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Sample records for canis p140 orthologs

  1. Major species-specific antibody epitopes of the Ehrlichia chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 orthologs in surface-exposed tandem repeat regions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tian; Zhang, Xiaofeng; McBride, Jere W

    2009-07-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. canis have a small subset of tandem repeat (TR)-containing protein orthologs, including p120/p140, which elicit strong antibody responses. The TR regions of these protein orthologs are immunoreactive, but the molecular characteristics of the p120/p140 epitopes have not been determined. In this study, the immunodeterminants of the E. chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 were identified and molecularly defined. Major antibody epitope-containing regions of both p120 and p140 were localized to the TR regions, which reacted strongly by Western immunoblotting with antibodies in sera from E. chaffeensis-infected dogs or patients and E. canis-infected dogs, respectively. Single continuous species-specific major epitopes within the E. chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 TRs were mapped to homologous surface-exposed glutamate/aspartate-rich regions (19 to 22 amino acids). In addition, minor cross-reactive epitopes were localized to homologous N- and C-terminal regions of p120 and p140. Furthermore, although the native and recombinant p120 and p140 proteins exhibited higher-than-predicted molecular masses, posttranslational modifications were not present on abnormally migrating p120 and p140 TR recombinant proteins as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:19420187

  2. Major Species-Specific Antibody Epitopes of the Ehrlichia chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 Orthologs in Surface-Exposed Tandem Repeat Regions?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian; Zhang, Xiaofeng; McBride, Jere W.

    2009-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. canis have a small subset of tandem repeat (TR)-containing protein orthologs, including p120/p140, which elicit strong antibody responses. The TR regions of these protein orthologs are immunoreactive, but the molecular characteristics of the p120/p140 epitopes have not been determined. In this study, the immunodeterminants of the E. chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 were identified and molecularly defined. Major antibody epitope-containing regions of both p120 and p140 were localized to the TR regions, which reacted strongly by Western immunoblotting with antibodies in sera from E. chaffeensis-infected dogs or patients and E. canis-infected dogs, respectively. Single continuous species-specific major epitopes within the E. chaffeensis p120 and E. canis p140 TRs were mapped to homologous surface-exposed glutamate/aspartate-rich regions (19 to 22 amino acids). In addition, minor cross-reactive epitopes were localized to homologous N- and C-terminal regions of p120 and p140. Furthermore, although the native and recombinant p120 and p140 proteins exhibited higher-than-predicted molecular masses, posttranslational modifications were not present on abnormally migrating p120 and p140 TR recombinant proteins as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:19420187

  3. Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Greater Dog; abbrev. CMa, gen. Canis Majoris; area 380 sq. deg.) A southern constellation which lies between Lepus and Puppis, and culminates at midnight in early January. It represents one of the two dogs of Orion (the Hunter), which dominates the sky to the north-west (the other dog being represented by Canis Minor). Its brightest star, α Canis Majoris (Sirius), is known as the `dog star'....

  4. Canis Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Lesser Dog; abbrev. CMi, gen. Canis Minoris; area 183 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Gemini and Monoceros, and culminates at midnight in mid-January. It represents one of the two dogs of Orion (the Hunter), which dominates the sky to the west (the other dog being represented by Canis Major). Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  5. Adamantane-based dendrons for trimerization of the therapeutic P140 peptide.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Grillaud, Maxime; Macri, Christophe; Chaloin, Olivier; Muller, Sylviane; Bianco, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Dendrons constituted of an adamantane core, a focal point and three arms, were synthetized starting from a multifunctional adamantane derivative. Maleimido groups at the periphery of the scaffold were used to covalently attach the peptide called P140, a therapeutic phosphopeptide controlling disease activity in systemic lupus, both in mice and patients. Biotinylation of the trimers at the focal point was performed using click chemistry and the conjugates were studied in terms of solubility, binding affinity to its receptor, the HSPA8/HSC70 chaperone protein, effect on HSPA8 folding property and in vivo activity. The results showed that the trimerization of P140 peptide does not trigger aggregation or steric hindrances during the interaction with HSPA8 protein. Compared to the monomeric cognate peptide, the trivalent P140 peptide displayed the same capacity, in vitro, to down-regulate HSPA8 activity and, in vivo in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice, to reduce abnormal blood hypercellularity. The control trimer synthesized with the same scaffold and a scrambled sequence of P140 showed no effect in vivo. This work reveals that adamantane-based scaffolds with a well-defined spatial conformation are promising trivalent systems for molecular recognition and for biomedical applications. PMID:24889033

  6. Characterization of the TPR-MET oncogene p65 and the MET protooncogene p140 protein-tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzatti-Haces, M.; Seth, A.; Park, M.; Copeland, T.; Oroszlan, S.; Vande Woude, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the human TPR-MET oncogene (p65/sup tpr-met/) and the human MET protooncogene (p140/sup met/) have been identified. The p65/sup tpr-met/ and p140/sup met/, as well as a truncated TPR-MET product expression in Escherichia coli, p50/sup met/, are autophosphorylated in vitro on tyrosine residues. Using the immunocomplex kinase assay, p140/sup met/ activity was detected in various human tumor epithelial cell lines. In vivo, p65/sup tpr-met/ is phosphorylated on both serine and tyrosine residues, while p140/sup met/ is phosphorylated on serine and threonine. p140/sup met/ is labeled by cell-surface iodination procedures, suggesting that it is a receptor-like transmembrane protein-tyrosine kinase.

  7. HSC70 blockade by the therapeutic peptide P140 affects autophagic processes and endogenous MHCII presentation in murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Page, Nicolas; Gros, Frédéric; Schall, Nicolas; Décossas, Marion; Bagnard, Dominique; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2011-01-01

    Background The P140 phosphopeptide issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K small nuclear ribonucleoprotein protein displays protective properties in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. It binds both major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) and HSC70/Hsp73 molecules. P140 peptide increases MRL/lpr peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases autoepitope recognition by T cells. Objective To explore further the mode of action of P140 peptide on HSC70+ antigen-presenting cells. Methods P140 biodistribution was monitored in real time using an imaging system and by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Fluorescence activated cell sorting and Western blotting experiments were used to evaluate the P140 effects on autophagic flux markers. Results P140 fluorescence accumulated especially in the lungs and spleen. P140 peptide reduced the number of peripheral and splenic T and B cells without affecting these cells in normal mice. Remaining MRL/lpr B cells responded normally to mitogens. P140 peptide decreased the expression levels of HSC70/Hsp73 chaperone and stable MHCII dimers, which are both increased in MRL/lpr splenic B cells. It impaired refolding properties of chaperone HSC70. In MRL/lpr B cells, it increased the accumulation of the autophagy markers p62/SQSTM1 and LC3-II, consistent with a downregulated lysosomal degradation during autophagic flux. Conclusion The study results suggest that after P140 peptide binding to HSC70, the endogenous (auto)antigen processing might be greatly affected in MRL/lpr antigen-presenting B cells, leading to the observed decrease of autoreactive T-cell priming and signalling via a mechanism involving a lysosomal degradation pathway. This unexpected mechanism might explain the beneficial effect of P140 peptide in treated MRL/lpr mice. PMID:21173017

  8. Poxvirus Orthologous Clusters (POCs).

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Angelika; Osborne, John; Slack, Stephanie; Roper, Rachel L; Upton, Chris

    2002-11-01

    Poxvirus Orthologous Clusters (POCs) is a JAVA client-server application which accesses an updated database containing all complete poxvirus genomes; it automatically groups orthologous genes into families based on BLASTP scores for assessment by a human database curator. POCs has a user-friendly interface permitting complex SQL queries to retrieve interesting groups of DNA and protein sequences as well as gene families for subsequent interrogation by a variety of integrated tools: BLASTP, BLASTX, TBLASTN, Jalview (multiple alignment), Dotlet (Dotplot), Laj (local alignment), and NAP (nucleotide to amino acid alignment). PMID:12424130

  9. p140Cap dual regulation of E-cadherin/EGFR cross-talk and Ras signalling in tumour cell scatter and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Damiano, L; Di Stefano, P; Camacho Leal, M P; Barba, M; Mainiero, F; Cabodi, S; Tordella, L; Sapino, A; Castellano, I; Canel, M; Frame, M; Turco, E; Defilippi, P

    2010-06-24

    The adaptor protein p140Cap/SNIP is a novel Src-binding protein that regulates Src activation through C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). Here, by gain and loss of function approaches in breast and colon cancer cells, we report that p140Cap immobilizes E-cadherin at the cell membrane and inhibits EGFR and Erk1/2 signalling, blocking scatter and proliferation of cancer cells. p140Cap-dependent regulation of E-cadherin/EGFR cross-talk and cell motility is due to the inhibition of Src kinase. However, rescue of Src activity is not sufficient to restore Erk1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation. Indeed, p140Cap also impairs Erk1/2 phosphorylation by affecting Ras activity, downstream to the EGFR. In conclusion, p140Cap stabilizes adherens junctions and inhibits EGFR and Ras signalling through the dual control of both Src and Ras activities, thus affecting crucial cancer properties such as invasion and growth. Interestingly, p140Cap expression is lost in more aggressive human breast cancers, showing an inverse correlation with EGFR expression. Therefore, p140Cap mechanistically behaves as a tumour suppressor that inhibits signalling pathways leading to aggressive phenotypes. PMID:20453886

  10. Production of human factor VIII-FL in 293T cells using the bicistronic MGMT(P140K)-retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Fontes, A M; Melo, F U F; Greene, L J; Faa, V M; Lin, Y; Gerson, S L; Covas, D T

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is the most common X-linked bleeding disorder; it is caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Replacement therapy with rFVIII produced from human cell line is a major goal for treating hemophilia patients. We prepared a full-length recombinant FVIII (FVIII-FL), using the pMFG-P140K retroviral vector. The IRES DNA fragment was cloned upstream to the P140K gene, providing a 9.34-kb bicistronic vector. FVIII-FL cDNA was then cloned upstream to IRES, resulting in a 16.6-kb construct. In parallel, an eGFP control vector was generated, resulting in a 10.1- kb construct. The 293T cells were transfected with these constructs, generating the 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K and 293T-eGFP/P140K cell lines. In 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K cells, FVIII and P140K mRNAs levels were 4,410 (931.7)- and 295,400 (75,769)-fold higher than in virgin cells. In 293T-eGFP/P140K cells, the eGFP and P140K mRNAs levels were 1,501,000 (493,700)- and 308,000 (139,300)-fold higher than in virgin cells. The amount of FVIII-FL was 0.2 IU/mL and 45 ng/mL FVIII cells or 4.4 IU/?g protein. These data demonstrate the efficacy of the bicistronic retroviral vector expressing FVIII-FL and MGMT(P140K), showing that it could be used for producing the FVIII-FL protein in a human cell line. PMID:22576836

  11. The Spliceosomal Phosphopeptide P140 Controls the Lupus Disease by Interacting with the HSC70 Protein and via a Mechanism Mediated by ?? T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Page, Nicolas; Schall, Nicolas; Strub, Jean-Marc; Quinternet, Marc; Chaloin, Olivier; Dcossas, Marion; Cung, Manh Thong; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2009-01-01

    The phosphopeptide P140 issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K snRNP protein is recognized by lupus CD4+ T cells, transiently abolishes T cell reactivity to other spliceosomal peptides in P140-treated MRL/lpr mice, and ameliorates their clinical features. P140 modulates lupus patients' T cell response ex vivo and is currently included in phase IIb clinical trials. Its underlying mechanism of action remains elusive. Here we show that P140 peptide binds a unique cell-surface receptor, the constitutively-expressed chaperone HSC70 protein, known as a presenting-protein. P140 induces apoptosis of activated MRL/lpr CD4+ T cells. In P140-treated mice, it increases peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases B cell, activated T cell, and CD4?CD8?B220+ T cell counts via a specific mechanism strictly depending on ?? T cells. Expression of inflammation-linked genes is rapidly regulated in CD4+ T cells. This work led us to identify a powerful pathway taken by a newly-designed therapeutic peptide to immunomodulate lupus autoimmunity. PMID:19390596

  12. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Piratae, Supawadee; Pimpjong, Kiattisak; Vaisusuk, Kotchaphon; Chatan, Wasupon

    2015-01-01

    Canine tick borne diseases showing distribution worldwide have caused morbidity and mortality in dogs. This study observed the mainly tick borne pathogens described for dogs in Thailand, Ehrlichia canis, Hepatozoon canis and Babesia canis vogeli. From May to July 2014, blood samples were collected from 79 stray dogs from 7 districts of Mahasarakham province to molecular surveyed for 16s rRNA gene of E. canis and 18s rRNA gene of H. canis and B. canis vogeli. Twenty eight (35.44%) of stray dogs showed the infection with tick borne pathogens. The prevalence of E. canis infection was the highest with 21.5% (17/79). DNA of H. canis and B. canis vogeli were detected at the prevalence of 10.1% (8/79) and 6.3% (5/79), respectively. Co-infection between E. canis and B. canis vogeli were identified in 2 (2.5%) dogs. The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens are circulation in the canine population in Mahasarakham province. This study is the first report on prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli in stray dogs in Mahasarakham, a province in northern part of Thailand. This data providing is important to understand the prevalence of E. canis, H. canis and B. canis vogeli infection in stray dogs in this region, which will assist in the management of these blood parasite. PMID:26568991

  13. Integrating Sequence Evolution into Probabilistic Orthology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Sjstrand, Joel; Andersson, Peter; Sennblad, Bengt; Lagergren, Jens

    2015-11-01

    Orthology analysis, that is, finding out whether a pair of homologous genes are orthologs - stemming from a speciation - or paralogs - stemming from a gene duplication - is of central importance in computational biology, genome annotation, and phylogenetic inference. In particular, an orthologous relationship makes functional equivalence of the two genes highly likely. A major approach to orthology analysis is to reconcile a gene tree to the corresponding species tree, (most commonly performed using the most parsimonious reconciliation, MPR). However, most such phylogenetic orthology methods infer the gene tree without considering the constraints implied by the species tree and, perhaps even more importantly, only allow the gene sequences to influence the orthology analysis through the a priori reconstructed gene tree. We propose a sound, comprehensive Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method, DLRSOrthology, to compute orthology probabilities. It efficiently sums over the possible gene trees and jointly takes into account the current gene tree, all possible reconciliations to the species tree, and the, typically strong, signal conveyed by the sequences. We compare our method with PrIME-GEM, a probabilistic orthology approach built on a probabilistic duplication-loss model, and MrBayesMPR, a probabilistic orthology approach that is based on conventional Bayesian inference coupled with MPR. We find that DLRSOrthology outperforms these competing approaches on synthetic data as well as on biological data sets and is robust to incomplete taxon sampling artifacts. PMID:26130236

  14. Stable differentiation and clonality of murine long-term hematopoiesis after extended reduced-intensity selection for MGMT P140K transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Claudia R.; Pilz, Ingo H.; Schmidt, Manfred; Fessler, Sylvia; Williams, David A.; Glimm, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    Efficient in vivo selection increases survival of gene-corrected hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and protects hematopoiesis, even if initial gene transfer efficiency is low. Moreover, selection of a limited number of transduced HSCs lowers the number of cell clones at risk of gene activation by insertional mutagenesis. However, a limited clonal repertoire greatly increases the proliferation stress of each individual clone. Therefore, understanding the impact of in vivo selection on proliferation and lineage differentiation of stem-cell clones is essential for its clinical use. We established minimal cell and drug dosage requirements for selection of P140K mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT P140K)–expressing HSCs and monitored their differentiation potential and clonality under long-term selective stress. Up to 17 administrations of O6-benzylguanine (O6-BG) and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitroso-urea (BCNU) did not impair long-term differentiation and proliferation of MGMT P140K–expressing stem-cell clones in mice that underwent serial transplantation and did not lead to clonal exhaustion. Interestingly, not all gene-modified hematopoietic repopulating cell clones were efficiently selectable. Our studies demonstrate that the normal function of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is not compromised by reduced-intensity long-term in vivo selection, thus underscoring the potential value of MGMT P140K selection for clinical gene therapy. PMID:17496202

  15. Autochthonous canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis canis in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Berzina, Inese; Capligina, Valentina; Baumanis, Viesturs; Ranka, Renate; Cirule, Dina; Matise, Ilze

    2013-09-23

    This is the first report of confirmed canine babesiosis in Latvia supporting the observed geographical expansion of this disease. Between 2009 and 2011 three dogs which have not traveled outside of Latvia were diagnosed with babesiosis. Hematological analysis and serological tests for granulocytic anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and borreliosis were negative (Idexx SNAP 4Dx test). Peripheral blood erythrocytes of the three dogs contained large Babesia that were identified as Babesia canis canis by PCR. Sequences of partial 18S rRNA gene were 98-100% similar to the sequences of B. canis canis isolated from dogs in other European countries. We conclude that these are the first autochthonous canine babesiosis cases reported from Latvia. PMID:23582665

  16. OPTIC: orthologous and paralogous transcripts in clades.

    PubMed

    Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P

    2008-01-01

    The genome sequences of a large number of metazoan species are now known. As multiple closely related genomes are sequenced, comparative studies that previously focussed on only pairs of genomes can now be extended over whole clades. The orthologous and paralogous transcripts in clades (OPTIC) database currently provides sets of gene predictions and orthology assignments for three clades: (i) amniotes, including human, dog, mouse, opossum, platypus and chicken (17 443 orthologous groups); (ii) a Drosophila clade of 12 species (12 889 orthologous groups) and (iii) a nematode clade of four species (13 626 orthologous groups). Gene predictions, multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees are freely available to browse and download from http://genserv.anat.ox.ac.uk/clades. Further genomes and clades will be added in the future. PMID:17933761

  17. Inferring Orthologs: Open Questions and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tekaia, Fredj

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of sequenced genomes and their comparisons, the detection of orthologs is crucial for reliable functional annotation and evolutionary analyses of genes and species. Yet, the dynamic remodeling of genome content through gain, loss, transfer of genes, and segmental and whole-genome duplication hinders reliable orthology detection. Moreover, the lack of direct functional evidence and the questionable quality of some available genome sequences and annotations present additional difficulties to assess orthology. This article reviews the existing computational methods and their potential accuracy in the high-throughput era of genome sequencing and anticipates open questions in terms of methodology, reliability, and computation. Appropriate taxon sampling together with combination of methods based on similarity, phylogeny, synteny, and evolutionary knowledge that may help detecting speciation events appears to be the most accurate strategy. This review also raises perspectives on the potential determination of orthology throughout the whole species phylogeny. PMID:26966373

  18. Giardia canis: ultrastructural analysis of G. canis trophozoites transfected with full length G. canis virus cDNA transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giardia canis virus (GCV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of the family Totiviridae. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the G. canis virus was constructed in pPoly2/sfinot vector and RNA was transcribed in vitro. Virus-free G. canis trophozoites were transfected with in vitro transcribed ...

  19. Orthology relations, symbolic ultrametrics, and cographs.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Marc; Hernandez-Rosales, Maribel; Huber, Katharina T; Moulton, Vincent; Stadler, Peter F; Wieseke, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Orthology detection is an important problem in comparative and evolutionary genomics and, consequently, a variety of orthology detection methods have been devised in recent years. Although many of these methods are dependent on generating gene and/or species trees, it has been shown that orthology can be estimated at acceptable levels of accuracy without having to infer gene trees and/or reconciling gene trees with species trees. Thus, it is of interest to understand how much information about the gene tree, the species tree, and their reconciliation is already contained in the orthology relation on the underlying set of genes. Here we shall show that a result by Bcker and Dress concerning symbolic ultrametrics, and subsequent algorithmic results by Semple and Steel for processing these structures can throw a considerable amount of light on this problem. More specifically, building upon these authors' results, we present some new characterizations for symbolic ultrametrics and new algorithms for recovering the associated trees, with an emphasis on how these algorithms could be potentially extended to deal with arbitrary orthology relations. In so doing we shall also show that, somewhat surprisingly, symbolic ultrametrics are very closely related to cographs, graphs that do not contain an induced path on any subset of four vertices. We conclude with a discussion on how our results might be applied in practice to orthology detection. PMID:22456957

  20. Nephrotic syndrome associated with Toxocara canis infection.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A K; Aviles, D H

    1999-09-01

    This case report describes nephrotic syndrome in a 7-year-old boy coincident with Toxocara canis infection. This rare association was confirmed by elevated Toxocara-specific IgM titres. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in remission of renal symptoms as well as abatement of the T. canis infection. The relationship between T. canis infection and glomerular disease is still unclear; nephrotic syndrome may be another manifestation of T. canis infection. PMID:10715718

  1. Ortholog-Finder: A Tool for Constructing an Ortholog Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Tokumasa; Minai, Ryoichi; Miyata, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yoji; Tateno, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Orthologs are widely used for phylogenetic analysis of species; however, identifying genuine orthologs among distantly related species is challenging, because genes obtained through horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and out-paralogs derived from gene duplication before speciation are often present among the predicted orthologs. We developed a program, “Ortholog-Finder,” to obtain ortholog data sets for performing phylogenetic analysis by using all open-reading frame data of species. The program includes five processes for minimizing the effects of HGT and out-paralogs in phylogeny construction: 1) HGT filtering: Genes derived from HGT could be detected and deleted from the initial sequence data set by examining their base compositions. 2) Out-paralog filtering: Out-paralogs are detected and deleted from the data set based on sequence similarity. 3) Classification of phylogenetic trees: Phylogenetic trees generated for ortholog candidates are classified as monophyletic or polyphyletic trees. 4) Tree splitting: Polyphyletic trees are bisected to obtain monophyletic trees and remove HGT genes and out-paralogs. 5) Threshold changing: Out-paralogs are further excluded from the data set based on the difference in the similarity scores of genuine orthologs and out-paralogs. We examined how out-paralogs and HGTs affected phylogenetic trees constructed for species based on ortholog data sets obtained by Ortholog-Finder with the use of simulation data, and we determined the effects of confounding factors. We then used Ortholog-Finder in phylogeny construction for 12 Gram-positive bacteria from two phyla and validated each node of the constructed tree by comparison with individually constructed ortholog trees. PMID:26782935

  2. Ortholog-Finder: A Tool for Constructing an Ortholog Data Set.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Tokumasa; Minai, Ryoichi; Miyata, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yoji; Tateno, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Orthologs are widely used for phylogenetic analysis of species; however, identifying genuine orthologs among distantly related species is challenging, because genes obtained through horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and out-paralogs derived from gene duplication before speciation are often present among the predicted orthologs. We developed a program, "Ortholog-Finder," to obtain ortholog data sets for performing phylogenetic analysis by using all open-reading frame data of species. The program includes five processes for minimizing the effects of HGT and out-paralogs in phylogeny construction: 1) HGT filtering: Genes derived from HGT could be detected and deleted from the initial sequence data set by examining their base compositions. 2) Out-paralog filtering: Out-paralogs are detected and deleted from the data set based on sequence similarity. 3) Classification of phylogenetic trees: Phylogenetic trees generated for ortholog candidates are classified as monophyletic or polyphyletic trees. 4) Tree splitting: Polyphyletic trees are bisected to obtain monophyletic trees and remove HGT genes and out-paralogs. 5) Threshold changing: Out-paralogs are further excluded from the data set based on the difference in the similarity scores of genuine orthologs and out-paralogs. We examined how out-paralogs and HGTs affected phylogenetic trees constructed for species based on ortholog data sets obtained by Ortholog-Finder with the use of simulation data, and we determined the effects of confounding factors. We then used Ortholog-Finder in phylogeny construction for 12 Gram-positive bacteria from two phyla and validated each node of the constructed tree by comparison with individually constructed ortholog trees. PMID:26782935

  3. Assessment of orthologous splicing isoforms in human and mouse orthologous genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent discoveries have highlighted the fact that alternative splicing and alternative transcripts are the rule, rather than the exception, in metazoan genes. Since multiple transcript and protein variants expressed by the same gene are, by definition, structurally distinct and need not to be functionally equivalent, the concept of gene orthology should be extended to the transcript level in order to describe evolutionary relationships between structurally similar transcript variants. In other words, the identification of true orthology relationships between gene products now should progress beyond primary sequence and "splicing orthology", consisting in ancestrally shared exon-intron structures, is required to define orthologous isoforms at transcript level. Results As a starting step in this direction, in this work we performed a large scale human- mouse gene comparison with a twofold goal: first, to assess if and to which extent traditional gene annotations such as RefSeq capture genuine splicing orthology; second, to provide a more detailed annotation and quantification of true human-mouse orthologous transcripts defined as transcripts of orthologous genes exhibiting the same splicing patterns. Conclusions We observed an identical exon/intron structure for 32% of human and mouse orthologous genes. This figure increases to 87% using less stringent criteria for gene structure similarity, thus implying that for about 13% of the human RefSeq annotated genes (and about 25% of the corresponding transcripts) we could not identify any mouse transcript showing sufficient similarity to be confidently assigned as a splicing ortholog. Our data suggest that current gene and transcript data may still be rather incomplete - with several splicing variants still unknown. The observation that alternative splicing produces large numbers of alternative transcripts and proteins, some of them conserved across species and others truly species-specific, suggests that, still maintaining the conventional definition of gene orthology, a new concept of "splicing orthology" can be defined at transcript level. PMID:20920313

  4. Orthology and paralogy constraints: satisfiability and consistency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A variety of methods based on sequence similarity, reconciliation, synteny or functional characteristics, can be used to infer orthology and paralogy relations between genes of a given gene family G. But is a given set C of orthology/paralogy constraints possible, i.e., can they simultaneously co-exist in an evolutionary history for G? While previous studies have focused on full sets of constraints, here we consider the general case where C does not necessarily involve a constraint for each pair of genes. The problem is subdivided in two parts: (1) Is C satisfiable, i.e. can we find an event-labeled gene tree G inducing C? (2) Is there such a G which is consistent, i.e., such that all displayed triplet phylogenies are included in a species tree? Results Previous results on the Graph sandwich problem can be used to answer to (1), and we provide polynomial-time algorithms for satisfiability and consistency with a given species tree. We also describe a new polynomial-time algorithm for the case of consistency with an unknown species tree and full knowledge of pairwise orthology/paralogy relationships, as well as a branch-and-bound algorithm in the case when unknown relations are present. We show that our algorithms can be used in combination with ProteinOrtho, a sequence similarity-based orthology detection tool, to extract a set of robust orthology/paralogy relationships. PMID:25572629

  5. Fatal Babesia canis canis infection in a splenectomized Estonian dog.

    PubMed

    Tiškina, Valentina; Capligina, Valentina; Must, Külli; Berzina, Inese; Ranka, Renate; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2016-01-01

    A previously splenectomized dog from Estonia was presented with a sudden lack of appetite and discoloration of the urine. Despite supportive therapy, its condition deteriorated dramatically during 1 day. Severe thrombocytopenia and high numbers of protozoan hemoparasites were evident in blood smears, and the hematocrit dropped from 46 to 33 %. The dog was euthanized before specific antibabesial treatment was initiated. Blood samples from the dog and from two other dogs in the same household tested positive for Babesia using molecular methods, and the sequences of partial 18S rRNA gene confirmed the causative species as Babesia canis canis. The risk of severe, rapidly progressing babesiosis in splenectomized dogs merits awareness. PMID:26810086

  6. PCR test for Microsporum canis identification.

    PubMed

    Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Micha?ek, Ewelina; Saunte, Ditte Marie Lindhardt; Nielsen, Sanne Sgaard; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2013-08-01

    Microsporum canis, for which the natural hosts are cats and dogs, is the most prevalent zoophilic agent causing tinea capitis and tinea corporis in humans. We present here a diagnostic PCR test for M. canis, since its detection and species identification is relevant to the choice of treatment and to the understanding of a probable source of infection. An M. canis-specific PCR was evaluated using 130 clinical isolates of dermatophytes (including M. canis [n = 15] and 13 other species), 10 yeast or mold isolates, 12 hair and skin samples from animals with or without experimental M. canis infection, and 35 patient specimens, including seven specimens positive for M. canis and 15 dermatophyte negative samples. All pure cultures, animal specimens and clinical samples with M. canis were detected by the PCR test, whereas none of the other fungal isolates or samples without M. canis was negative. This study indicates that the PCR test for M. canis identification applied directly to patient specimens or animal hair, as well as to clinical isolates had 100% specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23294424

  7. Long-term polyclonal and multilineage engraftment of methylguanine methyltransferase P140K gene-modified dog hematopoietic cells in primary and secondary recipients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Brian C.; Sud, Reeteka; Keyser, Kirsten A.; Ironside, Christina; Neff, Tobias; Gerull, Sabine; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of methylguanine methyltransferase P140K (MGMTP140K) has been successfully used for in vivo selection and chemoprotection in mouse and large animal studies, and has promise for autologous and allogeneic gene therapy. We examined the long-term safety of MGMTP140K selection in a clinically relevant dog model. Based on the association of provirus integration and proto-oncogene activation leading to leukemia in the X-linked immunodeficiency trial, we focused our analysis on the distribution of retrovirus integration sites (RIS) relative to proto-oncogene transcription start sites (TSS). We analyzed RIS near proto-oncogene TSS before (n = 157) and after (n = 129) chemotherapy in dogs that received MGMTP140K gene-modified cells and identified no overall increase of RIS near proto-oncogene TSS after chemotherapy. We also wanted to determine whether in vivo selected cells retained fundamental characteristics of hematopoietic stem cells. To that end, we performed secondary transplantation of MGMTP140K gene-modified cells after in vivo selection in dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)–matched dogs. Gene-modified cells achieved multilineage repopulation, and we identified the same gene-modified clone in both dogs more than 800 and 900 days after transplantation. These data suggest that MGMTP140K selection is well tolerated and should allow clinically for selection of gene-corrected cells in genetic or infectious diseases or chemoprotection for treatment of malignancy. PMID:19336761

  8. Lentiviral MGMT(P140K)-mediated in vivo selection employing a ubiquitous chromatin opening element (A2UCOE) linked to a cellular promoter.

    PubMed

    Phaltane, Ruhi; Lachmann, Nico; Brennig, Sebastian; Ackermann, Mania; Modlich, Ute; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Notwithstanding recent successes, insertional mutagenesis as well as silencing and variegation of transgene expression still represent considerable obstacles to hematopoietic gene therapy. This also applies to O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)-mediated myeloprotection, a concept recently proven clinically effective in the context of glioblastoma therapy. To improve on this situation we here evaluate a SIN-lentiviral vector expressing the MGMT(P140K)-cDNA from a combined A2UCOE/PGK-promoter. In a murine in vivo chemoselection model the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT construct allowed for significant myeloprotection as well as robust and stable selection of transgenic hematopoietic cells. In contrast, only transient enrichment and severe myelotoxicity was observed for a PGK.MGMT control vector. Selection of A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-transduced myeloid and lymphoid mature and progenitor cells was demonstrated in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, and thymus. Unlike the PGK and SFFV promoters used as controls, the A2UCOE.PGK promoter allowed for sustained vector copy number-related transgene expression throughout the experiment indicating an increased resistance to silencing, which was further confirmed by CpG methylation studies of the PGK promoter. Thus, our data support a potential role of the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-vector in future MGMT-based myeloprotection and chemoselection strategies, and underlines the suitability of the A2UCOE element to stabilize lentiviral transgene expression in hematopoietic gene therapy. PMID:24875758

  9. [Pasteurella canis hemorragic sepsis and empyema].

