains, as well as European and U.S. CDV isolates. The results suggest that CDV has also evolved in Japan, and further studies will be needed for an evaluation and possible improvement of the efficacies of current CDV vaccines. PMID:10449479

  3. Canine distemper infections, with special reference to South Africa, with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Leisewitz, A L; Carter, A; van Vuuren, M; van Blerk, L

    2001-09-01

    Canine distemper virus is a member of the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe disease in dogs and a range of wild mammals. The clinical signs relate essentially to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. In South Africa, infection with Ehrlichia canis and canine parvovirus may present similarly Many dogs will initially present with a wide range of central nervous system signs without any history of systemic disease. A recent South African study evaluating ante mortem diagnosis highlighted the importance of recognising clinical signs, cerebrospinal fluid IgG titres, serum IgM titres and immunocytochemistry of epithelial tissue. A 2-year retrospective evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid samples collected from dogs presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital indicates that distemper infection is common, and this disease should routinely be suspected in cases of diverse neurological disease in dogs. The South African dog population is specifically at high risk for the disease because of the large pool of unvaccinated, reproductively-active dogs that expose the wildlife resources of the country to risk of fatal disease. Outbreaks of disease in dogs continue to occur in developed and developing communities in both vaccinated and unvaccinated dogs worldwide, and have also been described in a wide range of free-ranging wildlife, including seals, dolphins and lions, and in endangered zoo animals. Modified live virus vaccines have contributed markedly to disease control in the dog population but have caused mortality in some wild carnivores. New recombinant vaccines are being developed that will be safe in wild animals. The pathogenesis of CNS demyelination has been compared to various important demyelinating diseases in humans and, amongst other things, relates to down-regulation of the oligodendrocyte gene coding for myelin synthesis and non-immunocyte CNS cell expression of type II major

  4. Canine distemper virus infection in fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Jho, Yeon-Sook; Bak, Eun-Jung

    2010-08-01

    Fifteen 8-month-old fennec foxes imported from Sudan showed fever, mucopurulent ocular discharge, diarrhea, severe emaciation, seizures, and generalized ataxia, and died. Three of the 15 animals were presented for diagnostic investigation. Severe dehydration, brain congestion, and gastric ulcers were observed in all animals. In one animal, the lungs had failed to collapse and were multifocally dark red in appearance. Histopathologically, there were lymphohistiocytic meningoencephalitis with malacia, mild interstitial pneumonia, lymphoid depletion of lymphoid tissues and organs, and intestinal villous atrophy with intralesional coccidia. There were many intracytoplasmic and/or intranuclear inclusion bodies in the epithelial cells of the medullary velum, lungs, liver, kidneys, trachea, pancreas, stomach, gall bladder, urinary bladder, and ureters, and in macrophages of malacia foci and lymphocytes and macrophages of lymphoid organs. Additionally, intestinal coccidia were confirmed to be Isospora species by a fecal test. To our knowledge, this is the first report of canine distemper with intestinal coccidiosis in fennec fox. PMID:20299771

  5. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of canine distemper virus-induced footpad hyperkeratosis (hard Pad disease) in dogs with natural canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, A F; Baumgärtner, W; Tontis, D; Polizopoulou, Z; Saridomichelakis, M N; Lekkas, S

    2004-01-01

    Hard pad disease represents an uncommon manifestation of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection with a still uncertain pathogenesis. To study the pathogenesis of this uncommon, virally induced cutaneous lesion, the footpads of 19 dogs with naturally occurring distemper were investigated for histologic changes and distribution pattern of CDV antigen. All dogs displayed clinical signs of distemper, which had lasted from 10 to 75 days. Overt digital hyperkeratosis was observed in 12 animals (group A), whereas the footpads of the remaining seven dogs appeared normal macroscopically (group B). Orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis (12/12; 100%), irregular acanthosis (11/12; 92%), thickened rete ridges (10/12; 83%), and mild mononuclear perivascular (10/ 12; 83%) and periadnexal (7/12; 58%) dermatitis were the most common findings in dogs with hard pad disease. Surprisingly, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis (5/7; 71%), irregular acanthosis (5/7; 71%), and thickened rete ridges (4/7; 57%) were also seen in the dogs without clinical evidence of digital hyperkeratosis. CDV-specific inclusion bodies and ballooning degeneration were not observed in the footpad epidermis of the 19 dogs. Immunohis-tochemistry revealed that CDV antigen was most frequently found in the stratum spinosum and granulosum and in the epithelial cells of the eccrine sweat glands and only rarely in the basal layer. Fibroblasts, pericytes, endothelial cells, and hair follicles were also positive in some animals. Despite the obvious difference regarding the macroscopic picture, the microscopic changes were less prominent between the animal groups. The selective infection of keratinocytes in the stratum spinosum might be the key event for the development of hard pad disease in the dog. PMID:14715962

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus in domestic dogs in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhenwei; Wang, Yongshan; Wang, Xiaoli; Xia, Xingxia

    2015-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a broad range of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. The hemagglutinin gene, which encodes the attachment protein that determines viral tropism, has been widely used to determine the relationship between CDV strains of different lineages circulating worldwide. We determined the full-length H gene sequences of seven CDV field strains detected in domestic dogs in Nanjing, China. A phylogenetic analysis of the H gene sequences of CDV strains from different geographic regions and vaccine strains was performed. Four of the seven CDV strains were grouped in the same cluster of the Asia-1 lineage to which the vast majority of Chinese CDV strains belong, whereas the other three were clustered within the Asia-4 lineage, which has never been detected in China. This represents the first record of detection of strains of the Asia-4 lineage in China since this lineage was reported in Thailand in 2013. PMID:25416856

  7. Epizootic canine distemper virus infection among wild mammals.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yuki; Nagao, Yumiko; Nishio, Yohei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuo; Une, Yumi; Sato, Hiroshi; Shimojima, Masayuki; Maeda, Ken

    2012-01-27

    In the spring of 2007, seven raccoon dogs and a weasel were captured near the city of Tanabe in Wakayama prefecture, Japan. The causative agent of the animals' death 1-2 days after capture was identified as canine distemper virus (CDV) by virus isolation, immunostaining with an anti-CDV polyclonal antibody, and a commercially available CDV antigen-detection kit. Sequence analysis of hemagglutinin genes indicated the isolated viruses belong to genotype Asia-1 and possess the substitution from tyrosine (Y) to histidine (H) at position 549 that is associated with the spread of CDV to non-canine hosts. A serosurvey for CDV was then conducted among wild animals in the region. The animals assayed consisted of 104 raccoons, 41 wild boars, 19 raccoon dogs, five Sika deer, two badgers, one weasel, one marten, one Siberian weasel and one fox. Virus-neutralization (VN) tests showed that, except for fox and weasel, all of the species assayed had VN antibodies to CDV. Interestingly, 11 of the 41 wild boars (27%) and two of the five Sika deer assayed possessed VN antibodies to CDV. These findings indicate that CDV infection was widespread among wild mammals during this epizootic. PMID:21840141

  8. New Aspects of the Pathogenesis of Canine Distemper Leukoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lempp, Charlotte; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Puff, Christina; Cana, Armend; Kegler, Kristel; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus morbillivirus, which is known to cause a variety of disorders in dogs including demyelinating leukoencephalitis (CDV-DL). In recent years, substantial progress in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms of CDV-DL has been made. In vivo and in vitro investigations provided new insights into its pathogenesis with special emphasis on axon-myelin-glia interaction, potential endogenous mechanisms of regeneration, and astroglial plasticity. CDV-DL is characterized by lesions with a variable degree of demyelination and mononuclear inflammation accompanied by a dysregulated orchestration of cytokines as well as matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. Despite decades of research, several new aspects of the neuropathogenesis of CDV-DL have been described only recently. Early axonal damage seems to represent an initial and progressive lesion in CDV-DL, which interestingly precedes demyelination. Axonopathy may, thus, function as a potential trigger for subsequent disturbed axon-myelin-glia interactions. In particular, the detection of early axonal damage suggests that demyelination is at least in part a secondary event in CDV-DL, thus challenging the dogma of CDV as a purely primary demyelinating disease. Another unexpected finding refers to the appearance of p75 neurotrophin (NTR)-positive bipolar cells during CDV-DL. As p75NTR is a prototype marker for immature Schwann cells, this finding suggests that Schwann cell remyelination might represent a so far underestimated endogenous mechanism of regeneration, though this hypothesis still remains to be proven. Although it is well known that astrocytes represent the major target of CDV infection in CDV-DL, the detection of infected vimentin-positive astrocytes in chronic lesions indicates a crucial role of this cell population in nervous distemper. While glial fibrillary acidic protein represents the characteristic intermediate filament of mature astrocytes

  9. Jaundice and bilirubinemia as manifestations of canine distemper in raccoons and ferrets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilham, L.; Habermann, R.T.; Herman, C.M.

    1956-01-01

    1) Two strains of distemper virus have been isolated from wild raccoons and one strain from ferrets. 2) All strains isolated have induced bilirubinemia in raccoons and ferrets. Many raccoons with bilirubinemia also had jaundice. 3) Identification of these strains as members of the canine distemper virus complex has been by clinical and pathological findings consistent with this diagnosis as well as by cross-immunity tests.

  10. Canine Distemper Virus in Wild Felids of Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Roberto; Barrueta, Flor; Soto-Fournier, Sofía; Chavarría, Max; Monge, Otto; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo A; Chaves, Andrea

    2016-04-28

    Several highly infectious diseases can be transmitted through feces and cause elevated mortality among carnivore species. One such infectious agent, canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae: Morbillivirus), has been reported to affect wild carnivores, among them several felid species. We screened free-ranging and captive wild carnivores in Costa Rica for CDV. Between 2006 and 2012, we collected 306 fecal samples from 70 jaguars (Panther onca), 71 ocelots ( Leopardus pardalis ), five jaguarundis (Puma yaguaroundi), 105 pumas ( Puma concolor ), five margays ( Leopardus wiedii ), 23 coyotes ( Canis latrans ), and 27 undetermined Leopardus spp. We found CDV in six individuals: one captive jaguarundi (rescued in 2009), three free-ranging ocelots (samples collected in 2012), and two free-ranging pumas (samples collected in 2007). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using sequences of the phosphoprotein (P) gene. We provide evidence of CDV in wild carnivores in Costa Rica and sequence data from a Costa Rican CDV isolate, adding to the very few sequence data available for CDV isolates from wild Central American carnivores. PMID:26967127

  11. A canine distemper virus epidemic in Serengeti lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Roelke-Parker, M E; Munson, L; Packer, C; Kock, R; Cleaveland, S; Carpenter, M; O'Brien, S J; Pospischil, A; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H; Mwamengele, G L; Mgasa, M N; Machange, G A; Summers, B A; Appel, M J

    1996-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is thought to have caused several fatal epidemics in canids within the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem of East Africa, affecting silver-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) and bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) in 1978 (ref. 1), and African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) in 1991 (refs 2, 3). The large, closely monitored Serengeti lion population was not affected in these epidemics. However, an epidemic caused by a morbillivirus closely related to CDV emerged abruptly in the lion population of the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, in early 1994, resulting in fatal neurological disease characterized by grand mal seizures and myoclonus; the lions that died had encephalitis and pneumonia. Here we report the identification of CDV from these lions, and the close phylogenetic relationship between CDV isolates from lions and domestic dogs. By August 1994, 85% of the Serengeti lion population had anti-CDV antibodies, and the epidemic spread north to lions in the Maasai Mara National reserve, Kenya, and uncounted hyaenas, bat-eared foxes, and leopards were also affected. PMID:8559247

  12. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  13. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV–LACK, rCDV–TSA, and rCDV–LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV–LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV–TSA- and rCDV–LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV–LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  14. Recombinant Newcastle disease viral vector expressing hemagglutinin or fusion of canine distemper virus is safe and immunogenic in minks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Gao, Yuwei; Wen, Zhiyuan; Yu, Guimei; Zhou, Weiwei; Zu, Shulong; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-05-15

    Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) infects many carnivores and cause several high-mortality disease outbreaks. The current CDV live vaccine cannot be safely used in some exotic species, such as mink and ferret. Here, we generated recombinant lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota expressing either envelope glycoproyein, heamagglutinine (H) or fusion protein (F), named as rLa-CDVH and rLa-CDVF, respectively. The feasibility of these recombinant NDVs to serve as live virus-vectored CD vaccine was evaluated in minks. rLa-CDVH induced significant neutralization antibodies (NA) to CDV and provided solid protection against virulent CDV challenge. On the contrast, rLa-CDVF induced much lower NA to CDV and fail to protected mink from virulent CDV challenge. Results suggest that recombinant NDV expressing CDV H is safe and efficient candidate vaccine against CDV in mink, and maybe other host species. PMID:25865465

  15. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) in Another Big Cat: Should CDV Be Renamed Carnivore Distemper Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Terio, Karen A.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or “spillover” hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease. PMID:24045642

  16. Canine distemper virus (CDV) in another big cat: should CDV be renamed carnivore distemper virus?

    PubMed

    Terio, Karen A; Craft, Meggan E

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or "spillover" hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease. PMID:24045642

  17. Concomitant canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvoviral enteritis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and toxoplasmosis in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Garcia, João Luis; Weissenböck, Herbert; da Silva, Ana Paula; Bodnar, Livia; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant infections of Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine adenovirus A types 1 (CAdV-1) and 2 (CAdV-2), Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and Toxoplasma gondii are described in a 43-day-old mixed-breed puppy. Clinically, there were convulsions and blindness with spontaneous death; 14 siblings of this puppy, born to a 10-month-old dam, which was seropositive (titer: 1,024) for T. gondii, also died. Necropsy revealed unilateral corneal edema (blue eye), depletion of intestinal lymphoid tissue, non-collapsible lungs, congestion of meningeal vessels, and a pale area in the myocardium. Histopathology demonstrated necrotizing myocarditis associated with intralesional apicomplexan protozoa; necrotizing and chronic hepatitis associated with rare intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes; necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis; interstitial pneumonia associated with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies within epithelial cells; atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi with cryptal necrosis; and white matter demyelination of the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with intranuclear inclusion bodies within astrocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified the partial fragments (bp) of the CDV N gene (290 bp), CPV-2c VP2 capsid protein gene (583 bp), and CAdV-1 (508 bp) and CAdV-2 (1,030 bp) E gene from urine and tissue samples. The PCR assays demonstrated that the apicomplexan protozoa observed within several organs contained DNA specific for T. gondii; genotyping revealed T. gondii type III. The findings support the characterization of concomitant infections of CDV, CAdV-1, CAdV-2, CPV-2, and T. gondii in this puppy. Further, seroreactivity to T. gondii of the dam in association with the systemic disease observed in the puppy described herein is suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:23293164

  18. Old diseases for new nightmares: distemper strikes back in Italy.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Alessio; Savini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses the distemper outbreak that affected the population of Apennine wolves (Canis lupus) in Italy during 2013. Distemper, as rabies, is a well-known viral infectious disease that concerns the canine population worldwide and represents a threat for wild species too. Implementation of vaccination and legislation for compulsory vaccination strategies should be achieved in areas with endangered wild species. PMID:24817331

  19. Canine Distemper Viruses Expressing a Hemagglutinin without N-Glycans Lose Virulence but Retain Immunosuppression▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Bevan; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-01-01

    Paramyxovirus glycoproteins are posttranslationally modified by the addition of N-linked glycans, which are often necessary for correct folding, processing, and cell surface expression. To establish the contribution of N glycosylation to morbillivirus attachment (H) protein function and overall virulence, we first determined the use of the potential N-glycosylation sites in the canine distemper virus (CDV) H proteins. Biochemical characterization revealed that the three sites conserved in all strains were N glycosylated, whereas only two of the up to five additional sites present in wild-type strains are used. A wild-type virus with an H protein reproducing the vaccine strain N-glycosylation pattern remained lethal in ferrets but with a prolonged course of disease. In contrast, introduction of the vaccine H protein in the wild-type context resulted in complete attenuation. To further characterize the role of N glycosylation in CDV pathogenesis, the N-glycosylation sites of wild-type H proteins were successively deleted, including a nonstandard site, to ultimately generate a nonglycosylated H protein. Despite reduced expression levels, this protein remained fully functional. Recombinant viruses expressing N-glycan-deficient H proteins no longer caused disease, even though their immunosuppressive capacities were retained, indicating that reduced N glycosylation contributes to attenuation without affecting immunosuppression. PMID:20042514

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of canine distemper virus strains detected from giant panda and raccoon dogs in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a variety of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. In this study, we sequenced and phylogenetic analyses of the hemagglutinin (H) genes from eight canine distemper virus (CDV) isolates obtained from seven raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the partial hemagglutinin gene sequences showed close clustering for geographic lineages, clearly distinct from vaccine strains and other wild-type foreign CDV strains, all the CDV strains were characterized as Asia-1 genotype and were highly similar to each other (91.5-99.8% nt and 94.4-99.8% aa). The giant panda and raccoon dogs all were 549Y on the HA protein in this study, irrespective of the host species. Conclusions These findings enhance our knowledge of the genetic characteristics of Chinese CDV isolates, and may facilitate the development of effective strategies for monitoring and controlling CDV for wild canids and non-cainds in China. PMID:23566727

  1. Expression of a foreign gene by recombinant canine distemper virus recovered from cloned DNAs.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christopher L; Wang, Hai-Ping; Kovacs, Gerald R; Vasilakis, Nikos; Kowalski, Jacek; Nowak, Rebecca M; Lerch, Robert A; Walpita, Pramila; Sidhu, Mohinderjit S; Udem, Stephen A

    2002-02-26

    A canine distemper virus (CDV) genomic cDNA clone and expression plasmids required to establish a CDV rescue system were generated from a laboratory-adapted strain of the Onderstepoort vaccine virus. In addition, a CDV minireplicon was prepared and used in transient expression studies performed to identify optimal virus rescue conditions. Results from the transient expression experiments indicated that minireplicon-encoded reporter gene activity was increased when transfected cell cultures were maintained at 32 rather than 37 degrees C, and when the cellular stress response was induced by heat shock. Applying these findings to rescue of recombinant CDV (rCDV) resulted in efficient recovery of virus after transfected HEp2 or A549 cells were co-cultured with Vero cell monolayers. Nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of restriction site polymorphisms confirmed that rescued virus was rCDV. A rCDV strain also was engineered that contained the luciferase gene inserted between the P and M genes; this virus directed high levels of luciferase expression in infected cells. PMID:11864746

  2. Development and characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against canine distemper virus hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Bi, Zhenwei; Xia, Xingxia; Wang, Yongshan; Mei, Yongjie

    2015-04-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a serious multisystemic disease in dogs and other carnivora. Hemagglutinin (H) protein-specific antibodies are mainly responsible for protective immunity against CDV infection. In the present study, six neutralizing MAbs to the H protein of CDV were newly obtained and characterized by immunizing BALB/c mice with a recent Chinese field isolate. Competitive binding inhibition assay revealed that they recognized four distinct antigenic regions of the H protein. Immunofluorescence assay and western blotting showed that all MAbs recognize the conformational rather than the linear epitopes of the H protein. Furthermore, in immunofluorescence and virus neutralization assays, two of the MAbs were found to react only with the recent Chinese field isolate and not with older CDV strains, including vaccine strain Onderstepoort, indicating there are neutralization-related antigenic variations between the recent Chinese field isolate and the older CDV strains examined in this study. The newly established MAbs are useful for differentiating the expanding CDV strains and could be used in immunotherapy and immunodiagnosis against infection with CDV. PMID:25644427

  3. Three-year serologic immunity against canine parvovirus type 2 and canine adenovirus type 2 in dogs vaccinated with a canine combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Larson, L J; Schultz, R D

    2007-01-01

    A group of client-owned dogs and a group of dogs at a commercial kennel were evaluated for duration of antibody responses against canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1) after receiving a combination vaccine containing recombinant canarypox-vectored canine distemper virus (CDV) and modified-live CPV-2, CAV-2, and canine parainfluenza virus, with (C6) or without (C4) two serovars of Leptospira (Recombitek C4 or C6, Merial). Duration of antibody, which correlates with protective immunity, was found to be at least 36 months in both groups. Recombitek combination vaccines can confidently be given every 3 years with assurance of protection in immunocompetent dogs against CPV-2 and CAV-1 as well as CDV. This allows this combination vaccine, like other, similar modified- live virus combination products containing CDV, CAV-2, and CPV-2, to be administered in accordance with the recommendations of the American Animal Hospital Association Canine Vaccine Task Force. PMID:18183549

  4. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. PMID:25680810

  5. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  6. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  7. Antiviral antibodies stimulate production of reactive oxygen species in cultured canine brain cells infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bürge, T; Griot, C; Vandevelde, M; Peterhans, E

    1989-01-01

    Canine distemper is characterized mainly by respiratory, enteric, and nervous symptoms. Infection of the central nervous system results in demyelination, to which inflammation has been shown to contribute significantly. It has been proposed that macrophages play a major role as effector cells in this process. We report that cultured dog brain cells contain a population of macrophages capable of producing reactive oxygen species as measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. In cultures infected with canine distemper virus, a burst of reactive oxygen is triggered by antiviral antibody. This response depends on the presence of viral antigens on the surfaces of infected cells and is mediated by the interaction of antigen-bound antibody with Fc receptors on the macrophages. Since there is no evidence in vitro or in vivo that oligodendrocytes, the cells forming myelin, are infected, our observation supports the hypothesis that "innocent bystander killing" is important in demyelination caused by canine distemper virus. Reactive oxygen species released from macrophages may contribute to destruction of myelin. Images PMID:2724413

  8. Low Titers of Canine Distemper Virus Antibody in Wild Fishers (Martes pennanti) in the Eastern USA.

    PubMed

    Peper, Steven T; Peper, Randall L; Mitcheltree, Denise H; Kollias, George V; Brooks, Robert P; Stevens, Sadie S; Serfass, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects species in the order Carnivora. Members of the family Mustelidae are among the species most susceptible to CDV and have a high mortality rate after infection. Assessing an animal's pathogen or disease load prior to any reintroduction project is important to help protect the animal being reintroduced, as well as the wildlife and livestock in the area of relocation. We screened 58 fishers for CDV antibody prior to their release into Pennsylvania, US, as part of a reintroduction program. Five of the 58 (9%) fishers had a weak-positive reaction for CDV antibody at a dilution of 1:16. None of the fishers exhibited any clinical sign of canine distemper while being held prior to release. PMID:26555109

  9. Unusual Necrotizing Encephalitis in Raccoons and Skunks Concurrently Infected With Canine Distemper Virus and Sarcocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Kubiski, S V; Sisó, S; Church, M E; Cartoceti, A N; Barr, B; Pesavento, P A

    2016-05-01

    Canine distemper virus commonly infects free-ranging, terrestrial mesopredators throughout the United States. Due to the immunosuppressive effects of the virus, concurrent opportunistic infections are also common. Among these, secondary systemic protozoal infections have been described in a number of species. We report an unusual presentation of necrotizing encephalitis associated withSarcocystissp in four raccoons and one skunk concurrently infected with canine distemper virus. Lesions were characterized by variably sized necrotizing cavitations composed of abundant mineral admixed with inflammatory cells and protozoa.Sarcocystissp was confirmed via immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody toSarcocystis neurona The pathologic changes are similar to lesions in human AIDS patients infected withToxoplasma gondii. PMID:26374278

  10. Isolation and sequence analysis of a canine distemper virus from a raccoon dog in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Jianjun; Shao, Xiqun; Ma, Zengjun; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Wu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major pathogen not only in raccoon dogs but also in a variety of carnivorous animals, including domesticated animals, particularly if they have not been vaccinated. In this study, a wild-type strain of CDV was isolated from lung tissue from a raccoon dog kept at a fur farm in Jilin Province, China. Cytopathic effects typical of CDV infection were observed after three blind passages in Vero cells, yielding a virus titer of 10(4.6) TCID50/mL. Virus identification was carried out by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and genome sequencing. The results showed that the isolated virus, termed the SY strain, corresponded to the Asia-1 genotype of CDV and has a genome of 15,690 nucleotides. This represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of a CDV strain circulating in raccoon dogs in China. PMID:26265248

  11. Antibody study in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein gene-immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Li, X Y; Zhu, T; Yuan, L; Hu, J P; Chen, J; Gao, W; Ren, W Z

    2015-01-01

    The gene for the nucleocapsid (N) protein of canine distemper virus was cloned into the pMD-18T vector, and positive recombinant plasmids were obtained by enzyme digestion and sequencing. After digestion by both EcoRI and KpnI, the plasmid was directionally cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA; the positive clone pcDNA-N was screened by electrophoresis and then transfected into COS-7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis results showed that the canine distemper virus N protein was expressed in the cytoplasm of transfected COS-7 cells. After emulsification in Freund's adjuvant, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-N was injected into the abdominal cavity of 8-week-old BABL/c mice, with the pcDNA original vector used as a negative control. Mice were immunized 3 times every 2 weeks. The blood of immunized mice was drawn 2 weeks after completing the immunizations to measure titer levels. The antibody titer in the pcDNA-N test was 10(1.62 ± 0.164), while in the control group this value was 10(0.52 ± 0.56), indicating that specific humoral immunity was induced in canine distemper virus nucleocapsid protein-immunized mice. PMID:25966074

  12. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  13. The 2000 canine distemper epidemic in Caspian seals (Phoca caspica): pathology and analysis of contributory factors.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, T; Kennedy, S; Barrett, T; Van de Bildt, M W G; Borgsteede, F H; Brew, S D; Codd, G A; Duck, C; Deaville, R; Eybatov, T; Forsyth, M A; Foster, G; Jepson, P D; Kydyrmanov, A; Mitrofanov, I; Ward, C J; Wilson, S; Osterhaus, A D M E

    2006-05-01

    More than 10,000 Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) were reported dead in the Caspian Sea during spring and summer 2000. We performed necropsies and extensive laboratory analyses on 18 seals, as well as examination of the pattern of strandings and variation in weather in recent years, to identify the cause of mortality and potential contributory factors. The monthly stranding rate in 2000 was up to 2.8 times the historic mean. It was preceded by an unusually mild winter, as observed before in mass mortality events of pinnipeds. The primary diagnosis in 11 of 13 seals was canine distemper, characterized by broncho-interstitial pneumonia, lymphocytic necrosis and depletion in lymphoid organs, and the presence of typical intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in multiple epithelia. Canine distemper virus infection was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction products. Organochlorine and zinc concentrations in tissues of seals with canine distemper were comparable to those of Caspian seals in previous years. Concurrent bacterial infections that may have contributed to the mortality of the seals included Bordetella bronchiseptica (4/8 seals), Streptococcus phocae (3/8), Salmonella dublin (1/8), and S. choleraesuis (1/8). A newly identified bacterium, Corynebacterium caspium, was associated with balanoposthitis in one seal. Several infectious and parasitic organisms, including poxvirus, Atopobacter phocae, Eimeria- and Sarcocystis-like organisms, and Halarachne sp. were identified in Caspian seals for the first time. PMID:16672579

  14. Rabies, canine distemper, and canine parvovirus exposure in large carnivore communities from two Zambian ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Are R; Dunbar, Mike R; Becker, Matthew S; M'soka, Jassiel; Droge, Egil; Sakuya, Nicholas M; Matandiko, Wigganson; McRobb, Rachel; Hanlon, Cathleen A

    2013-09-01

    Disease transmission within and among wild and domestic carnivores can have significant impacts on populations, particularly for threatened and endangered species. We used serology to evaluate potential exposure to rabies virus, canine distemper virus (CDV), and canine parvovirus (CPV) for populations of African lions (Panthera leo), African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), and spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in Zambia's South Luangwa National Park (SLNP) and Liuwa Plain National Park (LPNP) as well as community lands bordering these areas. In addition, domestic dogs in the study region were evaluated for exposure to CDV and rabies. We provide the first comprehensive disease exposure data for these species in these ecosystems. Twenty-one lions, 20 hyenas, 13 wild dogs, and 38 domestic dogs were sampled across both regions from 2009 to 2011. Laboratory results show 10.5% of domestic dogs, 5.0% of hyenas, and 7.7% of wild dogs sampled were positive for CDV exposure. All lions were negative. Exposure to CPV was 10.0% and 4.8% for hyenas and lions, respectively. All wild dogs were negative, and domestic dogs were not tested due to insufficient serum samples. All species sampled were negative for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies except lions. Forty percent of lions tested positive for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies. Because these lions appeared clinically healthy, this finding is consistent with seroconversion following exposure to rabies antigen. To our knowledge, this finding represents the first ever documentation of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies consistent with rabies exposure that did not lead to clinical disease in free-ranging African lions from this region. With ever-increasing human pressure on these ecosystems, understanding disease transmission dynamics is essential for proper management and conservation of these carnivore species. PMID:23805791

  15. Construction of an Expression System for Bioactive IL-18 and Generation of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing IL-18

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Yuxiu; SATO, Hiroki; HAMANA, Masahiro; MOONAN, Navita Anisia; YONEDA, Misako; XIA, Xianzhu; KAI, Chieko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin 18 (IL-18) plays an important role in the T-helper-cell type 1 immune response against intracellular parasites, bacteria and viral infections. It has been widely used as an adjuvant for vaccines and as an anticancer agent. However, IL-18 protein lacks a typical signal sequence and requires cleavage into its mature active form by caspase 1. In this study, we constructed mammalian expression vectors carrying cDNA encoding mature canine IL-18 (cIL-18) or mouse IL-18 (mIL-18) fused to the human IL-2 (hIL-2) signal sequence. The expressed proIL-18 proteins were processed to their mature forms in the cells. The supernatants of cells transfected with these plasmids induced high interferon-γ production in canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells or mouse splenocytes, respectively, indicating the secretion of bioactive IL-18. Using reverse genetics, we also generated a recombinant canine distemper virus that expresses cIL-18 or mIL-18 fused to the hIL-2 signal sequence. As expected, both recombinant viruses produced mature IL-18 in the infected cells, which secreted bioactive IL-18. These results indicate that the signal sequence from hIL-2 is suitable for the secretion of mature IL-18. These recombinant viruses can also potentially be used as immunoadjuvants and agents for anticancer therapies in vivo. PMID:24898077

  16. Construction of an expression system for bioactive IL-18 and generation of recombinant canine distemper virus expressing IL-18.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiu; Sato, Hiroki; Hamana, Masahiro; Moonan, Navita Anisia; Yoneda, Misako; Xia, Xianzhu; Kai, Chieko

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18) plays an important role in the T-helper-cell type 1 immune response against intracellular parasites, bacteria and viral infections. It has been widely used as an adjuvant for vaccines and as an anticancer agent. However, IL-18 protein lacks a typical signal sequence and requires cleavage into its mature active form by caspase 1. In this study, we constructed mammalian expression vectors carrying cDNA encoding mature canine IL-18 (cIL-18) or mouse IL-18 (mIL-18) fused to the human IL-2 (hIL-2) signal sequence. The expressed proIL-18 proteins were processed to their mature forms in the cells. The supernatants of cells transfected with these plasmids induced high interferon-γ production in canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells or mouse splenocytes, respectively, indicating the secretion of bioactive IL-18. Using reverse genetics, we also generated a recombinant canine distemper virus that expresses cIL-18 or mIL-18 fused to the hIL-2 signal sequence. As expected, both recombinant viruses produced mature IL-18 in the infected cells, which secreted bioactive IL-18. These results indicate that the signal sequence from hIL-2 is suitable for the secretion of mature IL-18. These recombinant viruses can also potentially be used as immunoadjuvants and agents for anticancer therapies in vivo. PMID:24898077

  17. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  18. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  19. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks. PMID:26611227

  20. Duration of Maternal Antibodies against Canine Distemper Virus and Hendra Virus in Pteropid Bats

    PubMed Central

    Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Middleton, Deborah; Barr, Jennifer A.; DuBovi, Edward; Boyd, Victoria; Pope, Brian; Todd, Shawn; Crameri, Gary; Walsh, Allyson; Pelican, Katey; Fielder, Mark D.; Davies, Angela J.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Old World frugivorous bats have been identified as natural hosts for emerging zoonotic viruses of significant public health concern, including henipaviruses (Nipah and Hendra virus), Ebola virus, and Marburg virus. Epidemiological studies of these viruses in bats often utilize serology to describe viral dynamics, with particular attention paid to juveniles, whose birth increases the overall susceptibility of the population to a viral outbreak once maternal immunity wanes. However, little is understood about bat immunology, including the duration of maternal antibodies in neonates. Understanding duration of maternally derived immunity is critical for characterizing viral dynamics in bat populations, which may help assess the risk of spillover to humans. We conducted two separate studies of pregnant Pteropus bat species and their offspring to measure the half-life and duration of antibodies to 1) canine distemper virus antigen in vaccinated captive Pteropus hypomelanus; and 2) Hendra virus in wild-caught, naturally infected Pteropus alecto. Both of these pteropid bat species are known reservoirs for henipaviruses. We found that in both species, antibodies were transferred from dam to pup. In P. hypomelanus pups, titers against CDV waned over a mean period of 228.6 days (95% CI: 185.4–271.8) and had a mean terminal phase half-life of 96.0 days (CI 95%: 30.7–299.7). In P. alecto pups, antibodies waned over 255.13 days (95% CI: 221.0–289.3) and had a mean terminal phase half-life of 52.24 days (CI 95%: 33.76–80.83). Each species showed a duration of transferred maternal immunity of between 7.5 and 8.5 months, which was longer than has been previously estimated. These data will allow for more accurate interpretation of age-related Henipavirus serological data collected from wild pteropid bats. PMID:23826322

  1. Duration of Maternal Antibodies against Canine Distemper Virus and Hendra Virus in Pteropid Bats.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan H; Baker, Michelle L; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Middleton, Deborah; Barr, Jennifer A; Dubovi, Edward; Boyd, Victoria; Pope, Brian; Todd, Shawn; Crameri, Gary; Walsh, Allyson; Pelican, Katey; Fielder, Mark D; Davies, Angela J; Wang, Lin-Fa; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Old World frugivorous bats have been identified as natural hosts for emerging zoonotic viruses of significant public health concern, including henipaviruses (Nipah and Hendra virus), Ebola virus, and Marburg virus. Epidemiological studies of these viruses in bats often utilize serology to describe viral dynamics, with particular attention paid to juveniles, whose birth increases the overall susceptibility of the population to a viral outbreak once maternal immunity wanes. However, little is understood about bat immunology, including the duration of maternal antibodies in neonates. Understanding duration of maternally derived immunity is critical for characterizing viral dynamics in bat populations, which may help assess the risk of spillover to humans. We conducted two separate studies of pregnant Pteropus bat species and their offspring to measure the half-life and duration of antibodies to 1) canine distemper virus antigen in vaccinated captive Pteropus hypomelanus; and 2) Hendra virus in wild-caught, naturally infected Pteropus alecto. Both of these pteropid bat species are known reservoirs for henipaviruses. We found that in both species, antibodies were transferred from dam to pup. In P. hypomelanus pups, titers against CDV waned over a mean period of 228.6 days (95% CI: 185.4-271.8) and had a mean terminal phase half-life of 96.0 days (CI 95%: 30.7-299.7). In P. alecto pups, antibodies waned over 255.13 days (95% CI: 221.0-289.3) and had a mean terminal phase half-life of 52.24 days (CI 95%: 33.76-80.83). Each species showed a duration of transferred maternal immunity of between 7.5 and 8.5 months, which was longer than has been previously estimated. These data will allow for more accurate interpretation of age-related Henipavirus serological data collected from wild pteropid bats. PMID:23826322

  2. Pathogenesis of canine distemper virus in experimentally infected raccoon dogs, foxes, and minks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianjun; Shi, Ning; Sun, Yangang; Martella, Vito; Nikolin, Veljko; Zhu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Hailing; Hu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Yan, Xijun

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a broad range of carnivores and causes a highly contagious disease with severe immunosuppression. The disease severity markedly varies in different species. To investigate the pathogenesis of CDV in raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides), fox (Vulpes vulpes) and mink (Neovison vison) species, three groups of CDV sero-negative animals were infected with CDV strain LN(10)1. This CDV strain belongs to the Asia-1 genotype, which is epidemiologically predominant in carnivores in China. CDV infection provoked marked differences in virulence in the three species that were studied. Raccoon dogs developed fever, severe conjunctivitis, and pathological lesions, with 100% (5/5) mortality and with high viral RNA loads in organs within 15 days post infection (dpi). In infected foxes, the onset of the disease was delayed, with 40% (2/5) mortality by 21 dpi. Infected minks developed only mild clinical signs and pathological lesions, and mortality was not observed. Raccoon dogs and foxes showed more severe immune suppression (lymphopenia, decreased lymphocyte proliferation, viremia and low-level virus neutralizing antibodies) than minks. We also observed a distinct pattern of cytokine mRNA transcripts at different times after infection. Decreased IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA responses were evident in the animals with fatal disease, while up-regulation of these cytokines was observed in the animals surviving the infection. Increased TNF-α response was detected in animals with mild or severe clinical signs. Based on the results, we could distinguish three different patterns of disease after experimental CDV infection, e.g. a mild form in minks, a moderate form in foxes and a severe disease in raccoon dogs. The observed differences in susceptibility to CDV could be related to distinct host cytokine profiles. Comparative evaluation of CDV pathogenesis in various animal species is pivotal to generate models suitable for the evaluation of CDV

  3. Canine distemper epizootic in lions, tigers, and leopards in North America.

    PubMed

    Appel, M J; Yates, R A; Foley, G L; Bernstein, J J; Santinelli, S; Spelman, L H; Miller, L D; Arp, L H; Anderson, M; Barr, M

    1994-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection occurred in captive leopards (Panthera pardus), tigers (Panthera tigris), lions (Panthera leo), and a jaguar (Panthera onca) in 1991 and 1992. An epizootic affected all 4 types of cats at the Wildlife Waystation, San Fernando, California, with 17 mortalities. CDV-infected raccoons were thought to be the source of infection in these cats. Two black leopards died at the Naibi Zoo, Coal Valley, Illinois, and 2 tigers died at the Shambala Preserve, Acton, California. Initial clinical signs were anorexia with gastrointestinal and/or respiratory disease followed by seizures. Canine distemper virus was isolated from 3 leopards, 3 tigers, and 3 lions that died or were euthanized when moribund. Monoclonal antibody testing identified the virus isolates as CDV. Gross and histopathologic findings were similar to those found in canids with distemper with a few exceptions. There were fewer lesions in the brain, and there was a pronounced type 2 cell proliferation in the lung, with inclusion bodies and CDV antigen demonstrated by immunohistology. Neutralizing antibody to CDV was found in high titers in serum from most animals but was absent or was found only in low titers in some cats that succumbed after CDV infection. There was a marked difference in neutralizing antibody titers when tests were done with different strains of CDV. PMID:7948195

  4. Cloning and characterization of DNA complementary to the canine distemper virus mRNA encoding matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenblatt, S.; Eizenberg, O.; Englund, G.; Bellini, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Double-stranded cDNA synthesized from total polyadenylate-containing mRNA, extracted from monkey kidney cells infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), has been cloned into the PstI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Clones containing canine distemper virus DNA were identified by hybridization to a canine distemper virus-specific, /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA. Four specific clones containing different classes of sequences have been identified. The cloned plasmids contain inserts of 800 (clone 44-80), 960 (clone 74-16), 1700 (clone 364), and 950 (clone 40-9) base pairs. The sizes of the mRNA species complementary to these inserts are 1500, 1850, 1850 and 2500 nucleotides, respectively, as determined by the Northern technique. Three of the cloned DNA fragments were further identified as the reverse transcripts of the mRNA coding for the matrix, phosphoprotein, and nucleocapsid protein of CDV.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus in South America clade 1 reveals unique molecular signatures of the local epidemic.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cristine D B; Gräf, Tiago; Ikuta, Nilo; Lehmann, Fernanda K M; Passos, Daniel T; Makiejczuk, Aline; Silveira, Marcos A T; Fonseca, André S K; Canal, Cláudio W; Lunge, Vagner R

    2016-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious pathogen for domestic dogs and several wild carnivore species. In Brazil, natural infection of CDV in dogs is very high due to the large non-vaccinated dog population, a scenario that calls for new studies on the molecular epidemiology. This study investigates the phylodynamics and amino-acid signatures of CDV epidemic in South America by analyzing a large dataset compiled from publicly available sequences and also by collecting new samples from Brazil. A population of 175 dogs with canine distemper (CD) signs was sampled, from which 89 were positive for CDV, generating 42 new CDV sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the new and publicly available sequences revealed that Brazilian sequences mainly clustered in South America 1 (SA1) clade, which has its origin estimated to the late 1980's. The reconstruction of the demographic history in SA1 clade showed an epidemic expanding until the recent years, doubling in size every nine years. SA1 clade epidemic distinguished from the world CDV epidemic by the emergence of the R580Q strain, a very rare and potentially detrimental substitution in the viral genome. The R580Q substitution was estimated to have happened in one single evolutionary step in the epidemic history in SA1 clade, emerging shortly after introduction to the continent. Moreover, a high prevalence (11.9%) of the Y549H mutation was observed among the domestic dogs sampled here. This finding was associated (p<0.05) with outcome-death and higher frequency in mixed-breed dogs, the later being an indicator of a continuous exchange of CDV strains circulating among wild carnivores and domestic dogs. The results reported here highlight the diversity of the worldwide CDV epidemic and reveal local features that can be valuable for combating the disease. PMID:27060756

  6. Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR) for diagnosis of natural infection with canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Canine distemper virus (CDV) is present worldwide and produces a lethal systemic infection of wild and domestic Canidae. Pre-existing antibodies acquired from vaccination or previous CDV infection might interfere the interpretation of a serologic diagnosis method. In addition, due to the high similarity of nucleic acid sequences between wild-type CDV and the new vaccine strain, current PCR derived methods cannot be applied for the definite confirmation of CD infection. Hence, it is worthy of developing a simple and rapid nucleotide-based assay for differentiation of wild-type CDV which is a cause of disease from attenuated CDVs after vaccination. High frequency variations have been found in the region spanning from the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the matrix (M) gene to the fusion (F) gene (designated M-F UTR) in a few CDV strains. To establish a differential diagnosis assay, an amplification refractory mutation analysis was established based on the highly variable region on M-F UTR and F regions. Results Sequences of frequent polymorphisms were found scattered throughout the M-F UTR region; the identity of nucleic acid between local strains and vaccine strains ranged from 82.5% to 93.8%. A track of AAA residue located 35 nucleotides downstream from F gene start codon highly conserved in three vaccine strains were replaced with TGC in the local strains; that severed as target sequences for deign of discrimination primers. The method established in the present study successfully differentiated seven Taiwanese CDV field isolates, all belonging to the Asia-1 lineage, from vaccine strains. Conclusions The method described herein would be useful for several clinical applications, such as confirmation of nature CDV infection, evaluation of vaccination status and verification of the circulating viral genotypes. PMID:20534175

  7. Canine viral vaccines at a turning point--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E

    1999-01-01

    The most important canine viral infections are distemper and CPV-2. Problems of variable CD vaccine safety and efficacy persist, but CD vaccines have greatly reduced the prevalence of disease and cases in vaccinated dogs are now rare. Canine hepatitis (ICH, CAV-1 infection) also has been controlled well by vaccines for more than 35 years and it is now rare; the sporadic cases seen in the 1990s have usually occurred in unvaccinated dogs. CAV-2 vaccines should, therefore, continue to be given since they have proved to be safe and effective, and prevent hepatitis as well as adenoviral tracheobronchitis. Failure to vaccinate would likely result in increase in cases of ICH, a serious disease, but never as significant as distemper and CPV infection. "Are we vaccinating too often?" The question is complex, but the dominant opinion is "yes" (Smith, 1995). The question cannot be responded to unequivocally, however, since manufacturers employ different strains that vary in their immunizing capacity and, probably, duration of immunity. This question was frequent with distemper in the 1960s. At that time, many veterinarians tested batches of the vaccine they used by providing pre- and postvaccinal sera to competent diagnostic laboratories. That practice appeared to benefit veterinarians and dogs, as well as the quality of vaccines. Unfortunately, many owners and some veterinarians seem to hold the view that infectious diseases such as parvovirus infection can be controlled by frequent vaccination alone. The common practice of dog breeders of vaccinating their animals several times each year is senseless. Revaccination for distemper and parvovirus infection is suggested at 1 year of age, but recommendations regarding the frequency of most vaccinations given after that time are unclear. Since most distemper and CPV-2 vaccines probably provide immunity that endures several years, vaccination at 3- to 5-year intervals, after the first year, seems a reasonable practice until more

  8. In-vitro antiviral efficacy of ribavirin and interferon-alpha against canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Otávio V.; Saraiva, Giuliana L.; Ferreira, Caroline G.T.; Felix, Daniele M.; Fietto, Juliana L.R.; Bressan, Gustavo C.; Almeida, Márcia R.; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper is a highly contagious disease with high incidence and lethality in the canine population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral action with ribavirin (RBV), interferon-alpha (IFNα), and combinations of RBV and IFNα against canine distemper virus (CDV). Vero cells inoculated with CDV were treated with RBV, IFNα, and combinations of these drugs. The efficacy to inhibit viral replication was evaluated by adding the compounds at different times to determine which step of the viral replicative process was affected. Both drugs were effective against CDV in vitro. The IFNα was the most active compound, with an average IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) value lower than the IC50 of the RBV. Ribavirin (RBV) was more selective than IFNα, however, and neither drug showed extracellular antiviral activity. The combination of RBV and IFNα exhibited antiviral activity for the intra- and extracellular stages of the replicative cycle of CDV, although the intracellular viral inhibition was higher. Both RBV and IFNα showed high antiviral efficacy against CDV, and furthermore, RBV + IFNα combinations have shown greater interference range in viral infectivity. These compounds could potentially be used to treat clinical disease associated with CDV infection. PMID:25355997

  9. Dog overpopulation and burden of exposure to canine distemper virus and other pathogens on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Nicole M; Mendez, Gabriella S; Grijalva, C Jaime; Walden, Heather S; Cruz, Marilyn; Aragon, Eduardo; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Dog overpopulation and diseases are hazards to native island species and humans on the Galapagos. Vaccination and importation of dogs are prohibited on the Galapagos. Risk management of these hazards requires the use of science-based risk assessment and risk communication. The objectives of the study reported here were (i) to estimate the human:dog ratio and (ii) the prevalence of and identify exposure factors associated with positive antibody titers to canine distemper virus (CDV) and other pathogens, as well as infection with intestinal parasites in owned dogs on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos in September 2014. The observed human:dog ratio was 6.148:1 which extrapolates to 2503 dogs (two times more than a recent dog count conducted by Galapagos Biosecurity Agency in March 2014). The proportion of spayed female dogs (50%) was higher, compared to neutered male dogs (30%) (p=0.04). Prevalence of dogs with positive antibody titers to CDV was 36% (95% CI=26, 46%), to canine parvovirus was 89% (95% CI=82, 95%), and to canine adenovirus was 40% (95% CI=30, 51%). The frequency of seropositive dogs to CDV was lower in urban dogs (26%), compared to rural dogs (53%) (p<0.05). A positive interaction effect between rural residence and spay/neuter status on seropositivity to CDV was observed, which we discuss in this report. Because vaccination is prohibited, the dog population on Santa Cruz is susceptible to an outbreak of CDV (particularly among urban dogs) with potential spill over to marine mammals. Dog's age (1-2 or 3-14 years old, compared to younger dogs), and residence (rural, urban) were associated with positive antibody titers to parvovirus, adenovirus, Ehrlichia spp., or Anaplasma spp., as well as infection with Ancylostoma spp., an intestinal parasite in dogs that can be transmitted to humans, particularly children. These results provide the most comprehensive assessment of dog overpopulation and exposure to CDV and other pathogens on the Galapagos to date. PMID

  10. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control. PMID:18634509

  11. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    SciTech Connect

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo . E-mail: Riccardo.Wittek@unil.ch

    2005-07-05

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F{sub WT}) and attachment (H{sub WT}) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H{sub WT} determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F{sub WT} reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection.

