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Sample records for canine oral papillomavirus

  1. Absence of canine papillomavirus sequences in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sardon, D; Blundell, R; Burrai, G P; Alberti, A; Tore, G; Passino, E Sanna; Antuofermo, E

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (PVs) are found in human breast cancer tissue; however, it remains controversial as to whether these viruses play a role in the aetiology of this tumour. There has been minimal study of whether PVs are found in normal or abnormal mammary glands of animals. The present study investigated whether a PV sequence could be found in the mammary glands of 33 female dogs by rolling circle amplification and polymerase chain reaction. No PV DNA was found in normal or neoplastic canine mammary tissues, suggesting that canine PVs are probably not involved in the pathogenesis of canine mammary neoplasia. PMID:25435511

  2. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  3. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection. PMID:26588443

  4. Epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Christine H.; Bagheri, Ashley; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to cause a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. Data regarding oral HPV infection is limited but emerging. HPV infection of the genital tract has been more thoroughly researched and helps inform our understanding of oral HPV infection. In this article we review current data on HPV prevalence, natural history, mode of acquisition, and risk factors for oral HPV infection. PMID:24080455

  5. Novel papillomavirus isolated from the oral mucosa of a polar bear does not cluster with other papillomaviruses of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Hans; Rector, Annabel; Bertelsen, Mads F; Leifsson, Pall S; Van Ranst, Marc

    2008-05-25

    Papillomatosis has been documented in several carnivores, and papillomavirus (PV) types have been characterized from lesions in a number of carnivore species: the canine oral PV (COPV), the Felis domesticus PV type 1 (FdPV-1) isolated from a Persian cat, the Procyon lotor PV type 1 (PlPV-1) isolated from a raccoon, the canine PV type 2 (CPV-2) from a dog's foot pad lesion and the canine PV type 3 (CPV-3) associated with a canine epidermodysplasia verruciformis - like disease. A tissue sample was taken from a papillomatous lesion on the oral mucosa of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Extracted DNA was used as a template for multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA), and restriction enzyme analysis of the RCA product indicated the presence of papillomaviral DNA. The genome of this PV was cloned and the complete genomic sequence was determined. The Ursus maritimus PV type 1 (UmPV-1) genome counts 7582 basepairs and is smaller than that of other papillomaviruses from carnivore species. UmPV-1 contains the typical noncoding region NCR1, but unlike the carnivore PVs of the Lambda genus, UmPV-1 does not possess a second noncoding region NCR2. Phylogenetic analysis based on a nucleotide sequence alignment of the L1 ORF of UmPV-1 and 51 other PV types indicates that UmPV-1 does not cluster with any of the other carnivore PVs, but branches off near the root of the common branch of the genus Alphapapillomavirus. PMID:18215475

  6. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Ankit H; Chotaliya, Kiran; Marfatia, Y S

    2013-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%), but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers. PMID:24339456

  7. Oral papillomatosis caused by Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1) in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Miller, Melissa A; Kondov, Nikola O; Dodd, Erin M; Batac, Francesca; Manzer, Mike; Ives, Sarah; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) is a threatened marine sentinel. During postmortem investigations of stranded sea otters from 2004 to 2013 in California, US, papillomas were detected in the oral cavity of at least seven otters via necropsy and histopathology. Next-generation sequencing of viral particles purified from a single papilloma revealed a novel papillomavirus, Enhydra lutris papillomavirus 1 (ElPV-1). The genome of ElPV-1 was obtained, representing the first fully sequenced viral genome from southern sea otters. Phylogenetic analysis of the entire L1 gene, as well as a concatenated protein identities plot of all papillomaviral genes revealed that ElPV-1 is a λ-papillomavirus, related to a raccoon papillomavirus (Procyon lotor papillomavirus type 1) and a canine oral papillomavirus. Immunohistochemical staining, using a cross-reactive bovine papillomavirus antibody, suggested that ElPV-1 is present in intranuclear inclusions and intracytoplasmic keratin granules. Virus-infected cells were scattered throughout the stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum of the gingival and buccal papillomas. Using ElPV-1-specific PCR, we confirmed viral DNA in oral papillomas from all seven stranded sea otters, with identical L1 sequences. This virus is associated with the development of oral papillomatosis in southern sea otters. PMID:25647597

  8. Oral Human Papillomavirus in Youth From the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Farhat, Sepideh; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I; Russell, Jonathan S; Van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to high rates of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, only 2% of 209 perinatally HIV-infected youth had oral HPV. This rate was similar in HIV-exposed but uninfected youth. No association was found with sexual activity; however, low CD4 counts were associated with oral HPV. PMID:27414680

  9. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  10. The Canine Papillomavirus and Gamma HPV E7 Proteins Use an Alternative Domain to Bind and Destabilize the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingang; Zhou, Dan; Prabhu, Anjali; Schlegel, Richard; Yuan, Hang

    2010-01-01

    The high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins cooperate to immortalize primary human cervical cells and the E7 protein can independently transform fibroblasts in vitro, primarily due to its ability to associate with and degrade the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, pRb. The binding of E7 to pRb is mediated by a conserved Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu (LXCXE) motif in the conserved region 2 (CR2) of E7 and this domain is both necessary and sufficient for E7/pRb association. In the current study, we report that the E7 protein of the malignancy-associated canine papillomavirus type 2 encodes an E7 protein that has serine substituted for cysteine in the LXCXE motif. In HPV, this substitution in E7 abrogates pRb binding and degradation. However, despite variation at this critical site, the canine papillomavirus E7 protein still bound and degraded pRb. Even complete deletion of the LXSXE domain of canine E7 failed to interfere with binding to pRb in vitro and in vivo. Rather, the dominant binding site for pRb mapped to the C-terminal domain of canine E7. Finally, while the CR1 and CR2 domains of HPV E7 are sufficient for degradation of pRb, the C-terminal region of canine E7 was also required for pRb degradation. Screening of HPV genome sequences revealed that the LXSXE motif of the canine E7 protein was also present in the gamma HPVs and we demonstrate that the gamma HPV-4 E7 protein also binds pRb in a similar way. It appears, therefore, that the type 2 canine PV and gamma-type HPVs not only share similar properties with respect to tissue specificity and association with immunosuppression, but also the mechanism by which their E7 proteins interact with pRb. PMID:20824099

  11. Oral human papillomavirus is common in individuals with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Sharon L.; Wells, Susanne I.; Zhang, Xue; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Davies, Stella M.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Mueller, Robin; Panicker, Gitika; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Brown, Darron R.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Background Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a loss of function of the FA-related DNA repair pathway. Individuals with FA are predisposed to some cancers including oropharyngeal and gynecological cancers with known associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population. Since individuals with FA respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation, prevention of cancer is critical. Methods To determine if individuals with FA are particularly susceptible to oral HPV infection, we analyzed survey-based risk factor data and tested DNA isolated from oral rinses from 126 individuals with FA and 162 unaffected first-degree family members for 37 HPV types. Results Fourteen individuals (11.1%) with FA tested positive, significantly more (p=0.003) than family members (2.5%). While HPV prevalence was even higher for sexually active individuals with FA (17.7% vs. 2.4% in family; p=0.003), HPV positivity also tended to be higher in the sexually inactive (8.7% in FA vs. 2.9% in siblings). Indeed, having FA increased HPV positivity 4.9 fold (95%CI: 1.6–15.4) considering age and sexual experience, but did not differ by other potential risk factors. Conclusion Our studies suggest that oral HPV is more common in individuals with FA. It will be essential to continue to explore associations between risk factors and immune dysfunction on HPV incidence and persistence over time. Impact HPV vaccination should be emphasized in those with FA as a first step to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, although additional studies are needed to determine if the level of protection it offers in this population is adequate. PMID:25809863

  12. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  13. Clinical systemic lupeol administration for canine oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    YOKOE, INORU; AZUMA, KAZUO; HATA, KEISHI; MUKAIYAMA, TOSHIYUKI; GOTO, TAKAHIRO; TSUKA, TAKESHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; ITOH, NORIHIKO; MURAHATA, YUSUKE; OSAKI, TOMOHIRO; MINAMI, SABURO; OKAMOTO, YOSHIHARU

    2015-01-01

    Canine oral malignant melanoma (COMM) is the most aggressive malignant tumor in dogs. Lupeol is a triterpene extracted from various fruits and vegetables that reportedly inhibits melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the efficacy of subcutaneous lupeol for spontaneous COMM was evaluated. A total of 11 dogs (3, 5 and 3 dogs diagnosed with clinical stage I, II and III melanoma, respectively) were evaluated. Subcutaneous lupeol (10 mg/kg) was administered postoperatively at various time points to treat these 11 COMM cases. Of the 11 subjects, 7 exhibited no local recurrence 180 days postoperatively and no severe adverse effects were observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, no distant metastasis was observed during the experimental period. Therefore, systemic lupeol may prevent local tumor progression and distant metastasis and may be a novel adjuvant treatment for the treatment of COMM. PMID:25469276

  14. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  15. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  16. No role for human papillomavirus infection in oral cancers in a region in southern India.

    PubMed

    Laprise, Claudie; Madathil, Sreenath A; Allison, Paul; Abraham, Priya; Raghavendran, Anantharam; Shahul, Hameed P; ThekkePurakkal, Akhil-Soman; Castonguay, Geneviève; Coutlée, François; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Franco, Eduardo L; Nicolau, Belinda

    2016-02-15

    Oral cancer is a major public health issue in India with ∼ 77,000 new cases and 52,000 deaths yearly. Paan chewing, tobacco and alcohol use are strong risk factors for this cancer in India. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are also related to a subset of head and neck cancers (HNCs). We examined the association between oral HPV and oral cancer in a sample of Indian subjects participating in a hospital-based case-control study. We recruited incident oral cancer cases (N = 350) and controls frequency-matched by age and sex (N = 371) from two main referral hospitals in Kerala, South India. Sociodemographic and behavioral data were collected by interviews. Epithelial cells were sampled using Oral CDx® brushes from the oral cancer site and the normal mucosa. Detection and genotyping of 36 HPV genotypes were done using a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Data collection procedures were performed by qualified dentists via a detailed protocol with strict quality control, including independent HPV testing in India and Canada. HPV DNA was detected in none of the cases or controls. Associations between oral cancer and risk factors usually associated with HPV infection, such as oral sex and number of lifetime sexual partners, were examined by logistic regression and were not associated with oral cancer. Lack of a role for HPV infection in this study may reflect cultural or religious characteristics specific to this region in India that are not conducive to oral HPV transmission. A nationwide representative prevalence study is needed to investigate HPV prevalence variability among Indian regions. PMID:26317688

  17. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  18. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein–Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  19. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  20. Rates and Determinants of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection in Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Hawes, Stephen; Hughes, James P.; Feng, Qinghua; Stern, Michael E.; O’Reilly, Sandra; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Xi, Long Fu; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about rates and determinants of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, an infection that is etiologically linked with oropharyngeal cancers. Methods A cohort of male university students (18–24 years of age) was examined every 4 months (212 men; 704 visits). Oral specimens were collected via gargle/rinse and swabbing of the oropharynx. Genotyping for HPV type 16 (HPV-16) and 36 other alpha-genus types was performed by PCR-based assay. Data on potential determinants was gathered via clinical examination, in-person questionnaire, and biweekly online diary. Hazard ratios (HR) were used to measure associations with incident infection. Results Prevalence of oral HPV infection at enrollment was 7.5% and 12-month cumulative incidence was 12.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.0, 21.3). Prevalence of oral HPV-16 was 2.8% and 12-month cumulative incidence was 0.8% (CI: 0.1, 5.7). 28.6% of prevalent and none of incident oral HPV infections were detected more than once. In a multivariate model, incident oral HPV infection was associated with recent frequency of performing oral sex (≥1 per week: HR=3.7; CI: 1.4, 9.8), recent anal sex with men (HR=42.9; CI: 8.8, 205.5), current infection with the same HPV type in the genitals (HR=6.2; CI: 2.4, 16.4) and hyponychium (HR=11.8, CI: 4.1; 34.2). Conclusions Although nearly 20% of sexually active male university students had evidence of oral HPV infection within 12 months, most infections were transient. HPV-16 was not common. Sexual contact and autoinoculation appeared to play independent roles in the transmission of alpha-genus HPV to the oral cavity of young men. PMID:23064535

  1. Frequent detection of high human papillomavirus DNA loads in oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, A; Cannella, F; Scagnolari, C; Gentile, M; Sciandra, I; Antonelli, G; Ciolfi, C; Russo, C; Palaia, G; Romeo, U; Polimeni, A

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is estimated to be the cause of 40--80% of the squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx but only of a small fraction of the oral cavity cancers. The prevalence of oral HPV infection has significantly increased in the last decade, raising concerns about the role of HPV in progression of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) toward squamous cell carcinomas. We sought to study HPV infection in patients with oral lesions, and in control individuals, using non-invasive and site-specific oral brushing and sensitive molecular methods. HPV DNA positivity and viral loads were evaluated in relation to patient data and clinical diagnosis. We enrolled 116 individuals attending Dental Clinics: 62 patients with benign oral lesions (e.g. fibromas, papillomatosis, ulcers) or OPMD (e.g. lichen, leukoplakia) and 54 controls. Oral cells were collected with Cytobrush and HPV-DNA was detected with quantitative real-time PCR for the more common high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) genotypes. HPV detection rate, percentage of HR HPVs and HPV-DNA loads (namely HPV16 and in particular, HPV18) were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Lichen planus cases had the highest HPV-positive rate (75.0%), hairy leukoplakia the lowest (33.3%). This study detected unexpectedly high rates of HPV infection in cells of the oral mucosa. The elevated HR HPV loads found in OPMD suggest the effectiveness of quantitative PCR in testing oral lesions. Prospective studies are needed to establish whether elevated viral loads represent a clinically useful marker of the risk of malignant progression. PMID:26408278

  2. Draft genome sequences of 26 porphyromonas strains isolated from the canine oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Coil, David A; Alexiev, Alexandra; Wallis, Corrin; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Davis, Ian; Horsfall, Alexander; Kirkwood, Nicola; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A; Harris, Stephen; Darling, Aaron E

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequences for 26 strains of Porphyromonas (P. canoris, P. gulae, P. cangingavalis, P. macacae, and 7 unidentified) and an unidentified member of the Porphyromonadaceae family. All of these strains were isolated from the canine oral cavity, from dogs with and without early periodontal disease. PMID:25858832

  3. Human Papillomavirus in Oral Leukoplakia, Verrucous Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Normal Mucous Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Ghazi, Narges; Meshkat, Zahra; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common oral malignancy, and verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a less invasive type of SCC. Leukoplakia (LP) is the most frequent premalignant lesion in the oral cavity. The human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as one of the etiologic factors of these conditions. The association of anogenital and cervical cancers with HPV particularly its high-risk subtypes (HPV HR) has been demonstrated. The purpose of our study was to investigate the hypothetical association between HPV and the mentioned oral cavity lesions. Methods One hundred and seventy-three samples (114 SCCs, 21 VCs, 20 LPs) and 18 normal mucosa samples (as a control group) were retrieved from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology of Mashhad Dental School, Iran. The association of HPV genotypes in LP, VC, and SCC was compared to normal oral mucosa using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed the absence of HPV in normal mucosa and LP lesions. In three samples of VC (14.3%), we observed the presence of HPV HR (types 16 and 18). All VCs were present in the mandibular ridge of females aged over 65 years old. No statistically significant correlation between HPV and VC was observed (p=0.230). Additionally, 15 (13.1%) SCCs showed HPV positivity, but this was not significant (p=0.830). The prevalence of SCC was higher on the tongue with the dominant presence of less carcinogenic species of HPV (types 6 and 11). A statistically significant association was not observed between HPV and SCC or VC in the oral cavity. Conclusion More studies are necessary to better understand the relationship between HPV and malignant/premalignant oral cavity lesions. PMID:26674929

  4. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Among Young Women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Castro, Felipe; Hildesheim, Allan; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Herrero, Rolando; Alfaro, Mario; Bratti, M. Concepción; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; Guillén, Diego; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfonso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) in Latin America. Methods. Women (N = 5838) aged 22–29 in the control and vaccine arms of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica had oral, cervical, and anal specimens collected. Samples were tested for alpha mucosal HPV types (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1); a subset of oral samples (n = 500) was tested for cutaneous HPV types in the genera alpha, beta, gamma, mu, and nu. Results. In the control arm (n = 2926), 1.9% of women had an oral alpha mucosal HPV detected, 1.3% had carcinogenic HPV, and 0.4% had HPV-16; similar patterns for non-16/18 HPV types were observed in the vaccine arm. Independent risk factors for any oral alpha mucosal HPV among women in the control arm included marital status (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8–5.7 for single compared to married/living as married), number of sexual partners (AOR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.0–6.1 for ≥4 partners compared to 0–1 partners), chronic sinusitis (AOR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5–6.7), and cervical HPV infection (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–4.6). Detection of beta HPV was common (18.6%) and not associated with sexual activity. Conclusions. Unlike cutaneous HPV types, alpha mucosal HPV types were uncommon in the oral region and were predominately associated with sexual behavior. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661. PMID:24014882

  5. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  6. Incidence and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Hildesheim, Allan; Villa, Luisa L.; Salmerón, Jorge J.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers disproportionately affect men, are increasing in incidence, and have no proven prevention methods. We aimed to establish the natural history of oral HPV infection in men. Methods To estimate incidence and clearance of HPV infections, men residing in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA who were HIV negative and reported no history of anogenital cancer were recruited into the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) cohort study. A subset of the cohort who provided two or more oral rinse-and-gargle samples with valid HPV results and who completed a minimum of 2 weeks of follow-up were included in this analysis. Oral rinse-and-gargle samples and questionnaire data were obtained every 6 months for up to 4 years. Samples were analysed for the presence of oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV infections by the linear array method. Findings 1626 men aged 18–73 years and with a median follow-up of 12·7 months (IQR 12·1–14·7) were included in the analysis. During the first 12 months of follow-up, 4·4% (95% CI 3·5–5·6; n=115 incident infections) of men acquired an incident oral HPV infection, 1·7% (1·2–2·5; n=53 incident infections) an oral oncogenic HPV infection, and 0·6% (0·3–1·1; n=18 incident infections) an oral HPV 16 infection. Acquisition of oral oncogenic HPV was significantly associated with smoking and not being married or cohabiting, but was similar across countries, age groups, and reported sexual behaviours. Median duration of infection was 6·9 months (95 % CI 6·2–9·3; n=45 cleared infections) for any HPV, 6·3 months (6·0–9·9; n=18 cleared infections) for oncogenic HPV, and 7·3 months (6·0–not estimable; n=5 cleared infections) for HPV 16. Eight of the 18 incident oral HPV 16 infections persisted for two or more study visits. Interpretation Newly acquired oral oncogenic HPV infections in healthy men were rare and most were cleared within 1 year

  7. Strategies for Developing Oral Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Induced Cancer using Nanoparticle mediated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Kouzi, Samir A; Hussain, Muhammad Delwar