    PubMed

    Casallas-Rivera, Martha; Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro; Perdomo-Beltrán, Natalia; Botero-García, Carlos; Bravo, Juan; Pérez-Díaz, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old female patient, with a three-day history of hematemesis, melena, abdominal wall hematoma and epistaxis associated with thrombocytopenia and anemia. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was diagnosed and she was treated with dexamethasone for four days. The patient developed acute respiratory failure with signs of systemic inflammatory response. Blood and pleural fluid cultures grew Pasteurella canis. This is the first case, to our knowledge, of P. canis empyema associated with hemorrhagic septicemia without epidemiological background and the third case of septicemia caused by P. canis reported in the literature. PMID:26965885

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of Canis lupus campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honghai; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Lei; Sha, Weilai; Liu, Guangshuai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, blood sample was obtained from a female Mongolian wolf (Canis lupus campestris) captured from Mongolia and its complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for the first time. PMID:23984823

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Orthologous Protein Domains Using the HOPS Database

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Christian E.V.; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most reliable methods for protein function annotation is to transfer experimentally known functions from orthologous proteins in other organisms. Most methods for identifying orthologs operate on a subset of organisms with a completely sequenced genome, and treat proteins as single-domain units. However, it is well known that proteins are often made up of several independent domains, and there is a wealth of protein sequences from genomes that are not completely sequenced. A comprehensive set of protein domain families is found in the Pfam database. We wanted to apply orthology detection to Pfam families, but first some issues needed to be addressed. First, orthology detection becomes impractical and unreliable when too many species are included. Second, shorter domains contain less information. It is therefore important to assess the quality of the orthology assignment and avoid very short domains altogether. We present a database of orthologous protein domains in Pfam called HOPS: Hierarchical grouping of Orthologous and Paralogous Sequences. Orthology is inferred in a hierarchic system of phylogenetic subgroups using ortholog bootstrapping. To avoid the frequent errors stemming from horizontally transferred genes in bacteria, the analysis is presently limited to eukaryotic genes. The results are accessible in the graphical browser NIFAS, a Java tool originally developed for analyzing phylogenetic relations within Pfam families. The method was tested on a set of curated orthologs with experimentally verified function. In comparison to tree reconciliation with a complete species tree, our approach finds significantly more orthologs in the test set. Examples for investigating gene fusions and domain recombination using HOPS are given. PMID:14525933

  12. Multiple nuclear ortholog next generation sequencing phylogeny of Daucus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing is helping to solve the data insufficiency problem hindering well-resolved dominant gene phylogenies. We used Roche 454 technology to obtain DNA sequences from 93 nuclear orthologs, dispersed throughout all linkage groups of Daucus. Of these 93 orthologs, ten were designed...

  13. Secreted metalloprotease gene family of Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Brouta, Frdric; Descamps, Frdric; Monod, Michel; Vermout, Sandy; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2002-10-01

    Keratinolytic proteases secreted by dermatophytes are likely to be virulence-related factors. Microsporum canis, the main agent of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats, causes a zoonosis that is frequently reported. Using Aspergillus fumigatus metalloprotease genomic sequence (MEP) as a probe, three genes (MEP1, MEP2, and MEP3) were isolated from an M. canis genomic library. They presented a quite-high percentage of identity with both A. fumigatus MEP and Aspergillus oryzae neutral protease I genes. At the amino acid level, they all contained an HEXXH consensus sequence, confirming that these M. canis genes (MEP genes) encode a zinc-containing metalloprotease gene family. Furthermore, MEP3 was found to be the gene encoding a previously isolated M. canis 43.5-kDa keratinolytic metalloprotease, and was successfully expressed as an active recombinant enzyme in Pichia pastoris. Reverse transcriptase nested PCR performed on total RNA extracted from the hair of M. canis-infected guinea pigs showed that at least MEP2 and MEP3 are produced during the infection process. This is the first report describing the isolation of a gene family encoding potential virulence-related factors in dermatophytes. PMID:12228297

  14. OrthoDisease: a database of human disease orthologs.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kevin P; Westerlund, Isabelle; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2004-08-01

    One of the greatest promises of genome sequencing projects is to further the understanding of human diseases and to develop new therapies. Model organism genomes have been sequenced in parallel to human genomes to provide effective tools for the investigation of human gene function. Many of their genes share a common ancestry and function with human genes, and this is particularly true for orthologous genes. Here we present OrthoDisease, a comprehensive database of model organism genes that are orthologous to human disease genes. OrthoDisease was constructed by applying the Inparanoid ortholog detection algorithm to disease genes derived from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). Pairwise whole genome/proteome comparisons between Homo sapiens and six other organisms were performed to identify ortholog clusters. OMIM numbers were extracted from the OMIM Morbid Map and were converted to gene sequences using the Locuslink mim2loc and loc2acc tables. These were mapped to Inparanoid ortholog clusters using Blast. The number of ortholog clusters in OrthoDisease with each respective species is currently: M. musculus, 1,354; D. melanogaster, 724; C. elegans, 533; A. thaliana, 398; S. cerevisiae, 290; and E. coli, 153. The database is accessible online at http://orthodisease.cgb.ki.se, and can be searched with disease or protein names. The web interface presents all ortholog clusters that include a selected disease gene. A capability to download the entire dataset is also provided. PMID:15241792

  15. Orthology for comparative genomics in the mouse genome database.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Mary E; Baldarelli, Richard M; Bello, Susan M; Ni, Li; McAndrews, Monica S; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A

    2015-08-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD) is the model organism database component of the mouse genome informatics system at The Jackson Laboratory. MGD is the international data resource for the laboratory mouse and facilitates the use of mice in the study of human health and disease. Since its beginnings, MGD has included comparative genomics data with a particular focus on human-mouse orthology, an essential component of the use of mouse as a model organism. Over the past 25years, novel algorithms and addition of orthologs from other model organisms have enriched comparative genomics in MGD data, extending the use of orthology data to support the laboratory mouse as a model of human biology. Here, we describe current comparative data in MGD and review the history and refinement of orthology representation in this resource. PMID:26223881

  16. Babesia canis vogeli, Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasma platys infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Al Izzi, Salah; Martin, Donald S; Chan, Roxanne Y Y; Leutenegger, Christian M

    2013-12-01

    A 12-month-old male neutered mixed breed dog was presented with a history of diarrhea, lethargy, emaciation, polydypsia, and sniffling. Physical examination findings included pale mucous membranes, increased heart and respiratory rates, and normal rectal temperature (38C). Hematologic abnormalities included anemia and thrombocytopenia. Biochemical abnormalities included hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and elevated ALP and ALT activities. A SNAP 4Dx test result was positive for Ehrlichia canis. Babesia canis vogeli organisms were found in the peripheral blood films, while morulae of E canis were not seen. Real-time polymerase chain reaction testing confirmed the presence of both B c vogeli and E canis organisms, and also was positive for Anaplasma platys infection. The dog recovered following treatment with doxycycline and imidocarb dipropionate, with normal hematology and biochemical profiles. PMID:24138512

  17. Beyond the bounds of orthology: functional inference from metagenomic context.

    PubMed

    Vey, Gregory; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    The effectiveness of the computational inference of function by genomic context is bounded by the diversity of known microbial genomes. Although metagenomes offer access to previously inaccessible organisms, their fragmentary nature prevents the conventional establishment of orthologous relationships required for reliably predicting functional interactions. We introduce a protocol for the prediction of functional interactions using data sources without information about orthologous relationships. To illustrate this process, we use the Sargasso Sea metagenome to construct a functional interaction network for the Escherichia coli K12 genome. We identify two reliability metrics, target intergenic distance and source interaction count, and apply them to selectively filter the predictions retained to construct the network of functional interactions. The resulting network contains 2297 nodes with 10 072 edges with a positive predictive value of 0.80. The metagenome yielded 8423 functional interactions beyond those found using only the genomic orthologs as a data source. This amounted to a 134% increase in the total number of functional interactions that are predicted by combining the metagenome and the genomic orthologs versus the genomic orthologs alone. In the absence of detectable orthologous relationships it remains feasible to derive a reliable set of predicted functional interactions. This offers a strategy for harnessing other metagenomes and homologs in general. Because metagenomes allow access to previously unreachable microorganisms, this will result in expanding the universe of known functional interactions thus furthering our understanding of functional organization. PMID:20419183

  18. Case report. Onychomycosis due to Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Paccagnini, E; Pelliccia, L

    2001-05-01

    A case of distal subungual onychomycosis of the big toe due to Microsporum canis is reported in a 69-year-old male asthma patient who had been treated with systemic corticosteroids for the last 3 years. The nail infection was contracted from a cat who was a healthy carrier. The patient was treated successfully with intermittent itraconazole therapy. PMID:11413924

  19. The Mitochondrial Genome of Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, D. Timothy J.; Hu, Min; Gasser, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Ascaridida: Nematoda), which parasitizes (at the adult stage) the small intestine of canids, can be transmitted to a range of other mammals, including humans, and can cause the disease toxocariasis. Despite its significance as a pathogen, the genetics, epidemiology and biology of this parasite remain poorly understood. In addition, the zoonotic potential of related species of Toxocara, such as T. cati and T. malaysiensis, is not well known. Mitochondrial DNA is known to provide genetic markers for investigations in these areas, but complete mitochondrial genomic data have been lacking for T. canis and its congeners. In the present study, the mitochondrial genome of T. canis was amplified by long-range polymerase chain reaction (long PCR) and sequenced using a primer-walking strategy. This circular mitochondrial genome was 14162 bp and contained 12 protein-coding, 22 transfer RNA, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes consistent for secernentean nematodes, including Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex (Ascaridida). The mitochondrial genome of T. canis provides genetic markers for studies into the systematics, population genetics and epidemiology of this zoonotic parasite and its congeners. Such markers can now be used in prospecting for cryptic species and for exploring host specificity and zoonotic potential, thus underpinning the prevention and control of toxocariasis in humans and other hosts. PMID:18682828

  20. Record high wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 m2 and summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a wolf pack on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada.

  1. Record high Wolf, Canis lupus, pack density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Tracy, S.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a year-around Wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 km2 and a summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota Wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a Wolf pack on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

  2. Molecular characterization of DSC1 orthologs in invertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying-Jun; Yu, Lin-Lin; Xu, Hai-Jun; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2012-05-01

    DSC1 and BSC1 are two founding members of a novel family of invertebrate voltage-gated cation channels with close structural and evolutionary relationships to voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. In this study, we searched the published genome sequences for DSC1 orthologs. DSC1 orthologs were found in all 48 insect species, and in other invertebrate species belonging to phyla Mollusca, Cnidaria, Hemichordata and Echinodermata. However, DSC1 orthologs were not found in four arachnid species, Ixodes scapularis, Rhipicephalus microplus, Tetranychus urticae and Varroa destructor, two species in Annelida or any vertebrate species. We then cloned and sequenced NlSC1 and BmSC1 full-length cDNAs from the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and the silkworm (Bombyx mori), respectively. NlSC1 and BmSC1 share about 50% identity with DSC1, and the expression of NlSC1 and BmSC1 transcripts was most abundant in the head and antenna in adults. All DSC1 orthologs contain a unique and conserved DEEA motif, instead of the EEEE or EEDD motif in classical calcium channels or the DEKA motif in sodium channels. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that DSC1 and its orthologs form a separate group distinct from the classical voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels and constitute a unique family of cation channels. The DSC1/BSC1-family channels could be potential targets of new and safe insecticides for pest control. PMID:22321571

  3. OGO: an ontological approach for integrating knowledge about orthology

    PubMed Central

    Miarro-Gimenez, Jose Antonio; Madrid, Marisa; Fernandez-Breis, Jesualdo Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Background There exist several information resources about orthology of genes and proteins, and there are also systems for querying those resources in an integrated way. However, caveats with current approaches include lack of integration, since results are shown sequentially by resource, meaning that there is redundant information and the users are required to combine the results obtained manually. Results In this paper we have applied the Ontological Gene Orthology approach, which makes use of a domain ontology to integrate the information output from selected orthology resources. The integrated information is stored in a knowledge base, which can be queried through semantic languages. A friendly user interface has been developed to facilitate the search; consequently, users do not need to have knowledge on ontologies or ontological languages to obtain the relevant information. Conclusion The development and application of our approach allows users to retrieve integrated results when querying orthology information, providing a gene product-oriented output instead of a traditional information resource-oriented one. Besides this benefit for users, it also allows a better exploitation and management of orthology information and knowledge. PMID:19796397

  4. Orthology Detection Combining Clustering and Synteny for Very Large Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Marcus; Hernandez-Rosales, Maribel; Doerr, Daniel; Wieseke, Nicolas; Thvenin, Annelyse; Stoye, Jens; Hartmann, Roland K.; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    The elucidation of orthology relationships is an important step both in gene function prediction as well as towards understanding patterns of sequence evolution. Orthology assignments are usually derived directly from sequence similarities for large data because more exact approaches exhibit too high computational costs. Here we present PoFF, an extension for the standalone tool Proteinortho, which enhances orthology detection by combining clustering, sequence similarity, and synteny. In the course of this work, FFAdj-MCS, a heuristic that assesses pairwise gene order using adjacencies (a similarity measure related to the breakpoint distance) was adapted to support multiple linear chromosomes and extended to detect duplicated regions. PoFF largely reduces the number of false positives and enables more fine-grained predictions than purely similarity-based approaches. The extension maintains the low memory requirements and the efficient concurrency options of its basis Proteinortho, making the software applicable to very large datasets. PMID:25137074

  5. Toxocara canis infection in dogs in Beersheba, Israel.

    PubMed

    Gross, E M; Zeitan, R; Torok, V

    1984-06-01

    In the desert city of Beersheba, Israel, a survey was made of the infection rate of Toxocara canis in dogs. 3.0% of dogs destroyed at the municipal dog pound had intestinal T. canis. 7% of faecal samples gathered from day care centres throughout the city were shown to contain T. canis eggs. This low rate of infection could possibly be explained by the hot, arid climatic conditions which may render eggs non-infective or by the sandy soil in the area that may cover faeces containing T. canis ova and make the eggs unavailable to other dogs. PMID:6747256

  6. Canine vector-borne co-infections: Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in the same host monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon; Gal, Arnon; Aroch, Itamar

    2015-02-28

    The protozoon Hepatozoon canis and the rickettsia Ehrlichia canis are tick-borne pathogens, transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, which cause canine hepatozoonosis and canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, respectively. Co-infection of the same host monocytes with H. canis and E. canis confirmed by molecular characterization of the infecting agents and quantitative assessment of co-infected cells is described for the first time in three naturally-infected dogs. Blood smear evaluation indicated that at least 50% of the leukocytes infected with H. canis gamonts contained E. canis morulae. Co-infection of the same host cell demonstrated in this report suggests that infection with one pathogen may permit or enhance invasion or prolonged cellular survival of the other. PMID:25560923

  7. Quantity Discrimination in Wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Utrata, Ewelina; Virnyi, Zsfia; Range, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested 11 hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus) in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four) sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris) and coyotes (Canis latrans), our wolves' performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Weber's law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current set-up are still needed to determine whether and when wolves' quantity discrimination conforms to Weber's law. PMID:23181044

  8. Quantity Discrimination in Wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Utrata, Ewelina; Virnyi, Zsfia; Range, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Quantity discrimination has been studied extensively in different non-human animal species. In the current study, we tested 11 hand-raised wolves (Canis lupus) in a two-way choice task. We placed a number of food items (one to four) sequentially into two opaque cans and asked the wolves to choose the larger amount. Moreover, we conducted two additional control conditions to rule out non-numerical properties of the presentation that the animals might have used to make the correct choice. Our results showed that wolves are able to make quantitative judgments at the group, but also at the individual level even when alternative strategies such as paying attention to the surface area or time and total amount are ruled out. In contrast to previous canine studies on dogs (Canis familiaris) and coyotes (Canis latrans), our wolves performance did not improve with decreasing ratio, referred to as Webers law. However, further studies using larger quantities than we used in the current set-up are still needed to determine whether and when wolves quantity discrimination conforms to Webers law. PMID:23181044

  9. Development of multiplex polymerase chain reaction for detection of Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp and Hepatozoon canis in canine blood.

    PubMed

    Kledmanee, Kan; Suwanpakdee, Sarin; Krajangwong, Sakranmanee; Chatsiriwech, Jarin; Suksai, Parut; Suwannachat, Pongpun; Sariya, Ladawan; Buddhirongawatr, Ruangrat; Charoonrut, Phingphol; Chaichoun, Kridsada

    2009-01-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been developed for simultaneous detection of canine blood parasites, Ehrlichia canis, Babesia spp and Hepatozoon canis, from blood samples in a single reaction. The multiplex PCR primers were specific to E. canis VirB9, Babesia spp 16S rRNA and H. canis 16S rRNA genes. Specificity of the amplicons was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The assay was evaluated using normal canine and infected blood samples, which were detected by microscopic examination. This multiplex PCR offers scope for simultaneous detection of three important canine blood parasites and should be valuable in monitoring parasite infections in dogs and ticks. PMID:19323031

  10. Pathogenic Fungus Microsporum canis Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liming; Zhang, Liping; Li, Hua; Chen, Wei; Wang, Hongbin; Wu, Shuxian; Guo, Caiqin; Lu, Ailing; Yang, Guiwen; An, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    Microsporum canis is a pathogenic fungus with worldwide distribution that causes tinea capitis in animals and humans. M. canis also causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. To defy pathogenic fungal infection, the host innate immune system is the first line of defense. As an important arm of innate immunity, the inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that control the activation of caspase-1, which cleaves proinflammatory cytokine pro-interleukin-1? (IL-1?) into its mature form. To determine whether the inflammasome is involved in the host defense against M. canis infection, we challenged human monocytic THP-1 cells and mouse dendritic cells with a clinical strain of M. canis isolated from patients with tinea capitis. We found that M. canis infection triggered rapid secretion of IL-1? from both THP-1 cells and mouse dendritic cells. Moreover, by using gene-specific shRNA and competitive inhibitors, we determined that M. canis-induced IL-1? secretion was dependent on NLRP3. The pathways proposed for NLRP3 inflammasome activation, namely, cathepsin B activity, K+ efflux, and reactive oxygen species production, were all required for the inflammasome activation triggered by M. canis. Meanwhile, Syk, Dectin-1, and Card9 were found to be involved in M. canis-induced IL-1? secretion via regulation of pro-IL-1? transcription. More importantly, our data revealed that M. canis-induced production of IL-1? was dependent on the NLRP3 inflammasome in vivo. Together, this study unveils that the NLRP3 inflammasome exerts a critical role in host innate immune responses against M. canis infection, and our data suggest that diseases that result from M. canis infection might be controlled by regulating the activation of inflammasomes. PMID:24478101

  11. Genetic polymorphism characteristics of Brucella canis isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Di, Dongdong; Cui, Buyun; Wang, Heng; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Tian, Lili; Tian, Guozhong; Kang, Jingli; Mao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Du, Pengfei; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Zhuo; Mao, Lingling; Yao, Wenqing; Guan, Pingyuan; Fan, Weixing; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease typically caused by Brucella melitensis infection (biovars 1 and 3). Brucella canis infection in dogs has not traditionally recognized as a major problem. In recent years however, brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection has also been reported, suggesting that infections from this species may be increasing. Data concerning the epidemiology of brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the diversity among Chinese Brucella canis strains for epidemiological purposes. First, we employed a 16-marker VNTR assay (Brucella MLVA-16) to assess the diversity and epidemiological relationship of 29 Brucella canis isolates from diverse locations throughout China with 38 isolates from other countries. MLVA-16 analysis separated the 67 Brucella canis isolates into 57 genotypes that grouped into five clusters with genetic similarity coefficients ranging from 67.73 to 100%. Moreover, this analysis revealed a new genotype (2-3-9-11-3-1-5-1:118), which was present in two isolates recovered from Guangxi in 1986 and 1987. Second, multiplex PCR and sequencing analysis were used to determine whether the 29 Chinese Brucella canis isolates had the characteristic BMEI1435 gene deletion. Only two isolates had this deletion. Third, amplification of the omp25 gene revealed that 26 isolates from China had a T545C mutation. Collectively, this study reveals that considerable diversity exists among Brucella canis isolates in China and provides resources for studying the genetic variation and microevolution of Brucella. PMID:24465442

  12. Genetic Polymorphism Characteristics of Brucella canis Isolated in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heng; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Tian, Lili; Tian, Guozhong; Kang, Jingli; Mao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Du, Pengfei; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Zhuo; Mao, Lingling; Yao, Wenqing; Guan, Pingyuan; Fan, Weixing; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease typically caused by Brucella melitensis infection (biovars 1 and 3). Brucella canis infection in dogs has not traditionally recognized as a major problem. In recent years however, brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection has also been reported, suggesting that infections from this species may be increasing. Data concerning the epidemiology of brucellosis resulting from Brucella canis infection is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the diversity among Chinese Brucella canis strains for epidemiological purposes. First, we employed a 16-marker VNTR assay (Brucella MLVA-16) to assess the diversity and epidemiological relationship of 29 Brucella canis isolates from diverse locations throughout China with 38 isolates from other countries. MLVA-16 analysis separated the 67 Brucella canis isolates into 57 genotypes that grouped into five clusters with genetic similarity coefficients ranging from 67.73 to 100%. Moreover, this analysis revealed a new genotype (2-3-9-11-3-1-5-1:118), which was present in two isolates recovered from Guangxi in 1986 and 1987. Second, multiplex PCR and sequencing analysis were used to determine whether the 29 Chinese Brucella canis isolates had the characteristic BMEI1435 gene deletion. Only two isolates had this deletion. Third, amplification of the omp25 gene revealed that 26 isolates from China had a T545C mutation. Collectively, this study reveals that considerable diversity exists among Brucella canis isolates in China and provides resources for studying the genetic variation and microevolution of Brucella. PMID:24465442

  13. Endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis: an emerging zoonosis?

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Coutard, Aymeric; Troché, Gilles; Augusto, Sandrine; Pons, Stéphanie; Zuber, Benjamin; Laurent, Virginie; Amara, Marlène; Couzon, Brigitte; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Pangon, Béatrice; Grimaldi, David

    2016-02-01

    We report a human case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis. Identification was carried out from positive blood culture using mass spectrometry and SodA gene sequencing. S. canis related zoonotic invasive infections may have been previously underdiagnosed due to inadequate identification of group G Streptococcus species. PMID:26104727

  14. "Toxocara canis" Infection of Children: Epidemiology and Neurospychologic Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents results of a serologic survey for antibodies to Toxocara canis (the common roundworm of dogs) in a sample of 4,652 New York City children. Discusses findings of a case-control study conducted to identify host and environmental risk factors for T. canis infection and to investigate its consequences. (KH)

  15. Resolving the Ortholog Conjecture: Orthologs Tend to Be Weakly, but Significantly, More Similar in Function than Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Altenhoff, Adrian M.; Studer, Romain A.; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The function of most proteins is not determined experimentally, but is extrapolated from homologs. According to the ortholog conjecture, or standard model of phylogenomics, protein function changes rapidly after duplication, leading to paralogs with different functions, while orthologs retain the ancestral function. We report here that a comparison of experimentally supported functional annotations among homologs from 13 genomes mostly supports this model. We show that to analyze GO annotation effectively, several confounding factors need to be controlled: authorship bias, variation of GO term frequency among species, variation of background similarity among species pairs, and propagated annotation bias. After controlling for these biases, we observe that orthologs have generally more similar functional annotations than paralogs. This is especially strong for sub-cellular localization. We observe only a weak decrease in functional similarity with increasing sequence divergence. These findings hold over a large diversity of species; notably orthologs from model organisms such as E. coli, yeast or mouse have conserved function with human proteins. PMID:22615551

  16. [The prevalence of Babesia canis canis in marsh ticks (Dermacentor reticulatus) in the Saarland].

    PubMed

    Beelitz, Pamela; Schumacher, Stefan; Marholdt, Fritz; Pfister, Kurt; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    An accumulation of autochthonous cases of canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis has been registered in a small animal clinic in the Saarland since the beginning of 2006, some cases with fatal outcome. This study aims to contribute to the explanation of strong focal occurrence of infections with B. canis in this region.Therefore, patient owners who had presented their dogs in the years 2006 and 2007 because of babesiosis and who had claimed not having left the Saarland with their dogs at least six months before the outbreak of Babesiosis, were asked for their dog walking habits. Accordingly, a selection often tick collection sites of various landscape structures was made.Tick sampling by flagging the vegetation took place every month from March to December 2008. The collected ticks were identified morphologically. In eight of ten collecting sites a total of 397 adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were collected from March to December with the highest frequencies during the months of May, October and November. All collected specimens were examined by genus-specific conventional PCR for the presence of Babesia-DNA. In positive samples, the PCR-products were differentiated by sequencing. ten D. reticulatus (2.5%) ticks examined were found positive for DNA of B. canis canis originating from three out of eight collection sites. Consequently, an endemic distribution of D. reticulatus was confirmed and a natural PMID:22515037

  17. Multiplex real-time qPCR for the detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis vogeli.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; Inbar, Jacob; Harrus, Shimon

    2010-10-29

    Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis vogeli are two tick-borne canine pathogens with a worldwide importance. Both pathogens are transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the brown dog tick, which has an increasing global distribution. A multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the tick-borne pathogens E. canis and B. canis vogeli was developed using dual-labeled probes. The target genes were the 16S rRNA of E. canis and the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) of B. canis vogeli. The canine beta actin (ACTB) gene was used as an internal control gene. The assay was conducted without using any pre-amplification steps such as nested reactions. The sensitivity of each reaction in the multiplex qPCR assay was tested in the presence of high template concentrations of the other amplified genes in the same tube and in the presence of canine DNA. The detection threshold of the multiplex assay was 1-10 copies/?l in all channels and the amplifications of the B. canis hsp70 and ACTB were not affected by the other simultaneous reactions, while minor interference was observed in the amplification of the E. canis 16S rRNA gene. This assay would be useful for diagnostic laboratories and may save time, labor and costs. PMID:20674177

  18. Leadership in wolf, Canis lupus, packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    I examine leadership in Wolf (Canis lupus) packs based on published observations and data gathered during summers from 1986 to 1998 studying a free-ranging pack of Wolves on Ellesmere Island that were habituated to my presence. The breeding male tended to initiate activities associated with foraging and travel, and the breeding female to initiate, and predominate in, pup care and protection. However, there was considerable overlap and interaction during these activities such that leadership could be considered a joint function. In packs with multiple breeders, quantitative information about leadership is needed.

  19. Systematic discovery of nonobvious human disease models through orthologous phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    McGary, Kriston L.; Park, Tae Joo; Woods, John O.; Cha, Hye Ji; Wallingford, John B.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists have long used model organisms to study human diseases, particularly when the model bears a close resemblance to the disease. We present a method that quantitatively and systematically identifies nonobvious equivalences between mutant phenotypes in different species, based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes from human, mouse, yeast, worm, and plant (212,542 gene-phenotype associations). These orthologous phenotypes, or phenologs, predict unique genes associated with diseases. Our method suggests a yeast model for angiogenesis defects, a worm model for breast cancer, mouse models of autism, and a plant model for the neural crest defects associated with Waardenburg syndrome, among others. Using these models, we show that SOX13 regulates angiogenesis, and that SEC23IP is a likely Waardenburg gene. Phenologs reveal functionally coherent, evolutionarily conserved gene networksmany predating the plant-animal divergencecapable of identifying candidate disease genes. PMID:20308572

  20. Bioinformatic approaches to identifying orthologs and assessing evolutionary relationships

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-human primate genetic research defines itself through comparisons to humans; few other species require the implicit comparative genomics approaches. Because of this, errors in the identification of non-human primate orthologs can have profound effects. Gene prediction algorithms can and have produced false transcripts that have become incorporated into commonly used databases and genomics portals. These false transcripts can arise from deficiencies in the algorithms themselves as well as through gaps and other problems in the genome assembly. Putative genes generated can not only miss microexons, but improperly incorporate non-coding sequence resulting in pseudogenes or other transcripts without biological relevance. False transcripts then become identified as orthologs to established human genes and are too often taken as gospel by unwary researchers. Here the processes through which these errors propagate are isolated and methods are described for identifying false orthologs in databases with several representative errors illustrated. Through these steps any researcher seeking to make use of non-human primate genetic information will have the tools at their disposal to ascertain where errors exist and to remedy them once encountered. PMID:19467333

  1. Toxocara canis and the allergic process

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Mauricio Grecco; de Oliveira, Sandra Regina Pereira; de Castro, Cynthia Aparecida; Soares, Edson Garcia; Afonso, Ana; Monnazzi, Luis Gustavo S; Peitl, Oscar; Faccioli, Lcia Helena; Anibal, Fernanda de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of infectious agents against allergic reactions has been thoroughly investigated. Current studies have demonstrated the ability of some helminths to modulate the immune response of infected hosts. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Toxocara canis infection and the development of an allergic response in mice immunised with ovalbumin (OVA). We determined the total and differential blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells using BALB/c mice as a model. To this end, the levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-10 and anti-OVA-IgE were measured using an ELISA. The inflammatory process in the lungs was observed using histology slides stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The results showed an increase in the total number of leukocytes and eosinophils in the blood of infected and immunised animals at 18 days after infection. We observed a slight lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate in the portal space in all infected mice. Anti-OVA-IgE levels were detected in smaller proportions in the plasma of immunised and infected mice compared with mice that were only infected. Therefore, we concluded that T. canis potentiates inflammation in the lungs in response to OVA, although anti-OVA-IgE levels suggest a potential reduction of the inflammatory process through this mechanism. PMID:26517650

  2. [Superficial infections caused by Microsporum canis in humans and animals].

    PubMed

    Segundo, Carolina; Martnez, Alejandrina; Arenas, Roberto; Fernndez, Ramn; Cervantes, Roberto A

    2004-03-01

    Dermatophytic infections caused by M. canis in humans and animals have a world wide distribution and they are zoonotic. The objective in this work was to know the frequency of M. canis infections in humans and pets. We studied our cases from January 1994 to December 2002. The human samples were obtained from a Dermatological Department in a General Hospital and we registered the next data: age, sex, job, and affected area. The animal samples were obtained from a mycological veterinary laboratory, and we registered the presence or absence of clinical lesions. A total of 46 clinical cases of M. canis infections were recorded, 26 female and 20 males: tinea capitis 21, tinea corporis 17, tinea pedis five, onychomycosis two, and only one case with tinea faciei. The 46 cases with positive culture yield 42 positive samples in KOH. The age range varied from 2 to 60 years. Among the animals, we studied 461 dogs and found six KOH positive (1%) samples and cultured 23 isolates (4.98%): 21 M. canis, one M. gypseum and one Trichophyton spp. From the 68 samples of cats, eight (11.76%) were positive to KOH, being 26 (38.23%) M. canis isolates. In M. canis infections in humans, the age rage was wide with predominance in women. In animals, M. canis isolates represented the most dermatophytic infection. PMID:15458362

  3. Factors affecting the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species tree in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background As originally defined, orthologous genes implied a reflection of the history of the species. In recent years, many studies have examined the concordance between orthologous gene trees and species trees in bacteria. These studies have produced contradictory results that may have been influenced by orthologous gene misidentification and artefactual phylogenetic reconstructions. Here, using a method that allows the detection and exclusion of false positives during identification of orthologous genes, we address the question of whether putative orthologous genes within bacteria really reflect the history of the species. Results We identified a set of 370 orthologous genes from the bacterial order Rhizobiales. Although manifesting strong vertical signal, almost every orthologous gene had a distinct phylogeny, and the most common topology among the orthologous gene trees did not correspond with the best estimate of the species tree. However, each orthologous gene tree shared an average of 70% of its bipartitions with the best estimate of the species tree. Stochastic error related to gene size affected the concordance between the best estimated of the species tree and the orthologous gene trees, although this effect was weak and distributed unevenly among the functional categories. The nodes showing the greatest discordance were those defined by the shortest internal branches in the best estimated of the species tree. Moreover, a clear bias was evident with respect to the function of the orthologous genes, and the degree of divergence among the orthologous genes appeared to be related to their functional classification. Conclusion Orthologous genes do not reflect the history of the species when taken as individual markers, but they do when taken as a whole. Stochastic error affected the concordance of orthologous genes with the species tree, albeit weakly. We conclude that two important biological causes of discordance among orthologous genes are incomplete lineage sorting and functional restriction. PMID:18973688

  4. Diagnosis of canine monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis): an overview.

    PubMed

    Harrus, Shimon; Waner, Trevor

    2011-03-01

    Canine monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia canis, an important canine disease with a worldwide distribution. Diagnosis of the disease can be challenging due to its different phases and multiple clinical manifestations. CME should be suspected when a compatible history (living in or traveling to an endemic region, previous tick exposure), typical clinical signs and characteristic hematological and biochemical abnormalities are present. Traditional diagnostic techniques including hematology, cytology, serology and isolation are valuable diagnostic tools for CME, however a definitive diagnosis of E. canis infection requires molecular techniques. This article reviews the current literature covering the diagnosis of infection caused by E. canis. PMID:20226700

  5. The systematic status of the Italian wolf Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, R.M.; Federoff, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the past, the gray wolf Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758, has been recognized in Italy as either the subspecies lupus or italicus. It has also been postulated that this population has undergone introgression from the domestic dog Canis familiaris. In order to clarify these issues, multistatistical analyses were made of 10 skull measurements of 34 full grown male wolves from the Italian Peninsula, 91 other male Eurasian wolves, and 20 domestic dogs. The analyses, together with other morphological evidence and prior genetic research, support recognition of the Italian wolf as a separate subspecies, Canis lupus italicus. The same evidence indicates that the subspecies has not been affected through hybridization with the domestic dog.