  12. Coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and Canine Distemper Virus in a Yellow-throated Marten ( Martes flavigula koreana) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Surim; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Hae Beom; Cho, Ho Seong; Kim, Wonil; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2016-04-28

    We describe coinfection with Hepatozoon sp. and canine distemper virus (CDV) in a yellow-throated marten ( Martes flavigula koreana). We found Hepatozoon cysts in muscular tissue and viral inclusion bodies in the brain. Hepatozoon sp., and CDV was confirmed in blood and brain, respectively, by PCR. PMID:27054471

  13. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  14. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  15. First evidence of canine distemper in Brazilian free-ranging felids.

    PubMed

    Nava, Alessandra Ferreira Dales; Cullen, Laury; Sana, Dênis Aléssio; Nardi, Marcello Schiavo; Filho, José Domingues Ramos; Lima, Thiago Ferraz; Abreu, Kauê Cachuba; Ferreira, Fernando

    2008-12-01

    Serum samples from 19 jaguars (Panthera onca), nine pumas (Puma concolor), and two ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) were collected between January 1999 and March of 2005 and tested for presence of canine distemper virus (CDV). All cats were free-ranging animals living in two protected areas in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In addition, 111 domestic dogs from nearby areas were sampled for CDV. Our results show the first evidence of CDV exposure in Brazilian free-ranging felids. From the 30 samples analyzed, six jaguars and one puma were tested seropositive for CDV. All seropositive large felids were from Ivinhema State Park, resulting in 31.5% of the sampled jaguars or 60% of the total jaguar population in Ivinhema State Park, and 11.28% of the sampled pumas. From the total 111 domestic dogs sampled, 45 were tested seropositive for CDV. At Morro do Diabo State Park, 34.6% of the dogs sampled were positive for CDV, and 100% at Ivinhema State Park. Canine distemper virus in wild felids seems to be related with home range use and in close association with domestic dogs living in nearby areas. PMID:19259737

  16. Pathologic and Molecular Virologic Characterization of a Canine Distemper Outbreak in Farmed Civets.

    PubMed

    Techangamsuwan, S; Banlunara, W; Radtanakatikanon, A; Sommanustweechai, A; Siriaroonrat, B; Lombardini, E D; Rungsipipat, A

    2015-07-01

    In October 2011, a fatal disease outbreak occurred in 3 civet species farmed for their use in the coffee industry in Thailand. The disease quickly killed 20 animals in a mixed population of Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus; n = 18), a masked palm civet (Paguma larvata; n = 1), and small Indian civet (Viverricula indica; n = 1). Clinical signs consisted of severe lethargy, weakness, vomiting, and diarrhea with associated dehydration, dyspnea, nasal and footpad hyperkeratosis, and seizures. All civets were positive for canine morbillivirus using the commercial canine distemper virus (CDV) antigen test kit. Consistently observed necropsy findings consisted of severe pneumonia and hemorrhagic enteritis. Microscopic examination revealed severe gastroenteritis, bronchointerstitial pneumonia, lymphadenitis, necrotizing dermatitis, nonsuppurative polioencephalitis, and characteristic intranuclear/intracytoplasmic eosinophilic viral inclusions in multiple tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed immunoreactivity of varying intensity, while virus isolation demonstrated typical cytopathic effects. To confirm CDV infection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction against fusion (F), phosphoprotein (P), and hemagglutinin (H) genes showed bands of expected size using conjunctival swabs (9 civets, 1 dog [Canis lupus familiaris] living on the farm). Phylogenetic analyses and restriction fragment length polymorphism results indicated that the civets were infected by the Asia-1 strain of CDV commonly found in dogs in Thailand. The deduced amino acid sequences of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule binding region of the CDV-H proteins revealed a Y549H mutation in both CDV-infected Asian palm civets (n = 4) and a co-located dog. We report a canine distemper outbreak in a civet colony with lineage classification and a Y549H mutation in noncanid species in Thailand. PMID:25253065

  17. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  18. Detection of IgM antibodies against a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus in dog sera using a dot-blot assay.

    PubMed

    Barben, G; Stettler, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Zurbriggen, A

    1999-03-01

    A dot-blot assay for the detection of IgM antibodies (ABs) against canine distemper virus (CDV) in canine serum is described. The diagnostic potential of this technique was evaluated by analysing sera from three test groups: (i) specific pathogen-free (SPF) beagle dogs experimentally infected with virulent CDV; (ii) SPF dogs immunized with a combined vaccine containing CDV, and (iii) SPF dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine. As antigen for the dot-blot assay we used the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of the virulent A75/17 CDV strain. All 12 dogs of group 1, infected with virulent CDV, showed detectable CDV-specific IgM levels in their serum. All dogs of group 2 were also positive for anti-CDV IgM after the first immunization with the CDV-containing vaccine. The four dogs immunized with a CDV-free vaccine (group iii) remained negative throughout the course of the experiment. From these results, we conclude that the IgM detection test, which requires only a single serum sample, is a useful method for diagnosing current or recent CDV infection in CDV-infected or CDV-immunized dogs under experimental conditions. PMID:10216448

  19. Use of hydrophilic extra-viral domain of canine distemper virus H protein for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki-hyun; Kim, Jeongmi; Yoo, Hyun-ah; Kim, Dae-hee; Park, Seung-yong; Song, Chang-seon; Choi, In-soo

    2014-01-01

    Simple methods for measuring the levels of serum antibody against canine distemper virus (CDV) would assist in the effective vaccination of dogs. To develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for CDV, we expressed hydrophilic extra-viral domain (HEVD) protein of the A75/17-CDV H gene in a pET 28a plasmid-based Escherichia (E.) coli vector system. Expression was confirmed by dot and Western blotting. We proposed that detection of E. coli-expressed H protein might be conformation-dependent because intensities of the reactions observed with these two methods varied. The H gene HEVD protein was further purified and used as an antigen for an ELISA. Samples from dogs with undetectable to high anti-CDV antibody titers were analyzed using this HEVD-specific ELISA and a commercial CDV antibody detection kit (ImmunoComb). Levels of HEVD antigenicity measured with the assays and immunochromatography correlated. These data indicated that the HEDV protein may be used as antigen to develop techniques for detecting antibodies against CDV. PMID:25234325

  20. Use of hydrophilic extra-viral domain of canine distemper virus H protein for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki-hyun; Kim, Jeongmi; Yoo, Hyun-ah; Kim, Dae-hee; Park, Seung-yong; Song, Chang-seon; Choi, In-soo; Lee, Joong-bok

    2014-12-01

    Simple methods for measuring the levels of serum antibody against canine distemper virus (CDV) would assist in the effective vaccination of dogs. To develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for CDV, we expressed hydrophilic extra-viral domain (HEVD) protein of the A75/17-CDV H gene in a pET 28a plasmid-based Escherichia (E.) coli vector system. Expression was confirmed by dot and Western blotting. We proposed that detection of E. coli-expressed H protein might be conformation- dependent because intensities of the reactions observed with these two methods varied. The H gene HEVD protein was further purified and used as an antigen for an ELISA. Samples from dogs with undetectable to high anti-CDV antibody titers were analyzed using this HEVD-specific ELISA and a commercial CDV antibody detection kit (ImmunoComb). Levels of HEVD antigenicity measured with the assays and immunochromatography correlated. These data indicated that the HEDV protein may be used as antigen to develop techniques for detecting antibodies against CDV. PMID:25234325

  1. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing either the measles virus fusion or hemagglutinin glycoprotein protect dogs against canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Pincus, S; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1991-08-01

    cDNA clones of the genes encoding either the hemagglutinin (HA) or fusion (F) proteins of the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) were expressed in vaccinia virus recombinants. Immunofluorescence analysis detected both proteins on the plasma membranes of unfixed cells as well as internally in fixed cells. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically radiolabeled infected-cell extracts by using specific sera demonstrated a 76-kDa HA polypeptide and gene products of 60, 44, and 23 kDa which correspond to a MV F precursor and cleavage products F0, F1, and F2, respectively. Neither recombinant induced cell fusion of Vero cells when inoculated individually, but efficient cell fusion was readily observed upon coinfection of cells with both recombinants. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV F recombinant (VV-MVF) did not give rise to detectable MV-neutralizing antibody. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV HA recombinant (VV-MVHA) or coinoculation with both recombinants (VV-MVF and VV-MVHA) induced significant MV-neutralizing titers that were increased following a booster inoculation. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus recombinants or with MV failed to induce canine distemper virus (CDV)-neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with a lethal dose of virulent CDV, signs of infection were observed in dogs inoculated with (VV-MVF). No symptoms of disease were observed in dogs that had been vaccinated with VV-MVHA or with VV-MVHA and VV-MVF and then challenged with CDV. All dogs vaccinated with the recombinant viruses as well as those inoculated with MV or a vaccine strain of CDV survived CDV challenge. PMID:1830113

  2. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing either the measles virus fusion or hemagglutinin glycoprotein protect dogs against canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J; Pincus, S; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones of the genes encoding either the hemagglutinin (HA) or fusion (F) proteins of the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) were expressed in vaccinia virus recombinants. Immunofluorescence analysis detected both proteins on the plasma membranes of unfixed cells as well as internally in fixed cells. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically radiolabeled infected-cell extracts by using specific sera demonstrated a 76-kDa HA polypeptide and gene products of 60, 44, and 23 kDa which correspond to a MV F precursor and cleavage products F0, F1, and F2, respectively. Neither recombinant induced cell fusion of Vero cells when inoculated individually, but efficient cell fusion was readily observed upon coinfection of cells with both recombinants. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV F recombinant (VV-MVF) did not give rise to detectable MV-neutralizing antibody. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus-MV HA recombinant (VV-MVHA) or coinoculation with both recombinants (VV-MVF and VV-MVHA) induced significant MV-neutralizing titers that were increased following a booster inoculation. Inoculation of dogs with the vaccinia virus recombinants or with MV failed to induce canine distemper virus (CDV)-neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with a lethal dose of virulent CDV, signs of infection were observed in dogs inoculated with (VV-MVF). No symptoms of disease were observed in dogs that had been vaccinated with VV-MVHA or with VV-MVHA and VV-MVF and then challenged with CDV. All dogs vaccinated with the recombinant viruses as well as those inoculated with MV or a vaccine strain of CDV survived CDV challenge. Images PMID:1830113

  3. Induction of castration by immunization of male dogs with recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-canine distemper virus (CDV) T helper cell epitope p35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Jeong; Moon, Young-Chan; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Kim, Sun-Eui; Chang, Wha-Seok; Park, Seung-Young; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Park, Keun-Kyu; McOrist, Steven; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2005-03-01

    Immunocastration is a considerable alternative to a surgical castration method especially in male animal species for alleviating unwanted male behaviors and characteristics. Induction of high titer of antibody specific for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) correlates with the regression of testes. Fusion proteins composed of canine GnRH and T helper (Th) cell epitope p35 originated from canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein and goat rotavirus VP6 protein were produced in E. coli. When these fusion proteins were injected to male dogs which were previously immunized with CDV vaccine, the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35 induced much higher antibody than that of GnRH-rotavirus VP6 protein or GnRH alone. The degeneration of spermatogenesis was also verified in the male dogs immunized with the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35. These results indicate that canine GnRH conjugated to CDV Th cell epitope p35 acted as a strong immunogen and the antibody to GnRH specifically neutralized GnRH in the testes. This study also implies a potential application of GnRH-based vaccines for immunocastration of male pets. PMID:15785119

  4. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity specific for hemagglutinin (H) protein of canine distemper virus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Kyoko; Togashi, Ken-ichi; Wakasa, Chiaki; Yoneda, Misako; Nishi, Toshiya; Endo, Yasuyuki; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Kai, Chieko

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to hemagglutinin (H) protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) were evaluated in dogs using the replication-deficient adenovirus protein expression system. Skin fibroblasts were isolated from two dogs and were infected with recombinant adenovirus bearing the CDV-H gene (Ade-CDVH). CTL assay was performed using fibroblasts expressing CDV-H protein as target cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) collected from the same dogs one week after immunization of CDV as effector cells. Specific cytotoxic activity was observed against autologous but not heterologous fibroblasts expressing CDV-H protein. These results indicate that the CTL epitope(s) were localized in the H protein. PMID:12576714

  5. Experimental Adaptation of Wild-Type Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) to the Human Entry Receptor CD150

    PubMed Central

    Bieringer, Maria; Han, Jung Woo; Kendl, Sabine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Plattet, Philippe; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a close relative of measles virus (MV), is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM) and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F) genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (102 pfu/ml) in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM). After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (105 pfu/ml). Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G) was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L) and Gly to Glu (G71E), and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs. PMID:23554862

  6. Canine Distemper Virus Infects Canine Keratinocytes and Immune Cells by Using Overlapping and Distinct Regions Located on One Side of the Attachment Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Langedijk, Johannes P. M.; Janda, Jozef; Origgi, Francesco C.; Örvell, Claes; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The morbilliviruses measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) both rely on two surface glycoproteins, the attachment (H) and fusion proteins, to promote fusion activity for viral cell entry. Growing evidence suggests that morbilliviruses infect multiple cell types by binding to distinct host cell surface receptors. Currently, the only known in vivo receptor used by morbilliviruses is CD150/SLAM, a molecule expressed in certain immune cells. Here we investigated the usage of multiple receptors by the highly virulent and demyelinating CDV strain A75/17. We based our study on the assumption that CDV-H may interact with receptors similar to those for MeV, and we conducted systematic alanine-scanning mutagenesis on CDV-H throughout one side of the β-propeller documented in MeV-H to contain multiple receptor-binding sites. Functional and biochemical assays performed with SLAM-expressing cells and primary canine epithelial keratinocytes identified 11 residues mutation of which selectively abrogated fusion in keratinocytes. Among these, four were identical to amino acids identified in MeV-H as residues contacting a putative receptor expressed in polarized epithelial cells. Strikingly, when mapped on a CDV-H structural model, all residues clustered in or around a recessed groove located on one side of CDV-H. In contrast, reported CDV-H mutants with SLAM-dependent fusion deficiencies were characterized by additional impairments to the promotion of fusion in keratinocytes. Furthermore, upon transfer of residues that selectively impaired fusion induction in keratinocytes into the CDV-H of the vaccine strain, fusion remained largely unaltered. Taken together, our results suggest that a restricted region on one side of CDV-H contains distinct and overlapping sites that control functional interaction with multiple receptors. PMID:21849439

  7. SLAM- and Nectin-4-Independent Noncytolytic Spread of Canine Distemper Virus in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Lisa; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Avila, Mislay; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles and canine distemper viruses (MeV and CDV, respectively) first replicate in lymphatic and epithelial tissues by using SLAM and nectin-4 as entry receptors, respectively. The viruses may also invade the brain to establish persistent infections, triggering fatal complications, such as subacute sclerosis pan-encephalitis (SSPE) in MeV infection or chronic, multiple sclerosis-like, multifocal demyelinating lesions in the case of CDV infection. In both diseases, persistence is mediated by viral nucleocapsids that do not require packaging into particles for infectivity but are directly transmitted from cell to cell (neurons in SSPE or astrocytes in distemper encephalitis), presumably by relying on restricted microfusion events. Indeed, although morphological evidence of fusion remained undetectable, viral fusion machineries and, thus, a putative cellular receptor, were shown to contribute to persistent infections. Here, we first showed that nectin-4-dependent cell-cell fusion in Vero cells, triggered by a demyelinating CDV strain, remained extremely limited, thereby supporting a potential role of nectin-4 in mediating persistent infections in astrocytes. However, nectin-4 could not be detected in either primary cultured astrocytes or the white matter of tissue sections. In addition, a bioengineered “nectin-4-blind” recombinant CDV retained full cell-to-cell transmission efficacy in primary astrocytes. Combined with our previous report demonstrating the absence of SLAM expression in astrocytes, these findings are suggestive for the existence of a hitherto unrecognized third CDV receptor expressed by glial cells that contributes to the induction of noncytolytic cell-to-cell viral transmission in astrocytes. IMPORTANCE While persistent measles virus (MeV) infection induces SSPE in humans, persistent canine distemper virus (CDV) infection causes chronic progressive or relapsing demyelination in carnivores. Common to both central nervous system (CNS

  8. Dynamics of a morbillivirus at the domestic–wildlife interface: Canine distemper virus in domestic dogs and lions

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Mafalda; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Halliday, Jo; Packer, Craig; Craft, Meggan E.; Hampson, Katie; Czupryna, Anna; Dobson, Andrew P.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Ernest, Eblate; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Horton, Daniel L.; Kaare, Magai T.; Kanellos, Theo; Lankester, Felix; Mentzel, Christine; Mlengeya, Titus; Mzimbiri, Imam; Takahashi, Emi; Willett, Brian; Haydon, Daniel T.; Lembo, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Morbilliviruses cause many diseases of medical and veterinary importance, and although some (e.g., measles and rinderpest) have been controlled successfully, others, such as canine distemper virus (CDV), are a growing concern. A propensity for host-switching has resulted in CDV emergence in new species, including endangered wildlife, posing challenges for controlling disease in multispecies communities. CDV is typically associated with domestic dogs, but little is known about its maintenance and transmission in species-rich areas or about the potential role of domestic dog vaccination as a means of reducing disease threats to wildlife. We address these questions by analyzing a long-term serological dataset of CDV in lions and domestic dogs from Tanzania’s Serengeti ecosystem. Using a Bayesian state–space model, we show that dynamics of CDV have changed considerably over the past three decades. Initially, peaks of CDV infection in dogs preceded those in lions, suggesting that spill-over from dogs was the main driver of infection in wildlife. However, despite dog-to-lion transmission dominating cross-species transmission models, infection peaks in lions became more frequent and asynchronous from those in dogs, suggesting that other wildlife species may play a role in a potentially complex maintenance community. Widespread mass vaccination of domestic dogs reduced the probability of infection in dogs and the size of outbreaks but did not prevent transmission to or peaks of infection in lions. This study demonstrates the complexity of CDV dynamics in natural ecosystems and the value of long-term, large-scale datasets for investigating transmission patterns and evaluating disease control strategies. PMID:25605919

  9. Dynamics of a morbillivirus at the domestic-wildlife interface: Canine distemper virus in domestic dogs and lions.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mafalda; Cleaveland, Sarah; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Halliday, Jo; Packer, Craig; Craft, Meggan E; Hampson, Katie; Czupryna, Anna; Dobson, Andrew P; Dubovi, Edward J; Ernest, Eblate; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Hopcraft, J Grant C; Horton, Daniel L; Kaare, Magai T; Kanellos, Theo; Lankester, Felix; Mentzel, Christine; Mlengeya, Titus; Mzimbiri, Imam; Takahashi, Emi; Willett, Brian; Haydon, Daniel T; Lembo, Tiziana

    2015-02-01

    Morbilliviruses cause many diseases of medical and veterinary importance, and although some (e.g., measles and rinderpest) have been controlled successfully, others, such as canine distemper virus (CDV), are a growing concern. A propensity for host-switching has resulted in CDV emergence in new species, including endangered wildlife, posing challenges for controlling disease in multispecies communities. CDV is typically associated with domestic dogs, but little is known about its maintenance and transmission in species-rich areas or about the potential role of domestic dog vaccination as a means of reducing disease threats to wildlife. We address these questions by analyzing a long-term serological dataset of CDV in lions and domestic dogs from Tanzania's Serengeti ecosystem. Using a Bayesian state-space model, we show that dynamics of CDV have changed considerably over the past three decades. Initially, peaks of CDV infection in dogs preceded those in lions, suggesting that spill-over from dogs was the main driver of infection in wildlife. However, despite dog-to-lion transmission dominating cross-species transmission models, infection peaks in lions became more frequent and asynchronous from those in dogs, suggesting that other wildlife species may play a role in a potentially complex maintenance community. Widespread mass vaccination of domestic dogs reduced the probability of infection in dogs and the size of outbreaks but did not prevent transmission to or peaks of infection in lions. This study demonstrates the complexity of CDV dynamics in natural ecosystems and the value of long-term, large-scale datasets for investigating transmission patterns and evaluating disease control strategies. PMID:25605919

  10. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25880113

  11. Canine Distemper Virus Epithelial Cell Infection Is Required for Clinical Disease but Not for Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao-Xiang; Hinkelmann, Sarah; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the importance of infection of epithelial cells for morbillivirus pathogenesis, we took advantage of the severe disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) in ferrets. To obtain a CDV that was unable to enter epithelial cells but retained the ability to enter immune cells, we transferred to its attachment (H) protein two mutations shown to interfere with the interaction of measles virus H with its epithelial receptor, human nectin-4. As expected for an epithelial receptor (EpR)-blind CDV, this virus infected dog and ferret epithelial cells inefficiently and did not cause cell fusion or syncytium formation. On the other hand, the EpR-blind CDV replicated in cells expressing canine signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), the morbillivirus immune cell receptor, with similar kinetics to those of wild-type CDV. While ferrets infected with wild-type CDV died within 12 days after infection, after developing severe rash and fever, animals infected with the EpR-blind virus showed no clinical signs of disease. Nevertheless, both viruses spread rapidly and efficiently in immune cells, causing similar levels of leukopenia and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation activity, two indicators of morbillivirus immunosuppression. Infection was documented for airway epithelia of ferrets infected with wild-type CDV but not for those of animals infected with the EpR-blind virus, and only animals infected with wild-type CDV shed virus. Thus, epithelial cell infection is necessary for clinical disease and efficient virus shedding but not for immunosuppression. PMID:22278252

  12. Fatal canine distemper infection in a pack of African wild dogs in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Fyumagwa, Robert D; Nikolin, Veljko; East, Marion L; Kilewo, Morris; Speck, Stephanie; Müller, Thomas; Matzke, Martina; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2010-12-15

    In 2007, disease related mortality occurred in one African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) pack close to the north-eastern boundary of the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Histopathological examination of tissues from six animals revealed that the main pathologic changes comprised interstitial pneumonia and suppurative to necrotizing bronchopneumonia. Respiratory epithelial cells contained numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and multiple syncytial cells were found throughout the parenchymal tissue, both reacting clearly positive with antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV) antigen. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 388 nucleotide (nt) fragment of the CDV phosphoprotein (P) gene revealed that the pack was infected with a CDV variant most closely related to Tanzanian variants, including those obtained in 1994 during a CDV epidemic in the Serengeti National Park and from captive African wild dogs in the Mkomazi Game Reserve in 2000. Phylogenetic analysis of a 335-nt fragment of the fusion (F) gene confirmed that the pack in 2007 was infected with a variant most closely related to one variant from 1994 during the epidemic in the Serengeti National Park from which a comparable fragment is available. Screening of tissue samples for concurrent infections revealed evidence of canine parvovirus, Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum and Hepatozoon sp. No evidence of infection with Babesia sp. or rabies virus was found. Possible implications of concurrent infections are discussed. This is the first molecular characterisation of CDV in free-ranging African wild dogs and only the third confirmed case of fatal CDV infection in a free-ranging pack. PMID:20684868

  13. Inhibition of viral RNA synthesis in canine distemper virus infection by proanthocyanidin A2.

    PubMed

    Gallina, Laura; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Galligioni, Viola; Bombardelli, Ezio; Scagliarini, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a contagious and multisystemic viral disease that affects domestic and wild canines as well as other terrestrial and aquatic carnivores. The disease in dogs is often fatal and no specific antiviral therapy is currently available. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity against CDV of proanthocyanidin A2 (PA2), a phenolic dimer belonging to the class of condensed tannins present in plants. Our results showed that PA2 exerted in vitro antiviral activity against CDV with a higher selectivity index compared to ribavirin, included in our study for the previously tested anti-CDV activity. The time of addition assay led us to observe that PA2 was able to decrease the viral RNA synthesis and to reduce progeny virus liberation, at different times post infection suggesting multiple mechanisms of action including inhibition of viral replicative complex and modulation of the redox milieu. These data suggest that PA2, isolated from the bark of Aesculus hippocastanum, has potential usefulness as an anti-CDV compound inhibiting viral replication. PMID:22020306

  14. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus in wolves in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brynn; Hebblewhite, Mark; Ezenwa, Vanessa; Shury, Todd; Merrill, Evelyn H; Paquet, Paul C; Schmiegelow, Fiona; Seip, Dale; Skinner, Geoff; Webb, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Wild carnivores are often exposed to diseases via contact with peridomestic host species that travel through the wildland-urban interfaces. To determine the antibody prevalences and relationships to human activity for two common canid pathogens, we sampled 99 wolves (Canis lupus) from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks and surrounding areas of the Canadian Rockies. This population was the source for wolves reintroduced into the Northern Rockies of the US. Of 99 wolves sampled, 94 had detectable antibody to CPV (95%), 24 were antibody-positive for CDV (24%), and 24 had antibodies to both pathogens (24%). We tested whether antibody prevalences for CPV and CDV were higher closer to human activity (roads, town sites, First Nation reserves) and as a function of sex and age class. Wolves ≥2 yr old were more likely to be have antibodies to CPV. For CDV, male wolves, wolves ≥2 yr, and those closer to First Nation reserves were more likely to have antibodies. Overall, however, we found minimal support for human influence on antibody prevalence for CDV and CPV. The similarity between our antibody prevalence results and results from recent studies in Yellowstone National Park suggests that at least in the case of CDV, and perhaps CPV, these could be important pathogens with potential effects on wolf populations. PMID:22247375

  15. Rabies virus and canine distemper virus in wild and domestic carnivores in Northern Kenya: are domestic dogs the reservoir?

    PubMed

    Prager, K C; Mazet, Jonna A K; Dubovi, Edward J; Frank, Laurence G; Munson, Linda; Wagner, Aaron P; Woodroffe, Rosie

    2012-12-01

    Rabies virus (RV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) can cause significant mortality in wild carnivore populations, and RV threatens human lives. We investigated serological patterns of exposure to CDV and RV in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas), spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), striped hyenas (Hyaena hyaena) and African lions (Panthera leo), over a 10-year period, in a Kenyan rangeland to assess the role domestic dogs may play in the transmission dynamics of these two important canid pathogens. Observed patterns of RV exposure suggested that repeated introduction, rather than maintenance, occurred in the wild carnivore species studied. However, RV appeared to have been maintained in domestic dogs: exposure was more likely in domestic dogs than in the wild carnivores; was detected consistently over time without variation among years; and was detected in juveniles (≤1-year-old) as well as adults (>1-year-old). We conclude that this domestic dog population could be a RV reservoir. By contrast, the absence of evidence of CDV exposure for each carnivore species examined in the study area, for specific years, suggested repeated introduction, rather than maintenance, and that CDV may require a larger reservoir population than RV. This reservoir could be a larger domestic dog population; another wildlife species; or a "metareservoir" consisting of multiple interconnected carnivore populations. Our findings suggest that RV risks to people and wild carnivores might be controlled by domestic dog vaccination, but that CDV control, if required, would need to target the species of concern. PMID:23459924

  16. Canine distemper in an isolated population of fishers (Martes pennanti) from California.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stefan M; Gabriel, Mourad; Terio, Karen A; Dubovi, Edward J; VanWormer, Elizabeth; Sweitzer, Rick; Barret, Reginald; Thompson, Craig; Purcell, Kathryn; Munson, Linda

    2012-10-01

    Four fishers (Martes pennanti) from an insular population in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA died as a consequence of an infection with canine distemper virus (CDV) in 2009. Three fishers were found in close temporal and spatial relationship; the fourth fisher died 4 mo later at a 70 km distance from the initial group. Gross lesions were restricted to hyperkeratosis of periocular skin and ulceration of footpads. All animals had necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis with syncytia and intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Inclusion bodies were abundant in the epithelia of urinary bladder and epididymis but were infrequent in the renal pelvis and the female genital epithelia. No histopathologic or immunohistochemical evidence for virus spread to the central nervous system was found. One fisher had encephalitis caused by Sarcocystis neurona and another had severe head trauma as a consequence of predation. The H gene nucleotide sequence of the virus isolates from the first three fishers was identical and was 99.6% identical to the isolate from the fourth fisher. Phylogenetically, the isolates clustered with other North American isolates separate from classical European wildlife lineage strains. These data suggest that the European wildlife lineage might consist of two separate subgroups that are genetically distinct and endemic in different geographic regions. The source of infection as well as pertinent transmission routes remained unclear. This is the first report of CDV in fishers and underscores the significance of CDV as a pathogen of management concern. PMID:23060505

  17. Canine distemper virus infection among wildlife before and after the epidemic

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Junko; NISHIO, Yohei; KAMEO, Yuki; TERADA, Yutaka; KUWATA, Ryusei; SHIMODA, Hiroshi; SUZUKI, Kazuo; MAEDA, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In 2007–2008, a canine distemper virus (CDV) epidemic occurred among wild animals in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, and many mammals, including the wild boar and deer, were infected. In this study, CDV prevalence among wild animals was surveyed before and after the epidemic. At first, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated protein A/G was established to detect CDV antibodies in many mammalian species. This established ELISA was available for testing dogs, raccoons and raccoon dogs as well as virus-neutralization test. Next, a serological survey of wild mammalians was conducted, and it was indicated that many wild mammalians, particularly raccoons, were infected with CDV during the epidemic, but few were infected before and after the epidemic. On the other hand, many raccoon dogs died during the epidemic, but CDV remained prevalent in the remaining population, and a small epidemic occurred in raccoon dogs in 2012–2013. These results indicated that the epidemic of 2007–2008 may have been intensified by transmission to raccoons. PMID:26074342

  18. Selective spread and reduced virus release leads to canine distemper virus persistence in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Graber, H U; Vandevelde, M

    1995-05-01

    In primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC) the attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) is cytolytic, whereas virulent CDV is not. Thus, the question why cytolysis does or does not occur appears to be intimately associated with the mechanism of persistence. Persistence is most likely related to the way these viruses replicate. In the present study we used morphological and immunocytochemical approaches to compare several aspects of virus replication between a cytolytic and a virulent CDV strain using DBCC to study both strains. Quantitative measurements did not detect a difference in the rate of virus protein synthesis at the level of the single cell, between the two types of infection. Electron microscopical results and virus titration experiments showed marked differences in virus spread and virus release. Immunocytochemical studies showed differences in the distribution of the nucleocapsid and matrix proteins between the two infections. Budding and cytolysis are strongly limited in the virulent A75/17-CDV infection as compared to attenuated viruses. This is probably due to structural changes in the virus proteins leading to modifications of virus assembly. Thus the present study supports a mechanism of CDV persistence through a type of virus maturation and spread by which very little virus is released outside of the cell. PMID:8588323

  19. Canine distemper virus infection among wildlife before and after the epidemic.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Junko; Nishio, Yohei; Kameo, Yuki; Terada, Yutaka; Kuwata, Ryusei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuo; Maeda, Ken

    2015-11-01

    In 2007-2008, a canine distemper virus (CDV) epidemic occurred among wild animals in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, and many mammals, including the wild boar and deer, were infected. In this study, CDV prevalence among wild animals was surveyed before and after the epidemic. At first, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated protein A/G was established to detect CDV antibodies in many mammalian species. This established ELISA was available for testing dogs, raccoons and raccoon dogs as well as virus-neutralization test. Next, a serological survey of wild mammalians was conducted, and it was indicated that many wild mammalians, particularly raccoons, were infected with CDV during the epidemic, but few were infected before and after the epidemic. On the other hand, many raccoon dogs died during the epidemic, but CDV remained prevalent in the remaining population, and a small epidemic occurred in raccoon dogs in 2012-2013. These results indicated that the epidemic of 2007-2008 may have been intensified by transmission to raccoons. PMID:26074342

  20. Molecular phylogeography of canine distemper virus: Geographic origin and global spreading.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Yanina; Sarute, Nicolás; Iraola, Gregorio; Hernández, Martín; Pérez, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) (Paramyxoviridae-Morbillivirus) is a worldwide spread virus causing a fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore hosts. In this study we performed Bayesian inferences using 208 full-length hemagglutinin gene nucleotide sequences isolated in 16 countries during 37 years (1975-2011). The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor suggested that current CDV strains emerged in the United States in the 1880s. This ancestor diversified through time into two ancestral clades, the current America 1 lineage that recently spread to Asia, and other ancestral clade that diversified and spread worldwide to originate the remaining eight lineages characterized to date. The spreading of CDV was characterized by several migratory events with posterior local differentiation, and expansion of the virus host range. A significant genetic flow between domestic and wildlife hosts is displayed; being domestic hosts the main viral reservoirs worldwide. This study is an extensive and integrative description of spatio/temporal population dynamics of CDV lineages that provides a novel evolutionary paradigm about the origin and dissemination of the current strains of the virus. PMID:26151219

  1. Canine distemper virus as a threat to wild tigers in Russia and across their range.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Martin; Soutyrina, Svetlana V; Seryodkin, Ivan V; Sulikhan, Nadezhda; Uphyrkina, Olga V; Goncharuk, Mikhail; Matthews, Louise; Cleaveland, Sarah; Miquelle, Dale G

    2015-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has recently been identified in populations of wild tigers in Russia and India. Tiger populations are generally too small to maintain CDV for long periods, but are at risk of infections arising from more abundant susceptible hosts that constitute a reservoir of infection. Because CDV is an additive mortality factor, it could represent a significant threat to small, isolated tiger populations. In Russia, CDV was associated with the deaths of tigers in 2004 and 2010, and was coincident with a localized decline of tigers in Sikhote-Alin Biosphere Zapovednik (from 25 tigers in 2008 to 9 in 2012). Habitat continuity with surrounding areas likely played an important role in promoting an ongoing recovery. We recommend steps be taken to assess the presence and the impact of CDV in all tiger range states, but should not detract focus away from the primary threats to tigers, which include habitat loss and fragmentation, poaching and retaliatory killing. Research priorities include: (i) recognition and diagnosis of clinical cases of CDV in tigers when they occur; and (ii) collection of baseline data on the health of wild tigers. CDV infection of individual tigers need not imply a conservation threat, and modeling should complement disease surveillance and targeted research to assess the potential impact to tiger populations across the range of ecosystems, population densities and climate extremes occupied by tigers. Describing the role of domestic and wild carnivores as contributors to a local CDV reservoir is an important precursor to considering control measures. PMID:25939829

  2. Sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Yanlong; Wang, Huiguo; Jin, Jinhua; Li, Wenzhe

    2013-01-01

    A sandwich-dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot ELISA) was developed for the detection of canine distemper virus (CDV). In 56 dogs suspected to have CD the rates of detection of CDV antigen in samples of blood lymphocytes and palpebral conjunctiva by dot ELISA and ELISA were, respectively, 91% (49/54) and 81% (44/54) for the lymphocyte samples and 88% (28/32) and 75% (24/32) for the conjunctival samples. The CDV detection limits were 10 ng/50 μL for dot ELISA and 40 ng/50 μL for ELISA. The reliability of dot ELISA relative to electron microscopy was 96% with 22 samples: all 21 samples in which CDV particles were observed by electron microscopy yielded positive results with dot ELISA; the single sample in which particles were not observed yielded false-positive results with dot ELISA. The results indicate that the dot ELISA developed can serve as a reliable rapid diagnostic test in suspected cases of CD and also be useful for epidemiologic surveillance of the disease. PMID:24124274

  3. CD9, a tetraspan transmembrane protein, renders cells susceptible to canine distemper virus.

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, S; Lottspeich, F; Lanza, F; Azorsa, D O; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a lymphotropic and neurotropic negative-stranded RNA virus of the Morbillivirus genus, causes a life-threatening disease in several carnivores, including domestic dogs. To identify the cellular receptor(s) involved in the uptake of CDV by susceptible cells, we isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb K41) which binds to the cell surface and inhibits the CDV infection of several cell lines from various species. Pretreatment of cells with MAb K41 reduces the number of infectious centers and the size of the syncytia. Using affinity chromatography with MAb K41, we purified from HeLa and Vero cell extracts a 26-kDa protein which contained the amino acid sequence TKDEPQRETLK of human CD9, a member of the tetraspan transmembrane or transmembrane 4 superfamily of cell surface proteins. Transfection of NIH 3T3 or MDBK cells with a CD9 expression plasmid rendered these cells permissive for viral infection and raised virus production by a factor of 10 to 100. The mechanism involved is still unclear, since we were unable to detect direct binding of CDV to CD9 by using immunoprecipitation and a virus overlay protein binding assay. These findings indicate that human CD9 and its homologs in other species are necessary factors for the uptake of CDV by target cells, the formation of syncytia, and the production of progeny virus. PMID:8985321

  4. Canine Distemper Virus Fusion Activation: Critical Role of Residue E123 of CD150/SLAM

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Mojtaba; Bringolf, Fanny; Röthlisberger, Silvan; Bieringer, Maria; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Origgi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) possess tetrameric attachment proteins (H) and trimeric fusion proteins, which cooperate with either SLAM or nectin 4 receptors to trigger membrane fusion for cell entry. While the MeV H-SLAM cocrystal structure revealed the binding interface, two distinct oligomeric H assemblies were also determined. In one of the conformations, two SLAM units were sandwiched between two discrete H head domains, thus spotlighting two binding interfaces (“front” and “back”). Here, we investigated the functional relevance of both interfaces in activating the CDV membrane fusion machinery. While alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified five critical regulatory residues in the front H-binding site of SLAM, the replacement of a conserved glutamate residue (E at position 123, replaced with A [E123A]) led to the most pronounced impact on fusion promotion. Intriguingly, while determination of the interaction of H with the receptor using soluble constructs revealed reduced binding for the identified SLAM mutants, no effect was recorded when physical interaction was investigated with the full-length counterparts of both molecules. Conversely, although mutagenesis of three strategically selected residues within the back H-binding site of SLAM did not substantially affect fusion triggering, nevertheless, the mutants weakened the H-SLAM interaction recorded with the membrane-anchored protein constructs. Collectively, our findings support a mode of binding between the attachment protein and the V domain of SLAM that is common to all morbilliviruses and suggest a major role of the SLAM residue E123, located at the front H-binding site, in triggering the fusion machinery. However, our data additionally support the hypothesis that other microdomain(s) of both glycoproteins (including the back H-binding site) might be required to achieve fully productive H-SLAM interactions. IMPORTANCE A complete understanding of the measles virus

  5. Viral Oncolysis — Can Insights from Measles Be Transferred to Canine Distemper Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Lapp, Stefanie; Pfankuche, Vanessa M.; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Puff, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Neoplastic diseases represent one of the most common causes of death among humans and animals. Currently available and applied therapeutic options often remain insufficient and unsatisfactory, therefore new and innovative strategies and approaches are highly needed. Periodically, oncolytic viruses have been in the center of interest since the first anecdotal description of their potential usefulness as an anti-tumor treatment concept. Though first reports referred to an incidental measles virus infection causing tumor regression in a patient suffering from lymphoma several decades ago, no final treatment concept has been developed since then. However, numerous viruses, such as herpes-, adeno- and paramyxoviruses, have been investigated, characterized, and modified with the aim to generate a new anti-cancer treatment option. Among the different viruses, measles virus still represents a highly interesting candidate for such an approach. Numerous different tumors of humans including malignant lymphoma, lung and colorectal adenocarcinoma, mesothelioma, and ovarian cancer, have been studied in vitro and in vivo as potential targets. Moreover, several concepts using different virus preparations are now in clinical trials in humans and may proceed to a new treatment option. Surprisingly, only few studies have investigated viral oncolysis in veterinary medicine. The close relationship between measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV), both are morbilliviruses, and the fact that numerous tumors in dogs exhibit similarities to their human counterpart, indicates that both the virus and species dog represent a highly interesting translational model for future research in viral oncolysis. Several recent studies support such an assumption. It is therefore the aim of the present communication to outline the mechanisms of morbillivirus-mediated oncolysis and to stimulate further research in this potentially expanding field of viral oncolysis in a highly suitable