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are a diverse group of small non-enveloped DNA viruses. Some HPVs are classified as low-risk as they are very rarely associated with neoplasia or cancer in the general population, and cause lenient warts. Other HPVs are considered as high-risk types because they are responsible for several important human cancers, including cervical cancer, a large proportion of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Transmission of HPV occurs primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The risk of contracting genital HPV infection and cervical cancer is influenced by sexual activity. Currently two prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil® (Merck, USA) and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline, UK), are available and recommended for mass immunization of adolescents. However, these vaccines have limitations as they are expensive and require cold chain storage and trained personnel to administer them by injection. The use of nano or micro particulate vaccines could address most of these limitations as they are stable at room temperature, inexpensive to produce and distribute to resource poor regions, and can be administered orally without the need for adjuvants in the formulation. Also it is possible to increase the efficiency of these particulate vaccines by decorating the surface of the nano or micro particulates with suitable ligands for targeted delivery. Oral vaccines, which can be delivered using particulate formulations, have the added potential to stimulate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue located in the digestive tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, both of which are important for the induction of effective mucosal response against many viruses. In addition, oral vaccines provide the opportunity to reduce production and administration costs and are very patient compliant. This review elaborately discusses different strategies that can be pursued to develop a nano or micro particulate oral vaccine for HPV induced cancers and

  8. p53 mutations and human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma: correlation with apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J. Y.; Cho, N. P.; Kong, G.; Lee, J. D.; Yoon, K.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were analysed for p53 mutations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to examine the prevalency of these factors and correlation with apoptotic index (AI; number of apoptotic cells per 100 tumour cells) of the tumour tissue. In polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Southern blot analysis, HPV DNAs were detected from 22 out of 42 SCCs (52%) with predominance of HPV-16 (68%). p53 mutations in exons 5-8, screened by nested PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, were observed in 16 of 42 tumours (38%). The state of the p53 gene did not show any correlation with HPV infection. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) method was used for detection of apoptotic cells. The mean AI was 2.35, ranging from 0.31 to 6.63. SCCs associated with p53 mutation had significantly lower AI than those without p53 mutation (P < 0.01), whereas no difference in AI was found between SCCs with and without HPV infection. The results of this study confirmed that HPV infection and/or p53 mutations are implicated, but are not mutually exclusive events, in carcinogenesis of oral SCC and also showed that decrease in apoptosis is more closely related to p53 mutation than HPV infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703282

  9. Effect of human papillomavirus 16 oncoproteins on oncostatin M upregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chotiyano, Apinya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Promthet, Supannee; Swangphon, Piyawut; Wongjampa, Weerayut; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection modulates several host cytokines contributing to cancer development. Oncostatin M (OSM), an IL-6 family cytokine, acts to promote cell senescence and inhibit growth. Its dysregulation promotes cell survival, cell proliferation and metastasis in various malignancies. The effect of HPV on OSM dysregulation has not been investigated. To elucidate this, immunohistochemistry was used on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues: HPV-positive (50) and HPV-negative (50) cases. Immortalized human cervical keratinocytes expressing HPV16E6 (HCK1T, Tet-On system) were used to demonstrate the role of HPV16E6 in OSM expression. In addition, a vector containing HPV16E6/E7 was transiently transfected into oral cancer cell lines. Cell viability, cell-cycle progression and cell migration were evaluated using flow cytometry and a wound healing assay, respectively. The results showed various intensities of OSM expression in OSCC. Interestingly, the median percentages of strongly stained cells were significantly higher in HPV-positive OSCCs than in HPV-negative OSCCs. To explore the role of HPV oncoproteins on OSM expression, the expression of HPV16E6 in the HCK1T Tet-On condition was induced by doxycycline and HPV16E6 was found to significantly upregulate levels of OSM mRNA and protein, with concomitant upregulation of c-Myc. In addition, the levels of OSM mRNA and protein in E6/E7 transiently transfected oral cancer cells also gradually increased in a time-dependent manner and these transfected cells showed greater viability and higher migration rates and cell-cycle progression than controls. This result demonstrates that HPV16 oncoproteins upregulate OSM and play an important role to promote OSCC development. PMID:27349249

  10. Risk Factors for Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Healthy Individuals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with oral cancer development. However, few epidemiologic investigations have focused on oral HPV prevalence in healthy individuals. The objective of this study was to provide updated information regarding oral HPV prevalence in patients without oral cancer worldwide. Methods We systematically reviewed 29 studies reporting the prevalence of oral HPV infection that included 22,756 subjects (10,124 males, 12,623 females, and nine unknown gender; age range 2 - 89 years) and were published from January 2012 to June 2015. Results The prevalence of overall HPV, low-risk type HPV, high-risk type HPV, and HPV16 in the reported cases was 5.5%, 2.2%, 2.7%, and 1.0%, respectively. The prevalence of overall HPV was considerably higher in males who had sex with males (12.2%) as compared to heterosexual males (4.7%) and females (2.9%). A meta-analysis was performed to elucidate significant risk factors for oral HPV infection, which revealed a significant statistical association for oral sex and smoking with oral HPV infection (odds ratio (OR): 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.51 - 2.39, P < 0.0001; OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.32 - 3.43, P = 0.002). Conclusions Our findings suggest that sexual behavior and smoking are importantly related to oral HPV infection in healthy individuals.

  11. Treatment of canine oral squamous cell carcinomas with photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, D L; Pope, E R; Payne, J T; West, M K; Tompson, R V; Tate, D

    2000-01-01

    Eleven dogs with naturally occurring oral squamous cell carcinomas were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using Photochlor (HPPH) as the photosensitizer. The largest length of the tumours measured in a two-dimensional plane ranged from 0.9 to 6.8 cm. Seven of the tumours invaded underlying bone as determined by radiograph appearance. Photochlor was injected intravenously at a dose of 0.3 mg kg–1. Forty-eight hours later the tumours were treated. Tumours with a surface to base depth of greater than 1 cm were surgically reduced to less than 1 cm. Irradiation with 665 nm light with an energy density of 100 J cm–2was administered. Eight dogs were considered cured with no tumour recurrence for at least 17 months after treatment. Local treatment of oral squamous cell carcinomas with PDT appears to give results similar to those obtained with surgical removal of large portions of the mandible or maxilla. The cosmetic results with PDT are superior to those of radical surgical removal. The new sensitizer, Photochlor, appears effective for oral squamous carcinomas with results similar to those reported for other sensitizers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755404

  12. Incidence and clinical management of oral human papillomavirus infection in men: a series of key short messages.

    PubMed

    Videla, Sebastián; Darwich, Laila; Cañadas, MariPaz; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sirera, Guillem

    2014-08-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are less prevalent than genital and anal infections. However, the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas has increased significantly over the last 2 decades in several countries. At least 90% of these cancers are associated with oncogenic type HPV16. Oral HPV infections are notably more frequent in men than in women, and the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas has increased, predominantly among mid-adult men. Nevertheless, little is known about the progression of oral HPV infection to cancer, and it remains unclear which medical interventions should be applied to modify the natural history of the disease. This narrative review aimed at non-experts in HPV infection provides an update on oral HPV infection and its clinical management in men. Furthermore, using the cervix as a reference anatomical site, the lessons learned from investigations on cervical HPV infection are also addressed. PMID:24865412

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in canine oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    MARTANO, MANUELA; RESTUCCI, BRUNELLA; CECCARELLI, DORA MARIA; LO MUZIO, LORENZO; MAIOLINO, PAOLA

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial for the growth and metastasis of malignant tumours, and various proangiogenic factors promote this process. One of these factors is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which appears to play a key role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to assess whether VEGF expression is associated with angiogenesis, disease progression and neoplastic proliferation in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue. VEGF immunoreactivity was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 30 specimens, including normal oral mucosa and OSCC tissues graded as well, moderately or poorly differentiated. VEGF expression was correlated with tumour cell proliferation, as assessed using the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) marker and microvessel density (data already published). The present results revealed that VEGF and PCNA expression increased significantly between normal oral tissue and neoplastic tissue, and between well and moderately/poorly differentiated tumours. In addition, VEGF expression was strongly correlated with PCNA expression and microvessel density. It was concluded that VEGF may promote angiogenesis through a paracrine pathway, stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and, similarly, may induce tumour cell proliferation through an autocrine pathway. The present results suggest that the evaluation of VEGF may be a useful additional criterion for estimating malignancy and growth potential in canine OSCCs. PMID:26870224

  14. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  15. Risk factors for acquisition and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Margolick, Joseph B; Weber, Kathleen M; Strickler, Howard D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Cranston, Ross D; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010-2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and "rimming" partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P < 0.05). This helps explain the consistent associations observed between these factors and prevalent oral HPV infection in previous cross-sectional studies. PMID:25480823

  16. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Clearance of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Strickler, Howard D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Cranston, Ross D.; Burk, Robert D.; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010–2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and “rimming” partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P < 0.05). This helps explain the consistent associations observed between these factors and prevalent oral HPV infection in previous cross-sectional studies. PMID:25480823

  17. High-risk human papillomavirus in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Association of High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) with oral cancer has been established recently. Detecting these viruses in oral cavity is important to prevent oral lesions related to them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HR-HPV in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer, and their children. A total of 70 women, previously diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 46 children of these women, born by vaginal delivery only, were selected for this study. Buccal swabs were collected from their oral cavity and HPV detection was carried out using Hybrid Capture 2 high-risk HPV (HC2 HR-HPV) detection system. Results Out of 70 women with cervical cancer, four (5.71%) were found to be positive for HR-HPV in their oral cavity. No association of HR-HPV was found with sociodemographic profile, marital status, reproductive history, tobacco and alcohol usage, contraceptive pills usage, and presence of oral lesions (p>0.05). Among children, HR-HPV in the oral cavity was detected in only 1 of the 46 subjects examined (2.17%). Clinically healthy oral mucosa, without any oral lesions, was observed in all the HR-HPV positive subjects. Conclusion The result of this study showed that there is low, if any, risk of HR-HPV infection in the oral cavity of women with cervical cancer. Further, our study suggests that there is very low risk for children of women with cervical cancer, to acquire and sustain HR-HPV in their oral cavity until childhood or adolescence. PMID:20550718

  18. Human Papillomavirus as an Independent Predictor in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Xu, Qin-gan; Chen, Xin-ming; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-01-01

    Aim There is an increasing evidence for the role of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relevance of HPV infection to the survival and prognosis of OSCC. Methodology Fifty-two patients with OSCC were followed from 4 to 88 months with a median of 50.7 months. HPV DNA was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens by nested PCR with MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primer pairs and the HPV genotype was determined by direct DNA sequencing. Association between the HPV status and risk factors for cancer as well as tumor-host characteristics were analyzed. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed using the log-rank test. Results HPV was found in 40.4% of the tumors with HPV16 accounting for 63.5%, HPV18 for 30.8%, HPV6 for 3.9% and HPV11 for 1.8%. No infection with more than one HPV genotype was detected. HPV infection was significantly associated with poor histological grade, TNM stage I–II, alcohol usage and no smoking status. Multi-variate analysis showed that HPV had an independent prognostic effect on the overall survival after adjusting other confounding factors such as histological grade, TNM stage and tobacco usage. The presence of HPV was significantly correlated with a better survival in patients with OSCC. Conclusion HPV infection can act as an independent predictor for the survival and prognosis of OSCC. PMID:20695077

  19. Comparison of oral and intramuscular recombinant canine distemper vaccination in African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Connolly, Maren; Thomas, Patrick; Woodroffe, Rosie; Raphael, Bonnie L

    2013-12-01

    A series of three doses of recombinant canary-pox-vectored canine distemper virus vaccine was administered at 1-mo intervals, orally (n = 8) or intramuscularly (n = 13), to 21 previously unvaccinated juvenile African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo. Titers were measured by serum neutralization at each vaccination and at intervals over a period of 3.5-21.5 mo after the initial vaccination. All postvaccination titers were negative for orally vaccinated animals at all sampling time points. Of the animals that received intramuscular vaccinations, 100% had presumed protective titers by the end of the course of vaccination, but only 50% of those sampled at 6.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers. None of the three animals sampled at 21.5 mo postvaccination had positive titers. PMID:24450046

  20. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    King, Eleanor M.; Oomeer, Soonita; Gilson, Richard; Copas, Andrew; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Jit, Mark; Edmunds, W. John; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men who have sex with men (MSM) differs from anogenital HPV infection. The impact of HPV vaccination has, to date, largely focussed on anogenital outcomes. Vaccination of MSM in the UK has been recommended and, if implemented, baseline estimates of oral HPV prevalence will be useful. Methods We searched Medline, Embase and psycINFO databases for studies reporting prevalence, incidence, and clearance of oral HPV infection in MSM. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression on prevalence estimates and summarised within-study risk factors for oral HPV DNA detection and incidence/clearance rates. We also performed a meta-analysis of the effect of MSM on oral HPV prevalence compared to heterosexual men. Results 26 publications were identified. The pooled prevalence of oral HPV16 from twelve estimates was 3.0% (95%CI 0.5–5.5) in HIV-negative and 4.7% (95%CI 2.1–7.3) in HIV-positive MSM. Median age of study participants explained 38% of heterogeneity (p<0.01) in HPV prevalence estimates (pooled = 17% and 29% in HIV-negative and HIV-positive, respectively; 22 estimates). Nine studies compared MSM to heterosexual men and found no difference in oral HPV prevalence (pooled OR 1.07 (95%CI 0.65–1.74)). The clearance rate was higher than incidence within studies. Type-specific concordance between oral and anogenital sites was rare. Conclusion There was substantial heterogeneity between estimates of oral HPV prevalence in MSM populations that was partly explained by HIV status and median age. PMID:27384050

  1. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies. PMID:24548425

  2. Cell proliferation and expression of connexins differ in melanotic and amelanotic canine oral melanomas.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tarso Felipe; Gentile, Luciana Boffoni; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Mennecier, Gregory; Chaible, Lucas Martins; Cogliati, Bruno; Roman, Marco Antonio Leon; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan

    2014-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant neoplasm occurring in several animal species, and is the most frequently found tumor in the oral cavity in dogs. Melanomas are classified into two types: melanotic and amelanotic. Prior research suggests that human amelanotic melanomas are more aggressive than their melanotic counterparts. This study evaluates the behavior of canine melanotic and amelanotic oral cavity melanomas and quantifies cell proliferation and the expression of connexins. Twenty-five melanomas (16 melanotic and 9 amelanotic) were collected from dogs during clinical procedures at the Veterinary Hospital of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. After diagnosis, dogs were followed until death or euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed the gross melanotic or amelanotic characteristics and tumors were classified according to the WHO. HMB45 or Melan A immunostainings were performed to confirm the diagnosis of amelanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was quantified both by counting mitotic figures and PCNA positive nuclei. Expressions of connexins 26 and 43 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Dogs bearing amelanotic melanomas presented a shorter lifespan in comparison to those with melanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was significantly higher in amelanotic melanomas. Expressions of Connexins 26 and 43 were significantly reduced in amelanotic melanomas. The results presented here suggest that oral cavity melanotic and amelanotic melanomas differ regarding their behavior, cell proliferation and connexin expression in dogs, indicating a higher aggressiveness of amelanotic variants. PMID:24126842

  3. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  4. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, 'universal' SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by 'universal' primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  5. Comparative Genomics of the Genus Porphyromonas Identifies Adaptations for Heme Synthesis within the Prevalent Canine Oral Species Porphyromonas cangingivalis

    PubMed Central

    O’Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Wallis, Corrin; Davis, Ian J.; Harris, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonads play an important role in human periodontal disease and recently have been shown to be highly prevalent in canine mouths. Porphyromonas cangingivalis is the most prevalent canine oral bacterial species in both plaque from healthy gingiva and plaque from dogs with early periodontitis. The ability of P. cangingivalis to flourish in the different environmental conditions characterized by these two states suggests a degree of metabolic flexibility. To characterize the genes responsible for this, the genomes of 32 isolates (including 18 newly sequenced and assembled) from 18 Porphyromonad species from dogs, humans, and other mammals were compared. Phylogenetic trees inferred using core genes largely matched previous findings; however, comparative genomic analysis identified several genes and pathways relating to heme synthesis that were present in P. cangingivalis but not in other Porphyromonads. Porphyromonas cangingivalis has a complete protoporphyrin IX synthesis pathway potentially allowing it to synthesize its own heme unlike pathogenic Porphyromonads such as Porphyromonas gingivalis that acquire heme predominantly from blood. Other pathway differences such as the ability to synthesize siroheme and vitamin B12 point to enhanced metabolic flexibility for P. cangingivalis, which may underlie its prevalence in the canine oral cavity. PMID:26568374

  6. Comparative Genomics of the Genus Porphyromonas Identifies Adaptations for Heme Synthesis within the Prevalent Canine Oral Species Porphyromonas cangingivalis.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Darling, Aaron E; Eisen, Jonathan A; Wallis, Corrin; Davis, Ian J; Harris, Stephen J

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonads play an important role in human periodontal disease and recently have been shown to be highly prevalent in canine mouths. Porphyromonas cangingivalis is the most prevalent canine oral bacterial species in both plaque from healthy gingiva and plaque from dogs with early periodontitis. The ability of P. cangingivalis to flourish in the different environmental conditions characterized by these two states suggests a degree of metabolic flexibility. To characterize the genes responsible for this, the genomes of 32 isolates (including 18 newly sequenced and assembled) from 18 Porphyromonad species from dogs, humans, and other mammals were compared. Phylogenetic trees inferred using core genes largely matched previous findings; however, comparative genomic analysis identified several genes and pathways relating to heme synthesis that were present in P. cangingivalis but not in other Porphyromonads. Porphyromonas cangingivalis has a complete protoporphyrin IX synthesis pathway potentially allowing it to synthesize its own heme unlike pathogenic Porphyromonads such as Porphyromonas gingivalis that acquire heme predominantly from blood. Other pathway differences such as the ability to synthesize siroheme and vitamin B12 point to enhanced metabolic flexibility for P. cangingivalis, which may underlie its prevalence in the canine oral cavity. PMID:26568374

  7. A Multimeric L2 Vaccine for Prevention of Animal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Subhashini; Malandro, Nicole; Kwak, Kihyuck; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard; Palmer, Kenneth E; Huh, Warner K; Campo, M Saveria; Roden, Richard BS

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear what level of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to protect cattle from experimental bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) challenge. Markedly lower, and often undetected, serum neutralizing antibody titers were associated with protection in cattle vaccinated with BPV4 L2 as compared to L1 VLP. We hypothesized that vaccination with concatemers of the N-terminal protective epitopes of L2 derived from multiple animal papillomavirus types would enhance the breadth and strength of immunity. Therefore we generated a multimeric L2 antigen derived from three bovine and three canine papillomavirus types with divergent phenotypes and purified it from bacteria. Mice vaccinated three times with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum or RIBI adjuvant generated robust serum neutralizing antibody titers against BPV1, BPV4 and canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). Furthermore, vaccination with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum, like BPV1 L1 VLP, protected the mice from experimental challenge with BPV1 pseudovirus. PMID:21920572

  8. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human papillomavirus DNA was only found in two oral warts and was identified as HPV type 32. Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected in 16 biopsy specimens, including the 12 HLs, 2 cases of candidiasis, and 2 samples of normal epithelium. Epstein-Barr virus positivity in HL could be confirmed by Southern blot analysis and DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated DNA probes (bio-DISH). Epstein-Barr virus bio-DISH was also positive in one sample of normal epithelium from a patient with HL. The results indicate that HL is strongly associated with EBV and not with any of the common HPV types that react with general HPV primers in the PCR. However the detection of EBV in normal oral epithelium by PCR and bio-DISH suggests that the presence of this virus is not exclusively related to HL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2169191

  9. Concurrence of oral and genital human papillomavirus infection in healthy men: a population-based cross-sectional study in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Hang, Dong; Deng, Qiuju; Liu, Mengfei; Xi, Longfu; He, Zhonghu; Zhang, Chaoting; Sun, Min; Liu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Yaqi; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, a primary cause of genital cancer, is also related to the increasing incidence of oropharyngeal cancer among young men. Relatively little is known about the concurrence of oral and genital infection among healthy individuals. Oral and genital swab exfoliated cells were collected simultaneously from 2566 men in rural China. Using general primer-mediated (SPF1/GP6+) PCR and sequencing, HPV testing results were obtained from 2228 men with both valid oral and genital specimens (β-globin-positive). The prevalence of HPV infection was 6.7% in the oral cavity and 16.9% for the external genitalia. Among 43 men (1.9%, 43/2228) with oral-genital coinfection, 60.5% (26/43) harbored an identical HPV type at both sites. The risk of oral HPV infection was higher among men with genital infection than among uninfected men (11.4% vs. 5.7%, Adjusted OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.6–3.4). In addition, having multiple lifetime sexual partners was a significant risk for oral-genital HPV coinfection (Adjusted OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.0–7.0; 2 partners vs. 1 partner). These findings provide a basis for further understanding the natural history and transmission dynamics of oral HPV infection. PMID:26503510

  10. Oral human papillomavirus type-specific infection in HIV-infected men: a prospective cohort study among men who have sex with men and heterosexual men.