  6. Intestinal helminth parasite community in wolves (Canis lupus) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Guberti, V; Stancampiano, L; Francisci, F

    1993-12-01

    From 1987 to 1993, 89 wolves (Canis lupus) collected throughout the whole Italian range were examined for intestinal helminth parasites. Twelve species were found, including 5 nematodes (Uncinaria stenocephala, Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Trichuris vulpis and Toxascaris leonina) and 7 cestodes (Echinococcus granulosus, Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. pisiformis, T. ovis, Mesocestoides lineatus and Dipylidium caninum). No significant differences were detected between sexes. T. canis showed higher prevalence and numbers in youngs, while E. granulosus and T. vulpis in adults. Interference between U. stenocephala and A. caninum was detected. Parasite biocenosis was stable in respect to geographical and ecological variables. PMID:8065823

  7. Investigating 42 candidate orthologous protein groups by molecular evolutionary analysis on genome scale.

    PubMed

    Xie, T; Ding, D

    2000-12-31

    It is one of key problems for comparative genomics to accurately identify orthologous genes/proteins. Here 42 quartettes of human, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster candidate orthologs, defined by using similarity-based highest hit criteria (Mushegian et al., 1998 Genome Res. 8: 590-598), were reconsidered according to molecular evolutionary analysis. We found that only 14 of the 42 candidate orthologous groups can be identified to have truly one-to-one orthologous relationships, whereas other groups were characterized by one (many)-to-many orthologous relationships or even more complex scenarios involving gene duplications and/or gene losses. The result could imply that the classical one-to-one orthology might be not as common as typically accepted and automated similarity-based methods should be used with caution when accurate orthology/paralogy discrimination is required. PMID:11167018

  8. Prey escaping wolves, Canis lupus, despite close proximity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe attacks by wolf (Canis lupus) packs in Minnesota on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and a moose (Alces alces) in which wolves were within contact distance of the prey but in which the prey escaped.

  9. First record of coccidiosis in Wolves, Canis Lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Mech L.; Kurtz, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Three 4-month-old Wolf (Canis lupus) pups in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota died during August and September 1997, apparently from coccidiosis. This appears to be the first record of coccidiosis in Wolves.

  10. Breeding season of Wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12?? and 80??N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  11. Breeding season of wolves, Canis lupus, in relation to latitude

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    A significant relationship was found between Wolf (Canis lupus) breeding dates and latitudes between 12 deg. and 80 deg. N, with Wolves breeding earlier at lower latitudes, probably because of differences in seasonality.

  12. Mass loss from UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsel, H.; Rahe, J.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The present analysis is an application of the theory described by Lucy (1971) for the calculation of P Cygni resonance line profiles formed by isotropic and coherent scattering in spherically symmetric expanding circumstellar envelopes. Copernicus satellite measurements of resonance features in the FUV spectrum of the O 7 supergiant UW Canis Majoris (= HD 57060) are compared with theoretical P Cygni profiles. Grids of line profiles are computed using four free parameters which contain information about the velocity law, ionization equilibrium, temperature, and envelope density. Thus, with the assumption of a spherically symmetric steady flow, and of solar element abundances, the stellar mass loss rate and the electron temperature of the expanding shell can be derived. The mass flow is treated in a fully transonic way, i.e., the Sobolev approximation is applied.

  13. Application the mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF technique for detection of Babesia canis canis infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Adaszek, Łukasz; Banach, Tomasz; Bartnicki, Michał; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Łyp, Paweł; Winiarczyk, Stanisław

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to use rapid mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics analyses for diagnosis of Babesia canis canis infections in dogs. The study was conducted on two groups of dogs--healthy dogs and dogs infected with B. canis canis which demonstrated symptoms of babesiosis. The matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS technique revealed the presence of a protein fraction of 51-52 kDa in the blood serum of all the animals infected with the protozoa, which was not found in the serum of healthy dogs. The proteins are suspected to be disease markers, whereas the MALDI-TOF technique itself has high specificity and sensitivity and can be applied in analytical laboratories in the diagnosis of canine babesiosis. PMID:25238794

  14. Different hydrophobicities of orthologous proteins from Xenopus and human.

    PubMed

    Cruveiller, S; Jabbari, K; D'Onofrio, G; Bernardi, G

    1999-09-30

    A compositional transition was previously detected by comparing orthologous coding sequences from cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates (see Bernardi, G., Hughes, S., Mouchiroud, D., 1997. The major compositional transitions in the vertebrate genome. J. Mol. Evol. 44, S44-S51 for a review). The transition is characterized by higher GC levels (GC is the molar ratio of guanine+cytosine in DNA) and, especially, by higher GC3 levels (GC3 is the GC level of third codon positions) in coding sequences from warm-blooded vertebrates. This transition essentially affects GC-rich genes, although the nucleotide substitution rate is of the same order of magnitude in both GC-poor and GC-rich genes. In order to understand the evolutionary basis of the changes, we have compared the hydrophobicity of orthologous proteins from Xenopus and human. Although the differences are small in proteins encoded by coding sequences ranging from 0 to 65% in GC3, they are large in the proteins encoded by sequences characterized by GC3 values higher than 65%. The latter proteins are more hydrophobic in human than in Xenopus. PMID:10570979

  15. Toxocara canis infection of children: epidemiologic and neuropsychologic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, M; Glickman, L; Shofer, F; Faich, L A; Rosenberg, C; Cornblatt, B; Friedman, S

    1987-01-01

    Sera from 4,652 children whose blood was submitted to the New York City Department of Health for lead analysis were tested for antibodies to Toxocara canis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Standardized to the age distribution of the study population, T. canis seropositivity (inverse titers greater than or equal to 16) was 5.7 per cent in males and 5.1 per cent in females. T. canis antibody titers and lead exposures as measured by Centers for Disease Control lead classes were positively correlated. Children who were seropositive to T. canis (cases) were compared to seronegatives (controls) matched on age (+/- 6 months), sex, time-of-screening (+/- 3 months) and CDC lead class. Logistic regression analysis of 155 case-control pairs demonstrated elevated relative risks (RRs) for geophagia (RR = 3.14; 95% CI = 1.75, 5.64) and having had a litter of puppies in the home (RR = 5.22; 95% CI = 1.63, 16.71). Compared to controls, cases had increased eosinophil counts, serum immunoglobulin E concentrations, and anti-hemagglutinin-A titers. Small deficits in cases compared to controls were found in performance on several neuropsychological tests after adjustment for potential confounders including case-control differences in race, socioeconomic status, and current blood lead concentrations. The study thus confirmed that T. canis infection is common in urban children and suggested that infection may be associated with adverse neuropsychological effects. PMID:3565646

  16. Trophic cascades linking wolves (Canis lupus), coyotes (Canis latrans), and small mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, B.J.; Harlow, H.J.; Harlow, T.S.; Biggins, D.; Ripple, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    When large carnivores are extirpated from ecosystems that evolved with apex predators, these systems can change at the herbivore and plant trophic levels. Such changes across trophic levels are called cascading effects and they are very important to conservation. Studies on the effects of reintroduced wolves in Yellowstone National Park have examined the interaction pathway of wolves (Canis lupus L., 1758) to ungulates to plants. This study examines the interaction effects of wolves to coyotes to rodents (reversing mesopredator release in the absence of wolves). Coyotes (Canis latrans Say, 1823) generally avoided areas near a wolf den. However, when in the proximity of a den, they used woody habitats (pine or sage) compared with herbaceous habitats (grass or forb or sedge)- when they were away from the wolf den. Our data suggested a significant increase in rodent numbers, particularly voles (genus Microtus Schrank, 1798), during the 3-year study on plots that were within 3 km of the wolf den, but we did not detect a significant change in rodent numbers over time for more distant plots. Predation by coyotes may have depressed numbers of small mammals in areas away from the wolf den. These factors indicate a top-down effect by wolves on coyotes and subsequently on the rodents of the area. Restoration of wolves could be a powerful tool for regulating predation at lower trophic levels.

  17. Fatal acute babesiosis in captive grey wolves (Canis lupus) due to Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Erdlyi, Kroly; Mez?si, Lszl; Vladov, Sztojkov; Fldvri, Gbor

    2014-04-01

    Two adult male Eurasian grey wolves belonging to a group of 12 animals, kept in an open air 15,000-m(2) enclosure at the Bear Farm facility near Veresegyhza, Hungary, were found dead in September 2002. Another 2 wolves died during the same period, but laboratory examination of their carcasses was not possible. During necropsy both animals were found to be in a good body condition. Oral mucosa, conjunctiva, sclera, and subcutaneous tissues revealed severe jaundice. The liver, gall bladder, and spleen were enlarged. The kidneys were paler than normal, and petechial haemorrhages were also seen under their fascia. Small, round Babesia-like organisms, 1.5-2 ?m in diameter, were demonstrated in large numbers in stained impression smears made from the spleens of both animals. PCR amplification and sequencing identified Babesia canis. There are very few reports on babesiosis in the grey wolf, and our findings draw attention to the potential threat posed by B. canis that will probably have to be taken into account in future ex situ and in situ wolf conservation efforts. PMID:24507435

  18. ncRNA orthologies in the vertebrate lineage

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J.; Muffato, Matthieu; Gordon, Leo; White, Simon; Flicek, Paul; Herrero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of orthologous and paralogous genes is necessary for many aspects of evolutionary analysis. Methods to infer these homology relationships have traditionally focused on protein-coding genes and evolutionary models used by these methods normally assume the positions in the protein evolve independently. However, as our appreciation for the roles of non-coding RNA genes has increased, consistently annotated sets of orthologous and paralogous ncRNA genes are increasingly needed. At the same time, methods such as PHASE or RAxML have implemented substitution models that consider pairs of sites to enable proper modelling of the loops and other features of RNA secondary structure. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis pipeline for the automatic detection of orthologues and paralogues for ncRNA genes. We focus on gene families represented in Rfam and for which a specific covariance model is provided. For each family ncRNA genes found in all Ensembl species are aligned using Infernal, and several trees are built using different substitution models. In parallel, a genomic alignment that includes the ncRNA genes and their flanking sequence regions is built with PRANK. This alignment is used to create two additional phylogenetic trees using the neighbour-joining (NJ) and maximum-likelihood (ML) methods. The trees arising from both the ncRNA and genomic alignments are merged using TreeBeST, which reconciles them with the species tree in order to identify speciation and duplication events. The final tree is used to infer the orthologues and paralogues following Fitch's definition. We also determine gene gain and loss events for each family using CAFE. All data are accessible through the Ensembl Comparative Genomics (‘Compara’) API, on our FTP site and are fully integrated in the Ensembl genome browser, where they can be accessed in a user-friendly manner. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org PMID:26980512

  19. ncRNA orthologies in the vertebrate lineage.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J; Muffato, Matthieu; Gordon, Leo; White, Simon; Flicek, Paul; Herrero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Annotation of orthologous and paralogous genes is necessary for many aspects of evolutionary analysis. Methods to infer these homology relationships have traditionally focused on protein-coding genes and evolutionary models used by these methods normally assume the positions in the protein evolve independently. However, as our appreciation for the roles of non-coding RNA genes has increased, consistently annotated sets of orthologous and paralogous ncRNA genes are increasingly needed. At the same time, methods such as PHASE or RAxML have implemented substitution models that consider pairs of sites to enable proper modelling of the loops and other features of RNA secondary structure. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis pipeline for the automatic detection of orthologues and paralogues for ncRNA genes. We focus on gene families represented in Rfam and for which a specific covariance model is provided. For each family ncRNA genes found in all Ensembl species are aligned using Infernal, and several trees are built using different substitution models. In parallel, a genomic alignment that includes the ncRNA genes and their flanking sequence regions is built with PRANK. This alignment is used to create two additional phylogenetic trees using the neighbour-joining (NJ) and maximum-likelihood (ML) methods. The trees arising from both the ncRNA and genomic alignments are merged using TreeBeST, which reconciles them with the species tree in order to identify speciation and duplication events. The final tree is used to infer the orthologues and paralogues following Fitch's definition. We also determine gene gain and loss events for each family using CAFE. All data are accessible through the Ensembl Comparative Genomics ('Compara') API, on our FTP site and are fully integrated in the Ensembl genome browser, where they can be accessed in a user-friendly manner.Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26980512

  20. Isolation of viable neospora caninum from brains of wild gray wolves (canis lupus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neospora caninum is a common cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. Canids, including the dog and the dingo (Canis familiaris), the coyote (Canis latrans), and the gray wolf (Canis lupus) are its definitive hosts, but also can act as intermediate hosts by harbor tissue stages of the parasite that ca...

  1. Generalized Microsporum canis dermatophytosis in six Yorkshire terrier dogs.

    PubMed

    Cerundolo, Rosario

    2004-06-01

    Six Yorkshire terrier dogs with generalized, chronic dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis were seen over a 3-year period. Specific tests showed that they also had concurrent leishmaniosis (four cases), leishmaniosis and ehrlichiosis (one case) or diabetes mellitus (one case). Although specific therapy for these infectious diseases was instituted and the dogs were treated systemically and topically with appropriate antifungal drugs, only partial clinical resolution of the dermatophytosis was achieved. M. canis infection resolved in the dog with diabetes mellitus after stabilizing the diabetes mellitus. Although immunological studies were not performed in these cases, it is theorized that the immune disregulation caused by leishmaniosis, ehrlichiosis or diabetes mellitus may have favoured generalization of the infection and prevented favourable responses to appropriate treatment of the M. canis infection. PMID:15214955

  2. Toxocara canis infection: Unusual trigger of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michal; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Baudouin, Vronique; Guillem, Colette; Peuchmaur, Michel; Deschnes, Georges; Fila, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Infection by Toxocara canis can cause systemic vasculitis. We report here a unique case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) triggered by T. canis infection. An 8-year-old girl was treated with albendazole therapy for common toxocariasis, but she developed two weeks later, asthenia, fever, infiltrated maculopapular eruption of the face, peripheral vascular disease with necrosis of the fingers and inflammatory anemia with proteinuria. Anti-nuclear, anti-DNA and anti-Sm antibodies positivity, together with minimal change nephritis with mesangial exclusive IgM deposit on renal biopsy and clinical relapse after initially successful steroid therapy, led to the diagnosis of SLE. T. canis infection can trigger systemic lupus but must also be ruled out of the differential diagnosis given its association with autoimmunity. PMID:26147636

  3. Hepatozoon canis infection in a litter of Dalmatian dogs.

    PubMed

    Baneth, G; Aroch, I; Presentey, B

    1997-06-01

    Infection with Hepatozoon canis is described in a litter of seven Dalmatians. Four littermates were presented with concurrent hepatozoonosis and parvoviral enteritis and the remaining three puppies were parasitemic with H. canis with no other concurrent disease. Parasitemia ranged between 3% and 67% of the blood neutrophils. The mean number of parasitized neutrophils per microliter among littermates with concurrent hepatozoonosis and parvoviral enteritis was 1139 (+/-447 SD) on the day of admission, compared with 470 (+/-379) among littermates with hepatozoonosis only. Puppies with hepatozoonosis and parvovirus infection at admission differed significantly in their degree of H. canis parasitemia from their littermates which were not infected with parvovirus (P = 0.0286). Concurrent parvoviral enteritis and hepatozoonosis in the dog are reported here for the first time. PMID:9195724

  4. Linking the potato genome to the Conserved Ortholog Set (COS) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conserved ortholog set (COS) markers are an important functional genomics resource that has greatly improved orthology detection in Asterid species. A comprehensive list of these markers is available at Sol Genomics Network (http://www.sgn.cornell.edu) and many of these have been placed in the genet...

  5. Expression analysis of kenaf cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) ortholog during developmental and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to clone and analyze the expression pattern of a C4H gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). A full-length C4H ortholog was cloned using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. The full-length C4H ortholog...

  6. Hepatozoon canis infection of wild carnivores in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Alencar, N X; Kohayagawa, A; Santarm, V A

    1997-07-01

    Hepatozoon canis was diagnosed in a crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous) found on a highway in the region of Botucatu, So Paulo, Brazil, after being hit by a car. The fox had bilateral fractures of the olecranon, which was corrected by osteosynthesis. Hematologic findings included a neutrophilia, eosinophilia, monocytosis and mild anemia. In the Leishman-stained blood film, gametocytes of Hepatozoon canis in neutrophils were identified measuring 9.1 +/- 0.54 x 5.3 +/- 0.46 microns. PMID:9211653

  7. Meningitis by Toxocara canis after Ingestion of Raw Ostrich Liver

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Young; Hong, Sung-Tae; Yun, Ji Young; Park, Hong-Kyun; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Young Eun

    2012-01-01

    Recently reports on toxocariasis are increasing by serodiagnosis in Korea. A previously healthy 17-yr-old boy complained of headache, fever, dyspnea, and anorexia. He showed symptoms and signs of eosinophilic meningitis with involvement of the lungs and liver. Specific IgG antibody to Toxocara canis larval antigen was positive in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by ELISA. He took raw ostrich liver with his parents 4 weeks before the symptom onset. His parents were seropositive for T. canis antigen but had no symptoms or signs suggesting toxocariasis. This is the first report of toxocariasis in a family due to ingestion of raw ostrich liver in Korea. PMID:22969260

  8. Use of chimeric DNA-RNA primers in quantitative PCR for detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; Inbar, Jacob; Harrus, Shimon

    2009-10-01

    To overcome the problem of nonspecific by-products in quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, we constructed DNA-RNA chimeric primers and evaluated their use in the detection and quantification of the Ehrlichia canis 16S rRNA, Babesia canis Hsp70, and canine beta-actin genes. Several RNA bases were incorporated into specific positions in the DNA primers, while no RNA stretches were allowed. qPCR reactions were carried out without preamplification steps. This resulted in decreased formation of undesirable by-products and a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. PMID:19633128

  9. Use of Chimeric DNA-RNA Primers in Quantitative PCR for Detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis?

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Ofer; Baneth, Gad; Eyal, Osnat; Inbar, Jacob; Harrus, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the problem of nonspecific by-products in quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, we constructed DNA-RNA chimeric primers and evaluated their use in the detection and quantification of the Ehrlichia canis 16S rRNA, Babesia canis Hsp70, and canine ?-actin genes. Several RNA bases were incorporated into specific positions in the DNA primers, while no RNA stretches were allowed. qPCR reactions were carried out without preamplification steps. This resulted in decreased formation of undesirable by-products and a 10-fold increase in assay sensitivity. PMID:19633128

  10. Identification of serum biomarkers in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis canis using a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease that is caused by the haemoprotozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. There are limited data on serum proteomics in dogs, and none of the effect of babesiosis on the serum proteome. The aim of this study was to identify the potential serum biomarkers of babesiosis using proteomic techniques in order to increase our understanding about disease pathogenesis. Results Serum samples were collected from 25 dogs of various breeds and sex with naturally occurring babesiosis caused by B. canis canis. Blood was collected on the day of admission (day 0), and subsequently on the 1st and 6th day of treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) of pooled serum samples of dogs with naturally occurring babesiosis (day 0, day 1 and day 6) and healthy dogs were run in triplicate. 2DE image analysis showed 64 differentially expressed spots with p ≤ 0.05 and 49 spots with fold change ≥2. Six selected spots were excised manually and subjected to trypsin digest prior to identification by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry on an Amazon ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass spectrometry data was processed using Data Analysis software and the automated Matrix Science Mascot Daemon server. Protein identifications were assigned using the Mascot search engine to interrogate protein sequences in the NCBI Genbank database. A number of differentially expressed serum proteins involved in inflammation mediated acute phase response, complement and coagulation cascades, apolipoproteins and vitamin D metabolism pathway were identified in dogs with babesiosis. Conclusions Our findings confirmed two dominant pathogenic mechanisms of babesiosis, haemolysis and acute phase response. These results may provide possible serum biomarker candidates for clinical monitoring of babesiosis and this study could serve as the basis for further proteomic investigations in canine babesiosis. PMID:24885808

  11. An orthology-based analysis of pathogenic protozoa impacting global health: an improved comparative genomics approach with prokaryotes and model eukaryote orthologs.

    PubMed

    Cuadrat, Rafael R C; da Serra Cruz, Srgio Manuel; Tschoeke, Diogo Antnio; Silva, Edno; Tosta, Frederico; Juc, Henrique; Jardim, Rodrigo; Campos, Maria Luiza M; Mattoso, Marta; Dvila, Alberto M R

    2014-08-01

    A key focus in 21(st) century integrative biology and drug discovery for neglected tropical and other diseases has been the use of BLAST-based computational methods for identification of orthologous groups in pathogenic organisms to discern orthologs, with a view to evaluate similarities and differences among species, and thus allow the transfer of annotation from known/curated proteins to new/non-annotated ones. We used here a profile-based sensitive methodology to identify distant homologs, coupled to the NCBI's COG (Unicellular orthologs) and KOG (Eukaryote orthologs), permitting us to perform comparative genomics analyses on five protozoan genomes. OrthoSearch was used in five protozoan proteomes showing that 3901 and 7473 orthologs can be identified by comparison with COG and KOG proteomes, respectively. The core protozoa proteome inferred was 418 Protozoa-COG orthologous groups and 704 Protozoa-KOG orthologous groups: (i) 31.58% (132/418) belongs to the category J (translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis), and 9.81% (41/418) to the category O (post-translational modification, protein turnover, chaperones) using COG; (ii) 21.45% (151/704) belongs to the categories J, and 13.92% (98/704) to the O using KOG. The phylogenomic analysis showed four well-supported clades for Eukarya, discriminating Multicellular [(i) human, fly, plant and worm] and Unicellular [(ii) yeast, (iii) fungi, and (iv) protozoa] species. These encouraging results attest to the usefulness of the profile-based methodology for comparative genomics to accelerate semi-automatic re-annotation, especially of the protozoan proteomes. This approach may also lend itself for applications in global health, for example, in the case of novel drug target discovery against pathogenic organisms previously considered difficult to research with traditional drug discovery tools. PMID:24960463

  12. An Orthology-Based Analysis of Pathogenic Protozoa Impacting Global Health: An Improved Comparative Genomics Approach with Prokaryotes and Model Eukaryote Orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrat, Rafael R. C.; da Serra Cruz, Srgio Manuel; Tschoeke, Diogo Antnio; Silva, Edno; Tosta, Frederico; Juc, Henrique; Jardim, Rodrigo; Campos, Maria Luiza M.; Mattoso, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A key focus in 21st century integrative biology and drug discovery for neglected tropical and other diseases has been the use of BLAST-based computational methods for identification of orthologous groups in pathogenic organisms to discern orthologs, with a view to evaluate similarities and differences among species, and thus allow the transfer of annotation from known/curated proteins to new/non-annotated ones. We used here a profile-based sensitive methodology to identify distant homologs, coupled to the NCBI's COG (Unicellular orthologs) and KOG (Eukaryote orthologs), permitting us to perform comparative genomics analyses on five protozoan genomes. OrthoSearch was used in five protozoan proteomes showing that 3901 and 7473 orthologs can be identified by comparison with COG and KOG proteomes, respectively. The core protozoa proteome inferred was 418 Protozoa-COG orthologous groups and 704 Protozoa-KOG orthologous groups: (i) 31.58% (132/418) belongs to the category J (translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis), and 9.81% (41/418) to the category O (post-translational modification, protein turnover, chaperones) using COG; (ii) 21.45% (151/704) belongs to the categories J, and 13.92% (98/704) to the O using KOG. The phylogenomic analysis showed four well-supported clades for Eukarya, discriminating Multicellular [(i) human, fly, plant and worm] and Unicellular [(ii) yeast, (iii) fungi, and (iv) protozoa] species. These encouraging results attest to the usefulness of the profile-based methodology for comparative genomics to accelerate semi-automatic re-annotation, especially of the protozoan proteomes. This approach may also lend itself for applications in global health, for example, in the case of novel drug target discovery against pathogenic organisms previously considered difficult to research with traditional drug discovery tools. PMID:24960463

  13. Improving 3D Genome Reconstructions Using Orthologous and Functional Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Diament, Alon; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The study of the 3D architecture of chromosomes has been advancing rapidly in recent years. While a number of methods for 3D reconstruction of genomic models based on Hi-C data were proposed, most of the analyses in the field have been performed on different 3D representation forms (such as graphs). Here, we reproduce most of the previous results on the 3D genomic organization of the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae using analysis of 3D reconstructions. We show that many of these results can be reproduced in sparse reconstructions, generated from a small fraction of the experimental data (5% of the data), and study the properties of such models. Finally, we propose for the first time a novel approach for improving the accuracy of 3D reconstructions by introducing additional predicted physical interactions to the model, based on orthologous interactions in an evolutionary-related organism and based on predicted functional interactions between genes. We demonstrate that this approach indeed leads to the reconstruction of improved models. PMID:26000633

  14. Serodetection of Ehrlichia canis amongst dogs in central Namibia.

    PubMed

    Manyarara, Rutendo; Tubbesing, Ulf; Soni, Minty; Noden, Bruce H

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis is a major pathogen in dogs throughout Africa, yet it has not been reported in Namibia. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis in central Namibia using the ImmunoComb assay (Biogal, Galed Laboratories). The study included 76 dogs that presented to the Rhino Park Veterinary Clinic in the north-western suburb of Khomasdal, Windhoek, Namibia, as well as 30 stray dogs from the Windhoek branch of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Of the 106 dogs tested, 53.8% were seropositive at titres > 1:80. Dogs that presented with symptoms of E. canis infection had a significantly higher seroprevalence (86.6%) compared with apparently healthy dogs (41.6%) (P = 0.00). Location of habitation was significant (P < 0.017), with a high percentage of dogs exposed to E. canis living in the northern or north-western part of Windhoek. As the first study to serologically establish E. canis as a major pathogen in dogs in central Namibia, it is notable that the highest proportion of seropositive dogs came from low-income areas. Further investigation is necessary to describe the ecology of this important tick-borne pathogen of companion animals in Namibia. PMID:26244587

  15. Is Palomar 1 Really Associated With the Canis Major Overdensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviane, I.; Monaco, L.; Correnti, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Geisler, D.

    2011-07-01

    It has recently been suggested that the peculiar cluster Pal 1 is associated to the Canis Major dwarf galaxy, which existence is still at the center of a debate. Our first measurement of the cluster's chemical abundance ratios allows us to examine this association and to advance further in the clarification of Pal 1 possible origin.

  16. Fossil Canis from the tar pits of La Brea, Peru.

    PubMed

    CHURCHER, C S

    1959-09-01

    New fossil material has been obtained from La Brea, Peru. Included in this material are remains of a large wolflike canid which could not be referred to any living or fossil South American canine genus. Comparison with fossil canids from Rancho La Brea, Calif., shows that it closely resembles Canis (Aenocyon) dirus Leidy. PMID:13810222

  17. Long daily movements of wolves (Canis lupus) during pup raising

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Wolves, Canis lupus, on Ellesmere Island traveled a daily round-trip distance of 40.2 km from their den to a landfill during July 2008, plus an undetermined distance hunting after leaving the landfill. Although long travels by Wolves are well known, this appears to be the first documentation of long daily movements by Wolves rearing pups.

  18. An example of endurance in an old wolf, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    An 11 to 13-year-old Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos) was observed chasing a young Arctic Hare (Lepus arcticus) for 6 to 7 minutes and catching it. This provides an example of the degree of endurance of which an old wolf is capable.

  19. Hepatozoon canis infection in Slovakia: imported or autochthonous?

    PubMed

    Majlthov, Viktria; Hurnkov, Zuzana; Majlth, Igor; Petko, Branislav

    2007-01-01

    Tissue samples from nine red foxes (four samples of striated muscle tissue and five samples of heart tissue) that originated from the Michalovce district (Slovakia), an area with endemic occurrence of canine babesiosis were examined by PCR method using primers amplifying a fragment of the 18S rRNA spanning the V4 region of Babesia and Theileria. An unexpected determination of 450 bp DNA fragment of Hepatozoon canis was found in four samples. Partial sequences of the 18S rRNA gene from the H. canis showed 100% similarity with the sequence from Brasil isolate of H. canis from a pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) (AY471615) as well as from a fox in Spain (AY150067) and from a dog in Brazil (AY864677). In the present study, we report the first PCR detection of Hepatozoon canis in a naturally infected red fox from Slovakia, a Rhipicephalus sanguineus-free region. We assume that the infection was spread by infected R. sanguineus that might have been brought to Slovakia by travelers, by golden jackals, or by foxes migrating because of expansion of golden jackals and environmental and climate changes. PMID:17627439

  20. GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPECIES AND GENOTYPES IN COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feces and duodenal scrapings were collected from 22 coyotes (Canis latrans) killed in managed hunts in northeastern Pennsylvania. PCR methods were used to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium. PCR amplified fragments of the Giardia and Cryptosporidium SSU-rRNA genes were subjected to DNA sequence ana...