  6. Molecular Determinants Defining the Triggering Range of Prefusion F Complexes of Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Origgi, Francesco; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The morbillivirus cell entry machinery consists of a fusion (F) protein trimer that refolds to mediate membrane fusion following receptor-induced conformational changes in its binding partner, the tetrameric attachment (H) protein. To identify molecular determinants that control F refolding, we generated F chimeras between measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV). We located a central pocket in the globular head domain of CDV F that regulates the stability of the metastable, prefusion conformational state of the F trimer. Most mutations introduced into this “pocket'” appeared to mediate a destabilizing effect, a phenotype associated with enhanced membrane fusion activity. Strikingly, under specific triggering conditions (i.e., variation of receptor type and H protein origin), some F mutants also exhibited resistance to a potent morbillivirus entry inhibitor, which is known to block F triggering by enhancing the stability of prefusion F trimers. Our data reveal that the molecular nature of the F stimulus and the intrinsic stability of metastable prefusion F both regulate the efficiency of F refolding and escape from small-molecule refolding blockers. IMPORTANCE With the aim to better characterize the thermodynamic basis of morbillivirus membrane fusion for cell entry and spread, we report here that the activation energy barrier of prefusion F trimers together with the molecular nature of the triggering “stimulus” (attachment protein and receptor types) define a “triggering range,” which governs the initiation of the membrane fusion process. A central “pocket” microdomain in the globular F head contributes substantially to the regulation of the conformational stability of the prefusion complexes. The triggering range also defines the mechanism of viral escape from entry inhibitors and describes how the cellular environment can affect membrane fusion efficiency. PMID:24371057

  7. Canine Distemper Virus: an Emerging Disease in Wild Endangered Amur Tigers (Panthera tigris altaica)

    PubMed Central

    Seimon, Tracie A.; Miquelle, Dale G.; Chang, Tylis Y.; Newton, Alisa L.; Korotkova, Irina; Ivanchuk, Galina; Lyubchenko, Elena; Tupikov, Andre; Slabe, Evgeny; McAloose, Denise

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fewer than 500 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) remain in the wild. Due to low numbers and their solitary and reclusive nature, tiger sightings across their range in the Russian Far East and China are rare; sightings of sick tigers are rarer still. Serious neurologic disease observed in several wild tigers since 2001 suggested disease emergence in this endangered species. To investigate this possibility, histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH), and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were performed on tissues from 5 affected tigers that died or were destroyed in 2001, 2004, or 2010. Our results reveal canine distemper virus (CDV) infection as the cause of neurologic disease in two tigers and definitively establish infection in a third. Nonsuppurative encephalitis with demyelination, eosinophilic nuclear viral inclusions, and positive immunolabeling for CDV by IHC and ISH were present in the two tigers with available brain tissue. CDV phosphoprotein (P) and hemagglutinin (H) gene products were obtained from brains of these two tigers by RT-PCR, and a short fragment of CDV P gene sequence was detected in lymph node tissue of a third tiger. Phylogenetically, Amur tiger CDV groups with an Arctic-like strain in Baikal seals (Phoca siberica). Our results, which include mapping the location of positive tigers and recognition of a cluster of cases in 2010, coupled with a lack of reported CDV antibodies in Amur tigers prior to 2000 suggest wide geographic distribution of CDV across the tiger range and recent emergence of CDV as a significant infectious disease threat to endangered Amur tigers in the Russian Far East. PMID:23943758

  8. Susceptibility of carnivore hosts to strains of canine distemper virus from distinct genetic lineages.

    PubMed

    Nikolin, Veljko M; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Michler, Frank-Uwe F; Wolf, Peter; East, Marion L

    2012-04-23

    Using the complete haemagglutinin (HA) gene and partial phosphoprotein (P) gene we investigated the genotype of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains recovered from two wildlife species in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated significant differences between the strains from raccoons Procyon lotor (family Procyonidae) obtained in 2007 and strains from red foxes Vulpes vulpes (family Canidae) obtained in 2008. The raccoon strains belonged to the CDV European wildlife lineage whereas the red fox strains belonged to the CDV Europe lineage. We combined our genetic sequence data with published data from 138 CDV stains worldwide to investigate the proposed importance of amino acid substitutions in the SLAM binding region of the CDV HA protein at position 530 (G/E to R/D/N) and 549 (Y to H) to the spread of domestic dog-adapted CDV strains to other carnivores. We found no evidence that amino acid 530 was strongly affected by host species. Rather, site 530 was conserved within CDV lineages, regardless of host species. Contrary to expectation, strains from non-dog hosts did not exhibit a bias towards the predicted substitution Y549H. Wild canid hosts were more frequently infected by strains with 549Y, a pattern similar to domestic dogs. Non-canid strains showed no significant bias towards either H or Y at site 549, although there was a trend towards 549H. Significant differences between the prevalence of 549Y and 549H in wild canid strains and non-canid strains suggests a degree of virus adaptation to these categories of host. PMID:22024346

  9. Epidemiology, pathology, and genetic analysis of a canine distemper epidemic in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Gowtage-Sequeira, Sonya; Banyard, Ashley C; Barrett, Tom; Buczkowski, Hubert; Funk, Stephan M; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2009-10-01

    Severe population declines have resulted from the spillover of canine distemper virus (CDV) into susceptible wildlife, with both domestic and wild canids being involved in the maintenance and transmission of the virus. This study (March 2001 to October 2003) collated case data, serologic, pathologic, and molecular data to describe the spillover of CDV from domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) to black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) during an epidemic on the Namibian coast. Antibody prevalence in jackals peaked at 74.1%, and the clinical signs and histopathologic observations closely resembled those observed in domestic dog cases. Viral RNA was isolated from the brain of a domestic dog from the outbreak area. Sequence data from the phosphoprotein (P) gene and the hemagglutinin (H) genes were used for phylogenetic analyses. The P gene sequence from the domestic dog shared 98% identity with the sequence data available for other CDV isolates of African carnivores. For the H gene, the two sequences available from the outbreak that decimated the lion population in Tanzania in 1994 were the closest match with the Namibian sample, being 94% identical across 1,122 base pairs (bp). Phylogenetic analyses based on this region clustered the Namibian sample with the CDV that is within the morbilliviruses. This is the first description of an epidemic involving black-backed jackals in Namibia, demonstrating that this species has the capacity for rapid and large-scale dissemination of CDV. This work highlights the threat posed to endangered wildlife in Namibia by the spillover of CDV from domestic dog populations. Very few sequence data are currently available for CDV isolates from African carnivores, and this work provides the first sequence data from a Namibian CDV isolate. PMID:19901377

  10. Canine distemper virus persistence in the nervous system is associated with noncytolytic selective virus spread.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Graber, H U; Wagner, A; Vandevelde, M

    1995-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a negative-strand RNA morbillivirus, causes a progressive demyelinating disease in which virus persistence plays an essential role. The antiviral immune response leads to virus clearance in the inflammatory lesions. However, CDV can replicate and persist outside these inflammatory lesions within the brain. How CDV is capable of persisting in the presence of an effective antiviral immune response is poorly understood. In the present investigation, we studied several aspects of virus replication in primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC), comparing an attenuated CDV strain and a virulent CDV strain. Confluent DBCC were infected with either virulent A75/17-CDV or attenuated Onderstepoort-CDV and monitored for 60 days. Persistence was not associated with defective virus production, because all mRNAs and corresponding proteins were continuously expressed in the noncytolytic infection. Quantitative measurements did not detect a difference between the two types of infection in the rate of virus transcription and protein synthesis at the level of the single cell. However, electron microscopy and virus titration experiments showed that in the persistent CDV infection virus budding is strongly limited compared with that of the attenuated virus. Morphometry and immunocytochemistry showed profound differences in the way the two viruses spread in the culture. The attenuated CDV spread randomly to immediately adjacent cells, whereas persistent CDV spread selectively to more-distant cells by way of cell processes. In conclusion, the present study supports a mechanism of CDV persistence through selective spread by way of cell processes, enabling virulent CDV to invade the central nervous system without the need of releasing much virus into the extracellular space. PMID:7853504

  11. Canine distemper virus persistence in the nervous system is associated with noncytolytic selective virus spread.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Graber, H U; Wagner, A; Vandevelde, M

    1995-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a negative-strand RNA morbillivirus, causes a progressive demyelinating disease in which virus persistence plays an essential role. The antiviral immune response leads to virus clearance in the inflammatory lesions. However, CDV can replicate and persist outside these inflammatory lesions within the brain. How CDV is capable of persisting in the presence of an effective antiviral immune response is poorly understood. In the present investigation, we studied several aspects of virus replication in primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC), comparing an attenuated CDV strain and a virulent CDV strain. Confluent DBCC were infected with either virulent A75/17-CDV or attenuated Onderstepoort-CDV and monitored for 60 days. Persistence was not associated with defective virus production, because all mRNAs and corresponding proteins were continuously expressed in the noncytolytic infection. Quantitative measurements did not detect a difference between the two types of infection in the rate of virus transcription and protein synthesis at the level of the single cell. However, electron microscopy and virus titration experiments showed that in the persistent CDV infection virus budding is strongly limited compared with that of the attenuated virus. Morphometry and immunocytochemistry showed profound differences in the way the two viruses spread in the culture. The attenuated CDV spread randomly to immediately adjacent cells, whereas persistent CDV spread selectively to more-distant cells by way of cell processes. In conclusion, the present study supports a mechanism of CDV persistence through selective spread by way of cell processes, enabling virulent CDV to invade the central nervous system without the need of releasing much virus into the extracellular space. PMID:7853504

  12. Climate Extremes Promote Fatal Co-Infections during Canine Distemper Epidemics in African Lions

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Linda; Terio, Karen A.; Kock, Richard; Mlengeya, Titus; Roelke, Melody E.; Dubovi, Edward; Summers, Brian; Sinclair, Anthony R. E.; Packer, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Extreme climatic conditions may alter historic host-pathogen relationships and synchronize the temporal and spatial convergence of multiple infectious agents, triggering epidemics with far greater mortality than those due to single pathogens. Here we present the first data to clearly illustrate how climate extremes can promote a complex interplay between epidemic and endemic pathogens that are normally tolerated in isolation, but with co-infection, result in catastrophic mortality. A 1994 canine distemper virus (CDV) epidemic in Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) coincided with the death of a third of the population, and a second high-mortality CDV epidemic struck the nearby Ngorongoro Crater lion population in 2001. The extent of adult mortalities was unusual for CDV and prompted an investigation into contributing factors. Serological analyses indicated that at least five “silent” CDV epidemics swept through the same two lion populations between 1976 and 2006 without clinical signs or measurable mortality, indicating that CDV was not necessarily fatal. Clinical and pathology findings suggested that hemoparsitism was a major contributing factor during fatal epidemics. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured the magnitude of hemoparasite infections in these populations over 22 years and demonstrated significantly higher levels of Babesia during the 1994 and 2001 epidemics. Babesia levels correlated with mortalities and extent of CDV exposure within prides. The common event preceding the two high mortality CDV outbreaks was extreme drought conditions with wide-spread herbivore die-offs, most notably of Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer). As a consequence of high tick numbers after the resumption of rains and heavy tick infestations of starving buffalo, the lions were infected by unusually high numbers of Babesia, infections that were magnified by the immunosuppressive effects of coincident CDV, leading to unprecedented mortality. Such mass mortality events may

  13. Phylogenetic features of hemagglutin gene in canine distemper virus strains from different genetic lineages.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peng; Guo, Li; Wen, Yongjun; Yang, Yangling; Cheng, Shipeng

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the genotype of two Canine distemper virus (CDV) strains, namely, ZJJ-SD and ZJJ-LN, were investigated, based on the whole hemagglutinin (HA) gene. The CDV strains were obtained from two foxes in Shandong Province and Liaoning Province in 2011. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out for 260 CDV strains worldwide, and a statistical analysis was performed in the amino acid substitutions at positions 530 and 549 of the HA protein. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two strains, ZJJ-SD and ZJJ-LN, belonged to the CDV Asia I lineage. Site 530 of HA protein was found to be relatively conserved within CDV lineages in different host species by combining the genetic sequence data with the published data from 260 CDV strains worldwide. The data analysis showed a bias toward the predicted substitution Y549H for the non-dog strains in Asia I and Europe lineages. The ratio of site 549 genetic drift in the HA gene were significantly different between dogs and non-dogs in the two lineages. The strain ZJJ-SD, from wild canid, has an Y549H substitution. It is one of three Y549H substitution for wild canids in Asia I lineages. Site 530 of HA protein was not immediately relative to CDV genetic drift from dogs to non-dogs. Statistical analysis indicated that non-dog strains have a high probability to contain Y549H than dog strains in Asia I and Europe lineages. Thus, site 549 is considered important in genetic drift from dogs to non-dogs, at least in Asia I and Europe lineages. PMID:26131292

  14. Persistence of canine distemper virus in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem's carnivore community.

    PubMed

    Almberg, Emily S; Cross, Paul C; Smith, Douglas W

    2010-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is an acute, highly immunizing pathogen that should require high densities and large populations of hosts for long-term persistence, yet CDV persists among terrestrial carnivores with small, patchily distributed groups. We used CDV in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem's (GYE) wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) as a case study for exploring how metapopulation structure, host demographics, and multi-host transmission affect the critical community size and spatial scale required for CDV persistence. We illustrate how host spatial connectivity and demographic turnover interact to affect both local epidemic dynamics, such as the length and variation in inter-epidemic periods, and pathogen persistence using stochastic, spatially explicit susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered simulation models. Given the apparent absence of other known persistence mechanisms (e.g., a carrier or environmental state, densely populated host, chronic infection, or a vector), we suggest that CDV requires either large spatial scales or multi-host transmission for persistence. Current GYE wolf populations are probably too small to support endemic CDV. Coyotes are a plausible reservoir host, but CDV would still require 50000-100000 individuals for moderate persistence (> 50% over 10 years), which would equate to an area of 1-3 times the size of the GYE (60000-200000 km2). Coyotes, and carnivores in general, are not uniformly distributed; therefore, this is probably a gross underestimate of the spatial scale of CDV persistence. However, the presence of a second competent host species can greatly increase the probability of long-term CDV persistence at much smaller spatial scales. Although no management of CDV is currently recommended for the GYE, wolf managers in the region should expect periodic but unpredictable CDV-related population declines as often as every 2-5 years. Awareness and monitoring of such outbreaks will allow corresponding adjustments

  15. Persistence of canine distemper virus in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem's carnivore community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almberg, E.S.; Cross, P.C.; Smith, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is an acute, highly immunizing pathogen that should require high densities and large populations of hosts for long-term persistence, yet CDV persists among terrestrial carnivores with small, patchily distributed groups. We used CDV in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem's (GYE) wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) as a case study for exploring how metapopulation structure, host demographics, and multi-host transmission affect the critical community size and spatial scale required for CDV persistence. We illustrate how host spatial connectivity and demographic turnover interact to affect both local epidemic dynamics, such as the length and variation in inter-epidemic periods, and pathogen persistence using stochastic, spatially explicit susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered simulation models. Given the apparent absence of other known persistence mechanisms (e.g., a carrier or environmental state, densely populated host, chronic infection, or a vector), we suggest that CDV requires either large spatial scales or multi-host transmission for persistence. Current GYE wolf populations are probably too small to support endemic CDV. Coyotes are a plausible reservoir host, but CDV would still require 50 000-100 000 individuals for moderate persistence (>50% over 10 years), which would equate to an area of 1-3 times the size of the GYE (60000-200000 km2). Coyotes, and carnivores in general, are not uniformly distributed; therefore, this is probably a gross underestimate of the spatial scale of CDV persistence. However, the presence of a second competent host species can greatly increase the probability of long-term CDV persistence at much smaller spatial scales. Although no management of CDV is currently recommended for the GYE, wolf managers in the region should expect periodic but unpredictable CDV-related population declines as often as every 2-5 years. Awareness and monitoring of such outbreaks will allow corresponding

  16. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine. PMID:23867013

  17. Canine distemper outbreak in raccoons suggests pathogen interspecies transmission amongst alien and native carnivores in urban areas from Germany.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Solís, Zaida; Förster, Christine; Aue, Angelika; Wittstatt, Ulrich; Wibbelt, Gudrun; König, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    From December 2012 to May 2013, an outbreak occurred among urban wild carnivores from Berlin. We collected 97 free-ranging raccoons from the city area. PCR assays, histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in 74 raccoons. Phylogenetic analysis of haemagglutinin gene fragments (1767 nucleotides) of CDV isolated from four raccoons showed close relation to CDV isolates from foxes from Germany and a domestic dog from Hungary; all belonging to the "Europe" lineage of CDV. These study results suggest an inter-species transmission of CDV as the origin for the outbreak among the raccoon population. Implications for domestic pets and suggested interspecies transmission between urban wildlife and raccoons are discussed. This is the first major outbreak of CDV amongst free-ranging raccoons in Europe. PMID:25258173

  18. Molecular typing of canine distemper virus strains reveals the presence of a new genetic variant in South America.

    PubMed

    Sarute, Nicolás; Pérez, Ruben; Aldaz, Jaime; Alfieri, Amauri A; Alfieri, Alice F; Name, Daniela; Llanes, Jessika; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV, Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the causative agent of a severe infectious disease affecting terrestrial and marine carnivores worldwide. Phylogenetic relationships and the genetic variability of the hemagglutinin (H) protein and the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) allow for the classification of field strains into genetic lineages. Currently, there are nine CDV lineages worldwide, two of them co-circulating in South America. Using the Fsp-coding region, we analyzed the genetic variability of strains from Uruguay, Brazil, and Ecuador, and compared them with those described previously in South America and other geographical areas. The results revealed that the Brazilian and Uruguayan strains belong to the already described South America lineage (EU1/SA1), whereas the Ecuadorian strains cluster in a new clade, here named South America 3, which may represent the third CDV lineage described in South America. PMID:24647552

  19. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    SciTech Connect

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  20. Epidemiology of canine distemper and canine parvovirus in domestic dogs in urban and rural areas of the Araucanía region in Chile.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Jamett, G; Surot, D; Cortés, M; Marambio, V; Valenzuela, C; Vallverdu, A; Ward, M P

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether the seroprevalence of canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) in domestic dogs is higher in urban versus rural areas of the Araucanía region in Chile and risk factors for exposure, a serosurvey and questionnaire survey at three, urban-rural paired sites was conducted from 2009 to 2012. Overall, 1161 households were interviewed of which 71% were located in urban areas. A total of 501 blood samples were analysed. The overall CDV and CPV seroprevalences were 61% (CI 90%: 58-70%) and 47% (CI 90%: 40-49%), and 89% (CI 90%: 85-92%) and 72% (CI 90%: 68-76%) in urban and rural areas, respectively. The higher seroprevalence in domestic dogs in urban areas suggests that urban domestic dogs might be a maintenance host for both CDV and CPV in this region. Due to the presence of endangered wild canids populations in areas close to these domestic populations, surveillance and control of these pathogens in urban dog populations is needed a priority. PMID:26013417

  1. Rapid and sensitive detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies against canine distemper virus by a new recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    von Messling, V; Harder, T C; Moennig, V; Rautenberg, P; Nolte, I; Haas, L

    1999-04-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (kappa = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of >/=50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.968) with V-NA titers of >/=1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of >/=1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies

  2. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG Antibodies against Canine Distemper Virus by a New Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    von Messling, Veronika; Harder, Timm C.; Moennig, Volker; Rautenberg, Peter; Nolte, Ingo; Haas, Ludwig

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) infection causes a frequently fatal systemic disease in a broad range of carnivore species, including domestic dogs. In CDV infection, classical serology provides data of diagnostic and prognostic values (kinetics of seroconversion) and is also used to predict the optimal vaccination age of pups. Routine CDV serology is still based on time- and cost-intensive virus neutralization assays (V-NA). Here, we describe a new capture-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses recombinant baculovirus-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein of a recent CDV wild-type isolate (2544/Han95) for the detection of CDV-specific antibodies in canine sera. Recombinant antigen was produced with high efficacy in Heliothis virescens larvae. The capture-sandwich ELISA enabled a clear-cut qualitative evaluation of the CDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM serostatuses of 196 and 35 dog sera, respectively. Inter-rater agreement analysis (κ = 0.988) indicated that the ELISA can be used unrestrictedly as a substitute for the V-NA for the qualitative determination of CDV-specific IgG serostatus. In an attempt to semiquantify N-specific antibodies, a one-step-dilution (alpha method) IgG-specific ELISA was implemented. Alpha values of ≥50% showed very good inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.968) with V-NA titers of ≥1/100 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) as measured against the central European CDV wild-type isolate 2544/Han95 in canine sera originating from northern Germany. An ND50 titer of 1/100 is considered a threshold, and titers of ≥1/100 indicate a resilient, protective immunity. CDV N-specific antibodies of the IgM class were detected by the newly developed ELISA in 9 of 15 sera obtained from dogs with symptoms of acute distemper. In leucocytes of 5 of the 15 dogs (all of which were also IgM positive) CDV RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The recombinant capture-sandwich ELISA detecting N-specific antibodies of the

  3. Fatal combined infection with canine distemper virus and orthopoxvirus in a group of Asian marmots (Marmota caudata).

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Sattler, U; Pilo, P; Waldvogel, A S

    2013-09-01

    A fatal combined infection with canine distemper virus (CDV) and orthopoxvirus (OPXV) in Asian marmots (Marmota caudata) is reported in this article. A total of 7 Asian marmots from a small zoological garden in Switzerland were found dead in hibernation during a routine check in the winter of 2011. The marmots died in February 2011. No clinical signs of disease were observed at any time. The viruses were detected in all individuals for which the tissues were available (n = 3). Detection of the viruses was performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The most consistent gross lesion was a neck and thorax edema. A necrotizing pharyngitis and a multifocal necrotizing pneumonia were observed histologically. Numerous large intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions were seen in the epithelial cells of the pharynx, of the airways, and in the skin keratinocytes. Brain lesions were limited to mild multifocal gliosis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the marmot CDV strain was closely related to the clusters of CDVs detected in Switzerland in wild carnivores during a local outbreak in 2002 and the 2009-2010 nationwide epidemic, suggesting a spillover of this virus from wildlife. The OPXV was most closely related to a strain of cowpoxvirus, a poxvirus species considered endemic in Europe. This is the first reported instance of CDV infection in a rodent species and of a combined CDV and OPXV infection. PMID:23381928

  4. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV), named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P) and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H) gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China. PMID:22087872

  5. Arctic Lineage-Canine Distemper Virus as a Cause of Death in Apennine Wolves (Canis lupus) in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Di Sabatino, Daria; Lorusso, Alessio; Di Francesco, Cristina E.; Gentile, Leonardo; Di Pirro, Vincenza; Bellacicco, Anna Lucia; Giovannini, Armando; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Marsilio, Fulvio; Savini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection is a primary threat affecting a wide number of carnivore species, including wild animals. In January 2013, two carcasses of Apennine wolves (Canis lupus) were collected in Ortona dei Marsi (L'Aquila province, Italy) by the local Veterinary Services. CDV was immediately identified either by RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry in lung and central nervous tissue samples. At the same time, severe clinical signs consistent with CDV infection were identified and taped (Videos S1–S3) from three wolves rescued in the areas surrounding the National Parks of the Abruzzi region by the Veterinary Services. The samples collected from these symptomatic animals also turned out CDV positive by RT-PCR. So far, 30 carcasses of wolves were screened and CDV was detected in 20 of them. The sequencing of the haemagglutinin gene and subsequent phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the identified virus belonged to the CDV Arctic lineage. Strains belonging to this lineage are known to circulate in Italy and in Eastern Europe amongst domestic dogs. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of CDV Arctic lineage epidemics in the wild population in Europe. PMID:24465373

  6. Matrix genes of measles virus and canine distemper virus: cloning, nucleotide sequences, and deduced amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, W J; Englund, G; Richardson, C D; Rozenblatt, S; Lazzarini, R A

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the matrix (M) proteins of measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) were determined from cDNA clones containing these genes in their entirety. In both cases, single open reading frames specifying basic proteins of 335 amino acid residues were predicted from the nucleotide sequences. Both viral messages were composed of approximately 1,450 nucleotides and contained 400 nucleotides of presumptive noncoding sequences at their respective 3' ends. MV and CDV M-protein-coding regions were 67% homologous at the nucleotide level and 76% homologous at the amino acid level. Only chance homology was observed in the 400-nucleotide trailer sequences. Comparisons of the M protein sequences of MV and CDV with the sequence reported for Sendai virus (B. M. Blumberg, K. Rose, M. G. Simona, L. Roux, C. Giorgi, and D. Kolakofsky, J. Virol. 52:656-663; Y. Hidaka, T. Kanda, K. Iwasaki, A. Nomoto, T. Shioda, and H. Shibuta, Nucleic Acids Res. 12:7965-7973) indicated the greatest homology among these M proteins in the carboxyterminal third of the molecule. Secondary-structure analyses of this shared region indicated a structurally conserved, hydrophobic sequence which possibly interacted with the lipid bilayer. Images PMID:3754588

  7. Black-backed jackal exposure to rabies virus, canine distemper virus, and Bacillus anthracis in Etosha National Park, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Steve E; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Miyen, Jacobeth; Ebersohn, Karen; Küsters, Martina; Prager, K C; Van Vuuren, Moritz; Sabeta, Claude; Getz, Wayne M

    2012-04-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) occur worldwide in wild carnivore and domestic dog populations and pose threats to wildlife conservation and public health. In Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia, anthrax is endemic and generates carcasses frequently fed on by an unusually dense population of black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas). Using serology, phylogenetic analyses (on samples obtained from February 2009-July 2010), and historical mortality records (1975-2011), we assessed jackal exposure to Bacillus anthracis (BA; the causal bacterial agent of anthrax), CDV, and RABV. Prevalence of antibodies against BA (95%, n = 86) and CDV (71%, n = 80) was relatively high, while that of antibodies against RABV was low (9%, n = 81). Exposure to BA increased significantly with age, and all animals >6 mo old were antibody-positive. As with BA, prevalence of antibodies against CDV increased significantly with age, with similar age-specific trends during both years of the study. No significant effect of age was found on the prevalence of antibodies against RABV. Three of the seven animals with antibodies against RABV were monitored for more than 1 yr after sampling and showed no signs of active infection. Mortality records revealed that rabid animals are destroyed nearly every year inside the ENP tourist camps. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that jackal RABV in ENP is part of the same transmission cycle as other dog-jackal RABV cycles in Namibia. PMID:22493112

  8. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses. PMID:26514066

  9. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-05-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection. PMID:1313899

  10. Development of a duplex real-time RT-qPCR assay to monitor genome replication, gene expression and gene insert stability during in vivo replication of a prototype live attenuated canine distemper virus vector encoding SIV gag.

    PubMed

    Coleman, John W; Wright, Kevin J; Wallace, Olivia L; Sharma, Palka; Arendt, Heather; Martinez, Jennifer; DeStefano, Joanne; Zamb, Timothy P; Zhang, Xinsheng; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-03-01

    Advancement of new vaccines based on live viral vectors requires sensitive assays to analyze in vivo replication, gene expression and genetic stability. In this study, attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) was used as a vaccine delivery vector and duplex 2-step quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assays specific for genomic RNA (gRNA) or mRNA have been developed that concurrently quantify coding sequences for the CDV nucleocapsid protein (N) and a foreign vaccine antigen (SIV Gag). These amplicons, which had detection limits of about 10 copies per PCR reaction, were used to show that abdominal cavity lymphoid tissues were a primary site of CDV vector replication in infected ferrets, and importantly, CDV gRNA or mRNA was undetectable in brain tissue. In addition, the gRNA duplex assay was adapted for monitoring foreign gene insert genetic stability during in vivo replication by analyzing the ratio of CDV N and SIV gag genomic RNA copies over the course of vector infection. This measurement was found to be a sensitive probe for assessing the in vivo genetic stability of the foreign gene insert. PMID:25486083

  11. Two Domains of the V Protein of Virulent Canine Distemper Virus Selectively Inhibit STAT1 and STAT2 Nuclear Import▿

    PubMed Central

    Röthlisberger, Anne; Wiener, Dominique; Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes in dogs a severe systemic infection, with a high frequency of demyelinating encephalitis. Among the six genes transcribed by CDV, the P gene encodes the polymerase cofactor protein (P) as well as two additional nonstructural proteins, C and V; of these V was shown to act as a virulence factor. We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the P gene products of the neurovirulent CDV A75/17 strain disrupt type I interferon (IFN-α/β)-induced signaling that results in the establishment of the antiviral state. Using recombinant knockout A75/17 viruses, the V protein was identified as the main antagonist of IFN-α/β-mediated signaling. Importantly, immunofluorescence analysis illustrated that the inhibition of IFN-α/β-mediated signaling correlated with impaired STAT1/STAT2 nuclear import, whereas the phosphorylation state of these proteins was not affected. Coimmunoprecipitation assays identified the N-terminal region of V (VNT) responsible for STAT1 targeting, which correlated with its ability to inhibit the activity of the IFN-α/β-mediated antiviral state. Conversely, while the C-terminal domain of V (VCT) could not function autonomously, when fused to VNT it optimally interacted with STAT2 and subsequently efficiently suppressed the IFN-α/β-mediated signaling pathway. The latter result was further supported by a single mutation at position 110 within the VNT domain of CDV V protein, resulting in a mutant that lost STAT1 binding while retaining a partial STAT2 association. Taken together, our results identified the CDV VNT and VCT as two essential modules that complement each other to interfere with the antiviral state induced by IFN-α/β-mediated signaling. Hence, our experiments reveal a novel mechanism of IFN-α/β evasion among the morbilliviruses. PMID:20427537

  12. Estimating the potential impact of canine distemper virus on the Amur tiger population (Panthera tigris altaica) in Russia.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Martin; Miquelle, Dale G; Goodrich, John M; Reeve, Richard; Cleaveland, Sarah; Matthews, Louise; Joly, Damien O

    2014-01-01

    Lethal infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) have recently been diagnosed in Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), but long-term implications for the population are unknown. This study evaluates the potential impact of CDV on a key tiger population in Sikhote-Alin Biosphere Zapovednik (SABZ), and assesses how CDV might influence the extinction potential of other tiger populations of varying sizes. An individual-based stochastic, SIRD (susceptible-infected-recovered/dead) model was used to simulate infection through predation of infected domestic dogs, and/or wild carnivores, and direct tiger-to-tiger transmission. CDV prevalence and effective contact based on published and observed data was used to define plausible low- and high-risk infection scenarios. CDV infection increased the 50-year extinction probability of tigers in SABZ by 6.3% to 55.8% compared to a control population, depending on risk scenario. The most significant factors influencing model outcome were virus prevalence in the reservoir population(s) and its effective contact rate with tigers. Adjustment of the mortality rate had a proportional impact, while inclusion of epizootic infection waves had negligible additional impact. Small populations were found to be disproportionately vulnerable to extinction through CDV infection. The 50-year extinction risk in populations consisting of 25 individuals was 1.65 times greater when CDV was present than that of control populations. The effects of density dependence do not protect an endangered population from the impacts of a multi-host pathogen, such as CDV, where they coexist with an abundant reservoir presenting a persistent threat. Awareness of CDV is a critical component of a successful tiger conservation management policy. PMID:25354196

  13. Estimating the Potential Impact of Canine Distemper Virus on the Amur Tiger Population (Panthera tigris altaica) in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Martin; Miquelle, Dale G.; Goodrich, John M.; Reeve, Richard; Cleaveland, Sarah; Matthews, Louise; Joly, Damien O.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) have recently been diagnosed in Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), but long-term implications for the population are unknown. This study evaluates the potential impact of CDV on a key tiger population in Sikhote-Alin Biosphere Zapovednik (SABZ), and assesses how CDV might influence the extinction potential of other tiger populations of varying sizes. An individual-based stochastic, SIRD (susceptible-infected-recovered/dead) model was used to simulate infection through predation of infected domestic dogs, and/or wild carnivores, and direct tiger-to-tiger transmission. CDV prevalence and effective contact based on published and observed data was used to define plausible low- and high-risk infection scenarios. CDV infection increased the 50-year extinction probability of tigers in SABZ by 6.3% to 55.8% compared to a control population, depending on risk scenario. The most significant factors influencing model outcome were virus prevalence in the reservoir population(s) and its effective contact rate with tigers. Adjustment of the mortality rate had a proportional impact, while inclusion of epizootic infection waves had negligible additional impact. Small populations were found to be disproportionately vulnerable to extinction through CDV infection. The 50-year extinction risk in populations consisting of 25 individuals was 1.65 times greater when CDV was present than that of control populations. The effects of density dependence do not protect an endangered population from the impacts of a multi-host pathogen, such as CDV, where they coexist with an abundant reservoir presenting a persistent threat. Awareness of CDV is a critical component of a successful tiger conservation management policy. PMID:25354196

  14. The Role of Canine Distemper Virus and Persistent Organic Pollutants in Mortality Patterns of Caspian Seals (Pusa caspica)

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Susan C.; Eybatov, Tariel M.; Amano, Masao; Jepson, Paul D.; Goodman, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants are a concern for species occupying high trophic levels since they can cause immunosuppression and impair reproduction. Mass mortalities due to canine distemper virus (CDV) occurred in Caspian seals (Pusa caspica), in spring of 1997, 2000 and 2001, but the potential role of organochlorine exposure in these epizootics remains undetermined. Here we integrate Caspian seal mortality data spanning 1971–2008, with data on age, body condition, pathology and blubber organochlorine concentration for carcases stranded between 1997 and 2002. We test the hypothesis that summed PCB and DDT concentrations contributed to CDV associated mortality during epizootics. We show that age is the primary factor explaining variation in blubber organochlorine concentrations, and that organochlorine burden, age, sex, and body condition do not account for CDV infection status (positive/negative) of animals dying in epizootics. Most animals (57%, n = 67) had PCB concentrations below proposed thresholds for toxic effects in marine mammals (17 µg/g lipid weight), and only 3 of 67 animals had predicted TEQ values exceeding levels seen to be associated with immune suppression in harbour seals (200 pg/g lipid weight). Mean organonchlorine levels were higher in CDV-negative animals indicating that organochlorines did not contribute significantly to CDV mortality in epizootics. Mortality monitoring in Azerbaijan 1971–2008 revealed bi-annual stranding peaks in late spring, following the annual moult and during autumn migrations northwards. Mortality peaks comparable to epizootic years were also recorded in the 1970s–1980s, consistent with previous undocumented CDV outbreaks. Gompertz growth curves show that Caspian seals achieve an asymptotic standard body length of 126–129 cm (n = 111). Males may continue to grow slowly throughout life. Mortality during epizootics may exceed the potential biological removal level (PBR) for the population, but the low

  15. The role of canine distemper virus and persistent organic pollutants in mortality patterns of Caspian seals (Pusa caspica).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Eybatov, Tariel M; Amano, Masao; Jepson, Paul D; Goodman, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants are a concern for species occupying high trophic levels since they can cause immunosuppression and impair reproduction. Mass mortalities due to canine distemper virus (CDV) occurred in Caspian seals (Pusa caspica), in spring of 1997, 2000 and 2001, but the potential role of organochlorine exposure in these epizootics remains undetermined. Here we integrate Caspian seal mortality data spanning 1971-2008, with data on age, body condition, pathology and blubber organochlorine concentration for carcases stranded between 1997 and 2002. We test the hypothesis that summed PCB and DDT concentrations contributed to CDV associated mortality during epizootics. We show that age is the primary factor explaining variation in blubber organochlorine concentrations, and that organochlorine burden, age, sex, and body condition do not account for CDV infection status (positive/negative) of animals dying in epizootics. Most animals (57%, n = 67) had PCB concentrations below proposed thresholds for toxic effects in marine mammals (17 µg/g lipid weight), and only 3 of 67 animals had predicted TEQ values exceeding levels seen to be associated with immune suppression in harbour seals (200 pg/g lipid weight). Mean organonchlorine levels were higher in CDV-negative animals indicating that organochlorines did not contribute significantly to CDV mortality in epizootics. Mortality monitoring in Azerbaijan 1971-2008 revealed bi-annual stranding peaks in late spring, following the annual moult and during autumn migrations northwards. Mortality peaks comparable to epizootic years were also recorded in the 1970s-1980s, consistent with previous undocumented CDV outbreaks. Gompertz growth curves show that Caspian seals achieve an asymptotic standard body length of 126-129 cm (n = 111). Males may continue to grow slowly throughout life. Mortality during epizootics may exceed the potential biological removal level (PBR) for the population, but the low frequency of

  16. Genetically distant American Canine distemper virus lineages have recently caused epizootics with somewhat different characteristics in raccoons living around a large suburban zoo in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John A; Dubach, Jean; Kinsel, Michael J; Meehan, Thomas P; Bocchetta, Maurizio; Hungerford, Laura L; Sarich, Nicolene A; Witecki, Kelley E; Braid, Michael D; Pedrak, Casandra; Houde, Christiane M

    2004-01-01

    Background Mortality rates have differed during distemper outbreaks among free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor) living around a large Chicago-area zoo, and appeared higher in year 2001 than in 1998 and 2000. We hypothesized that a more lethal variant of the local Canine distemper virus (CDV) lineage had emerged in 2001, and sought the genetic basis that led to increased virulence. However, a more complex model surfaced during preliminary analyses of CDV genomic sequences in infected tissues and of virus isolated in vitro from the raccoons. Results Phylogenetic analyses of subgenomic CDV fusion (F) -, phosphoprotein (P) -, and complete hemagglutinin (H) – gene sequences indicated that distinct American CDV lineages caused the distemper epizootics. The 1998 outbreak was caused by viruses that are likely from an old CDV lineage that includes CDV Snyder Hill and Lederle, which are CDV strains from the early 1950's. The 2000 and 2001 viruses appear to stem from the lineage of CDV A75/17, which was isolated in the mid 1970's. Only the 2001 viruses formed large syncytia in brain and/or lung tissue, and during primary isolation in-vitro in Vero cells, demonstrating at least one phenotypic property by which they differed from the other viruses. Conclusions Two different American CDV lineages caused the raccoon distemper outbreaks. The 1998 viruses are genetically distant to the 2000/2001 viruses. Since CDV does not cause persistent infections, the cycling of different CDV lineages within the same locale suggests multiple reintroductions of the virus to area raccoons. Our findings establish a precedent for determining whether the perceived differences in mortality rates are actual and attributable in part to inherent differences between CDV strains arising from different CDV lineages. PMID:15507154

  17. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment... Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. Possible Field Test Locations: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New York, North...

  18. [Production of rabies vaccine in animal diploid cells].

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Reculard, P; Adamowicz, P; Vacher, B; Prunet, P

    1982-01-01

    Modalities for production of inactivated rabies vaccine derived from diploid hamster cell cultures are reported. The inactivated concentrated virus, purified by zonal centrifugation, is utilised for the preparation of vaccines destinated to carnivores, either in the form of monovalent vaccine or associated with distemper and canine contagious hepatitis vaccines. The inactivated concentrated virus is utilised for the preparation of bovine vaccine. The procedure is compatible with industrial production. The results concerning safety and potency tests of the experimental lots are presented. PMID:7128072

  19. Sequence Analysis and Expression of the Attachment and Fusion Proteins of Canine Distemper Virus Wild-Type Strain A75/17

    PubMed Central

    Cherpillod, Pascal; Beck, Karin; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo

    1999-01-01

    The biological properties of wild-type A75/17 and cell culture-adapted Onderstepoort canine distemper virus differ markedly. To learn more about the molecular basis for these differences, we have isolated and sequenced the protein-coding regions of the attachment and fusion proteins of wild-type canine distemper virus strain A75/17. In the attachment protein, a total of 57 amino acid differences were observed between the Onderstepoort strain and strain A75/17, and these were distributed evenly over the entire protein. Interestingly, the attachment protein of strain A75/17 contained an extension of three amino acids at the C terminus. Expression studies showed that the attachment protein of strain A75/17 had a higher apparent molecular mass than the attachment protein of the Onderstepoort strain, in both the presence and absence of tunicamycin. In the fusion protein, 60 amino acid differences were observed between the two strains, of which 44 were clustered in the much smaller F2 portion of the molecule. Significantly, the AUG that has been proposed as a translation initiation codon in the Onderstepoort strain is an AUA codon in strain A75/17. Detailed mutation analyses showed that both the first and second AUGs of strain A75/17 are the major translation initiation sites of the fusion protein. Similar analyses demonstrated that, also in the Onderstepoort strain, the first two AUGs are the translation initiation codons which contribute most to the generation of precursor molecules yielding the mature form of the fusion protein. PMID:9971809

  20. Canine Leishmania vaccines: still a long way to go.

    PubMed

    Gradoni, Luigi

    2015-02-28

    Dogs are the main reservoir host for zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis, a sand fly-borne disease caused by Leishmania infantum. In endemic areas, "susceptible" dogs suffer from a severe disease characterized by chronic polymorphic viscerocutaneous signs that manifest several months from the exposure, whereas "resistant" dogs can remain subclinically infected for years or lifelong. The protective immune response to Leishmania is cell-mediated; for visceralizing Leishmania species a mixed T helper (Th)1/Th2 response with a dominant Th1 profile is required for protection. The activation of the adaptive immune system in naturally resistant dogs is revealed by parasite-specific lymphoproliferation, delayed-type hypersensitivity, the production of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α cytokines, and enhanced macrophage leishmanicidal activity via nitric oxide. Hence, an effective canine Leishmania vaccine should induce strong and long-lasting Th1-dominated immunity to control both infection progression and the parasite transmissibility via the vector. Preclinical research in rodent models has evaluated the efficacy of several categories of Leishmania antigens including killed parasites, cell purified fractions, parasite protein components or subunits, single or multiple chimeric recombinant proteins, plasmid DNA and viral particles encoding parasite virulence factors. Promising antigen(s)/adjuvant combinations from each of the above categories have also been tested in dogs; they mostly resulted in limited or no protection in Phase I-II studies (designed to test vaccine safety, immunogenicity and laboratory-induced protection) in which vaccinated dogs were challenged by the artificial intravenous injection of high-load L. infantum promastigotes. The recombinant A2 antigen plus saponin conferred about 40% protection against infection by this challenge system and has been registered in Brazil as a canine vaccine (LeishTec(®)). An increasing number of efficacy studies

  1. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid protein of the virulent A75/17-CDV strain of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Stettler, M; Zurbriggen, A

    1995-05-01

    Virus persistence is essential in the chronic inflammatory canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating disease. In the case of CDV there is a close association between persistence and virulence. Virulent CDV isolated from dogs with distemper shows immediate persistence in primary dog brain cell cultures (DBCC) and in different cell lines. We have evidence that the nucleocapsid (NP) protein plays an important role in the development of persistence. The NP-protein, the most abundant structural virus protein, also influences virus assembly and has some regulatory functions in virus transcription and replication. In this study we compared the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of a virulent CDV strain (A75/17-CDV) to a culture-attenuated non-virulent strain (OP-CDV). Viral RNA was extracted from DBCC infected with virulent CDV. Virulent CDV retains its in vivo properties, such as virulence and ability to cause demyelination, when propagated in these DBCC. The viral RNA was reverse transcribed and the resulting cDNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction for subsequent cloning. The nucleotide sequences of these clones were determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. The number of nucleotides and the putative NP-protein of the virulent strain matched the attenuated CDV strain. We observed a total of 105 nucleotide differences. Three were localised within the 3' and five within the 5' non-coding region of the NP-gene. The 97 nucleotide changes within the coding region resulted in 22 amino acid differences. 10 of these amino acid (AA) modifications were within the N-terminal region (AA 1 to 159) and 12 within the C-terminal area (AA 351 to 523).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8588315

  2. The Fusion Protein Signal-Peptide-Coding Region of Canine Distemper Virus: A Useful Tool for Phylogenetic Reconstruction and Lineage Identification

    PubMed Central

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages. PMID:23675493

  3. Antibodies to CD9, a Tetraspan Transmembrane Protein, Inhibit Canine Distemper Virus-Induced Cell-Cell Fusion but Not Virus-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Erik; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Gassen, Uta; Rima, Bert; ter Meulen, Volker; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a life-threatening disease in several carnivores including domestic dogs. Recently, we identified a molecule, CD9, a member of the tetraspan transmembrane protein family, which facilitates, and antibodies to which inhibit, the infection of tissue culture cells with CDV (strain Onderstepoort). Here we describe that an anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody (MAb K41) did not interfere with binding of CDV to cells and uptake of virus. In addition, in single-step growth experiments, MAb K41 did not induce differences in the levels of viral mRNA and proteins. However, the virus release of syncytium-forming strains of CDV, the virus-induced cell-cell fusion in lytically infected cultures, and the cell-cell fusion of uninfected with persistently CDV-infected HeLa cells were strongly inhibited by MAb K41. These data indicate that anti-CD9 antibodies selectively block virus-induced cell-cell fusion, whereas virus-cell fusion is not affected. PMID:10906209

  4. Possible lin between elevated accumulation of trace elements and canine distemper virus infection in the Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) stranded in 2000 and 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinsuke, T.; Takashi, K.; Yasumi, A.; Tokutaka, I.; Reiji, K.