    PubMed

    Darwich, L; Cañadas, M P; Videla, S; Coll, J; Molina-López, R A; Cobarsi, P; Sirera, G; Clotet, B

    2014-09-01

    The natural history of type-specific oral infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) was assessed in a cohort of HIV-infected men (538 men who have sex with men (MSM); 195 heterosexuals). Risk factors associated with oral HPV infections were examined. The overall prevalence of HPV was 16%: HPV-16 was the most prevalent type (3.7% MSM; 7.8% heterosexuals). The prevalence of HPV-16 in heterosexuals was associated with CD4 nadir counts <200 cells/μL (ORadjusted = 3.0, 95% CI, 1.4-6.3). The overall incidence of HPV was similar between groups (11%), but the incidence of HPV-16 was higher in heterosexuals (ORadjusted = 3.2, 95% CI, 1.1-9.5). Not only MSM but also HIV-infected heterosexual men are at risk of HPV infection. Regular and careful oral inspection is needed. PMID:24382308

  11. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs. PMID:27276060

  12. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs. PMID:27276060

  13. Diversity of beta-papillomavirus at anogenital and oral anatomic sites of men: The HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Emily Montosa; Sudenga, Staci L; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to describe prevalence of β-HPVs at three anatomic sites among 717 men from Brazil, Mexico and US enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. β-HPVs were genotyped using Luminex technology. Overall, 77.7%, 54.3% and 29.3% men were positive for any β-HPV at the genitals, anal canal, and oral cavity, respectively. Men from US and Brazil were significantly less likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal than men from Mexico. Older men were more likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal compared to younger men. Prevalence of β-HPV at the oral cavity was significantly associated with country of origin and age. Current smokers were significantly less likely to have β-HPV in the oral cavity than men who never smoked. Lack of associations between β-HPV and sexual behaviors may suggest other routes of contact such as autoinoculation which need to be explored further. PMID:27161202

  14. The Magnitude of the Association between Human Papillomavirus and Oral Lichen Planus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Tingting; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) in oral lichen planus (OLP) is controversial. Objectives The primary aim of the current study is to calculate the pooled risk estimates of HPV infection in OLP when compared with healthy controls. Methods Bibliographic searches were conducted in three electronic databases. Articles on the association between HPV and OLP were selected from case-control studies or cross-sectional studies, following predefined criteria. Pooled data were analyzed by calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 233 publications identified, 22 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. Collectively, 835 cases and 734 controls were available for analysis. The summary estimate showed that OLP patients have significantly higher HPV prevalence (OR: 6.83; 95% CI: 4.15–11.27) than healthy controls. In subgroup analyses, the association of HPV and OLP varied significantly by geographic populations. The ORs ranged from 2.43 to 132.04. The correlation of HPV and erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus (EA-OLP) (OR: 9.34) was comparable and well above that of HPV and non-EA-OLP (OR: 4.32). Among HPV genotypes, HPV 16 showed an extremely strong association with OLP (OR: 11.27), and HPV 18 showed a relatively strong one (OR: 6.54). Conclusion In conclusion, a significant association was found between HPV and OLP. The strength of the association varied across geographic populations, clinical types of OLP, and HPV genotypes. The results suggest that HPV might play an important causal role in OLP and in its malignant to progression. PMID:27571417

  15. Reduced Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 4 Years after Bivalent HPV Vaccination in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. Methods and Findings A total of 7,466 women 18–25 years old were randomized (1∶1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI = 63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI = 63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE = 0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. Conclusions HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661 PMID:23873171

  16. A comparison of oral and intravenous pimonidazole in canine tumors using intravenous CCI-103F as a control hypoxia marker

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiter, Miriam M.; Thrall, Donald E.; Malarkey, David E.; Ji Xiaoshen; Lee, David Y.W.; Chou, S.-C.; Raleigh, James A. . E-mail: james_raleigh@med.unc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Pimonidazole HCl is widely used in immunohistochemical analyses of hypoxia in normal and malignant tissues. The present study investigates oral administration as a means of minimizing invasiveness. Methods and Materials: Twelve dogs with confirmed malignancy received 0.5 g/m{sup 2} of pimonidazole HCl: 6 by mouth and 6 by i.v. infusion. All dogs received i.v. CCI-103F as a control. Plasma levels of pimonidazole, pimonidazole N-oxide, and CCI-103F were measured. Tumor biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, sectioned, immunostained, and analyzed for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding. pH dependence for pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding was studied in vitro. Results: Pimonidazole and CCI-103F binding in carcinomas and sarcomas was strongly correlated for both oral and i.v. pimonidazole HCl (r {sup 2} = 0.97). On average, the extent of pimonidazole binding exceeded that for CCI-103F by a factor of approximately 1.2, with the factor ranging from 1.0 to 1.65. Binding of both markers was pH dependent, but pimonidazole binding was greater at all values of pH. Conclusions: Oral pimonidazole HCl is effective as a hypoxia marker in spontaneously arising canine tumors. Selective cellular uptake and concomitant higher levels of binding in regions of hypoxia at the high end of pH gradients might account for the greater extent of pimonidazole binding.

  17. Systemic Immunization with Papillomavirus L1 Protein Completely Prevents the Development of Viral Mucosal Papillomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzich, Joann A.; Ghim, Shin-Je; Palmer-Hill, Frances J.; White, Wendy I.; Tamura, James K.; Bell, Judith A.; Newsome, Joseph A.; Bennett Jenson, A.; Schlegel, Richard

    1995-12-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy.

  18. Systemic immunization with papillomavirus L1 protein completely prevents the development of viral mucosal papillomas.

    PubMed Central

    Suzich, J A; Ghim, S J; Palmer-Hill, F J; White, W I; Tamura, J K; Bell, J A; Newsome, J A; Jenson, A B; Schlegel, R

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mucosal epithelium by papillomaviruses is responsible for the induction of genital and oral warts and plays a critical role in the development of human cervical and oropharyngeal cancer. We have employed a canine model to develop a systemic vaccine that completely protects against experimentally induced oral mucosal papillomas. The major capsid protein, L1, of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was expressed in Sf9 insect cells in native conformation. L1 protein, which self-assembled into virus-like particles, was purified on CsCl gradients and injected intradermally into the foot pad of beagles. Vaccinated animals developed circulating antibodies against COPV and became completely resistant to experimental challenge with COPV. Successful immunization was strictly dependent upon native L1 protein conformation and L1 type. Partial protection was achieved with as little as 0.125 ng of L1 protein, and adjuvants appeared useful for prolonging the host immune response. Serum immunoglobulins passively transferred from COPV L1-immunized beagles to naive beagles conferred protection from experimental infection with COPV. Our results indicate the feasibility of developing a human vaccine to prevent mucosal papillomas, which can progress to malignancy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8524802

  19. p16 Immunostaining of Canine Squamous Cell Carcinomas Is Not Associated with Papillomaviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sabattini, Silvia; Savini, Federica; Gallina, Laura; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Bassi, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    While papillomavirus (PVs) are an established cause of human cancer, few reports have supported a relationship between PV and canine squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Human oncogenic PVs lead to an increased expression of the p16 tumor suppressor protein, and the latter can be demonstrated immunohistochemically to support a likely causal relationship between tumor and PV infection. In the present study, archive samples of canine SCC from different anatomical locations were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of PV DNA and by p16 immunohistochemistry. The aims were to investigate the relationship between p16 expression and presence of PV DNA, in order to assess the utility of p16 overexpression as a biomarker of PV infection in canine SCC. A total of 52 SCCs were included. Nine cases (17.3%) showed moderate p16 immunoreactivity, with no association with tumor degree of differentiation, histotype or mitotic activity. The canPVf/FAP64 primers amplified Canis familiaris PV-1 DNA from 3 out of 52 tumors (5.8%), one cutaneous, one oral and one tonsillar SCC. There was no association between PV presence and p16 immunostaining. These results do not support a significant role of PVs in the development of canine SCCs. Additionally, PV infection was apparently not the cause of the p16 immunostaining observed in a subset of canine SCCs. A better awareness of p16 level of expression and cellular function in canine cancer may help to define its diagnostic and prognostic role. PMID:27441555

  20. Nongenital human papillomavirus disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Khan, Michelle J

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral cause of cancer, and is responsible for 5% of cancers worldwide. Following demonstration of the causative link between HPV and cervical cancer, HPV has been shown to be associated with several anogenital malignancies and with oral pharyngeal cancers. HPV-related anal and oral pharyngeal disease is rising in incidence and includes anal warts and neoplasia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and oral pharyngeal neoplasia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongenital HPV-related disease. PMID:23732034

  1. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5+/6+) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients. PMID:27279791

  2. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Gopinath, Subash C B; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5(+)/6(+)) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients. PMID:27279791

  3. Evaluation of the effect of oral omeprazole on canine cerebrospinal fluid production: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Girod, M; Allerton, F; Gommeren, K; Tutunaru, A C; de Marchin, J; Van Soens, I; Ramery, E; Peeters, D

    2016-03-01

    Administration of omeprazole by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion or intravenously has been shown to decrease cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production in dogs and rabbits. Oral omeprazole has consequently been recommended to reduce CSF production in dogs with conditions in which clinical signs may be attributable to an accumulation of CSF in the central nervous system (e.g. hydrocephalus, syringomyelia). The albumin quotient (QAlb), the ratio between CSF and serum albumin concentration, has been proposed as a reliable means to evaluate CSF production; decreasing CSF production should cause an increase in QAlb. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of oral administration of omeprazole on QAlb in dogs and to compare two methods to assess CSF albumin concentration. Fifteen healthy Beagle dogs received omeprazole (1.2 mg/kg/day) orally for 14 days; CSF and blood were obtained before and after treatment. CSF albumin concentrations were evaluated by nephelometry and high-resolution protein electrophoresis. Regardless of the method used for measuring albumin, QAlb did not change significantly following oral omeprazole administration, suggesting that CSF production in healthy dogs may not be affected by chronic oral therapy with omeprazole. PMID:26852945

  4. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  5. Low prevalence of oral and nasal human papillomavirus in employees performing CO2-laser evaporation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola; Møller, Charlotte; Frøding, Ligita P; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Markauskas, Algirdas; Blomberg, Maria; Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Strauss, Gitte; Madsen, Klaus G; Sand, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p = 0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal cavity of health care personnel, however, employees at departments of dermato-venereology are at risk of acquiring hand warts. PMID:24941064

  6. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner for the treatment of canine generalised demodicosis

    PubMed Central

    Beugnet, Frédéric; Halos, Lénaïg; Larsen, Diane; de Vos, Christa

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of oral treatment with a chewable tablet containing afoxolaner 2.27% w/w (NexGard®, Merial) administered orally was assessed in eight dogs diagnosed with generalised demodicosis and compared with efficacy in eight dogs under treatment with a topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin (Advocate®, Bayer). Afoxolaner was administered at the recommended dose (at least 2.5 mg/kg) on Days 0, 14, 28 and 56. The topical combination of imidacloprid/moxidectin was given at the same intervals at the recommended concentration. Clinical examinations and deep skin scrapings were performed every month in order to evaluate the effect on mite numbers and the resolution of clinical signs. The percentage reductions of mite counts were 99.2%, 99.9% and 100% on Days 28, 56 and 84, respectively, in the afoxolaner-treated group, compared to 89.8%, 85.2% and 86.6% on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. Skin condition of the dogs also improved significantly from Day 28 to Day 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group. Mite reductions were significantly higher on Days 28, 56 and 84 in the afoxolaner-treated group compared to the imidacloprid/moxidectin-treated group. The results of this study demonstrated that afoxolaner, given orally, was effective in treating dogs with generalised demodicosis within a two-month period. PMID:27012161

  7. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs. PMID:25248518

  8. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christine M. Pierce; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O’Keefe, Michael T.; Ingles, Donna J.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ≥2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18–64 years (median, 36 years; IQR, 25–42) and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9–49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ≥12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ≥24 months, and none persisted ≥36 months (median infection duration, 7.3 months [95% CI, 6.4–NA]). Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ≥12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ≥24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ≥36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ≥48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (P trend=0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:25575501

  9. p16 expression independent of human papillomavirus is associated with lower stage and longer disease-free survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Virk, Sohaib A; Lum, Trina; Gao, Kan; Clark, Jonathan R; Gupta, Ruta

    2016-08-01

    There is limited information regarding the incidence of p16 expression, its association with human papillomavirus (HPV) and prognosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The role of p16 in OSCC is evaluated in 215 cases using tissue microarrays (TMAs). p16 immunohistochemistry and HPV in situ hybridisation were performed on TMAs following histopathology review of 215 patients with OSCC in the Sydney Head and Neck Cancer Institute database. Thirty-seven (17.2%) cases showed p16 expression without association with HPV. p16 expression significantly decreased with increasing pT category (p=0.002). p16 expression was associated with longer disease-specific survival on univariable analysis (p=0.044) but not on multivariable analysis adjusting for depth of invasion. Amongst patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy, patients with p16 expression had significantly longer disease-free and overall survival. p16 expression was seen in early stage OSCCs and was associated with better survival following surgery and radiotherapy. While not an independent predictor of survival, p16 may mediate its effects by contributing to reduced proliferative capacity, leading to smaller tumour size and lower invasive potential. PMID:27370365

  10. Human Papillomavirus Type 6 and 11 Genetic Variants Found in 71 Oral and Anogenital Epithelial Samples from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Danielewski, Jennifer A.; Garland, Suzanne M.; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific

  11. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  12. Canine Distemper

    MedlinePlus

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of health information. Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. ...

  13. Prevalence of human papillomaviruses in the healthy oral mucosa of women with high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion and of their partners as compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Tatár, Tímea Zsófia; Kis, Andrea; Szabó, Éva; Czompa, Levente; Boda, Róbert; Tar, Ildikó; Szarka, Krisztina

    2015-10-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) carriage rates were investigated in relation to genital HPV carriage in women with HPV-associated cervical lesions and male partner of such women, including several couples, in comparison with healthy individuals. Buccal and lingual mucosa of 60 males and 149 females with healthy oral mucosa and without known genital lesion, genital and oral mucosa of further 40 females with cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and 34 male sexual partners of women with HSIL (including 20 couples) were sampled. HPV DNA was detected using MY/GP PCR. Genotype was determined by sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Virus copy numbers were determined by real-time PCR. Overall, oral HPV carriage rate was 5.7% (12/209) in healthy individuals; average copy number was 5.8 × 10(2) copies/1 μg DNA; male and female rates were comparable. Oral carriage in women with HSIL was significantly higher, 20.0% (8/40, P = 0.003); males with partners with HSIL showed a carriage rate of 17.6% (6/34), copy numbers were similar to the healthy controls. In contrast, genital carriage rate (52.9%, 18/34 vs. 82.5%, 33/40; P = 0.006) and average copy number were lower in males (5.0 × 10(5) vs. 7.8 × 10(5) copies/1 μg DNA; P = 0.01). Oral copy numbers in these groups and in healthy individuals were comparable. High-risk genotypes were dominant; couples usually had the same genotype in the genital sample. In conclusion, genital HPV carriage is a risk factor of oral carriage for the individual or for the sexual partner, but alone is not sufficient to produce an oral HPV infection in most cases. PMID:25495524

  14. Oral vaccination of dogs (Canis familiaris) with baits containing the recombinant rabies-canine adenovirus type-2 vaccine confers long-lasting immunity against rabies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Fooks, Anthony R; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-01-17

    Rabies is a reemerging and fatal infectious disease in Asia mainly caused by exposure to rabid dogs. Prevention of dog rabies would be the most effective way to stop rabies transmission to humans. However, vaccinating stray dogs in urban and rural areas using conventional vaccines is always difficult and is not cost-effective for use in most areas including China. Further to previous studies from our laboratory, we developed a bait containing the recombinant rabies vaccine and performed a non-parenteral trial in dogs. This vaccine was intranasally administrated once to 46 dogs in solution form with 1 x 10(8.5) PFU and orally to 90 dogs in specially designed baits with 3 x 10(8.5) PFU of the recombinant canine adenovirus. Results showed that about 87.5% (119/136) of the immunized dogs developed virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). The immune response against rabies in dogs was detectable at 2-3 weeks after administration, reaching a peak by 5-6 weeks. Among the seroconverted animals, 90.8% (108/119) elicited a VNA response for over 24 months. The antibody titer during the 2 years was above 0.5IU /ml while showing a gradual but slow decline from the 6th week after vaccination. In a challenge experiment of 10 dogs with 60,000 mouse LD(50) of CVS-24 2 years after the vaccination, all the dogs survived. This demonstrated that the recombinant vaccine could be orally administrated and the bait was effective for the oral vaccination of dogs. PMID:18083277