  1. Construction of an Ortholog Database Using the Semantic Web Technology for Integrative Analysis of Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Hirokazu; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of biological data, including genomic sequences, have been rapidly accumulating. To discover biological knowledge from such growing heterogeneous data, a flexible framework for data integration is necessary. Ortholog information is a central resource for interlinking corresponding genes among different organisms, and the Semantic Web provides a key technology for the flexible integration of heterogeneous data. We have constructed an ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology, aiming at the integration of numerous genomic data and various types of biological information. To formalize the structure of the ortholog information in the Semantic Web, we have constructed the Ortholog Ontology (OrthO). While the OrthO is a compact ontology for general use, it is designed to be extended to the description of database-specific concepts. On the basis of OrthO, we described the ortholog information from our Microbial Genome Database for Comparative Analysis (MBGD) in the form of Resource Description Framework (RDF) and made it available through the SPARQL endpoint, which accepts arbitrary queries specified by users. In this framework based on the OrthO, the biological data of different organisms can be integrated using the ortholog information as a hub. Besides, the ortholog information from different data sources can be compared with each other using the OrthO as a shared ontology. Here we show some examples demonstrating that the ortholog information described in RDF can be used to link various biological data such as taxonomy information and Gene Ontology. Thus, the ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology can contribute to biological knowledge discovery through integrative data analysis. PMID:25875762

  2. Excavation of Pid3 orthologs with differential resistance spectra to Magnaporthe oryzae in rice resource.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Lv, Qiming; Shang, Junjun; Pang, Zhiqian; Zhou, Zhuangzhi; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Guanghuai; Tao, Yong; Xu, Qian; Li, Xiaobing; Zhao, Xianfeng; Li, Shigui; Xu, Jichen; Zhu, Lihuang

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-six orthologs of the rice blast resistance gene Pid3 from cultivated varieties and wild rice accessions distributed in different areas were cloned by allele mining. Sequence analysis showed that while each of the orthologous genes from indica varieties and most wild accessions encodes a complete NBS-LRR protein, each of the proteins encoded by those from japonica varieties and few wild rice accessions presents a premature termination. Eleven of the 26 orthologs were selected for blast resistance testing by transforming into the blast susceptible rice variety TP309, respectively. Inoculation of 23 M. oryzae strains collected from diverse regions of China to the respective transgenic plants revealed that 6 Pid3 orthologs showed susceptible to all the tested strains, while the other 5 orthologs showed differential resistance spectra in a gradually spectrum-widen order as Pid3-W3, Pid3-W4, Pid3-I3, Pid3-W5 and Pid3-I1. Amino acid sequences alignment of these orthologs indicated that the sequence diversities between the blast resistance orthologs were mostly located in the LRR domain such as the substitutions of Q694H,D856H,Q896R,D899E etc. However, the differences between the resistance orthologs and the susceptible ones were mostly located in the NBS domain. The present experiments provide an example of that the ortholog evaluation of plant R genes could be an efficient way to expand the rice blast resistance and some other plant disease resistance as well for breeding. PMID:24681716

  3. Construction of an ortholog database using the semantic web technology for integrative analysis of genomic data.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Hirokazu; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of biological data, including genomic sequences, have been rapidly accumulating. To discover biological knowledge from such growing heterogeneous data, a flexible framework for data integration is necessary. Ortholog information is a central resource for interlinking corresponding genes among different organisms, and the Semantic Web provides a key technology for the flexible integration of heterogeneous data. We have constructed an ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology, aiming at the integration of numerous genomic data and various types of biological information. To formalize the structure of the ortholog information in the Semantic Web, we have constructed the Ortholog Ontology (OrthO). While the OrthO is a compact ontology for general use, it is designed to be extended to the description of database-specific concepts. On the basis of OrthO, we described the ortholog information from our Microbial Genome Database for Comparative Analysis (MBGD) in the form of Resource Description Framework (RDF) and made it available through the SPARQL endpoint, which accepts arbitrary queries specified by users. In this framework based on the OrthO, the biological data of different organisms can be integrated using the ortholog information as a hub. Besides, the ortholog information from different data sources can be compared with each other using the OrthO as a shared ontology. Here we show some examples demonstrating that the ortholog information described in RDF can be used to link various biological data such as taxonomy information and Gene Ontology. Thus, the ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology can contribute to biological knowledge discovery through integrative data analysis. PMID:25875762

  4. Excavation of Pid3 Orthologs with Differential Resistance Spectra to Magnaporthe oryzae in Rice Resource

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Junjun; Pang, Zhiqian; Zhou, Zhuangzhi; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Guanghuai; Tao, Yong; Xu, Qian; Li, Xiaobing; Zhao, Xianfeng; Li, Shigui; Xu, Jichen; Zhu, Lihuang

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-six orthologs of the rice blast resistance gene Pid3 from cultivated varieties and wild rice accessions distributed in different areas were cloned by allele mining. Sequence analysis showed that while each of the orthologous genes from indica varieties and most wild accessions encodes a complete NBS-LRR protein, each of the proteins encoded by those from japonica varieties and few wild rice accessions presents a premature termination. Eleven of the 26 orthologs were selected for blast resistance testing by transforming into the blast susceptible rice variety TP309, respectively. Inoculation of 23 M. oryzae strains collected from diverse regions of China to the respective transgenic plants revealed that 6 Pid3 orthologs showed susceptible to all the tested strains, while the other 5 orthologs showed differential resistance spectra in a gradually spectrum-widen order as Pid3-W3, Pid3-W4, Pid3-I3, Pid3-W5 and Pid3-I1. Amino acid sequences alignment of these orthologs indicated that the sequence diversities between the blast resistance orthologs were mostly located in the LRR domain such as the substitutions of Q694H,D856H,Q896R,D899E etc. However, the differences between the resistance orthologs and the susceptible ones were mostly located in the NBS domain. The present experiments provide an example of that the ortholog evaluation of plant R genes could be an efficient way to expand the rice blast resistance and some other plant disease resistance as well for breeding. PMID:24681716

  5. Detection of genotype-specific Ehrlichia canis exposure in Brazilian dogs by TRP36 peptide ELISA.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Braga, Isis A; Taques, Isis I G G; McBride, Jere W

    2016-02-01

    We recently characterized a novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis based on the tandem repeat (TR) sequence of the TRP36 gene in Brazil. The TR amino acid sequence of the Brazilian (Br) genotype (ASVVPEAE) was divergent from the previously described US genotype (TEDSVSAPA) of E. canis. In this study, we developed an ELISA based on TRP36 TR synthetic peptides from both Br and US E. canis TRP36 genotypes to serologically detect and distinguish infections caused by these genotypes. Sera from 30 Brazilian dogs naturally infected with E. canis, sera from dogs experimentally infected E. canis (Jake and Cuiabá #1 strains) and E. chaffeensis (Arkansas strain) and 12 seronegative E. canis dogs were evaluated. Fifteen naturally infected Brazilian dogs had antibodies that reacted with the US TRP36 (n=9) or Br TRP36 (n=6) only, and 13 dogs had antibodies that reacted with both TPR36 peptides suggesting that these dogs were exposed to both genotypes. Most dogs (n=28) had antibodies that reacted with the highly conserved E. canis TRP19 peptide; however, two dogs had antibodies to E. canis TRP19, but did not have TRP36 antibodies, raising the possibility that another novel TRP36 genotype is circulating in Brazil. Our results demonstrate that synthetic peptides based on the TR region of E. canis TRP36 can be used to serologically distinguish infections or identify coinfections by different genotypes, and to determine the seroprevalence of various E. canis genotypes in Brazil. PMID:26482949

  6. Poxvirus orthologous clusters: toward defining the minimum essential poxvirus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, Chris; Slack, Stephanie; Hunter, Arwen L; Ehlers, Angelika; Roper, Rachel L

    2003-07-01

    Increasingly complex bioinformatic analysis is necessitated by the plethora of sequence information currently available. A total of 21 poxvirus genomes have now been completely sequenced and annotated, and many more genomes will be available in the next few years. First, we describe the creation of a database of continuously corrected and updated genome sequences and an easy-to-use and extremely powerful suite of software tools for the analysis of genomes, genes, and proteins. These tools are available free to all researchers and, in most cases, alleviate the need for using multiple Internet sites for analysis. Further, we describe the use of these programs to identify conserved families of genes (poxvirus orthologous clusters) and have named the software suite POCs, which is available at www.poxvirus.org. Using POCs, we have identified a set of 49 absolutely conserved gene families-those which are conserved between the highly diverged families of insect-infecting entomopoxviruses and vertebrate-infecting chordopoxviruses. An additional set of 41 gene families conserved in chordopoxviruses was also identified. Thus, 90 genes are completely conserved in chordopoxviruses and comprise the minimum essential genome, and these will make excellent drug, antibody, vaccine, and detection targets. Finally, we describe the use of these tools to identify necessary annotation and sequencing updates in poxvirus genomes. For example, using POCs, we identified 19 genes that were widely conserved in poxviruses but missing from the vaccinia virus strain Tian Tan 1998 GenBank file. We have reannotated and resequenced fragments of this genome and verified that these genes are conserved in Tian Tan. The results for poxvirus genes and genomes are discussed in light of evolutionary processes. PMID:12805459

  7. The OMA orthology database in 2015: function predictions, better plant support, synteny view and other improvements

    PubMed Central

    Altenhoff, Adrian M.; Škunca, Nives; Glover, Natasha; Train, Clément-Marie; Sueki, Anna; Piližota, Ivana; Gori, Kevin; Tomiczek, Bartlomiej; Müller, Steven; Redestig, Henning; Gonnet, Gaston H.; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The Orthologous Matrix (OMA) project is a method and associated database inferring evolutionary relationships amongst currently 1706 complete proteomes (i.e. the protein sequence associated for every protein-coding gene in all genomes). In this update article, we present six major new developments in OMA: (i) a new web interface; (ii) Gene Ontology function predictions as part of the OMA pipeline; (iii) better support for plant genomes and in particular homeologs in the wheat genome; (iv) a new synteny viewer providing the genomic context of orthologs; (v) statically computed hierarchical orthologous groups subsets downloadable in OrthoXML format; and (vi) possibility to export parts of the all-against-all computations and to combine them with custom data for ‘client-side’ orthology prediction. OMA can be accessed through the OMA Browser and various programmatic interfaces at http://omabrowser.org. PMID:25399418

  8. SPOCS: Software for Predicting and Visualizing Orthology/Paralogy Relationships Among Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Darren S.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Callister, Stephen J.; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-15

    At the rate that prokaryotic genomes can now be generated, comparative genomics studies require a flexible method for quickly and accurately predicting orthologs among the rapidly changing set of genomes available. SPOCS implements a graph-based ortholog prediction method to generate a simple tab-delimited table of orthologs and in addition, html files that provide a visualization of the predicted ortholog/paralog relationships to which gene/protein expression metadata may be overlaid. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: A SPOCS web application is freely available at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/tools/spocs.html. Source code for Linux systems is also freely available under an open source license at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/software/spocs.html; the Boost C++ libraries and BLAST are required.

  9. Signalogs: Orthology-Based Identification of Novel Signaling Pathway Components in Three Metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Rov, Petra; Palotai, Robin; Fazekas, Dvid; Lenti, Katalin; Farkas, Ills J.; Csermely, Pter; Vellai, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Background Uncovering novel components of signal transduction pathways and their interactions within species is a central task in current biological research. Orthology alignment and functional genomics approaches allow the effective identification of signaling proteins by cross-species data integration. Recently, functional annotation of orthologs was transferred across organisms to predict novel roles for proteins. Despite the wide use of these methods, annotation of complete signaling pathways has not yet been transferred systematically between species. Principal Findings Here we introduce the concept of signalog to describe potential novel signaling function of a protein on the basis of the known signaling role(s) of its ortholog(s). To identify signalogs on genomic scale, we systematically transferred signaling pathway annotations among three animal species, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and humans. Using orthology data from InParanoid and signaling pathway information from the SignaLink database, we predict 88 worm, 92 fly, and 73 human novel signaling components. Furthermore, we developed an on-line tool and an interactive orthology network viewer to allow users to predict and visualize components of orthologous pathways. We verified the novelty of the predicted signalogs by literature search and comparison to known pathway annotations. In C. elegans, 6 out of the predicted novel Notch pathway members were validated experimentally. Our approach predicts signaling roles for 19 human orthodisease proteins and 5 known drug targets, and suggests 14 novel drug target candidates. Conclusions Orthology-based pathway membership prediction between species enables the identification of novel signaling pathway components that we referred to as signalogs. Signalogs can be used to build a comprehensive signaling network in a given species. Such networks may increase the biomedical utilization of C. elegans and D. melanogaster. In humans, signalogs may identify novel drug targets and new signaling mechanisms for approved drugs. PMID:21559328

  10. Behavioural changes and muscle strength in Rattus norvegicus experimentally infected with Toxocara cati and T. canis.

    PubMed

    Santos, S V; Moura, J V L; Lescano, S A Z; Castro, J M; Ribeiro, M C S A; Chieffi, P P

    2015-07-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are nematode parasites in dogs and cats, respectively, transmitted by ingestion of embryonated eggs, transmammary and transplacental (T. canis) routes and paratenic host predation. Many parasites use mechanisms that change the behaviour of their hosts to ensure continued transmission. Several researchers have demonstrated behavioural changes in mouse models as paratenic hosts for T. canis. However, there have been no studies on behavioural changes in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) experimentally infected with T. cati. This study investigated behavioural changes and muscle strength in male and female rats experimentally infected with T. cati or T. canis in acute and chronic phases of infection. Regardless of sex, rats infected with T. cati showed a greater decrease in muscle strength 42 days post infection compared to rats infected with T. canis. However, behavioural changes were only observed in female rats infected with T. canis. PMID:24725503

  11. [Factors associated with Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs infested with ticks from Huanuco, Peru].

    PubMed

    Huerto-Medina, Edward; Dámaso-Mata, Bernardo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and associated factors of Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs. Blood samples from 150 dogs infested with ticks in 10 veterinary clinics in the city of Huanuco in Peru were collected. The dogs were randomly selected without regard to breed, age or sex. Ehrlichia canis antibodies were detected by chromatographic immunoassay.51.3% of dogs were infected with Ehrlichia canis. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with the presence of Ehrlichia canis were: poor health of the dog (p = 0.049), a higher average of tick infestation (p = 0.018), and adult dogs (p = 0.038). The frequency of Ehrlichia canis in dogs of this city is high. Control of the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) vector of Ehrlichia canis is recommended. PMID:26732926

  12. Outbreaks of Keratoconjunctivitis in a Camel Herd Caused by a Specific Biovar of Moraxella canis?

    PubMed Central

    Tejedor-Junco, Mara Teresa; Gutirrez, Carlos; Gonzlez, Margarita; Fernndez, Ana; Wauters, Georges; De Baere, Thierry; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Two tributyrin hydrolysis-negative Moraxella isolates obtained in cases of keratoconjunctivitis in Camelus dromedarius in the Canary Islands showed highest degrees of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Moraxella canis. A level of DNA relatedness to the M. canis type strain of 79% confirmed the identity of the isolates as a tributyrin hydrolysis-negative biovar of M. canis. PMID:20032257

  13. Giardia and Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in coyotes (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Trout, James M; Santn, Mnica; Fayer, Ronald

    2006-06-01

    Feces and duodenal scrapings were collected from 22 coyotes (Canis latrans) killed in managed hunts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were used to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. PCR-amplified fragments of Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. SSU-rRNA genes were subjected to DNA sequence analysis for species/genotype determination. Seven coyotes (32%) were positive for G. duodenalis: three assemblage C, three assemblage D, and one assemblage B. Six coyotes (27%) were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. One isolate shared 99.7% homology with C. muris, whereas five others (23%) shared 100% homology with C. canis, coyote genotype. This is the first report on multiple genotypes of Giardia spp. in coyotes and on the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes in coyotes. PMID:17312792

  14. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-? (IFN-?), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-? in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-? antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-?. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-? to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-?, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-? has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance. PMID:24148826

  15. Toxocara canis: Larvicidal activity of fatty acid amides.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, Tas; D'Oca, Caroline da Ros Montes; Mata-Santos, Hlton Antnio; Fenalti, Juliana; Pinto, Nitza; Coelho, Tatiane; Berne, Maria Elisabeth; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonalves Montes; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-02-01

    Considering the therapeutic potential of fatty acid amides, the present study aimed to evaluate their in vitro activity against Toxocara canis larvae and their cytotoxicity for the first time. Linoleylpyrrolidilamide was the most potent, with a minimal larvicidal concentration (MLC) of 0.05mg/mL and 27% cytotoxicity against murine peritoneal macrophages C57BL/6 mice, as assessed by the MTT assay. PMID:26783180

  16. Denning behaviour of non-gravid wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Phillips, M.K.; Smith, D.W.; Kreeger, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wild wolves (Canis lupus) that had produced pups in earlier years but were not currently pregnant, and ovariectomized captive wolves, dug dens during and after the whelping season even though they produced no pups. These observations suggest that den digging is not a function of pregnancy or of ovarian estrogen or progesterone. We hypothesize that increasing prolactin in spring elicits or mediates den-digging behavior.

  17. Genetic blueprint of the zoonotic pathogen Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xing-Quan; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Cai, Huimin; Young, Neil D.; Nejsum, Peter; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Boag, Peter R.; Tan, Patrick; Li, Qiye; Min, Jiumeng; Yang, Yulan; Wang, Xiuhua; Fang, Xiaodong; Hall, Ross S.; Hofmann, Andreas; Sternberg, Paul W.; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    Toxocara canis is a zoonotic parasite of major socioeconomic importance worldwide. In humans, this nematode causes disease (toxocariasis) mainly in the under-privileged communities in developed and developing countries. Although relatively well studied from clinical and epidemiological perspectives, to date, there has been no global investigation of the molecular biology of this parasite. Here we use next-generation sequencing to produce a draft genome and transcriptome of T. canis to support future biological and biotechnological investigations. This genome is 317 Mb in size, has a repeat content of 13.5% and encodes at least 18,596 protein-coding genes. We study transcription in a larval, as well as adult female and male stages, characterize the parasite’s gene-silencing machinery, explore molecules involved in development or host–parasite interactions and predict intervention targets. The draft genome of T. canis should provide a useful resource for future molecular studies of this and other, related parasites. PMID:25649139

  18. Comparative study of Microsporum canis isolates by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Shabnam; Khosravi, Ali Reza; Ashrafi Tamai, Iradj

    2014-08-01

    Microsporum canis is a zoophilic fungus and it is an important agent of dermatophytosis. Cats act as important reservoirs. Clinically, it is too difficult to differentiate dermatophytosis caused by various species, also this fungus loses its morphological characteristics easily because of subculture; so using of rapid and accurate laboratory techniques for identifying the dermatophytes is important, therefore, RAPD-PCR was applied for the differentiation of the isolates. In this study, 10 M. canis isolates were detected in cats, dog, human, fox and rabbit at the Mycology Research Center, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran. For running the RAPD-PCR, PCR set system and three random primers OPU 15, OPU 13 and OPA 04 were used. Then phylogenetic tree and similarity coefficient table were drawn. The results showed that there were some common bands between M. canis isolates. There were some specific bands for each isolates, as well. Our study showed, despite the typical morphology of the whole isolates, they were placed in different branches in molecular typing. PMID:24635009

  19. Antifungal susceptibility and genotypical pattern of Microsporum canis strains.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, R S N; Cordeiro, R A; Medrano, D J A; Monteiro, A J; Sidrim, J J C; Rocha, M F G

    2005-06-01

    Dermatophytes are a group of fungi that are capable of invading keratinized tissues of humans and other animals. Antifungal susceptibility analysis and genetic studies by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), have been used to detect polymorphism as well as determining the possible resistance of dermatophytes to antifungals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible correlation between the antifungal susceptibility and genotypical pattern of Microsporum canis strains isolated in dogs and cats with dermatophytosis in Northeast Brazil. The antifungal susceptibility study was conducted using the broth microdilution test with griseofulvine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, and fluconazole. The genotypical analysis was performed using the RAPD method. The antifungal susceptibility analysis showed that all the strains of M. canis analyzed (n = 22) were sensitive to griseofulvine (0.25 microg/mL < or minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) < or = 1 microg/mL), ketoconazole (0.25 microg/mL < or = MIC < or = 2 microg/mL), itraconazole (0.25 microg/mL < or = MIC < or = 1 microg/mL), and fluconazole (1 microg/mL < or = MIC < or = 16 microg/mL). The RAPD results showed that all analyzed strains are genetically similar. Thus, based on antifungal susceptibility analysis and RAPD data, a possible correlation can be shown between the antifungal susceptibility and the genotypical pattern of the strains of M. canis from Northeast Brazil. PMID:16121230

  20. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jrgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available. PMID:25931211

  1. A Phylogeny-Based Benchmarking Test for Orthology Inference Reveals the Limitations of Function-Based Validation

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Tomas; Powell, Sean; Doerks, Tobias; von Mering, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Accurate orthology prediction is crucial for many applications in the post-genomic era. The lack of broadly accepted benchmark tests precludes a comprehensive analysis of orthology inference. So far, functional annotation between orthologs serves as a performance proxy. However, this violates the fundamental principle of orthology as an evolutionary definition, while it is often not applicable due to limited experimental evidence for most species. Therefore, we constructed high quality "gold standard" orthologous groups that can serve as a benchmark set for orthology inference in bacterial species. Herein, we used this dataset to demonstrate 1) why a manually curated, phylogeny-based dataset is more appropriate for benchmarking orthology than other popular practices and 2) how it guides database design and parameterization through careful error quantification. More specifically, we illustrate how function-based tests often fail to identify false assignments, misjudging the true performance of orthology inference methods. We also examined how our dataset can instruct the selection of a core species repertoire to improve detection accuracy. We conclude that including more genomes at the proper evolutionary distances can influence the overall quality of orthology detection. The curated gene families, called Reference Orthologous Groups, are publicly available at http://eggnog.embl.de/orthobench2. PMID:25369365

  2. A phylogeny-based benchmarking test for orthology inference reveals the limitations of function-based validation.

    PubMed

    Trachana, Kalliopi; Forslund, Kristoffer; Larsson, Tomas; Powell, Sean; Doerks, Tobias; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Accurate orthology prediction is crucial for many applications in the post-genomic era. The lack of broadly accepted benchmark tests precludes a comprehensive analysis of orthology inference. So far, functional annotation between orthologs serves as a performance proxy. However, this violates the fundamental principle of orthology as an evolutionary definition, while it is often not applicable due to limited experimental evidence for most species. Therefore, we constructed high quality "gold standard" orthologous groups that can serve as a benchmark set for orthology inference in bacterial species. Herein, we used this dataset to demonstrate 1) why a manually curated, phylogeny-based dataset is more appropriate for benchmarking orthology than other popular practices and 2) how it guides database design and parameterization through careful error quantification. More specifically, we illustrate how function-based tests often fail to identify false assignments, misjudging the true performance of orthology inference methods. We also examined how our dataset can instruct the selection of a "core" species repertoire to improve detection accuracy. We conclude that including more genomes at the proper evolutionary distances can influence the overall quality of orthology detection. The curated gene families, called Reference Orthologous Groups, are publicly available at http://eggnog.embl.de/orthobench2. PMID:25369365

  3. Bioinformatics analysis of plant orthologous introns: identification of an intronic tRNA-like sequence.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Walters, Lorraine; Saha-Mandal, Arnab; Khandekar, Sushant; Crawford, Erin; Zirbel, Craig L; Leisner, Scott; Prakash, Ashwin; Fedorova, Larisa; Fedorov, Alexei

    2014-09-10

    Orthologous introns have identical positions relative to the coding sequence in orthologous genes of different species. By analyzing the complete genomes of five plants we generated a database of 40,512 orthologous intron groups of dicotyledonous plants, 28,519 orthologous intron groups of angiosperms, and 15,726 of land plants (moss and angiosperms). Multiple sequence alignments of each orthologous intron group were obtained using the Mafft algorithm. The number of conserved regions in plant introns appeared to be hundreds of times fewer than that in mammals or vertebrates. Approximately three quarters of conserved intronic regions among angiosperms and dicots, in particular, correspond to alternatively-spliced exonic sequences. We registered only a handful of conserved intronic ncRNAs of flowering plants. However, the most evolutionarily conserved intronic region, which is ubiquitous for all plants examined in this study, including moss, possessed multiple structural features of tRNAs, which caused us to classify it as a putative tRNA-like ncRNA. Intronic sequences encoding tRNA-like structures are not unique to plants. Bioinformatics examination of the presence of tRNA inside introns revealed an unusually long-term association of four glycine tRNAs inside the Vac14 gene of fish, amniotes, and mammals. PMID:25014137

  4. Identification and Expression Analysis of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Co-orthologs in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Paul, Puneet; Keller, Mario; Einloft, Jens; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis involves a large inventory of proteinaceous and RNA cofactors. More than 250 ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) have been described in yeast. These factors are involved in multiple aspects like rRNA processing, folding, and modification as well as in ribosomal protein (RP) assembly. Considering the importance of RBFs for particular developmental processes, we examined the complexity of RBF and RP (co-)orthologs by bioinformatic assignment in 14 different plant species and expression profiling in the model crop Solanum lycopersicum. Assigning (co-)orthologs to each RBF revealed that at least 25% of all predicted RBFs are encoded by more than one gene. At first we realized that the occurrence of multiple RBF co-orthologs is not globally correlated to the existence of multiple RP co-orthologs. The transcript abundance of genes coding for predicted RBFs and RPs in leaves and anthers of S. lycopersicum was determined by next generation sequencing (NGS). In combination with existing expression profiles, we can conclude that co-orthologs of RBFs by large account for a preferential function in different tissue or at distinct developmental stages. This notion is supported by the differential expression of selected RBFs during male gametophyte development. In addition, co-regulated clusters of RBF and RP coding genes have been observed. The relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:25698879

  5. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    Galpert, Deborah; Del Ro, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification. PMID:26605337

  6. eggNOG v4.0: nested orthology inference across 3686 organisms

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Sean; Forslund, Kristoffer; Szklarczyk, Damian; Trachana, Kalliopi; Roth, Alexander; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Gabaldn, Toni; Rattei, Thomas; Creevey, Chris; Kuhn, Michael; Jensen, Lars J.; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing availability of various omics data, high-quality orthology assignment is crucial for evolutionary and functional genomics studies. We here present the fourth version of the eggNOG database (available at http://eggnog.embl.de) that derives nonsupervised orthologous groups (NOGs) from complete genomes, and then applies a comprehensive characterization and analysis pipeline to the resulting gene families. Compared with the previous version, we have more than tripled the underlying species set to cover 3686 organisms, keeping track with genome project completions while prioritizing the inclusion of high-quality genomes to minimize error propagation from incomplete proteome sets. Major technological advances include (i) a robust and scalable procedure for the identification and inclusion of high-quality genomes, (ii) provision of orthologous groups for 107 different taxonomic levels compared with 41 in eggNOGv3, (iii) identification and annotation of particularly closely related orthologous groups, facilitating analysis of related gene families, (iv) improvements of the clustering and functional annotation approach, (v) adoption of a revised tree building procedure based on the multiple alignments generated during the process and (vi) implementation of quality control procedures throughout the entire pipeline. As in previous versions, eggNOGv4 provides multiple sequence alignments and maximum-likelihood trees, as well as broad functional annotation. Users can access the complete database of orthologous groups via a web interface, as well as through bulk download. PMID:24297252

  7. An Effective Big Data Supervised Imbalanced Classification Approach for Ortholog Detection in Related Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Galpert, Deborah; del Río, Sara; Herrera, Francisco; Ancede-Gallardo, Evys; Antunes, Agostinho; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermin

    2015-01-01

    Orthology detection requires more effective scaling algorithms. In this paper, a set of gene pair features based on similarity measures (alignment scores, sequence length, gene membership to conserved regions, and physicochemical profiles) are combined in a supervised pairwise ortholog detection approach to improve effectiveness considering low ortholog ratios in relation to the possible pairwise comparison between two genomes. In this scenario, big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance between ortholog and nonortholog pair classes allow for an effective scaling solution built from two genomes and extended to other genome pairs. The supervised approach was compared with RBH, RSD, and OMA algorithms by using the following yeast genome pairs: Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Kluyveromyces lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Candida glabrata, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Schizosaccharomyces pombe as benchmark datasets. Because of the large amount of imbalanced data, the building and testing of the supervised model were only possible by using big data supervised classifiers managing imbalance. Evaluation metrics taking low ortholog ratios into account were applied. From the effectiveness perspective, MapReduce Random Oversampling combined with Spark SVM outperformed RBH, RSD, and OMA, probably because of the consideration of gene pair features beyond alignment similarities combined with the advances in big data supervised classification. PMID:26605337

  8. Testing the Ortholog Conjecture with Comparative Functional Genomic Data from Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Radivojac, Predrag; Hahn, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    A common assumption in comparative genomics is that orthologous genes share greater functional similarity than do paralogous genes (the ortholog conjecture). Many methods used to computationally predict protein function are based on this assumption, even though it is largely untested. Here we present the first large-scale test of the ortholog conjecture using comparative functional genomic data from human and mouse. We use the experimentally derived functions of more than 8,900 genes, as well as an independent microarray dataset, to directly assess our ability to predict function using both orthologs and paralogs. Both datasets show that paralogs are often a much better predictor of function than are orthologs, even at lower sequence identities. Among paralogs, those found within the same species are consistently more functionally similar than those found in a different species. We also find that paralogous pairs residing on the same chromosome are more functionally similar than those on different chromosomes, perhaps due to higher levels of interlocus gene conversion between these pairs. In addition to offering implications for the computational prediction of protein function, our results shed light on the relationship between sequence divergence and functional divergence. We conclude that the most important factor in the evolution of function is not amino acid sequence, but rather the cellular context in which proteins act. PMID:21695233

  9. Detection of Ehrlichia canis by polymerase chain reaction in dogs from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Nuno; Santos, Ana Sofia; Nncio, Maria Sofia; Sousa, Rita de; Boinas, Fernando; Bacellar, Ftima

    2009-09-01

    Antibodies against Ehrlichia canis, the cause of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, have been reported previously in clinically ill and stray dogs from Portugal. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene of E. canis was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 12/55 (22%) of dogs with suspected tick-borne disease in the Algarve region in Portugal. PMID:18682335

  10. The efficacy of Advantix to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis to dogs by Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Josephus Johannes; Luus, Herman Gerhardus; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a topical combination of imidacloprid and permethrin (Advantix) to prevent transmission of Ehrlichia canis was studied in two groups of six dogs. One group served as controls, whereas the other group was treated. All dogs were exposed to E. canis-infected Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks on Days 7, 14, 21 and Day 28 post acaricidal treatment. The adult R. sanguineus ticks were released into the individual kennels of the dogs to simulate natural tick exposure. In situ tick counts were conducted on Day 9, 16 and 23 and any remaining ticks were counted and removed on Day 30. The efficacy of the acaricidal treatment against R. sanguineus ranged between 96.1% and 98.9% at 48h post-application and lasted up to 4weeks. Four out of six control dogs became infected with E. canis, as demonstrated by the presence of specific E. canis antibodies and the detection by PCR of E. canis DNA in blood samples. These dogs became thrombocytopenic and displayed fever and were consecutively rescue-treated by doxycycline. None of the six treated dogs became infected with E. canis, as confirmed by the lack of specific antibodies and absence of E. canis DNA in blood samples. Advantix prevented transmission of E. canis and provided protection against monocytic ehrlichiosis for 4 weeks post acaricidal treatment. PMID:24135158

  11. Novel Papillomaviral Sequence Detected within Epidermal Plaques in a Wolf (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Rothenburger, Jamie L; Myers, Sherry; Lockerbie, Betty; Wobeser, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe numerous pale plaques affecting the inguinal skin of a grey wolf (Canis lupus). Histologically, these were consistent with papillomaviral plaques. Immunohistochemistry confirmed papillomavirus antigens, and partial sequencing of the L1 gene suggests this is a novel papillomavirus most-closely related to Canis familiaris Papillomavirus 5. PMID:26540181

  12. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarityan Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Gnolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our methods main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  13. IONS: Identification of Orthologs by Neighborhood and Similarity-an Automated Method to Identify Orthologs in Chromosomal Regions of Common Evolutionary Ancestry and its Application to Hemiascomycetous Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Seret, Marie-Line; Baret, Philippe V

    2011-01-01

    Comparative sequence analysis is widely used to infer gene function and study genome evolution and requires proper ortholog identification across different genomes. We have developed a program for the Identification of Orthologs in one-to-one relationship by Neighborhood and Similarity (IONS) between closely related species. The algorithm combines two levels of evidence to determine co-ancestrality at the genome scale: sequence similarity and shared neighborhood. The method was initially designed to provide anchor points for syntenic blocks within the Gnolevures project concerning nine hemiascomycetous yeasts (about 50,000 genes) and is applicable to different input databases. Comparison based on use of a Rand index shows that the results are highly consistent with the pillars of the Yeast Gene Order Browser, a manually curated database. Compared with SYNERGY, another algorithm reporting homology relationships, our method's main advantages are its automation and the absence of dataset-dependent parameters, facilitating consistent integration of newly released genomes. PMID:21918595

  14. Inferring protein function from homology using the Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD).

    PubMed

    Livstone, Michael S; Oughtred, Rose; Heinicke, Sven; Vernot, Benjamin; Huttenhower, Curtis; Durand, Dannie; Dolinski, Kara

    2011-03-01

    Inferring a protein's function by homology is a powerful tool for biologists. The Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD) offers a simple way to visualize and analyze the relationships between homologous proteins in order to infer function. P-POD contains computationally generated analysis distinguishing orthologs from paralogs combined with curated published information on functional complementation and on human diseases. P-POD also features an applet, Notung, for users to explore and modify phylogenetic trees and generate their own ortholog/paralogs calls. This unit describes how to search P-POD for precomputed data, how to find and use the associated curated information from the literature, and how to use Notung to analyze and refine the results. PMID:21400696

  15. InParanoid 8: orthology analysis between 273 proteomes, mostly eukaryotic.

    PubMed

    Sonnhammer, Erik L L; Östlund, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The InParanoid database (http://InParanoid.sbc.su.se) provides a user interface to orthologs inferred by the InParanoid algorithm. As there are now international efforts to curate and standardize complete proteomes, we have switched to using these resources rather than gathering and curating the proteomes ourselves. InParanoid release 8 is based on the 66 reference proteomes that the 'Quest for Orthologs' community has agreed on using, plus 207 additional proteomes from the UniProt complete proteomes--in total 273 species. These represent 246 eukaryotes, 20 bacteria and seven archaea. Compared to the previous release, this increases the number of species by 173% and the number of pairwise species comparisons by 650%. In turn, the number of ortholog groups has increased by 423%. We present the contents and usages of InParanoid 8, and a detailed analysis of how the proteome content has changed since the previous release. PMID:25429972

  16. A golden jackal (Canis aureus) from Austria bearing Hepatozoon canis--import due to immigration into a non-endemic area?

    PubMed

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Kbber-Heiss, Anna; Richter, Barbara; Suchentrunk, Franz

    2013-02-01

    The protozoan Hepatozoon canis, which is transmitted via ingestion of infected ticks by canine hosts, is not endemic to mid-latitude regions in Europe. Its distribution is supposed to be linked to the occurrence of its primary tick vector Rhipicephalus sanguineus. A young male golden jackal (Canis aureus) found as road kill close to Vienna, Austria, was infected by this pathogen. Cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed 6 different haplotypes of H. canis. Based on the sequences, no clear relationship to the origin of infection could be traced. This is the first report of H. canis for Austria, and wild canines such as the currently found jackal may provide a source of natural spread of this parasite into non-endemic areas. This natural immigration of wild animals represents a way of pathogen introduction, which has to be considered in disease prevention in addition to human-made introduction due to animal import and export. PMID:23306030

  17. Presence of antibodies to canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus type 1 in free-ranging jackals (Canis adustus and Canis mesomelas) in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J A; Bingham, J; Heath, R; Richards, B

    1999-09-01

    A survey of free-ranging jackals (Canis adustus and Canis mesomelas) in Zimbabwe was conducted to determine the prevalence of serum antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1). Sera from 16 Canis adustus and 22 Canis mesomelas were collected from 1990 to 1993 from various regions of Zimbabwe and assayed by means of immunofluorescent techniques. Seroprevalence in C. adustus and C. mesomelas respectively were 50% and 63.6% for CDV, 12.5% and 18.2% for CPV and 37.5 and 9.1 for CAV-1. These results demonstrate that jackals are infected with these viruses and may act as reservoirs of them, although their susceptibility to the viruses is not known. PMID:10631712

  18. In vitro isolation and molecular characterization of an Ehrlichia canis strain from So Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2008-07-01

    An Ehrlichia canis isolate was obtained from an naturally infected dog exhibiting clinical signs of ehrlichiosis in So Paulo Municipality, state of So Paulo, Brazil. The isolate was characterized by PCR and DNA sequencing of portions of the ehrlichial genes dsb, 16SrRNA, and p28. Partial dsb and 16S rRNA sequences were identical to three and five other E. canis strains, respectively, from different countries and continents (including North America, Africa, Asia and Europe). Conversely, the p28 partial sequence for this E. canis (So Paulo) differed by 1, 2, and 2 nucleotides from the corresponding sequences of the E. canis strains Jake (from USA), Oklahoma (USA), and VHE (Venezuela), respectively. The results in this study indicate that E. canis is the only recognized Ehrlichia species infecting dogs in Brazil. PMID:24031251

  19. In vitro isolation and molecular characterization of an Ehrlichia canis strain from So Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Daniel M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Labruna, Marcelo B.