    2003-05-01

    In the Caspian Sea, a die-off of thousands of Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) occurred in 1997 and 2000. While a direct cause for these deaths seems to be canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, immunosuppression due to environmental pollutants is considered as one of the possible explanations for the development of the disease. The purpose of this work is to examine whether exposure to trace metals could be one of the factors involved in the mass mortality of Caspian seals. Concentrations of 13 trace elements weredetermined in liver, kidney and muscle of Caspian seals found stranded along the coasts of the Caspian Sea in 2000 and 2001. Concentrations of toxic elemen ts (Ag, Cd, Hg, Tl and Pb) in the Caspian seals collected in 2000 and 2001 were comparable to or lower than those in healthy Caspian seals collected in 1993 and 1998 and in seals from other regions, suggesting that these elements would not be the causative agent for the death of Caspian seals. In contrast, Zn and Fe concentrations in the stranded Caspian seals were apparently higher than those in seals from other locations. These results suggest the disturbance in homeostatic control and nutritional statu s of essential elements in the stranded Caspian seals.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell. PMID:26179070

  6. Canine Distemper Virus Infection Leads to an Inhibitory Phenotype of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells In Vitro with Reduced Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules and Increased Interleukin-10 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Vanessa; Stein, Veronika M.; Tipold, Andrea; Urhausen, Carola; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Rohn, Karl; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Beineke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper. PMID:24769532

  7. The hemagglutinin envelope protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) confers cell tropism as illustrated by CDV and measles virus complementation analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, L B; Greenberg, M; Gershoni, J M; Rozenblatt, S

    1995-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) are morbilliviruses that cause acute illnesses and several persistent central nervous system infections in humans and in dogs, respectively. Characteristically, the cytopathic effect of these viruses is the formation of syncytia in permissive cells. In this study, a vaccinia virus expression system was used to express MV and CDV hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) envelope proteins. We found that cotransfecting F and HA genes of MV or F and HA genes of CDV resulted in extensive syncytium formation in permissive cells while transfecting either F or HA alone did not. Similar experiments with heterologous pairs of proteins, CDV-F with MV-HA or MV-F with CDV-HA, caused significant cell fusion in both cases. These results indicate that in this expression system, cell fusion requires both F and HA; however, the functions of these proteins are interchangeable between the two types of morbilliviruses. Human-mouse somatic hybrids were used to determine the human chromosome conferring susceptibility to either MV and CDV. Of the 12 hybrids screened, none were sensitive to MV. Two of the hybrids containing human chromosome 19 formed syncytia following CDV infection. In addition, these two hybrids underwent cell fusion when cotransfected with CDV-F and CDV-HA (but not MV-F and MV-HA) glycoproteins by using the vaccinia virus expression system. To discover the viral component responsible for cell specificity, complementation experiments coexpressing CDV-HA with MV-F or CDV-F with MV-HA in the CDV-sensitive hybrids were performed. We found that syncytia were formed only in the presence of CDV-HA. These results support the idea that the HA protein is responsible for cell tropism. Furthermore, while the F protein is necessary for the fusion process, it is interchangeable with the F protein from other morbilliviruses. PMID:7853502

  8. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  9. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  10. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  11. Interaction of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of canine distemper virus fusion protein with phospholipid vesicles: a biophysical study.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Francisco J; Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    The F protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a classic type I glycoprotein formed by two polypeptides, F1 and F2. The N-terminal regions of the F1 polypeptides of CDV, measles virus and other paramyxoviruses present moderate to high homology, supporting the existence of a high conservation within these structures, which emphasises its role in viral-host cell membrane fusion. This N-terminal polypeptide is usually termed the fusion peptide. The fusion peptides of most viral fusion-mediating glycoproteins contain a high proportion of hydrophobic amino acids, which facilitates its insertion into target membranes during fusion. In this work we report on the interaction of a 31-residue synthetic peptide (FP31) corresponding to the N terminus of CDV F1 protein with phospholipid membranes composed of various phospholipids, as studied by means of various biophysical techniques. FTIR investigation of FP31 secondary structure in aqueous medium and in membranes resulted in a major proportion of alpha-helical structure which increased upon membrane insertion. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the presence of concentrations of FP31 as low as 0.1 mol%, in mixtures with L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and L-alpha-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC), already affected the thermotropic properties of the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition. In mixtures with the three lipids, increasing the concentration of peptide made the pretransition to disappear, and lowered and broadened the main transition. This effect was slightly stronger as the acyl chain length of the phospholipid grew larger. In the corresponding partial phase diagrams, no immiscibilities or critical points were observed. FTIR showed that incorporation of 1 mol% of peptide in DPPC shifted the antisymmetric and symmetric CH2 stretching bands to higher values, indicating the existence of an additional disordering of the acyl chain

  12. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) The 20 dogs to... negative at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to.... (2) Potency test for canine hepatitis—serum neutralization test. Bulk or final container samples...

  13. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... serum neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine parainfluenza virus. (2) A geometric mean... neutralization titers of 1:4 or greater; or, if there is not a significant reduction in virus isolation rate...

  14. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... serum neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine parainfluenza virus. (2) A geometric mean... neutralization titers of 1:4 or greater; or, if there is not a significant reduction in virus isolation rate...

  15. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... serum neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine parainfluenza virus. (2) A geometric mean... neutralization titers of 1:4 or greater; or, if there is not a significant reduction in virus isolation rate...

  16. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... serum neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine parainfluenza virus. (2) A geometric mean... neutralization titers of 1:4 or greater; or, if there is not a significant reduction in virus isolation rate...

  17. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... serum neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine parainfluenza virus. (2) A geometric mean... neutralization titers of 1:4 or greater; or, if there is not a significant reduction in virus isolation rate...

  18. Use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR to investigate the correlation between viremia and viral shedding of canine distemper virus, and infection outcomes in experimentally infected dogs

    PubMed Central

    SEHATA, Go; SATO, Hiroaki; ITO, Toshihiro; IMAIZUMI, Yoshitaka; NORO, Taichi; OISHI, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    We used real-time RT-PCR and virus titration to examine canine distemper virus (CDV) kinetics in peripheral blood and rectal and nasal secretions from 12 experimentally infected dogs. Real-time RT-PCR proved extremely sensitive, and the correlation between the two methods for rectal and nasal (r=0.78, 0.80) samples on the peak day of viral RNA was good. Although the dogs showed diverse symptoms, viral RNA kinetics were similar; the peak of viral RNA in the symptomatic dogs was consistent with the onset of symptoms. These results indicate that real-time RT-PCR is sufficiently sensitive to monitor CDV replication in experimentally infected dogs regardless of the degree of clinical manifestation and suggest that the peak of viral RNA reflects active CDV replication. PMID:25728411

  19. Use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR to investigate the correlation between viremia and viral shedding of canine distemper virus, and infection outcomes in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Sehata, Go; Sato, Hiroaki; Ito, Toshihiro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Noro, Taichi; Oishi, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    We used real-time RT-PCR and virus titration to examine canine distemper virus (CDV) kinetics in peripheral blood and rectal and nasal secretions from 12 experimentally infected dogs. Real-time RT-PCR proved extremely sensitive, and the correlation between the two methods for rectal and nasal (r=0.78, 0.80) samples on the peak day of viral RNA was good. Although the dogs showed diverse symptoms, viral RNA kinetics were similar; the peak of viral RNA in the symptomatic dogs was consistent with the onset of symptoms. These results indicate that real-time RT-PCR is sufficiently sensitive to monitor CDV replication in experimentally infected dogs regardless of the degree of clinical manifestation and suggest that the peak of viral RNA reflects active CDV replication. PMID:25728411

  20. Combined distemper-adenoviral pneumonia in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Valdez-Nava, Yazel; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Zárate-Ramos, Juan J.; López, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    A 3 1/2-month-old pug with oculonasal discharge and seizures was submitted for postmortem examination. Grossly, the lungs had cranioventral consolidation, and microscopically, 2 distinct types of inclusion bodies compatible with Canine distemper virus and Canine adenovirus type 2. Presence of both viruses was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. PMID:17616064

  1. Combined distemper-adenoviral pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tovar, Luis E; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Valdez-Nava, Yazel; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M; Zárate-Ramos, Juan J; López, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    A 3 1/2-month-old pug with oculonasal discharge and seizures was submitted for postmortem examination. Grossly, the lungs had cranioventral consolidation, and microscopically, 2 distinct types of inclusion bodies compatible with Canine distemper virus and Canine adenovirus type 2. Presence of both viruses was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. PMID:17616064

  2. Evaluation of an attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Rudoler, Nir; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; van Straten, Michael; Harrus, Shimon

    2012-12-17

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is an important tick-borne disease worldwide. No commercial vaccine for the disease is currently available and tick control is the main preventive measure against the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a multi-passaged attenuated strain of Ehrlichia canis to serve as a vaccine for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and to assess the use of azithromycin in the treatment of acute ehrlichiosis. Twelve beagle dogs were divided into 3 groups of 4 dogs. Groups 1 and 2 were inoculated (vaccinated) with an attenuated strain of E. canis (#611A) twice or once, respectively. The third group consisted of naïve dogs which served as controls. All 3 groups were challenged with a wild virulent strain of E. canis by administering infected dog-blood intravenously. Transient thrombocytopenia was the only hematological abnormality observed following inoculation of dogs with the attenuated strain. Challenge with the virulent strain resulted in severe disease in all 4 control dogs while only 3 of 8 vaccinated dogs presented mild transient fever. Furthermore, the mean blood rickettsial load was significantly higher in the control group (27-92-folds higher during days 14-19 post challenge with the wild the strain) as compared to the vaccinated dogs. The use of azithromycin was assessed as a therapeutic agent for the acute disease. Four days treatment resulted in further deterioration of the clinical condition of the dogs. Molecular comparison of 4 genes known to express immunoreactive proteins and virulence factors (p30, gp19, VirB4 and VirB9) between the attenuated strain and the challenge wild strain revealed no genetic differences between the strains. The results of this study indicate that the attenuated E. canis strain may serve as an effective and secure future vaccine for canine ehrlichiosis. PMID:23072894

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and reaction to vaccination in client-owned, healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Riedl, M; Truyen, U; Reese, S; Hartmann, K

    2015-12-12

    The purpose of this population-based cohort study was to assess current prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) in adult, healthy dogs, including risk factors associated with lack of antibodies, and reaction to revaccination with a modified live vaccine (MLV). One hundred dogs routinely presented for vaccination were included in the study and vaccinated with a single dose of a combined MLV. Information was collected on signalment, origin, environment, vaccination history and side effects. Prevaccination and postvaccination antibodies were detected by haemagglutination inhibition. Univariate analysis, followed by multivariate logistic regression, was used to investigate association between different variables and presence of antibodies as well as titre increase. Protective CPV antibodies were present in 86.0 per cent of dogs. Intervals of more than four years since the last vaccination and rare contacts with other dogs were determined as main risk factors for the absence of antibodies. An increase in titres only occurred in 17.0 per cent of dogs. Dogs without protective titres before vaccination or with bodyweight <10 kg were more likely to have an adequate titre increase. Based on these findings, antibody status should be determined instead of periodic vaccinations to ensure reliable protection without unnecessary vaccinations in adult dogs. PMID:26514756

  4. Coverage of pilot parenteral vaccination campaign against canine rabies in N'Djaména, Chad.

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, U.; Mindekem, R.; Yémadji, N.; Vounatsou, P.; Kaninga, Y.; Ndoutamia, A. G.; Zinsstag, J.

    2003-01-01

    Canine rabies, and thus human exposure to rabies, can be controlled through mass vaccination of the animal reservoir if dog owners are willing to cooperate. Inaccessible, ownerless dogs, however, reduce the vaccination coverage achieved in parenteral campaigns. This study aimed to estimate the vaccination coverage in dogs in three study zones of N'Djaména, Chad, after a pilot free parenteral mass vaccination campaign against rabies. We used a capture-mark-recapture approach for population estimates, with a Bayesian, Markov chain, Monte Carlo method to estimate the total number of owned dogs, and the ratio of ownerless to owned dogs to calculate vaccination coverage. When we took into account ownerless dogs, the vaccination coverage in the dog populations was 87% (95% confidence interval (CI), 84-89%) in study zone I, 71% (95% CI, 64-76%) in zone II, and 64% (95% CI, 58-71%) in zone III. The proportions of ownerless dogs to owned dogs were 1.1% (95% CI, 0-3.1%), 7.6% (95% CI, 0.7-16.5%), and 10.6% (95% CI, 1.6-19.1%) in the three study zones, respectively. Vaccination coverage in the three populations of owned dogs was 88% (95% CI, 84-92%) in zone I, 76% (95% CI, 71-81%) in zone II, and 70% (95% CI, 66-76%) in zone III. Participation of dog owners in the free campaign was high, and the number of inaccessible ownerless dogs was low. High levels of vaccination coverage could be achieved with parenteral mass vaccination. Regular parenteral vaccination campaigns to cover all of N'Djaména should be considered as an ethical way of preventing human rabies when post-exposure treatment is of limited availability and high in cost. PMID:14758434

  5. Effects of a commercial canine gonadotropin releasing hormone vaccine on estrus suppression and estrous behavior in mares.

    PubMed

    Donovan, C E; Hazzard, T; Schmidt, A; LeMieux, J; Hathaway, F; Kutzler, M A

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effect of immunization against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) using a commercial canine GnRH vaccine on estrus suppression and unwanted estrous behavior in mares. In experiment 1, mares were immunized (n = 6) twice with vaccine (5 mL) given intramuscularly 4 weeks apart or received a control diluent (n = 5). Transrectal ultrasonographic examination of the reproductive tracts was performed three days a week for 40 weeks after initial vaccination. Blood samples were collected weekly for GnRH antibody titer and progesterone concentration determination. In experiment 2, privately-owned mares (n = 12) were immunized twice with vaccine (1 mL) given intramuscularly 4 weeks apart. Blood samples were collected prior to each vaccination as well as 12 and 20 weeks after initial treatment, and transrectal ultrasonographic examinations of the reproductive tracts were performed 12 weeks after the first vaccination. Vaccinated mares in experiment 1 responded with a GnRH antibody titer, progesterone concentrations significantly lower than controls, and cessation of ovarian activity. Vaccinated mares in experiment 2 also responded with a GnRH antibody titer, progesterone concentrations that remained basal for the duration of the study, and cessation of ovarian activity. Owners of vaccinated mares in experiment 2 reported that the number of unwanted estrous behaviors present before vaccination significantly decreased following vaccination. In conclusion, GnRH immunization using a canine GnRH vaccine is an effective method for suppressing estrus and unwanted estrous behavior. PMID:24083943

  6. Effective immunotherapy against canine visceral leishmaniasis with the FML-vaccine.

    PubMed

    Borja-Cabrera, Gulnara Patricia; Cruz Mendes, Amanda; Paraguai de Souza, Edilma; Hashimoto Okada, Lilian Y; de A Trivellato, Fernando Antonio; Kawasaki, Jarbas Kiyoshi A; Costa, Andreia Cerqueira; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Genaro, Odair; Batista, Leopoldina Maria Melo; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz

    2004-06-01

    The potential effect of the fucose mannose ligand (FML)-vaccine on immunotherapy of canine visceral leishmaniasis was assayed on five mongrel dogs experimentally infected with Leishmania donovani and on 21 Leishmania chagasi naturally infected dogs when seropositive to FML but completely asymptomatic. The clinical signs of the experimentally infected, symptomatic dogs only disappeared after the complete vaccination. Protection was obtained in 3/5 animals that remained asymptomatic, IDR positive and parasite free, 1 year after infection. Furthermore, the asymptomatic, FML-vaccine treated dogs showed stable anti-FML IgG1 levels, increasing IgG2 levels and 79-95% of positive DTH response, during the whole experiment. Twenty-two months after complete vaccination, no obits due to visceral leishmaniasis were recorded and 90% of these dogs were still asymptomatic, healthy and parasite free. On the other hand, 37% (17/46 dogs) kala-azar obits were recorded in a control group that received no treatment during the same period, and that was FML-seropositive and asymtpomatic at the beginning of the assay. Our results indicate that the FML-vaccine was effective in the immunotherapy against visceral leishmaniasis of asymptomatic infected dogs. Normal proportions of CD4 and CD21 lymphocytes were detected in PBMC by FACS analysis, in dogs submitted to immunotherapy, suggesting their non-infectious condition. All animals showed as well significantly increased percents of CD8 lymphocytes as expected for Quillaja saponin (QuilA) vaccine treatments. PMID:15149782

  7. Large-scale survey of adverse reactions to canine non-rabies combined vaccines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Suzuki, Aki; Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Takase, Yukari; Kiuchi, Akio; Fujimura, Masato; Kurita, Goro; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2012-01-15

    Canine non-rabies combined vaccines are widely used to protect animals from infectious agents, and also play an important role in public health. We performed a large-scale survey to investigate vaccine-associated adverse events (VAAEs), including anaphylaxis, in Japan by distributing questionnaires on VAAEs to veterinary hospitals from April 1, 2006 through May 31, 2007. Valid responses were obtained for 57,300 vaccinated dogs at 573 animal hospitals; we obtained VAAEs information for last 100 vaccinated dogs in each veterinary hospital. We found that of the 57,300, 359 dogs showed VAAEs. Of the 359 dogs, death was observed in 1, anaphylaxis in 41, dermatological signs in 244, gastrointestinal signs in 160, and other signs in 106. Onset of VAAEs was mostly observed within 12h after vaccination (n=299, 83.3%). In this study, anaphylaxis events occurred within 60 min after vaccination, and about half of these events occurred within 5 min (n=19, 46.3%). Furthermore, where anaphylaxis was reported, additional information to support the diagnosis was obtained by reinvestigation. Our resurvey of dogs with anaphylaxis yielded responses on 31 dogs; 27 of these demonstrated collapse (87.1%), 24 demonstrated cyanosis (77.4%), and both signs occurred in 22 (71.0%). Higher rates of animal VAAEs, anaphylaxis, and death were found in Japan than in other countries. Further investigations, including survey studies, will be necessary to elucidate the interaction between death and vaccination and the risk factors for VAAEs, and thus develop safer vaccines. Moreover, it may also be necessary to continually update the data of VAAEs. PMID:22264736

  8. Evaluation of oral and subcutaneous delivery of an experimental canarypox recombinant canine distemper vaccine in the Siberian polecate (Mustela eversmanni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimsatt, J.; Biggins, D.; Innes, K.; Taylor, B.; Garell, D.

    2003-01-01

    The direct and indirect effects of human activities, including environmental contamination, upon bird populations in San Francisco Bay and Chesapeake Bay are imperfectly understood, and few data are available. that allow a comparison of the contamination levels in birds from these two areas. Certain trace elements and organochlorine compounds have been found at sufficiently high concentrations in bird tissues or their foods to expect adverse effects in these birds, based upon results of field and laboratory studies conducted with other avian species. The decline and recovery of populations of many avian species have been recorded, including some associated with organochlorine contamination. The present paper summarizes available information on the occurrence and potential effects of contaminants upon birds in these two regions.

  9. Efficacy and safety of a live canine adenovirus-vectored rabies virus vaccine in swine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Ma, Guangpeng; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-10-01

    Rabies infections in swine have been reported occasionally in recent years in certain geographic locations. Although a protective vaccine consisting of inactivated rabies virus is available for use in swine, searching for a more economically viable formulation for use in developing countries is always a priority. This work describes the testing of a canine adenovirus that expresses a rabies viral epitope (CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP) in a porcine rabies model. The data presented here show that the recombinant viral vaccine was effective in protecting swine against rabies if administered intramuscularly, but not orally or intranasally, and that protection was probably related to the development of a humoral response that lasted at least 28 weeks. Following vaccination, no behavioral abnormalities were observed in vaccinated swine and virus particles were not detected in either tissues or body fluids, indicating that this formulation was safe. The recombinant virus stimulated an effective level of antibody response in the immunized swine after a single intramuscular inoculation. PMID:18721839

  10. Immune Responses to rAAV6: The Influence of Canine Parvovirus Vaccination and Neonatal Administration of Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Andrea L. H.; Garikipati, Dilip; Wang, Zejing; Tapscott, Stephen; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors promote long-term gene transfer in many animal species. Significant effort has focused on the evaluation of rAAV delivery and the immune response in both murine and canine models of neuromuscular disease. However, canines provided for research purposes are routinely vaccinated against canine parvovirus (CPV). rAAV and CPV possess significant homology and are both parvoviruses. Thus, any immune response generated to CPV vaccination has the potential to cross-react with rAAV vectors. In this study, we investigated the immune response to rAAV6 delivery in a cohort of CPV-vaccinated canines and evaluated multiple vaccination regimens in a mouse model of CPV-vaccination. We show that CPV-vaccination stimulates production of neutralizing antibodies with minimal cross-reactivity to rAAV6. In addition, no significant differences were observed in the magnitude of the rAAV6-directed immune response between CPV-vaccinated animals and controls. Moreover, CPV-vaccination did not inhibit rAAV6-mediated transduction. We also evaluated the immune response to early rAAV6-vaccination in neonatal mice. The influence of maternal hormones and cytokines leads to a relatively permissive state in the neonate. We hypothesized that immaturity of the immune system would permit induction of tolerance to rAAV6 when delivered during the neonatal period. Mice were vaccinated with rAAV6 at 1 or 5 days of age, and subsequently challenged with rAAV6 exposure during adulthood via two sequential IM injections, 1 month apart. All vaccinated animals generated a significant neutralizing antibody response to rAAV6-vaccination that was enhanced following IM injection in adulthood. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immune response raised against rAAV6 is distinct from that which is elicited by the standard parvoviral vaccines and is sufficient to prevent stable tolerization in neonatal mice. PMID:22065964

  11. Molecular surveillance of traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Larocca, Vittorio; Losurdo, Michele; Lanave, Gianvito; Lucente, Maria Stella; Corrente, Marialaura; Catella, Cristiana; Bo, Stefano; Elia, Gabriella; Torre, Giorgio; Grandolfo, Erika; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2016-08-30

    A molecular survey for traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) was conducted in Italy between 2011 and 2013 on a total of 138 dogs, including 78 early acute clinically ill CIRD animals, 22 non-clinical but exposed to clinically ill CIRD dogs and 38 CIRD convalescent dogs. The results showed that canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) was the most commonly detected CIRD pathogen, followed by canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma cynos, Mycoplasma canis and canine pneumovirus (CnPnV). Some classical CIRD agents, such as canine adenoviruses, canine distemper virus and canid herpesvirus 1, were not detected at all, as were not other emerging respiratory viruses (canine influenza virus, canine hepacivirus) and bacteria (Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus). Most severe forms of respiratory disease were observed in the presence of CPIV, CRCoV and M. cynos alone or in combination with other pathogens, whereas single CnPnV or M. canis infections were detected in dogs with no or very mild respiratory signs. Interestingly, only the association of M. cynos (alone or in combination with either CRCoV or M. canis) with severe clinical forms was statistically significant. The study, while confirming CPIV as the main responsible for CIRD occurrence, highlights the increasing role of recently discovered viruses, such as CRCoV and CnPnV, for which effective vaccines are not available in the market. PMID:27527760

  12. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. PMID:27449079

  13. Development of canine herpesvirus based antifertility vaccines for foxes using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Strive, Tanja; Hardy, Christopher M; French, Nigel; Wright, John D; Nagaraja, Nitin; Reubel, Gerhard H

    2006-02-13

    Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology, a canine herpesvirus (CHV)-based recombinant vaccine vector was produced for the development of an antifertility vaccine for foxes. Infectious viruses were recovered following transfection of canid cells with a BAC plasmid carrying the complete CHV genome. In vitro growth characteristics of BAC-derived viruses were similar to that of wildtype (wt)-CHV. Two recombinant antigens, fox zona pellucida protein subunit 3 (fZPC) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as control antigen, were inserted into thymidine kinase (TK) locus of the CHV genome and shown to be efficiently expressed in vitro. Inoculation of foxes with transgenic CHVs induced CHV specific antibodies, but was innocuous and failed to elicit transgene-specific antibody responses. Infectious virus or viral DNA was not detected in mucosal secretions or tissues of vaccinated foxes. The CHV-BAC system proved to be a quick and reliable method to manipulate the CHV genome. It will help to readily apply changes in the vector design in order to improve virus replication in vivo. PMID:16198458

  14. Virological and serological findings in dogs with naturally occurring distemper.

    PubMed

    Elia, Gabriella; Camero, Michele; Losurdo, Michele; Lucente, Maria Stella; Larocca, Vittorio; Martella, Vito; Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2015-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. The unpredictable and variable course of CDV-related disease may hamper correct diagnosis of infection and makes it crucial the collection of samples suitable for laboratory confirmation. In the present study we were able to follow the disease in two dogs infected naturally, collecting different biological matrices during the entire period of infection. By real time RT-PCR, viral RNA was detected and quantified, suggesting that urine and rectal swabs would be useful for ante-mortem diagnosis of distemper in dogs, regardless of the clinical stage and form of the illness. PMID:25512131

  15. Efficacy of two canine parvovirus vaccines for inducing seroconversion in Rottweiler and Doberman pinscher pups with various levels of maternally derived antibodies.

    PubMed

    Coyne, M J

    2000-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the efficacy of two commonly used modified-live virus vaccines to induce seroconversion against canine parvovirus (CPV) in 213 Rottweiler and Doberman pinscher pups with various titers of maternally derived CPV antibody. Beginning at 6 to 8 weeks of age, pups were given a subcutaneous vaccination every 21 days (range, 18-24 days) in the dorsal region of the neck or shoulder area. Pups vaccinated with vaccine A(a) received three vaccinations and completed the vaccination series by 12 to 14 weeks of age. Pups vaccinated with vaccine Bb received four vaccinations and completed the vaccination series by 15 to 17 weeks of age. Antibody titers against CPV in both vaccine groups were similar before vaccination. Pups in the vaccine-A group seroconverted significantly earlier than those in the vaccine-B group. After the first vaccination, more pups with a CPV-2b hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer of < or = 1:80 responded to vaccine A than to vaccine B. In addition, CPV-2b HI titers after vaccination were also significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher for the pups in the vaccine-A group after first, second, and third vaccinations, compared with those of pups in the vaccine-B group. PMID:19757563

  16. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)-expression and IFNγ production define vaccine-specific canine T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Ashley N; Tarleton, Rick L

    2015-04-15

    Canines suffer from and serve as strong translational animals models for many immunological disorders and infectious diseases. Routine vaccination has been a mainstay of protecting dogs through the stimulation of robust antibody responses and expansion of memory T-cell populations. Commercially available reagents and described techniques are limited for identifying and characterizing canine T-cell subsets and evaluating T-cell-specific effector function. To define reagents for delineating naïve versus activated T-cells and identify antigen-specific T-cells, we tested anti-human and anti-bovine T-cell specific cell surface marker reagents for cross-reactivity with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells from healthy canine donors showed reactivity to CCL19-Ig, a CCR7 ligand, and coexpression with CD62L. An in vitro stimulation with concanavalin A validated downregulation of CCR7 and CD62L expression on stimulated healthy control PBMCs, consistent with an activated T-cell phenotype. Anti-IFNγ antibodies identified antigen-specific IFNγ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells upon in vitro vaccine antigen PBMC stimulation. PBMC isolation within 24h of sample collection allowed for efficienT-cell recovery and accurate T-cell effector function characterization. These data provide a reagent and techniques platform via flow cytometry for identifying canine T-cell subsets and characterizing circulating antigen-specific canine T-cells for potential use in diagnostic and field settings. PMID:25758065

  17. A virus vector based on Canine Herpesvirus for vaccine applications in canids.

    PubMed

    Strive, T; Hardy, C M; Wright, J; Reubel, G H

    2007-01-31

    Canine Herpesvirus (CHV) is being developed as a virus vector for the vaccination of European red foxes. However, initial studies using recombinant CHV vaccines in foxes revealed viral attenuation and lack of antibody response to inserted foreign antigens. These findings were attributed both to inactivation of the thymidine kinase (TK) gene and excess foreign genetic material in the recombinant viral genome. In this study, we report an improved CHV-bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector system designed to overcome attenuation in foxes. A non-essential region was identified in the CHV genome as an alternative insertion site for foreign genes. Replacement of a guanine/cytosine (GC)-rich intergenic region between UL21 and UL22 of CHV with a marker gene did not change growth behaviour in vitro, showing that this region is not essential for virus growth in cell culture. We subsequently produced a CHV-BAC vector with an intact TK gene in which the bacterial genes and the antigen expression cassette were inserted into this GC-rich locus. Unlike earlier constructs, the new CHV-BAC allowed self-excision of the bacterial genes via homologous recombination after transfection of BACs into cell culture. The BAC-CHV system was used to produce a recombinant virus that constitutively expressed porcine zona pellucida subunit C protein between the UL21 and UL22 genes of CHV. Complete self-excision of the bacterial genes from CHV was achieved within one round of replication whilst retaining antigen gene expression. PMID:17079096

  18. Gentamicin-Attenuated Leishmania infantum Vaccine: Protection of Dogs against Canine Visceral Leishmaniosis in Endemic Area of Southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Hamid; Namazi, Mohammad Javad; Kamiabi, Hossein; Burchmore, Richard; Cleaveland, Sarah; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An attenuated line of Leishmania infantum (L. infantum H-line) has been established by culturing promastigotes in vitro under gentamicin pressure. A vaccine trial was conducted using 103 naive dogs from a leishmaniosis non-endemic area (55 vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated) brought into an endemic area of southeast Iran. No local and/or general indications of disease were observed in the vaccinated dogs immediately after vaccination. The efficacy of the vaccine was evaluated after 24 months (4 sandfly transmission seasons) by serological, parasitological analyses and clinical examination. In western blot analysis of antibodies to L. infantum antigens, sera from 10 out of 31 (32.2%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of the sera from vaccinated dogs which were seropositive at >100, recognized the 21 kDa antigen of L. infantum wild-type (WT). Nine out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of vaccinated dogs, were positive for the presence of Leishmania DNA. One out of 46 (2.2%) vaccinated dogs and 9 out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs developed clinical signs of disease. These results suggest that gentamicin-attenuated L. infantum induced a significant and strong protective effect against canine visceral leishmaniosis in the endemic area. PMID:24743691

  19. Gentamicin-attenuated Leishmania infantum vaccine: protection of dogs against canine visceral leishmaniosis in endemic area of southeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Hamid; Namazi, Mohammad Javad; Kamiabi, Hossein; Burchmore, Richard; Cleaveland, Sarah; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    An attenuated line of Leishmania infantum (L. infantum H-line) has been established by culturing promastigotes in vitro under gentamicin pressure. A vaccine trial was conducted using 103 naive dogs from a leishmaniosis non-endemic area (55 vaccinated and 48 unvaccinated) brought into an endemic area of southeast Iran. No local and/or general indications of disease were observed in the vaccinated dogs immediately after vaccination. The efficacy of the vaccine was evaluated after 24 months (4 sandfly transmission seasons) by serological, parasitological analyses and clinical examination. In western blot analysis of antibodies to L. infantum antigens, sera from 10 out of 31 (32.2%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of the sera from vaccinated dogs which were seropositive at >100, recognized the 21 kDa antigen of L. infantum wild-type (WT). Nine out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs, but none of vaccinated dogs, were positive for the presence of Leishmania DNA. One out of 46 (2.2%) vaccinated dogs and 9 out of 31 (29%) unvaccinated dogs developed clinical signs of disease. These results suggest that gentamicin-attenuated L. infantum induced a significant and strong protective effect against canine visceral leishmaniosis in the endemic area. PMID:24743691

  20. Hematological, Biochemical, and Serological Findings in Healthy Canine Blood Donors after the Administration of CaniLeish® Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Starita, Chiara; Gavazza, Alessandra; Lubas, George

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate hematological, biochemical, and serological findings in healthy canine blood donors after the administration of CaniLeish® vaccine. Twenty-seven client-owned dogs were included in the study and arranged into 3 groups according to the vaccination stage. Complete blood count (CBC) with blood smear examination, serum biochemical profile (SBP), serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), and serological tests for L. infantum were performed at different times. Additionally, in a subgroup of dogs IgA, IgM, and IgG were quantified. No statistical significance for CBC and SBP was found. In 10.7% of cases slight hyperproteinemia occurred. In SPE absolute values β-1-globulins (Group 2 and Group 2-3) and β-2-globulins (Group 3) were found modified (P < 0.05). IgG values were statistically different (P < 0.05) 6–8 months after the third immunisation (Group 2) and IgM and IgG values were statistically different after 2 months (Group 3). IFAT positive samples were 20.8% (Group 1), 15.0% (Group 2), and 52.8% (Group 3). Speed Leish K™ tests were always negative. The modifications found were probably attributed to the development of immune or inflammatory response due to the vaccine. Administration of CaniLeish vaccine in canine blood donors could be a safe practice and did not affect their health status. PMID:27313949

  1. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the safety, efficacy and anti-tumor effects of a surgery adjuvant treatment on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This approach combined suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by formolized tumor cells and irradiated xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The post-surgical margin of the cavity was infiltrated with lipid-complexed thymidine kinase suicide gene coadministrated with ganciclovir. Toxicity was minimal or absent in all patients. With respect to surgery-treated controls (SC), this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of patients local disease-free from 6 to 58% and distant metastases-free from 43 to 78% (Fisher's Exact test). In addition, CT significantly improved both SC overall 78 (23-540) and metastasis-free survival 112 (0-467) days to more than 1312 days (respective ranges: 43-1312 and 0-1312) (Kaplan-Meier analysis). In those patients subjected to partial surgery or presenting local recurrence, the efficacy of CT was verified by a 49% of objective responses that averaged 85% of tumor mass loss, while 22% displayed tumor progression as 94% of SC did. Therefore, surgery adjuvant CT controlled tumor growth, delaying or preventing post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly extending survival and recovering the quality of life. PMID:18033308

  2. Development of a novel vaccine against canine parvovirus infection with a clinical isolate of the type 2b strain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Ah; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Hwi Yool; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of an extensive vaccination program, parvoviral infections still pose a major threat to the health of dogs. Materials and Methods We isolated a novel canine parvovirus (CPV) strain from a dog with enteritis. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence analysis of the isolate showed that it is a novel type 2b CPV with asparagine at the 426th position and valine at the 555th position in VP2. To develop a vaccine against CPV infection, we passaged the isolate 4 times in A72 cells. Results The attenuated isolate conferred complete protection against lethal homologous CPV infection in dogs such that they did not develop any clinical symptoms, and their antibody titers against CPV were significantly high at 7-11 days post infection. Conclusion These results suggest that the virus isolate obtained after passaging can be developed as a novel vaccine against paroviral infection. PMID:23596579

  3. Oral vaccination of dogs (Canis familiaris) with baits containing the recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus type-2 vaccine confers long-lasting immunity against rabies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Fooks, Anthony R; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-01-17

    Rabies is a reemerging and fatal infectious disease in Asia mainly caused by exposure to rabid dogs. Prevention of dog rabies would be the most effective way to stop rabies transmission to humans. However, vaccinating stray dogs in urban and rural areas using conventional vaccines is always difficult and is not cost-effective for use in most areas including China. Further to previous studies from our laboratory, we developed a bait containing the recombinant rabies vaccine and performed a non-parenteral trial in dogs. This vaccine was intranasally administrated once to 46 dogs in solution form with 1 x 10(8.5) PFU and orally to 90 dogs in specially designed baits with 3 x 10(8.5) PFU of the recombinant canine adenovirus. Results showed that about 87.5% (119/136) of the immunized dogs developed virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). The immune response against rabies in dogs was detectable at 2-3 weeks after administration, reaching a peak by 5-6 weeks. Among the seroconverted animals, 90.8% (108/119) elicited a VNA response for over 24 months. The antibody titer during the 2 years was above 0.5IU /ml while showing a gradual but slow decline from the 6th week after vaccination. In a challenge experiment of 10 dogs with 60,000 mouse LD(50) of CVS-24 2 years after the vaccination, all the dogs survived. This demonstrated that the recombinant vaccine could be orally administrated and the bait was effective for the oral vaccination of dogs. PMID:18083277

  4. Impact of LbSapSal Vaccine in Canine Immunological and Parasitological Features before and after Leishmania chagasi-Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Lucilene Aparecida; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Gama-Ker, Henrique; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; de Mendonça, Ludmila Zanandreis; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    Dogs represent the most important domestic reservoir of L. chagasi (syn. L. infantum). A vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) would be an important tool for decreasing the anxiety related to possible L. chagasi infection and for controlling human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Because the sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited during transmission of Leishmania parasites, their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine has been investigated in past decades. We investigated the immunogenicity of the “LbSapSal” vaccine (L. braziliensis antigens, saponin as adjuvant, and Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary gland extract) in dogs at baseline (T0), during the post-vaccination protocol (T3rd) and after early (T90) and late (T885) times following L. chagasi-challenge. Our major data indicated that immunization with “LbSapSal” is able to induce biomarkers characterized by enhanced amounts of type I (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-12, interferon [IFN]-γ) cytokines and reduction in type II cytokines (IL-4 and TGF-β), even after experimental challenge. The establishment of a prominent pro-inflammatory immune response after “LbSapSal” immunization supported the increased levels of nitric oxide production, favoring a reduction in spleen parasitism (78.9%) and indicating long-lasting protection against L. chagasi infection. In conclusion, these results confirmed the hypothesis that the “LbSapSal” vaccination is a potential tool to control the Leishmania chagasi infection. PMID:27556586

  5. Impact of LbSapSal Vaccine in Canine Immunological and Parasitological Features before and after Leishmania chagasi-Challenge.

    PubMed

    Resende, Lucilene Aparecida; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Gama-Ker, Henrique; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Mendonça, Ludmila Zanandreis de; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; Silveira-Lemos, Denise da; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro

    2016-01-01

    Dogs represent the most important domestic reservoir of L. chagasi (syn. L. infantum). A vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) would be an important tool for decreasing the anxiety related to possible L. chagasi infection and for controlling human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Because the sand fly salivary proteins are potent immunogens obligatorily co-deposited during transmission of Leishmania parasites, their inclusion in an anti-Leishmania vaccine has been investigated in past decades. We investigated the immunogenicity of the "LbSapSal" vaccine (L. braziliensis antigens, saponin as adjuvant, and Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary gland extract) in dogs at baseline (T0), during the post-vaccination protocol (T3rd) and after early (T90) and late (T885) times following L. chagasi-challenge. Our major data indicated that immunization with "LbSapSal" is able to induce biomarkers characterized by enhanced amounts of type I (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-12, interferon [IFN]-γ) cytokines and reduction in type II cytokines (IL-4 and TGF-β), even after experimental challenge. The establishment of a prominent pro-inflammatory immune response after "LbSapSal" immunization supported the increased levels of nitric oxide production, favoring a reduction in spleen parasitism (78.9%) and indicating long-lasting protection against L. chagasi infection. In conclusion, these results confirmed the hypothesis that the "LbSapSal" vaccination is a potential tool to control the Leishmania chagasi infection. PMID:27556586

  6. Porcupine quills in raccoons as an indicator of rabies, distemper, or both diseases: disease management implications.

    PubMed

    Rosatte, Rick; Wandeler, Alex; Muldoon, Frances; Campbell, Doug

    2007-03-01

    A relationship was detected between the presence of embedded porcupine quills and the diagnosis of rabies in raccoons in eastern Canada during 1999-2004. No relationship was found between the presence of quills in raccoons and the diagnosis of canine distemper. Raccoons with embedded quills should be submitted for rabies testing. PMID:17436909

  7. Virus neutralizing antibody response in mice and dogs with a bicistronic DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein and canine parvovirus VP2.

    PubMed

    Patial, Sonika; Chaturvedi, V K; Rai, A; Saini, M; Chandra, Rajesh; Saini, Y; Gupta, Praveen K

    2007-05-16

    A bicistronic DNA vaccine against rabies and parvovirus infection of dogs was developed by subcloning rabies glycoprotein and canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 genes into a bicistronic vector. After characterizing the expression of both the proteins in vitro, the bicistronic DNA vaccine was injected in mice and induced immune response was compared with monocistronic DNA vaccines. There was no significant difference in ELISA and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody responses against rabies and CPV in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic DNA vaccine. Further, there was significantly similar protection in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic rabies DNA vaccine on rabies virus challenge. Similarly, dogs immunized with monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccines developed comparable VN antibodies against rabies and CPV. This study indicated that bicistronic DNA vaccine can be used in dogs to induce virus neutralizing immune responses against both rabies and CPV. PMID:17391817

  8. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test with less than 500 ID50 of measles virus. (2... neutralization test using less than 500 ID50 of canine distemper virus. (4) At least 21 days postinoculation,...

  9. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test with less than 500 ID50 of measles virus. (2... neutralization test using less than 500 ID50 of canine distemper virus. (4) At least 21 days postinoculation,...

  10. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test with less than 500 ID50 of measles virus. (2... neutralization test using less than 500 ID50 of canine distemper virus. (4) At least 21 days postinoculation,...

  11. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test with less than 500 ID50 of measles virus. (2... neutralization test using less than 500 ID50 of canine distemper virus. (4) At least 21 days postinoculation,...

  12. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test with less than 500 ID50 of measles virus. (2... neutralization test using less than 500 ID50 of canine distemper virus. (4) At least 21 days postinoculation,...