  15. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  16. Proteomic analysis of human papillomavirus-related oral squamous cell carcinoma: identification of thioredoxin and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated protein markers in microdissected tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Winkler, Robert; Schimmel, Bettina; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Wittekindt, Claus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been identified as an etiologic agent for a subset of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with increasing incidence. HPV DNA-positivity may confer better prognosis but the related oncogenic mechanisms are unknown. For the identification of HPV relevant proteins, we analyzed microdissected cells from HPV DNA-positive (n = 17) and HPV DNA-negative (n = 7) OSCC tissue samples. We identified 18 proteins from tumor tissues by peptide fingerprint mapping and SELDI MS that were separated using 2-DE. Among a number of signals that were detected as significantly different in the protein profiling analysis, we identified thioredoxin (TRX) and epidermal-fatty acid binding protein as upregulated in HPV related tumor tissue. This study, investigating for the first time proteomic changes in microdissected HPV infected tumor tissue, provides an indication on the oncogenic potential of viruses. PMID:19337991

  17. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes. PMID:14610898

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Crocuta crocuta Papillomavirus Type 1 (CcrPV1) from a Spotted Hyena, the First Papillomavirus Characterized in a Member of the Hyaenidae.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Hans; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Karlien; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Wise, Annabel; Nelson, Keith; Holekamp, Kay; Engh, Anne; McKnight, Christy; Van Ranst, Marc; Rector, Annabel

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genomic sequence of the Crocuta crocuta papillomavirus type 1 (CcrPV1), isolated from an oral papillomatous lesion of a wild spotted hyena. This virus is the first papillomavirus found in a species belonging to the Hyaenidae family of carnivores, and it can be classified in the genus Lambdapapillomavirus. PMID:23405364

  19. American canine hepatozoonosis.

    PubMed

    Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A

    2003-06-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis is an emerging, tick-transmitted infection of domestic dogs caused by a recently recognized species of apicomplexan parasite, Hepatozoon americanum. The known definitive host of the protozoan is the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Presently recognized intermediate hosts include the domestic dog and the coyote, Canis latrans. Laboratory-reared larval or nymphal A. maculatum can be infected readily by feeding to repletion on a parasitemic intermediate host; sporogony requires 35-40 days. Transmission of infection to the dog has been produced experimentally by oral administration of mature oocysts or oocyst-containing ticks. Canine disease follows experimental exposure in 4-6 weeks and is characterized by systemic illness, extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, muscle and bone pain, and proliferation of periosteal bone. Histopathological findings include multifocal skeletal and cardiac myositis associated with escape of mature merozoites from within the host-cell environment. There is also rapid onset of periosteal activation and osteogenesis and, less frequently, glomerulopathy and amyloidosis. Sequential stages of development of H. americanum in both the dog and the tick have been elucidated. Gamonts potentially infectious to ticks have been observed in peripheral blood leukocytes of the dog in as few as 28 days after exposure to oocysts. Young coyotes experimentally exposed to a canine strain of H. americanum acquired disease indistinguishable from that of similarly exposed young dogs. PMID:12885206

  20. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  1. Canine Parvovirus

    MedlinePlus

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  2. Fluoroquinolone levels in healthy dog urine following a 20-mg/kg oral dose of enrofloxacin exceed mutant prevention concentration targets against Escherichia coli isolated from canine urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Daniels, J B; Tracy, G; Irom, S J; Lakritz, J

    2014-04-01

    A 3-day course of oral enrofloxacin is effective for treating uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs when administered 20 mg/kg Q24H. However, emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of uropathogens is a concern. Urine concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were measured in six healthy dogs following dose of enrofloxacin 20 mg/kg. Mutant prevention concentrations of Escherichia coli isolated from canine UTI were also determined against ciprofloxacin. Urine AUC(24)/MPC ratios considering ciprofloxacin concentrations ranged 3819-7767, indicating that selection of resistant E. coli mutants in dogs with uncomplicated UTIs is unlikely in the bladder given that an AUC(24)/MPC = 39 is considered to be protective against mutant selection for ciprofloxacin. However, additional studies are required to evaluate the effects of this enrofloxacin treatment protocol on bacteria that colonize anatomic sites where fluoroquinolones achieve lower concentrations compared to the urinary bladder. PMID:23859001

  3. Canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Sapierzyński, R

    2008-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) is an infectious disease of zoonotic potential, caused by protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania. Common clinical manifestations of canine visceral leishmaniosis include decrease of appetite, progressive weight loss, exercise intolerance, peripheral lymph node and spleen enlargement, chronic renal and liver disease, muscle, atrophy, polyarthritis and others. Because the Polish literature in the field contains no information on leishmaniosis in animals the recognised case of this disease is presented. Homeless mongrel, intact female dog, 3 years of age was brought to a veterinary clinic because of apathy, and generalised dermatologic lesions to perform routine examination. Because therapeutic effect of primarily recognised scabies was unsatisfactory, the skin samples from ear margins, trunk and lesion of the area of the left gluteal region for histopatologic examination were taken. Due to suspicion of leishmaniosis, fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes, skin lesions, ocular discharge and imprint samples from skin lesion were performed, and tissue collected were examined under optical microscopy for identification of Leishmania amastigotes. To confirm cytologic diagnosis, blood samples for serological tests (enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay-ELISA; indirect immunofluorescence assay test-IFAT) were taken. Based on physical examination, histopatology, cytopathology and serology, canine visceral leishmaniosis was finally diagnosed. PMID:18683546

  4. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  5. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Papillomavirus-associated cutaneous papillomas in a population of wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Keith G; Engh, Anne L; McKnight, Christy A; Kiupel, Matti; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K; Stevens, Hans; Heylen, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Karlien; Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc; Flies, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2013-07-01

    Beginning in 1997 Michigan State University Mara Hyena Project investigators observed waxing and waning progression of oral and genital masses during long-term behavioral observations of a population of wild spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) from the Masai Mara Game Reserve, Kenya. From 1999-2000, we darted adult spotted hyenas to obtain routine physiologic and hematologic data and collected small, raised, lobulated, pigmented masses from the oral or genital areas of eight animals. Microscopically, masses consisted of variably thickened epidermis with thick elongate rete pegs, prominent stratum spinosum, and few koilocytes, consistent with papillomavirus-induced lesions. Immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded papilloma tissue revealed positive intranuclear labeling for papillomavirus antigen in the superficial stratum granulosum and in sloughing keratin layers of multiple samples. Polymerase chain reaction on DNA extracts from tumor tissue amplified a papillomavirus-specific 418 base pair amplicon in the E1 ORF. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool analysis of the sequenced amplicon suggests a novel hyaenid papillomavirus. Confirmatory complete genomic sequencing was performed later by the Rega Institute in Belgium. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a papillomavirus in a Hyaenidae species. Spotted hyena social behavior might facilitate oral-genital transmission of papillomavirus in this population. PMID:23778611

  7. Correction of bilateral impacted mandibular canines with a lip bumper for anchorage reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sachin; Yadav, Sumit; Shah, Neelesh V; Valiathan, Ashima; Uribe, Flavio; Nanda, Ravindra

    2013-03-01

    Multiple treatment options are available to patients with impacted manibular canines in addition to a retained deciduous canine. This article describes the treatment of a prepubertal girl, aged 10 years 6 months, with a skeletal Class I, dental Class II Division 1 malocclusion, retrognathic mandible, deep overbite, proclined maxillary incisors, midline diastema, and bilateral mandibular canine impaction. The orthodontic treatment plan included extraction of the deciduous canine and forced eruption of the impacted canines. A modified lip bumper appliance was used both for forced eruption and to reinforce anchorage. Through the collaborative efforts of an orthodontist and an oral surgeon, an excellent esthetic and functional outcome was achieved. PMID:23452974

  8. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer. PMID:26462505

  9. Canine hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, P G; Steiner, J M

    2015-10-01

    Hyperlipidaemia refers to an increased concentration of lipids in the blood. Hyperlipidaemia is common in dogs and has recently emerged as an important clinical condition that requires a systematic diagnostic approach and appropriate treatment. Hyperlipidaemia can be either primary or secondary to other diseases. Secondary hyperlipidaemia is the most common form in dogs, and it can be a result of endocrine disorders, pancreatitis, cholestasis, protein-losing nephropathy, obesity, as well as other conditions and the use of certain drugs. Primary hyperlipidaemia is less common in the general canine population but it can be very common within certain breeds. Hypertriglyceridaemia of Miniature Schnauzers is the most common form of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs but other breeds are also affected. Possible complications of hyperlipidaemia in dogs include pancreatitis, liver disease, atherosclerosis, ocular disease and seizures. Management of primary hyperlipidaemia in dogs is achieved by administration of ultra low-fat diets with or without the administration of lipid lowering drugs such as omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates, niacin and statins. PMID:26456868

  10. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. PMID:26456009

  11. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control. PMID:18634509

  12. Canine generalized demodicosis treated with varying doses of a 2.5% moxidectin+10% imidacloprid spot-on and oral ivermectin: parasiticidal effects and long-term treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Tara E; Halliwell, Richard E; Fields, Paul J; Louw, Marta Lanza; Ball, Geoff; Louw, Jakobus; Pinckney, Rhonda

    2014-10-15

    Advocate(®) (2.5% moxidectin+10% imidacloprid) (Bayer HealthCare, Leverkusen, Germany) is a multiparasiticidal spot-on authorized for treating canine demodicosis in many countries. This blinded, randomized three-phase clinical trial compared its efficacy employing different dosing regimens with that of ivermectin. In the blinded first phase, 58 dogs suffering from generalized demodicosis were randomly assigned to one of four groups and treated with monthly, biweekly or weekly applications of Advocate(®), or with oral ivermectin (IVR) at 500 μg/kg daily. Dogs were evaluated clinically and multiple skin scrapings undertaken every 4 weeks until parasitological cure was achieved (defined as two consecutive series of deep skin scrapings at monthly intervals negative for all life forms). Forty dogs completed the 16-week initial blinded phase, with 5 cases achieving parasitological cure. Five dogs were deemed treatment failures and subsequently treated with ivermectin. The treatment protocol was then changed for the remaining 35 dogs and this cross-over phase (Phase 2) was maintained for a further 8 weeks with an additional 9 dogs achieving parasitological cure. Thereafter, all remaining animals were treated with IVR until cured (Phase 3). Overall, 26 dogs achieved parasitological cure during the clinical investigation. Of these, 23 remained disease-free for at least 12 months while two were lost to follow up and one died of unrelated causes. A total of 32 (55.2%) dogs were withdrawn at various stages of the investigation including the 5 dogs that were judged treatment failures. Other reasons for withdrawal included: non-compliance, lost to follow-up, ivermectin toxicity or reasons unrelated to the investigation. No adverse effects were attributable to the use of Advocate(®). Parasiticidal efficacy was assessed by changes in mite counts (live adult, juvenile and egg) and skin lesion extent & severity scores. Statistical significance was assessed using ANCOVA with

  13. Identification of a Novel Bat Papillomavirus by Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Andy S. P.; Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of novel viruses in animals expands our knowledge of viral diversity and potentially emerging zoonoses. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology gives millions or even billions of sequence reads per run, allowing a comprehensive survey of the genetic content within a sample without prior nucleic acid amplification. In this study, we screened 156 rectal swab samples from apparently healthy bats (n = 96), pigs (n = 9), cattles (n = 9), stray dogs (n = 11), stray cats (n = 11) and monkeys (n = 20) using a HTS metagenomics approach. The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus (PV), Miniopterus schreibersii papillomavirus type 1 (MscPV1), with L1 of 60% nucleotide identity to Canine papillomavirus (CPV6), was identified in a specimen from a Common Bent-wing Bat (M. schreibersii). It is about 7.5kb in length, with a G+C content of 45.8% and a genomic organization similar to that of other PVs. Despite the higher nucleotide identity between the genomes of MscPV1 and CPV6, maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the L1 gene sequence showed that MscPV1 and Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus (EdPV1) are most closely related. Estimated divergence time of MscPV1 from the EdPV1/MscPV1 common ancestor was approximately 60.2–91.9 millions of years ago, inferred under strict clocks using the L1 and E1 genes. The estimates were limited by the lack of reliable calibration points from co-divergence because of possible host shifts. As the nucleotide sequence of this virus only showed limited similarity with that of related animal PVs, the conventional approach of PCR using consensus primers would be unlikely to have detected the novel virus in the sample. Unlike the first bat papillomavirus RaPV1, MscPV1 was found in an asymptomatic bat with no apparent mucosal or skin lesions whereas RaPV1 was detected in the basosquamous carcinoma of a fruit bat Rousettus aegyptiacus. We propose MscPV1 as the first member of the novel Dyolambda-papillomavirus

  14. Biology and pathological associations of the human papillomaviruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    1998-06-01

    Historical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus studies raised early indications of a mammalian DNA oncogenic virus. Today, molecular cloning recognises numerous animal and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and the development of in vitro transformation assays has escalated oncological research in HPVs. Currently, their detection and typing in tissues is usually by Southern blotting, in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction methods. The complete papillomavirus virion constitutes a protein coat (capsid) surrounding a circular, double-stranded DNA organised into coding and non-coding regions. 8 early (E1-E8) open reading frames (ORFs) and 2 late (L1, L2) ORFs have been identified in the coding region of all papillomaviruses. The early ORFs encode proteins which interact with the host genome to produce new viral DNA while late ORFs are activated only after viral DNA replication and encode for viral capsid proteins. All papillomaviruses are obligatory intranuclear organisms with specific tropism for keratinocytes. Three possible courses of events can follow papillomaviruses entry into cells: (1) viral DNA are maintained as intranuclear, extrachromosomal, circular DNA episomes, which replicates synchronously with the host cell, establishing a latent infection; (2) conversion from latent into productive infection with assembly of complete infective virions; (3) integration of viral DNA into host cellular genome, a phenomenon seen in HPV infections associated with malignant transformation. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) essentially induce skin and mucosal epithelial lesions. Various skin warts are well known to be HPV-associated (HPVs 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10). Besides HPVs 3 and 10, HPVs 5, 8, 17 and 20 have been recovered from Epidermodysplasia verruciformis lesions. Anogenital condyloma acuminatum, strongly linked with HPVs 6 and 11 are probably sexually transmitted. The same HPVs, demonstrable in recurrent juvenile laryngeal papillomas, are probably transmitted by passage

  15. Kinetics of canine dental calculus crystallization: an in vitro study on the influence of inorganic components of canine saliva.

    PubMed

    Borah, Ballav M; Halter, Timothy J; Xie, Baoquan; Henneman, Zachary J; Siudzinski, Thomas R; Harris, Stephen; Elliott, Matthew; Nancollas, George H

    2014-07-01

    This work identifies carbonated hydroxyapatite (CAP) as the primary component of canine dental calculus, and corrects the long held belief that canine dental calculus is primarily CaCO3 (calcite). CAP is known to be the principal crystalline component of human dental calculus, suggesting that there are previously unknown similarities in the calcification that occurs in these two unique oral environments. In vitro kinetic experiments mimicking the inorganic components of canine saliva have examined the mechanisms of dental calculus formation. The solutions were prepared so as to mimic the inorganic components of canine saliva; phosphate, carbonate, and magnesium ion concentrations were varied individually to investigate the roll of these ions in controlling the nature of the phases that is nucleated. To date, the inorganic components of the canine oral systems have not been investigated at concentrations that mimic those in vivo. The mineral composition of the synthetic calculi grown under these conditions closely resembled samples excised from canines. This finding adds new information about calculus formation in humans and canines, and their sensitivity to chemicals used to treat these conditions. PMID:24776659

  16. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval

    PubMed Central

    FELLMAN, C. L.; ARCHER, T. M.; STOKES, J. V.; WILLS, R. W.; LUNSFORD, K. V.; MACKIN, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  17. Effects of oral cyclosporine on canine T-cell expression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma across a 12-h dosing interval.

    PubMed

    Fellman, C L; Archer, T M; Stokes, J V; Wills, R W; Lunsford, K V; Mackin, A J

    2016-06-01

    The duration of immunosuppressive effects following oral cyclosporine in dogs is unknown. This study used flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate the effects of high-dose oral cyclosporine across a 12-h dosing interval. Expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) was compared before and after 8 days of cyclosporine at 10 mg/kg every 12 h in six healthy dogs. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h postdosing for analysis of unactivated and activated T-cell and whole blood cytokine expression using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR, respectively, and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 h postdosing for measurement of cyclosporine concentrations. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR both demonstrated significant marked reductions in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels at 0, 2, 4, and 8 h after dosing compared to pretreatment levels (P < 0.05) for activated samples, with less consistent effects observed for unactivated samples. Both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR are viable techniques for measuring cyclosporine pharmacodynamics in dogs, yielding comparable results with activated samples. Two hours postdrug administration is the preferred time for concurrent assessment of peak drug concentration and cytokine expression, and T-cell activation is needed for optimal results. PMID:26676223

  18. Localization of Impacted Canines

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Praveen; Bhagchandani, Jitendra; Singh, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Snehi; Sharma, Ashish; Yadav, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. The impaction of canine can be prevented in some situationsif the canine displacement is diagnosed in the early mixed dentition period and this would be extremely useful for the clinician. Hence,it is very important to focus on the means of early diagnosis and interception of this clinical situation. In the present article, the differentmodalities used to diagnose the impacted canine are reviewed with an insight into current 3-D modalities. PMID:25738100

  19. Treatment of canine scabies with milbemycin oxime.

    PubMed

    Miller, W H; de Jaham, C; Scott, D W; Cayatte, S M; Bagladi, M S; Buerger, R G

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of orally administered milbemycin oxime in the treatment of canine scabies. Forty dogs were treated. Mean drug dosage for all dogs was approximately 2 mg/kg body weight. Twenty-seven dogs received 3 doses separated by 7 d, and 13 dogs received 2 doses separated by 14 d. All dogs were clinically normal following treatment and no adverse reactions were detected. PMID:8801016

  20. Rapid maxillary canine retraction by dental distraction: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Koteswara Prasad, N. K.; Chitharanjan, Arun; Kailasam, Vignesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to perform rapid maxillary canine retraction through distraction of the periodontal ligament and investigate the rate and amount of canine retraction, amount of anchor loss, the nature of tooth movement achieved, and radiographic changes in the periodontal ligament region during and after canine distraction. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 10 distractions ranging in age from 14 years to 25 years who needed canine retraction and first premolar extraction in the maxillary arch. Ten canine distractions were carried out with custom-made, tooth-borne intra-oral distraction device. Results: The results indicate that the periodontal ligament can be distracted just like the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion and the maxillary canines are retracted rapidly into the first premolar extraction space at the rate of about 2.53 mm/week. Conclusion: Though this study indicates that the periodontal ligament can be distracted to elicit rapid tooth movement, the long-term effects of canine distraction are not well known and need close monitoring. PMID:25298710

  1. The Papillomavirus E2 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Alison A.

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are pivotal to the viral life cycle and have well characterized functions in transcriptional regulation, initiation of DNA replication and partitioning the viral genome. The E2 proteins also function in vegetative DNA replication, post-transcriptional processes and possibly packaging. This review describes structural and functional aspects of the E2 proteins and their binding sites on the viral genome. It is intended to be a reference guide to this viral protein. - Highlights: • Overview of E2 protein functions. • Structural domains of the papillomavirus E2 proteins. • Analysis of E2 binding sites in different genera of papillomaviruses. • Compilation of E2 associated proteins. • Comparison of key mutations in distinct E2 functions.