    2008-01-01

    An Ehrlichia canis isolate was obtained from an naturally infected dog exhibiting clinical signs of ehrlichiosis in So Paulo Municipality, state of So Paulo, Brazil. The isolate was characterized by PCR and DNA sequencing of portions of the ehrlichial genes dsb, 16SrRNA, and p28. Partial dsb and 16S rRNA sequences were identical to three and five other E. canis strains, respectively, from different countries and continents (including North America, Africa, Asia and Europe). Conversely, the p28 partial sequence for this E. canis (So Paulo) differed by 1, 2, and 2 nucleotides from the corresponding sequences of the E. canis strains Jake (from USA), Oklahoma (USA), and VHE (Venezuela), respectively. The results in this study indicate that E. canis is the only recognized Ehrlichia species infecting dogs in Brazil. PMID:24031251

  20. Human Brucella canis Infection and Subsequent Laboratory Exposures Associated with a Puppy, New York City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Dentinger, C M; Jacob, K; Lee, L V; Mendez, H A; Chotikanatis, K; McDonough, P L; Chico, D M; De, B K; Tiller, R V; Traxler, R M; Campagnolo, E R; Schmitt, D; Guerra, M A; Slavinski, S A

    2015-08-01

    Human Brucella canis infection incidence is unknown. Most identified cases are associated with pet dogs. Laboratory-acquired infections can occur following contact with Brucella spp. We identified a paediatric B. canis case, the source and other exposed persons. A 3-year-old New York City child with fever and dyspnoea was hospitalized for 48 h for bronchiolitis. After her admission, blood culture grew B. canis, she was prescribed anti-microbials and recovered. B. canis was also isolated from blood of the child's pet dog; these isolates were genetically similar. The dog originated from an Iowa breeding facility which was quarantined after identification of the dog's infection. Additionally, 31 laboratory workers were exposed and subsequently monitored for symptoms; 15 completed post-exposure prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first report strongly suggesting B. canis zoonotic transmission to a child in the United States, and highlights the need for coordinated control policies to minimize human illness. PMID:25363807

  1. An experimental approach to the study of intraocular Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Luxenberg, M N

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study of nematode endophthalmitis due to T canis and review of the literature has been presented. Six owl monkeys were infected either by nasogastric tube using embryonated T canis eggs or by carotid or intravitreal injection of second stage larvae. The clinical manifestations, especially ocular, were observed and various diagnostic tests performed. Only minimal or no intraocular changes were seen after systemic infection but significant abnormalities such as retinal hemorrhages and venous dilation were noted after intravitreal infection. Motile larvae were observed in the lenses of three eyes and in the vitreous of five eyes and, probably a sixth, after intravitreal injection. The intensity and timing of the intraocular reaction seemed to correlate with the infecting dose and apparent disappearance of larvae from the eye. Pathologic confirmation of larvae in the lens was obtained in one eye. A marked inflammatory reaction occurred in eyes receiving intraocular infection but none was seen in eyes with only systemic infectin. Various laboratory and serologic studies were performed, including the ELISA test, which were used to evaluate systemic as well as intraocular responses to infection with T canis. The two monkeys infected by nasogastric tube gave a positive ELISA response in the serum but intraocular fluids gave a negative response in all monkeys including those infected syst:mically and/or intraocularly. Problems in the understanding of clinical aspects of the disease, laboratory diagnosis and treatment are discussed. The need for future experimental studies is emphasized. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 2 D FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 PMID:120993

  2. Toxocara canis: Molecular basis of immune recognition and evasion

    PubMed Central

    Maizels, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Toxocara canis has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in the tissues of diverse vertebrate species, as well as to develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive canid host. Human disease is caused by larval stages invading musculature, brain and the eye, and immune mechanisms appear to be ineffective at eliminating the infection. Survival of T. canis larvae can be attributed to two molecular strategies evolved by the parasite. Firstly, it releases quantities of excretorysecretory products which include lectins, mucins and enzymes that interact with and modulate host immunity. For example, one lectin (CTL-1) is very similar to mammalian lectins, required for tissue inflammation, suggesting that T. canis may interfere with leucocyte extravasation into infected sites. The second strategy is the elaboration of a specialised mucin-rich surface coat; this is loosely attached to the parasite epicuticle in a fashion that permits rapid escape when host antibodies and cells adhere, resulting in an inflammatory reaction around a newly vacated focus. The mucins have been characterised as bearing multiple glycan side-chains, consisting of a blood-group-like trisaccharide with one or two O-methylation modifications. Both the lectins and these trisaccharides are targeted by host antibodies, with anti-lectin antibodies showing particular diagnostic promise. Antibodies to the mono-methylated trisaccharide appear to be T. canis-specific, as this epitope is not found in the closely related Toxocara cati, but all other antigenic determinants are very similar between the two species. This distinction may be important in designing new and more accurate diagnostic tests. Further tools to control toxocariasis could also arise from understanding the molecular cues and steps involved in larval development. In vitro-cultivated larvae express high levels of four mRNAs that are translationally silenced, as the proteins they encode are not detectable in cultured larvae. However, these appear to be produced once the parasite has entered the mammalian host, as they are recognised by specific antibodies in infected patients. Elucidating the function of these genes, or analysing if micro-RNA translational silencing suppresses production of the proteins, may point towards new drug targets for tissue-phase parasites in humans. PMID:23351972

  3. Hierarchical clustering algorithm for comprehensive orthologous-domain classification in multiple genomes

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2006-01-01

    Ortholog identification is a crucial first step in comparative genomics. Here, we present a rapid method of ortholog grouping which is effective enough to allow the comparison of many genomes simultaneously. The method takes as input all-against-all similarity data and classifies genes based on the traditional hierarchical clustering algorithm UPGMA. In the course of clustering, the method detects domain fusion or fission events, and splits clusters into domains if required. The subsequent procedure splits the resulting trees such that intra-species paralogous genes are divided into different groups so as to create plausible orthologous groups. As a result, the procedure can split genes into the domains minimally required for ortholog grouping. The procedure, named DomClust, was tested using the COG database as a reference. When comparing several clustering algorithms combined with the conventional bidirectional best-hit (BBH) criterion, we found that our method generally showed better agreement with the COG classification. By comparing the clustering results generated from datasets of different releases, we also found that our method showed relatively good stability in comparison to the BBH-based methods. PMID:16436801

  4. Probing the boundaries of orthology: the unanticipated rapid evolution of Drosophila centrosomin.

    PubMed

    Eisman, Robert C; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2013-08-01

    The rapid evolution of essential developmental genes and their protein products is both intriguing and problematic. The rapid evolution of gene products with simple protein folds and a lack of well-characterized functional domains typically result in a low discovery rate of orthologous genes. Additionally, in the absence of orthologs it is difficult to study the processes and mechanisms underlying rapid evolution. In this study, we have investigated the rapid evolution of centrosomin (cnn), an essential gene encoding centrosomal protein isoforms required during syncytial development in Drosophila melanogaster. Until recently the rapid divergence of cnn made identification of orthologs difficult and questionable because Cnn violates many of the assumptions underlying models for protein evolution. To overcome these limitations, we have identified a group of insect orthologs and present conserved features likely to be required for the functions attributed to cnn in D. melanogaster. We also show that the rapid divergence of Cnn isoforms is apparently due to frequent coding sequence indels and an accelerated rate of intronic additions and eliminations. These changes appear to be buffered by multi-exon and multi-reading frame maximum potential ORFs, simple protein folds, and the splicing machinery. These buffering features also occur in other genes in Drosophila and may help prevent potentially deleterious mutations due to indels in genes with large coding exons and exon-dense regions separated by small introns. This work promises to be useful for future investigations of cnn and potentially other rapidly evolving genes and proteins. PMID:23749319

  5. In silico mapping of Conserved Ortholog Set (COS) markers in the potato genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conserved ortholog set (COS) markers are useful for genetic mapping across diverse taxa, including the Solanaceae. We amplified over 300 COS markers from diverse set of Solanum germplasm, sequenced them and aligned into the whole genome sequence of potato. We also mapped a set of COS markers genetic...

  6. Functional dissection of HAMP domains in NIK1 ortholog from pathogenic yeast Candida lusitaniae.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Anmoldeep; Chawla, Srishti; Mondal, Alok K

    2016-02-15

    Nik1 orthologs or group III hybrid histidine kinases (HHK) are ubiquitous signaling molecules in fungal pathogens. Besides osmosensing, they are also involved in hyphal morphogenesis, virulence, and conidiation. They are important molecular targets for antifungal agents. Nik1 orthologs contain a varying number of HAMP domain repeats (poly-HAMP) in the N-terminal region. Poly-HAMP plays a crucial role in their function. So far, the role of HAMP domains in their function has been studied only in a few Nik1 orthologs. In this paper, we describe the functional characterization of a Nik1 ortholog (ClNik1p) from Candida lusitaniae, an emerging and important fungal pathogen. We show that ClNik1p acts as a bona fide osmosensor and negatively regulates the downstream HOG pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data suggests a differential role of the HAMP domains in the functionality of ClNik1p. The HAMP domains H1, H2, H3 and H5 are essential for kinase activity, and H4 domain has a regulatory role. Among the HAMP like linker domains, only H4b was crucial for the activity of ClNik1p. PMID:26657037

  7. Demodicosis caused by Demodex canis and Demodex cornei in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Sudhakara Reddy, B; Rayulu, V C

    2015-12-01

    Two mongrel dogs aged between 7 and 9months in a same house were presented to the clinics with a history of chronic dermatitis associated with pruritus. Clinical examination revealed presence of primary and secondary skin lesions on the face, around the ears, chin, neck, fore limbs and lateral abdomen. Examination of skin scrapings revealed Demodex cornei (majority) and D. canis (minority) in both the dogs. By using hair pluck examination D. canis were detected and by tape impression smears examination large number of adult short-tail Demodex mites were found. D. cornei was identified by based on the morphological characters including short opisthosoma with blind and round terminal end. Mean length of total body, opisthosoma of both types of the mites were differed statistically significant (P<0.01) but gnathosoma and podosoma did not differ significantly (P>0.05). Dogs were treated with daily oral ivermectin @ 500?g/kg/day, external application of amitraz along with supportive therapy. After completion of 45 days of therapy dogs were recovered completely without any side effects. PMID:26688632

  8. Large dust grains in the wind of VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Wesson, R.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Kasper, M.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Wolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    Massive stars live short lives, losing large amounts of mass through their stellar wind. Their mass is a key factor determining how and when they explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium with heavy elements and dust. During the red supergiant phase, mass-loss rates increase prodigiously, but the driving mechanism has proven elusive. Here we present high-contrast optical polarimetric-imaging observations of the extreme red supergiant VY Canis Majoris and its clumpy, dusty, mass-loss envelope, using the new extreme-adaptive-optics instrument SPHERE at the VLT. These observations allow us to make the first direct and unambiguous detection of submicron dust grains in the ejecta; we derive an average grain radius ~0.5 μm, 50 times larger than in the diffuse ISM, large enough to receive significant radiation pressure by photon scattering. We find evidence for varying grain sizes throughout the ejecta, highlighting the dynamical nature of the envelope. Grains with 0.5 μm sizes are likely to reach a safe distance from the eventual explosion of VY Canis Majoris; hence it may inject upwards of 10-2 M⊙ of dust into the ISM. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program 60.A-9368(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. OrthoVenn: a web server for genome wide comparison and annotation of orthologous clusters across multiple species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome wide analysis of orthologous clusters is an important component of comparative genomics studies. Identifying the overlap among orthologous clusters can enable us to elucidate the function and evolution of proteins across multiple species. Here, we report a web platform named OrthoVenn that i...

  10. Evola: Ortholog database of all human genes in H-InvDB with manual curation of phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    Matsuya, Akihiro; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Koyanagi, Kanako O.; Sato, Yoshiharu; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Habara, Takuya; Nakaoka, Hajime; Todokoro, Fusano; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Endo, Toshinori; OOta, Satoshi; Makalowski, Wojciech; Ikeo, Kazuho; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hanada, Kousuke; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hirai, Momoki; Iwama, Hisakazu; Saitou, Naruya; Hiraki, Aiko T.; Jin, Lihua; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kanno, Masako; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Noda, Akiko Ogura; Saichi, Naomi; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mami; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Gojobori, Takashi; Imanishi, Tadashi; Itoh, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Orthologs are genes in different species that evolved from a common ancestral gene by speciation. Currently, with the rapid growth of transcriptome data of various species, more reliable orthology information is prerequisite for further studies. However, detection of orthologs could be erroneous if pairwise distance-based methods, such as reciprocal BLAST searches, are utilized. Thus, as a sub-database of H-InvDB, an integrated database of annotated human genes (http://h-invitational.jp/), we constructed a fully curated database of evolutionary features of human genes, called ‘Evola’. In the process of the ortholog detection, computational analysis based on conserved genome synteny and transcript sequence similarity was followed by manual curation by researchers examining phylogenetic trees. In total, 18 968 human genes have orthologs among 11 vertebrates (chimpanzee, mouse, cow, chicken, zebrafish, etc.), either computationally detected or manually curated orthologs. Evola provides amino acid sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees of orthologs and homologs. In ‘dN/dS view’, natural selection on genes can be analyzed between human and other species. In ‘Locus maps’, all transcript variants and their exon/intron structures can be compared among orthologous gene loci. We expect the Evola to serve as a comprehensive and reliable database to be utilized in comparative analyses for obtaining new knowledge about human genes. Evola is available at http://www.h-invitational.jp/evola/. PMID:17982176

  11. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing on embryonation of Toxocara canis eggs.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Houk, Alice E; Flick, George J; Lindsay, David S

    2014-07-01

    Toxocara canis is a zoonotic nematode parasite that can be transmitted to humans by food or water contaminated with T. canis eggs from infected dog feces. High-pressure processing (HPP) is a useful alternative to thermal treatments to eliminate pathogens from foods. Most of the research on HPP has focused on prokaryotes, but little is known about its effects on eukaryotic organisms. We evaluated the ability of HPP to affect embryonation of T. canis eggs to test the hypothesis that HPP treatment can delay development of T. canis eggs. Efficacy of HPP was determined by using an embryonation assay on T. canis eggs from naturally infected puppies. For each treatment, 2500 T. canis eggs in tap water were placed in sealable plastic bags and subjected to 138-400 megapascals (MPa; 1 MPa=10 atm=147 psi) for 60 s in a commercial HPP unit. We found that treatment with 300 or 400 MPa for 60 s killed 100% of eggs using embryonation as the standard. Treatment with 250, 241, and 207 MPa was less effective and killed 80%, 56%, and 8% of eggs, respectively. Results from this study suggest that HPP may be a useful treatment to protect foods from T. canis contamination. PMID:24866420

  12. Polymerase chain reaction method to detect canis materials by amplification of species-specific DNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Zhu; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Zhu, Lai-Hua

    2004-01-01

    Rapid identification of mammal materials in feeding stuffs and food is essential for effective control of a potential source of pathogens, such as those that cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy. A convenient polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay was developed for detection and identification of a canis-specific mitochondrial DNA sequence in foodstuffs and food. The amplified canis-specific PCR product was a 213 base pair band from the D-loop DNA fragment of mitochondria, a high copy gene which should improve the possibility of amplifying template molecules of adequate size among the degraded DNA fragments brought about by heat denaturation. The specificity of this method was confirmed by 8 canis blood DNA samples (from different breeds of dog) and 9 noncanis animal blood DNA samples (bovine, sheep, porcine, chicken, fish, donkey, rabbit, deer, horse). This method was able to detect the presence of canis material in foodstuffs and in food mixtures even when the concentration of canis-derived meat was reduced to 0.05%. Furthermore, it did not appear to be affected by prolonged heat treatment. This method was developed for detection of canis materials in feeding stuffs, and occasionally for medical jurisprudence detection of canis-derived materials. PMID:15493678

  13. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M; Braun, Caroline L; Davis, Lawrence C; Kanost, Michael R; Gorman, Maureen J

    2015-04-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surprising because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  14. Molecular identification and characterization of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Almazán, Consuelo; González-Álvarez, Vicente H; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Martínez, Rafael; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    The tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys are the causative agents of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and canine cyclic thrombocytopenia (CCT). Although molecular evidence of E. canis has been shown, phylogenetic analysis of this pathogen has not been performed and A. platys has not been identified in Mexico, where the tick vector Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) is common. The aim of this research was to screen, identify and characterize E. canis and A. platys by PCR and phylogenetic analysis in dogs from La Comarca Lagunera, a region formed by three municipalities, Torreon, Gomez-Palacio and Lerdo, in the Northern states of Coahuila and Durango, Mexico. Blood samples and five engorged R. sanguineus s.l. ticks per animal were collected from 43 females and 57 male dogs presented to veterinary clinics or lived in the dog shelter from La Comarca Lagunera. All the sampled dogs were apparently healthy and PCR for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, Ehrlichia 16S rRNA, and E. canis trp36 were performed. PCR products were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analysis. PCR products were successfully amplified in 31% of the samples using primers for Anaplasma 16S rRNA, while 10% and 4% amplified products using primers for Ehrlichia 16S rRNA and E. canis trp36 respectively. Subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of these products showed that three samples corresponded to A. platys and four to E. canis. Based on the analysis of trp36 we confirmed that the E. canis strains isolated from Mexico belong to a conservative clade of E. canis and are closely related to strains from USA. In conclusion, this is the first molecular identification of A. platys and the first molecular characterization and phylogenetic study of both A. platys and E. canis in dogs in Mexico. PMID:26615872

  15. Evolutionary aspects of variability in bHLH orthologous families: insights from the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Gyoja, Fuki; Satoh, Nori

    2013-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play significant roles in multiple biological processes in metazoan cells. In recent work, we showed that three orthologous HLH families, pearl, amber, and peridot, have apparently been lost in the Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Homo sapiens lineages. To further address the gain and loss of bHLH proteins during bilaterian evolution, we examined the genome of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata, which has recently been sequenced. We characterized the putative full set 65 bHLH genes and showed that genes previously categorized into the orthologous family PTFb, actually fall into two distinct orthologous families, 48-related-1 and 48-related-2. We also identified a novel orthologous family, clockwork orange. Based on these newly identified orthologous family members and on orphan bHLH factors, we propose that genes encoding bHLH factors in bilaterians are not as evolutionarily stable as previously thought. PMID:24125650

  16. Divergence of the TRP36 protein (gp36) in Ehrlichia canis strains found in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Melo, Andreia L T

    2015-03-01

    The molecular characterization of 16S rRNA gene and immunoreactive proteins of Ehrlichia canis usually provide little information about the overall diversity of this organism. On the other hand, distinct sequences of the Tandem Repeat Protein 36 (TRP36/gp36) gene of E. canis have been reported, indicating substantial degree of diversity. The present letter aims to update and discuss the molecular divergence of the TRP36 protein between strains of E. canis isolated in different countries including Brazil. PMID:25467070

  17. The ringworm riddle: an outbreak of Microsporum canis in the nursery.

    PubMed

    Snider, R; Landers, S; Levy, M L

    1993-02-01

    Tinea capitis, the most common fungal infection in children, is rare in neonates. We report six patients in a Level II intermediate care nursery who developed nosocomial dermatophyte infections caused by Microsporum canis. The investigation, which led to the identification of a nurse as the common source, is described. The nurse had an indolent infection with M. canis. Human to human transmission is exceedingly rare for M. canis. The literature regarding neonatal dermatophyte infections is discussed in relation to the reported outbreak. PMID:8426773

  18. First reported human case of native mitral infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus canis.

    PubMed

    Amsallem, Myriam; Iung, Bernard; Bouleti, Claire; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Eme, Anne-Line; Touati, Aziza; Kirsch, Matthias; Duval, Xavier; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-11-01

    A 65 year-old woman was admitted for acute heart failure and severe sepsis revealing definite mitral infective endocarditis with severe regurgitation, complicated by multiple embolisms. Three blood cultures yielded a group G Streptococcus canis strain. Urgent surgery was performed with bioprosthetic valve replacement. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the valve found S canis DNA. Amoxicillin and gentamicin were given for 2 weeks followed by 4 weeks of amoxicillin alone. She reported contact with a dog without bite. S canis has been reported to cause zoonotic septicemia but to our knowledge, this is the first human case of native valve infective endocarditis. PMID:25442453

  19. Conserved repertoire of orthologous vomeronasal type 1 receptor genes in ruminant species

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Hiromi; Nikaido, Masato; Date-Ito, Atsuko; Mogi, Kazutaka; Okamura, Hiroaki; Okada, Norihiro; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, pheromones play an important role in social and innate reproductive behavior within species. In rodents, vomeronasal receptor type 1 (V1R), which is specifically expressed in the vomeronasal organ, is thought to detect pheromones. The V1R gene repertoire differs dramatically between mammalian species, and the presence of species-specific V1R subfamilies in mouse and rat suggests that V1R plays a profound role in species-specific recognition of pheromones. In ruminants, however, the molecular mechanism(s) for pheromone perception is not well understood. Interestingly, goat male pheromone, which can induce out-of-season ovulation in anestrous females, causes the same pheromone response in sheep, and vice versa, suggesting that there may be mechanisms for detecting "inter-species" pheromones among ruminant species. Results We isolated 23 goat and 21 sheep intact V1R genes based on sequence similarity with 32 cow V1R genes in the cow genome database. We found that all of the goat and sheep V1R genes have orthologs in their cross-species counterparts among these three ruminant species and that the sequence identity of V1R orthologous pairs among these ruminants is much higher than that of mouse-rat V1R orthologous pairs. Furthermore, all goat V1Rs examined thus far are expressed not only in the vomeronasal organ but also in the main olfactory epithelium. Conclusion Our results suggest that, compared with rodents, the repertoire of orthologous V1R genes is remarkably conserved among the ruminants cow, sheep and goat. We predict that these orthologous V1Rs can detect the same or closely related chemical compound(s) within each orthologous set/pair. Furthermore, all identified goat V1Rs are expressed in the vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium, suggesting that V1R-mediated ligand information can be detected and processed by both the main and accessory olfactory systems. The fact that ruminant and rodent V1Rs have distinct features suggests that ruminant and rodent V1Rs have evolved distinct functions. PMID:19751533

  20. Results from an indirect fluorescent antibody test using three different strains of Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Enara; Aylln, Tania; Sainz, Angel; Amusategui, Inmaculada; Villaescusa, Alejandra; Rodrguez-Franco, Fernando; Tesouro, Miguel A

    2009-11-01

    An indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test is usually performed to detect antibodies in dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis. In this work, results obtained using three different E. canis strains as antigen (a commercial antigen, the E. canis Oklahoma strain and the E. canis Madrid strain) were compared. One hundred and forty-nine serum samples obtained from dogs living in the centre of Spain were analysed. When qualitative results were evaluated, identical results were detected in 87.2% of samples for the three antigens tested. When comparing antibody titre results, differences between the Madrid strain and the commercial antigen, and between the Madrid and Oklahoma strains were statistically significant (P<0.0001). No differences were found when comparing the Oklahoma strain with the commercial antigen (P=0.562). Subtle intra-laboratory variations shown in this study suggest a higher sensitivity of the IFA test when an autochthonous strain is used as antigen. PMID:18760641

  1. First isolation and molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis in Costa Rica, Central America.

    PubMed

    Romero, L E; Meneses, A I; Salazar, L; Jimnez, M; Romero, J J; Aguiar, D M; Labruna, M B; Dolz, G

    2011-08-01

    The present study investigated Ehrlichia species in blood samples from dogs suspected of clinical ehrlichiosis, using molecular and isolation techniques in cell culture. From a total of 310 canine blood samples analyzed by 16S rRNA nested PCR, 148 (47.7%) were positive for Ehrlichia canis. DNA from Ehrlichia chaffeensis or Ehrlichia ewingii was not detected in any sample using species-specific primers in separated reactions. Leukocytes from five PCR-positive dogs were inoculated into DH82 cells; successful isolation of E. canis was obtained in four samples. Partial sequence of the dsb gene of eight canine blood samples (including the five samples for in vitro isolation) was obtained by PCR and their analyses through BLAST showed 100% of identity with the corresponding sequence of E. canis in GenBank. This study represents the first molecular diagnosis, isolation, and molecular characterization of E. canis in dogs from Costa Rica. PMID:20723954

  2. Prevalence of Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina and Dirofilaria immitis in dogs in Chuncheon, Korea (2004)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hun

    2005-01-01

    The intestines and hearts of dogs were examined for Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, and Dirofilaria immitis, after necropsy between June 26 and September 29, 2004 in Chuncheon, Korea. Of the 662 dogs examined, 6 were infected with T. canis (0.9%), 86 with T. leonina (13.0%). Fifty dogs were infected with D. immitis among 500 dogs examined (10.0%). Five were co-infected with T. canis and T. leonina, and three were co-infected with T. leonina and D. immitis. The cumulative positive infection rate for three species was 134/662(20.2%). Considering previously reported seropositive rates of T. canis excretory-secretory antigen, i.e., 5% in the adult population in Korea, the possibility of toxocariasis caused by T. leonina should be reevaluated. PMID:15951642

  3. Relatedness of Streptococcus canis from canine streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed Central

    DeWinter, L M; Prescott, J F

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in dogs caused by Streptococcus canis has been reported by our laboratory. Since clonal expansion is thought to be partially responsible for the spread of invasive strains of Streptococcus pyogenes in humans, the relatedness of 15 isolates of S. canis from canine STSS and/or NF was examined using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and biotyping; production of proteases and of a CAMP-like reaction were also examined. Only 2 of the 15 STSS and/or NF isolates were clonally related, suggesting that the emergence of canine STSS/NF is not the result of clonal expansion of one or more highly virulent strains of S. canis. All of the isolates produced proteases and demonstrated a CAMP-like reaction, which appear to be additional characteristics of S. canis. PMID:10369564

  4. A Serological Survey of Dogs for Brucella canis in Southwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Bosu, W. T. K.; Prescott, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Sera from 2 000 dogs from southwestern Ontario were tested for antibodies to Brucella canis by a rapid slide agglutination test. The 100 positively reacting sera were tested by tube agglutination and immunoprecipitation (gel diffusion) tests. Thirty-one of these sera gave suspicious titres and one a positive titre in the tube agglutination test. Six of the rapid slide test positive sera gave positive reactions in immunoprecipitation tests. One dog was identified which was found to have a history very suggestive of B. canis infection. It was judged that 0.3% of sera tested showed serological evidence of B. canis infection. The complexities of the serological diagnosis of B. canis infection was apparent, in particular the tendency to false-positive results in the rapid slide agglutination test. PMID:7427846

  5. Allozyme variability in the Italian wolf (Canis lupus) population.

    PubMed

    Randi, E; Lucchini, V; Francisci, F

    1993-11-01

    Multilocus protein electrophoresis was used to estimate genetic variability in a sample of 38 Italian wolves (Canis lupus). Percentage of polymorphic loci was p = 10.0 per cent (four polymorphic loci out of 40 examined), and average observed heterozygosity was Ho = 0.028. Genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Electrophoretic analysis does not indicate a significant reduction of genetic variability at nuclear gene loci following at least one century of isolation from other European populations and demographic fluctuations suggested by recent range contraction and expansion. These findings are compared with published allozyme and mitochondrial DNA data for dogs, Canadian wolves, and introgressed wolf x coyote populations from Minnesota and Isle Royale (U.S.A.). PMID:8276634

  6. Helminth parasites of the coyote (Canis latrans) in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Van den Bussche, R A; Kennedy, M L; Wilhelm, W E

    1987-04-01

    From 1980 to 1984, 267 coyotes (Canis latrans) from Tennessee were examined for helminth parasites. Hearts were examined for the presence of Dirofilaria immitis, diaphragms for Trichinella spiralis, and digestive tracts for other helminths. Six species were found including 5 nematodes (D. immitis, Physaloptera rara, Trichuris vulpis, Ancylostoma caninum, and Toxascaris leonina) and 1 cestode (Taenia pisiformis). Univariate and multivariate statistical techniques were used to assess parasite prevalence and intensity. For prevalence data, a matrix of correlation among characters was computed, and the first 3 principal components were extracted from the original distance matrix. These accounted for 93.7% of the variation in the character set. Three-dimensional projections of localities showed spatial variability on each component. Significant relationships were found between principal component I and longitude, component II and latitude and mean January temperature, and component III and mean July precipitation and mean January actual evapotranspiration. For intensity data, no spatial variability was determined. PMID:3585628

  7. Seismic analysis of the massive ? Cephei star 15 Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Przemys?aw; Handler, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    15 Canis Majoris is a quite massive (M ~ 14 M?) main sequence pulsator of the ? Cephei type. Recent photometric (Handler 2014) and spectroscopic (Saesen & Briquet, priv. comm.) observations confirm four pulsational frequencies and indicate possible additional modes. We calculated models fitting two frequencies identified as radial and dipole modes. Our analysis indicates rather effective overshooting from the convective core as well as a strong dependence of the minimal required overshooting parameter (?ov,min) on the metallicity, Z (?ov,min ~ -2.5 Z). When incorporating the non-adiabatic f-parameter (Daszyn?ka-Daszkiewicz & Walczak 2009), defined as the ratio of the bolometric flux changes to the radial displacement, significant differences between the opacity tables were obtained. The comparison of the models derived with different codes is also interesting. We used two evolutionary codes: Warsaw-New Jersey (Pamyatnykh et al. 1998) and MESA (Paxton et al. 2011) and some systematic differences were found.

  8. Prolonged intensive dominance behavior between gray wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean

    2010-01-01

    Dominance is one of the most pervasive and important behaviors among wolves in a pack, yet its significance in free-ranging packs has been little studied. Insights into a behavior can often be gained by examining unusual examples of it. In the High Arctic near Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, we videotaped and described an unusually prolonged and intensive behavioral bout between an adult male Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) and a male member of his pack, thought to be a maturing son. With tail raised, the adult approached a male pack mate about 50 m from us and pinned and straddled this packmate repeatedly over 6.5 minutes, longer than we had ever seen in over 50 years of studying wolves. We interpreted this behavior as an extreme example of an adult wolf harassing a maturing offspring, perhaps in prelude to the offspring?s dispersal.

  9. Myotonic dystrophy in two European grey wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Pkozdy, A; Leschnik, M; Nell, B; Kolm, U S; Virnyi, Z; Belnyi, B; Molnr, M J; Bilzer, T

    2007-03-01

    Two related European Grey wolves (Canis lupus) with the history of muscle stiffness beginning at 2 weeks of age were examined in this study. Muscle tone and muscle mass were increased in both animals. Muscle stiffness was worsened by stress so that the animals fell into lateral recumbency. Blood chemistry revealed mildly increased serum creatine kinase activity. Abnormal potentials typical of myotonic discharges were recorded by electromyography. Cataract, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and inhomogeneous myocardial texture by ultrasound suggested extramuscular involvement. Myopathology demonstrated dystrophic signs in the muscle biopsy specimen. The presumptive diagnosis based on the in vivo findings was myotonic dystrophy. Immunochemistry of the striated muscles revealed focal absence of dystrophin 1 and beta-dystroglycan in both cases. Cardiac and ophthalmologic involvement suggested a disorder very similar to a human form of myotonic dystrophy. This is the first description of myotonic dystrophy in wolves. PMID:17385559

  10. Results from the Coded Aperture Neutron Imaging System (CANIS).

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Steele, John T.; Brennan, James S.; Hilton, Nathan R.; Marleau, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Because of their penetrating power, energetic neutrons and gamma rays ({approx}1 MeV) offer the best possibility of detecting highly shielded or distant special nuclear material (SNM). Of these, fast neutrons offer the greatest advantage due to their very low and well understood natural background. We are investigating a new approach to fast-neutron imaging- a coded aperture neutron imaging system (CANIS). Coded aperture neutron imaging should offer a highly efficient solution for improved detection speed, range, and sensitivity. We have demonstrated fast neutron and gamma ray imaging with several different configurations of coded masks patterns and detectors including an 'active' mask that is composed of neutron detectors. Here we describe our prototype detector and present some initial results from laboratory tests and demonstrations.