  13. Canine Parvovirus (CPV) Vaccination: Comparison of Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Pups after Inoculation with CPV2 or CPV2b Modified Live Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Cavalli, Alessandra; Martella, Vito; Tempesta, Maria; Decaro, Nicola; Carmichael, Leland Eugene; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2001-01-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2) emerged in 1978 as causative agent of a new disease of dogs. New antigenic variants (biotypes), designated CPV2a and CPV2b, became widespread during 1979 to 1980 and 1984, respectively. At the present time the original CPV2 has disappeared in the dog population and has been replaced by the two new viruses. In the present study the comparison of neutralizing antibody titers in two groups of pups (18 pups in each group) inoculated with CPV2 and CPV2b modified live virus vaccines is reported. Using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, relevant differences between antibody titers, against either the homologous or the heterologous virus, were not constantly observed. Using the neutralization (Nt) test, however, the pups inoculated with CPV2 had antibody titers which were approximately 30 times higher to the homologous virus (mean, 4,732) than to the heterologous virus (CPV2b) (mean, 162). The results of these experiments support two conclusions: (i) the HI test may not always accurately evaluate the true immune status of dogs with respect to CPV, and (ii) dogs inoculated with CPV2 vaccine develop relatively low Nt antibody titers against the heterologous virus (CPV2b). These data may suggest an advantage for new vaccines, considering that most presently licensed vaccines are produced with CPV2, which no longer exists in the dog population. PMID:11329467

  14. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing. PMID:25632689

  15. Evaluation of a vectored equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) vaccine expressing H3 haemagglutinin in the protection of dogs against canine influenza

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Cristina; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R.; Metzger, Stephan M.; Hoelzer, Karin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Kim, Sung G.; Parrish, Colin R.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) was identified as a respiratory pathogen of dogs for the first time and is closely related to H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV). We generated a recombinant vectored vaccine that expresses H3 of a recent isolate of EIV using equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. This EHV-1 vectored vaccine exhibited robust and stable EIV H3 expression and induced a strong influenza virus-specific response in both mice and dogs upon intranasal or subcutaneous administration. Furthermore, upon challenge with the recent CIV isolate A/canine/PA/10915-07, protection of vaccinated dogs could be demonstrated by a significant reduction in clinical sings, and, more importantly, by a significant reduction in virus shedding. We concluded that the EHV-1/H3 recombinant vector can be a valuable alternative for protection of dogs against clinical disease induced by CIV and can significantly reduce spread. PMID:18407383

  16. Safety and Efficacy of a Genetic Vaccine Targeting Telomerase Plus Chemotherapy for the Therapy of Canine B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gavazza, Alessandra; Lubas, George; Fridman, Arthur; Peruzzi, Daniela; Impellizeri, Joseph A.; Luberto, Laura; Marra, Emanuele; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Client-owned pet dogs represent exceptional translational models for advancement of cancer research because they reflect the complex heterogeneity observed in human cancer. We have recently shown that a genetic vaccine targeting dog telomerase reverse transcriptase (dTERT) and based on adenovirus DNA electro-gene-transfer (Ad/DNA-EGT) technology can induce strong cell-mediated immune responses against this tumor antigen and increase overall survival of dogs affected by B-cell lymphosarcoma (LSA) in comparison with historical controls when combined with a cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (COP) chemotherapy regimen. Here, we have conducted a double-arm clinical trial with an extended number of LSA patients, measured the antigen-specific immune response, and evaluated potential toxic effects of the immunotherapy along with a follow-up of patients survival for 3.5 years. The immune response was measured by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The expression of dTERT was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Changes in hematological parameters, local/systemic toxicity or organic dysfunction and fever were monitored over time during the treatment. dTERT-specific cell-mediated immune responses were induced in almost all treated animals. No adverse effects were observed in any dog patient that underwent treatment. The overall survival time of vaccine/COP-treated dogs was significantly increased over the COP-only cohort (>76.1 vs. 29.3 weeks, respectively, p<0.0001). There was a significant association between dTERT expression levels in LSA cells and overall survival among vaccinated patients. In conclusion, Ad/DNA-EGT-based cancer vaccine against dTERT in combination with COP chemotherapy is safe and significantly prolongs the survival of LSA canine patients. These data confirm the therapeutic efficacy of dTERT vaccine and support the evaluation of this approach for other cancer types as well as the translation of this approach to human

  17. Induction of neutralizing antibodies by a tobacco chloroplast-derived vaccine based on a B cell epitope from canine parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Andrea; Veramendi, Jon . E-mail: jon@unavarra.es; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra

    2005-11-25

    The 2L21 epitope of the VP2 protein from the canine parvovirus (CPV), fused to the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-2L21), was expressed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts. Mice and rabbits that received protein-enriched leaf extracts by parenteral route produced high titers of anti-2L21 antibodies able to recognize the VP2 protein. Rabbit sera were able to neutralize CPV in an in vitro infection assay with an efficacy similar to the anti-2L21 neutralizing monoclonal antibody 3C9. Anti-2L21 IgG and seric IgA antibodies were elicited when mice were gavaged with a suspension of pulverized tissues from CTB-2L21 transformed plants. Combined immunization (a single parenteral injection followed by oral boosters) shows that oral boosters help to maintain the anti-2L21 IgG response induced after a single injection, whereas parenteral administration of the antigen primes the subsequent oral boosters by promoting the induction of anti-2L21 seric IgA antibodies. Despite the induced humoral response, antibodies elicited by oral delivery did not show neutralizing capacity in the in vitro assay. The high yield of the fusion protein permits the preparation of a high number of vaccine doses from a single plant and makes feasible the oral vaccination using a small amount of crude plant material. However, a big effort has still to be done to enhance the protective efficacy of subunit vaccines by the oral route.

  18. Antibody responses induced by Leish-Tec®, an A2-based vaccine for visceral leishmaniasis, in a heterogeneous canine population.

    PubMed

    Testasicca, Miriam C de Souza; dos Santos, Mariana Silva; Machado, Leopoldo Marques; Serufo, Angela Vieira; Doro, Daniel; Avelar, Daniel; Tibúrcio, Ana Maria Leonardi; Abrantes, Christiane de Freitas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Grimaldi, Gabriel; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2014-08-29

    Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a widespread disease, and dogs are the main reservoirs for human parasite transmission. Hence, development of an effective vaccine that prevents disease and reduces the transmission of VL is required. As euthanasia of seropositive dogs is recommended in Brazil for VL epidemiological control, to include anti-VL canine vaccines as a mass control measure it is necessary to characterize the humoral responses induced by vaccination and if they interfere with the reactivity of vaccinated dogs in serological diagnostic tests. Leish-Tec(®) is an amastigote-specific A2 recombinant protein vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) that is commercially available in Brazil. Here, we tested the immunogenicity of Leish-Tec(®) in a heterogeneous dog population by measuring A2-specific antibody responses. Healthy dogs (n=140) of various breeds were allocated to two groups: one group received Leish-Tec(®) (n=70), and the other group received a placebo (n=70). Anti-A2 or anti-Leishmania promastigote antigen (LPA) antibody levels were measured by ELISA in serum samples collected before and after vaccination. An immunochromatographic test (DPP) based on the recombinant K28 antigen was also used for serodiagnosis of CVL. Vaccinated animals, except one, remained seronegative for anti-LPA total IgG and anti-K28 antibodies. Conversely, seropositivity for anti-A2 total IgG antibodies was found in 98% of animals after vaccination. This value decreased to 81.13% at 6 months before rising again (98%), after the vaccination boost. Anti-A2 IgG2 and IgG1 titers were also increased in vaccinated animals relative to control animals. These data indicate that Leish-Tec(®) is immunogenic for dogs of different genetic backgrounds and that humoral responses induced by vaccination can be detected by A2-ELISA, but do not interfere with the LPA-ELISA and DPP diagnostic tests for CVL. PMID:24863572

  19. A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally-occurring canine leishmaniosis, part I: vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C E; Carbonell-Antoñanzas, M; Aiassa, E; Dhollander, S; Zagmutt, F J; Brodbelt, D C; Solano-Gallego, L

    2014-11-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an important zoonotic disease; however, the efficacy of available vaccines for the prevention of naturally-occurring Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs remains unclear. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of currently available vaccines to prevent naturally-occurring L. infantum infection in dogs. Four bibliographic databases (CAB Direct 2011, Web of Science 2011, U.S. National Library of Medicine 2011 and Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) were searched along with eight sets of conference proceedings and the International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) database, from 1980 to November 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised clinical trials (NRCTs), cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated vaccine efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search was conducted for all mitigations for CanL and yielded the title and abstract of 937 articles, from which 84 articles were screened based on full text. Twelve studies on vaccinations (five RCTs, seven NRCTs) were identified. Ten studies were at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, whilst two were at an unclear risk. The use of 200 μg ALM protein, Leishmune(®), CaniLeish(®), LiESAp with MDP, and ALM with BCG tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. The use of lyophilized protein vaccine significantly

  20. Vaccination against canine leishmaniosis increases the phagocytic activity, nitric oxide production and expression of cell activation/migration molecules in neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Marcela L; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; Marteleto, Bruno H; Ribeiro, Vitor M; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo C; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Araújo, Márcio S S

    2016-04-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is transmitted by phlebotomine sandfly vectors and domestic dogs serve as a reservoir. The elimination of seropositive dogs has been a recommended strategy for managing the disease in Brazil. A protective canine vaccine would be an important tool for controlling the disease, reducing the parasites available to sandfly vectors and, consequently, reducing the number of human VL cases. Leishmune(®) is an anti-canine Leishmaniosis (VL Canine) vaccine produced by Zoetis (Pfizer, Brazil) that was commercially available in Brazil until 2014. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the protective immunological events induced by vaccination with Leishmune(®) in the time frame of one year. Healthy, non-vaccinated dogs and dogs of 1, 6 and 10 months post-vaccination were evaluated. Results showed that Leishmune(®) induced an increase in phagocytic activity of neutrophils and monocytes and also increased NO production. Immunological events were correlated with functional responses, as high levels of IgG and an increase of the receptor Fcγ were detected. Vaccination induced an increased expression of TLR (2, 4, 5, 9), integrin (CD29, CD49f), activation (MHCII) and co-stimulatory (CD80, CD81) molecules by neutrophils and monocytes. Vaccination led to decrease of IL-4 and an increase of IL-8 production by monocytes and higher IFN-γ and IL-17 production by T-cells. The results suggested that Leishmune(®) was able to induce a long-lasting change in immune response, mediated by supportive immunological events that may be participating in protective immunity against CL. PMID:26995719

  1. Vaccination of dogs with canine parvovirus type 2b (CPV-2b) induces neutralising antibody responses to CPV-2a and CPV-2c.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen; Illambas, Joanna; Siedek, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; Plevová, Edita; Sture, Gordon; Salt, Jeremy

    2014-09-22

    Since the identification of canine parvovirus type 2, three variants have subsequently been observed differing from the historical CPV-2 and each other by 1-2 amino acids only. As a result there has been considerable research into differential diagnostics, with some researchers indicating there is a need for new vaccines containing different strains of CPV-2. In this study we investigated whether vaccination with a CPV-2b containing vaccine would induce cross-reactive antibody responses to the other CPV-2 variants. Two studies where dogs were vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine, subsequently challenged with CPV-2b and sera samples analysed are presented. Six week old pups with defined serological status were vaccinated twice, three weeks apart and challenged either 5 weeks (MDA override study) or one year after vaccination (duration of immunity study). Sera samples were collected before each vaccination and at periods throughout each study. In each study the antibody profiles were very similar; serological responses against CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c were higher than those for CPV-2. Nevertheless, responses against CPV-2 were well above levels considered clinically protective. In each study dogs also showed a rapid increase in antibody titres following vaccination, reached a plateau following second vaccination with a slight decline to challenge after which rapid anamnestic responses were seen. Evaluation of the serological responses suggests vaccination with CPV-2b would cross-protect against CPV-2a and CPV-2c, as well as against CPV-2 which is now extinct in the field. In conclusion we have demonstrated that vaccination of minimum aged dogs with a multivalent vaccine containing the CPV-2b variant strain will induce serological responses which are cross-reactive against all currently circulating field strains, CPV-2a and CPV-2c, and the now extinct field strain CPV-2. PMID:25148778

  2. DNA vaccines and their applications in veterinary practice: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dhama, K; Mahendran, Mahesh; Gupta, P K; Rai, A

    2008-06-01

    Inoculation of plasmid DNA, encoding an immunogenic protein gene of an infectious agent, stands out as a novel approach for developing new generation vaccines for prevention of infectious diseases of animals. The potential of DNA vaccines to act in presence of maternal antibodies, its stability and cost effectiveness and the non-requirement of cold chain have heightened the prospects. Even though great strides have been made in nucleic acid vaccination, still there are many areas that need further research for its wholesome practical implementation. Major areas of concern are vaccine delivery, designing of suitable vectors and cytotoxic T cell responses. Also, the induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines is inconclusive due to the lack of knowledge regarding the concentration of the protein expressed in vivo. Alternative delivery systems having higher transfection efficiency and the use of cytokines, as immunomodulators, needs to be further explored. Recently, efforts are being made to modulate and prolong the active life of dendritic cells, in order to make antigen presentation a more efficacious one. For combating diseases like acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), influenza, malaria and tuberculosis in humans; and foot and mouth disease, Aujesky's disease, swine fever, rabies, canine distemper and brucellosis in animals, DNA vaccine clinical trials are underway. This review highlights the salient features of DNA vaccines, and measures to enhance their efficacy so as to devise an effective and novel vaccination strategy against animal diseases. PMID:18425596

  3. A new tetravalent canine leptospirosis vaccine provides at least 12 months immunity against infection.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, H L B M; van der Veen, M; Sutton, D; Molkenboer, M J C H

    2014-03-15

    A key success factor in the vaccination of dogs against leptospirosis is long term protection against establishment of the renal carrier state, in order to protect other dogs, as well as humans, against this re-emerging zoonotic disease. In this paper, we describe the ability of a new European tetravalent vaccine containing antigen from Leptospira interrogans (sensu lato) serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae, Canicola, Grippotyphosa and Australis to control infection and renal excretion in dogs at 12 months after vaccination. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of all four vaccine components, four separate challenge studies were performed. For each study two groups of dogs were used (a group receiving the leptospirosis vaccine and a control group). Twelve months after the second vaccination all dogs in the vaccine and control groups were challenged, both intraperitoneally and conjunctivally, using a pathogenic challenge strain from one of four serogroups. Parameters recorded post-challenge were: clinical signs of disease, change in body temperature, total leucocyte count, thrombocyte count, presence of challenge organisms in blood, urine and kidney tissue, and evidence of interstitial nephritis at necropsy four weeks after challenge. The vaccine was able to either prevent or significantly reduce infection following challenge with the strains of all four serogroups. The vaccine was also able to prevent or significantly reduce renal infection following Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae challenge, and there was a trend of reduction of renal infection with Australis (serovar Bratislava). In the case of the Grippotyphosa study, challenge led to no detectable renal infection in any dog of the control group. In conclusion, in this study significant protective immunity was achieved in dogs 12 months after a basic vaccination schedule of two doses against strains of serogroups Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Grippotyphosa and Australis. PMID:24054091

  4. Experimental immunization of cats with a recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus vaccine elicits a long-lasting neutralizing antibody response against rabies.

    PubMed

    Hu, R L; Liu, Y; Zhang, S F; Zhang, F; Fooks, A R

    2007-07-20

    During the past decade, human rabies caused by cats has ranked the second highest in China. Several recombinant rabies vaccines have been developed for dogs. However, seldom have these vaccines been assessed or used in cats. In this trial, we report the experimental immunization of a recombinant canine adenovirus-rabies vaccine, CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP, in cats. Thirty cats were inoculated with the recombinant vaccine intramuscularly, orally and intranasally, respectively. Safety and efficacy studies were undertaken using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test and evaluated. Results showed that this recombinant vaccine is safe for cats as demonstrated by the three different routes of administration. The vaccine stimulated an efficient humoral response in the vaccinated cats when 10(8.5)PFU/ml of the recombinant vaccine was injected intramuscularly in a single dose. The neutralizing antibody level increased above 0.5IU/ml at 4 weeks after the vaccination. The mean antibody level ranged from 0.96+/-0.26 to 4.47+/-1.57IU/ml among individuals, and the antibody levels were elicited for at least 12 months. After this period, the immunized cats survived the challenge of CVS-24 and an obvious anemnestic and protective immune response was stimulated after the challenge. The immune response occurred later than the inactivated vaccine and the overall antibody level in the vaccinated cats was lower, but it was sufficient to confer protection of cats against infection. This demonstrated that a single, intramuscular dose of CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP stimulated a long-lasting protective immune response in cats and suggested that CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP could be considered as a potential rabies vaccine candidate for cats. PMID:17576027

  5. Immunological comparison of DNA vaccination using two delivery systems against canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Saljoughian, Noushin; Doroud, Delaram; Jamshidi, Shahram; Mahdavi, Niousha; Shirian, Sadegh; Daneshbod, Yahya; Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-09-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal disease caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum. Dogs are the primary reservoirs of this parasite, and vaccination of dogs could be an effective method to reduce its transfer to humans. In order to develop a vaccine against VL (apart from the choice of immunogenic candidate antigens), it is necessary to use an appropriate delivery system to promote a proper antigen-specific immune response. In this study, we compared two vaccine delivery systems, namely electroporation and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticle (cSLN) formulation, to administer a DNA vaccine containing the Leishmania donovani A2 antigen, and L. infantum cysteine proteinases of type I (CPA) and II (CPB) without its unusual C-terminal extension. The protective potencies of these two vaccine delivery systems were evaluated against L. infantum challenge in outbred dogs. Our results show that the administration of pcDNA-A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE)GFP vaccine as a prime-boost by either electroporation or cSLN formulation protects the dogs against L. infantum infection. Partial protection in vaccinated dogs is associated with significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of IgG2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α and with low levels of IgG1 and IL-10 as compared to the control group. Protection was also correlated with a low parasite burden and a strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. This study demonstrates that both electroporation and cSLN formulation can be used as efficient vaccine delivery systems against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26255093

  6. Vaccination of dogs with a recombinant cysteine protease from the intestine of canine hookworms diminishes the fecundity and growth of worms.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Alex; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Williamson, Angela L; Goud, Gaddam N; Mendez, Susana; Zhan, Bin; Hawdon, John M; Elena Bottazzi, Maria; Brindley, Paul J; Hotez, Peter J

    2004-05-15

    We expressed a catalytically active cysteine protease, Ac-CP-2, from the blood-feeding stage of the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and vaccinated dogs with the purified protease. Dogs acquired high-titer, antigen-specific antibody responses, and adult hookworms recovered from the intestines of vaccinated dogs were significantly smaller than hookworms from control dogs. There was also a marked decrease in fecal egg counts and the number of female hookworms in vaccinated dogs. Ac-CP-2 is expressed by the parasite in the brush-border membrane of its alimentary canal, and anti-Ac-CP-2 antibodies were bound to the gut of hookworms from vaccinated dogs, which suggests that these antibodies were ingested by the parasites with their blood meal. IgG from vaccinated dogs decreased proteolytic activity against a peptide substrate by 73%, which implies that neutralizing antibodies were induced by vaccination. These results indicate that cysteine proteases involved in parasite nutrition are promising candidates as vaccines against hookworm disease. PMID:15122534

  7. Self-assembly of virus-like particles of canine parvovirus capsid protein expressed from Escherichia coli and application as virus-like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Guo, Hui-Chen; Wei, Yan-Quan; Dong, Hu; Han, Shi-Chong; Ao, Da; Sun, De-Hui; Wang, Hai-Ming; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Sun, Shi-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Canine parvovirus disease is an acute infectious disease caused by canine parvovirus (CPV). Current commercial vaccines are mainly attenuated and inactivated; as such, problems concerning safety may occur. To resolve this problem, researchers developed virus-like particles (VLPs) as biological nanoparticles resembling natural virions and showing high bio-safety. This property allows the use of VLPs for vaccine development and mechanism studies of viral infections. Tissue-specific drug delivery also employs VLPs as biological nanomaterials. Therefore, VLPs derived from CPV have a great potential in medicine and diagnostics. In this study, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion motif was utilized to express a whole, naturalVP2 protein of CPV in Escherichia coli. After the cleavage of the fusion motif, the CPV VP2 protein has self-assembled into VLPs. The VLPs had a size and shape that resembled the authentic virus capsid. However, the self-assembly efficiency of VLPs can be affected by different pH levels and ionic strengths. The mice vaccinated subcutaneously with CPV VLPs and CPV-specific immune responses were compared with those immunized with the natural virus. This result showed that VLPs can effectively induce anti-CPV specific antibody and lymphocyte proliferation as a whole virus. This result further suggested that the antigen epitope of CPV was correctly present on VLPs, thereby showing the potential application of a VLP-based CPV vaccine. PMID:24413974

  8. Molecular characterization of canine parvovirus strains in Argentina: Detection of the pathogenic variant CPV2c in vaccinated dogs.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Marina Gallo; Mattion, Nora; Bucafusco, Danilo; Fogel, Fernando; Remorini, Patricia; La Torre, Jose

    2009-08-01

    PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers was used to detect canine parvovirus (CPV) DNA in 38 rectal swabs from Argentine domestic dogs with symptoms compatible with parvovirus disease. Twenty-seven out of 38 samples analyzed were CPV positive. The classical CPV2 strain was not detected in any of the samples, but nine samples were identified as CPV2a variant and 18 samples as CPV2b variant. Further sequence analysis revealed a mutation at amino acid 426 of the VP2 gene (Asp426Glu), characteristic of the CPV2c variant, in 14 out of 18 of the samples identified initially by PCR as CPV2b. The appearance of CPV2c variant in Argentina might be dated at least to the year 2003. Three different pathogenic CPV variants circulating currently in the Argentine domestic dog population were identified, with CPV2c being the only variant affecting vaccinated and unvaccinated dogs during the year 2008. PMID:19490967

  9. Serum antibody responses to vaccinal antigens in lean and obese geriatric dogs.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John; Gow, Sheryl; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Kong, Lyndsay; Musil, Kristyna; Snead, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The immune responses in control dogs [1 to 4 years of age, body condition score (BCS): 4 to 5 out of 9] were compared to those of aging dogs (based on breed and body size) either categorized as lean (BCS: 4 to 5 out of 9) or obese (BCS: 8 to 9 out of 9). Of interest were the serum titers to the following common agents found in vaccines, canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), and Bordetella bronchiseptica. There were no statistical differences in the antibodies to CPIV, B. bronchispetica, and CRCoV, among the age/weight categories, nor among the age/weight categories and the time, in days, between the date of sample collection and the date of the last recorded vaccination for CPIV, B. bronchiseptica, CPV, and CDV. For CPV, the control dogs had significantly (P < 0.002) higher serum neutralization (SN) titers than the lean geriatric dogs and the obese geriatric dogs. For CDV SN titers, the only statistically significant (P = 0.01) difference was that the control dogs had higher SN titers than the lean geriatric dogs. PMID:27152043

  10. Evaluation of a vectored equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) vaccine expressing H3 haemagglutinin in the protection of dogs against canine influenza.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Cristina; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Metzger, Stephan M; Hoelzer, Karin; Dubovi, Edward J; Kim, Sung G; Parrish, Colin R; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2008-05-01

    In 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) was identified as a respiratory pathogen of dogs for the first time and found to be closely related to H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV). We generated a recombinant vectored vaccine that expresses H3 of a recent isolate of EIV using equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. This EHV-1 vectored vaccine exhibited robust and stable EIV H3 expression and induced a strong influenza virus-specific response in both mice and dogs upon intranasal or subcutaneous administration. Furthermore, upon challenge with the recent CIV isolate A/canine/PA/10915-07, protection of vaccinated dogs could be demonstrated by a significant reduction in clinical sings, and, more importantly, by a significant reduction in virus shedding. We concluded that the EHV-1/H3 recombinant vector can be a valuable alternative for protection of dogs against clinical disease induced by CIV and can significantly reduce virus spread. PMID:18407383

  11. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Jamshidi, Shahram; Shirian, Sadegh; Mahdavi, Niousha; Hassankhani, Mehdi; Daneshbod, Yahya; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL. PMID:26197085

  12. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Jamshidi, Shahram; Shirian, Sadegh; Mahdavi, Niousha; Hassankhani, Mehdi; Daneshbod, Yahya; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL. PMID:26197085

  13. Molecular and serological surveillance of canine enteric viruses in stray dogs from Vila do Maio, Cape Verde

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections caused by canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and canine coronavirus are an important cause of mortality and morbidity in dogs worldwide. Prior to this study, no information was available concerning the incidence and prevalence of these viruses in Cape Verde archipelago. Results To provide information regarding the health status of the canine population in Vila do Maio, Maio Island, Cape Verde, 53 rectal swabs were collected from 53 stray dogs during 2010 and 93 rectal swabs and 88 blood samples were collected from 125 stray dogs in 2011. All rectal swabs (2010 n = 53; 2011 n = 93) were analysed for the presence of canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and canine coronavirus nucleic acids by quantitative PCR methods. Specific antibodies against canine distemper virus and canine parvovirus were also assessed (2011 n = 88). From the 2010 sampling, 43.3% (23/53) were positive for canine parvovirus DNA, 11.3% (6/53) for canine distemper virus RNA and 1.9% (1/53) for canine coronavirus RNA. In 2011, the prevalence values for canine parvovirus and canine coronavirus were quite similar to those from the previous year, respectively 44.1% (41/93), and 1.1% (1/93), but canine distemper virus was not detected in any of the samples analysed (0%, 0/93). Antibodies against canine parvovirus were detected in 71.6% (63/88) blood samples and the seroprevalence found for canine distemper virus was 51.1% (45/88). Conclusions This study discloses the data obtained in a molecular and serological epidemiological surveillance carried out in urban populations of stray and domestic animals. Virus transmission and spreading occurs easily in large dog populations leading to high mortality rates particularly in unvaccinated susceptible animals. In addition, these animals can act as disease reservoirs for wild animal populations by occasional contact. Identification of susceptible wildlife of Maio Island is of upmost importance to evaluate the risk

  14. Longitudinal analysis of serological tests officially adopted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis in dogs vaccinated with Leishmune®.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Mary; de Lima, Valéria Marçal Félix; de Araújo, Maria de Fátima Lereno; Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Tolezano, José Eduardo; Vieira, Rafael F C; Biondo, Alexander W

    2013-11-01

    Development of vaccines against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) may provide a prophylactic barrier, but antibody response detected by standard diagnostic techniques may not separate vaccinated from naturally infected dogs. Moreover, anti-Leishmania antibody levels in vaccinated dogs may be detectable for months. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate an "in-house" ELISA with three serological tests officially adopted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the diagnosis of CVL in dogs vaccinated with Leishmune(®). A total of 18 mongrel dogs were submitted to a complete protocol of the vaccine, monitored and evaluated in 5 times (T0-T4) up to 180 days after T0. Twenty-one days after the first dose (T1), 50% of the dogs were seropositive by the "in-house" ELISA and 5.5% by IFAT, while by the official ELISA and DPP(®) CVL rapid test all dogs tested negative. At time T2, 42 days after of the first dose, 100%, 83.3%, 11.1%, and 5.5% of the dogs were seropositive by the "in-house" ELISA, IFAT, official ELISA kit and the DPP(®) CVL rapid test, respectively. Ninety days after the first dose (T3), 100%, 83.3%, 72.2% and 33.3% of the dogs were seropositive by the "in-house" ELISA, official ELISA kit, IFAT, and the DPP(®) CVL rapid test, respectively. Finally, at time T4, 88.8%, 33.3%, 11.1% and 5.5% of the dogs were seropositive by the "in-house" ELISA, official ELISA kit, DPP(®) CVL rapid test and IFAT, respectively. In conclusion, dogs vaccinated with Leishmune(®) cross-react by an "in-house" ELISA and by the three official Brazilian serological tests for the diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis up to six months after the first vaccine dose, and may be mistakenly diagnosed and removed. PMID:23920056

  15. Canine CD4+CD8+ double positive T cells in peripheral blood have features of activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bismarck, Doris; Schütze, Nicole; Moore, Peter; Büttner, Mathias; Alber, Gottfried; Buttlar, Heiner v

    2012-10-15

    In dogs a CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cell subpopulation exists that has not been phenotypically defined yet. We demonstrate that canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are mature CD1a(-) and TCRαβ(+) T cells. To analyse the activation potential of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells, PBMC from dogs vaccinated against canine distemper virus (CDV) were re-stimulated with CDV. Upon antigen-specific stimulation, the CD4(+)CD8(+) T cell fraction increases and consists nearly exclusively of proliferated cells. Similarly, other features of activated effector/memory T cells such as up-regulation of CD25 and MHC-II as well as down-regulation of CD62L (L-selectin) were observed in CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells after stimulation. Canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are less abundant, but more heterogeneous than porcine ones, comprising a small proportion expressing the β chain of CD8 in addition to the CD8α chain, like human CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. In summary, this analysis provides the basis for functional characterisation of the in vivo relevance of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells in T-cell mediated immunity. PMID:22789871

  16. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    PubMed

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately. PMID:25707551

  17. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; García-Mendoza, Humberto; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A.; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD). Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP) and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4) were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue. PMID:24163822

  18. Effect of the plasmid-DNA vaccination on macroscopic and microscopic damage caused by the experimental chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; García-Mendoza, Humberto; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Vallejo, Maite; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD). Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP) and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4) were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue. PMID:24163822

  19. Applications of pox virus vectors to vaccination: an update.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E

    1996-10-15

    Recombinant pox viruses have been generated for vaccination against heterologous pathogens. Amongst these, the following are notable examples. (i) The engineering of the Copenhagen strain of vaccinia virus to express the rabies virus glycoprotein. When applied in baits, this recombinant has been shown to vaccinate the red fox in Europe and raccoons in the United States, stemming the spread of rabies virus infection in the wild. (ii) A fowlpox-based recombinant expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion and hemagglutinin glycoproteins has been shown to protect commercial broiler chickens for their lifetime when the vaccine was administered at 1 day of age, even in the presence of maternal immunity against either the Newcastle disease virus or the pox vector. (iii) Recombinants of canarypox virus, which is restricted for replication to avian species, have provided protection against rabies virus challenge in cats and dogs, against canine distemper virus, feline leukemia virus, and equine influenza virus disease. In humans, canarypox virus-based recombinants expressing antigens from rabies virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and HIV have been shown to be safe and immunogenic. (iv) A highly attenuated vaccinia derivative, NYVAC, has been engineered to express antigens from both animal and human pathogens. Safety and immunogenicity of NYVAC-based recombinants expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, a polyprotein from Japanese encephalitis virus, and seven antigens from Plasmodium falciparum have been demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic in early human vaccine studies. PMID:8876138

  20. Evaluation of Immunity and Seropositivity of IgG Antibodies to Canine Parvoviruses in Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Dogs in Abeokuta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, E T; Ijaopo, O K; Okonko, I O

    2016-01-01

    Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is a very contagious and virulent viral disease affecting domestic dogs all over the world causing high morbidity and mortality in dogs, especially puppies. This study aimed at determining the seropositivity of IgG antibodies against CPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated dogs and to evaluate the immune status of dogs presented in Abeokuta. Forty-eight dogs were enrolled in this study. These dogs were presented at random for treatment, routine checkup, and vaccination at the State Veterinary Hospital and Veterinary Teaching Hospital all in Abeokuta. All the dogs were fully maintained under domestic setting. Selection for study was done based on thorough examination of the dogs and their medical records. The clients were informed of the nature of the investigation. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for anti-CPV-IgG. In principle, protective immunity correlates with high antibody titers and this was determined using a commercially available immunocomb® test kit for anti-CPV IgG antibody. Of 48 dogs sampled, 38 (79.2%) had high level of anti-CPV antibody titer and 10 (20.8%) had low level of anti-CPV antibody titer. Twenty six (54.2%) were males while 22 (45.8%) were females. Forty-five (93.75%) dogs were exotic breeds while 3 (6.25%) dogs were mongrels. Thirty (62.5%) of the dogs were less than one year old and the age range of all dogs sampled was between 7 weeks and 7 years. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between sex and the level of immunity but significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed between ages of dogs, breeds, post-vaccination period, and the level of immunity. In conclusion, this study has further confirmed the presence of IgG antibodies against canine parvovirus among dogs in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Of all variables evaluated, ages of dogs, breeds and post-vaccination period were the main correlates of the level of immunity to CPV. This study also showed agreement with previous studies in the diagnostic value

  1. Immunogenicity in dogs of three recombinant antigens (TSA, LeIF and LmSTI1) potential vaccine candidates for canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Vale, André Macedo; França da Silva, João Carlos; da Costa, Roberto Teodoro; Quetz, Josiane da Silva; Martins Filho, Olindo Assis; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Corrêa Oliveira, Rodrigo; Machado-Coelho, George Lins; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Bethony, Jeffrey Michael; Frank, Glen; Nascimento, Evaldo; Genaro, Odair; Mayrink, Wilson; Reed, Steven; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Control of canine visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains a difficult and serious problem mostly because there is no reliable and effective vaccine available to prevent this disease. A mixture of three recombinant leishmanial antigens (TSA, LeIF and LmSTI1) encoded by three genes highly conserved in the Leishmania genus have been shown to induce excellent protection against infection in both murine and simian models of cutaneous leishmaniasis. A human clinical trial with these antigens is currently underway. Because of the high degree of conservation, these antigens might be useful vaccine candidates for VL as well. In the present study, using the dog model of the visceral disease, we evaluated the immunogenicity of these three antigens formulated with two different adjuvants, MPL-SE and AdjuPrime. The results were compared with a whole parasite vaccine formulated with BCG as the adjuvant. In order to investigate if sensitization with the recombinant antigens would result in recognition of the corresponding native parasite antigens upon infection, the animals were exposed for four weeks after the termination of the immunization protocol with the recombinant antigens to a low number of L. chagasi promastigotes, an etiological agent of VL. Immune response was evaluated by quantitative ELISA in the animal sera before and after exposure to the viable parasites. Both antigen specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels were measured. Immunization of dogs with the recombinant antigens formulated in either MPL-SE or AdjuPrime resulted in high antibody levels particularly to LmSTI1. In addition, this immunization although to low levels, resulted in the development of antibody response to the whole parasite lysate. Importantly, experimental exposure with low numbers of culture forms of L. chagasi promastigotes caused a clear boost in the immune response to both the recombinant antigens and the corresponding native molecules. The boost response was predominantly of the IgG2 isotype in

  2. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  3. Totally synthetic peptide-based immunocontraceptive vaccines show activity in dogs of different breeds.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Ghosh, Souravi; Pagnon, Joanne; Colantoni, Caterina; Newbold, Andrea; Zeng, Weiguang; Jackson, David C

    2007-10-10

    In this study we examine the immunogenicity of totally synthetic peptide-based immunocontraceptive vaccines in dogs. Seven individual epitope-based vaccines were assembled in which a different T helper (T(H)) cell epitope derived from the sequence of F protein of canine distemper virus was synthesized in tandem with a peptide representing luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH). Each of the individual T(H)-LHRH peptide vaccines was inoculated subcutaneously into dogs. The results demonstrate that five of the seven peptide vaccines were able to elicit strong anti-LHRH antibody responses in beagle foxhounds accompanied by a concomitant suppression in the levels of the hormones testosterone and progesterone in the majority of the animals. A pool of these five peptides was then used to inoculate five different breeds of dogs. All animals responded with high levels of anti-LHRH antibody. An investigation of the proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from inoculated dogs showed that the majority of breeds responded to each of the individual T helper cell epitope tested. The results provide a strategy for development of an immunocontraceptive vaccine for use in multiple breeds of dogs. PMID:17825958

  4. Étude comparative de l’innocuité de deux vaccins commerciaux contre la babésiose canine provoquée par Babesia canis

    PubMed Central

    Freyburger, L.; Lemaitre, L.; Médaille, C.; Oberli, F.; Fanchon, L.; Bergamo, P.

    2011-01-01

    L’innocuité de deux vaccins commercialisés en France contre la babésiose canine – Nobivac Piro® (NP) et Pirodog® (P) – a été étudiée. Leur impact local, général et biochimique a été comparé, en conditions expérimentales maîtrisées, sur un groupe témoin (T) et deux groupes vaccinés deux fois à 21 jours d’intervalle. Tous les chiens ont présenté une réaction locale modérée. Cependant, le groupe NP a présenté une réaction locale significativement plus intense que le groupe P. Ceci est objectivé par les paramètres cliniques et biologiques. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n’est mise en évidence entre les évolutions des groupes P et T. PMID:22091461

  5. Evaluation of an immunochemotherapeutic protocol constituted of N-methyl meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) and the recombinant Leish-110f + MPL-SE vaccine to treat canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Miret, Jorge; Nascimento, Evaldo; Sampaio, Weverton; França, João Carlos; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Vale, André; Dias, Edelberto Santos; Vieira, Edvá; da Costa, Roberto Teodoro; Mayrink, Wilson; Campos Neto, Antonio; Reed, Steven

    2008-03-17

    The evaluation of the efficacy of an immunochemotherapy protocol to treat symptomatic dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi was studied. This clinical trial had the purpose to test the combination of N-methyl meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime and the second generation recombinant vaccine Leish-110f plus the adjuvant MPL-SE to treat the canine leishmaniasis (CanL). Thirty symptomatic naturally infected mongrel dogs were divided into five groups. Animals received standard treatment with Glucantime or treatment with Glucantime Leish-110f + MPL-SEas immunochemotherapy protocol. Additional groups received Leish-110f + MPL-SE only, MPL-SE only, or placebo. Evaluation of haematological, biochemical (renal and hepatic function) and plasmatic proteins, immunological (humoral and cellular immune response) and the parasitological test revealed improvement of the clinical parameters and parasitological cure in dogs in both chemotherapy alone and immunochemotherapy cohorts. However, the immunotherapy and immunochemotherapy cohorts had reduced number of deaths, higher survival probability, and specific cellular reactivity to leishmanial antigens, in comparison with chemotherapy cohort only and control groups (adjuvant alone and placebo). These results support the notion of using well-characterized recombinant vaccine as an adjunct to improve the current chemotherapy of CanL. PMID:18328956

  6. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-11-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:7474152

  7. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer. PMID:12909408

  8. Assessing demographic and epidemiologic parameters of rural dog populations in India during mass vaccination campaigns.

    PubMed

    Belsare, Aniruddha V; Gompper, Matthew E

    2013-08-01

    Mass vaccination of dogs is a mainstay for efforts to control rabies and other viral pathogens. The success of such programs is a function of the ability to vaccinate sufficient proportions of animals to develop herd immunity. However, fully assessing success in reaching target vaccination-levels and in understanding the outcome of mass vaccination efforts is hindered if insufficient information is available on the demographics of dog populations and the prevalence of the targeted pathogens. While such information can sometimes be gained from questionnaire surveys, greater precision requires direct assessment of the dog populations. Here we show how such information can be gained from surveys of dogs conducted in association with mass-vaccination programs. We conducted surveys of dogs in six villages in rural Maharashtra, India, between February and July 2011 as part of an effort to reduce the risk of human rabies and virus transmission from dogs to wildlife. Mass vaccination efforts were conducted in each village, and paired with blood sample collection and photographic mark-recapture approaches to gain epidemiologic and demographic data. This data in turn facilitated estimates of dog abundance, population density and structure, vaccination coverage, and seroprevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and canine distemper virus (CDV). The median dog population size for the six villages was 134 (range 90-188), the median dog population density was 719 dogs per km(2) (range 526-969), and the median human:dog ratio for these six villages was 34 (range 30-47). The median household:dog ratio for the six villages was 6 (range 5-8). Following vaccination efforts, the median vaccination coverage achieved was 34% (range 24-42%). The dog populations consisted mostly of adult dogs (67-86%) and the median sex ratio for the study area was male biased (1.55 males per female; range 0.9-2.5). The seroprevalence of antibodies against CAV, CPV

  9. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  10. Efficacy of canine influenza virus (H3N8) vaccine to decrease severity of clinical disease after co-challenge with canine influenza virus and Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since first emerging into the North American canine population in 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) subtype H3N8 has shown horizontal transmission among dogs, with a high level of adaptation to this species. Severity of disease is variable, and co-infection by other respiratory pathogens is an impo...