  2. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  3. Lung adenocarcinoma and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Chen, Jen-Hau; Richard, Kradin; Chen, Pao-Yang; Christiani, David C

    2004-09-15

    Over the past three decades, the incidence of lung adenocarcinoma has increased worldwide. Most individuals with lung adenocarcinoma (especially women) are nonsmokers. Reported risk factors for the development of lung adenocarcinoma include cigarette smoking; exposure to cooking fumes, air pollution, second-hand smoke, asbestos, and radon; nutritional status; genetic susceptibility; immunologic dysfunction; tuberculosis infection; and asthma. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a known risk factor for the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but it has not been thoroughly assessed as a potential risk factor for the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. More than 50% of people are infected with HPV during their lifetimes, either via intrauterine or postnatal infection. Recent studies involving Taiwanese patients have demonstrated a possible association between HPV infection and the risk of developing pulmonary adenocarcinoma. HPV transmission pathways have not yet been conclusively identified. The observation of certain types of HPV in association with cervical and oral SCC raises the possibility of sexual transmission of HPV from the cervix to the oral cavity, with subsequent transmission to the larynx and then to the lung. HPV infection and metaplasia in lung tissue may increase an individual's susceptibility to the tumorigenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Further epidemiologic and pathologic investigations will be necessary to establish a causal relation. PMID:15368331

  4. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers. PMID:23966202

  5. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  6. Canine Gouging: A Taboo Resurfacing in Migrant Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Anila Virani; Wong, Ferranti; Pawar, Ravikiran Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Cosmopolitan cities have become a pool of migrants from different parts of the world, who carry their cultural beliefs and superstitions with them around the globe. Canine gouging is a kind of infant oral mutilation (IOM) which is widely practiced among rural population of Africa where the primary tooth bud of the deciduous canine is enucleated. The belief is that the life threatening illnesses in children like vomiting, diarrhoea, and fevers are caused by worms which infest on tooth buds. This case report is of a 15-year-old Somalian born boy, who presented at the dental institute with intermittent pain in his lower right permanent canine which was associated with a discharging intra oral buccal sinus. The tooth was endodontically treated and then restored with composite. General dental practitioners need to be vigilant when encountered with tooth presenting unusual morphology, unilateral missing tooth, and shift in the midline due to early loss of deciduous/permanent canines. Identification of any such dental mutilation practice will need further counselling of the individual and family members. It is the duty of every dental professional to educate and safeguard the oral and dental health of general public. PMID:26266057

  7. Canine Gouging: A Taboo Resurfacing in Migrant Urban Population.

    PubMed

    Noman, Anila Virani; Wong, Ferranti; Pawar, Ravikiran Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Cosmopolitan cities have become a pool of migrants from different parts of the world, who carry their cultural beliefs and superstitions with them around the globe. Canine gouging is a kind of infant oral mutilation (IOM) which is widely practiced among rural population of Africa where the primary tooth bud of the deciduous canine is enucleated. The belief is that the life threatening illnesses in children like vomiting, diarrhoea, and fevers are caused by worms which infest on tooth buds. This case report is of a 15-year-old Somalian born boy, who presented at the dental institute with intermittent pain in his lower right permanent canine which was associated with a discharging intra oral buccal sinus. The tooth was endodontically treated and then restored with composite. General dental practitioners need to be vigilant when encountered with tooth presenting unusual morphology, unilateral missing tooth, and shift in the midline due to early loss of deciduous/permanent canines. Identification of any such dental mutilation practice will need further counselling of the individual and family members. It is the duty of every dental professional to educate and safeguard the oral and dental health of general public. PMID:26266057

  8. Dento-Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis for rapid Orthodontic Canine Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Prashantha, GS; Raikar, Sudhir; Ranganath, Krishnappa; Mathew, Silju; Nambiar, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    technique reduces orthodontic treatment duration by 6 to 9 months in patients who need extraction, with no need for any sort of anchorage reinforcement. How to cite this article: Kumar N, Prashantha GS, Raikar S, Ranganath K, Mathew S, Nambiar S. Dento-Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis for rapid Orthodontic Canine Retraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):31-41 . PMID:24453442

  9. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  10. The Biology of Papillomavirus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Maglennon, Gareth Adam; Doorbar, John

    2012-01-01

    The presence of viral DNA in the absence of disease has suggested that papillomaviruses, like many other viruses, can exist as latent infections in the skin or other epithelial sites. In animal models, where detailed investigation has been carried out, papillomavirus DNA can be found at sites of previous infection following immune regression, with the site of latent infection being the epithelial basal layer. Such studies suggest that immune surveillance can restrict viral gene expression in the basal and parabasal layers without efficiently suppressing viral genome replication, most probably through the action of memory T-cells in the skin or dermis. Although gradual papillomavirus genome loss appears to occur over time at latent sites, immunosuppression can arrest this, and can lead to an elevation in viral genome copy number in experimental systems. In addition to immune-mediated latency, it appears that a similar situation can be achieved following infection at low virus titres and/or infection at epithelial sites where the virus life cycle is not properly supported. Such silent of asymptomatic infections do not necessarily involve the host immune system and may be controlled by different mechanisms. It appears that virus reactivation can be triggered by mechanical irritation, wounding or by UV irradiation which changes the local environment. Although the duration of papillomavirus latency in humans is not yet known, it is likely that some of the basic principles will resemble those elucidated in these model systems, and that persistence in the absence of disease may be the default outcome for at least some period of time following regression. PMID:23341854

  11. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL). The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now. PMID:25628897

  12. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  13. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  14. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  15. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  16. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination. PMID:21966809

  17. Papillomavirus DNA Complementation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Recent phylogenic studies indicate that DNA recombination could have occurred in ancient papillomaviruses types. However, no experimental data is available to demonstrate this event because of the lack of human papillomavirus infection models. We have used the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model to study pathogenesis and immunogenicity of different mutant genomes in vivo. Although the domestic rabbit is not a natural host for CRPV infection, it is possible to initiate infection with naked CRPV DNA cloned into a plasmid and monitor papilloma outgrowth on these animals. Taking advantage of a large panel of mutants based on a CRPV strain (Hershey CRPV), we tested the hypothesis that two non-viable mutant genomes could induce papillomas by either recombination or complementation. We found that co-infection with a dysfunctional mutant with an E2 transactivation domain mutation and another mutant with an E7 ATG knock out generated papillomas in rabbits. DNA extracted from these papillomas contained genotypes from both parental genomes. Three additional pairs of dysfunctional mutants also showed similar results. Individual wild type genes were also shown to rescue the function of corresponding dysfunctional mutants. Therefore, we suggest that complementation occurred between these two non-viable mutant PV genomes in vivo. PMID:19379784

  18. Pathogenesis of infection by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Brendle, Sarah A; Bywaters, Stephanie M; Christensen, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with benign lesions known as warts and several cancer types including cancer of the cervix, penis, anus and oral cavity. HPVs are classified by their oncogenic potential and are divided into high-risk oncogenic HPVs and low-risk HPVs. Tissue tropism is used as another means of classifying the virus, and HPVs are divided into types that infect mucosal or cutaneous tissues. Several risk factors have been identified that elevate an individual's likelihood of becoming infected with HPV including cigarette smoking, a large number of lifetime sexual partners and immunosuppression. Most HPV infections are cleared naturally, although persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to the cancers mentioned above. HPV has employed several mechanisms to avoid detection by the host immune system. Virus is released along with shedding skin cells in a nonlytic manner, and the virus has an altered codon usage leading to reduced expression of viral proteins. Infections from high-risk oncogenic HPV types that progress cause neoplasias that are defined as CIN1-CIN3 depending on the amount of abnormal cell growth and the level of cellular differentiation. PMID:24643177

  19. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  20. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  1. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit

    2014-11-01

    Oral and oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is a complex and often relentless malignancy prone to local invasion and dissemination. Despite advances in understanding of the disease and improved therapeutic interventions, it continues to be diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival rate remains poor. The financial cost of treating OPC may be the highest of all cancers in the United States and survivors often experience major detriments to quality of life. Major risk factors for OPC are tobacco, alcohol, areca nut, and human papillomavirus infection. This article updates medical practitioners on the causes, presentation, diagnosis, and management of OPC. PMID:25443678

  2. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study. PMID:27522713

  4. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  5. Canine degenerative myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Coates, Joan R; Wininger, Fred A

    2010-09-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an adult-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease that occurs in many breeds. The initial upper motor neuron spastic paraparesis and general proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs progress to a flaccid lower motor neuron tetraparesis. Recently, a missense mutation in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene was found to be a risk factor for DM, suggesting that DM is similar to some forms of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). This article reviews the current knowledge of canine DM with regard to its signalment, clinical spectrum, diagnostic approach, and treatment. The implications of the SOD1 mutation on both diseases are discussed, comparing pathogenic mechanisms while conveying perspectives to translational medicine. PMID:20732599

  6. Control of canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, G

    1995-05-01

    Control of canine distemper can realistically only be achieved by the use of vaccination. The types of vaccine in current use are described, together with some of the problems encountered such as interference by maternal antibodies, and usage in species other than dogs. Modified live viral vaccines, as used for more than thirty years, have proved very effective. Nevertheless there is scope for some improvement in vaccine efficacy and recent developments in genetic recombinant methods are described. PMID:8588329

  7. Canine ehrlichiosis in Connecticut.

    PubMed Central

    Magnarelli, L A; Litwin, H J; Holland, C J; Anderson, J F; Ristic, M

    1990-01-01

    The first case of canine ehrlichiosis in Connecticut is reported. A female Brittany spaniel from Milford presented with lethargy, anorexia, fever, petechiae, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, anemia, elevated serum alkaline phosphatase, lymphopenia, and hypoalbuminemia. Serologic analysis revealed antibodies to Ehrlichia canis (titer, 1:2,560). This documents a more northern geographic distribution in the United States for this infectious agent than had previously been suspected. PMID:2312682

  8. Oral Cancer Chernoprevention: Current Status and Future Direction.

    PubMed

    Messadi, Diana V; Sato, Kazumichi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current status of cancer chemoprevention and its effectiveness in treatment of oral premalignant lesions and prevention of their progression to oral cancer. The challenges encountered in the different oral cancer chemoprevention clinical trials, including lack of surrogate endpoints, reversal of histologic premalignant changes as study endpoints, tobacco use, human papillomavirus, delivery system, adverse effects and risk of bias in clinical studies, are presented. PMID:26930753

  9. Cell type specific transcriptional activities among different papillomavirus long control regions and their regulation by E2

    PubMed Central

    Ottinger, Matthias; Smith, Jennifer A.; Schweiger, Michal-Ruth; Robbins, Dana; Powell, Maria L.C.; You, Jianxin; Howley, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    This study systematically examined the viral long control region (LCR) activities and their responses to E2 for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 11. 16 and 18 as well as bovine papillomavirus 1 (BPV1) in a number of different cell types, including human cervical cancer cell lines, human oral keratinocytes, BJ fibroblasts, as well as CV1 cells. The study revealed cell- and virus-type specific differences among the individual LCRs and their regulation by E2. In addition, the integration of the LCR into the host genome was identified as a critical determinant for LCR activity and its response to E2. Collectively, these data indicate a more complex level of transcriptional regulation of the LCR by cellular and viral factors than previously appreciated, including a comparatively low LCR activity and poor E2 responsive for HPV16 in most human cells. This study should provide a valuable framework for future transcriptional studies in the papillomavirus field. PMID:19836046

  10. Aerodigestive cancers: oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Luke; Haws, Bryn Taylor

    2014-09-01

    Worldwide, approximately 260,000 new cases of oral cancer occur, and more than 125,000 mortalities are attributed to oral cancers each year. Oral cancers most commonly arise in the tongue, followed by the floor of the mouth and the lower gum. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors, although human papillomavirus has been identified as an etiology in a small percentage of oral squamous cell cancers. Although the evidence to support routine annual screening for oral cancers is inconclusive, family physicians and dental practitioners should be attentive to precursor lesions, such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia, and strongly consider obtaining or referring for biopsy patients with suspicious lesions. Depending on stage, management of oral cancers often involves surgery, with or without postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients who have been treated for these cancers should undergo close surveillance by otolaryngology subspecialists, but their family physicians primarily will be responsible for their long-term care. Complications relating to management, including difficulties with speech, swallowing, and chewing, will need to be addressed. For patients with advanced-stage disease, family physicians also may be responsible for palliative and end-of-life care. PMID:25198382

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females vaginal and ... Gardasil-9 can prevent most of these cancers. HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most ...

  12. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  13. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  14. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females ... 9) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National ...

  16. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Júnior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Júnior, João Lídio S G V; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L; de Sá, Lilian Rose M

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. PMID:27540053

  17. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T.; Júnior, João Lídio S. G. V.; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J.; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L.; de Sá, Lilian Rose M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. PMID:27540053

  18. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Losa, María del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored. PMID:26221121

  19. Oncogenic Activities of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Infectious etiologies for certain human cancers have long been suggested by epidemiological studies and studies with animals. Important support for this concept came from the discovery by Harald zur Hausen’s group that human cervical carcinoma almost universally contains certain “high-risk” human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Over the years, much has been learned about the carcinogenic activities of high-risk HPVs. These studies have revealed that two viral proteins, E6 and E7, that are consistently expressed in HPV-associated carcinomas, are necessary for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Hence, HPV-associated tumors are unique amongst human solid tumors in that they are universally caused by exposure to the same, molecularly defined oncogenic agents, and the molecular signal transduction pathways subverted by these viral transforming agents are frequently disrupted in other, non-virus associated human cancers. PMID:19540281

  20. Anorectal Human Papillomavirus: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Reddy, Vikram; Einarsdottir, Hulda; Longo, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Increased anorectal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is related to the recent trends in sexual behavior in both homosexual and heterosexual groups and prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Clinical presentation and natural history depend on the serotype involved. HPV 6 and 11 are found in the benign wart. Local control can be achieved with a wide selection of surgical and topical techniques. HPV 16, 18, and 31 are found in dysplastic lesions and have the potential to progress to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Recognition and early management of dysplastic lesions is crucial to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with anal cancer. While low-grade lesions can be closely observed, high-grade lesions should be eradicated. Different strategies can be used to eradicate the disease while preserving anorectal function. Studies on the efficacy of vaccination on anorectal HPV showed promising results in select population groups and led to the recent expansion of current vaccination recommendations. PMID:25506286

  1. Canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  2. Brazilian canine hepatozoonosis.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2011-01-01

    The genus Hepatozoon includes hundreds of species that infect birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, in all continents with tropical and subtropical climates. Two species have been described in domestic dogs: H. canis, reported in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and the United States; and H. americanum, which so far has only been diagnosed in the United States. In Brazil, the only species found infecting dogs is H. canis. The objective of this review was to detail some aspects of canine hepatozoonosis, caused by H. canis, and the main points of its biology, transmission, pathogenicity, symptoms, epidemiology and diagnostic methods, with emphasis on research developed in Brazil. PMID:21961746

  3. [Natural history of the infection for human papillomavirus: an actualization].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gerardo González; Troconis, José Núñez

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in our understanding of the biology and natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Most papillomavirus infections are transmitted by close contact of either skin to skin or mucosa to mucosa. Sexual intercourse is not a requirement for genital HPV infection. Digital-oral infections occur and there is evidence that digital-genital and oral-genital contacts can result in the transmission of HPV, although in a relatively low percentage. Vertical transmission from mother to fetus is a common route of infection; in fact, it is recognized that more than 80% of infants born from mothers infected with genital HPV will be positive for HPV DNA determination in the nasal-pharyngeal region and oral mucosa. Women with transient infections often develop cytological abnormalities that take place while there is active HPV replication. This occurs because productive HPV infections result in cytological abnormalities in infected epithelial cells. The strong association between the risk of HPV infection and increased immune suppression, supports a direct biological effect of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection on the natural history of HPV. PMID:24758104

  4. Expression of EBV-encoded oncogenes and EBV-like virions in multiple canine tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Chiou, Shiow-Her; Chiang, Shu-Fen; Chiou, Che-Hao; Wu, Guo-Hua; Yang, Hsiu-Ching; Ho, Shu-Peng; Chen, Yuh-Kun; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Sun, H Sunny

    2013-04-12

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human oncovirus. Previous studies by us and others have indicated that pet dogs frequently encounter EBV or EBV-related viral infection. In this study, we explored whether EBV is involved in canine malignancies in dogs. EBV-specific BamHI W sequence was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 10 of 12 canine tumor specimens, including 8 of 10 oral tumors. Using reverse transcription-PCR, gene expressions of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP 1) and BamHI H rightward reading frame 1 (BHRF1) were identified in 8 and 7 of 12 specimens, respectively. A novel LMP1 variant, T0905, was predominant in 5 canine tumor specimens and found to exist in EBV positive human BC-2 cells. Another LMP1 variant, T0902, was similar to human tumor variant JB7. The BHRF1 sequence identified from these canine tumors was identical to that of the B95-8 viral strain. LMP1 protein and EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) were detected by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization, respectively, in several tumors, particularly in tumor nests of oral amelanotic melanomas. Furthermore, EBV-like virions adopting a herpesvirus egress pathway were detected in a canthal fibroblastic osteosarcoma and an oral amelanotic melanoma. In conclusion, we report the expressions of BHRF1 transcript (a viral anti-apoptotic protein), LMP1 (a viral oncoprotein) transcript and protein, EBER (a viral oncogenic RNA), and EBV-like virions in multiple canine tumors. The identity of BHRF1 and the resemblance of LMP1 variants between canine and human tumors indicate either a close evolutionary relationship between canine and human EBV, or the possibility of zoonotic transmission. PMID:23380461

  5. Bovine Papillomavirus Type 13 DNA in Equine Sarcoids

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Michele; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Rodrigues, Wagner Borges; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Equine sarcoids are locally aggressive fibroblastic neoplasms considered to be the most common skin tumors of horses worldwide. Bovine papillomavirus types 1 and 2 have typically been associated with sarcoids in equids. Investigations aiming to identify papillomavirus strains, aside from bovine papillomaviruses 1 and 2, which might be associated with sarcoid lesions, have been lacking. The aim of this article is to report the identification of a third bovine papillomavirus type, bovine papillomavirus 13, associated with equine sarcoids. Six sarcoid lesions were collected from diverse anatomical sites on two horses from southern Brazil. To detect a broad spectrum of papillomavirus strains, eight degenerate primer pairs designed to detect conserved regions on the L1 and E1 genes were tested on the DNA samples. Direct sequencing was then performed on the obtained amplicons, and sequence identities were compared with sequences from all bovine papillomavirus types. The FAP59/FAP64, MY09/MY11, and AR-E1F2/AR-E1R4 sequences generated from the sarcoids were shown to present 99 to 100% identity with bovine papillomavirus 13, a new bovine papillomavirus type previously described in cattle. The results from this study suggest that there is a need to identify bovine papillomavirus type 13 and other papillomavirus strains that might be associated with sarcoids in diverse geographical areas; such investigations might establish the frequency of occurrence of this viral type in these common tumors of equids. PMID:23637294