  11. MBGD update 2015: microbial genome database for flexible ortholog analysis utilizing a diverse set of genomic data.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Ikuo; Mihara, Motohiro; Nishide, Hiroyo; Chiba, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    The microbial genome database for comparative analysis (MBGD)(available at http://mbgd.genome.ad.jp/) is a comprehensive ortholog database for flexible comparative analysis of microbial genomes, where the users are allowed to create an ortholog table among any specified set of organisms. Because of the rapid increase in microbial genome data owing to the next-generation sequencing technology, it becomes increasingly challenging to maintain high-quality orthology relationships while allowing the users to incorporate the latest genomic data available into an analysis. Because many of the recently accumulating genomic data are draft genome sequences for which some complete genome sequences of the same or closely related species are available, MBGD now stores draft genome data and allows the users to incorporate them into a user-specific ortholog database using the MyMBGD functionality. In this function, draft genome data are incorporated into an existing ortholog table created only from the complete genome data in an incremental manner to prevent low-quality draft data from affecting clustering results. In addition, to provide high-quality orthology relationships, the standard ortholog table containing all the representative genomes, which is first created by the rapid classification program DomClust, is now refined using DomRefine, a recently developed program for improving domain-level clustering using multiple sequence alignment information. PMID:25398900

  12. Evidence for unapparent Brucella canis infections among adults with occupational exposure to dogs.

    PubMed

    Krueger, W S; Lucero, N E; Brower, A; Heil, G L; Gray, G C

    2014-11-01

    Human serological assays designed to detect brucellosis will miss infections caused by Brucella canis, and low levels of periodic bacteremia limit diagnosis by blood culture. Recent B. canis outbreaks in dogs and concomitant illnesses in caretakers suggest that unapparent human infections may be occurring. With more than a quarter of a million persons in occupations involving dogs, and nearly 80 million dog owners in the United States, this pathogen is an under-recognized human health threat. To investigate occupational exposure to B. canis, we adapted a commercial canine serological assay and present the first controlled seroepidemiological study of human B. canis infections in recent years. 306 adults with occupational exposure to dogs and 101 non-matched, non-canine-exposed subjects were enrolled. Antibodies were detected using the canine D-Tec() CB rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT) kit with a secondary 2-mercaptoethanol (ME)-RSAT. Results were validated on a blinded subset of sera with an additional RSAT and indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay at the National Administration of Laboratories and Health Institutes (ANLIS) in Argentina. Seroprevalence ranged from 10.8% (RSAT) to 3.6% (ME-RSAT) among canine-exposed subjects. Kennel employees were more likely to test RSAT seropositive compared with other canine exposures (OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.8); however, low seroprevalence limited meaningful occupational risk factor analyses. Two seropositive participants reported experiencing symptoms consistent with brucellosis and having exposure to B. canis-infected dogs; however, temporality of symptom onset with reported exposure could not be determined. D-Tec() CB results had substantial agreement with ANLIS assays (Cohen's kappa = 0.60-0.68). These data add to a growing body of literature suggesting that people occupationally exposed to dogs may be at risk of unapparent B. canis infection. It seems prudent to consider B. canis as an occupational public health concern and encourage the development of serological assays to detect human B. canis infections. PMID:24751191

  13. Toxocara Canis IgG Seropositivity in Patients with Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Burak-Selek, Mehmet; Baylan, Orhan; Kutlu, Ali; zyurt, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate IgG antibody levels specific to Toxocara canis (T. canis), a parasite which subsists in dog's intestine, on serum samples obtained from patients with chronic urticaria (CU) to evaluate effective risk in CU etiopathogenesis.In this study, 73 patients diagnosed with CU and 109 healthy individuals as control group, were included. Various factors such as sex, age, education and income, daily hand washing habits, history of dog owning and soil eating were questioned in patient anamnesis. T. canis IgG antibodies were detected using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit prepared with T. canis larval excretory-secretory antigens. Positive results were confirmed with western blot (WB) WB test.We found T. canis IgG positivity in 17.8% (n=13) of patients (n=73) with CU. But we did not observe any T. canis IgG positivity in healthy controls (n=109). Low molecular weight bands (24-35 kDa) were observed in 11 samples in WB analyses while two of the samples were weakly positive. It is revealed that dog owning history increases T. canis seropositivity 12.9 times while insufficient daily hand washing habit (less than six times a day) increase sseropositivity 20.7 times. Our study showed that T. canis may trigger CU since we found 17.8% seropositivity in 73 patients with CU and none in 109 healthy individuals.Moreover, various socio-demographic characteristics have been shown to affect T. canisseropositivity in patients with CU. PMID:26547714

  14. Brucella canis is an intracellular pathogen that induces a lower proinflammatory response than smooth zoonotic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Altamirano-Silva, Pamela; González-Espinoza, Gabriela; Medina, María-Concepción; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Bouza-Mora, Laura; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Wong, Melissa; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Rojas, Norman; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Moreno, Edgardo; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban

    2015-12-01

    Canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis is a disease of dogs and a zoonotic risk. B. canis harbors most of the virulence determinants defined for the genus, but its pathogenic strategy remains unclear since it has not been demonstrated that this natural rough bacterium is an intracellular pathogen. Studies of B. canis outbreaks in kennel facilities indicated that infected dogs displaying clinical signs did not present hematological alterations. A virulent B. canis strain isolated from those outbreaks readily replicated in different organs of mice for a protracted period. However, the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12 in serum were close to background levels. Furthermore, B. canis induced lower levels of gamma interferon, less inflammation of the spleen, and a reduced number of granulomas in the liver in mice than did B. abortus. When the interaction of B. canis with cells was studied ex vivo, two patterns were observed, a predominant scattered cell-associated pattern of nonviable bacteria and an infrequent intracellular replicative pattern of viable bacteria in a perinuclear location. The second pattern, responsible for the increase in intracellular multiplication, was dependent on the type IV secretion system VirB and was seen only if the inoculum used for cell infections was in early exponential phase. Intracellular replicative B. canis followed an intracellular trafficking route undistinguishable from that of B. abortus. Although B. canis induces a lower proinflammatory response and has a stealthier replication cycle, it still displays the pathogenic properties of the genus and the ability to persist in infected organs based on the ability to multiply intracellularly. PMID:26438796

  15. Spatial distribution of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Tolnai, Z; Sréter-Lancz, Z; Sréter, T

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus were reported from Hungary. The aim of the present study was to reveal the spatial distribution pattern of pathogens transmitted by R. sanguineus in a sentinel species, red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Hungary and to analyse the relationship of these patterns with landscape and climate by geographical information systems. Fox carcasses, representing 0.5% of the total fox population were randomly selected out of all the foxes of Hungary. The spleen samples of the animals were tested by real-time PCR for Anaplasma platys, Babesia vogeli, E. canis and H. canis infection. Positive results were confirmed by conventional PCR followed by sequencing. The prevalence of H. canis infection was 22.2% (95% CI=18.4-26.4%), and this parasite was detected in all areas including the mountain regions of Hungary. These findings indicate that other tick species or other transmission routes (oral and transplacental) might be in the background of the countrywide distribution of H. canis. Anaplasma platys was not found; nevertheless, the prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection transmitted by Ixodes ricinus was 12.5% (95% CI=9.7-16.1%) in foxes. B. vogeli and E. canis infection was not detected. There was no correlation between environmental parameter values in the home range of foxes and A. phagocytophilum or H. canis infection, which is in line with that observed in the case of tick species infesting foxes in Hungary. The results of this study indicate that R. sanguineus, if present, might be rare in Hungary. Our baseline study can be used for future evaluation of the effect of climate change on the spreading and emergence of R. sanguineus transmitted pathogens in Hungary. PMID:26065623

  16. Experimental infection and co-infection of dogs with Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis: hematologic, serologic and molecular findings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rhipicephalus sanguineus is a ubiquitous tick responsible for transmitting Ehrlichia canis and most likely Anaplasma platys to dogs, as either single or co-infections. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of either simultaneous or sequential experimental infections with E. canis and A. platys on hematological and serological parameters, duration of infection, and efficacy of doxycycline therapy in dogs infected with one or both organisms. Six dogs per group were either uninfected, A. platys infected, E. canis infected, A. platys and E. canis co-infected, A. platys infected and E. canis challenged or E. canis infected and A. platys challenged at day 112 post-infection (PI). Doxycycline treatment was initiated at 211 days PI, followed by dexamethasone immunosuppression beginning 410 days PI. Results Initially, transient decreases in hematocrit occurred in all groups infected with E. canis, but the mean hematocrit was significantly lower in the A. platys and E. canis co-infected group. All dogs except the controls developed marked thrombocytopenia after initial infection followed by gradually increased platelet counts by 112 days PI in groups with the single infections, while platelet counts remained significantly lower in the A. platys and E. canis co-infected group. Both sequential and simultaneous infections of A. platys and E. canis produced an enhanced humoral immune response to A. platys when compared to infection with A. platys alone. Likewise, co-infection with E. canis and A. platys resulted in a more persistent A. platys infection compared to dogs infected with A. platys only, but nearly all A. platys infected dogs became A. platys PCR negative prior to doxycycline treatment. E. canis infected dogs, whether single or co-infected, remained thrombocytopenic and E. canis PCR positive in blood for 420 days. When treated with doxycycline, all E. canis infected dogs became E. canis PCR negative and the thrombocytopenia resolved. Despite immunosuppression, neither A. platys nor E. canis DNA was PCR amplified from doxycycline-treated dogs. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that simultaneous or sequential infection with A. platys and E. canis can alter various pathophysiological parameters in experimentally infected dogs, and because natural exposure to multiple tick-borne pathogens occurs frequently in dogs, awareness of co-infection is important in clinical practice. PMID:20377870

  17. The Arabidopsis ortholog of the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 influences auxin-mediated development.

    PubMed

    Tsugeki, Ryuji; Terada, Shiho

    2015-10-01

    In animals and yeasts, the DEAH-box RNA-dependent ATPase Prp16 facilitates pre-mRNA splicing. However, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Caenorhabditis elegans, Prp16 orthologs are not important for general pre-mRNA splicing, but are required for gene silencing and sex determination, respectively. The CLUMSY VEIN (CUV) gene, which encodes a unique Prp16 ortholog in Arabidopsis thaliana, influences auxin-mediated development. A loss-of-function cuv-1 mutation tells us that CUV does not facilitate splicing of pre-mRNA substrates indiscriminately, but differentially effects splicing and expression of genes. Here we show that CUV influences root-meristem maintenance and planar polarity of root-hair positioning, both of which are processes regulated by auxin. We propose that Arabidopsis PRP16/CUV differentially facilitates the expression of genes, including genes involved in auxin biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling, and that in this way it influences auxin-mediated development. PMID:26237376

  18. orthoFind Facilitates the Discovery of Homologous and Orthologous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mier, Pablo; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    Finding homologous and orthologous protein sequences is often the first step in evolutionary studies, annotation projects, and experiments of functional complementation. Despite all currently available computational tools, there is a requirement for easy-to-use tools that provide functional information. Here, a new web application called orthoFind is presented, which allows a quick search for homologous and orthologous proteins given one or more query sequences, allowing a recurrent and exhaustive search against reference proteomes, and being able to include user databases. It addresses the protein multidomain problem, searching for homologs with the same domain architecture, and gives a simple functional analysis of the results to help in the annotation process. orthoFind is easy to use and has been proven to provide accurate results with different datasets. Availability: http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/orthofind/. PMID:26624019

  19. InParanoid 8: orthology analysis between 273 proteomes, mostly eukaryotic

    PubMed Central

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; Östlund, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The InParanoid database (http://InParanoid.sbc.su.se) provides a user interface to orthologs inferred by the InParanoid algorithm. As there are now international efforts to curate and standardize complete proteomes, we have switched to using these resources rather than gathering and curating the proteomes ourselves. InParanoid release 8 is based on the 66 reference proteomes that the ‘Quest for Orthologs’ community has agreed on using, plus 207 additional proteomes from the UniProt complete proteomes—in total 273 species. These represent 246 eukaryotes, 20 bacteria and seven archaea. Compared to the previous release, this increases the number of species by 173% and the number of pairwise species comparisons by 650%. In turn, the number of ortholog groups has increased by 423%. We present the contents and usages of InParanoid 8, and a detailed analysis of how the proteome content has changed since the previous release. PMID:25429972

  20. A bacterial ortholog of class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase activates lysine.

    PubMed

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Sll, Dieter; Moses, Sarath

    2010-07-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalytic core of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, but it lacks the amino terminal anticodon binding domain of the latter enzyme. We show that, in agreement with its well-conserved lysine binding site, GenX can activate in vitro l-lysine and lysine analogs, but does not acylate tRNA(Lys) or other cellular RNAs. PMID:20580719

  1. A Bacterial Ortholog of Class II Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Activates Lysine

    PubMed Central

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; ODonoghue, Patrick; Sll, Dieter; Moses, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalytic core of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, but it lacks the amino terminal anticodon binding domain of the latter enzyme. We show that, in agreement with its well-conserved lysine binding site, GenX can activate in vitro L-lysine and lysine analogs, but does not acylate tRNALys or other cellular RNAs. PMID:20580719

  2. Molecular Diagnosis of Ehrlichia canis in Dogs and Ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pat-Nah, Henry; Rodriguez-Vivas, Roger Ivan; Bolio-Gonzalez, Manuel Emilio; Villegas-Perez, Sandra Luz; Reyes-Novelo, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the etiological agent behind canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, and the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) is its main vector. Blood smear and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify E. canis infection in dogs and R. sanguineus, and explore factors possibly associated with infection in dogs in Yucatan, Mexico. Blood samples were taken and ticks R. sanguineus collected from 50 dogs (10 house dogs and 40 in an animal control center). Data were collected on dog age, sex, body condition, and signs associated with platelet deficiencies (epistaxis). Blood smears were analyzed to identify E. canis morulae and generate platelet counts. Nested PCR analysis was done on blood samples and 200 ticks. A ?(2) test was done to identify factors associated with the E. canis infection in the tested dogs. The overall prevalence for infection, as determined by PCR, was 36% (18 out of 50). All positive dogs were from samples collected from the animal shelter, representing prevalence, for this sampling site, of 45% (18 out of 40). Morulae in monocytes were identified in only 4% of samples. Dog origin (i.e. animal control center) was the only variable associated with E. canis infection (P < 0.01). Male ticks had a higher (P < 0.05) infection rate than female ticks (24.5 vs 13.5%). It is concluded that E. canis infection is present in both dogs and the brown dog ticks R. sanguineus in Yucatan, Mexico. PMID:26336286

  3. Detection of Babesia canis subspecies and other arthropod-borne diseases in dogs from Tirana, Albania.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Dietmar; Silaghi, Cornelia; Knaus, Martin; Visser, Martin; Kusi, Ilir; Rapti, Dhimiter; Rehbein, Steffen; Pfister, Kurt

    2009-10-01

    Summary. The importance of arthropod-borne diseases increased in the recent past in particular due to frequent travel with dogs in or by importing of dogs from regions with endemic occurrence of these diseases. While the epidemiological situation is well known for the western parts of the Mediterranean, only limited data is available for Eastern Europe and the Balkans. Thirty clinically healthy dogs from suburban areas of Tirana, Albania, were tested for Babesia canis, Hepatozoon spp., Leishmania spp., Dirofilaria spp., Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp. and Rickettsia spp. using direct and indirect methods. Antibodies against and/or pathogens of arthropod-borne diseases were detected in the blood of 20 (67%) dogs. Nineteen dogs (63%) had antibodies against B. canis, E. canis and/or A. phagocytophilum. Babesia c. canis, Babesia c. vogeli, Hepatozoon spp., D. immitis and/or E. canis were identified by blood smear, PCR or ELISA in 13 (43%) dogs. There was no evidence for Leishmania spp., Bartonella spp. and Rickettsia spp. infections. PMID:19915816

  4. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the gp200 protein of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Chia; Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Tsang, Chau-Loong; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2010-12-01

    Ehrlichia (E.) canis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Currently, the genetic diversity of E. canis strains worldwide is poorly defined. In the present study, sequence analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rDNA (1,620 bp) and the complete coding region (4,269 bp) of the gp200 gene, which encodes the largest major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, from 17 Taiwanese samples was conducted. The resultant 16S rDNA sequences were found to be identical to each other and have very high homology (99.4~100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of gp200 demonstrated that the E. canis Taiwanese genotype was genetically distinct from other reported isolates obtained from the United States, Brazil, and Israel, and that it formed a separate clade. Remarkable variations unique to the Taiwanese genotype were found throughout the deduced amino acid sequence of gp200, including 15 substitutions occurring in two of five known species-specific epitopes. The gp200 amino acid sequences of the Taiwanese genotype bore 94.4~94.6 identities with those of the isolates from the United States and Brazil, and 93.7% homology with that of the Israeli isolate. Taken together, these results suggest that the Taiwanese genotype represents a novel strain of E. canis that has not yet been characterized. PMID:21113103

  5. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the gp200 protein of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Chia; Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Tsang, Chau-Loong

    2010-01-01

    Ehrlichia (E.) canis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Currently, the genetic diversity of E. canis strains worldwide is poorly defined. In the present study, sequence analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rDNA (1,620 bp) and the complete coding region (4,269 bp) of the gp200 gene, which encodes the largest major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, from 17 Taiwanese samples was conducted. The resultant 16S rDNA sequences were found to be identical to each other and have very high homology (99.4~100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis of gp200 demonstrated that the E. canis Taiwanese genotype was genetically distinct from other reported isolates obtained from the United States, Brazil, and Israel, and that it formed a separate clade. Remarkable variations unique to the Taiwanese genotype were found throughout the deduced amino acid sequence of gp200, including 15 substitutions occurring in two of five known species-specific epitopes. The gp200 amino acid sequences of the Taiwanese genotype bore 94.4~94.6 identities with those of the isolates from the United States and Brazil, and 93.7% homology with that of the Israeli isolate. Taken together, these results suggest that the Taiwanese genotype represents a novel strain of E. canis that has not yet been characterized. PMID:21113103

  6. Molecular typing for epidemiological evaluation of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Heo, Eun Jeong; Nam, Hyang Mi; Jung, Suk Chan; Cho, Donghee

    2009-08-01

    To investigate genotype relationships among regional groups of Brucella isolates, variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted according to previously reported methods. Field strains of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis were isolated from 9 provinces in the Republic of Korea during the years 1996-2006 and each of the isolates was classified by eight loci of HOOF-Prints. On the basis of the alleles, the 33 B. abortus and 21 B. canis field strains were divided into 22 and 18 distinct genotypes, respectively. Phylogenetic cluster analysis of Brucella isolates could be discriminated with geographical region in the Republic of Korea. Simpson's diversity index values of B. abortus and B. canis isolates ranged from 0 to 0.85. The stability of each locus was determined with in vivo and in vitro experiments. After twenty passages in blood agar, the VNTR numbers of loci 1 and 7 in B. abortus isolates and loci 5, 7, and 8 in B. canis isolates changed. The same change of the VNTR numbers at loci 1 and 7 was observed with B. abortus RB51 strains isolated from vaccinated cattle for the in vivo experiment. Although B. canis and B. abortus isolates were discriminated to herd levels by the HOOF-Prints, this method needs further improvement for the high variable locus. This study represents the first epidemiological data of molecular typing of B. abortus and B. canis reported in Korea. PMID:19463862

  7. Strains differentiation of Microsporum canis by RAPD analysis using (GACA)4 and (ACA)5 primers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolska, Anita; Debska, Joanna; Koz?owska, Magdalena; Staczek, Pawe?

    2011-01-01

    Molecular analysis of dermatophytes (based on PCR fingerprinting) revealed high clonal differentiation between the genus and species. Microsporum canis (zoophilic dermatophyte, belonging to genus Microsporum), responsible for most cases of tinea capitis in children, tinea corporis in adults and dermatophytoses in cats, is very unique in comparison with other dermatophytes. Results of most molecular studies show that there is no clonal differentiation within M. canis as distinct from other species. The aim of this study was application of (GACA)4 repetitive primer and (ACA)5 primer for typing of M. canis strains isolated from human and animals in Central Poland. Fungal strains: 32 clinical isolates of M. canis, originated from patients from Central Poland; 11 strains isolated from infected cats (6) and dogs (7), reference strains of M. canis (CBS 113480), T rubrum (CBS 120358), T mentagrophytes (CBS 120357) and E. floccosum (CBS 970.95). The genomic DNAs of the strains were used as a template in RAPD reaction. No differentiation was observed for the analyzed M. canis strains using (GACA)4 and (ACA)5 typing. PMID:21905632

  8. Further characteristics of Arcanobacterium canis, a novel species of genus Arcanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Sammra, O; Balbutskaya, A; Zhang, S; Hijazin, M; Nagib, S; Lämmler, C; Abdulmawjood, A; Prenger-Berninghoff, E; Kostrzewa, M; Timke, M

    2013-12-27

    Comparable to previously conducted phenotypical and genotypical investigations characterizing Arcanobacterium canis, a newly described species with the type strain A. canis DSM 25104 isolated from an otitis externa of a dog, four additional A. canis strains isolated from infections of three dogs and one cat could reliably be identified by phenotypic properties, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and by sequencing the genomic targets 16S rDNA, 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region, 23S rDNA, and the genes rpoB and gap. All four A. canis investigated in the present study were isolated from the infected animals together with several other bacterial species indicating that the pathogenic importance of A. canis remains unclear. However, the detection of peptidic spectra by MALDI-TOF MS and the presented phenotypic and genotypic approaches might help to identify A. canis in future and might elucidate the role this species plays in infections of dogs and cats. PMID:24144861

  9. Intestinal nematode infections in Turkish military dogs with special reference to Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Senlik, B; Cirak, V Y; Karabacak, A

    2006-09-01

    The prevalence and potential zoonotic risk factors of intestinal nematodes of military working dogs, which are used for different military purposes, were assessed. Faecal samples from 352 defined-breed Turkish military dogs were investigated and 107 (30.4%) dogs were found to be infected with one or two nematode species. The following nematodes, with their respective prevalences, were diagnosed in the faecal samples: Toxascaris leonina (21.8%), Toxocara canis (13.3%), Trichuris vulpis (2.9%) and Uncinaria stenocephala (1.2%). Toxocara canis infections were more frequently seen in puppies (0-6 months old). The prevalence of T. canis was significantly higher in male than in female dogs and also higher in dogs which were exercised daily than in those without exercise. The highest prevalence was found in Belgian malinois breed dogs. Toxocara canis infections were not influenced by the floor type of the kennels (i.e. concrete or soil floor). There was no difference in the occurrence of T. canis infection when the last anthelmintic treatment was carried out less or more than 3 months prior to sampling. It is suggested that T. canis infected military dogs would be a threat not only for dog trainers but also for military personnel, notably during national and international operations. PMID:16923275

  10. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in dogs in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lasta, Camila Serina; dos Santos, Andrea Pires; Messick, Joanne Belle; Oliveira, Simone Tostes; Biondo, Alexander Welker; Vieira, Rafael Felipe da Costa; Dalmolin, Magnus Larruscaim; Gonzlez, Flix Hilario Diaz

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the occurrence of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis infection in dogs in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil; and to investigate their association with hematological abnormalities. Serum samples from 196 dogs were first tested using dot-ELISA for antibodies against Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia canis. Peripheral blood samples from 199 dogs were subjected to 16S rRNA nested PCR (nPCR) for A. platys and E. canis, followed by DNA sequencing to ensure pathogen identity. A total of 19/196 samples (9.69%) were positive for Anaplasma spp. using ELISA and 28/199 (14.07%) samples were positive for A. platys by nested PCR. All the dog samples were negative for E. canis, both in anti-E. canis antibody tests and in nested PCR. There were no significant differences in hematological parameters between A. platys-PCR positive and negative dogs and Anaplasma spp. serologically positive dogs, except for basophil counts, which were higher in nPCR-positive dogs. This is the first report showing A. platys presence in dogs in Southern Brazil. In conclusion, hematological parameters may not be sufficient to diagnose A. platys infection in dogs in Southern Brazil, probably due either to low pathogenicity or to chronic infection. On the other hand, E. canis may either have very low occurrence or be absent in dogs in Porto Alegre. PMID:24142166

  11. A study of ectoparasites of Canis lupus familiaris in Mueang district, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nithikathkul, Choosak; Polseela, Ruxsina; Iamsa-ard, Jareerat; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2005-01-01

    We studied ectoparasites found on Canis lupus familiaris sampled in five areas in Mueang district, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. The prevalence of fleas and ticks as well as their density were determined in 100 dogs that did not receive treatments. A total number of 458 ectoparasites was found corresponding to two species: 25.8% Ctenocephalides canis and 74.2% Rhipicephalus sanguineus. R. sanguineus was the most abundant species, and Ct. canis was the only flea species found. The stages of R. sanguineus were larvae (5.3%), nymphs (29.1%) and adults (39.1% in male and 26.5% in female). The stages of Ct. canis were larvae (41.5%) and adults (58.5%). Both species were commonly found on domestic dogs in all areas of the study. Ct. canis was not present on domestic dogs in one sub-district. The prevalence rates of tick-harboring domestic dogs was 80% (R. sanguineus), and flea-haboring domestic dogs was 26% (Ct. canis). PMID:16438201

  12. Tunicate pregnane X receptor (PXR) orthologs: transcript characterization and natural variation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Ingrid; Fidler, Andrew E

    2015-10-01

    Vertebrate pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2), a ligand-activated nuclear receptor (NR), regulates expression of detoxification genes. Vertebrate PXR orthologs may adaptively evolve to bind deleterious/toxic xenobiotics typically encountered by organisms from their diet. Tunicates (phylum Chordata) are marine filter-feeders that form a sister clade to the Vertebrata. Genomes of two tunicate taxa, Ciona intestinalis and Botryllus schlosseri, encode at least two PXR orthologs (abbreviated VDR/PXR? and ?). Here we report characterization of the transcript structures and sequence variation of three tunicate PXR orthologs: C. intestinalis VDR/PXR? and ?, and B. schlosseri VDR/PXR?. The three predicted proteins consist of both DNA-binding (DBD) and ligand-binding (LBD) domains typical of NRs. The C. intestinalis VDR/PXR? LBD may be significantly larger than that of the VDR/PXR? orthologs. In both tunicate taxa, the mRNAs were characterized by high frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ca. 3 SNPs/100 base pairs). The majority of SNPs were synonymous and standard tests (Tajima's D, dN/dS ratios) indicated strong purifying selection. However, one base pair frameshift allelic variants were found in the C. intestinalis VDR/PXR? and ? genes. The predicted proteins consisted of a DBD but lacked an LBD. The persistence of these variants may possibly reflect constitutive expression of detoxification genes as a selective advantage in the marine environment. These results provide a foundation for further investigations into the molecular evolution, population genetics and functioning of tunicate receptors involved in detection of marine bioactive compounds. PMID:25988373

  13. Identification and functional analysis of three MAX2 orthologs in chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lili; Ishak, Abdurazak; Yu, Jing; Zhao, Ruiyan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2013-05-01

    MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING 2 (MAX2), initially identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, is a key regulatory gene in strigolactone signal transduction. Three orthologs of MAX2 were cloned from Dendranthema grandiflorum (DgMAX2a, b, and c). Each of the genes has an open reading frame of 2,049 bp and encodes 682 amino acid proteins. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three DgMAX2s are most closely related to the MAX2 orthologs identified in petunia (PhMAX2A and PhMAX2B), and display the highest amino acid sequence similarity with PhMAX2A compared to other MAX2s. Expression analysis revealed that DgMAX2s are predominantly expressed in the stem and axillary buds. On a cellular level, we localized the DgMAX2a::GFP fusion protein to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells, which is consistent with the nuclear localization of MAX2 in Arabidopsis. The chrysanthemum DgMAX2a is able to restore the max2-1 mutant branching to wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that it is a functional MAX2 ortholog. These results suggest that DgMAX2s may be candidate genes for reducing the shoot branching of chrysanthemum. PMID:23302095

  14. Pleurochrysome: A Web Database of Pleurochrysis Transcripts and Orthologs Among Heterogeneous Algae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Kudo, Toru; Fujiwara, Shoko; Takatsuka, Yukiko; Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Takano, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Suda, Kunihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Yokoyama, Koji; Shibata, Daisuke; Tabata, Satoshi; Yano, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Pleurochrysis is a coccolithophorid genus, which belongs to the Coccolithales in the Haptophyta. The genus has been used extensively for biological research, together with Emiliania in the Isochrysidales, to understand distinctive features between the two coccolithophorid-including orders. However, molecular biological research on Pleurochrysis such as elucidation of the molecular mechanism behind coccolith formation has not made great progress at least in part because of lack of comprehensive gene information. To provide such information to the research community, we built an open web database, the Pleurochrysome (http://bioinf.mind.meiji.ac.jp/phapt/), which currently stores 9,023 unique gene sequences (designated as UNIGENEs) assembled from expressed sequence tag sequences of P. haptonemofera as core information. The UNIGENEs were annotated with gene sequences sharing significant homology, conserved domains, Gene Ontology, KEGG Orthology, predicted subcellular localization, open reading frames and orthologous relationship with genes of 10 other algal species, a cyanobacterium and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This sequence and annotation information can be easily accessed via several search functions. Besides fundamental functions such as BLAST and keyword searches, this database also offers search functions to explore orthologous genes in the 12 organisms and to seek novel genes. The Pleurochrysome will promote molecular biological and phylogenetic research on coccolithophorids and other haptophytes by helping scientists mine data from the primary transcriptome of P. haptonemofera. PMID:26746174

  15. Rock, paper, scissors: harnessing complementarity in ortholog detection methods improves comparative genomic inference.