  11. Are licensed canine parvovirus (CPV2 and CPV2b) vaccines able to elicit protection against CPV2c subtype in puppies?: A systematic review of controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Blanco, Beatriz; Catala-López, Ferrán

    2015-10-22

    Severe gastroenteritis caused by canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2) is a serious life-threatening disease in puppies less than 4-months of age. The emergence of new variants has provoked some concern about the cross-protection elicited by licensed canine parvovirus modified-live type 2 (CPV2) and type 2b (CPV2b) vaccines against the most recent subtype CPV2c. A systematic review was carried out to assess the efficacy of commercial vaccines. We conducted a literature search of Pub Med/MEDLINE from January 1990 to May 2014. This was supplemented by hand-searching of related citations and searches in Google/Google Scholar. Controlled clinical trials in which vaccinated puppies were challenged with CPV2c virus were evaluated. Reporting of outcome measures and results for vaccine efficacy were critically appraised through a variety of clinical signs, serological tests, virus shedding and the ability to overcome maternally derived antibodies (MDA) titres. Six controlled clinical trials were included in the review. In most cases, the results of the selected studies reported benefits in terms of clinical signs, serological tests and virus shedding. However, MDA interference was not considered or evaluated in 5 of the selected trials. No accurate definitions of baseline healthy status and/or clinical outcomes were provided. Methods of randomization, allocation concealment and blinding were usually poorly reported. As a result of the limited number of included studies matching the inclusion criteria, the small sample sizes, short follow-up and the methodological limitations observed, it was not possible to reach a final conclusion regarding the cross-protection of licensed CPV2 and CPV2b vaccines against the subtype 2c in puppies. Further and specifically designed trials are required in order to elucidate whether cross-protection is acquired from licensed CPV vaccines. PMID:26249827

  12. Canine kobuvirus infections in Korean dogs.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2014-10-01

    To investigate canine kobuvirus (CaKoV) infection, fecal samples (n = 59) were collected from dogs with or without diarrhea (n = 21 and 38, respectively) in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2012. CaKoV infection was detected in four diarrheic samples (19.0 %) and five non-diarrheic samples (13.2 %). All CaKoV-positive dogs with diarrhea were found to be infected in mixed infections with canine distemper virus and canine parvovirus or canine adenovirus. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of CaKoV in dogs with and without diarrhea. By phylogenetic analysis based on partial 3D genes and complete genome sequences, the Korean isolates were found to be closely related to each other regardless of whether they were associated with diarrhea, and to the canine kobuviruses identified in the USA and UK. This study supports the conclusion that CaKoVs from different countries are not restricted geographically and belong to a single lineage. PMID:24906525

  13. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and interferon-β plus suicide gene as combined therapy for spontaneous canine sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Villaverde, Marcela S; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2011-10-01

    Eleven soft tissue- and five osteosarcoma canine patients were subjected to: (i) periodic subcutaneous injection of irradiated xenogeneic cells secreting hGM-CSF and hIL-2 mixed with allogeneic or autologous tumor homogenates; and (ii) injections of cIFN-β and HSVtk-carrying lipoplexes and ganciclovir, marginal (after surgery) and/or intratumoral (in the case of partial tumor resection, local relapse or small surface tumors). This treatment alone (4 patients) or as surgery adjuvant (12 patients), was safe and well tolerated. In those patients presenting local disease (6/11), the suicide gene plus cIFN-β treatment induced local antitumor activity evidenced by the objective responses (3 complete, 2 partial) and stable diseases (2). In addition, the treatment prevented or delayed local relapse, regional metastases (lymph nodes developed only in 3/16) and distant metastases (0/16), suggesting a strong systemic antitumor immunity. The most encouraging result was the long survival times of 10 patients (>1 year, with good quality of life). PMID:21300385

  14. Magnetic protein microbead-aided indirect fluoroimmunoassay for the determination of canine virus specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Ren, Li; Tu, Qin; Wang, Jianchun; Zhang, Yanrong; Li, Manlin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinyi

    2011-03-15

    Rabies, canine distemper, and canine parvovirus are common contagious viral diseases of dogs and many other carnivores, and pose a severe threat to the population dynamics of wild carnivores, as well as endangering carnivore conservation. However, clinical diagnosis of these diseases, especially canine distemper and canine parvovirus, is difficult because of the broad spectrum of symptoms that may be confused with other respiratory and enteric diseases of dogs. The most frequently used and proven techniques for diagnosing viral diseases include the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT), mouse neutralisation test (MNT), and fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. However, these methods still have some inherent limitations. In this study, a magnetic protein microbead-aided indirect fluoroimmunoassay was developed to detect canine virus specific antibodies, human rabies immunoglobulin, CDV McAbs, and CPV McAbs. In this assay, an avidin-biotin system was employed to combine magnetic microbeads and virus antigens (rabies virus, canine distemper virus, and canine parvovirus). Quantification of the targeted virus antibodies was analyzed through indirect fluoroimmunoassay using the specific antigen-antibody reaction, as well as their corresponding FITC-labeled detection antibodies (mouse anti-human IgG/FITC conjugate or rabbit anti-dog IgG/FITC conjugate). The results indicated that the fluorescence intensity increased when a higher concentration of the targeted analyte was used, but the control had almost no fluorescence, much like the conventional ELISA. For human rabies immunoglobulin, CDV McAbs, and CPV McAbs, the minimum detectable concentrations were 0.2 IU/mL, 0.3 ng/mL, and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. All of these results indicate that this assay can be employed to determine the presence of canine virus specific antibodies. In addition, the method devised here can be utilized as a general

  15. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  16. Cytokine-enhanced vaccine and suicide gene therapy as surgery adjuvant treatments for spontaneous canine melanoma: 9 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, L M E; Glikin, G C

    2012-12-01

    We present here the updated results after 9 years of the beginning of a trial on canine patients with malignant melanoma. This surgery adjuvant approach combined local suicide gene therapy with a subcutaneous vaccine composed by tumor cells extracts and xenogeneic cells producing human interleukin-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Toxicity was absent or minimal in all patients (0≤VCOG-CTCAE grade≤1). With respect to surgery-treated controls (ST), the complete surgery (CS) arm of this combined treatment (CT) significantly increased the fraction of local disease-free patients from 13 to 81% and distant metastases free from 32 to 84%. Even though less effective than the CS arm, the partial surgery (PS) arm of this CT was significantly better controlling the disease than only surgery (14% while PS-ST: 0%, P<0.01 and CS-ST: 5%, P<0.05). In addition, CT produced a significant sevenfold (CS) and threefold (PS) increase in overall survival. The CS-CT arm significantly improved both CS-ST metastasis-free- and melanoma overall survival from 99 days (respective ranges: 11-563 and 10-568) to >2848 days (81-2848 and 35-2848). Thus, more of 50% of our CT patients died of melanoma unrelated causes, transforming a lethal disease into a chronic one. Finally, surgery adjuvant CT delayed or prevented post-surgical recurrence and distant metastasis, significantly improved disease-free and overall survival maintaining the quality of life. Long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment are supported by the high number of CT patients (283) and extensive follow-up (>9 years). The successful clinical outcome encourages the further translation of similar approaches to human gene therapy trials. PMID:23059870

  17. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  18. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future. PMID:22216938

  19. Canine dysautonomia in a litter of Havanese puppies.

    PubMed

    Hull, Noah C; O'Toole, Donal; Miller, Myrna M; Shoults, Hannah; Deck, Robin; Jones, Warren; Johnson, Gayle C; Shaw, Daniel P; Schumaker, Brant A

    2015-09-01

    Canine dysautonomia is a sporadic, generally fatal disease that rarely affects groups of related animals. Four 10-week-old Havanese puppies from a litter of 5 developed clinical signs of canine dysautonomia. The 4 affected dogs were exposed to an outdoor environment, whereas the fifth littermate was not exposed to the outdoors and remained clinically healthy. Clinical signs of dysautonomia developed 10-16 days after going outside the house. An unrelated dog also developed dysautonomia after exposure to 1 of the affected Havanese littermates. All 5 dogs had morphological changes consistent with dysautonomia (widespread neuronal degeneration in autonomic ganglia, select brainstem nuclei, and ventral horn motor neurons). Differential diagnoses were excluded through negative toxicological evaluation, fecal parasite screening, negative Canine distemper virus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, fluorescent antibody testing, attempted virus isolation, and electron microscopy. The 5 affected dogs were in the Kansas City, Missouri area, where there is a high incidence of dysautonomia. PMID:26179098

  20. Vaccination with an Attenuated Mutant of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Induces Pathogen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection from Tick-Transmitted Wild-Type Challenge in the Canine Host

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Jodi L.; Nair, Arathy D. S.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rusk, Rachel A.; Jaworski, Deborah C.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen and the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Transmitted by the Amblyomma americanum tick, E. chaffeensis also causes disease in several other vertebrate species including white-tailed deer and dogs. We have recently described the generation of an attenuated mutant strain of E. chaffeensis, with a mutation in the Ech_0660 gene, which is able to confer protection from secondary, intravenous-administered, wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in dogs. Here, we extend our previous results, demonstrating that vaccination with the Ech_0660 mutant protects dogs from physiologic, tick-transmitted, secondary challenge with wild-type E. chaffeensis; and describing, for the first time, the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by Ech_0660 mutant vaccination and wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in the canine host. Both vaccination and infection induced a rise in E. chaffeensis-specific antibody titers and a significant Th1 response in peripheral blood as measured by E. chaffeensis antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production. Further, we describe for the first time significant IL-17 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from both Ech_0660 mutant vaccinated animals and control animals infected with wild-type E. chaffeensis, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and Th17 cells in the immune response to rickettsial pathogens. Our results are a critical first step towards defining the role of the immune system in vaccine-induced protection from E. chaffeensis infection in an incidental host; and confirm the potential of the attenuated mutant clone, Ech_0660, to be used as a vaccine candidate for protection against tick-transmitted E. chaffeensis infection. PMID:26841025

  1. Phocine Distemper Virus: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Duignan, Pádraig J.; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Baker, Jason D.; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M.; De Guise, Sylvain; de Swart, Rik L.; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Duprex, W. Paul; Early, Greg; Fauquier, Deborah; Goldstein, Tracey; Goodman, Simon J.; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R.; Gulland, Frances; Hall, Ailsa; Jensen, Brenda A.; Lamy, Karina; Matassa, Keith; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E.; Nielsen, Ole; Rotstein, David; Rowles, Teresa K.; Saliki, Jeremy T.; Siebert, Ursula; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2014-01-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) was first recognized in 1988 following a massive epidemic in harbor and grey seals in north-western Europe. Since then, the epidemiology of infection in North Atlantic and Arctic pinnipeds has been investigated. In the western North Atlantic endemic infection in harp and grey seals predates the European epidemic, with relatively small, localized mortality events occurring primarily in harbor seals. By contrast, PDV seems not to have become established in European harbor seals following the 1988 epidemic and a second event of similar magnitude and extent occurred in 2002. PDV is a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus with minor sequence variation between outbreaks over time. There is now mounting evidence of PDV-like viruses in the North Pacific/Western Arctic with serological and molecular evidence of infection in pinnipeds and sea otters. However, despite the absence of associated mortality in the region, there is concern that the virus may infect the large Pacific harbor seal and northern elephant seal populations or the endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on PDV with particular focus on developments in diagnostics, pathogenesis, immune response, vaccine development, phylogenetics and modeling over the past 20 years. PMID:25533658

  2. Phocine distemper virus: current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Pádraig J; Van Bressem, Marie-Françoise; Baker, Jason D; Barbieri, Michelle; Colegrove, Kathleen M; De Guise, Sylvain; de Swart, Rik L; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dobson, Andrew; Duprex, W Paul; Early, Greg; Fauquier, Deborah; Goldstein, Tracey; Goodman, Simon J; Grenfell, Bryan; Groch, Kátia R; Gulland, Frances; Hall, Ailsa; Jensen, Brenda A; Lamy, Karina; Matassa, Keith; Mazzariol, Sandro; Morris, Sinead E; Nielsen, Ole; Rotstein, David; Rowles, Teresa K; Saliki, Jeremy T; Siebert, Ursula; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2014-12-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) was first recognized in 1988 following a massive epidemic in harbor and grey seals in north-western Europe. Since then, the epidemiology of infection in North Atlantic and Arctic pinnipeds has been investigated. In the western North Atlantic endemic infection in harp and grey seals predates the European epidemic, with relatively small, localized mortality events occurring primarily in harbor seals. By contrast, PDV seems not to have become established in European harbor seals following the 1988 epidemic and a second event of similar magnitude and extent occurred in 2002. PDV is a distinct species within the Morbillivirus genus with minor sequence variation between outbreaks over time. There is now mounting evidence of PDV-like viruses in the North Pacific/Western Arctic with serological and molecular evidence of infection in pinnipeds and sea otters. However, despite the absence of associated mortality in the region, there is concern that the virus may infect the large Pacific harbor seal and northern elephant seal populations or the endangered Hawaiian monk seals. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on PDV with particular focus on developments in diagnostics, pathogenesis, immune response, vaccine development, phylogenetics and modeling over the past 20 years. PMID:25533658

  3. Immunohistochemical evaluation of mx protein expression in canine encephalitides.

    PubMed

    Porter, B F; Ambrus, A; Storts, R W

    2006-11-01

    Mx proteins are a group of interferon-induced GTPases whose expression has been demonstrated in a number of human viral infections and in some idiopathic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the expression of Mx protein was evaluated in known viral, nonviral, and idiopathic encephalitides in the dog via immunohistochemistry using an antibody against human MxA. All 12 cases of confirmed viral encephalitis, including 7 cases of canine distemper, 4 cases of canine herpesvirus, and 1 case of rabies, were Mx positive. In canine distemper cases, staining was particularly strong and a variety of cell types were positive, including astrocytes, macrophages/microglia, and neurons. Immunoreactivity for Mx protein was evident in a few cases of nonviral infectious encephalitis, including neosporosis (1/1), Chagas disease (2/3), aspergillosis (1/2), and encephalitozoonosis (1/1). Consistent staining was observed in most cases of idiopathic encephalitis, including granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (7/7), necrotizing meningoencephalitis of pug dogs (6/7), and necrotizing encephalitis of the Yorkshire Terrier (3/3) and Maltese (1/1) breeds. Mx staining was negative in 5 normal dog brains; 3 cases of cryptococcosis; and single cases of blastomycosis, protothecosis, and bacterial meningitis. PMID:17099155

  4. Phocine distemper virus (PDV) seroprevalence as predictor for future outbreaks in harbour seals.

    PubMed

    Ludes-Wehrmeister, Eva; Dupke, Claudia; Harder, Timm C; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Haas, Ludwig; Teilmann, Jonas; Dietz, Rune; Jensen, Lasse F; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-02-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) infections caused the two most pronounced mass mortalities in marine mammals documented in the past century. During the two outbreaks, 23,000 and 30,000 harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), died in 1988/1989 and 2002 across populations in the Wadden Sea and adjacent waters, respectively. To follow the mechanism and development of disease spreading, the dynamics of Morbillivirus-specific antibodies in harbour seal populations in German and Danish waters were examined. 522 serum samples of free-ranging harbour seals of different ages were sampled between 1990 and 2014. By standard neutralisation assays, Morbillivirus-specific antibodies were detected, using either the PDV isolate 2558/Han 88 or the related canine distemper virus (CDV) strain Onderstepoort. A total of 159 (30.5%) of the harbour seals were seropositive. Annual seroprevalence rates showed an undulating course: Peaks were seen in the post-epidemic years 1990/1991 and 2002/2003. Following each PDV outbreak, seroprevalence decreased and six to eight years after the epidemics samples were tested seronegative, indicating that the populations are now again susceptible to new PDV outbreak. After the last outbreak in 2002, the populations grew steadily to an estimated maximum (since 1975) of about 39,100 individuals in the Wadden Sea in 2014 and about 23,540 harbour seals in the Kattegat area in 2013. A re-appearence of PDV would presumably result in another epizootic with high mortality rates as encountered in the previous outbreaks. The current high population density renders harbour seals vulnerable to rapid spread of infectious agents including PDV and the recently detected influenza A virus. PMID:26790934

  5. Canine Parvovirus

    MedlinePlus

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  6. Protective vaccination against experimental canine visceral leishmaniasis using a combination of DNA and protein immunization with cysteine proteinases type I and II of L. infantum.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Sima; Nakhaee, Alireza; Taheri, Tahere; Taslimi, Yasaman; Darabi, Haideh; Eravani, Davood; Sanos, Stephanie; Kaye, Paul; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Jamshidi, Shahram; Rad, Mohammad Ali

    2005-05-25

    Leishmania infantum is known to be associated with visceral leishmaniasis in Iran and canids are natural reservoirs. Control of disease in dogs appears to be one of the most effective approaches for interrupting the domestic cycle of the disease. In search for successful vaccine strategies, we evaluated the cysteine proteinases (CPs) type I and II using a heterologous prime-boost regime for vaccination against experimental visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Following vaccination and challenge, dogs were followed for 12 months. Ten dogs vaccinated by prime/boost with DNA/recombinant CPs (in combination with CpG ODN and Montanide 720) remained free of infection in their bone morrow. In contrast, three out of four dogs in the control groups had infection in their bone marrow. The peripheral lymphocytes from protected animals had generally higher proliferation responses to F/T antigen, recombinant CPA (rCPA) and recombinant CPB (rCPB) than controls. During post-challenge period, the difference in stimulation index is significant (p<0.05) on months 11 and 12 to F/T antigens, all months for rCPA and 5, 7, 9, 11 and 12 months for rCPB. Analysis of cytokine mRNA level suggested that vaccinated dogs had elevated IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas there was a consistent increase in the level of IL-10 in the control groups and some vaccinated dogs. The level of total IgG and IgG2, but not IgG1, to rCPA and rCPB was significantly higher in the vaccinated group (p<0.05) than the control groups. We also showed that with the exception of one dog, all dogs in the vaccinated group in comparison to control dogs had strong DTH responses. We propose that the combination of DNA and recombinant protein vaccination using CPs could be instrumental to control (VL) in dogs. PMID:15882533

  7. Vaccination with the ospA- and ospB-Negative Borrelia burgdorferi Strain 50772 Provides Significant Protection against Canine Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, Rhonda L.; Dant, Jennifer C.; Wasmoen, Terri L.; Jobe, Dean A.; Lovrich, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Beagles received placebo or ospA- and ospB-negative Borrelia burgdorferi before a tick challenge. A total of 28 (41%) ticks and skin biopsy specimens from each control dog (n = 10) contained B. burgdorferi. In contrast, 12 (19%) ticks recovered from the vaccine recipients (n = 10) were infected (P = 0.0077), and 5 dogs yielded spirochetes from the skin biopsy specimens (P = 0.0325). In addition, 9 (90%) placebo recipients and 4 (40%) vaccine recipients developed joint abnormalities (P = 0.0573). Therefore, vaccination with the ospA- and ospB-negative spirochete provided significant protection against Lyme disease. PMID:25972405

  8. Evaluation of Trapper-Collected Nobuto Filter-Paper Blood Samples for Distemper and Parvovirus Antibody Detection in Coyotes (Canis latrans) and Raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Kamps, Amanda J; Dubay, Shelli A; Langenberg, Julie; Maes, Roger K

    2015-07-01

    Blood samples are often collected from free-ranging wildlife for antibody detection. However, filter-paper (FP) strips are more cost efficient and easy to collect and store. We evaluated trapper-collected FP strips and body-cavity blood for canine distemper (CDV) and parvovirus (CPV-2) antibody detection in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans). From 2008 to 2010, licensed trappers near Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US collected paired samples from harvested animals. Canine distemper antibodies were detected using virus neutralization and parvovirus antibodies were detected using hemagglutination inhibition. Titers ≥ 1:32 for CDV and ≥ 1:25 for CPV-2 were considered evidence of exposure. Using Cohen's kappa test of agreement, FP strip titers agreed with sera for CDV in coyotes (n = 28, K = 0.772) and raccoons (n = 29, K = 0.858) and for CPV-2 in coyotes (n = 40, K = 0.775) and raccoons (n = 70, K = 0.646). However, raccoons determined to be exposed to CPV-2 from sera were unexposed by FP strips in 35% of the samples. Titer results may be affected by quality and volume of blood samples, interval between collection and processing, small sample sizes, and diagnostic testing procedures. Filter-paper strips can be useful for detecting CDV and CPV-2 exposure in coyotes and raccoons with correct field sample collection and appropriate diagnostic testing procedures. PMID:25973631

  9. Victory and Defeat in the Induction of a Therapeutic Response through Vaccine Therapy for Human and Canine Brain Tumors: A Review of the State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Olin, Michael R.; Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Andersen, Brian M.; Shaver, Rob; Waldron, Nate N.; Moertel, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor immunotherapy using tumor lysate–based vaccines has made great advances over recent decades. Cancer vaccines aim to elicit adaptive immune responses through various pathways by providing tumor and tumor-associated antigens with an immune stimulant or adjuvant. These anti-tumor vaccines are therefore developed as personalized treatments. Utilizing tumors as a source of vaccine antigens in immunotherapy has demonstrated promising results with minimal toxicity. However, to date, researchers have failed to overcome the overpowering immune suppressive effects within the tumor microenvironment. Immune suppression occurs naturally via multiple mechanisms. These mechanisms serve an important homeostatic role restoring a normal tissue microenvironment following an inflammatory response. Due to these suppressive mechanisms and the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, it is imperative to then elicit and maintain a specific tumoricidal response if vaccine therapy or some other combination of reagents is chosen. In this review, we focus on the historical use of tumors as a source of antigens to elicit a tumoricidal response and the limitations encountered that prevent greater success in immunotherapy. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of various vaccines and their ineffectiveness due to tumor-induced immune suppression. PMID:25404047

  10. Canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Sapierzyński, R

    2008-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) is an infectious disease of zoonotic potential, caused by protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania. Common clinical manifestations of canine visceral leishmaniosis include decrease of appetite, progressive weight loss, exercise intolerance, peripheral lymph node and spleen enlargement, chronic renal and liver disease, muscle, atrophy, polyarthritis and others. Because the Polish literature in the field contains no information on leishmaniosis in animals the recognised case of this disease is presented. Homeless mongrel, intact female dog, 3 years of age was brought to a veterinary clinic because of apathy, and generalised dermatologic lesions to perform routine examination. Because therapeutic effect of primarily recognised scabies was unsatisfactory, the skin samples from ear margins, trunk and lesion of the area of the left gluteal region for histopatologic examination were taken. Due to suspicion of leishmaniosis, fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes, skin lesions, ocular discharge and imprint samples from skin lesion were performed, and tissue collected were examined under optical microscopy for identification of Leishmania amastigotes. To confirm cytologic diagnosis, blood samples for serological tests (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay-ELISA; indirect immunofluorescence assay test-IFAT) were taken. Based on physical examination, histopatology, cytopathology and serology, canine visceral leishmaniosis was finally diagnosed. PMID:18683546

  11. Distemper in raccoons and foxes suspected of having rabies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Habermann, R.T.; Herman, C.M.; Williams, F.P., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    1) Twenty-one raccoons and 3 red foxes were collected from areas where suspected rabies occurred. All were found to be nonrabid. 2) Distemper was diagnosed in 14 of the 21 raccoons by demonstrating intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions in the brain and visceral tissues. Two of the 3 foxes were considered to have distemper; the clinical signs were typical and mouse inoculation tests were negative for rabies. 3) Deaths of the other 7 raccoons were attributed to: leishmaniasis 1, gastritis 1, bronchopneumonia 1, parasitism 2, car injury 1; 1 showed no significant lesions. The death of 1 fox was attributed to parasitism. 4) Distemper may be a frequent cause of death in raccoons and foxes, in epizootics which simulate rabies.

  12. Comparison of lipopeptide-based immunocontraceptive vaccines containing different lipid groups.

    PubMed

    Chua, Brendon Y; Zeng, Weiguang; Lau, Yuk Fai; Jackson, David C

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that incorporating the lipid moiety dipalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteine (Pam2Cys) into peptide structures effectively adjuvants otherwise weak immunogens. In this study lipopeptides based on luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) as a B cell epitope, [B], were synthesised in tandem with a 17-residue T-helper epitope, [T], derived from the fusion protein of the morbillivirus canine distemper virus. In this way vaccine candidates with the structure [T]-[B] were produced. These peptides were then lipidated with different diacylated moieties. The acyl moieties used were: palmitic acid (C16) to give Pam2Cys, stearic acid (C18) to give Ste2Cys, lauric acid (C12) to give Lau2Cys and octanoic acid (C8) to give Oct2Cys. We compared the immunogenicities of these simple lipopeptides in BALB/c mice by measuring their ability to induce anti-LHRH antibodies and found that immunogenicity was dependent on the length of the alkane chains of the incorporated lipid moieties with the hierarchy C16=C18>C12>C8. The antibody levels elicited by the lipopeptides also correlated with their ability to inhibit the reproductive capability of female mice in fertility trials. Furthermore, the C16 lipopeptide was the most effective in activating dendritic cells, measured by up regulation of surface MHC Class II molecules, and also in activating NF-kappaB in a Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. PMID:17055123

  13. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES FOR SELECTED CANINE PATHOGENS AMONG WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) FROM THE ALASKA PENINSULA, USA.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dominique E; Benson, Anna-Marie

    2016-07-01

    We collected blood samples from wolves ( Canis lupus ) on the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, US, 2006-11 and tested sera for antibodies to canine adenovirus (CAV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine herpesvirus (CHV), canine parainfluenza (CPI), canine parvovirus (CPV), Neospora caninum , and Toxoplasma gondii . Detected antibody prevalence was 90% for CAV, 28% for CCV, 12% for CDV, 93% for CHV, 0% for CPI, 20% for CPV, 0% for N. caninum, and 86% for T. gondii . Prevalence of CCV antibodies suggested a seasonal pattern with higher prevalence during spring (43%) than in fall (11%). Prevalence of CCV antibodies also declined during the 6-yr study with high prevalence during spring 2006-08 (80%, n=24) and low prevalence during spring 2009-11 (4%, n=24). Prevalence of N. caninum and T. gondii antibodies were highly variable in the study area during 2006-11. Results suggested that some pathogens might be enzootic on the Alaska Peninsula (e.g., CAV and CHV) while others may be epizootic (e.g., CCV, N. caninum , T. gondii ). PMID:27195683

  15. Patterns of Exposure of Iberian Wolves (Canis lupus) to Canine Viruses in Human-Dominated Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; López-Bao, José Vicente; García, Emilio J; Oleaga, Álvaro; Llaneza, Luis; Palacios, Vicente; de la Torre, Ana; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Dubovi, Edward J; Esperón, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Wildlife inhabiting human-dominated landscapes is at risk of pathogen spill-over from domestic species. With the aim of gaining knowledge in the dynamics of viral infections in Iberian wolves (Canis lupus) living in anthropized landscapes of northern Spain, we analysed between 2010 and 2013 the samples of 54 wolves by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for exposure to four pathogenic canine viruses: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus-2 (CPV), canine adenovirus 1 and 2 (CAV-1 and CAV-2) and canine herpesvirus. Overall, 76% of the studied wolves presented evidence of exposure to CPV (96% by HI, 66% by PCR) and 75% to CAV (75% by virus neutralization (VN), 76% by PCR, of which 70% CAV-1 and 6% CAV-2). This represents the first detection of CAV-2 infection in a wild carnivore. CPV/CAV-1 co-infection occurred in 51% of the wolves. The probability of wolf exposure to CPV was positively and significantly correlated with farm density in a buffer zone around the place where the wolf was found, indicating that rural dogs might be the origin of CPV infecting wolves. CPV and CAV-1 appear to be enzootic in the Iberian wolf population, which is supported by the absence of seasonal and inter-annual variations in the proportion of positive samples detected. However, while CPV may depend on periodical introductions by dogs, CAV-1 may be maintained within the wolf population. All wolves were negative for exposure to CDV (by VN and PCR) and CHV (by PCR). The absence of acquired immunity against CDV in this population may predispose it to an elevated rate of mortality in the event of a distemper spill-over via dogs. PMID:26589403

  16. Whole genome sequence analysis of recently circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented thro...

  17. Canine hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, P G; Steiner, J M

    2015-10-01

    Hyperlipidaemia refers to an increased concentration of lipids in the blood. Hyperlipidaemia is common in dogs and has recently emerged as an important clinical condition that requires a systematic diagnostic approach and appropriate treatment. Hyperlipidaemia can be either primary or secondary to other diseases. Secondary hyperlipidaemia is the most common form in dogs, and it can be a result of endocrine disorders, pancreatitis, cholestasis, protein-losing nephropathy, obesity, as well as other conditions and the use of certain drugs. Primary hyperlipidaemia is less common in the general canine population but it can be very common within certain breeds. Hypertriglyceridaemia of Miniature Schnauzers is the most common form of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs but other breeds are also affected. Possible complications of hyperlipidaemia in dogs include pancreatitis, liver disease, atherosclerosis, ocular disease and seizures. Management of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs is achieved by administration of ultra low-fat diets with or without the administration of lipid lowering drugs such as omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates, niacin and statins. PMID:26456868

  18. Preparation and Identification of a Single-chain Variable Fragment Antibody Against Canine Distemper Virus.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Shipeng

    2015-08-01

    The variable regions of the heavy chain (VH) and light chain (VL) were amplified by RT-PCR from the hybridoma 1N8, which secretes the monoclonal antibody against CDV N protein (aa 277-471). The VL and VH amplicons were combined using SOE-PCR by a 12 amino acid flexible linker (SSGGGGSGGGGS), which produced the scFv gene (named scFv/1N8). After sequence analysis, the scFv/1N8 gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector PET32a with a His-tag. The recombinant scFv/1N8 protein was successfully expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli by IPTG induction. Moreover, the binding activity and specificity of the scFv were determined by indirect ELISA (His-tag) and competitive ELISA. The recombinant scFv/1N8 protein reported here will provide some basis for further antiviral drug research based on the scFv molecule. PMID:26301925

  19. Canine distemper virus envelope protein interactions modulated by hydrophobic residues in the fusion protein globular head.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mislay; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Alves, Lisa; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-01-15

    Membrane fusion for morbillivirus cell entry relies on critical interactions between the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) envelope glycoproteins. Through extensive mutagenesis of an F cavity recently proposed to contribute to F's interaction with the H protein, we identified two neighboring hydrophobic residues responsible for severe F-to-H binding and fusion-triggering deficiencies when they were mutated in combination. Since both residues reside on one side of the F cavity, the data suggest that H binds the F globular head domain sideways. PMID:25355896

  20. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Traoré, Abdallah; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mauti, Stephanie; Biarnais, Melanie; Balmer, Oliver; Samaké, Kassim; Kamissoko, Badian; Tembely, Saïdou; Sery, Amadou; Traoré, Abdel K.; Coulibaly, Amy P.; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We genetically characterized 32 canine rabies viruses isolated in Mali during 2006–2013 and identified 3 subgroups that belonged to the Africa 2 lineage. We also detected subgroup F rabies virus. This information should be useful for development of mass vaccination campaigns for dogs and eventual large-scale control programs in this country. PMID:27089307

  1. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Traoré, Abdallah; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mauti, Stephanie; Biarnais, Melanie; Balmer, Oliver; Samaké, Kassim; Kamissoko, Badian; Tembely, Saïdou; Sery, Amadou; Traoré, Abdel K; Coulibaly, Amy P; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Zinsstag, Jakob; Cliquet, Florence

    2016-05-01

    We genetically characterized 32 canine rabies viruses isolated in Mali during 2006-2013 and identified 3 subgroups that belonged to the Africa 2 lineage. We also detected subgroup F rabies virus. This information should be useful for development of mass vaccination campaigns for dogs and eventual large-scale control programs in this country. PMID:27089307

  2. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  3. In vitro cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy dogs to distemper virus, Malassezia and Toxocara.

    PubMed

    Valli, J L; Williamson, A; Sharif, S; Rice, J; Shewen, P E

    2010-04-15

    Naïve CD4+ T cells may differentiate into a number of subsets including T helper 1 (Th1) Th2, Th3, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells depending on the type of antigen they encounter. These CD4+ families have been defined based on the array of cytokines they produce and the effects they have on adaptive immune responses. CD4+ subsets are cross regulatory and at times cooperative. The study of these adaptive immune modulators has revealed the important role that cytokines play in mounting effective as well as detrimental immune responses to pathogens. Examining the cytokine responses of lymphocytes in culture can provide important understanding of how immune responses to pathogens are orchestrated. For this purpose the in vitro cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy dogs was examined in response to stimulation with antigens from a common canine virus (canine distemper virus, CDV), a commensal skin yeast of dogs (Malassezia pachydermatis) and a common canine helminth (Toxocara canis (T. canis)). Cell culture supernatants were removed from antigen stimulated and unstimulated control PBMC after 4, 24, 48 and 72 h and the concentration of Th1 type cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha) and Th2 type cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10) was determined using sandwich ELISA assays. CDV induced low levels of cytokine production initially with a predominance of IL-10 at 24h and a balanced response at 48 h of incubation. Malassezia antigen stimulated an early type 2 cytokine response with dramatic production of IL-4 at 24h of incubation compared to the other stimulants examined. By 48 h of incubation, however, the cytokine mix in response to Malassezia had also moved toward a Th1 type response. T. canis induced early production of Th2 type cytokines with IL-5 predominating; however, with longer incubation (48-72 h) there was a switch to a balanced Th1/Th2 response. In conclusion, the cytokines produced in vitro by canine PBMC in response to

  4. Serologic survey of selected canine pathogens among free-ranging jackals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Alexander, K A; Kat, P W; Wayne, R K; Fuller, T K

    1994-10-01

    Serum samples from 76 free-ranging adult jackals of three species from four localities in Kenya were examined for circulating antibodies against four canine pathogens: rabies virus, canine parvovirus (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV), and Ehrlichia canis. Samples were collected between April 1987 and January 1988. Among black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas), the most sampled species, the mean prevalence of antibodies to CPV-2, CDV, rabies virus, and E. canis was 34% (14 positive/55 sampled), 9% (4/55), 3% (1/28), and 2% (1/36), respectively. There were no significantly differences among sampling locations. In one area, antibody prevalence of CPV-2 was significantly higher for golden jackals (C. aureus; 9/16) than for C. mesomelas (5/26). Only three side-striped jackals (C. adustus) were sampled, but antibodies to CPV-2 and CDV were present. As jackals often are the most abundant wild carnivore in African ecosystems, they could serve as an important indicator species to monitor the potential of exposure of rare and endangered canids to specific canine diseases. PMID:7760476

  5. The Feasibility of Canine Rabies Elimination in Africa: Dispelling Doubts with Data

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, Tiziana; Hampson, Katie; Kaare, Magai T.; Ernest, Eblate; Knobel, Darryn; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Haydon, Daniel T.; Cleaveland, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Background Canine rabies causes many thousands of human deaths every year in Africa, and continues to increase throughout much of the continent. Methodology/Principal Findings This paper identifies four common reasons given for the lack of effective canine rabies control in Africa: (a) a low priority given for disease control as a result of lack of awareness of the rabies burden; (b) epidemiological constraints such as uncertainties about the required levels of vaccination coverage and the possibility of sustained cycles of infection in wildlife; (c) operational constraints including accessibility of dogs for vaccination and insufficient knowledge of dog population sizes for planning of vaccination campaigns; and (d) limited resources for implementation of rabies surveillance and control. We address each of these issues in turn, presenting data from field studies and modelling approaches used in Tanzania, including burden of disease evaluations, detailed epidemiological studies, operational data from vaccination campaigns in different demographic and ecological settings, and economic analyses of the cost-effectiveness of dog vaccination for human rabies prevention. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that there are no insurmountable problems to canine rabies control in most of Africa; that elimination of canine rabies is epidemiologically and practically feasible through mass vaccination of domestic dogs; and that domestic dog vaccination provides a cost-effective approach to the prevention and elimination of human rabies deaths. PMID:20186330

  6. Current and future tools for global canine rabies elimination.

    PubMed

    Franka, Richard; Smith, Todd G; Dyer, Jessie L; Wu, Xianfu; Niezgoda, Michael; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    Even though rabies is almost uniformly fatal, it is readily preventable with currently available tools. Vaccination is highly efficacious for the pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of rabies in humans and animals, and prompt postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) with vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG) can reliably prevent disease in humans. However, access to these tools and knowledge of their proper use are often limited, especially in impoverished, rabies-enzootic countries with the highest disease burden. In the absence of reliable diagnostic capacity and risk assessments, vaccines and RIG are often administered inappropriately, leading to chronic supply shortages and otherwise preventable deaths. Rather than focusing solely on human prophylaxis, it is more cost-effective over the long term to eliminate canine rabies in its natural terrestrial reservoirs. Because more than 99% of human rabies deaths result from dog bites, prevention efforts should focus on dogs. A versatile "One Health" strategy for canine rabies elimination should aim to create sustainable herd immunity in dogs, using proven vaccination strategies at the local level, coupled with community education and humane population management. Such strategies have succeeded in both developed and developing countries, and can be adapted to any locality. Numerous examples in Africa, Asia, and Latin America have shown that community-based, locally guided vaccination and education programs, based on a shared vision and long-term commitment, can eliminate canine rabies. Such programs should have specific goals and measurable outcomes, and should be conducted under the guidance of supportive governments, in collaboration with international partners and nongovernmental organizations. In addition to currently available tools, rabies prevention can be augmented by new dose-sparing human vaccine schedules, alternative routes of vaccine administration, monoclonal antibodies as an alternative to RIG, sensitive and

  7. The Cost of Canine Rabies on Four Continents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Shwiff, S A

    2015-08-01

    We estimated the economic impacts of canine rabies in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Direct and indirect costs of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis, dog vaccination and control, rabies diagnostic testing and cattle mortality-related costs were accounted for. The number of human deaths was updated from previous estimates based on population growth, and the costs associated with the risk of human mortality were incorporated. We accounted for uncertainty associated with the parameter estimates using a Monte Carlo simulation and estimated that the global burden of canine rabies is approximately $124 billion annually. This result illustrates the potential benefits that could be realized if canine rabies was eliminated and provides an important benchmark against which the cost of any potential elimination campaign can be compared. PMID:24112194

  8. Grease, anthraxgate, and kennel cough: a revisionist history of early veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tizard, I

    1999-01-01

    In conclusion, it is remarkable just how farsighted many of the early vaccine investigators were. Jenner was apparently very comfortable with contagion and even recognized that infectious agents could gradually change and adapt to a new species. Pasteur, long before his fowl cholera experiment, dreamed that attenuation could yield safe vaccines and it took him no time at all therefore to recognize the significance of that serendipitous experiment. The fact that two other investigators were also developing anthrax vaccines simultaneously is yet another example of how the times favor certain discoveries. Finally Ferry, while constrained by the fact that he had no idea that distemper was caused by a virus, recognized well the concept of secondary infection and rationalized, not unreasonably, that his vaccine might assist in controlling this. It is also clear that we must look skeptically at the accepted historical record. Thus, it is clear that Jenner used horse-derived material as a source of vaccine material and that vaccinia may in fact be the long-lost agent of horsepox. Certainly this would not be news to many nineteenth-century investigators and veterinarians. Individuals planning to use live vaccinia in recombinant vaccines may wish to keep this in mind. Who discovered anthrax vaccine? Burdon-Sanderson clearly recognized that he could attenuate the organism. Greenfield showed that this could protect against disease although he was far from developing an effective vaccine. Poor Henri Toussaint was probably the first to develop an effective product but did not publicize his results widely. It was left to Louis Pasteur to take the risks inherent in a high-profile public experiment and win. I believe that he richly deserves the prize. Finally, who deserves the credit for distemper vaccine? First, Carré deserves much more credit than hitherto for discovering that distemper was caused by a virus. Second, Ferry, although misled by his identification of B

  9. The immunopathology of canine vector-borne diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The canine vector-borne infectious diseases (CVBDs) are an emerging problem in veterinary medicine and the zoonotic potential of many of these agents is a significant consideration for human health. The successful diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these infections is dependent upon firm understanding of the underlying immunopathology of the diseases in which there are unique tripartite interactions between the microorganism, the vector and the host immune system. Although significant advances have been made in the areas of molecular speciation and the epidemiology of these infections and their vectors, basic knowledge of the pathology and immunology of the diseases has lagged behind. This review summarizes recent studies of the pathology and host immune response in the major CVBDs (leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, hepatozoonosis, anaplasmosis, bartonellosis and borreliosis). The ultimate application of such immunological investigation is the development of effective vaccines. The current commercially available vaccines for canine leishmaniosis, babesiosis and borreliosis are reviewed. PMID:21489234

  10. Antibodies to selected canine pathogens and infestation with intestinal helminths in golden jackals (Canis aureus) in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shamir, M; Yakobson, B; Baneth, G; King, R; Dar-Verker, S; Markovics, A; Aroch, I

    2001-07-01

    Blood and fecal samples, collected from 46 healthy adult free-ranging golden jackals captured in two different locations in Israel, were examined. A serological Study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of circulating antibodies reacting with four common canine pathogens: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), Ehrlichia canis and Leishmania infantum. Faecal flotation and haematological tests were also performed. The seroprevalence of CPV, E. canis, CDV, and L. infantum were 72.3% (34/47), 54.3% (25/46), 52.2% (24/46), and 6.5% (3/46) respectively. Faecal flotation tests revealed a high prevalence of Ancylostoma caninum (13/17, 76%) and a low prevalence of Dipilidium caninum infestation. Examination of blood smears revealed Hepatazoon canis gamonts in one jackal. Golden jackals are among the most common free-ranging carnivores in Israel and neighboring countries. Their habitats are in proximity to densely populated areas and they bear close phylogenic relation to the domestic dog. These facts, combined with the high prevalence of the jackals' exposure to the major canine pathogens demonstrated in this study, suggest that they may serve as a reservoir for the transmission of certain diseases to domestic dogs. PMID:11409931

  11. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderstepoort vaccine strain and two B95a (marmoset B cell line)-isolated strains of canine distemper virus caused extensive cytopathic effects in normally resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells after expression of canine SLAM. The Ako vaccine strain of rinderpest virus produced strong cytopathic effects in bovine SLAM-expressing CHO cells. The data on entry with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes bearing measles, canine distemper, or rinderpest virus envelope proteins were consistent with development of cytopathic effects in SLAM-expressing CHO cell clones after infection with the respective viruses, confirming that SLAM acts at the virus entry step (as a cellular receptor). Furthermore, most measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest virus strains examined could any use of the human, canine, and bovine SLAMs to infect cells. Our findings suggest that the use of SLAM as a cellular receptor may be a property common to most, if not all, morbilliviruses and explain the lymphotropism and immunosuppressive nature of morbilliviruses. PMID:11390585

  12. Dog distemper: imported into Europe from South America?.

    PubMed

    Blancou, Jean

    2004-01-01

    According to Charles Frédéric Heusinger (1853), dog distemper had been imported from Peru into Spain in the course of the 17th century. The disease was well described in 1746 by Ulloa in his work Relación histórica del viaje a la América meridional. During the course of the 1760s, the disease was reported in Spain, followed by England, Italy (1764) and Russia (1770). In 1763, 900 dogs died in a single day in Madrid. In 1844, Karle succeeded in the first experimental transmission of the disease by brushing the lips of young dogs with the discharge from sick animals. The causal agent of the disease was only discovered in 1905, when the virus was isolated by Henri Carré. In the meantime, Edward Jenner, who thought that the disease was a pox-like affection, claimed that it could be prevented by inoculation of the vaccinia virus. PMID:15376360

  13. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  14. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  15. A retrospective investigation of canine adenovirus (CAV) infection in adult dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gür, S; Acar, A

    2009-06-01

    Canine adenovirus (CAV) type 1 and 2, respectively, cause infectious canine hepatitis and infectious canine laryngotracheitis in members of the families Canidae and Ursidae worldwide. Both of these infections are acute diseases, especially in young dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a serological investigation of canine adenovirus infection. For this purpose, serum samples were collected from native pure-bred Kangal(n = 11), and Akbash dogs (n = 17) and Turkish Greyhounds (n = 15) in Eskişehir and Konya provinces. None of the dogs were previously vaccinated against CAV types. Indirect ELISA detected 88.2%, 93.3% and 100% prevalences in Akbash, Greyhound and Kangal dogs, respectively. The remainder of the samples (n = 51) were collected at the Afyonkarahisar Municipality Shelter. Fourty-two of these dogs (82.3%) were detected as seropositive. In total, 82 of 94 dogs (87.2%) were found to be positive for CAV serum antibodies. PMID:19831268

  16. Oral vaccination of dogs with recombinant rabies virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Blanton, Jesse; Manangan, Jamie; Morrill, Patricia; Murphy, Staci; Niezgoda, Michael; Orciari, Lillian A; Schumacher, Carolin L; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2005-07-01

    Oral rabies virus (RV) vaccines are used to immunize a diversity of mammalian carnivores, but no single biological is effective for all major species. Recently, advances in reverse genetics have allowed the design of recombinant RV for consideration as new vaccines. The objective of this experiment was to examine the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of recombinant RV vaccines administered to captive dogs by the oral route, compared to a commercial vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) recombinant virus vaccine. Animals consisted of naive purpose-bred beagles of both sexes, and were 6 months of age or older. Dogs were randomly assigned to one of six groups, and received either diluent or vaccine (PBS; V-RG; RV SN10-333; RV SPBN-Cyto c; RV SPBNGA; RV SPBNGAGA), with at least six animals per group. On day 0, 1 ml of each vaccine (or PBS) was administered to the oral cavity of each dog, at an approximate concentration of 10(8) to 10(9) TCID50. After vaccination, dogs were observed daily and bled weekly, for 5 weeks, prior to RV challenge. No signs of illness related to vaccination were detected during the observation period. Excluding the controls, RV neutralizing antibodies were detected in the majority of animals within 1-2 weeks of primary vaccination. Thereafter, all dogs were inoculated in the masseter muscle with a street virus of canine origin. All control animals developed rabies, but no vaccinates succumbed, with the exception of a single dog in the V-RG group. Review of these preliminary data demonstrates the non-inferiority of recombinant RV products, as concerns both safety and efficacy, and supports the suggestion that these vaccines may hold promise for future development as oral immunogens for important carnivore species, such as dogs. PMID:15896409

  17. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  18. The role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of spontaneous canine CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Spitzbarth, I; Baumgärtner, W; Beineke, A

    2012-06-15

    Dogs are comparatively frequently affected by various spontaneously occurring inflammatory and degenerative central nervous system (CNS) conditions, and immunopathological processes are a hallmark of the associated neuropathology. Due to the low regenerative capacity of the CNS a sophisticated understanding of the underlying molecular basis for disease initiation, progression and remission in canine CNS diseases represents a prerequisite for the development of novel therapeutical approaches. In addition, as many spontaneous canine CNS diseases share striking similarities with their human counterpart, knowledge about the immune pathogenesis may in part be translated for a better understanding of certain human diseases. In addition to cytokine-driven differentiation of peripheral leukocytes including different subsets of T cells recent research suggests a pivotal role of these mediators also in phenotype polarization of resident glial cells. Cytokines thus represent the key mediators of the local and systemic immune response in CNS diseases and their orchestration significantly decides on either lesion progression or remission. The aim of the present review is to summarize the growing number of data focusing on the molecular basis of the immune response during spontaneous canine CNS diseases and to detail the effect of cytokines on the immune pathogenesis of selected idiopathic, infectious, and traumatic canine CNS diseases. Steroid-responsive meningitis arteritis (SRMA) represents a unique idiopathic disease of leptomeningeal blood vessels characterized by excessive IgA secretion into the cerebrospinal fluid. Recent reports have given sophisticated insights into the cytokine-driven, immune-mediated pathogenesis of SRMA that is characterized by a biased T helper 2 cell response. Canine distemper associated leukoencephalitis represents an important spontaneously occurring disease that allows investigations on the basic pathogenesis of immune-mediated myelin loss. It

  19. Canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Coates, Joan R; Wininger, Fred A

    2010-09-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease that occurs in many breeds. The initial upper motor neuron spastic paraparesis and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs progress to a flaccid lower motor neuron tetraparesis. Recently, a missense mutation in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene was found to be a risk factor for DM, suggesting that DM is similar to some forms of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). This article reviews the current knowledge of canine DM with regard to its signalment, clinical spectrum, diagnostic approach, and treatment. The implications of the SOD1 mutation on both diseases are discussed, comparing pathogenic mechanisms while conveying perspectives to translational medicine. PMID:20732599

  20. Canine ehrlichiosis in Connecticut.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Litwin, H J; Holland, C J; Anderson, J F; Ristic, M

    1990-01-01

    The first case of canine ehrlichiosis in Connecticut is reported. A female Brittany spaniel from Milford presented with lethargy, anorexia, fever, petechiae, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, anemia, elevated serum alkaline phosphatase, lymphopenia, and hypoalbuminemia. Serologic analysis revealed antibodies to Ehrlichia canis (titer, 1:2,560). This documents a more northern geographic distribution in the United States for this infectious agent than had previously been suspected. PMID:2312682

  1. American canine hepatozoonosis.

    PubMed

    Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A

    2003-06-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis is an emerging, tick-transmitted infection of domestic dogs caused by a recently recognized species of apicomplexan parasite, Hepatozoon americanum. The known definitive host of the protozoan is the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Presently recognized intermediate hosts include the domestic dog and the coyote, Canis latrans. Laboratory-reared larval or nymphal A. maculatum can be infected readily by feeding to repletion on a parasitemic intermediate host; sporogony requires 35-40 days. Transmission of infection to the dog has been produced experimentally by oral administration of mature oocysts or oocyst-containing ticks. Canine disease follows experimental exposure in 4-6 weeks and is characterized by systemic illness, extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, muscle and bone pain, and proliferation of periosteal bone. Histopathological findings include multifocal skeletal and cardiac myositis associated with escape of mature merozoites from within the host-cell environment. There is also rapid onset of periosteal activation and osteogenesis and, less frequently, glomerulopathy and amyloidosis. Sequential stages of development of H. americanum in both the dog and the tick have been elucidated. Gamonts potentially infectious to ticks have been observed in peripheral blood leukocytes of the dog in as few as 28 days after exposure to oocysts. Young coyotes experimentally exposed to a canine strain of H. americanum acquired disease indistinguishable from that of similarly exposed young dogs. PMID:12885206

  2. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  3. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  4. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  5. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123(3):712-8. PMID: ...