  6. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening. PMID:21718495

  7. Replication and Partitioning of Papillomavirus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Alison A.

    2011-01-01

    Papillomaviruses establish persistent infection in the dividing, basal epithelial cells of the host. The viral genome is maintained as a circular, double-stranded DNA, extrachromosomal element within these cells. Viral genome amplification occurs only when the epithelial cells differentiate and viral particles are shed in squames that are sloughed from the surface of the epithelium. There are three modes of replication in the papillomavirus life cycle. Upon entry, in the establishment phase, the viral genome is amplified to a low copy number. In the second, maintenance phase, the genome replicates at a constant copy number in synchrony with the cellular DNA in dividing cells. And finally, in the vegetative or productive phase, the viral DNA is amplified to a high copy number in differentiated cells and is destined to be packaged in viral capsids. This review discussed the cis elements and protein factors required for each stage of papillomavirus replication. PMID:19081491

  8. Canine rickettsial infections.

    PubMed

    Stiles, J

    2000-09-01

    Dogs that live in tick-infested areas are at risk for contracting rickettsial infections. Clinical signs associated with ehrlichiosis or Rocky Mountain spotted fever may be dramatic or mild. Clinicians must consider the possibility of rickettsial diseases to request laboratory tests that will permit a proper diagnosis. Specific antimicrobial therapy usually brings about clinical improvement, although some dogs may not be cleared of rickettsial organisms, even with prolonged treatment. A small percentage of dogs die of rickettsial infections, either in the acute stage or owing to chronic bone marrow suppression and generalized debilitation. Ocular lesions are an important clinical sign in canine rickettsial infections and may aid the clinician in making a diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. PMID:11033879

  9. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions. PMID:27065598

  10. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  11. Adolescent Male Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nanagas, Vivian C.; Stolfi, Adrienne; Nanagas, Maria T.; Eberhart, Gregory M.; Alter, Sherman J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine male vaccination rates with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) before and after the October 2011 national recommendation to routinely immunize adolescent males. Methods. We reviewed HPV4 dose 1 (HPV4-1) uptake in 292 adolescent males in our urban clinic prior to national recommendations and followed-up for HPV4 series completion rates. After national recommendation, 248 urban clinic and 247 suburban clinic males were reviewed for HPV4-1 uptake. Factors associated with HPV4-1 refusal were determined with multiple logistic regression. Results. Of the initial 292 males, 78% received HPV4-1 and 38% received the 3-dose series. After recommendation, HPV4-1 uptake was 59% and 7% in urban and suburban clinics, respectively. Variables associated with HPV4-1 uptake/refusal included time period, race, type of insurance, and receipt of concurrent vaccines. Conclusions. HPV4-1 vaccination rates in our urban clinic were high before and after routine HPV vaccine recommendations for adolescent males. Our vaccination rates were much higher than in a suburban practice. PMID:27336012

  12. Canine Spontaneous Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Represent Their Human Counterparts at the Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E.; Northrup, Nicole C.; Dobbin, Kevin K.; Shin, Dong M.; Zhao, Shaying

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling), and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research. PMID:26030765

  13. Avian papillomaviruses: the parrot Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV) genome has a unique organization of the early protein region and is phylogenetically related to the chaffinch papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Tachezy, Ruth; Rector, Annabel; Havelkova, Marta; Wollants, Elke; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Jenson, A Bennett; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Background An avian papillomavirus genome has been cloned from a cutaneous exophytic papilloma from an African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus). The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus (PePV) were determined. This PePV sequence represents the first complete avian papillomavirus genome defined. Results The PePV genome (7304 basepairs) differs from other papillomaviruses, in that it has a unique organization of the early protein region lacking classical E6 and E7 open reading frames. Phylogenetic comparison of the PePV sequence with partial E1 and L1 sequences of the chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) papillomavirus (FPV) reveals that these two avian papillomaviruses form a monophyletic cluster with a common branch that originates near the unresolved center of the papillomavirus evolutionary tree. Conclusions The PePV genome has a unique layout of the early protein region which represents a novel prototypic genomic organization for avian papillomaviruses. The close relationship between PePV and FPV, and between their Psittaciformes and Passeriformes hosts, supports the hypothesis that papillomaviruses have co-evolved and speciated together with their host species throughout evolution. PMID:12110158

  14. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 120: a novel betapapillomavirus with tropism for multiple anatomical niches.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Danielle; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Bostjan J; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario; Burk, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that human papillomaviruses (HPVs) from the genera Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus are abundant in the human oral cavity. We report the cloning and characterization of a 7304 bp HPV120 genome from the oral cavity that is related most closely to HPV23 (L1 ORF, 83.7 % similarity), clustering it in the genus Betapapillomavirus (β-PV). HPV120 contains five early and two late genes, but no E5 ORF. HPV120 was detected from heterogeneous human biological niches, including the oral cavity, eyebrow hairs, anal canal and penile, vulvar and perianal warts. Characterization of the clinical spectrum of HPV120 infections indicates a broader spectrum of epithelial tropism than appreciated previously for HPV types from the genus β-PV. PMID:22552941

  15. The biology of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Harrison P; Ramírez-Fort, Marigdalia K; Rady, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that cause lesions in cutaneous and mucosal tissue and are responsible for carcinomas of the cervix, vagina, vulva and penis. HPVs sort into 5 genera with a total of approximately 150 species that have been sequenced. Its genome is comprised of an early (E) region encoding the viral regulatory proteins, a late (L) region encoding the viral structural proteins and a noncoding region that is essential to the viral life cycle. For infection to occur, the virus must access the basal epidermal layer where, following endocytosis and viral capsid disassembly, the L2 protein mediates viral genome transfer to the nuclei of mitotic keratinocytes. The viral genome is maintained in episomal form during the normal life cycle and replicates in synchrony with the host cell DNA under the mediation of E1, E2, E4 and E5 viral proteins. In most high-grade cervical neoplasms, however, the viral DNA is integrated into the host genome through the disruption of the E2 open reading frame. The oncoproteins E6 and E7, which were previously suppressed by E2, are then free to inhibit the Rb and p53 tumor suppressor pathways. The viral life cycle concludes with the packaging of the viral genome and virus release, which entails the E2-mediated recruitment of L2 to regions of replication, the expression of L1 and the assembly of the icosahedral capsid in the nucleus. Overall, the complex biology of HPV continues to be an important area of research with substantial implications for public health. PMID:24643175

  16. Human Papillomavirus: A Catalyst to a Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent and widespread sexually transmitted disease and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. However, HPV has received little public health attention, is not a reportable STD, and often is absent from the repertoire of STDs. In addition, there is pervasive misinformation…

  17. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G.; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers. PMID:26053201

  18. Canine leishmaniosis in South America

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2009-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis is widespread in South America, where a number of Leishmania species have been isolated or molecularly characterised from dogs. Most cases of canine leishmaniosis are caused by Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) and Leishmania braziliensis. The only well-established vector of Leishmania parasites to dogs in South America is Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of L. infantum, but many other phlebotomine sandfly species might be involved. For quite some time, canine leishmaniosis has been regarded as a rural disease, but nowadays it is well-established in large urbanised areas. Serological investigations reveal that the prevalence of anti-Leishmania antibodies in dogs might reach more than 50%, being as high as 75% in highly endemic foci. Many aspects related to the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis (e.g., factors increasing the risk disease development) in some South American countries other than Brazil are poorly understood and should be further studied. A better understanding of the epidemiology of canine leishmaniosis in South America would be helpful to design sustainable control and prevention strategies against Leishmania infection in both dogs and humans. PMID:19426440

  19. Canine gastrointestinal physiology: Breeds variations that can influence drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Hayley; Sharkey, Michele; Pade, Devendra; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2015-11-01

    Although all dogs belong to Canis lupus familiaris, the physiological diversity resulting from selective breeding can lead to wide interbreed variability in drug pharmacokinetics (PK) or in oral drug product performance. It is important to understand this diversity in order to predict the impact of drug product formulation attributes on in vivo dissolution and absorption characteristics across the canine population when the dog represents the targeted patient population. Based upon published information, this review addresses breed differences in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology and discusses the in vivo implications of these differences. In addition to the importance of such information for understanding the variability that may exist in the performance of oral dosage forms in dogs for the purpose of developing canine therapeutics, an appreciation of breed differences in GI physiology can improve our prediction of oral drug formulation performance when we extrapolate bioavailability results from the dog to the humans, and vice versa. In this literature review, we examine reports of breed associated diversity in GI anatomy and morphology, gastric emptying time (GET), oro-cecal transit time (OCTT), small intestinal transit time (SITT), large intestinal transit time (LITT), intestinal permeability, sodium/potassium fecal concentrations, intestinal flora, and fecal moisture content. PMID:26409436

  20. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  1. Pulp revascularization of a severely malformed immature maxillary canine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Chang; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Choi, Sung Chul; Nam, Ok Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a dental anomaly exhibiting complex anatomical forms. Because of this anatomical complexity, immature DI teeth with necrotic pulp are difficult to treat via apexification. We used revascularization as an alternative treatment for a patient with DI. An 11-year-old boy visited our clinic with chief complaints of gingival swelling and pain in the left maxillary canine. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of type III DI. Revascularization therapy was performed, and a 24-month follow-up examination confirmed healing of the periapical radiolucency and physiological root formation. (J Oral Sci 58, 295-298, 2016). PMID:27349553

  2. Self-reported Oral Health, Oral Hygiene, and Oral HPV Infection in At-Risk Women in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Tran, Ly Thi-Hai; Markham, Christine M.; Huynh, Thuy Thi-Thu; Tran, Loi Thi; Pham, Vy Thi-Tuong; Tran, Quan Minh; Hoang, Ngoc Hieu; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Sturgis, Erich Madison

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the relationship between self-reported oral health, oral hygiene practices, and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women at risk for sexually transmitted infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Study design Convenience and referral sampling methods were used in a clinic-based setting to recruit 126 women aged 18–45 years between August–October 2013. Behavioral factors were self-reported. Oral-rinse samples were tested for HPV DNA of two low-risk and 13 high-risk genotypes. Results A higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with poorer self-rated overall oral health (p=.001), reporting oral lesions/problems in the past year (p=.001), and reporting a tooth loss not because of injury (p=.001). Higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was also associated with two measures of oral hygiene: lower frequencies of toothbrush per day (p=.047) and gargling without toothbrush (p=.037). After adjusting for other factors in multivariable logistic regression models, poorer self-rated overall oral health remained statistically associated with oral HPV infection (p=.042); yet, the frequency of toothbrush per day did not (p=.704). Conclusion Results corroborate the association between self-reported poor oral health and oral HPV infection. The effect of oral hygiene on oral HPV infection remains inconclusive. PMID:26093681

  3. Papillomavirus DNA replication - From initiation to genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kadaja, Meelis; Silla, Toomas; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-02-20

    Papillomaviruses establish their productive life cycle in stratified epithelium or mucosa, where the undifferentiated proliferating keratinocytes are the initial targets for the productive viral infection. Papillomaviruses have evolved mechanisms to adapt to the normal cellular growth control pathways and to adjust their DNA replication and maintenance cycle to contend with the cellular differentiation. We provide overview of the papillomavirus DNA replication in the differentiating epithelium and describe the molecular interactions important for viral DNA replication on all steps of the viral life cycle.

  4. Human papillomavirus vaccination in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michelle; Raheja, Vinita; Jaiyesimi, Rotimi

    2013-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It remains the highest ranking preventable cancer affecting women in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by sexual transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV). It is estimated that more than 80% of sexually active women will be infected with HPV in their lifetime, usually in their mid to late teens, 20s and early 30s. Persistence of high-risk oncogenic subtypes can lead to the development of precancerous change (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)), which can ultimately lead to cervical cancer. Progression from CIN to cancer is slow in most cases, and it is believed that progression from CIN 3 to cancer at 10, 20 and 30 years is 16%, 25% and 31.3%, respectively. The cervical screening programme has been successful in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer by recognising early precancerous changes and treating them. A promising advance in women's health has been the development of a vaccine targeting high-risk oncogenic subtypes 16 and 18, which are responsible for 70% of all cervical cancers. Two HPV vaccines are available: Merck & Co.'s Gardasil(®) and GlaxoSmithKline's Cervarix(®). The aim of this programme is to provide three doses prior to sexual debut with the hope that it will reduce the rates of cervical cancer in the future. Women who are already sexually active can still be vaccinated, but, the vaccine has been shown to be less effective in them. Uptake remains a challenge for public health, and efforts should focus on educating parents about the association between HPV and cervical cancer. Routine vaccination of young men is a debatable issue and has been found to be less cost-effective, as the burden of disease such as anal and penile cancers in males is less than cervical cancers in women. Current evidence suggests that the HPV vaccination programme should focus on increasing and maintaining high coverage of vaccination in girls. There may, however, be some benefit in

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of canine ICOS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hwan; Joo, Young-Don; Yim, Daesong; Lee, Richard; Ostrander, Elaine A; Loretz, Carol; Little, Marie-Térèse; Storb, Rainer; Kuhr, Christian S

    2004-10-01

    Inducible costimulatory receptor (ICOS) is one recently identified member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules. Evidence suggests ICOS functions as a critical immune regulator and, to evaluate these effects, we employed the canine model system that has been used to develop strategies currently in clinical use for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To investigate the effects of blocking the ICOS pathway in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model, we tested existing murine and human reagents and cloned the full length of the open reading frame of canine ICOS cDNA to allow the development of reagents specific for the canine ICOS. Canine ICOS contains a major open reading frame of 624 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 208 amino acids, and localizes to chromosome 37. Canine ICOS shares 79% sequence identity with human ICOS, 70% with mouse, and 69% with rat. Canine ICOS expression is limited to stimulated PBMC. PMID:15475250

  6. Canine chronic inflammatory rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Rebecca C; Johnson, Lynelle R

    2006-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory rhinitis is commonly found in dogs with chronic nasal disease and is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in the nasal mucosa in the absence of an obvious etiologic process. The pathogenesis of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis remains unknown. Animals respond poorly to antibiotics, oral glucocorticoids, and antihistamines, making primary infectious, immune-mediated, or allergic etiologies unlikely. Aberrant immune response to inhaled organisms or allergens may induce inflammation in some animals. Common clinical signs include nasal discharge, sneezing, coughing, epistaxis, and stertor. Diagnosis is made by performing a thorough history, physical examination, radiography or advanced imaging (via computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging), rhinoscopy, and nasal mucosal biopsy to rule out primary etiologies of nasal discharge. Treatment strategies have included various antibiotics, antihistamines, oral and inhalant steroids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, and antifungal medications. Some dogs may respond partially to doxycycline or azithromycin, although it is unclear whether response is related to antimicrobial or antiinflammatory properties of these drugs. Hydration of the nasal cavity through nasal drops or aerosols may limit nasal discharge, and some animals may improve with inhalant (but rarely oral) glucocorticoids. PMID:16711613

  7. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature. PMID:26953614

  8. Successful management of refractory cases of canine demodicosis with homeopathy medicine Graphitis.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Dua, Kirti; Turkar, Sujata; Singh, Harkirat; Singla, L D

    2014-12-01

    Canine demodicosis is a refractory skin disease caused by excessive proliferation of mite Demodex canis. Despite availability of several treatment options, the disease poses a great challenge to clinicians for its long term management as some drugs may be ineffective or toxic. Present report describes successful treatment of two refractory cases of canine demodicosis using homeopathy medicine. After oral administration of Graphitis 200 C two drops once daily for 2 months, complete cure from the disease was observed. No adverse health effects of the medication were recorded during the treatment. Thus, it may be concluded that homeopathy medicine may be used safely for long-term management of canine demodicosis. PMID:25320495

  9. What's eating you? Canine scabies.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Richard F; Elston, Dirk M

    2003-08-01

    Infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var canis, the causative strain of canine scabies, can produce a pruritic rash in humans. The rash generally manifests within 24 to 96 hours of contact with the affected pet. Scrapings are generally negative, and the correct diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. PMID:12953932

  10. Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gillison, Maura L; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Anderson, William F; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now established as the principal cause of an increase in incidence of a subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNCs) in numerous geographic regions around the world. Further study of the epidemiology of HPV-positive HNC will be critical to the development and implementation of public health interventions to reverse these global incidence trends. Here, recent data are reviewed to provide insight into several topics, including incidence trends and projections for HPV-positive HNC; the worldwide HPV-attributable fraction; sex disparities in cancer risk; the epidemiology of oral HPV infection; the latency period between infection and cancer; the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccination; and prospects for secondary prevention through screening for oral HPV infection or seroreactivity to viral antigens. The identification of a single necessary cause for any cancer provides a rare and perhaps extraordinary opportunity for cancer prevention. PMID:26351338

  11. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  12. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  13. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  14. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Nonhemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype V Strain 1, Isolated from the Buccal Cavity of a Canine.

    PubMed

    Harden, Leeanne K; Morales, Karina M; Hughey, Jeffery R

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence from a nonhemolytic strain of Streptococcus agalactiae from the oral cavity of a canine was assembled. The genome is 2,165,968 bp, contains 2,055 genes, and is classified as group B streptococcus (GBS) serotype V, strain 1. A comparison to other S. agalactiae sequences shows high gene synteny with human and bovine strains. PMID:26823579

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Nonhemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype V Strain 1, Isolated from the Buccal Cavity of a Canine

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Leeanne K.; Morales, Karina M.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence from a nonhemolytic strain of Streptococcus agalactiae from the oral cavity of a canine was assembled. The genome is 2,165,968 bp, contains 2,055 genes, and is classified as group B streptococcus (GBS) serotype V, strain 1. A comparison to other S. agalactiae sequences shows high gene synteny with human and bovine strains. PMID:26823579

  17. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www. ... WHAT IS HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men ...

  18. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/ ... What is HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men ...

  19. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F. N.; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed. PMID:26266250

  20. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. PMID:26163301

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and pharynx (the back of the throat). Oral cancer accounts for roughly two percent of all cancers ...

  2. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  3. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    PubMed

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  4. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy preceding canine juvenile cellulitis in an Australian shepherd puppy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzell, Meaghan L.