    PubMed

    Maher, M Cyrus; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2015-04-01

    Ortholog detection (OD) is a lynchpin of most statistical methods in comparative genomics. This task involves accurately identifying genes across species that descend from a common ancestral sequence. OD methods comprise a wide variety of approaches, each with their own benefits and costs under a variety of evolutionary and practical scenarios. In this article, we examine the proteomes of ten mammals by using four methodologically distinct, rigorously filtered OD methods. In head-to-head comparisons, we find that these algorithms significantly outperform one another for 38-45% of the genes analyzed. We leverage this high complementarity through the development MOSAIC, or Multiple Orthologous Sequence Analysis and Integration by Cluster optimization, the first tool for integrating methodologically diverse OD methods. Relative to the four methods examined, MOSAIC more than quintuples the number of alignments for which all species are present while simultaneously maintaining or improving functional-, phylogenetic-, and sequence identity-based measures of ortholog quality. Further, this improvement in alignment quality yields more confidently aligned sites and higher levels of overall conservation, while simultaneously detecting of up to 180% more positively selected sites. We close by highlighting a MOSAIC-specific positively selected sites near the active site of TPSAB1, an enzyme linked to asthma, heart disease, and irritable bowel disease. MOSAIC alignments, source code, and full documentation are available at http://pythonhosted.org/bio-MOSAIC. PMID:25711833

  16. Tracing nonlegume orthologs of legume genes required for nodulation and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyan; Riely, Brendan K; Burns, Nicole J; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2006-04-01

    Most land plants can form a root symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi for assimilation of inorganic phosphate from the soil. In contrast, the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis is almost completely restricted to the legumes. The finding that the two symbioses share common signaling components in legumes suggests that the evolutionarily younger nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has recruited functions from the more ancient AM symbiosis. The recent advances in cloning of the genes required for nodulation and AM symbioses from the two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, provide a unique opportunity to address biological questions pertaining to the evolution of root symbioses in plants. Here, we report that nearly all cloned legume genes required for nodulation and AM symbioses have their putative orthologs in nonlegumes. The orthologous relationship can be clearly defined on the basis of both sequence similarity and microsyntenic relationship. The results presented here serve as a prelude to the comparative analysis of orthologous gene function between legumes and nonlegumes and facilitate our understanding of how gene functions and signaling pathways have evolved to generate species- or family-specific phenotypes. PMID:16452143

  17. wALADin Benzimidazoles Differentially Modulate the Function of Porphobilinogen Synthase Orthologs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) is a potential drug target in several human pathogens. wALADin1 benzimidazoles have emerged as species-selective PBGS inhibitors against Wolbachia endobacteria of filarial worms. In the present study, we have systematically tested wALADins against PBGS orthologs from bacteria, protozoa, metazoa, and plants to elucidate the inhibitory spectrum. However, the effect of wALADin1 on different PBGS orthologs was not limited to inhibition: several orthologs were stimulated by wALADin1; others remained unaffected. We demonstrate that wALADins allosterically modulate the PBGS homooligomeric equilibrium with inhibition mediated by favoring low-activity oligomers, while 5-aminolevulinic acid, Mg2+, or K+ stabilized high-activity oligomers. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBGS could be inhibited or stimulated by wALADin1 depending on these factors and pH. We have defined the wALADin chemotypes responsible for either inhibition or stimulation, facilitating the design of tailored PBGS modulators for potential application as antimicrobial agents, herbicides, or drugs for porphyric disorders. PMID:24568185

  18. Differential transcriptional regulation of orthologous dps genes from two closely related heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Sandh, Gustaf; Nenninger, Anja; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Stensjö, Karin

    2015-03-01

    In cyanobacteria, DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps) play an important role in the cellular response to oxidative and nutritional stresses. In this study, we have characterized the cell-type specificity and the promoter regions of two orthologous dps genes, Npun_R5799 in Nostoc punctiforme and alr3808 in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. A transcriptional start site (TSS), identical in location to the previously identified proximal TSS of alr3808, was identified for Npun_R5799 under both combined nitrogen supplemented and N2-fixing growth conditions. However, only alr3808 was also transcribed from a second distal TSS. Sequence homologies suggest that the promoter region containing the distal TSS is not conserved upstream of orthologous genes among heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. The analysis of promoter GFP-reporter strains showed a different role in governing cell-type specificity between the proximal and distal promoter of alr3808. We here confirmed the heterocyst specificity of the distal promoter of alr3808 and described a very early induction of its expression during proheterocyst differentiation. In contrast, the complete promoters of both genes were active in all cells. Even though Npun_R5799 and alr3808 are orthologs, the regulation of their respective expression differs, indicating distinctions in the function of these cyanobacterial Dps proteins depending on the strain and cell type. PMID:25663155

  19. Pleurochrysome: A Web Database of Pleurochrysis Transcripts and Orthologs Among Heterogeneous Algae

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shoko; Takatsuka, Yukiko; Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Takano, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Suda, Kunihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Yokoyama, Koji; Shibata, Daisuke; Tabata, Satoshi; Yano, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Pleurochrysis is a coccolithophorid genus, which belongs to the Coccolithales in the Haptophyta. The genus has been used extensively for biological research, together with Emiliania in the Isochrysidales, to understand distinctive features between the two coccolithophorid-including orders. However, molecular biological research on Pleurochrysis such as elucidation of the molecular mechanism behind coccolith formation has not made great progress at least in part because of lack of comprehensive gene information. To provide such information to the research community, we built an open web database, the Pleurochrysome (http://bioinf.mind.meiji.ac.jp/phapt/), which currently stores 9,023 unique gene sequences (designated as UNIGENEs) assembled from expressed sequence tag sequences of P. haptonemofera as core information. The UNIGENEs were annotated with gene sequences sharing significant homology, conserved domains, Gene Ontology, KEGG Orthology, predicted subcellular localization, open reading frames and orthologous relationship with genes of 10 other algal species, a cyanobacterium and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This sequence and annotation information can be easily accessed via several search functions. Besides fundamental functions such as BLAST and keyword searches, this database also offers search functions to explore orthologous genes in the 12 organisms and to seek novel genes. The Pleurochrysome will promote molecular biological and phylogenetic research on coccolithophorids and other haptophytes by helping scientists mine data from the primary transcriptome of P. haptonemofera. PMID:26746174

  20. Molecular dissection of the genetic mechanisms that underlie expression conservation in orthologous yeast ribosomal promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Lubliner, Shai; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Hodis, Eran; Vesterman, Rita; Weinberger, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a surprising phenomenon, whereby orthologous regulatory regions from different species drive similar expression levels despite being highly diverged in sequence. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by genomically integrating hundreds of ribosomal protein (RP) promoters from nine different yeast species into S. cerevisiae and accurately measuring their activity. We found that orthologous RP promoters have extreme expression conservation even across evolutionarily distinct yeast species. Notably, our measurements reveal two distinct mechanisms that underlie this conservation and which act in different regions of the promoter. In the core promoter region, we found compensatory changes, whereby effects of sequence variations in one part of the core promoter were reversed by variations in another part. In contrast, we observed robustness in Rap1 transcription factor binding sites, whereby significant sequence variations had little effect on promoter activity. Finally, cases in which orthologous promoter activities were not conserved could largely be explained by the sequence variation within the core promoter. Together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which expression is conserved throughout evolution across diverged promoter sequences. PMID:25294245

  1. OrthoDB v8: update of the hierarchical catalog of orthologs and the underlying free software.

    PubMed

    Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Tegenfeldt, Fredrik; Petty, Tom J; Waterhouse, Robert M; Simo, Felipe A; Pozdnyakov, Igor A; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Zdobnov, Evgeny M

    2015-01-01

    Orthology, refining the concept of homology, is the cornerstone of evolutionary comparative studies. With the ever-increasing availability of genomic data, inference of orthology has become instrumental for generating hypotheses about gene functions crucial to many studies. This update of the OrthoDB hierarchical catalog of orthologs (http://www.orthodb.org) covers 3027 complete genomes, including the most comprehensive set of 87 arthropods, 61 vertebrates, 227 fungi and 2627 bacteria (sampling the most complete and representative genomes from over 11,000 available). In addition to the most extensive integration of functional annotations from UniProt, InterPro, GO, OMIM, model organism phenotypes and COG functional categories, OrthoDB uniquely provides evolutionary annotations including rates of ortholog sequence divergence, copy-number profiles, sibling groups and gene architectures. We re-designed the entirety of the OrthoDB website from the underlying technology to the user interface, enabling the user to specify species of interest and to select the relevant orthology level by the NCBI taxonomy. The text searches allow use of complex logic with various identifiers of genes, proteins, domains, ontologies or annotation keywords and phrases. Gene copy-number profiles can also be queried. This release comes with the freely available underlying ortholog clustering pipeline (http://www.orthodb.org/software). PMID:25428351

  2. PhyloTreePruner: A Phylogenetic Tree-Based Approach for Selection of Orthologous Sequences for Phylogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Kocot, Kevin M.; Citarella, Mathew R.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Halanych, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics relies on accurate identification of orthologous sequences among the taxa of interest. Most orthology inference programs available for use in phylogenomics rely on small sets of pre-defined orthologs from model organisms or phenetic approaches such as all-versus-all sequence comparisons followed by Markov graph-based clustering. Such approaches have high sensitivity but may erroneously include paralogous sequences. We developed PhyloTreePruner, a software utility that uses a phylogenetic approach to refine orthology inferences made using phenetic methods. PhyloTreePruner checks single-gene trees for evidence of paralogy and generates a new alignment for each group containing only sequences inferred to be orthologs. Importantly, PhyloTreePruner takes into account support values on the tree and avoids unnecessarily deleting sequences in cases where a weakly supported tree topology incorrectly indicates paralogy. A test of PhyloTreePruner on a dataset generated from 11 completely sequenced arthropod genomes identified 2,027 orthologous groups sampled for all taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated supermatrix yielded a generally well-supported topology that was consistent with the current understanding of arthropod phylogeny. PhyloTreePruner is freely available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/phylotreepruner/. PMID:24250218

  3. Babesia canis and other tick-borne infections in dogs in Central Poland.

    PubMed

    Welc-Faleciak, Renata; Rodo, Anna; Si?ski, Edward; Bajer, Anna

    2009-12-23

    Vector-borne infections constitute increasing health problem in dogs worldwide, including sled dogs, dramatically decreasing the fitness of working dogs and even leading to death. In the period 2006-2008 eighty-two blood samples were collected from eight sled dog kennels in Central Poland. The prevalence of four vector-borne infections (Babesia canis, Bartonella sp., Anaplasma/Ehrlichia and Borrelia burgdorferi) was estimated in 82 sled dogs using PCR and nested PCR for diagnosis and the same methods were used to identify the vector-borne pathogens in 26 dogs presenting at veterinary clinics with symptoms of vector-borne diseases. None of four studied vector-borne pathogens was detected in samples originating from veterinary clinics. Among the remaining 82 dogs B. canis infections were confirmed in three dogs undergoing treatment for babesiosis. The DNA of tick-borne pathogens was also found among 22 (27.8%) of the 79 apparently healthy dogs, including 20 cases of B. canis infection (25.3%), one case of B. burgdorferi s.l. infection and one case of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. No evidence of Bartonella spp. and Ehrlichia canis infections were found in this set of samples. Sequencing of a Babesia fragment of 18S rDNA amplified from acute (n=5) and asymptomatic (n=5) cases revealed that all isolates were identical to the Babesia canis canis sequence, originally isolated from Dermacentor reticulatus ticks in Poland. A range of factors was shown to affect the distribution of babesiosis in sled dogs. The data are also discussed in respect to the health risk factors generated by asymptomatic B. canis infections and the efficiency of chemoprophylaxis measures taken by sled dog owners. PMID:19837515

  4. Validation of an ELISA method for the serological diagnosis of canine brucellosis due to Brucella canis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Maria Zoraida Daltro; Vale, Vera; Keid, Lara; Freire, Songeli Menezes; Meyer, Roberto; Portela, Ricardo Wagner; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, the validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serodiagnosis of canine brucellosis is described. Two different antigenic extracts, obtained by heat or ultrasonic homogenization of microbial antigens from a wild isolate of Brucella canis bacteria, were compared by ELISA and Western blot (WB). A total of 145 canine sera were used to define sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ELISA as follows: (1) sera from 34 animals with natural B. canis infection, confirmed by blood culture and PCR, as well as 51 sera samples from healthy dogs with negative results by the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for canine brucellosis, were used as the control panel for B. canis infection; and (2) to scrutinize the possibility of cross reactions with other common dog infections in the same geographical area in Brazil, 60 sera samples from dogs harboring known infections by Leptospira sp., Ehrlichia canis, canine distemper virus (CDV), Neospora caninum, Babesia canis and Leishmania chagasi (10 in each group) were included in the study. The ELISA using heat soluble bacterial extract (HE-antigen) as antigen showed the best values of sensitivity (91.18%), specificity (100%) and accuracy (96.47%). In the WB analyses, the HE-antigen showed no cross-reactivity with sera from dogs with different infections, while the B. canis sonicate had various protein bands identified by those sera. The performance of the ELISA standardized with the heat soluble B. canis antigen indicates that this assay can be used as a reliable and practical method to confirm infection by this microorganism, as well as a tool for seroepidemiological studies. PMID:20692004

  5. Inter-specific territoriality in a Canis hybrid zone: spatial segregation between wolves, coyotes, and hybrids.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) generally exhibit intraspecific territoriality manifesting in spatial segregation between adjacent packs. However, previous studies have found a high degree of interspecific spatial overlap between sympatric wolves and coyotes. Eastern wolves (Canis lycaon) are the most common wolf in and around Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada and hybridize with sympatric gray wolves and coyotes. We hypothesized that all Canis types (wolves, coyotes, and hybrids) exhibit a high degree of spatial segregation due to greater genetic, morphologic, and ecological similarities between wolves and coyotes in this hybrid system compared with western North American ecosystems. We used global positioning system telemetry and probabilistic measures of spatial overlap to investigate spatial segregation between adjacent Canis packs. Our hypothesis was supported as: (1) the probability of locating wolves, coyotes, and hybrids within home ranges ([Formula: see text] = 0.05) or core areas ([Formula: see text] < 0.01) of adjacent packs was low; and (2) the amount of shared space use was negligible. Spatial segregation did not vary substantially in relation to genotypes of adjacent packs or local environmental conditions (i.e., harvest regulations or road densities). We provide the first telemetry-based demonstration of spatial segregation between wolves and coyotes, highlighting the novel relationships between Canis types in the Ontario hybrid zone relative to areas where wolves and coyotes are reproductively isolated. Territoriality among Canis may increase the likelihood of eastern wolves joining coyote and hybrid packs, facilitate hybridization, and could play a role in limiting expansion of the genetically distinct APP eastern wolf population. PMID:23864253

  6. First detection and molecular characterization of Ehrlichia canis from dogs in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Joshua; Lee, Chung-Chan; Haruna, Ayuba M; Chung, Ping-Jun; Weka, Paul R; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2013-02-01

    The present study aimed to detect the presence of Ehrlichia canis in naturally infected dogs in Nigeria, using a combination of PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and two genes encoding the tandem repeat-containing proteins (TRPs), TRP19 and TRP36. Out of a total of 100 blood samples collected from domestic dogs presented to veterinary hospitals in Jos, the capital city of Plateau State of Nigeria, 11 were positive in nested PCR for E. canis. Sequencing results for these amplicons showed that all of the 16S rDNA sequences (1623 bp) or the TRP19 coding sequences (414 bp) were identical to each other and had very high similarities (99.3-100%) with those from other E. canis strains accessible in GenBank. The TRP36 gene sequences derived from the 11 Nigerian isolates were identical to each other except for the number of the 27-bp repeat unit in a tandem repeat region, which was found to be 8, 12 or 18. Without considering the number of tandem repeats, these sequences had 100% identity to that of the reported Cameroon 71 isolate, but distinctly differed from those obtained from other geographically distant E. canis strains previously published. A phylogenetic tree of E. canis based on the TRP36 amino acid sequences showed that the Nigerian isolates and the Cameroon 71 isolate fell into a separate clade, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. Overall, this study not only provides the first molecular evidence of E. canis infections in dogs from Nigeria but also highlights the value of the TRP36 gene as a tool to classify E. canis isolates and to elucidate their phylogeographic relationships. PMID:22925936

  7. Digital Gene Expression Analysis of Microsporum canis Exposed to Berberine Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chen-Wen; Ji, Quan-An; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Pan, Li-Jun; Bao, Guo-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid of many medicinal herbs, has an active function against a variety of microbial infections including Microsporum canis (M. canis). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To study the effect of berberine chloride on M. canis infection, a Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling was constructed and a transcriptome analysis of the M. canis cellular responses upon berberine treatment was performed. Illimina/Hisseq sequencing technique was used to generate the data of gene expression profile, and the following enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology (GO) and Pathway function were conducted based on the data of transcriptome. The results of DGE showed that there were 8476945, 14256722, 7708575, 5669955, 6565513 and 9303468 tags respectively, which was obtained from M. canis incubated with berberine or control DMSO. 8,783 genes were totally mapped, and 1,890 genes have shown significant changes between the two groups. 1,030 genes were up-regulated and 860 genes were down-regulated (P<0.05) in berberine treated group compared to the control group. Besides, twenty-three GO terms were identified by Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis, such as calcium-transporting ATPase activity, 2-oxoglutarate metabolic process, valine catabolic process, peroxisome and unfolded protein binding. Pathway significant enrichment analysis indicated 6 signaling pathways that are significant, including steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, Parkinson’s disease, 2,4-Dichlorobenzoate degradation, and tropane, piperidine and Isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis. Among these, eleven selected genes were further verified by qRT-PCR. Our findings provide a comprehensive view on the gene expression profile of M. canis upon berberine treatment, and shed light on its complicated effects on M. canis. PMID:25874937

  8. Phylogeography of the Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) in India

    PubMed Central

    Yumnam, Bibek; Negi, Tripti; Maldonado, Jesús E.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Jhala, Yadvendradev V.

    2015-01-01

    The golden jackal (Canis aureus) is one of the most common and widely distributed carnivores in India but phylogeographic studies on the species have been limited across its range. Recent studies have observed absence of mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity in European populations while some North African populations of golden jackal were found to carry gray wolf (Canis lupus lupaster) mtDNA lineages. In the present study, we sequenced 440 basepairs (bp) of control region (CR) and 412 bp of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene of mtDNA from 62 golden jackals sampled from India (n = 55), Israel (n = 2) and Bulgaria (n = 5), to obtain a total of eighteen haplotypes, comprising sixteen from India and one each from Israel and Bulgaria. Except for three previously described haplotypes represented by one cyt b and one CR haplotype both from India, and one CR haplotype from Bulgaria, all haplotypes identified in this study are new. Genetic diversity was high in golden jackals compared to that reported for other canids in India. Unlike the paraphyletic status of African conspecifics with the gray wolf, the Indian (and other Eurasian) golden jackal clustered in a distinct but shallow monophyletic clade, displaying no evidence of admixture with sympatric and related gray wolf and domestic dog clades in the region. Phylogeographic analyses indicated no clear pattern of genetic structuring of the golden jackal haplotypes and the median joining network revealed a star-shaped polytomy indicative of recent expansion of the species from India. Indian haplotypes were observed to be interior and thus ancestral compared to haplotypes from Europe and Israel, which were peripheral and hence more derived. Molecular tests for demographic expansion confirmed a recent event of expansion of golden jackals in the Indian subcontinent, which can be traced back ~ 37,000 years ago during the late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that golden jackals have had a potentially longer evolutionary history in India than in other parts of the world, although further sampling from Africa, the Middle East and south-east Asia is needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:26414163

  9. Phylogeography of the Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) in India.

    PubMed

    Yumnam, Bibek; Negi, Tripti; Maldonado, Jess E; Fleischer, Robert C; Jhala, Yadvendradev V

    2015-01-01

    The golden jackal (Canis aureus) is one of the most common and widely distributed carnivores in India but phylogeographic studies on the species have been limited across its range. Recent studies have observed absence of mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity in European populations while some North African populations of golden jackal were found to carry gray wolf (Canis lupus lupaster) mtDNA lineages. In the present study, we sequenced 440 basepairs (bp) of control region (CR) and 412 bp of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene of mtDNA from 62 golden jackals sampled from India (n = 55), Israel (n = 2) and Bulgaria (n = 5), to obtain a total of eighteen haplotypes, comprising sixteen from India and one each from Israel and Bulgaria. Except for three previously described haplotypes represented by one cyt b and one CR haplotype both from India, and one CR haplotype from Bulgaria, all haplotypes identified in this study are new. Genetic diversity was high in golden jackals compared to that reported for other canids in India. Unlike the paraphyletic status of African conspecifics with the gray wolf, the Indian (and other Eurasian) golden jackal clustered in a distinct but shallow monophyletic clade, displaying no evidence of admixture with sympatric and related gray wolf and domestic dog clades in the region. Phylogeographic analyses indicated no clear pattern of genetic structuring of the golden jackal haplotypes and the median joining network revealed a star-shaped polytomy indicative of recent expansion of the species from India. Indian haplotypes were observed to be interior and thus ancestral compared to haplotypes from Europe and Israel, which were peripheral and hence more derived. Molecular tests for demographic expansion confirmed a recent event of expansion of golden jackals in the Indian subcontinent, which can be traced back ~ 37,000 years ago during the late Pleistocene. Our results suggest that golden jackals have had a potentially longer evolutionary history in India than in other parts of the world, although further sampling from Africa, the Middle East and south-east Asia is needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:26414163

  10. Microarray gene expression analysis reveals major differences between Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati neurotoxocarosis and involvement of T. canis in lipid biosynthetic processes.

    PubMed

    Janecek, Elisabeth; Wilk, Esther; Schughart, Klaus; Geffers, Robert; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati are globally occurring intestinal nematodes of dogs and cats with a high zoonotic potential. Migrating larvae in the CNS of paratenic hosts, including humans, may cause neurotoxocarosis resulting in a variety of neurological symptoms. Toxocara canis exhibits a stronger affinity to the CNS than T. cati, causing more severe neurological symptoms in the mouse model. Pathomechanisms of neurotoxocarosis as well as host responses towards the respective parasite are mostly unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the pathogenesis at a transcriptional level using whole genome microarray expression analysis and identify differences and similarities between T. canis- and T. cati-infected brains. Microarray analysis was conducted in cerebra and cerebella of infected C57Bl/6J mice 42daysp.i. revealing more differentially transcribed genes for T. canis- than T. cati-infected brains. In cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice, a total of 2304 and 1954 differentially transcribed genes, respectively, were identified whereas 113 and 760 differentially transcribed genes were determined in cerebra and cerebella of T. cati-infected mice. Functional annotation analysis revealed major differences in host responses in terms of significantly enriched biological modules. Up-regulated genes were mainly associated with the terms "immune and defence response", "sensory perception" as well as "behaviour/taxis" retrieved from the Gene Ontology database. These observations indicate a strong immune response in both infection groups with T. cati-infected brains revealing less severe reactions. Down-regulated genes in T. canis-infected cerebra and cerebella revealed a significant enrichment for the Gene Ontology term "lipid/cholesterol biosynthetic process". Cholesterol is a highly abundant and important component in the brain, representing several functions. Disturbances of synthesis as well as concentration changes may lead to dysfunction in signal transduction and neurodegenerative disease. Overall, only a minor overlap of differentially transcribed genes was observed between the two infection groups in both brain parts. Most genes are regulated individually in each infection group, supporting the evident differences of both roundworm species observed in the paratenic host in previous studies. In summary the present study underlines the differences in pathogenicity of T. canis and T. cati. It furthermore provides a comprehensive basis for future analyses over the course of infection as well as functional tests to identify gene regulatory circuits that are crucial for pathogenesis of neurotoxocarosis. The results of this study provide a promising foundation for further specific research to evaluate the particular pathogenetic mechanisms and to identify possible therapeutic targets. PMID:25843806

  11. Isolation of Microsporum canis from the hair coat of pet dogs and cats belonging to owners diagnosed with M. canis tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Romito, Diana; Capelli, Gioia; Guillot, Jacques; Otranto, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Microsporum canis has been frequently isolated from human cases of tinea capitis and tinea corporis. The infection may be acquired from infected animals with cutaneous lesions but also from asymptomatic carriers or from the environment. As asymptomatic M. canis carriers are considered to be a critical factor in the epidemiology of dermatophytosis in humans, this study investigated the relationship between the presence of dermatophytes on the hair coats of dogs and cats without cutaneous lesions and the occurrence of the disease in their respective owners. A total of 136 dogs and 248 cats were sampled from January 1999 to January 2005. Seventy-eight animals (22 dogs and 56 cats) belonged to individuals affected by tinea corporis caused by M. canis and 306 (114 dogs and 192 cats) to individuals without dermatophytosis. Age, sex, breed, habitat and season were recorded for each animal and examined as potential risk factors. Dermatophytes were isolated from 20.5% of the dogs and 28.2% of the cats. Microsporum canis was isolated from 36.4% of dogs cohabiting with owners diagnosed with tinea corporis but it was never isolated from dogs whose owners had no lesions. By contrast, M. canis was isolated from 53.6% of cats cohabiting with owners diagnosed with tinea corporis and from 14.6% of cats whose owners had no signs of the disease. These results clearly indicate that both cats and dogs should be considered as a major source of pathogenic dermatophytes for humans even when they do not present clinical signs of dermatophytosis. PMID:16961818

  12. Molecular analysis of the rRNA genes of Babesia spp and Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L P; Cardozo, G P; Santos, E V; Mansur, M A B; Donini, I A N; Zissou, V G; Roberto, P G; Marins, M

    2009-04-01

    The partial DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia canis and the 16S rRNA gene of Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil, were compared to sequences from other strains deposited in GenBank. The E. canis strain circulating in Ribeiro Preto is identical to other strains previously detected in the region, whereas the subspecies Babesia canis vogeli is the main Babesia strain circulating in dogs from Ribeiro Preto. PMID:24031351

  13. Molecular analysis of the rRNA genes of Babesia spp and Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, L.P.; Cardozo, G.P.; Santos, E.V.; Mansur, M.A.B.; Donini, I.A.N.; Zissou, V.G.; Roberto, P.G.; Marins, M.

    2009-01-01

    The partial DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia canis and the 16S rRNA gene of Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil, were compared to sequences from other strains deposited in GenBank. The E. canis strain circulating in Ribeiro Preto is identical to other strains previously detected in the region, whereas the subspecies Babesia canis vogeli is the main Babesia strain circulating in dogs from Ribeiro Preto. PMID:24031351

  14. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in the region of Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, A. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a pilot project of spectroscopic observations for planetary nebulae (PNe) and PN candidates in Canis Major, a sky region where the remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy cannibalized by the Milky Way may be located. The spectra of seven objects were taken while testing the SALT spectrograph (South African Astronomical Observatory). All elemental abundances have been obtained by the T e method, where the electron temperature is calculated directly using the measured weak auroral [OIII] λ 4363 Å and/or [NII] λ 5755 Å lines. We have measured the intensities of all the detected emission lines and determined the abundances of oxygen and several other elements (N, Ne, S, Cl, C, and He) in all PNe. The radial velocity for one PN has been measured for the first time and the velocities for all of the remaining PNe have been measured with a considerably better accuracy than that of the previously published ones. The elemental abundances for three PNe have been calculated for the first time and the accuracies of determining the abundances for three others have been improved. The measured heavy-element abundance ratios (S/O, Ne/O, Cl/O) are in good agreement with their typical values for HII regions. Among the PNe studied, ESO 428-05 is the first and so far the most likely candidate for belonging to the remnants of a possible dwarf galaxy disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way.

  15. Kennel Disinfectants for Microsporum canis and Trichophyton sp.

    PubMed Central

    Moriello, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal efficacy of commonly used kennel disinfectants for large surfaces was tested using naturally infective material from untreated animals (M. canis and Trichophyton sp.) soaked and macerated but unfiltered leaving visible fluorescing hairs and/or scales in the test inoculum to create a robust challenge. Disinfectants included sodium hypochlorite (1?:?32 and 1?:?100), enilconazole (1?:?100), accelerated hydrogen peroxide (1?:?16), potassium peroxymonosulfate (1% and 2%), and calcium hypochlorite dry bleach. Disinfectants were tested at a 1?:?10, 1?:?5, and 1?:?1 dilution of test inoculum to disinfectant with a 10?min contact time. Good efficacy was defined as a disinfectant resulting in no growth. Control plates grew >300 colonies of each pathogen per plate. Enilconazole, sodium hypochlorite (all dilutions), accelerated hydrogen peroxide, and 2% potassium peroxymonosulfate (but not 1%) inhibited all growth of both pathogens at 1?:?10, 1?:?5, and 1?:?1 dilutions. Calcium hypochlorite showed no antifungal efficacy (>300 colonies per plate). Enilconazole (1?:?100), sodium hypochlorite (1?:?32 or 1?:?100), accelerated hydrogen peroxide (1?:?16), and 2% potassium peroxymonosulfate are recommended for decontamination of kennels exposed to dermatophyte pathogens. PMID:25763290

  16. Kennel Disinfectants for Microsporum canis and Trichophyton sp.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal efficacy of commonly used kennel disinfectants for large surfaces was tested using naturally infective material from untreated animals (M. canis and Trichophyton sp.) soaked and macerated but unfiltered leaving visible fluorescing hairs and/or scales in the test inoculum to create a robust challenge. Disinfectants included sodium hypochlorite (1 : 32 and 1 : 100), enilconazole (1 : 100), accelerated hydrogen peroxide (1 : 16), potassium peroxymonosulfate (1% and 2%), and calcium hypochlorite "dry bleach." Disinfectants were tested at a 1 : 10, 1 : 5, and 1 : 1 dilution of test inoculum to disinfectant with a 10 min contact time. Good efficacy was defined as a disinfectant resulting in no growth. Control plates grew >300 colonies of each pathogen per plate. Enilconazole, sodium hypochlorite (all dilutions), accelerated hydrogen peroxide, and 2% potassium peroxymonosulfate (but not 1%) inhibited all growth of both pathogens at 1 : 10, 1 : 5, and 1 : 1 dilutions. Calcium hypochlorite showed no antifungal efficacy (>300 colonies per plate). Enilconazole (1 : 100), sodium hypochlorite (1 : 32 or 1 : 100), accelerated hydrogen peroxide (1 : 16), and 2% potassium peroxymonosulfate are recommended for decontamination of kennels exposed to dermatophyte pathogens. PMID:25763290

  17. Diet of wolves Canis lupus returning to Hungary.

    PubMed

    Lanszki, Jzsef; Mrkus, Mrta; Ujvry, Dra; Szab, Adm; Szemethy, Lszl

    2012-04-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, the wolf Canis lupus was extinct in Hungary and in recent decades has returned to the northern highland area of the country. The diet of wolves living in groups in Aggteleki National Park was investigated using scat analysis (n?=?81 scats) and prey remains (n?=?31 carcasses). Throughout the year wolves (average, minimum two wolves per year) consumed mostly wild-living ungulates (mean percent of biomass consumed, B% 97.2%; relative frequency of occurrence, %O 74.0%). The wild boar Sus scrofa was the most common prey item found in wolf scat (%B 35.6%) and is also the most commonly occurring ungulate in the study areas. The second most commonly occurring prey item in wolf scat was red deer Cervus elaphus (B% 32.8%). Conversely, prey remain analyses revealed wild boar as the second most commonly utilised prey species (%O 16.1%) after red deer (%O 67.7%). The roe deer Capreolus capreolus that occurs at lower population densities was the third most commonly utilised prey species. The importance of low population density mouflon Ovis aries, livestock and other food types was low. The results are similar to those found in the northern part of the Carpathian Mountains. PMID:22448046

  18. Helminth parasites of the wolf Canis lupus from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Bagrade, G; Kirjusina, M; Vismanis, K; Ozoli?s, J

    2009-03-01

    Thirty-four wolves were collected between 2003 and 2008 from throughout Latvia and examined for helminths. A total of 17 helminth species were recorded: the trematode Alaria alata (85.3%); the cestodes Diphyllobothrium latum (2.9%), Echinococcus granulosus (2.9%), Echinococcus multilocularis (5.9%), Mesocestoides lineatus (5.9%), Taenia crassiceps (8.8%), Taenia hydatigena (41.2%), Taenia (ovis) krabbei (8.8%), Taenia multiceps (47.1%), Taenia pisiformis (20.6%), Taenia polyacantha (11.8%), Taenia spp. (8.8%); and the nematodes Ancylostoma caninum (2.9%), Crenosoma vulpis (9.1%), Eucoleus aerophilus (36.4%), Pearsonema plica (41.4%), Trichinella spp. (69.7%), Toxocara canis (5.8%), and Uncinaria stenocephala (41.2%). Alaria alata presented the highest mean intensity (403.8). All animals were infected with at least one species of parasite, while the maximum recorded in one specimen was eight. No differences in the intensity or prevalence of any helminth species were found among the host based on age and gender, except for T. multiceps which was more prevalent in adults than in juveniles. PMID:19138449

  19. Hyperhidrosis in Nave Purpose-Bred Beagle Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Catherine A; Seeman, Jennifer L; Hoffmann, Guenther

    2011-01-01

    This case study details the unusual clinical findings in a unique paw-pad disorder that recently emerged among 2 male and 1 female nave purpose-bred beagle dogs (Canis familiaris) newly received into our facility. During acclimation period physical examinations, the affected dogs demonstrated constantly moist, soft paw pads on all 4 feet. No information was available regarding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this pad condition in beagle dogs. Here, we report the results of physical examination, clinical chemistry analysis, hematology, histopathology, detailed observations, and novel testing techniques performed during the acclimation period. Histopathology of several sections of affected footpads was compared with that of an age-matched dog with clinically normal paw pads. We describe the morphologic features of a distinctive cutaneous canine footpad condition and discuss the possible differential diagnoses. The histologic and clinical features were most consistent with those of hyperhidrosis; to our knowledge, this report is the first description of hyperhidrosis as a distinct condition in purpose-bred beagle dogs. PMID:21640037

  20. Phylogeography of wolves (Canis lupus) in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckworth, B.V.; Talbot, S.L.; Cook, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glacial cycles in the late Pleistocene played a dominant role in sculpting the evolutionary histories of many high-latitude organisms. The refugial hypothesis argues that populations retracted during glacial maxima and were isolated in separate refugia. One prediction of this hypothesis is that populations inhabiting different refugia diverged and then, during interglacial periods, rapidly expanded into deglaciated regions. The range of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) was modified by these expansion and contraction cycles in the late Pleistocene. Our analyses of variation of mitochondrial control region sequences corroborate previous microsatellite analyses supporting independent evolutionary histories for Coastal and Continental wolves in North America. Coastal wolves represent the remnants of a formerly widespread and diverse southern clade that expanded into coastal Southeast Alaska, likely in the early Holocene. In contrast, extant northern Continental populations appear to be admixed, composed of lineages independently arising from ancestors that persisted in either southern or northern (Beringia) refugia. This pattern of diversification suggests the possibility of 3 temporally independent colonizations of North America by wolves from Asia. Coastal wolves are the last vestige of a formerly widespread phylogroup that largely was extirpated in North America by humans during the last century. The independent phylogeographic history of these Coastal wolves has yet to be characterized. Their distinctiveness among North American wolf populations may warrant a reevaluation of their conservation status and management. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  1. Cross-fostering in gray wolves (Canis lupus lupus).