  6. Vaccines for visceral leishmaniasis: A review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Keerti; Jain, N K

    2015-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, which is also known as Kala-Azar, is one of the most severely neglected tropical diseases recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO). The threat of this debilitating disease continues due to unavailability of promising drug therapy or human vaccine. An extensive research is undergoing to develop a promising vaccine to prevent this devastating disease. In this review we compiled the findings of recent research with a view to facilitate knowledge on experimental vaccinology for visceral leishmaniasis. Various killed or attenuated parasite based first generation vaccines, second generation vaccines based on antigenic protein or recombinant protein, and third generation vaccines derived from antigen-encoding DNA plasmids including heterologous prime-boost Leishmania vaccine have been examined for control and prevention of visceral leishmaniasis. Vaccines based on recombinant protein and antigen-encoding DNA plasmids have given promising results and few vaccines including Leishmune®, Leishtec, and CaniLeish® have been licensed for canine visceral leishmaniasis. A systematic investigation of these vaccine candidates can lead to development of promising vaccine for human visceral leishmaniasis, most probably in the near future. PMID:25858230

  7. Footrot vaccines and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dhungyel, Om; Hunter, James; Whittington, Richard

    2014-05-30

    Research on footrot in small ruminants, which is caused by Dichelobacter nodosus, has led to development of vaccines and their application for control, treatment and eradication of the disease in sheep. Footrot vaccines have evolved over decades to contain monovalent whole cell, multivalent recombinant fimbrial, and finally mono or bivalent recombinant fimbrial antigens. Initially whole cell vaccines made against the few known serogroups of D. nodosus were found to be inefficient in control of the disease in the field, which was attributed to the presence of other unidentified serogroups and also the use of inefficient adjuvants. Fimbriae or pili, which are the basis for antigenic variation, were found to be the major protective and also curative antigens but they are not cross protective between the different serogroups. Multivalent vaccines incorporating all the known serogroups have been proven to be of limited efficacy due to the phenomenon of antigenic competition. Recent studies in Nepal, Bhutan and Australia have shown that outbreak-specific vaccination which involves targeting identified serogroups with mono- or bivalent recombinant fimbrial vaccines, can be very effective in sheep and goats. Where multiple serogroups are present in a flock, antigenic competition can be overcome by sequentially targeting the serogroups with different bivalent vaccines every 3 months. A common antigen which would confer immunity to all serogroups would be the ideal immunogen but the initial studies were not successful in this area. Until universal antigen/s are available, flock specific mono or bivalent fimbrial vaccines are likely to be the most effective tool for control and eradication of footrot in sheep and goats. Future research in footrot vaccines should be focused on improving the duration of prophylaxis by incorporating new and emerging immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles, discovering a common antigen and understanding the mechanisms of

  8. Protection against morbillivirus-induced encephalitis by immunization with a rationally designed synthetic peptide vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, O E; Partidos, C D; Howard, C R; Steward, M W

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing T- and B-cell epitopes from the fusion (F) protein of measles virus (MV) were tested for their ability to induce a protective immune response against intracerebral challenge with neuroadapted strains of MV and canine distemper virus (CDV) in mice. Of the panel of peptides tested, only a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope (representing residues 288 to 302 of MV F protein) synthesized at the amino terminus of a B-cell epitope (representing residues 404 to 414 of MV F protein) was able to induce a protective response against challenge with MV and CDV in inbred mice. The protective response induced by this peptide (TTB) was associated with a significant reduction in mortality, histological absence of acute encephalitis, and greatly reduced titers of virus in the brains of TTB-immune mice following challenge compared with the results for nonimmunized controls. A chimeric peptide comprising one copy of the T-cell epitope and one copy of the B-cell epitope (TB) did not induce a protective response. A comparison of the antibody responses induced by the two chimeras suggested that differences in protective efficacy following immunization may be a result of the higher affinity of the antibody induced by the TTB peptide than that of the antibody induced by the TB peptide. In addition, differences in the immunoglobulin G subclass of the antipeptide antibody responses were observed, and these may play a role in the differences in protection observed. These results indicate that appropriately designed synthetic peptides have potential as vaccines for the induction of cross-reactive protection against morbilliviruses. PMID:7531779

  9. Canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  10. Brazilian canine hepatozoonosis.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2011-01-01

    The genus Hepatozoon includes hundreds of species that infect birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, in all continents with tropical and subtropical climates. Two species have been described in domestic dogs: H. canis, reported in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and the United States; and H. americanum, which so far has only been diagnosed in the United States. In Brazil, the only species found infecting dogs is H. canis. The objective of this review was to detail some aspects of canine hepatozoonosis, caused by H. canis, and the main points of its biology, transmission, pathogenicity, symptoms, epidemiology and diagnostic methods, with emphasis on research developed in Brazil. PMID:21961746

  11. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  12. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921696

  13. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  14. Establishment of Canine-Derived Giardia duodenalis Isolates in Culture.

    PubMed

    Tysnes, Kristoffer R; Robertson, Lucy J

    2016-06-01

    Researchers continue to rely on axenic cultivation of Giardia duodenalis trophozoites in vitro to study the life cycle and host-parasite interactions of G. duodenalis and to develop vaccines and drugs to prevent and treat giardiasis. The majority of in vitro studies of G. duodenalis have used a small subset of isolates, mostly of assemblage A, and these isolates are usually originally isolated from humans. The most commonly used isolate for lab studies is known as WB. Canine giardiasis is a disease of veterinary importance, but it may also be of relevance in zoonotic transmission. Few G. duodenalis isolates from dogs have been adapted to in vitro culture, probably because the methods used are not suitable for the canine-specific genotypes that tend to dominate in most dog populations. In the current study, an experimental approach to cultivating canine-derived isolates of G. duodenalis was attempted by modification of the standard protocol based on physiological differences between the human and canine digestive system. An adapted method is described for improving the rate of in vitro excystation of cysts isolated from dogs by chemically weakening the cyst wall. A new canine-derived assemblage A G. duodenalis isolate was successfully adapted to axenic culture by using this method; the dog apparently had a mixed infection of assemblages A and D, but the assemblage A successfully outcompeted the assemblage D under conditions of in vitro culture. Based on the results, reasons regarding why humans do not seem to be suitable hosts for G. duodenalis in assemblages C and D are discussed. PMID:26835750

  15. THE 2000 CANINE DISTEMPER EPIDEMIC IN CASPIAN SEALS(PHOCA CASPICA): PATHOLOGY AND ANALYSIS OF CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 10,000 Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) were reported dead in the Caspian Sea during spring and summer 2000. We performed necropsies and extensive laboratory analyses on 18 seals, as well as examination of the pattern of strandings and variation in weather in recent years, to identify the cau...

  16. [Diagnostic tools for canine parvovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is one of the most important and common infectious diseases in dogs, in particular affecting young puppies when maternal antibodies have waned and vaccine-induced antibodies have not yet developed. The mortality rate remains high. Therefore, a rapid and safe diagnostic tool is essential to diagnose the disease to 1) provide intensive care treatment and 2) to identify virus-shedding animals and thus prevent virus spread. Whilst the detection of antibodies against CPV is considered unsuitable to diagnose the disease, there are several different methods to directly detect complete virus, virus antigen or DNA. Additionally, to test in commercial laboratories, rapid in-house tests based on ELISA are available worldwide. The specificity of the ELISA rapid in-house tests is reported to be excellent. However, results on sensitivity vary and high numbers of false-negative results are commonly reported, which potentially leads to misdiagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and specific diagnostic tool. It also provides the opportunity to differentiate vaccine strains from natural infection when sequencing is performed after PCR. PMID:26403490

  17. First detection of canine parvovirus type 2c in pups with haemorrhagic enteritis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Decaro, N; Martella, V; Desario, C; Bellacicco, A L; Camero, M; Manna, L; d'Aloja, D; Buonavoglia, C

    2006-12-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), the aetiological agent of haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, includes three antigenic variants, types 2a, 2b and 2c. CPV-2c has been detected initially in Italy and subsequently in Vietnam. We report the first identification of this novel antigenic variant in Spain, where it caused an outbreak of fatal enteritis in basset hound pups in association with canine coronavirus type I and type II. We suggest that this new antigenic variant of CPV-2 could spread throughout Europe and that there is a subsequent need to update current CPV vaccines. PMID:17123424

  18. Whole genome sequence analysis of circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Jasperson, Dane C; Dubovi, Edward J; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; Wilson, William C

    2015-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented through serological surveys, and natural infection by the Culicoides vector has been suggested. The report of isolation of BTV serotype 11 (BTV-11) from 2 separate domestic canine abortion cases in the states of Texas in 2011 and Kansas in 2012, were apparently unrelated to BTV-contaminated vaccination or consumption of BTV-contaminated raw meat as had been previously speculated. To elucidate the origin and relationship of these 2 domestic canine BTV-11 isolates, whole genome sequencing was performed. Six additional BTV-11 field isolates from Texas, Florida, and Washington, submitted for diagnostic investigation during 2011 and 2013, were also fully sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the BTV-11 domestic canine isolates are virtually identical, and both share high identity with 2 BTV-11 isolates identified from white-tailed deer in Texas in 2011. The results of the current study further support the hypothesis that a BTV-11 strain circulating in the Midwestern states could have been transmitted to the dogs by the infected Culicoides vector. Our study also expands the short list of available BTV-11 sequences, which may aid BTV surveillance and epidemiology. PMID:26069226

  19. Canine rickettsial infections.

    PubMed

    Stiles, J

    2000-09-01

    Dogs that live in tick-infested areas are at risk for contracting rickettsial infections. Clinical signs associated with ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever may be dramatic or mild. Clinicians must consider the possibility of rickettsial diseases to request laboratory tests that will permit a proper diagnosis. Specific antimicrobial therapy usually brings about clinical improvement, although some dogs may not be cleared of rickettsial organisms, even with prolonged treatment. A small percentage of dogs die of rickettsial infections, either in the acute stage or owing to chronic bone marrow suppression and generalized debilitation. Ocular lesions are an important clinical sign in canine rickettsial infections and may aid the clinician in making a diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. PMID:11033879

  20. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions. PMID:27065598

  1. Canine Rabies: A Looming Threat to Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Cáceres, Sigfrido

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary This review is guided by three questions: What is canine rabies? Why is it a looming threat to public health? Why should we care about canine rabies being a public health threat? It seeks to answer these questions and notes that canine rabies is viral zoonosis with dogs being the major vectors. The disease is a looming threat to public health because rabid dogs bite humans, resulting in thousands of deaths every year. We should care about this evolving situation because, in general, rabies is a neglected disease for which there are vaccines, preventive measures, post-exposure prophylaxis, and control protocols. Abstract Rabies is an acute, fatal viral disease that infects domestic and wild animals and is transmissible to humans. Worldwide, rabies kills over 55,000 people every year. The domestic dog plays a pivotal role in rabies transmission. Domestic dogs are not only part of our daily lives but also of our immediate surroundings, and this is reflected in the rise in pet dog ownership in developed and developing countries. This is important given that more frequent exposures and interactions at the animal-human interface increases the likelihood of contracting zoonotic diseases of companion animals. Despite existing vaccines and post-exposure prophylactic treatment, rabies remains a neglected disease that is poorly controlled throughout much of the developing world, particularly Africa and Asia, where most human rabies deaths occur. It is believed that with sustained international commitments, global elimination of rabies from domestic dog populations, the most dangerous vector to humans, is a realistic goal. PMID:26486619

  2. Canine leishmaniosis in South America

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2009-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is widespread in South America, where a number of Leishmania species have been isolated or molecularly characterised from dogs. Most cases of canine leishmaniosis are caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) and Leishmania braziliensis. The only well-established vector of Leishmania parasites to dogs in South America is Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of L. infantum, but many other phlebotomine sandfly species might be involved. For quite some time, canine leishmaniosis has been regarded as a rural disease, but nowadays it is well-established in large urbanised areas. Serological investigations reveal that the prevalence of anti-Leishmania antibodies in dogs might reach more than 50%, being as high as 75% in highly endemic foci. Many aspects related to the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis (e.g., factors increasing the risk disease development) in some South American countries other than Brazil are poorly understood and should be further studied. A better understanding of the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis in South America would be helpful to design sustainable control and prevention strategies against Leishmania infection in both dogs and humans. PMID:19426440

  3. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers. PMID:26053201

  4. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are several types of HPV. ...

  5. Diphtheria Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination Pronounced (dif-THEER-ee-a) Recommend on Facebook ... Related Pages Pertussis Tetanus Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Abbreviations DTaP=Pediatric - Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis ...

  6. Giardia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Olson, M E; Ceri, H; Morck, D W

    2000-05-01

    Recently, a Giardia vaccine has become commercially available in the USA for prevention of clinical signs of giardiasis and reduction of cyst shedding in dogs and cats. The vaccine is based upon the current state of knowledge of Giardia antigenicity and immunology. Here, Merle Olson, Howard Ceri and Douglas Morck describe studies that led to the development of this vaccine and subsequent efficacy studies. Immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapeutic application of the vaccine are discussed. PMID:10782082

  7. Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Not Get Chickenpox Vaccine Types of Chickenpox Vaccine Child and Adult Immunization Schedules Possible Side Effects of Chickenpox Vaccine Childcare and School Vaccine Requirements Also Known As & Abbreviations ...

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of canine ICOS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hwan; Joo, Young-Don; Yim, Daesong; Lee, Richard; Ostrander, Elaine A; Loretz, Carol; Little, Marie-Térèse; Storb, Rainer; Kuhr, Christian S

    2004-10-01

    Inducible costimulatory receptor (ICOS) is one recently identified member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules. Evidence suggests ICOS functions as a critical immune regulator and, to evaluate these effects, we employed the canine model system that has been used to develop strategies currently in clinical use for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To investigate the effects of blocking the ICOS pathway in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model, we tested existing murine and human reagents and cloned the full length of the open reading frame of canine ICOS cDNA to allow the development of reagents specific for the canine ICOS. Canine ICOS contains a major open reading frame of 624 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 208 amino acids, and localizes to chromosome 37. Canine ICOS shares 79% sequence identity with human ICOS, 70% with mouse, and 69% with rat. Canine ICOS expression is limited to stimulated PBMC. PMID:15475250

  9. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  10. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature. PMID:26953614

  11. What's eating you? Canine scabies.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Richard F; Elston, Dirk M

    2003-08-01

    Infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var canis, the causative strain of canine scabies, can produce a pruritic rash in humans. The rash generally manifests within 24 to 96 hours of contact with the affected pet. Scrapings are generally negative, and the correct diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. PMID:12953932

  12. Vaccine Development Against Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amrita; Ali, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum/chagasi represents the second most challenging infectious disease worldwide, leading to nearly 500,000 new cases and 60,000 deaths annually. Zoonotic VL caused by L. infantum is a re-emergent canid zoonoses which represents a complex epidemiological cycle in the New world where domestic dogs serve as a reservoir host responsible for potentially fatal human infection and where dog culling is the only measure for reservoir control. Life-long immunity to VL has motivated development of prophylactic vaccines against the disease but very few have progressed beyond the experimental stage. No licensed vaccine is available till date against any form of leishmaniasis. High toxicity and increasing resistance to the current chemotherapeutic regimens have further complicated the situation in VL endemic regions of the world. Advances in vaccinology, including recombinant proteins, novel antigen-delivery systems/adjuvants, heterologous prime-boost regimens and strategies for intracellular antigen presentation, have contributed to recent advances in vaccine development against VL. Attempts to develop an effective vaccine for use in domestic dogs in areas of canine VL should be pursued for preventing human infection. Studies in animal models and human patients have revealed the pathogenic mechanisms of disease progression and features of protective immunity. This review will summarize the accumulated knowledge of pathogenesis, immune response, and prerequisites for protective immunity against human VL. Authors will discuss promising vaccine candidates, their developmental status and future prospects in a quest for rational vaccine development against the disease. In addition, several challenges such as safety issues, renewed and coordinated commitment to basic research, preclinical studies and trial design will be addressed to overcome the problems faced in developing prophylactic strategies for

  13. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  14. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  15. Oral Rabies Vaccine Design for Expression in Plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankit; Saxena, Gauri; Verma, Praveen C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the sensitization process of the immune system against any pathogen. Generally, recombinant subunit vaccines are considered safer than attenuated vaccines. As whole pathogenic organisms are used in the immunization process, the attenuated vaccines are considered more risky than subunit vaccines. Rabies is the oldest known zoonosis which spreads through a neurotropic Lyssavirus primarily mediated through infected canine bites. Rabies causes worldwide loss of more than 60,000 human lives every year. Animal vaccination is equally important to check the transmission of rabies into humans. Rabies oral vaccination can be a good alternative where multiple booster and priming regimens are required while the painful vaccination process can continue for long durations. Introduction of oral vaccines was made to ease the discomfort associated with the mode of introduction of conventional vaccines into the body. Although the rabies oral vaccine can substantially reduce the cost of vaccination in the developing countries, mass immunization programs need larger quantities of vaccines which should be delivered at nominal cost. Expression of recombinant antigen proteins in E. coli is often not viable because of lack of post-translational modifications and folding requirements. Though yeast and insect cell line expression systems have post-translational processing and modifications, significantly different immunological response against their post-translational modification pattern limits their deployment as an expression system. As an alternative, plants are emerging as a promising system to express and deliver wide range of functionally active biopharmaceutical product at lower cost for mass immunization programs. As generation of vaccine antigenic proteins in plant systems are cheaper, the strategy will benefit developing countries where this disease causes thousands of deaths every year. In this chapter, we will discuss about our efforts toward development of oral

  16. Dengue vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; SK, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way. PMID:25424928

  17. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  18. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F. N.; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed. PMID:26266250

  19. The immune response to disialoganglioside GD3 vaccination in normal dogs: a melanoma surface antigen vaccine.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Salute, M; Crawford, C; Abbot, J R; Farese, J

    2006-12-15

    As a result of its metastatic potential, canine malignant melanoma like its human counterpart like its human counter part, has a poor response to conventional treatment protocols. This prompted us to investigate the possibility of enhancing the immune response against the melanoma cell surface antigen, disialoganglioside GD3. Initially a flow cytometric study was designed in which the incidence of GD3 on the cell surface, recognized by the monoclonal antibody Mel-1 (R24), was established in canine melanoma cell lines. Results from the flow cytometry found GD3 to be highly expressed (94.2%) in six out of seven canine melanoma cell lines. Since it was thus potentially a good target, a study in which normal dogs were vaccinated intradermally with a vaccine containing GD3 plus adjuvants was designed. The adjuvant included CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) sequences and RIBI-adjuvant, which are known to target toll-like receptors (TLR) of the innate immune system. From a cohort of 10 dogs, 4 were vaccinated 3 times, at 4 weekly intervals with GD3 plus adjuvant, and 4 received only RIBI-adjuvant, and 2 phosphate buffered saline. Caliper measurements were collected to assess skin reaction at the vaccination site and sera assayed for IgM and IgG antibodies against GD3 and cell-mediated cytotoxicity against a melanoma cell line. Results from the study found significant differences (P<0.05) in the vaccine site reactions, IgM/IgG levels and cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the vaccinated versus unvaccinated dogs. The addition of CpG-ODN sequences and increasing GD3 concentration in the vaccine increased the inflammation response at the injection site. GD3 IgG and IgM antibodies in vaccinated dogs showed increasing titers over time and achieved significance at weeks 9 and 12, respectively. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity was only detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from vaccinated dogs. In conclusion, by combining the tumor antigen GD3 (a known weak self-antigen) and an

  20. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease: consequences for the elimination of canine rabies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Elaine A.; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Consunji, Ramona; Deray, Raffy; Friar, John; Haydon, Daniel T.; Jimenez, Joji; Pancipane, Marlon; Townsend, Sunny E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the factors influencing vaccination campaign effectiveness is vital in designing efficient disease elimination programmes. We investigated the importance of spatial heterogeneity in vaccination coverage and human-mediated dog movements for the elimination of endemic canine rabies by mass dog vaccination in Region VI of the Philippines (Western Visayas). Household survey data was used to parameterise a spatially-explicit rabies transmission model with realistic dog movement and vaccination coverage scenarios, assuming a basic reproduction number for rabies drawn from the literature. This showed that heterogeneous vaccination reduces elimination prospects relative to homogeneous vaccination at the same overall level. Had the three vaccination campaigns completed in Region VI in 2010-2012 been homogeneous, they would have eliminated rabies with high probability. However, given the observed heterogeneity, three further campaigns may be required to achieve elimination with probability 0.95. We recommend that heterogeneity be reduced in future campaigns through targeted efforts in low coverage areas, even at the expense of reduced coverage in previously high coverage areas. Reported human-mediated dog movements did not reduce elimination probability, so expending limited resources on restricting dog movements is unnecessary in this endemic setting. Enhanced surveillance will be necessary post-elimination, however, given the reintroduction risk from long-distance dog movements.

  1. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease: consequences for the elimination of canine rabies

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Elaine A.; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Consunji, Ramona; Deray, Raffy; Friar, John; Haydon, Daniel T.; Jimenez, Joji; Pancipane, Marlon; Townsend, Sunny E.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing vaccination campaign effectiveness is vital in designing efficient disease elimination programmes. We investigated the importance of spatial heterogeneity in vaccination coverage and human-mediated dog movements for the elimination of endemic canine rabies by mass dog vaccination in Region VI of the Philippines (Western Visayas). Household survey data was used to parameterise a spatially-explicit rabies transmission model with realistic dog movement and vaccination coverage scenarios, assuming a basic reproduction number for rabies drawn from the literature. This showed that heterogeneous vaccination reduces elimination prospects relative to homogeneous vaccination at the same overall level. Had the three vaccination campaigns completed in Region VI in 2010–2012 been homogeneous, they would have eliminated rabies with high probability. However, given the observed heterogeneity, three further campaigns may be required to achieve elimination with probability 0.95. We recommend that heterogeneity be reduced in future campaigns through targeted efforts in low coverage areas, even at the expense of reduced coverage in previously high coverage areas. Reported human-mediated dog movements did not reduce elimination probability, so expending limited resources on restricting dog movements is unnecessary in this endemic setting. Enhanced surveillance will be necessary post-elimination, however, given the reintroduction risk from long-distance dog movements. PMID:26667267

  2. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease: consequences for the elimination of canine rabies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine A; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Consunji, Ramona; Deray, Raffy; Friar, John; Haydon, Daniel T; Jimenez, Joji; Pancipane, Marlon; Townsend, Sunny E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing vaccination campaign effectiveness is vital in designing efficient disease elimination programmes. We investigated the importance of spatial heterogeneity in vaccination coverage and human-mediated dog movements for the elimination of endemic canine rabies by mass dog vaccination in Region VI of the Philippines (Western Visayas). Household survey data was used to parameterise a spatially-explicit rabies transmission model with realistic dog movement and vaccination coverage scenarios, assuming a basic reproduction number for rabies drawn from the literature. This showed that heterogeneous vaccination reduces elimination prospects relative to homogeneous vaccination at the same overall level. Had the three vaccination campaigns completed in Region VI in 2010-2012 been homogeneous, they would have eliminated rabies with high probability. However, given the observed heterogeneity, three further campaigns may be required to achieve elimination with probability 0.95. We recommend that heterogeneity be reduced in future campaigns through targeted efforts in low coverage areas, even at the expense of reduced coverage in previously high coverage areas. Reported human-mediated dog movements did not reduce elimination probability, so expending limited resources on restricting dog movements is unnecessary in this endemic setting. Enhanced surveillance will be necessary post-elimination, however, given the reintroduction risk from long-distance dog movements. PMID:26667267

  3. The protective immune response produced in dogs after primary vaccination with the LiESP/QA-21 vaccine (CaniLeish®) remains effective against an experimental challenge one year later.

    PubMed

    Martin, Virginie; Vouldoukis, Ioannis; Moreno, Javier; McGahie, David; Gueguen, Sylvie; Cuisinier, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Control of canine leishmaniasis is an important objective for the benefit of dogs living in or visiting endemic areas and for public health because of the zoonotic nature of this disease. Resistance or susceptibility to developing canine leishmaniasis after exposure to Leishmania infantum is primarily determined by the ability of the immune system to develop an appropriate Th1-dominated specific response to the parasite. For this reason there is a need for effective canine vaccines that can decrease the number of dogs developing progressive infections. In this study, we followed the impact of the LiESP/QA-21 canine vaccine (composed of excreted-secreted proteins of L. infantum and the QA-21 saponin adjuvant), recently launched commercially in Europe, on selected humoral and cellular immune parameters following an infectious intravenous challenge with L. infantum promastigotes administered one year after the primary vaccine course. We also followed parasitological parameters to determine the parasitological status of the challenged dogs. In contrast to controls, vaccinated dogs retained significantly stronger cell-mediated immune responses against the parasite despite a virulent challenge and had significantly lower mean parasite burdens at the end of the study, associated with a lower probability of developing active infections. These results confirm that the immune responses generated by vaccination with LiESP/QA-21 are still effective against an intravenous challenge one year after the primary vaccine course. PMID:24964736

  4. The protective immune response produced in dogs after primary vaccination with the LiESP/QA-21 vaccine (CaniLeish®) remains effective against an experimental challenge one year later

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Control of canine leishmaniasis is an important objective for the benefit of dogs living in or visiting endemic areas and for public health because of the zoonotic nature of this disease. Resistance or susceptibility to developing canine leishmaniasis after exposure to Leishmania infantum is primarily determined by the ability of the immune system to develop an appropriate Th1-dominated specific response to the parasite. For this reason there is a need for effective canine vaccines that can decrease the number of dogs developing progressive infections. In this study, we followed the impact of the LiESP/QA-21 canine vaccine (composed of excreted-secreted proteins of L. infantum and the QA-21 saponin adjuvant), recently launched commercially in Europe, on selected humoral and cellular immune parameters following an infectious intravenous challenge with L. infantum promastigotes administered one year after the primary vaccine course. We also followed parasitological parameters to determine the parasitological status of the challenged dogs. In contrast to controls, vaccinated dogs retained significantly stronger cell-mediated immune responses against the parasite despite a virulent challenge and had significantly lower mean parasite burdens at the end of the study, associated with a lower probability of developing active infections. These results confirm that the immune responses generated by vaccination with LiESP/QA-21 are still effective against an intravenous challenge one year after the primary vaccine course. PMID:24964736

  5. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause problems like genital warts and some kinds of cancer, a vaccine is an important step in preventing infection and protecting against the spread of HPV. That's why doctors recommend that all girls and guys get the vaccine at these ages: ...

  6. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  7. Anthrax Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... products some military personnel, as determined by the Department of Defense These people should get five doses of vaccine ( ... cdc.gov/agent/anthrax/vaccination/. Contact the U.S Department of Defense (DoD): call 1-877-438-8222 or visit ...

  8. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  9. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... determine susceptibility. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to...

  10. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determine susceptibility. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to...

  11. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to 300 TCID50 of virus shall be used. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. Other tests of equal...

  12. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to 300 TCID50 of virus shall be used. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. Other tests of equal...

  13. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to 300 TCID50 of virus shall be used. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. Other tests of equal...

  14. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to 300 TCID50 of virus shall be used. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. Other tests of equal...

  15. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to 300 TCID50 of virus shall be used. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution. Other tests of equal...

  16. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... determine susceptibility. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to...

  17. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... determine susceptibility. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to...

  18. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... determine susceptibility. Dogs shall be considered susceptible if there is no neutralization at a 1:2 final serum dilution in a constant virus-varying serum neutralization test in cell culture using 50 to...

  19. Schistosomiasis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Ganley-Leal, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease of public health importance to a billion people. An estimated 200 million people are currently infected; an additional 779 million individuals are at risk to acquire the infection in 74 countries. Despite many years of implementation of mass anti-parasitic drug therapy programs and other control measures, this disease has not been contained and continues to spread to new geographic areas.  The discovery of a protective vaccine still remains the most potentially effective means for the control of this disease, especially if the vaccine provides long-term immunity against the infection. A vaccine would contribute to the reduction of schistosomiasis morbidity through induced immune responses leading to decrease in parasite load and reduced egg production. This vaccine could be administered to children between the ages of 3 and 12 years to prevent severe infection in a particularly high risk population. This review summarizes the current status of schistosomiasis vaccine development. PMID:22048120

  20. Typhoid vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A; Dutta, A K

    2001-08-01

    Typhoid fever continues to be a major public health problem in developing countries with about 33 million cases per year. Protective efficacy of traditional acetone/phenol killed vaccines is similar to newer typhoid vaccines (Ty21A and Vi antigen vaccine) but side effects of these newer vaccines are considerably less. Though the mortality is low, typhoid fever causes considerable morbidity and loss of working days. Problems during treatment are increasing due to emergence and spread of multidrug resistant S. typhi. Hence to decrease the incidence of typhoid fever in addition to ensuring safe water supply and excreta disposal a typhoid vaccine needs to be introduced in the National Immunization Schedule. PMID:11563251

  1. Sequence-independent VIDISCA-454 technique to discover new viruses in canine livers.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Mitzi; de Vries, Michel; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Favier, Robert P; Deijs, Martin; Brinkhof, Bas; Rothuizen, Jan; van der Hoek, Lia; Penning, Louis C

    2012-10-01

    In many mammals, viruses cause hepatitis. Despite many efforts a specific virus responsible for canine idiopathic hepatitis has not been identified. The discovery of a viral etiology in canine hepatitis will promote the development of specific drugs and vaccines for the treatment of idiopathic hepatitis in dogs. The objective of this study was the application of the sequence-independent Virus Discovery cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (VIDISCA) technique combined with high through-put sequencing on a Roche-454 sequencer to identify unknown viruses. Liver tissue of a dog with idiopathic acute hepatitis was cultured on a canine liver cell line and the cell culture medium was submitted to the VIDISCA-454 technique. Without prior knowledge of the viral species involved, this technique identified Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1) as the infecting agent. This demonstrates the power of VIDISCA-454 to identify viruses, independent of preliminary information about the genomic sequence. Consequently, the strategy of propagation in this cell line followed by the VIDISCA-454 technique is valuable to identify the viral etiology of idiopathic hepatitis in dogs. PMID:22664180

  2. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  3. Canine leishmaniosis - an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Kaszak, Ilona; Planellas, Marta; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an invasive disease of dogs, caused by Leishmania spp. parasites transmitted by the bite of an infected phlebotomine sand fly. CanL is declared an important disease by World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). Due to its zoonotic potential is of a great importance the prevention of this disease in non endemic areas. Canine leishmaniosis is endemic disease in more than 70 countries and is a common disease in Mediterranean region. Recently, many cases have been reported in non endemic areas, like United Kingdom, Germany and Poland as well, where this disease is considered exotic. The aim of this article is to summarize shortly canine leishmaniosis, it's transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnostics procedure, treatment, prognosis and prevention. Increasing knowledge about this disease can be of a great use for veterinary surgeons from countries where CanL is an emerging disease. Multiple clinical presentations of CanL should aware clinicians to include leishmaniosis in the differential diagnosis of most clinical cases. Unfortunately, even if dogs recover clinically after treatment, complete elimination of Leishmania spp. is rarely achieved, and they remain infected and may relapse. PMID:26342500

  4. Evidence-based control of canine rabies: a critical review of population density reduction.

    PubMed

    Morters, Michelle K; Restif, Olivier; Hampson, Katie; Cleaveland, Sarah; Wood, James L N; Conlan, Andrew J K

    2013-01-01

    Control measures for canine rabies include vaccination and reducing population density through culling or sterilization. Despite the evidence that culling fails to control canine rabies, efforts to reduce canine population density continue in many parts of the world. The rationale for reducing population density is that rabies transmission is density-dependent, with disease incidence increasing directly with host density. This may be based, in part, on an incomplete interpretation of historical field data for wildlife, with important implications for disease control in dog populations. Here, we examine historical and more recent field data, in the context of host ecology and epidemic theory, to understand better the role of density in rabies transmission and the reasons why culling fails to control rabies. We conclude that the relationship between host density, disease incidence and other factors is complex and may differ between species. This highlights the difficulties of interpreting field data and the constraints of extrapolations between species, particularly in terms of control policies. We also propose that the complex interactions between dogs and people may render culling of free-roaming dogs ineffective irrespective of the relationship between host density and disease incidence. We conclude that vaccination is the most effective means to control rabies in all species. PMID:23004351

  5. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controls. If a second dose is recommended, the second dose shall be administered at the time specified on... dose shall be administered at the time specified on the label. (ii) Not less than 14 days after the... be administered at the time specified on the label. The dogs shall be observed each day for at...

  6. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... controls. If a second dose is recommended, the second dose shall be administered at the time specified on... dose shall be administered at the time specified on the label. (ii) Not less than 14 days after the... be administered at the time specified on the label. The dogs shall be observed each day for at...

  7. Chromatography purification of canine adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Segura, María Mercedes; Puig, Meritxell; Monfar, Mercè; Chillón, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Canine adenovirus vectors (CAV2) are currently being evaluated for gene therapy, oncolytic virotherapy, and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. Despite the need for increasing volumes of purified CAV2 preparations for preclinical and clinical testing, their purification still relies on the use of conventional, scale-limited CsCl ultracentrifugation techniques. A complete downstream processing strategy for CAV2 vectors based on membrane filtration and chromatography is reported here. Microfiltration and ultra/diafiltration are selected for clarification and concentration of crude viral stocks containing both intracellular and extracellular CAV2 particles. A DNase digestion step is introduced between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations. At these early stages, concentration of vector stocks with good recovery of viral particles (above 80%) and removal of a substantial amount of protein and nucleic acid contaminants is achieved. The ability of various chromatography techniques to isolate CAV2 particles was evaluated. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a Fractogel propyl tentacle resin was selected as a first chromatography step, because it allows removal of the bulk of contaminating proteins with high CAV2 yields (88%). An anion-exchange chromatography step using monolithic supports is further introduced to remove the remaining contaminants with good recovery of CAV2 particles (58-69%). The main CAV2 viral structural components are visualized in purified preparations by electrophoresis analyses. Purified vector stocks contained intact icosahedral viral particles, low contamination with empty viral capsids (10%), and an acceptable total-to-infectious particle ratio (below 30). The downstream processing strategy that was developed allows preparation of large volumes of high-quality CAV2 stocks. PMID:22799886

  8. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  9. Bilateral Mandibular Supernumerary Canines: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abouei Mehrizi, Ehsan; Semyari, Hassan; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are defined as the teeth developed in excess of the number found in a normal dentition. Supernumerary canine is an extremely rare finding particularly in the mandible. This case report presents a 25-year-old female patient with the unique feature of bilateral mandibular supplemental supernumerary canines. The patient was non-syndromic without any other supernumerary teeth. PMID:23346342

  10. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs.

    PubMed

    Na, Woonsung; Yeom, Minjoo; Yuk, Huijoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Kang, Bokyu; Song, Daesub

    2016-07-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  11. Influenza virus vaccine for neglected hosts: horses and dogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study provides information regarding vaccine research and the epidemiology of influenza virus in neglected hosts (horses and dogs). Equine influenza virus (EIV) causes a highly contagious disease in horses and other equids, and outbreaks have occurred worldwide. EIV has resulted in costly damage to the horse industry and has the ability of cross the host species barrier from horses to dogs. Canine influenza is a virus of equine or avian origin and infects companion animals that live in close contact with humans; this results in possible exposure to the seasonal epizootic influenza virus. There have been case reports of genetic reassortment between human and canine influenza viruses, which results in high virulence and the ability of transmission to ferrets. This emphasizes the need for vaccine research on neglected hosts to update knowledge on current strains and to advance technology for controlling influenza outbreaks for public health. PMID:27489801

  12. [Rabbies vaccination].

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    With very few exceptions, rabies is occurring around the globe. The clinical course of this mammal-transmitted infection is almost universally fatal. Thus, the disease is causing more human deaths than any other zoonosis. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, pre- or post-exposure vaccination remains the only effective means to avoid development of fatal disease. Save and highly effective cell culture vaccines which have been available for decades provide long-lasting protection. Various vaccination schedules have been tested and are being recommended. PMID:27268449

  13. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures. PMID:22839365

  14. Full-Genome Analysis of a Canine Pneumovirus Causing Acute Respiratory Disease in Dogs, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Decaro, Nicola; Pinto, Pierfrancesco; Mari, Viviana; Elia, Gabriella; Larocca, Vittorio; Camero, Michele; Terio, Valentina; Losurdo, Michele; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) associated to canine pneumovirus (CnPnV) infection is reported. The outbreak occurred in a shelter of the Apulia region and involved 37 out of 350 dogs that displayed cough and/or nasal discharge with no evidence of fever. The full-genomic characterisation showed that the causative agent (strain Bari/100-12) was closely related to CnPnVs that have been recently isolated in the USA, as well as to murine pneumovirus, which is responsible for respiratory disease in mice. The present study represents a useful contribution to the knowledge of the pathogenic potential of CnPnV and its association with CIRD in dogs. Further studies will elucidate the pathogenicity and epidemiology of this novel pneumovirus, thus addressing the eventual need for specific vaccines. PMID:24400129

  15. Arthropod vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Opdebeeck, J P

    1999-03-01

    Antigens located in the midgut of the tick are hidden from the host's immune system. Egg production of ticks can be reduced when ticks are fed on animals vaccinated with midgut antigens of the tick, and a subunit vaccine formulated with the recombinant antigen Bm86 is now available that can reduce the number of ticks infesting cattle grazing on pasture. Midgut antigens used in vaccines against insects that transmit pathogenic organisms to humans have not been as effective in reducing insect fecundity and an alternative approach may be necessary. Transmission-blocking vaccines directed at interfering with the vector-pathogen interaction could result in loss of vector competence and block the spread of disease-causing organisms. PMID:10198800

  16. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot) • One dose ...

  17. Meningococcal Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an infection of the covering of the brain and the spinal cord. Meningococcal disease also causes ... legs, have problems with their nervous systems, become deaf or mentally ... use of meningococcal vaccine is important for people at highest risk.

  18. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  19. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  20. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  1. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... The best way to prevent it is through vaccinations. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping ...