    2011-01-01

    A 10-week-old intact female Australian shepherd dog was presented sternally recumbent, mildly pyrexic, and painful on long bone palpation of both forelimbs. Based on radiographs she was diagnosed with hypertrophic osteodystrophy. Analgesia was provided with intravenous, oral, and topical medications. Approximately 2 wk later she was presented for facial swelling, regional dermatitis, and lymphadenopathy. Canine juvenile cellulitis was diagnosed and successfully treated. PMID:21731101

  5. Influence of oral sex and oral cancer information on young adults' oral sexual-risk cognitions and likelihood of HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stock, Michelle L; Peterson, Laurel M; Houlihan, Amy E; Walsh, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Public health information and educational interventions regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) have focused on the link between vaginal sex and cervical cancer among women. Many people are unaware that HPV can be transmitted through oral sex or that HPV causes oral cancers. Given that HPV infections and unprotected oral sex are increasing, research on oral sex-related HPV risk is important. This study examined the effect of a brief informational intervention regarding HPV and oral sex on the sexual risk cognitions of young adults. College students (N = 238) read information on HPV, oral sex, and oral cancer or no information. Participants then completed measures of oral sex and HPV knowledge, oral sex willingness, HPV vaccination likelihood, and risk perceptions. Participants who read the information on HPV and oral sex and cancer (compared to those who did not) reported greater knowledge, perceived risk and concern, and lower willingness to engage in oral sex. These effects were only significant among women. However, men reported a higher likelihood of future HPV vaccination compared to women who had not yet received the vaccine. Focusing on oral sex and cancer, this study adds to research investigating ways to reduce HPV infections. PMID:22236342

  6. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  7. Canine leishmaniosis - an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Kaszak, Ilona; Planellas, Marta; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is an invasive disease of dogs, caused by Leishmania spp. parasites transmitted by the bite of an infected phlebotomine sand fly. CanL is declared an important disease by World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). Due to its zoonotic potential is of a great importance the prevention of this disease in non endemic areas. Canine leishmaniosis is endemic disease in more than 70 countries and is a common disease in Mediterranean region. Recently, many cases have been reported in non endemic areas, like United Kingdom, Germany and Poland as well, where this disease is considered exotic. The aim of this article is to summarize shortly canine leishmaniosis, it's transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnostics procedure, treatment, prognosis and prevention. Increasing knowledge about this disease can be of a great use for veterinary surgeons from countries where CanL is an emerging disease. Multiple clinical presentations of CanL should aware clinicians to include leishmaniosis in the differential diagnosis of most clinical cases. Unfortunately, even if dogs recover clinically after treatment, complete elimination of Leishmania spp. is rarely achieved, and they remain infected and may relapse. PMID:26342500

  8. Transplacental transmission of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2008-01-01

    This paper aimed at studying the transplacental transmission of HPV and looking at the epidemiological factors involved in maternal viral infection. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, (a) genital; (b) peripheral blood; (2) in the newborn, (a) oral cavity, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the placenta. The HPV DNA was identified using two methods: multiplex PCR of human β-globin and of HPV using the PGMY09 and PGMY11 primers; and nested-PCR, which combines degenerated primers of the E6/E7 regions of the HPV virus, that allowed the identification of genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Transplacental transmission was considered when type-specific HPV concordance was found between the mother, the placenta and the newborn or the mother and cord blood. The study included 49 HPV DNA-positive pregnant women at delivery. Twelve placentas (24.5%, n = 12/49) had a positive result for HPV DNA. Eleven newborn were HPV DNA positive in samples from the nasopharyngeal or buccal and body or cord blood. In 5 cases (10.2%, n = 5/49) there was HPV type-specific agreement between genital/placenta/newborn samples. In one case (2%, n = 1/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between genital/cord blood and also suggested transplacental transmission. A positive and significant correlation was observed between transplacental transmission of HPV infection and the maternal variables of immunodepression history (HIV, p = 0.011). In conclusion the study suggests placental infection in 23.3% of the cases studied and transplacental transmission in 12.2%. It is suggested that in future HPV DNA be researched in the normal endometrium of women of reproductive age. The possible consequence of fetal exposure to HPV should be observed. PMID:18817577

  9. Isolation and cloning of a papillomavirus from a North American porcupine by using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification: the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Tachezy, Ruth; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; MacNamara, Tracey; Burk, Robert D; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2005-01-20

    The complete genome of a novel papillomavirus was isolated from a cutaneous papillomatous lesion of a North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum) using multiply primed rolling-circle amplification (RCA). The nucleotide sequence, genome organization, and phylogenetic position of the Erethizon dorsatum papillomavirus type 1 (EdPV-1) were determined. EdPV-1 is only distantly related to other benign cutaneous papillomavirus sequences and is the first member of the novel Sigma papillomavirus genus. PMID:15629787

  10. Human papillomavirus testing in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Castle, Philip E; Cremer, Miriam

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more reliable and sensitive but less specific than Papanicolaou (Pap) testing/cervical cytology for the detection of cervical precancer and cancer. HPV-negative women are at lower risk of cervical cancer than Pap-negative women. In high-resource settings, HPV testing can be used to make cervical cancer prevention programs more efficient by focusing clinical attention on women who have HPV. In lower-resource settings, where Pap testing has not been sustained or widespread, new, lower-cost HPV tests may make cervical cancer screening feasible. PMID:23732037

  11. Global Delivery of Human Papillomavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Jannah; Fontenot, Holly B; Zimet, Gregory D

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, if broadly implemented, has the potential to significantly reduce global rates of morbidity and mortality associated with cervical and other HPV-related cancers. More than 100 countries around the world have licensed HPV vaccines. As of February, 2015, there were an estimated 80 national HPV immunization programs and 37 pilot programs. This article discusses global implementation of HPV vaccination programs and issues such as vaccine financing and different approaches to HPV vaccine delivery. PMID:26613690

  12. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E. Muenger, Karl

    2009-02-20

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein shares functional similarities with such proteins as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large tumor antigen. As one of only two viral proteins always expressed in HPV-associated cancers, E7 plays a central role in both the viral life cycle and carcinogenic transformation. In the HPV viral life cycle, E7 disrupts the intimate association between cellular differentiation and proliferation in normal epithelium, allowing for viral replication in cells that would no longer be in the dividing population. This function is directly reflected in the transforming activities of E7, including tumor initiation and induction of genomic instability.

  13. [Infection therapeutic modalities in human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Pacheco, Adia; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genital it can infect any mucous of the body and to cause cancer of the uterine cervix. Until recently specific treatments did not exist on this infection, for what had to destroy or to remove the injured tissue by diverse procedures, what could have obstetric repercussions in young women. Recently some surgical modalities and topical drugs have arisen, as well as of systemic employment that allow to arrive to the lesions difficult to approach, and have demonstrated good effectiveness to cure the infection for HPV, for what an analysis of the medical treatment of this infection type is made. PMID:23427640

  14. Bilateral Mandibular Supernumerary Canines: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Abouei Mehrizi, Ehsan; Semyari, Hassan; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are defined as the teeth developed in excess of the number found in a normal dentition. Supernumerary canine is an extremely rare finding particularly in the mandible. This case report presents a 25-year-old female patient with the unique feature of bilateral mandibular supplemental supernumerary canines. The patient was non-syndromic without any other supernumerary teeth. PMID:23346342

  15. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development. PMID:25654476

  16. Viral and molecular aspects of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillbertz, Nicolette Salmon; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sand, Lars

    2012-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common epithelial malignancy in the oral cavity. SCCs and their variants constitute over 90% of oral malignancies, and the disease is associated with poor prognosis. OSCC is a complex malignancy where environmental factors, virus infections, and genetic alterations most likely interact, and thus give rise to the malignant condition. Herein, we review the available literature regarding high-risk factors such as alcohol and tobacco usage; discuss the roles of human papillomaviruses (HPV), the Epstein-Barr virus, and the human herpes simplex virus (HSV); and evaluate several candidate genes associated with the condition: p53, p16(INK4) and p21(WAF1/CIPI), survivin, B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), keratins, Fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3), FGF4, FGF19, Oral cancer overexpressed gene 1 (ORAOV1), and Cyclin D1 (CCND1). PMID:23060540

  17. Early canine plaque biofilms: characterization of key bacterial interactions involved in initial colonization of enamel.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Lucy J; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  18. Early Canine Plaque Biofilms: Characterization of Key Bacterial Interactions Involved in Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Lucy J.; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  19. [The first vaccine against cancer: the human papillomavirus vaccine].

    PubMed

    Bősze, Péter

    2013-04-21

    The last 20 years is one of the most remarkable periods in the fight against cancer, with the realization that some human papillomaviruses are causally related to cancer and with the development of the vaccine against human papillomavirus infections. This is a historical event in medicine and the prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines have provided powerful tools for primary prevention of cervical cancer and other human papillomavirus-associated diseases. This is very important as human papillomavirus infection is probably the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide, and over one million women develop associated cancer yearly, which is about 5% of all female cancers, and half of them die of their disease. Cancers associated with oncogenic human papillomaviruses, mostly HPV16 and 18, include cervical cancer (100%), anal cancer (95%), vulvar cancer (40%), vaginal cancer (60%), penile cancer (40%), and oro-pharingeal cancers (65%). In addition, pre-cancers such as genital warts and the rare recurrent respiratory papillomatosis are also preventable by vaccination. Currently, the human papillomavirus vaccines have the potential to significantly reduce the burden of human papillomavirus associated conditions, including prevention of up to 70% of cervical cancers. Two prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines are currently available worldwide: a bivalent vaccine (types 16 and 18), and a quadrivalent vaccine (types 6, 11, 16, and 18). Randomized controlled trials conducted on several continents during the last 10 years have demonstrated that these vaccines are safe without serious side effects; they are highly immunogenic and efficacious in preventing incident and persistent vaccine-type human papillomavirus infections, high grade cervical, vulvar and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and so on. In addition, the quadrivalent vaccine has been shown to prevent genital warts in women and men. The vaccine is most effective when given to human papillomavirus

  20. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures. PMID:22839365

  1. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  2. Retinoic acid metabolism proteins are altered in trichoblastomas induced by mouse papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Suo, Liye; Ghim, Shinge; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer burden is significant as treatment costs have skyrocketed to $8.1 million annually and some forms metastasize, such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and melanoma. cSCC is caused by altered growth factor signaling induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet light (UV) exposure, and infections with papillomaviruses (PVs). One of the few options for preventing cSCC in high-risk patients is oral retinoids. While much is understood about retinoid treatments and metabolism in mouse models of chemically and UV exposure induced cSCC, little is known about the role of retinoids in PV-induced cSCC. To better understand how retinoid metabolism is altered in cSCC, we examined the expression of this pathway in the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1), which produces trichoblastomas in dorsal skin but not cSCC. We found significant increases in a rate-limiting enzyme involved in retinoic acid synthesis and retinoic acid binding proteins, suggestive of increased RA synthesis, in MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J mice. Similar increases in these proteins were seen after acute UVB exposure in Crl:SKH1-Hr(hr) mice and in regressing pre-cancerous lesions in a chemically-induced mouse model, suggesting a common mechanism in limiting the progression of papillomas to full blown cSCC. PMID:26416148

  3. Characterization of Human Papillomavirus Type 154 and Tissue Tropism of Gammapapillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ure, Agustín Enrique; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 154 (HPV154) was characterized from a wart on the crena ani of a three-year-old boy. It was previously designated as the putative HPV type FADI3 by sequencing of a subgenomic FAP amplicon. We obtained the complete genome by combined methods including rolling circle amplification (RCA), genome walking through an adapted method for detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences by ligation-mediated PCR (DIPS-PCR), long-range PCR, and finally by cloning of four overlapping amplicons. Phylogenetically, the HPV154 genome clustered together with members of the proposed species Gammapapillomavirus 11, and demonstrated the highest identity in L1 to HPV136 (68.6%). The HPV154 was detected in 3% (2/62) of forehead skin swabs from healthy children. In addition, the different detection sites of 62 gammapapillomaviruses were summarized in order to analyze their tissue tropism. Several of these HPV types have been detected from multiple sources such as skin, oral, nasal, and genital sites, suggesting that the gammapapillomaviruses are generalists with a broader tissue tropism than previously appreciated. The study expands current knowledge concerning genetic diversity and tropism among HPV types in the rapidly growing gammapapillomavirus genus. PMID:24551244

  4. Use of a doxycycline-enrofloxacin-metronidazole combination with/without diminazene diaceturate to treat naturally occurring canine babesiosis caused by Babesia gibsoni.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Huang, Hui-Pi

    2010-01-01

    Canine babesiosis is an important worldwide, tick-borne disease caused by hemoprotozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. Babesia gibsoni is the predominant species that causes canine babesiosis in Taipei, Taiwan. It is a small pleomorphic intraerythrocytic parasite that can cause erythrocyte destruction and hemolytic anemia. Efficacy of oral administration of a doxycycline-enrofloxacin-metronidazole combination with and without injections of diminazene diaceturate in the management of naturally occurring canine babesiosis caused by B. gibsoni was evaluated retrospectively. The overall efficacy of this combination of doxycycline-enrofloxacin-metronidazole in conjunction with and without administration of diminazene diaceturate was 85.7% and 83.3%, respectively; with a mean recovery time of 24.2 and 23.5 days, respectively. Concomitant use of intramuscular diminazene diaceturate may not improve the efficacy of a doxycycline-enrofloxacin-metronidazole combination in management of canine babesiosis caused by B. gibsoni. PMID:20416095

  5. Papillomavirus research update: highlights of the Barcelona HPV 2000 international papillomavirus conference

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F; Rohan, T; Schneider, A; Frazer, I; Pfister, H; Castellsague, X; de Sanjose, S; Moreno, V; Puig-Tintore, L; Smith, P; Munoz, N; zur Hausen, H

    2001-01-01

    The 18th international papillomavirus conference took place in Barcelona, Spain in July 2000. The HPV clinical workshop was jointly organised with the annual meeting of the Spanish Association of Cervical Pathology and Colposcopy. The conference included 615 abstracts describing ongoing research in epidemiology, diagnosis/screening, treatment/prognosis, immunology/human immunodeficiency virus, vaccine development/trials, transformation/progression, replication, transcription/translation, viral protein functions, and viral and host interactions. This leader summarises the highlights presented at the conference (the full text of the abstracts and lectures can be found at www.hpv2000.com). Relevant material in Spanish can be found at www.aepcc.org. Key Words: papillomavirus • epidemiology • immunology • biology • screening PMID:11253126

  6. Concomitant canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvoviral enteritis, canine infectious tracheobronchitis, and toxoplasmosis in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; Fritzen, Juliana Torres Tomazi; Garcia, João Luis; Weissenböck, Herbert; da Silva, Ana Paula; Bodnar, Livia; Okano, Werner; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant infections of Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine adenovirus A types 1 (CAdV-1) and 2 (CAdV-2), Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), and Toxoplasma gondii are described in a 43-day-old mixed-breed puppy. Clinically, there were convulsions and blindness with spontaneous death; 14 siblings of this puppy, born to a 10-month-old dam, which was seropositive (titer: 1,024) for T. gondii, also died. Necropsy revealed unilateral corneal edema (blue eye), depletion of intestinal lymphoid tissue, non-collapsible lungs, congestion of meningeal vessels, and a pale area in the myocardium. Histopathology demonstrated necrotizing myocarditis associated with intralesional apicomplexan protozoa; necrotizing and chronic hepatitis associated with rare intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes; necrotizing bronchitis and bronchiolitis; interstitial pneumonia associated with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies within epithelial cells; atrophy and fusion of intestinal villi with cryptal necrosis; and white matter demyelination of the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with intranuclear inclusion bodies within astrocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified the partial fragments (bp) of the CDV N gene (290 bp), CPV-2c VP2 capsid protein gene (583 bp), and CAdV-1 (508 bp) and CAdV-2 (1,030 bp) E gene from urine and tissue samples. The PCR assays demonstrated that the apicomplexan protozoa observed within several organs contained DNA specific for T. gondii; genotyping revealed T. gondii type III. The findings support the characterization of concomitant infections of CDV, CAdV-1, CAdV-2, CPV-2, and T. gondii in this puppy. Further, seroreactivity to T. gondii of the dam in association with the systemic disease observed in the puppy described herein is suggestive of congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:23293164

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  8. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-cervarix.html . CDC review information for HPV Cervarix® ...

  9. The projections of chemically identified nerve fibres in canine ileum.

    PubMed

    Daniel, E E; Furness, J B; Costa, M; Belbeck, L

    1987-02-01

    The projections of nerve fibres with immunoreactivity for the peptides enkephalin (ENK), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin (SOM), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were studied in canine small intestine by analysing the consequences of lesions of intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Of peptides present in fibres supplying myenteric ganglia, GRP, SOM and VIP were in anally directed nerve pathways, whereas ENK and NPY were in orally directed pathways. Pathways ran for up to about 30 mm. SP fibres ran for short distances in both directions in the myenteric plexus. The circular muscle was supplied with ENK, NPY, SP and VIP fibres arising from the myenteric ganglia, whereas most mucosal SP and VIP fibres were deduced to arise from submucous ganglia. There were projections of fibres reactive for ENK, GRP, SOM, SP and VIP from myenteric ganglia to submucous ganglia. Antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were used to locate noradrenaline nerve fibres supplying the intestine; these fibres all disappeared when extrinsic nerves running through the mesentery to the small intestine were cut. It is deduced that there is an ordered pattern of projections of peptide-containing fibres in the canine intestine. PMID:2434235

  10. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80 % of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68 % of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways. PMID:25511566

  11. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  12. [General aspects of structure, classification and replication of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) refers to a group of viruses which belongs to a larger group, commonly referred to as papillomaviruses. These viruses are taxonomically located in the Papillomaviridae family. Papillomaviruses are small, non-enveloped with a genome of double-stranded DNA and they have affinity for epithelial tissue. Many of them are associated with human infection; they induce benign lesions of the skin (warts) and mucous membranes (condylomas), but they are also associated with some epithelial malignancies, such as cervical cancer and other tumors of the urogenital tract. Papillomaviridae contains 16 genera, which are named with a Greek letter prefix and the termination papillomavirus, e.g., Alphapapillomavirus, Betapapillomavirus, etcetera. From the clinical point of view, human papillomaviruses infecting the genital tract (which are located in the genus Alphapapilomavirus) have been divided into two groups: those of low risk, associated with benign genital warts, and those of high risk, with oncogenic potential, which are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. In this paper we review some relevant aspects of the structure, replication cycle and classification of human papillomaviruses. PMID:26462512

  13. Human papillomavirus-related cancers among people living with AIDS in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Pérez-Irizarry, Javier; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Suárez, Erick; Pérez, Naydi; Cruz, Maritza; Palefsky, Joel; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Miranda, Sandra; Colón-López, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers and the risk of death (by cancer status) among people living with AIDS (PLWA) in Puerto Rico. We used data from the Puerto Rico AIDS Surveillance Program and Central Cancer Registry (1985-2005). Cancers with highest incidence were cervix (299.6/100,000) for women and oral cavity/oropharynx for men (150.0/100,000); the greatest excess of cancer incidence for men (standardized incidence ratio, 86.8) and women (standardized incidence ratio, 52.8) was for anal cancer. PLWA who developed a cancer had decreased survival and increased risk of death compared with those who did not have cancer. Cancer control strategies for PLWA will be essential for improving their disease survival. PMID:24831284