  2. Promoting Vaccine Confidence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Vaccine hesitancy incorporates a wide range of parental attitudes and behaviors surrounding vaccines. Ironically, the very success of the immunization program has fueled vaccine concerns; because vaccine-preventable diseases are no longer prevalent, attention has shifted to the safety and necessity of vaccines themselves. This article reviews some of the underlying themes of vaccine hesitancy as well as specific vaccine safety concerns. Strategies for discussing vaccines with concerned parents are also discussed. PMID:26337737

  3. Nonreplicating viral vectors as potential vaccines: recombinant canarypox virus expressing measles virus fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Weinberg, R; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1992-03-01

    The development of canarypox virus (CPV) recombinants expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of measles virus (MV) is described. Inoculation of the CPV-MV recombinants into avian or nonavian tissue culture substrates led to the expression of authentic MVF and MVHA as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation and surface immunofluorescence. In contrast to avian-derived tissue culture, no productive replication of the CPV recombinant was evident in tissue culture cells derived from nonavian origin. On inoculation of dogs, a species restricted for avipoxvirus replication, the recombinants elicited a protective immune response against a lethal canine distemper virus (CDV) challenge. The level of MV neutralizing antibodies and the level of protection induced against CDV challenge achieved by the host-restricted CPV vector were equivalent to that obtained by vaccinia virus vectors expressing the same MV antigens. PMID:1736535

  4. Progress and hurdles in the development of influenza virus-like particle vaccines for veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), which resemble infectious virus particles in structure and morphology, have been proposed to provide a new generation of vaccine candidates against various viral infections. As effective immunogens, characterized by high immunogenicity and safety, VLPs have been employed in the development of human influenza vaccines. Recently, several influenza VLP vaccines have been developed for veterinary use and successfully evaluated in swine, canine, duck, and chicken models. These VLP vaccine candidates induced protective immune responses and enabled serological differentiation between vaccinated and infected animals in conjunction with a diagnostic test. Here, we review the current progress of influenza VLP development as a next-generation vaccine technology in the veterinary field and discuss the challenges and future direction of this technology. PMID:25003086

  5. Neuroinflammation in advanced canine glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing; Harper, Matthew M.; Kecova, Helga; Adamus, Grazyna; Kardon, Randy H.; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiological events that occur in advanced glaucoma are not well characterized. The principal purpose of this study is to characterize the gene expression changes that occur in advanced glaucoma. Methods Retinal RNA was obtained from canine eyes with advanced glaucoma as well as from healthy eyes. Global gene expression patterns were determined using oligonucleotide microarrays and confirmed by real-time PCR. The presence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors was evaluated by immunolabeling. Finally, we evaluated the presence of serum autoantibodies directed against retinal epitopes using western blot analyses. Results We identified over 500 genes with statistically significant changes in expression level in the glaucomatous retina. Decreased expression levels were detected for large number of functional groups, including synapse and synaptic transmission, cell adhesion, and calcium metabolism. Many of the molecules with decreased expression levels have been previously shown to be components of retinal ganglion cells. Genes with elevated expression in glaucoma are largely associated with inflammation, such as antigen presentation, protein degradation, and innate immunity. In contrast, expression of many other pro-inflammatory genes, such as interferons or interleukins, was not detected at abnormal levels. Conclusions This study characterizes the molecular events that occur in the canine retina with advanced glaucoma. Our data suggest that in the dog this stage of the disease is accompanied by pronounced retinal neuroinflammation. PMID:21042562

  6. Canine procalcitonin messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kuzi, Sharon; Aroch, Itamar; Peleg, Keren; Karnieli, Ohad; Klement, Eyal; Dank, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Procalcitonin is considered an acute phase protein used as both a marker of infection and prognosis in human medicine. Canine procalcitonin has been previously sequenced; however, its use as a diagnostic or prognostic tool in dogs has never been assessed. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for canine procalcitonin messenger RNA (mRNA) was developed. Whole blood samples were collected from ill and healthy dogs. RNA was extracted and the real-time PCR was assessed. The patients' diagnoses, complete blood cell count, and differential leukocyte count results were recorded. Based on the diagnosis, dogs were divided into 5 groups: inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, other diseases, and healthy controls. Procalcitonin mRNA expression and the hematological measures were compared between groups, and their correlations were assessed. Procalcitonin mRNA expression was assessed in 70 dogs, including infectious (17), noninfectious inflammatory (17), neoplastic (18), other diseases (7), and healthy controls (11), and was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in all ill dogs versus controls. Procalcitonin may therefore be considered an acutephase protein in dogs. However, there were no significant differences in procalcitonin mRNA expression between ill dog groups and no correlations between its expression levels and hematological measures. In 5 dogs of all disease categories, procalcitonin mRNA expression was measured twice during the course of disease. The changes in its levels were in agreement with the clinical evaluation of improvement or deterioration, suggesting a possible prognostic value. PMID:18776098

  7. Evidence for canine rehabilitation and physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Millis, Darryl L; Ciuperca, Ionut Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews some important studies regarding canine physical rehabilitation. Bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons undergo atrophy if loading is decreased. Knowledge of the changes that occur with immobilization and the time course of events helps in the development of a rehabilitation program to improve tissue integrity. Outcome assessment instruments are clinically useful indicators of patient progress and the success of rehabilitation programs. A number of physical modalities are used in canine rehabilitation, although there are relatively few canine-specific studies. Rehabilitation has specific benefits in the treatment of various orthopedic and neurologic conditions. PMID:25432679

  8. Cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients’ immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes. PMID:25904595

  9. Development of recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 expressing the Gn glycoprotein of Seoul virus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziguo; Zhang, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Gao, Shengyan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Huijuan; Wang, Xiaohu; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-05-01

    Seoul virus glycoprotein Gn is a major structural protein and candidate antigen of hantavirus that induces a highly immunogenic response for hantavirus vaccine. In this study, a replication-competent recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 expressing Gn was constructed by the in vitro ligation method. The Gn expression cassette, including the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) promoter/enhancer and the SV40 early mRNA polyadenylation signal, was cloned into the SspI site of the E3 region which is not essential for proliferation of CAV-2. Expression of Gn was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. PMID:18249007

  10. Comparative functional characterization of canine IgG subclasses.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lisa M; McCandless, Erin E; Dunham, Steve; Dunkle, Bill; Zhu, Yaqi; Shelly, John; Lightle, Sandra; Gonzales, Andrea; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2014-01-15

    To date, very little is known about the functional characteristics of the four published canine IgG subclasses. It is not clear how each subclass engages the immune system via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), or how long each antibody may last in serum. Such information is critical for understanding canine immunology and for the discovery of canine therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Through both in vitro and ex vivo experiments to evaluate canine Fc's for effector function, complement binding, FcRn binding, and ADCC, we are now able to categorize canine subclasses by function. The subclasses share functional properties with the four human IgG subclasses and are reported herein with their function-based human analog. Canine Fc fusions, canine chimeras, and caninized antibodies were characterized. Canine subclasses A and D appear effector-function negative while subclasses B and C bind canine Fc gamma receptors and are positive for ADCC. All canine subclasses bind the neonatal Fc receptor except subclass C. By understanding canine IgGs in this way, we can apply what is known of human immunology toward translational and veterinary medicine. Thus, this body of work lays the foundation for evaluating canine IgG subclasses for therapeutic antibody development and builds upon the fundamental scholarship of canine immunology. PMID:24268690

  11. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis. PMID:19482334

  12. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island Are Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus but Not Other Common Feline and Canine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Samuel P.; Kays, Roland W.; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population. PMID:18689668

  13. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island are infected with feline immunodeficiency virus but not other common feline and canine viruses.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Samuel P; Kays, Roland W; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population. PMID:18689668

  14. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  15. Etiology of maxillary canine impaction: a review.

    PubMed

    Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Stella

    2015-10-01

    This article is a review that enumerates the causes of impaction of the maxillary permanent canines, including hard tissue obstructions, soft tissue lesions, and anomalies of neighboring teeth, and discusses the much-argued relationship between environmental and genetic factors. These phenomena have been shown in many investigations to accompany the diagnosis of canine impaction and have been presented as unrelated anomalous features, each of which is etiologically construed as genetic, including the aberrant canine itself. While in general the influence of genetics pervades the wider picture, a guidance theory proposes an alternative etiologic line of reasoning and interpretation of these studies, in which the same genetically determined anomalous features provide an abnormal milieu in which the canine is reared and from which it is guided in its misdirected and often abortive path of eruption. PMID:26432311

  16. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment. PMID:2638021

  17. Rootless eruption of a mandibular permanent canine.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Yehoshua; Kuftinec, Mladen M

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the rootless eruption of a mandibular permanent canine in a 10-year-old boy; his mandible had been fractured in a car accident. The fracture was at the region of the developing canine, resulting in arrested root formation and causing abnormal, rootless eruption. Current theories on tooth eruption and the important role of the dental follicle in the process of eruption are discussed. PMID:21457868

  18. Development and validation of a serological potency test for the release of Leptospira vaccines--requirements in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Balks, Elisabeth; Gyra, Heike; Kobe, Babett; Cussler, Klaus; Werner, Esther

    2013-09-01

    Both European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 01/2008:0447 "Canine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" and the more recent Monograph 01/2008:1939 "Bovine Leptospirosis vaccine (inactivated)" explicitly allow for a sero-response test to assess batch potency. Test setup and requirements for in vivo and in vitro validation are described. Furthermore, the two main strategies to assess batch potency and their specific demands are addressed. PMID:23911253

  19. Rinderpest and other animal morbillivirus infections: comparative aspects and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Haas, L; Barrett, T

    1996-09-01

    The genus morbillivirus presently comprises measles virus of man, rinderpest virus (RPV), peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), and canine distemper virus (CDV). 'Emerging' morbilliviruses, such as phocid distemper virus (PDV) of seals, dolphin (DMV) and porpoise morbillivirus (PMV) have probably been present for a long period of time and outbreaks are possibly related to introduction into a highly susceptible population and/or be the result of interspecies transmission. In this review some comparative aspects of morbillivirus infections, particularly with respect to rinderpest and canine distemper viruses, are presented. Topics include pathogenesis, epidemiology, molecular phylogeny, diagnosis and prophylaxis. Recent developments in molecular biology have created tools which have enabled us to achieve a better understanding of morbillivirus infections at the nucleic acid level ('molecular epidemiology') while recombinant DNA technology has allowed new bivalent recombinant vaccines with improved heat stability to be produced. PMID:8885706

  20. Canine Cytogenetics - From band to basepair

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Humans and dogs have coexisted for thousands of years, during which time we have developed a unique bond, centered on companionship. Along the way, we have developed purebred dog breeds in a manner that has resulted unfortunately in many of them being affected by serious genetic disorders, including cancers. With serendipity and irony the unique genetic architecture of the 21st Century genome of Man's best friend may ultimately provide many of the keys to unlock some of nature's most intriguing biological puzzles. Canine cytogenetics has advanced significantly over the past 10 years, spurred on largely by the surge of interest in the dog as a biomedical model for genetic disease and the availability of advanced genomics resources. As such the role of canine cytogenetics has moved rapidly from one that served initially to define the gross genomic organization of the canine genome and provide a reliable means to determine the chromosomal location of individual genes, to one that enabled the assembled sequence of the canine genome to be anchored to the karyotype. Canine cytogenetics now presents the biomedical research community with a means to assist in our search for a greater understanding of how genome architectures altered during speciation and in our search for genes associated with cancers that affect both dogs and humans. The cytogenetics ‘toolbox’ for the dog is now loaded. This review aims to provide a summary of some of the recent advancements in canine cytogenetics. PMID:18467825

  1. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  2. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  3. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation. PMID:25698302

  4. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  5. Rabies Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... and booster doses should be given as needed. (Testing or booster doses are not recommended for travelers.) Ask your doctor for details. Vaccination After an Exposure:Anyone who has been bitten by an animal, or who otherwise may have been exposed to ...

  6. Valuing vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  7. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  8. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000. ... booster dose is needed every 2 years for people who remain at risk. Live typhoid vaccine (oral)Four doses: one capsule every other day for a week (day 1, day 3, day ...

  9. Polio Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the world. It would only take one person infected with polio virus coming from another country to bring the ... However, any medicine could cause a serious side effect, such as a severe allergic reaction or even death. The risk of polio vaccine causing serious harm is extremely small.

  10. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  11. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  12. Isolation and characterization of canine parvovirus type 2C (CPV-2C) from symptomatic puppies.

    PubMed

    Puentes, R; Eliopulos, N; Pérez, R; Franco, G; Sosa, K; Bianchi, P; Furtado, A; Hübner, S O; Esteves, P A

    2012-07-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is a leading cause of diarrhea in puppies in several parts of the world. In this study CPV-2 was detected and recovered from puppies showing clinical disease from Montevideo, Uruguay. Samples were processed and used to infect CRFK and MDCK cells in order to isolate the virus. Out of twelve, two samples were positive for CPV-2. A genomic region of 583 bp was amplified and the molecular characterization was performed by sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Two isolated viruses (UY1 and UY2) were CPV-2c-like viruses. The comparison between the cytophatic effect (CPE) of CPV-2 (vaccinal virus) and CPV-2c (isolated virus) on primary canine cells cultures and on CRFK line cells, demonstrated that CPV-2c is less citopathogenic in CRFK than in primary cultures. Our study represents the first report on isolation and characterization of canine parvovirus type 2c (CPV-2c) in cell cultures from South American dogs. PMID:24031919

  13. Isolation and characterization of canine parvovirus type 2C (CPV-2C) from symptomatic puppies

    PubMed Central

    Puentes, R; Eliopulos, N; Pérez, R; Franco, G; Sosa, K; Bianchi, P; Furtado, A; Hübner, S.O.; Esteves, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is a leading cause of diarrhea in puppies in several parts of the world. In this study CPV-2 was detected and recovered from puppies showing clinical disease from Montevideo, Uruguay. Samples were processed and used to infect CRFK and MDCK cells in order to isolate the virus. Out of twelve, two samples were positive for CPV-2. A genomic region of 583 bp was amplified and the molecular characterization was performed by sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Two isolated viruses (UY1 and UY2) were CPV-2c-like viruses. The comparison between the cytophatic effect (CPE) of CPV-2 (vaccinal virus) and CPV-2c (isolated virus) on primary canine cells cultures and on CRFK line cells, demonstrated that CPV-2c is less citopathogenic in CRFK than in primary cultures. Our study represents the first report on isolation and characterization of canine parvovirus type 2c (CPV-2c) in cell cultures from South American dogs. PMID:24031919

  14. The potential of canine sentinels for reemerging Trypanosoma cruzi transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Chu, Lily Chou; Quispe-Machaca, Victor; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Mazuelos, Milagros Bastos; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, a vector-borne disease transmitted by triatomine bugs and caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects millions of people in the Americas. In Arequipa, Peru, indoor residual insecticide spraying campaigns are routinely conducted to eliminate Triatoma infestans, the only vector in this area. Following insecticide spraying, there is risk of vector return and reinitiation of parasite transmission. Dogs are important reservoirs of T. cruzi and may play a role in reinitiating transmission in previously sprayed areas. Dogs may also serve as indicators of reemerging transmission. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional serological screening to detect T. cruzi antibodies in dogs, in conjunction with an entomological vector collection survey at the household level, in a disease endemic area that had been treated with insecticide 13 years prior. Spatial clustering of infected animals and vectors was assessed using Ripley’s K statistic, and the odds of being seropositive for dogs proximate to infected colonies was estimated with multivariate logistic regression. Results There were 106 triatomine-infested houses (41.1%), and 45 houses infested with T. cruzi-infected triatomine insects (17.4%). Canine seroprevalence in the area was 12.3% (n=154); all seropositive dogs were 9 months old or older. We observed clustering of vectors carrying the parasite, but no clustering of seropositive dogs. The age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio between seropositivity to T. cruzi and proximity to an infected triatomine (≤50m) was 5.67 (95% CI: 1.12 – 28.74; p=0.036). Conclusions Targeted control of reemerging transmission can be achieved by improved understanding of T. cruzi in canine populations. Our results suggest that dogs may be useful sentinels to detect re-initiation of transmission following insecticide treatment. Integration of canine T. cruzi blood sampling into existing interventions for zoonotic disease control (e.g. rabies vaccination programs

  15. Primary vaccination with the LiESP/QA-21 vaccine (CaniLeish) produces a cell-mediated immune response which is still present 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier; Vouldoukis, Ioannis; Schreiber, Paul; Martin, Virginie; McGahie, David; Gueguen, Sylvie; Cuisinier, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-15

    Canine leishmaniasis, an important zoonotic disease of dogs, is the result of an ineffective and inappropriate immune response to infection with Leishmania infantum. It is widely accepted that the appropriate immune response is characterised by a T-helper (Th)1-dominated profile in an overall mixed Th1/Th2 response. The absence of a strong Th1 response is associated with progression to the clinical disease. Thus, there is a need for an effective vaccine that could modulate the immune response to a more appropriate profile against the parasite. In this study we measured the impact of the LiESP/QA-21 canine vaccine, recently launched commercially in Europe, on selected humoral and cellular immune markers for one year after a primary vaccination course. The humoral response to vaccination was characterised by a predominantly IgG2 profile. Vaccinated dogs developed long-lasting cell-mediated immune responses against L. infantum, specifically with a stronger ability of macrophages to reduce intracellular parasite burdens in co-culture with autologous lymphocytes compared to control dogs (p=0.0002), which was correlated with induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) derivatives. These results confirm that vaccination with LiESP/QA-21 is capable of inducing an appropriate Th1-dominated immune profile which persists for a full year. PMID:24560650

  16. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccine for T1D promising in the clinic HPV vaccines halved infections in US teenage girls Modified DC immunotherapy against melanoma New study looks at clinical severity of human H7N9 infections Prevnar vaccines are valuable for healthcare systems GAPVAC: New consortium in the fight of brain cancer Cytomegalovirus vaccine to enter phase 3 Malaria vaccination using chemically attenuated parasites

  17. Fish Vaccines in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccination is a proven, cost-effective method to prevent infectious diseases in animals. Current fish vaccines can be categorized as killed fish vaccines or modified live vaccines. The major advantage of live vaccine is their ability to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses for ...

  18. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs Tips for Finding Vaccine Records Trusted Sources of Vaccine ... PRETEENS Vaccines You Need ...

  19. The Development and Clinical Evaluation of Second-Generation Leishmaniasis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Malcolm S.; Raman, Vanitha S.; Piazza, Franco M.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Leishmania parasites results in a range of clinical manifestations and outcomes. Control of Leishmania parasite transmission is extremely difficult due to the large number of vectors and potential reservoirs, and none of the current treatments are ideal. Vaccination could be an effective strategy to provide sustained control. In this review, the current global situation with regard to leishmaniasis, the immunology of Leishmania infection and various efforts to identify second generation vaccine candidates are briefly discussed. The variety of clinical trials conducted using the only current second generation vaccine approved for clinical use, LEISH-F1 + MPL-SE, are described. Given that epidemiological evidence suggests that reducing the canine reservoir also positively impacts human incidence, efforts at providing a vaccine for leishmaniasis in dogs are highlighted. Finally, potential refinements and surrogate markers that could expedite the introduction of a vaccine that can limit the severity and incidence of leishmaniasis are discussed. PMID:22085553

  20. Production and purification of non replicative canine adenovirus type 2 derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) derived vectors have been widely used for short or long-term gene transfer, both for gene therapy and vaccine applications. Because of the frequent pre-existing immunity against the classically used human adenovirus type 5, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) has been proposed as an alternative vector for human gene transfer. The well-characterized biology of CAV2, together with its ease of genetic manipulation, offer major advantages, notably for gene transfer into the central nervous system, or for inducing a wide range of protective immune responses, from humoral to cellular immunity. Nowadays, CAV2 represents one of the most appealing nonhuman adenovirus for use as a vaccine vector. This protocol describes a simple method to construct, produce and titer recombinant CAV2 vectors. After cloning the expression cassette of the gene of interest into a shuttle plasmid, the recombinant genomic plasmid is obtained by homologous recombination in the E. coli BJ5183 bacterial strain. The resulting genomic plasmid is then transfected into canine kidney cells expressing the complementing CAV2-E1 genes (DK-E1). A viral amplification enables the production of a large viral stock, which is purified by ultracentrifugation through cesium chloride gradients and desalted by dialysis. The resulting viral suspension routinely has a titer of over 10(10) infectious particles per ml and can be directly administrated in vivo. PMID:24326926

  1. Characterisation of canine parvovirus strains isolated from cats with feline panleukopenia.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Desario, Costantina; Amorisco, Francesca; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Parisi, Antonio; Terio, Valentina; Elia, Gabriella; Lucente, Maria Stella; Cavalli, Alessandra; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2010-10-01

    Unlike the original canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), CPV-2 variants have gained the ability to replicate in vivo in cats but there is limited information on the disease patterns induced by these variants in the feline host. During 2008, two distinct cases of parvoviral infection were diagnosed in our laboratories. A CPV-2a variant was identified in a 3-month-old Persian kitten displaying clinical sign of feline panleukopenia (FPL) (acute gastroenteritis and marked leukopenia) and oral ulcerations, that died eight days after the onset of the disease. Two pups living in the same pet shop as the cat were found to shed a CPV-2a strain genetically identical to the feline virus and were likely the source of infection. Also, non-fatal infection by a CPV-2c strain occurred in a 2.5-month-old European shorthair kitten displaying non-haemorrhagic diarrhoea and normal white blood cell counts. By sequence analysis of the major capsid protein (VP2) gene, the feline CPV-2c strain showed 100% identity to a recent canine type-2c isolate. Both kittens had been administered multivalent vaccines against common feline pathogens including FPL virus. Whether and to which extent the FPL vaccines can protect cats adequately from the antigenic variants of CPV-2 should be assessed. PMID:20334885

  2. Construction of an infectious clone of canine herpesvirus genome as a bacterial artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Arii, Jun; Hushur, Orkash; Kato, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Tohya, Yukinobu; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2006-04-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) is an attractive candidate not only for use as a recombinant vaccine to protect dogs from a variety of canine pathogens but also as a viral vector for gene therapy in domestic animals. However, developments in this area have been impeded by the complicated techniques used for eukaryotic homologous recombination. To overcome these problems, we used bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to generate infectious BACs. Our findings may be summarized as follows: (i) the CHV genome (pCHV/BAC), in which a BAC flanked by loxP sites was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene, was maintained in Escherichia coli; (ii) transfection of pCHV/BAC into A-72 cells resulted in the production of infectious virus; (iii) the BAC vector sequence was almost perfectly excisable from the genome of the reconstituted virus CHV/BAC by co-infection with CHV/BAC and a recombinant adenovirus that expressed the Cre recombinase; and (iv) a recombinant virus in which the glycoprotein C gene was deleted was generated by lambda recombination followed by Flp recombination, which resulted in a reduction in viral titer compared with that of the wild-type virus. The infectious clone pCHV/BAC is useful for the modification of the CHV genome using bacterial genetics, and CHV/BAC should have multiple applications in the rapid generation of genetically engineered CHV recombinants and the development of CHV vectors for vaccination and gene therapy in domestic animals. PMID:16515874

  3. A simplified system for generating recombinant E3-deleted canine adenovirus-2.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zuo; Jiang, Qian; Liu, Jiasen; Guo, Dongchun; Quan, Chuansong; Li, Botao; Qu, Liandong

    2015-01-01

    Canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) has been used extensively as a vector for studying gene therapy and vaccine applications. We describe a simple strategy for generating a replication-competent recombinant CAV-2 using a backbone vector and a shuttle vector. The backbone plasmid containing the full-length CAV-2 genome was constructed by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli strain BJ5183. The shuttle plasmid, which has a deletion of 1478 bp in the nonessential E3 viral genome region, was generated by subcloning a fusion fragment containing the flanking sequences of the CAV-2 E3 region and expression cassette sequences from pcDNA3.1(+) into modified pUC18. To determine system effectiveness, a gene for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was inserted into the shuttle plasmid and cloned into the backbone plasmid using two unique NruI and SalI sites. Transfection of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with the recombinant adenovirus genome containing the EGFP expression cassette resulted in infectious viral particles. This strategy provides a solid foundation for developing candidate vaccines using CAV-2 as a delivery vector. PMID:25450764

  4. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)Treatment of pneumococcal infections with penicillin and other drugs used to be more effective. But ... the disease, through vaccination, even more important. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV) protects against 23 types of pneumococcal ...

  5. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  6. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  7. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [335 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  8. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy, please see the MotherToBaby fact sheet Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot) during Pregnancy ( http: / / mothertobaby. org/ fact- sheets/ seasonal- influenza- vaccine- flu- shot- pregnancy/ pdf/ ). Nasal spray flu vaccines ...

  9. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  10. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccine called MMRV, which contains both chickenpox and MMR vaccines, may be given instead of the two individual ... like rash (about 1 person in 20) than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Moderate Problems:Seizure (jerking or staring) ...

  11. Vaccines for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HBV) during pregnancy Vaccination and Pregnancy Resources, journal articles, more sources, etc., from Immunization Action Coalition Video: "Vaccines and Your Baby" (26:41 min) Vaccine Education Center, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, November 2002 Also ...

  12. Vaccine refrigeration

    PubMed Central

    McColloster, Patrick J; Martin-de-Nicolas, Andres

    2014-01-01

    This commentary reviews recent changes in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) vaccine storage guidelines that were developed in response to an investigative report by the Office of the Inspector General. The use of temperature data loggers with probes residing in glycol vials is advised along with storing vaccines in pharmaceutical refrigerators. These refrigerators provide good thermal distribution but can warm to 8 °C in less than one hour after the power is discontinued. Consequently, electric grid instability influences appropriate refrigerator selection and the need for power back-up. System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI) values quantify this instability and can be used to formulate region-specific guidelines. A novel aftermarket refrigerator regulator with a battery back-up power supply and microprocessor control system is also described. PMID:24442209

  13. Synthetic generation of influenza vaccine viruses for rapid response to pandemics.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Philip R; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Gibson, Daniel G; Wentworth, David E; Stockwell, Timothy B; Algire, Mikkel A; Alperovich, Nina; Barro, Mario; Brown, David M; Craig, Stewart; Dattilo, Brian M; Denisova, Evgeniya A; De Souza, Ivna; Eickmann, Markus; Dugan, Vivien G; Ferrari, Annette; Gomila, Raul C; Han, Liqun; Judge, Casey; Mane, Sarthak; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Merryman, Chuck; Palladino, Giuseppe; Palmer, Gene A; Spencer, Terika; Strecker, Thomas; Trusheim, Heidi; Uhlendorff, Jennifer; Wen, Yingxia; Yee, Anthony C; Zaveri, Jayshree; Zhou, Bin; Becker, Stephan; Donabedian, Armen; Mason, Peter W; Glass, John I; Rappuoli, Rino; Venter, J Craig

    2013-05-15

    During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, vaccines for the virus became available in large quantities only after human infections peaked. To accelerate vaccine availability for future pandemics, we developed a synthetic approach that very rapidly generated vaccine viruses from sequence data. Beginning with hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences, we combined an enzymatic, cell-free gene assembly technique with enzymatic error correction to allow rapid, accurate gene synthesis. We then used these synthetic HA and NA genes to transfect Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were qualified for vaccine manufacture with viral RNA expression constructs encoding HA and NA and plasmid DNAs encoding viral backbone genes. Viruses for use in vaccines were rescued from these MDCK cells. We performed this rescue with improved vaccine virus backbones, increasing the yield of the essential vaccine antigen, HA. Generation of synthetic vaccine seeds, together with more efficient vaccine release assays, would accelerate responses to influenza pandemics through a system of instantaneous electronic data exchange followed by real-time, geographically dispersed vaccine production. PMID:23677594

  14. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  15. Subviral Particle as Vaccine and Vaccine Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subvirual particles retain similar antigenic features of their authentic viral capsids and thus have been applied as nonreplicating subunit vaccines against viral infection and illness. Additionally, the self-assembled, polyvalent subviral particles are excellent platforms to display foreign antigens for immune enhancement for vaccine development. These subviral particle-based vaccines are noninfectious and thus safer than the conventional live attenuated and inactivated vaccines. While several VLP vaccines are available in the markets, numerous others, including dual vaccines against more than one pathogen, are under clinical or preclinical development. This article provides an update of these efforts. PMID:24662314

  16. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  17. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of first-ever Dengue vaccine candidate in Phase 3 Agenus‘ brain cancer vaccine doubles survival rate in GBM patients New study: Rotavirus vaccines dramatically cut hospitalization rates in US children Therapeutic vaccines – from heart disease to cancer Agenus‘ genital herpes vaccine significantly reduces viral burden in Phase 2 The latest on PaxVax‘ and Gotovax AB’s cholera vaccine candidates ACIP ponders recommendation for Prevnar use in seniors PMID:25424916

  18. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates successful in phase 1 Flu shot may prevent heart attacks and stroke CDX-1401 combined with TLR agonist: Positive phase 1 results Three MRSA vaccines in early clincial trials Ovarian cancer vaccine candidate DPX-Survivac: Positive interim results from phase 1 Chinese biotech partnership brings first hepatitis E vaccine to the market Therapeutic vaccine for treatment of genital herpes enters phase 2 Visionary concept: Printable vaccines PMID:23817319

  19. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  20. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapy reduces the size of melanoma tumors in phase 3 trial EV71 vaccine protects children against HFMD Influenza vaccination important for risk groups Bharat‘s rotavirus vaccine is safe and modestly efficacious Successfully avoiding the cold-chain for vaccines FDA approval for Stallergenes’ sublingual grass pollen allergy immunotherapy HPV vaccination campaign could change from three to two doses in the UK Valneva continues phase 2/3 trial of Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccine PMID:25290656

  1. Transmigration of mandibular canine – case report

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Katarzyna; Różyło, T. Katarzyna; Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Denkiewicz, Katarzyna; Masłowska, Klaudia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Transmigration is a phenomenon of movement of an unerupted tooth in the bone across the midline. This anomaly is not often found. Transmigration is more prevalent in females than in males, and more often encountered in the mandible than maxilla, it affects mostly canines. Case Report The aim of this study was to present a case report of a mandibular canine transmigration in a patient aged 12. Intraoral examination determined hypodontia of right second premolar and delayed eruption of left second premolar in maxilla, as well as persistent deciduous teeth: right second molar, left canine and second molar. The patient was referred for a Cone-Beam CT examination, which allowed precise visualization of the transmigrating canine as well as ruled out resorption of roots of mandibular incisors. Results The treatment with a maxillary fixed orthodontic appliance was finished after obtaining a satisfactory result. Proper alignment of the incisors in the anterior-posterior plane and correct midline position were accepted by the patient. Transmigrating canine after consultation with the surgeon was designed to further radiological observation. PMID:24520309

  2. Immunologic Observations in Canine Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Kai; Mero, Matti; Oksanen, Aili; Sandholm, Markus

    1971-01-01

    Immunofluorescence studies in cases of chronic interstitial nephritis (CIN) in the dog demonstrated deposition of canine IgC and C'3 in the thickened capillary walls of the glomeruli and in the mesangium. Eluates obtained from the nephritic kidneys contained antibodies of IgG type and reacted with autologous or homologous nephritic kidneys but not with normal kidneys or with any normal canine tissue. The staining pattern of fluorescein-conjugated eluates was similar to that obtained with anti-canine IgG or anti-canine C'3. The eluates did not contain leptospiral antibodies. The findings indicate that complement-fixing immune complexes are deposited in the damaged glomeruli in CIN. The nature of the antigen involved in these complexes is unknown, but it does not seem to be a component of normal canine tissue and could thus be viral or bacterial. ImagesFig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:4106382

  3. In Vitro Exposure of Harbor Seal Immune Cells to Aroclor 1260 Alters Phocine Distemper Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Bogomolni, Andrea; Frasca, Salvatore; Levin, Milton; Matassa, Keith; Nielsen, Ole; Waring, Gordon; De Guise, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    In the last 30 years, several large-scale marine mammal mortality events have occurred, often in close association with highly polluted regions, leading to suspicions that contaminant-induced immunosuppression contributed to these epizootics. Some of these recent events also identified morbillivirus as a cause of or contributor to death. The role of contaminant exposures regarding morbillivirus mortality is still unclear. The results of this study aimed to address the potential for a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), specifically Aroclor 1260, to alter harbor seal T-lymphocyte proliferation and to assess if exposure resulted in increased likelihood of phocine distemper virus (PDV USA 2006) to infect susceptible seals in an in vitro system. Exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Aroclor 1260 did not significantly alter lymphocyte proliferation (1, 5, 10, and 20 ppm). However, using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), lymphocytes exposed to 20 ppm Aroclor 1260 exhibited a significant decrease in PDV replication at day 7 and a significant increase at day 11 compared with unexposed control cells. Similar and significant differences were apparent on exposure to Aroclor 1260 in monocytes and supernatant. The results here indicate that in harbor seals, Aroclor 1260 exposure results in a decrease in virus early during infection and an increase during late infection. The consequences of this contaminant-induced infection pattern in a highly susceptible host could result in a greater potential for systemic infection with greater viral load, which could explain the correlative findings seen in wild populations exposed to a range of persistent contaminants that suffer from morbillivirus epizootics. PMID:26142119

  4. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Vaccinated More Info Glossary Our Partners Related Websites AIDS.gov Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) CDC Vaccines Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program ...

  5. Towards Canine Rabies Elimination in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Assessment of Health Economic Data.

    PubMed

    Shwiff, S A; Hatch, B; Anderson, A; Nel, L H; Leroux, K; Stewart, D; de Scally, M; Govender, P; Rupprecht, C E

    2016-08-01

    Rabies remains a significant problem throughout much of the developing world. An estimated 69 000 people die annually from exposure to rabies. Most of these deaths are the result of being bitten by a rabid dog. Mass vaccination campaigns targeting dogs have been implemented around the world in an attempt to control or eliminate canine rabies. We analysed the vaccination and cost data for a campaign in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa; we found that the cost per dog vaccinated to be $6.61 for mass campaigns and $5.41 for local campaigns. We also estimated the cost of human post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). The cost of PEP is approximately $64.50 on average per patient, and $333 on average for the 9% of patients who receive RIG. We also found that the districts that vaccinated the most dogs per capita experienced the highest rates of human treatment and thus had the highest PEP costs. PMID:25414096

  6. A Multimeric L2 Vaccine for Prevention of Animal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Subhashini; Malandro, Nicole; Kwak, Kihyuck; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard; Palmer, Kenneth E; Huh, Warner K; Campo, M Saveria; Roden, Richard BS

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear what level of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to protect cattle from experimental bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) challenge. Markedly lower, and often undetected, serum neutralizing antibody titers were associated with protection in cattle vaccinated with BPV4 L2 as compared to L1 VLP. We hypothesized that vaccination with concatemers of the N-terminal protective epitopes of L2 derived from multiple animal papillomavirus types would enhance the breadth and strength of immunity. Therefore we generated a multimeric L2 antigen derived from three bovine and three canine papillomavirus types with divergent phenotypes and purified it from bacteria. Mice vaccinated three times with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum or RIBI adjuvant generated robust serum neutralizing antibody titers against BPV1, BPV4 and canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). Furthermore, vaccination with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum, like BPV1 L1 VLP, protected the mice from experimental challenge with BPV1 pseudovirus. PMID:21920572

  7. European regulatory framework and practices for veterinary Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Lukas

    2013-09-01

    In Europe, the legal basis for requirements for medicinal products is described in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) In the European Union, the Ph. Eur. is supplemented by several guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency. Immunological veterinary products must comply with the Ph. Eur. monograph on veterinary vaccines and the accompanying texts, as well as specific monographs. The Ph. Eur. includes monographs on canine leptospirosis and bovine leptospirosis vaccines (inactivated). Both monographs require that an immunogenicity test be performed once in the target species during the life of a vaccine. The hamster challenge test is applied for batch potency testing of canine vaccines. Alternatively, serological tests or suitable validated in vitro tests to determine the content of one or more antigenic components indicative of protection may be performed. Vaccines for use in cattle are tested in a serological test in guinea pigs. The acceptance criteria in alternative tests are set with reference to a batch of vaccine that has given satisfactory results in the immunogenicity test. At a January 2012 European workshop, the suitability of the hamster potency test was questioned and unanimous agreement was reached that moving toward complete in vitro testing is possible and should be promoted. PMID:23886926

  8. Furcation lesion in a mandibular canine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Dimitri Ribas; Sena, Larryson Goncalves; Santos, Maria Helena; Goncalves, Patricia Furtado

    2011-01-01

    Morphological changes can complicate dental treatment. This report presents a rare case of a furcation lesion in a mandibular canine with two roots. A 39-year-old man in general good health sought dental care for severe pain in his maxillary anterior teeth. The clinical examination showed localized swelling in the vestibular mucosa close to the mandibular left canine. Radiographic examination revealed two distinct roots and vertical bone resorption in the canine's mesial surface. Periodontal evaluation led to a diagnosis of periodontal abscess associated with furcation lesion. Despite the occurrence in an atypical location, the site of periodontal furcation received conventional therapy for initial decontamination, including tissue debridement and a combination of polyvinylpyrrolidone irrigation and antibiotics. To improve access, the decontamination was completed with surgical techniques and scaling and root planing. Early diagnosis of this rare morphological change helped to determine appropriate, timely treatment planning and optimal patient recovery. PMID:21903558

  9. Canine neuroendocrine carcinoma. A tumor resembling histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J; Hill, J; Weiss, L M

    1985-12-01

    The clinical and light- and electron microscopic features of 20 cases of canine neuroendocrine carcinoma, initially classified as atypical histiocytomas, are reported. The locally expansile well-circumscribed dermal tumor nodules were composed of solid masses of cells with high mitotic index and multinucleation, arranged in a trabecular pattern with prominent fibrovascular connective tissue stroma rich in reticulin fibers that outlined compact cell nests. Ultrastructural studies revealed evenly dispersed chromatin, focally indented nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with perinuclear filaments, membrane-bound dense core granules, and prominent interdigitating plasma membrane projections with primitive intercellular junctions. Clinical and pathological comparisons between canine neuroendocrine carcinoma, canine histiocytomas, and human Merkel cell neoplasms are discussed. PMID:4091229

  10. Canine rabies ecology in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Bingham, John

    2005-09-01

    Rabies is a widespread disease in African domestic dogs and certain wild canine populations. Canine rabies became established in Africa during the 20th century, coinciding with ecologic changes that favored its emergence in canids. I present a conceptual and terminologic framework for understanding rabies ecology in African canids. The framework is underpinned by 2 distinct concepts: maintenance and persistence. Maintenance encompasses the notion of indefinite transmission of infection within a local population and depends on an average transmission ratio > or =1. Maintenance in all local populations is inherently unstable, and the disease frequently becomes extinct. Persistence, the notion of long-term continuity, depends on the presence of rabies in > or =1 local population within the canine metapopulation at any time. The implications for understanding rabies ecology and control are reviewed, as are previous studies on rabies ecology in African canids. PMID:16229759

  11. The orthodontic management of ectopic canine

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukkarasu, R.; Sriram, G.; Satish, R.

    2015-01-01

    The canines being the cornerstone of the arch and smile is one of the teeth, which has the longest eruption passage that gets influenced by local and general etiological factors easily. The initial calcification of the crowns starts at 4–5 months of age and proceeds toward eruption about 11–13 years of age with mesiobuccal crown angulation that gets corrected toward occlusion. It gets displaced buccally or palatally or may sometimes get impacted. Early intervention is the best suited to manage canine eruption patterns. Once erupted ectopically, they possess a great challenge in repositioning them back into their correct position. This case report discusses an orthodontic treatment planning and execution to correct a buccally placed canine with an anterior crossbite in an adult. PMID:26538959

  12. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Nidom, Chairul A; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  13. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  14. Estimating the Global Burden of Endemic Canine Rabies

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Katie; Coudeville, Laurent; Lembo, Tiziana; Sambo, Maganga; Kieffer, Alexia; Attlan, Michaël; Barrat, Jacques; Blanton, Jesse D.; Briggs, Deborah J.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Costa, Peter; Freuling, Conrad M.; Hiby, Elly; Knopf, Lea; Leanes, Fernando; Meslin, François-Xavier; Metlin, Artem; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth; Müller, Thomas; Nel, Louis H.; Recuenco, Sergio; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Schumacher, Carolin; Taylor, Louise; Vigilato, Marco Antonio Natal; Zinsstag, Jakob; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a notoriously underreported and neglected disease of low-income countries. This study aims to estimate the public health and economic burden of rabies circulating in domestic dog populations, globally and on a country-by-country basis, allowing an objective assessment of how much this preventable disease costs endemic countries. Methodology/Principal Findings We established relationships between rabies mortality and rabies prevention and control measures, which we incorporated into a model framework. We used data derived from extensive literature searches and questionnaires on disease incidence, control interventions and preventative measures within this framework to estimate the disease burden. The burden of rabies impacts on public health sector budgets, local communities and livestock economies, with the highest risk of rabies in the poorest regions of the world. This study estimates that globally canine rabies causes approximately 59,000 (95% Confidence Intervals: 25-159,000) human deaths, over 3.7 million (95% CIs: 1.6-10.4 million) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and 8.6 billion USD (95% CIs: 2.9-21.5 billion) economic losses annually. The largest component of the economic burden is due to premature death (55%), followed by direct costs of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP, 20%) and lost income whilst seeking PEP (15.5%), with only limited costs to the veterinary sector due to dog vaccination (1.5%), and additional costs to communities from livestock losses (6%). Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that investment in dog vaccination, the single most effective way of reducing the disease burden, has been inadequate and that the availability and affordability of PEP needs improving. Collaborative investments by medical and veterinary sectors could dramatically reduce the current large, and unnecessary, burden of rabies on affected communities. Improved surveillance is needed to reduce uncertainty in burden estimates and to

  15. A Study of Transmigrated Canine in an Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagpal, Archna

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of transmigrated canines in a north Indian population and association with gender, side, associated pathologies, and dental anomalies. Subjects and methods. The prospective study consisted of panoramic radiographs of 3000 patients from two dental colleges in north India. The panoramic radiographs were screened for radiographically identified position of the transmigrated tooth, retained canine, and other coexisting dental anomalies. Results. The overall prevalence of transmigrated canines (15 mandibular and 5 maxillary) was 0.66%. The prevalence of mandibular transmigrated canine was 0.5% and maxillary transmigrated canine was 0.16%. All the transmigrated canines were unilateral. The age range was 15–53 years (average age 24.1 years) and there were 12 males (60%) and 8 females (40%). Type 1 mandibular canine transmigration was the commonest type found in our study (10 cases), followed by types 2 and 4 (2 cases each) and 1 case of type 5 transmigration. Conclusion. The prevalence of transmigrated canines in the north Indian population was 0.66% and no gender predilection was evident. The transmigrated canines have a low complication rate (10.0%) and no correlation with other dental anomalies was found. Type 3 canine is the rarest form of mandibular canine transmigration.

  16. Rabies intradermal post-exposure vaccination of humans using reconstituted and stored vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kamoltham, Thavachai; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Wilde, Henry

    2002-09-10

    Thailand's northern Petchabun province is endemic for canine rabies. There were 27 reported human rabies deaths between 1989 and 1998. A rabies control plan was formulated in 1997 between medical and veterinary public health officials. It started an intense education program and an ongoing dog vaccination campaign. Economic constraints and the high cost of biological were the main reasons for inadequate human post-exposure management (PET). It was therefore decided to use the economical Thai Red Cross Intradermal Vaccine Regimen (TRC-ID) throughout the province. The original TRC-ID method is only suitable for clinics that see more than one PET patient daily. TRC-ID was therefore modified by storing the reconstituted vaccine in a refrigerator for the same patient's next two visits. Data on a total of 8157 PET patients were collected. An additional modification of TRC-ID also eliminated the 90 day booster. There were no treatment failures and no human rabies deaths in 1999, 2000 and 2001. The modified TRC-ID method induces adequate levels of neutralizing antibodies, protects humans bitten by rabid dogs and results in significant savings in vaccine and travel costs. PMID:12213396

  17. Oncolytic Virotherapy of Canine and Feline Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Patil, Sandeep S.; Petrov, Ivan; Cappello, Joseph; Adelfinger, Marion; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in companion animals such as dogs and cats. Despite recent progress in the diagnosis and treatment of advanced canine and feline cancer, overall patient treatment outcome has not been substantially improved. Virotherapy using oncolytic viruses is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and lyse cancer cells, without causing excessive damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and initiate tumor-specific immunity. The current review describes the use of different oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy and their application to canine and feline cancer. PMID:24841386

  18. Canine Mammary Mixed Tumours: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dantas Cassali, Geovanni; Cavalheiro Bertagnolli, Angélica; Ferreira, Enio; Araújo Damasceno, Karine; de Oliveira Gamba, Conrado; Bonolo de Campos, Cecília

    2012-01-01

    Mammary mixed tumours are the most frequent neoplasias in female dogs. In humans, mixed tumours are frequently found in the salivary glands and are known as pleomorphic adenomas. In addition to their histomorphologic similarities, mixed tumours and pleomorphic adenomas have the potential to become malignant and give rise to carcinomas in mixed tumours and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma, respectively. The factors associated with malignant transformation are still poorly known in the case of canine mixed tumours. However, this form of neoplasia tends to be associated with a better prognosis than other malignant histological types. This paper discusses the main features associated with female canine mammary mixed tumours. PMID:23193497

  19. A report of canine tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, William B; O'Halloran, Henry S

    2004-03-01

    The authors describe the case of a 5-year-old girl traumatized from a dog bite to the superior aspect of the orbit in the right eye. The dog's canine tooth penetrated deep into the posterior orbit and severed the attachment of the superior oblique muscle from the globe posterior to the trochlea. The management and clinical course of the patient are described and photographs documenting the initial ocular damage and postoperative course are provided. In addition, the entity known as 'canine tooth syndrome' is reviewed. PMID:15513022

  20. Avian influenza vaccines and vaccination for poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines against avian influenza (AI) have had more limited use in poultry than vaccines against other poultry diseases such as Newcastle disease (ND) and infectious bronchitis, and have been used more commonly in the developing world. Over the past 40 years, AI vaccines have been primarily based o...