  14. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  15. Canine procalcitonin messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kuzi, Sharon; Aroch, Itamar; Peleg, Keren; Karnieli, Ohad; Klement, Eyal; Dank, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Procalcitonin is considered an acute phase protein used as both a marker of infection and prognosis in human medicine. Canine procalcitonin has been previously sequenced; however, its use as a diagnostic or prognostic tool in dogs has never been assessed. A quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for canine procalcitonin messenger RNA (mRNA) was developed. Whole blood samples were collected from ill and healthy dogs. RNA was extracted and the real-time PCR was assessed. The patients' diagnoses, complete blood cell count, and differential leukocyte count results were recorded. Based on the diagnosis, dogs were divided into 5 groups: inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic, other diseases, and healthy controls. Procalcitonin mRNA expression and the hematological measures were compared between groups, and their correlations were assessed. Procalcitonin mRNA expression was assessed in 70 dogs, including infectious (17), noninfectious inflammatory (17), neoplastic (18), other diseases (7), and healthy controls (11), and was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in all ill dogs versus controls. Procalcitonin may therefore be considered an acutephase protein in dogs. However, there were no significant differences in procalcitonin mRNA expression between ill dog groups and no correlations between its expression levels and hematological measures. In 5 dogs of all disease categories, procalcitonin mRNA expression was measured twice during the course of disease. The changes in its levels were in agreement with the clinical evaluation of improvement or deterioration, suggesting a possible prognostic value. PMID:18776098

  16. Neuroinflammation in advanced canine glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing; Harper, Matthew M.; Kecova, Helga; Adamus, Grazyna; Kardon, Randy H.; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiological events that occur in advanced glaucoma are not well characterized. The principal purpose of this study is to characterize the gene expression changes that occur in advanced glaucoma. Methods Retinal RNA was obtained from canine eyes with advanced glaucoma as well as from healthy eyes. Global gene expression patterns were determined using oligonucleotide microarrays and confirmed by real-time PCR. The presence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors was evaluated by immunolabeling. Finally, we evaluated the presence of serum autoantibodies directed against retinal epitopes using western blot analyses. Results We identified over 500 genes with statistically significant changes in expression level in the glaucomatous retina. Decreased expression levels were detected for large number of functional groups, including synapse and synaptic transmission, cell adhesion, and calcium metabolism. Many of the molecules with decreased expression levels have been previously shown to be components of retinal ganglion cells. Genes with elevated expression in glaucoma are largely associated with inflammation, such as antigen presentation, protein degradation, and innate immunity. In contrast, expression of many other pro-inflammatory genes, such as interferons or interleukins, was not detected at abnormal levels. Conclusions This study characterizes the molecular events that occur in the canine retina with advanced glaucoma. Our data suggest that in the dog this stage of the disease is accompanied by pronounced retinal neuroinflammation. PMID:21042562

  17. Evidence for canine rehabilitation and physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Millis, Darryl L; Ciuperca, Ionut Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews some important studies regarding canine physical rehabilitation. Bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons undergo atrophy if loading is decreased. Knowledge of the changes that occur with immobilization and the time course of events helps in the development of a rehabilitation program to improve tissue integrity. Outcome assessment instruments are clinically useful indicators of patient progress and the success of rehabilitation programs. A number of physical modalities are used in canine rehabilitation, although there are relatively few canine-specific studies. Rehabilitation has specific benefits in the treatment of various orthopedic and neurologic conditions. PMID:25432679

  18. Human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium elicit mucosal and systemic neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nardelli-Haefliger, D; Roden, R B; Benyacoub, J; Sahli, R; Kraehenbuhl, J P; Schiller, J T; Lachat, P; Potts, A; De Grandi, P

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated strains of Salmonella are attractive live vaccine candidates for eliciting mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. The ability to induce immune responses in the reproductive tract may be critical for the effectiveness of a prophylactic vaccine against genital human papillomaviruses (HPV), which are important etiologic agents in the development of cervical cancer. To examine the potential of a live Salmonella-based vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection, the L1 major capsid protein from HPV type 16 (HPV16) was constitutively expressed in the PhoPc strain of Salmonella typhimurium. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the L1 protein expressed in these bacteria assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) that resemble authentic papillomavirus virions. This is the first demonstration that papillomavirus VLPs can self-assemble in prokaryotes. BALB/c mice were immunized with the HPV16 L1 recombinant PhoPc strain by the oral and nasal routes. Despite a low stability of the L1-expressing plasmid in vivo, a double nasal immunization was effective in inducing L1-specific serum antibodies that recognized mainly native, but not disassembled, VLPs. These antibodies effectively neutralized HPV16 pseudotyped virions in an in vitro infectivity assay. Conformationally dependent anti-VLP immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were also detected in oral and vaginal secretions, indicating that potentially protective antibody responses were elicited at mucosal sites. Recombinant attenuated Salmonella expressing HPV capsids may represent a promising vaccine candidate against genital HPV infection. PMID:9234794

  19. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know [Gardasil®-9

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil-9 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www. ... WHY GET VACCINATED? Gardasil-9 prevents human papillomavirus (HPV) ... Vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, and Anal cancer in ...

  20. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  1. Comparative functional characterization of canine IgG subclasses.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lisa M; McCandless, Erin E; Dunham, Steve; Dunkle, Bill; Zhu, Yaqi; Shelly, John; Lightle, Sandra; Gonzales, Andrea; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2014-01-15

    To date, very little is known about the functional characteristics of the four published canine IgG subclasses. It is not clear how each subclass engages the immune system via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), or how long each antibody may last in serum. Such information is critical for understanding canine immunology and for the discovery of canine therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Through both in vitro and ex vivo experiments to evaluate canine Fc's for effector function, complement binding, FcRn binding, and ADCC, we are now able to categorize canine subclasses by function. The subclasses share functional properties with the four human IgG subclasses and are reported herein with their function-based human analog. Canine Fc fusions, canine chimeras, and caninized antibodies were characterized. Canine subclasses A and D appear effector-function negative while subclasses B and C bind canine Fc gamma receptors and are positive for ADCC. All canine subclasses bind the neonatal Fc receptor except subclass C. By understanding canine IgGs in this way, we can apply what is known of human immunology toward translational and veterinary medicine. Thus, this body of work lays the foundation for evaluating canine IgG subclasses for therapeutic antibody development and builds upon the fundamental scholarship of canine immunology. PMID:24268690

  2. Estimating canine tooth crown height in early Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ward, Carol V; Paulus, Faydre L

    2009-07-01

    Canine tooth size reduction and the associated reduction in canine dimorphism is a basal hominin character that also provides important evidence for models of behavioral evolution. Two specimens of Australopithecus anamensis (KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283) that do not preserve the canine crown, but do preserve the root or alveolus, appear to suggest that canine size variation and canine dimorphism in this species may have been greater than in other hominins. We evaluate canine root and crown dimensions in a series of extant hominoids, and estimate canine crown height in Australopithecus afarensis and A. anamensis. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to generate estimates of canine crown height from basal canine crown and root dimensions with a moderate degree of accuracy. Estimates of maxillary canine crown size for A. anamensis are slightly larger than those of A. afarensis, and are approximately the same size as canines of modern female chimpanzees. Estimated mandibular canine crown height is very similar in the two species. Variation within the A. anamensis sample of estimated canine crown heights is similar to that of modern humans, suggesting a low degree of sexual dimorphism. Inclusion of estimates for KNM-KP 29287 and KNM-KP 29283 does not substantially increase either the estimate of overall canine size or variation for A. anamensis. PMID:19482334

  3. Human Papillomaviruses and the Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Beglin, Melanie; Melar-New, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small DNA viruses that target stratified keratinocytes for infection. A subset of HPV types infect epithelia in the genital tract and are the causative agents of cervical as well as other anogenital cancers. Interferon treatment of existing genital HPV lesions has had mixed results. While HPV proteins down-regulate the expression of interferon-inducible genes, interferon treatment ultimately induces their high-level transcription after a delay. Cells containing complete HPV genomes that are able to undergo productive replication upon differentiation are sensitive to interferon-induced growth arrest, while cells from high-grade cancers that only express E6 and E7 are resistant. Recent studies indicate this sensitivity is dependent upon the binding of the interferon-inducible factor, p56, to the E1 replication protein. The response to interferon by HPV proteins is complex and results from the action of multiple viral proteins. PMID:19715460

  4. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: a Mozambique overview.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Putoto, Giovanni; Chhaganlal, Kajal D

    2016-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus is agent of the most common sexually transmitted disease which is able to infect mucosal and cutaneous membranes of the anogenital region, upper aerodigestive tract, and other head and neck mucosal regions. Although mainly HPV infection can be asymptomatic and transient, it may persist and give rise to various lesions such as warts, condyloma dysplasia and cancers depending on low or high risk type of HPV infection. Moreover, growing recent evidence suggests a role of this virus in male and female fertility. To date no effective prevention, test, treatment and control strategies are provided for people in developing countries despite the reported high incidence of HPV both in women and men. This paper reviews the more recent literature about HPV infection highlighting epidemiology, related pathologies and possible fertility effects of HPV in male and female with particular attention to the Mozambique context. PMID:27366761

  5. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV’s significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping. PMID:26768784

  6. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options. PMID:23706272

  7. Modulation of therapeutic sensitivity by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Swick, Adam D; Chatterjee, Anirban; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that pose significant public health concerns as the causative agent of approximately 5% of worldwide cancers. The HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 play key roles in carcinogenesis. In the last 15years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of HPV-related head and neck cancers arising primarily in the oropharynx. Patients with HPV-positive head and neck cancers (HNCs) have a significantly improved prognosis compared to those with HPV-negative disease. In this review we will discuss data suggesting how HPV oncogenes modulate both the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of HNCs and also have important effects upon the tumor microenvironment. Together, these findings contribute to the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC. PMID:26364887

  8. Human papillomavirus vaccines--immune responses.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret; Pinto, Ligia A; Trimble, Connie

    2012-11-20

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are highly effective. The available evidence suggests that neutralising antibody is the mechanism of protection. However, despite the robust humoral response elicited by VLP vaccines, there is no immune correlate, no minimum level of antibody, or any other immune parameter, that predicts protection against infection or disease. The durability of the antibody response and the importance of antibody isotype, affinity and avidity for vaccine effectiveness are discussed. Once infection and disease are established, then cellular immune responses are essential to kill infected cells. These are complex processes and understanding the local mucosal immune response is a prerequisite for the rational design of therapeutic HPV vaccines. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199968

  9. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  10. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  11. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  12. Concepts of papillomavirus entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Papillomaviruses enter basal cells of stratified epithelia. Assembly of new virions occurs in infected cells during terminal differentiation. This unique biology is reflected in the mechanism of entry. Extracellularly, the interaction of nonenveloped capsids with several host cell proteins, after binding, results in discrete conformational changes. Asynchronous internalization occurs over several hours by an endocytic mechanism related to, but distinct from macropinocytosis. Intracellular trafficking leads virions through the endosomal system, and from late endosomes to the trans-Golgi-network, before nuclear delivery. Here, we discuss the existing data with the aim to synthesize an integrated model of the stepwise process of entry, thereby highlighting key open questions. Additionally, we relate data from experiments with cultured cells to in vivo results. PMID:24525291

  13. Principles of polyoma- and papillomavirus uncoating.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Carla; Schelhaas, Mario

    2012-11-01

    Virus particles are vehicles for transmission of the viral genetic information between infected and uninfected cells and organisms. They have evolved to self-assemble, to serve as a protective shell for the viral genome during transfer, and to disassemble when entering a target cell. Disassembly during entry is a complex, multi-step process typically termed uncoating. Uncoating is triggered by multiple host-cell interactions. During cell entry, these interactions occur sequentially in different cellular compartments that the viruses pass through on their way to the site of replication. Here, we highlight the general principles of uncoating for two structurally related virus families, the polyoma- and papillomaviruses. Recent research indicates the use of different compartments and cellular interactions for uncoating despite their structural similarity. PMID:23001401

  14. Properties of intracellular bovine papillomavirus chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Waldeck, W; Zentgraf, H; Sauer, G

    1986-01-01

    Episomal nucleoprotein complexes of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) in transformed cells were exposed to DNase I treatment to localize hypersensitive regions. Such regions, which are indicative for gene expression, were found within the noncoding part of the genome, coinciding with the origin of replication and the 5' ends of most of the early mRNAs. However, there were also regions of hypersensitivity within the structural genes. These intragenic perturbations of the chromatin structure coincide with regulatory sequences at the DNA level. One of these regions maps in close proximity to a Z-DNA antibody-binding site which is located near the putative BPV-1 enhancer sequence. Images PMID:3009863

  15. Antitumor effects of celecoxib in COX-2 expressing and non-expressing canine melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyoung-won; Coh, Ye-rin; Rebhun, Robert B.; Ahn, Jin-ok; Han, Sei-Myung; Lee, Hee-woo; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential target for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, inhibits cell growth of various types of human cancer including malignant melanoma. In dogs, oral malignant melanoma represents the most common oral tumor and is often a fatal disease. Therefore, there is a desperate need to develop additional therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effects of celecoxib on canine malignant melanoma cell lines that express varying levels of COX-2. Celecoxib induced a significant anti-proliferative effect in both LMeC and CMeC-1 cells. In the CMeC cells, treatment of 50 µM celecoxib caused an increase in cells in the G0/G1 and a decreased proportion of cells in G-2 phase. In the LMeC cells, 50 µM of celecoxib led to an increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and a significant activation of caspase-3 when compared to CMeC-1 cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that celecoxib exhibits antitumor effects on canine melanoma LMeC and CMeC-1 cells by induction of G1-S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data suggest that celecoxib might be effective as a chemotherapeutic agent against canine malignant melanoma. PMID:24656746

  16. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  17. Oral Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral insulin is an exciting area of research and development in the field of diabetology. This brief review covers the various approaches used in the development of oral insulin, and highlights some of the recent data related to novel oral insulin preparation. PMID:21059246

  18. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine. PMID:23867013

  19. The possibility of vertical transmission of human papillomavirus through maternal milk.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Furumoto, H; Abe, A; Kato, T; Nishimura, M; Kuwahara, A; Maeda, K; Matsuzaki, T; Irahara, M

    2011-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA has been detected in the oral cavity of infants and breast cancer tissue, suggesting its vertical transmission through maternal milk. We determined whether HPV is detected in maternal milk and is vertically transmitted by breast-feeding. Informed consent was obtained, and maternal milk samples (n=80) were analysed for high-risk HPV DNA. In 43 women, this DNA was measured in the uterine cervix. In women with positive samples, this DNA was measured in the oral cavities of their children. The domain including HPV E6 and E7 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using consensus primers, and HPV serotype determined by electrophoresis after restriction enzyme digestion. High-risk HPV-16 was detected in two of 80 samples (2.5%), and in these two cases, high-risk HPV was not detected in the uterine cervix or oral cavity of the child. It was concluded that the infection of HPV in maternal milk is rare (2/80); vertical transmission through maternal milk was not detected in this study (0/80). HPV infection through maternal milk may occur, but its likelihood is low. PMID:21823849

  20. Human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer in the HIV-infected population.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Palefsky, J M

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted virus and an important etiologic factor in head and neck cancers. HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of developing oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) compared with the general population. HPV-positive OPC are also increasingly a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy. The epidemiology and natural history of oral HPV infection have not been well established, but it appears that oral HPV infection is less common than anal infection, and more common among HIV-infected persons than the general population. Prevention of OPC is therefore increasingly important in HIV-infected individuals. Although not demonstrated in randomized controlled trials, HPV vaccination may prevent oral HPV infection as well. The focus of organized HPV cancer prevention programs should include prophylactic HPV vaccination to reduce the burden of high-risk HPV and low-risk HPV types who have not yet been exposed. PMID:27109278

  1. Etiology of maxillary canine impaction: a review.

    PubMed

    Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Stella

    2015-10-01

    This article is a review that enumerates the causes of impaction of the maxillary permanent canines, including hard tissue obstructions, soft tissue lesions, and anomalies of neighboring teeth, and discusses the much-argued relationship between environmental and genetic factors. These phenomena have been shown in many investigations to accompany the diagnosis of canine impaction and have been presented as unrelated anomalous features, each of which is etiologically construed as genetic, including the aberrant canine itself. While in general the influence of genetics pervades the wider picture, a guidance theory proposes an alternative etiologic line of reasoning and interpretation of these studies, in which the same genetically determined anomalous features provide an abnormal milieu in which the canine is reared and from which it is guided in its misdirected and often abortive path of eruption. PMID:26432311

  2. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing. PMID:25632689

  3. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment. PMID:2638021

  4. Rootless eruption of a mandibular permanent canine.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Yehoshua; Kuftinec, Mladen M

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the rootless eruption of a mandibular permanent canine in a 10-year-old boy; his mandible had been fractured in a car accident. The fracture was at the region of the developing canine, resulting in arrested root formation and causing abnormal, rootless eruption. Current theories on tooth eruption and the important role of the dental follicle in the process of eruption are discussed. PMID:21457868

  5. Case Report of Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia (Heck's Disease) with Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Human Papillomavirus 13.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Mary A; Gordon, Katie; Firan, Miahil; Rady, Peter; Agim, Nnenna

    2016-05-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is an uncommon benign proliferation of oral mucosa caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly subtypes 13 and 32. The disease typically presents in young Native American patients and is characterized by multiple asymptomatic papules and nodules on the oral mucosa, lips, tongue, and gingiva. The factors that determine susceptibility to FEH are unknown, but the ethnic and geographic distribution of FEH suggests that genetic predisposition, particularly having the human lymphocytic antigen DR4 type, may be involved in pathogenesis. We report a case of FEH with polymerase chain reaction detection of HPV13 in a healthy 11-year-old Hispanic girl and discuss the current understanding of disease pathogenesis, susceptibility, and treatment. PMID:27072123

  6. Canine Cytogenetics - From band to basepair

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Humans and dogs have coexisted for thousands of years, during which time we have developed a unique bond, centered on companionship. Along the way, we have developed purebred dog breeds in a manner that has resulted unfortunately in many of them being affected by serious genetic disorders, including cancers. With serendipity and irony the unique genetic architecture of the 21st Century genome of Man's best friend may ultimately provide many of the keys to unlock some of nature's most intriguing biological puzzles. Canine cytogenetics has advanced significantly over the past 10 years, spurred on largely by the surge of interest in the dog as a biomedical model for genetic disease and the availability of advanced genomics resources. As such the role of canine cytogenetics has moved rapidly from one that served initially to define the gross genomic organization of the canine genome and provide a reliable means to determine the chromosomal location of individual genes, to one that enabled the assembled sequence of the canine genome to be anchored to the karyotype. Canine cytogenetics now presents the biomedical research community with a means to assist in our search for a greater understanding of how genome architectures altered during speciation and in our search for genes associated with cancers that affect both dogs and humans. The cytogenetics ‘toolbox’ for the dog is now loaded. This review aims to provide a summary of some of the recent advancements in canine cytogenetics. PMID:18467825

  7. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  8. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  9. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation. PMID:25698302

  10. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.