    PubMed

    Scharis, Inger; Amundin, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Cross-fostering in canids, with captive-bred pups introduced into endangered wild populations, might aid conservation efforts by increasing genetic diversity and lowering the risk of inbreeding depression. The gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus) population in Scandinavia suffers from severe inbreeding due to a narrow genetic base and geographical isolation. This study aimed at evaluating the method to cross-foster wolf pups from zoo-born to zoo-born litters. The following was assessed: female initial acceptance of foster pups, growth rate in relation to age difference between foster pups and pups in recipient litters and survival over the first 33 weeks. The study included four litters added by two foster pups in each. The age differences between the foster pups and the recipient litters were 2-8 days. After augmentation, all four females accepted the foster pups, demonstrated by her moving the entire litter to a new den site. Growth rate was dependent on the age difference of the pups in the foster litters, with a considerably slower growth rate in the 8 days younger pups. However, these pups later appeared to be at no disadvantage. Foster pups had a higher survival rate than females' pups, however, the causes of death were probably not kin or non-kin related. The results indicate that cross-fostering works in gray wolves and that this might be a plausible way to increase genetic variation in the wild population. PMID:25773058

  2. Helminth parasites in the endangered Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensis.

    PubMed

    van Kesteren, F; Piggott, K J; Bengui, T; Kubri, S B; Mastin, A; Sillero-Zubiri, C; Paris, M; Millar, R P; Macdonald, D W; Shiferaw, F; Craig, P S

    2015-07-01

    Ethiopian wolves, Canis simensis, are an endangered carnivore endemic to the Ethiopian highlands. Although previous studies have focused on aspects of Ethiopian wolf biology, including diet, territoriality, reproduction and infectious diseases such as rabies, little is known of their helminth parasites. In the current study, faecal samples were collected from 94 wild Ethiopian wolves in the Bale Mountains of southern Ethiopia, between August 2008 and February 2010, and were screened for the presence of helminth eggs using a semi-quantitative volumetric dilution method with microscopy. We found that 66 of the 94 faecal samples (70.2%) contained eggs from at least one group of helminths, including Capillaria, Toxocara, Trichuris, ancylostomatids, Hymenolepis and taeniids. Eggs of Capillaria sp. were found most commonly, followed by Trichuris sp., ancylostomatid species and Toxocara species. Three samples contained Hymenolepis sp. eggs, which were likely artefacts from ingested prey species. Four samples contained taeniid eggs, one of which was copro-polymerase chain reaction (copro-PCR) and sequence positive for Echinococcus granulosus, suggesting a spillover from a domestic parasite cycle into this wildlife species. Associations between presence/absence of Capillaria, Toxocara and Trichuris eggs were found; and egg burdens of Toxocara and ancylostomatids were found to be associated with geographical location and sampling season. PMID:25007150

  3. Inbreeding and inbreeding depression in endangered red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Waits, Lisette P; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2014-09-01

    In natural populations, the expression and severity of inbreeding depression can vary widely across taxa. Describing processes that influence the extent of inbreeding and inbreeding depression aid in our understanding of the evolutionary history of mating systems such as cooperative breeding and nonrandom mate selection. Such findings also help shape wildlife conservation theory because inbreeding depression reduces the viability of small populations. We evaluated the extent of inbreeding and inbreeding depression in a small, re-introduced population of red wolves (Canis rufus) in North Carolina. Since red wolves were first re-introduced in 1987, pedigree inbreeding coefficients (f) increased considerably and almost every wild born wolf was inbred (average f = 0.154 and max f = 0.383). The large inbreeding coefficients were due to both background relatedness associated with few founders and numerous close relative matings. Inbreeding depression was most evident for adult body size and generally absent for direct fitness measures such as reproductive success and survival; no lethal equivalents (LE = 0.00) were detected in juvenile survival. The lack of strong inbreeding depression in direct measures of fitness could be due to a founder effect or because there were no outbred individuals for comparison. Our results highlight the variable expression of inbreeding depression across traits and the need to measure a number of different traits when evaluating inbreeding depression in a wild population. PMID:25060763

  4. Medical management of pyometra in three red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie; Wolf, Karen N

    2013-12-01

    Pyometra is a serious, life-threatening disease of both domestic and non-domestic species often requiring ovariohysterectomy to preserve the life of the animal. Medical management of pyometra has been successful in domestic and non-domestic species, and the consideration of such treatment is of marked importance in a critically endangered species. Of the canids, the red wolf (Canis rufus) is second only to African hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus) in terms of the prevalence of both cystic endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra. In this report, three red wolves were medically managed for pyometra. Aside from vaginal discharge, none of the wolves exhibited clinical signs, nor were there reflective inflammatory changes in the laboratory findings. All wolves received standard treatment for pyometra, including prostaglandin F2alpha and antibiotic therapy, while one wolf was more aggressively managed with uterine lavage. Pyometra recurred in two of the treated wolves, while the most aggressively managed wolf continues to show ultrasonographic resolution 2 yr posttreatment. Aggressive medical management of pyometra should be considered a treatment option in certain red wolf females, as it may preserve the animal's reproductive potential. PMID:24450062

  5. Urbanization, Grassland, and Diet Influence Coyote (Canis latrans) Parasitism Structure.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alexander G; Lukasik, Victoria M; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Alexander, Shelley M

    2015-12-01

    Land use change can alter the ecological mechanisms that influence infectious disease exposure in animal populations. However, few studies have empirically integrated the environmental, spatial, and dietary patterns of wildlife epidemiology. We investigate how urbanization, habitat type, and dietary behavior are associated with coyote (Canis latrans) parasitism structure along a gradient of rural to urban land cover using multivariate redundancy analyses. Coyote fecal samples were collected in eight urban and six rural sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Parasite and diet components were identified using common flotation procedures and fecal dietary analysis, respectively. Redundancy analysis was used to identify the best land cover, connectivity, and dietary predictors. We tested for significance using multiple permutation tests and ANOVAs. Significant factors affecting enteric parasite prevalence included dietary and land cover factors (R (2) = 0.4130, P < 0.05). Variation in dietary behavior was observed between urban and rural sites (R (2) = 0.4712, P < 0.05), as anthropogenic diet items (i.e., garbage, crabapples) were strongly influenced by urbanization. Our research supports that developed habitat, grassland cover, and dietary choice interact to possibly influence the exposure of coyote hosts to enteric parasites and pioneers future investigation of disease ecology for natural populations in anthropogenic landscapes. PMID:26122205

  6. Accounts of famous North American Wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We examined historical accounts of 59 famous North American Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) reported during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fifty of the 59 wolves were purportedly responsible for great losses to livestock, but for 29 reports, evidence suggested that ???2 wolves (e.g., packs) were responsible for the purported kills; in addition, seven wolves had traits that suggested they were hybrids with dogs, and one wolf was probably not from the area where the damage purportedly occurred. Reported livestock losses, especially to Longhorn cattle, from individual wolves appeared excessively high in relation to current literature. Most famous wolves were old and/or impaired from past injuries: 19 were reportedly ???10 years old, 18 had mutilated feet from past trap injuries, and one had a partially severed trachea from being in a snare. Old age and physical impairments probably contributed to livestock depredations by some famous wolves. Several accounts appeared exaggerated, inaccurate, or fabricated. Historical accounts of famous wolves should be interpreted with great caution, especially when considering impacts of wolf reintroductions or when modeling predation rates.

  7. Characterization of AtSTOP1 orthologous genes in tobacco and other plant species.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Yoshinao; Ito, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Ikka, Takashi; Morita, Akio; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Imaizumi, Ryujiro; Aoki, Toshio; Komatsu, Kenji; Sakata, Yoichi; Iuchi, Satoshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) and proton (H?) tolerances are essential traits for plants to adapt to acid soil environments. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), these tolerances are mediated by a zinc-finger transcription factor, SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 (AtSTOP1), which regulates the transcription of multiple genes critical for tolerance to both stressors. Here, the functions of orthologous proteins (STOP1-like proteins) in other plant species were characterized by reverse genetics analyses and in planta complementation assays. RNA interference of a gene for NtSTOP1 repressed Al and H? tolerances of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) roots. Tobacco roots released citrate in response to Al, concomitant with the up-regulated transcription of an ortholog of an Al tolerance gene encoding a citrate-transporting multidrug and toxic compound extrusion protein. The RNA interference repression of NtSTOP1 blocked this process and also repressed the transcription of another orthologous gene for Al tolerance, ALUMINUM SENSITIVE3, which encodes a prokaryote-type transporter. These results demonstrated that NtSTOP1 regulates Al tolerance in tobacco through the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The in planta complementation assays revealed that other plant species, including woody plants, a legume, and a moss (Physcomitrella patens), possess functional STOP1-like proteins that can activate several H? and Al-tolerance genes in Arabidopsis. Knocking out the gene encoding the STOP1-like protein decreased the Al tolerance of P. patens. Together, our results strongly suggest that transcriptional regulation by STOP1-like proteins is evolutionarily conserved among land plants and that it confers the ability to survive in acid soils through the transcriptional regulation of Al- and H?-tolerance genes. PMID:23749850

  8. GPR50 is the mammalian ortholog of Mel1c: Evidence of rapid evolution in mammals

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The melatonin receptor subfamily contains three members Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c, found in all vertebrates except for Mel1c which is found only in fish, Xenopus species and the chicken. Another receptor, the melatonin related receptor known as GPR50, found exclusively in mammals and later identified as a member of the melatonin receptor subfamily because of its identity to the three melatonin receptors despite its absence of affinity for melatonin. The aim of this study was to describe the evolutionary relationships between GPR50 and the three other members of the melatonin receptor subfamily. Results Using an in silico approach, we demonstrated that GPR50 is the ortholog of the high affinity Mel1c receptor. It was necessary to also study the synteny of this gene to reach this conclusion because classical mathematical models that estimate orthology and build phylogenetic trees were not sufficient. The receptor has been deeply remodelled through evolution by the mutation of numerous amino acids and by the addition of a long C-terminal tail. These alterations have modified its affinity for melatonin and probably affected its interactions with the other two known melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 that are encoded by Mel1a and Mel1b genes respectively. Evolutionary studies provided evidence that the GPR50 group evolved under different selective pressure as compared to the orthologous groups Me11 a, b, and c. Conclusion This study demonstrated that there are only three members in the melatonin receptor subfamily with one of them (Me11c) undergoing rapid evolution from fishes and birds to mammals. Further studies are necessary to investigate the physiological roles of this receptor. PMID:18400093

  9. Expanding the Ortholog Approach for Hemophilia Treatment Complicated by Factor VIII Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zakas, P.M.; Vanijcharoenkarn, K.; Markovitz, R.C.; Meeks, S.L.; Doering, C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The formation of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) directed against human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) is a life-threatening pathogenic response that occurs in 2030% of severe congenital hemophilia A patients and 0.00015% of remaining population (i.e. acquired hemophilia A). Interspecies amino acid sequence disparity among FVIII orthologs represents a promising strategy to mask FVIII from existing inhibitors while retaining procoagulant function. Evidence for the effectiveness of this approach exists in clinical data obtained for porcine FVIII products, which have demonstrated efficacy in the setting of congenital and acquired hemophilia. Objectives In the current study, recombinant (r) ovine FVIII (oFVIII), was evaluated for antigenicity and procoagulant activity in the context of human patient-derived and murine model-generated FVIII inhibitors. Methods The antigenicity of roFVIII was assessed using i) inhibitor patient plasma samples, ii) murine anti-FVIII MAbs, iii) immunized murine hemophilia A plasmas, and iv) an in vivo model of acquired hemophilia A Results Overall, roFVIII demonstrated reduced reactivity to, and inhibition by, anti-hFVIII immunoglobulin in patient plasmas. Additionally, several hFVIII epitopes were predicted and empirically shown not to exist within roFVIII. In a murine hemophilia A model designed to mimic clinical inhibitor formation, it was demonstrated that inhibitor titers to roFVIII were significantly reduced compared to the orthologous immunogens, rhFVIII or rpFVIII. Furthermore in a murine model of acquired hemophilia A, roFVIII administration conferred protection from bleeding following tail transection. Conclusion These data support the investigation of FVIII orthologs as treatment modalities in both the congenital and acquired FVIII inhibitor settings. PMID:25315236

  10. Lipid regulators of Pkh2 in Candida albicans, the protein kinase ortholog of mammalian PDK1.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Schulze, Jörg O; Bahí, Anna; Süß, Evelyn; Casamayor, Antonio; Biondi, Ricardo M

    2016-03-01

    Pkh is the yeast ortholog of the mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1). Pkh phosphorylates the activation loop of Ypks, Tpks, Sch9 and also phosphorylates the eisosome components Lsp1 and Pil1, which play fundamental roles upstream of diverse signaling pathways, including the cell wall integrity and sphingosine/long-chain base (LCB) signaling pathways. In S. cerevisiae, two isoforms, ScPkh1 and ScPkh2, are required for cell viability, while only one ortholog exists in C. albicans, CaPkh2. In spite of the extensive information gathered on the role of Pkh in the LCB signaling, the yeast Pkh kinases are not known to bind lipids and previous studies did not identify PH domains in Pkh sequences. We now describe that the C-terminal region of CaPkh2 is required for its intrinsic kinase activity. In addition, we found that the C-terminal region of CaPkh2 enables its interaction with structural and signaling lipids. Our results further show that phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol (3,4 and 4,5)-biphosphates, and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate inhibit Pkh activity, whereas sulfatide binds with high affinity but does not affect the intrinsic activity of CaPkh2. Interestingly, we identified that its human ortholog PDK1 also binds to sulfatide. We propose a mechanism by which lipids and dihydrosphingosine regulate CaPkh2 kinase activity by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal region with the kinase domain, while sulfatide-like lipids support localization CaPkh2 mediated by a C-terminal PH domain, without affecting kinase intrinsic activity. PMID:26743850

  11. Synovial fluid cytology in experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Petanides, Theodoros; Tsafas, Konstantinos; Harrus, Shimon; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2015-05-15

    Evidence-based information of a cause-and-effect relationship between Ehrlichia canis infection and polyarthritis in naturally- or experimentally-infected dogs is currently lacking. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate whether synovial fluid cytological evidence of arthritis could be documented in dogs with acute monocytic ehrlichiosis. Direct synovial fluid cytology smears from eight Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis were examined prior to, and on 21, 35 and 63 days post-inoculation. The cytological variables assessed included cellularity, percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils, macrophage reactivity and evidence of E. canis morulae. The median cellularity and percentages of mononuclear cells and neutrophils prior to inoculation did not differ when compared to post-inoculation cytological evaluation. Increased cellularity, E. canis morulae or cytological evidence of arthritis or macrophage reactivity were not observed throughout the course of the study. In the present study, no cytological evidence of arthritis was found in dogs with experimental acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, suggesting that E. canis infection should be considered a rather uncommon cause of arthritis in dogs. PMID:25770893

  12. First record of autochthonous canine ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia canis in Romania.

    PubMed

    Morar, Doru; D?r?bu?, Gheorghe; Imre, Mirela; Ilie, Marius Stelian; Imre, Klmn

    2015-06-01

    This case study describes the first genetically confirmed and clinically manifested autochthonous Ehrlichia canis infection in a 9-year-old female mixed-breed dog from Romania. Health screening of the dog included clinical examination, evaluation of stained peripheral blood smear and hematologic variables, as well as serologic testing and molecular analysis. Clinical signs included fever, apathy, dehydration, pale mucous membranes, and weakness. The microscopic examination of the blood smear and immunologic assays for Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Ecanis antibodies, and for Dirofilaria immitis antigen yielded negative results. Hematologic abnormalities included moderate nonregenerative anemia, leucopenia with neutropenia, and moderate thrombocytopenia. The biochemical abnormalities identified were hypoalbuminemia, and mildly increased serum enzyme activities of AST and ALT. In addition, increased urea and creatinine levels associated with low urine specific gravity and proteinuria were also present. Nested PCR amplification of the partial Ecanis 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the presence of this rickettsial pathogen in the dog's blood, which subsequently was confirmed through sequencing based on the 100% homology with GenBank deposited Ecanis isolates. After specific treatment with doxycycline (10mg/kg, orally, SID) for onemonth, the proteinuria, and hematologic and serum biochemical abnormalities with the exception of mild azotemia resolved. This report supports the geographical expansion of canine ehrlichiosis caused by Ecanis in nonendemic regions of Europe. PMID:25867940

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of arginine kinase gene of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Shivani; Samanta, S; Harish, D R; Sudhakar, N R; Raina, O K; Shantaveer, S B; Madhu, D N; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Toxocara canis is an important gastrointestinal nematode of dogs and also a causative agent of visceral larva migrans in humans. Arginine kinase (AK) gene is one of the important biomolecule of phosphagen kinase of T. canis which is emerging as an exciting novel diagnostic target in toxocarosis. The present study was carried out to clone and characterize AK gene of T. canis for future utilization as a diagnostic molecule. Total RNA was extracted from intact adult worms and reverse transcription was done with oligo dT primers to obtain complementary DNA (cDNA). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out using cDNA as template with specific primers which amplified a product of 1,202bp. The amplicon was cloned into pDrive cloning vector and clone was confirmed by colony PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis. Sequence analysis of the gene showed 99.8 and 77.9% homology with the published AK gene of T. canis (EF015466.1) and Ascaris suum respectively. Structural analysis shown that the mature AK protein consist of 400 amino acids with a molecular wt of 45360.73Da. Further expression studies are required for producing the recombinant protein for its evaluation in the diagnosis of T. canis infection in humans as well as in adult dogs. PMID:26064002

  14. Genetic comparison of Brucella canis isolates by the MLVA assay in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Heo, Eun Jeong; Cho, Donghee; Kim, Jong Wan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Her, Moon

    2011-06-01

    The multiple-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) assay is a method frequently employed as a molecular epidemiological tool for Brucella genetic fingerprinting. The purpose of this study was to assess the genotyping of 77 B. canis isolates from 14 different dog breeding farms in Korea by the MLVA assay and to compare the epidemiological relationships between the Korean isolates and foreign ones. Simpson's diversity index for 17 loci showed a range from 0 to 0.846 in 77 B. canis isolates. B. canis isolates in Korea were observed to have high genetic diversity at the most variable loci and were divided into 30 distinct genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. Some B. canis isolates were closely related to previously typed isolates in other countries. The MLVA assay can be helpful to analyze the epidemiological correlation of B. canis isolates in domestic pet animals and to track the geographic origin by comparing the genetic patterns with foreign isolates. Therefore, the MLVA assay will be useful as a tool for control and preventive measures of canine brucellosis. PMID:21307620

  15. Reconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis as a model for the screening of antifungal drugs against Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Tabart, Jeremy; Baldo, Aline; Vermout, Sandy; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    A fully differentiated reconstructed interfollicular feline epidermis (RFE) was recently developed in vitro. It was shown to be relevant for the study of Microsporum canis-epidermal interactions. In this study, RFE was evaluated as a potential model for the in vitro screening of drugs against M. canis. As a preliminary step, the minimum inhibitory concentration of miconazole nitrate against M. canis IHEM 21239 grown on Sabouraud's dextrose agar was determined to be 0.3 microg mL(-1). RFE grown at the air-liquid interface was cultured for 24 h in RFE culture medium, supplemented with either miconazole (range 0.1-1 microg mL(-1)) or its solvent (dimethylsulfoxide). Then, RFE was inoculated in triplicate with 1 x 10(5 )M. canis arthroconidia and incubated for five additional days. To evaluate fungal growth, RFE was processed for routine histopathology, three serial sections being performed across the block at 100 microm intervals. No fungal growth was detected invading or on the surface of infected RFE in the presence of miconazole concentrations equal to or higher than 0.3 microg mL (final concentration in the culture medium). This study demonstrates that RFE is an adequate model for the in vitro screening of drugs against M. canis and potentially against other skin pathogens. PMID:18477328

  16. Genetic variability in Microsporum canis isolated from cats, dogs and humans in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Fernanda V A; Farias, Marconi R; Bier, Daniele; de Andrade, Caroline P; de Castro, Luiza A; da Silva, Sérgio C; Ferreiro, Laerte

    2013-09-01

    Dermatophytosis caused by Microsporum canis is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical manifestations. M. canis is a zoophilic dermatophyte and the most frequent fungi isolated from dogs, cats and children in Brazil. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of M. canis isolates from different animal species using two microsatellite markers, namely, McGT(13) and McGT(17), and to correlate the results with the clinical and epidemiological patient data in Brazil. The study included a global set of 102 M. canis strains, including 37 symptomatic cats, 35 asymptomatic cats, 19 human patients with tinea, 9 asymptomatic dogs and 2 symptomatic dogs. A total of 14 genotypes were identified, and 6 large populations were distinguished. There was no correlation between these multilocus genotypes and the clinical and epidemiological data, including the source, symptomatology, clinical picture, breed, age, sex, living conditions and geographic location. These results demonstrate that the use of microsatellite polymorphisms is a reliable method for the differentiation of M. canis strains. However, we were unable to demonstrate a shared clinical and epidemiological pattern among the same genotype samples. PMID:23551796

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Toxocara canis Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Romero Núñez, Camilo; Mendoza Martínez, Germán David; Yañez Arteaga, Selene; Ponce Macotela, Martha; Bustamante Montes, Patricia; Ramírez Durán, Ninfa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine seroprevalence and identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis infection. A clinical and epidemiological questionnaire and body mass index were used to assess the risk factors associated with human toxocariasis in 108 children with an age range of 2–16 years. Antibodies against Toxocara canis were detected using an ELISA test kit. Chi-square analysis and odds ratio (OR) were used to identify risk factors associated with Toxocara canis seropositivity. The prevalence of antibodies against Toxocara canis was greater (P = 0.02) in males than females (28.84% and 16.07%, resp.). Chi-square analysis and odds ratio revealed just one variable with P < 0.05, and OR > 1.0 was associated with seropositivity: the possession of dogs under one year old (OR = 1.78). Although not significant, the OR values suggest that other factors may be epidemiologically important for Toxocara presence such as not washing hands before meals, malnutrition, obesity, and use of public parks. Children in the age group >12 and <16 years old had higher seroprevalence to Toxocara canis (17.59%) than the >2 and <11 years old age group (4.62%). Toxocariosis infection needs to be prevented by pet deworming and hygienic measures after contact with dogs. PMID:23844404

  18. Short communication: Streptococcus canis is able to establish a persistent udder infection in a dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Krl, Jaros?aw; Twardo?, Jan; Mrowiec, Jacek; Podkowik, Magdalena; Dejneka, Grzegorz; D?bski, Bogdan; Nowicki, Tadeusz; Zalewski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Streptococcus canis is relatively rare. Consequently, many epidemiologic aspects of the infection, including factors that mediate crossing of host species barriers by the pathogen, infectiousness of the microorganism to the mammary gland, and the course of the disease within a herd, are still not elucidated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe results of a 15-mo observation of subclinical Strep. canis mastitis on a dairy farm housing 76 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. Upon 3 visits to the farm during a period between April 2013 and June 2014, Strep. canis was cultured from milk samples of 17 (22.4% of the herd), 7 (9.6%), and 8 (11.3%) cows, respectively. The isolates obtained were characterized phenotypically by means of the API Strep identification kit (bioMrieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), as well as genetically by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains displayed the same biochemical features, and the molecular methods revealed that the isolates belonged to a single clone or were very closely related. Results of the study indicate that Strep. canis is capable of causing intramammary infections of long duration, behaving in a contagious manner. Because a persistently infected cow may serve as the source of Strep. canis infection for other animals, effective control of this type of udder infection within a herd may require similar measures to those adopted in Streptococcus agalactiae eradication programs. PMID:26233445

  19. Subtilisin Sub3 is involved in adherence of Microsporum canis to human and animal epidermis.

    PubMed

    B?gu?, Elena Tatiana; Baldo, Aline; Mathy, Anne; Cambier, Ludivine; Antoine, Nadine; Cozma, Vasile; Mignon, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of the secreted keratinolytic subtilisin-like protease Sub3 in adherence of Microsporum canis to epidermis from various susceptible species, in addition to cat for which this role was recently demonstrated. Firstly, we showed by immunostaining that Sub3 is not expressed in arthroconidia from an M. canis SUB3 RNA-silenced strain but is present on the surface of arthroconidia from a SUB3 non-silenced parental strain. Secondly, comparative adherence assays using arthroconidia from both M. canis strains and skin explants from humans, dogs, horses, rabbits, guinea pigs, mice and cats revealed that only 8-16% of arthroconidia from the SUB3 silenced strain adhered to different types of epidermis when compared to the control strain. Attempts to restore fungal adherence by the addition of recombinant Sub3 failed in the tested conditions. Overall results show for the first time that Sub3 is necessary for the adherence of M. canis arthroconidia to epidermis from humans and other animal species than cat, supporting the idea that Sub3 plays a central role in colonization of keratinized host structures by M. canis, whatever the host. PMID:22770520

  20. Prevention of transmission of Babesia canis by Dermacentor reticulatus ticks to dogs treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Josephus J; Stanneck, Dorothee; Jongejan, Frans

    2013-02-18

    A group of 8 dogs was treated with an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto()) 28 days prior to infestation with adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks, infected with Babesia canis. The ability of the collar to prevent transmission of B. canis in the treated group was compared to an untreated control group. All 8 dogs in the untreated control group became infected with B. canis parasites, which were detected in blood smears as early as day 6 post tick-application. All control dogs developed clinical signs of babesiosis and were rescue-treated with imidocarb dipropionate. These dogs also developed specific B. canis antibodies as identified by serology (IFA test) and were confirmed PCR/RLB positive. None of the 8 dogs treated with the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar became infected with B. canis, which was confirmed by the absence of specific B. canis antibodies and babesial DNA as confirmed by PCR/RLB. The collar caused 96.02% of the ticks to die within 48h post challenge and this increased to 100% within 4 days. Although a high percentage of 44% of the Dermacentor ticks were infected with B. canis, they were unable to transmit the infection to the treated group. Hence, the imidacloprid/flumethrin collar effectively prevented transmission of B. canis 1 month after application onto the dogs. PMID:23158840

  1. Variation in reproductive traits of members of the genus Canis with special attention to the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Lord, Kathryn; Feinstein, Mark; Smith, Bradley; Coppinger, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    We compare differences in the reproductive strategies of "free-living" dogs with their wild relatives in the genus Canis, of which the dog is a very recently evolved member. The members of this genus display a greater range of parental motor patterns than generally seen in other species of Carnivora, including pair-bonding and extended parental care; parents regurgitate to offspring and provision them with food for months to as long as a year. But the domestic dog does not routinely display these genus-typical behaviors. While this has generally been assumed to be a result of direct human intervention, humans have little reproductive control over the vast majority of domestic dogs. We analyze the low frequency of display of genus-typical behaviors and postulate that the dog's reproductive behaviors are an adaptation to permanent human settlement and the waste resources associated with it. Adaptation to this environment has decreased seasonality, increased the fecundity of unrestrained dogs and reduced the need for prolonged parental care. The consequences of greater fecundity and reduced parental care are compared to the reproductive behavior of other species of the genus. PMID:23124015

  2. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed origin of three wild-living canids showing anomalous phenotypic traits. Results indicated that these canids were hybrids between golden jackals and domestic dogs. One of them was a backcross to jackal and another one was a backcross to dog, confirming that golden jackal–domestic dog hybrids are fertile. The uniparental markers showed that the direction of hybridization, namely females of the wild species hybridizing with male domestic dogs, was common to most cases of canid hybridization. A melanistic 3bp-deletion at the K locus (β-defensin CDB103 gene), that was absent in reference golden jackal samples, but was found in a backcross to jackal with anomalous black coat, suggested its introgression from dogs via hybridization. Moreover, we demonstrated that MHC sequences, although rarely used as markers of hybridization, can be also suitable for the identification of hybrids, as long as haplotypes are exclusive for the parental species.

  3. Down-regulation of MHC class II receptors of DH82 cells, following infection with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Harrus, Shimon; Waner, Trevor; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Fishman, Zohar; Bark, Hylton; Harmelin, Alon

    2003-12-15

    In order to evaluate whether infection with E. canis alters the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and/or MHC class II receptors, and by doing so alters the immune response to the organism, flow cytometry was performed on DH82 cells infected with Ehrlichia canis (90% infection) and on uninfected DH82 cells of the same passage, using anti-canine MHC class I and II antibodies. MHC class II expression was evident in 47.6 and 46.2% (mean 46.9%) of uninfected DH82 cells using two different anti-MHC class II antibodies, while no MHC class II expression was evident in DH82 cells infected with E. canis. The present results indicate that infection of DH82 macrophages with E. canis down-regulates their MHC class II receptors. These results suggest a possible mechanism by which E. canis evades the immune system. PMID:14592737

  4. Epidemiological and molecular study of Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F S; Wenceslau, A A; Carlos, R S A; Albuquerque, G R

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present article was an epidemiological and molecular study of Ehrlichia canis in dogs of Ilhus and Itabuna in Bahia, as well as an evaluation of associated risk factors. Blood samples were collected from 153 dogs and DNA was extracted and analyzed by the nested-polymerase chain reaction, using one pair of primers to detect Ehrlichia bacteria and another pair to detect the presence of E. canis. Of the 153 animals, 12 (7.8%) were polymerase chain reaction-positive for E. canis, indicating the presence of the parasite in dogs of the Ilhus-Itabuna microregion. The associated risk factors were exposure to tick-infested habitats and the fact that the dogs lived in the countryside. PMID:18752193

  5. Antibiotic clearance of Ehrlichia canis from dogs infected by intravenous inoculation of carrier blood.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, John J; Kahn, Jonathan; Needham, Glen R; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Ewing, S A; Stich, R W

    2008-12-01

    Ehrlichia canis is the etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) and is a useful model for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens, many of which infect dogs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate rifampin and doxycycline regimens for clearance of E. canis infections in addition to alleviation of CME. Beagles were infected with E. canis by intravenous inoculation with carrier blood and treated with either rifampin or doxycycline after the acute phase of CME. Improved hematological values demonstrated that both treatments effectively relieved signs of the disease. Peripheral blood from all dogs became PCR negative after antibiotic treatment, suggesting that these infections were eliminated and that rifampin is an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of CME. PMID:19120226

  6. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs from the North of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lus; Tuna, Joana; Vieira, Lisete; Yisaschar-Mekuzas, Yael; Baneth, Gad

    2010-02-01

    Tick-transmitted rickettsial pathogens belonging to the Ehrlichia and Anaplasma genera can infect dogs and humans. In this study, four dogs from the North of Portugal, in which an ehrlichial disease was suspected clinically, were tested by molecular methods. After DNA extraction from blood on filter paper, a 345 bp fragment of the Ehrlichia/Anaplasma 16S rRNA gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis of PCR products revealed one dog infected with Ehrlichia canis and three with Anaplasma platys. One of these latter animals was co-infected with Babesia canis subspecies vogeli. This is the first report of the genetic characterisation of both A. platys and E. canis in naturally infected dogs from the North of Portugal. PMID:19056304

  7. [Seroprevalence anti-Ehrlichia canis antibodies in dogs of Cuiab, Mato Grosso].

    PubMed

    Silva, Jos Nivaldo da; Almeida, Arleana do Bom Parto Ferreira de; Boa Sorte, Eveline da Cruz; Freitas, Agrdia Gonalves de; Santos, Luana Gabriela Ferreira do; Aguiar, Daniel Moura; Sousa, Valria Rgia Franco

    2010-01-01

    Canine ehrlichiosis is a disease transmitted by ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus and caused by Ehrlichia canis, obligatory intracellular bacteria. The present study examined the prevalence of anti-E. canis in 254 dogs from four administrative regions of Cuiab, Mato Grosso, by indirect immunofluorescence assay. There was a prevalence of 42.5% (108/254) without significant difference between the studied regions. The variables age, breed, sex, habitat, access to rural and ticks were analyzed. The antibody titers ranged from 1:40 to 1:2,560. Only 32 (29.63%) seropositive dogs were infested with ticks, all R. sanguineus. The results confirm that do not have breed, sex or age predisposition to ehrlichiosis due E. canis, while the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestation, although no significant difference between dogs with or without infestation with the tick vector. PMID:20624348

  8. Fecundity and egg output by Toxocara canis in the red fox, Vulpes vulpes.

    PubMed

    Richards, D T; Lewis, J W

    2001-06-01

    The role of the red fox Vulpes vulpes in the dissemination of eggs of Toxocara canis into the environment is considered with reference to female worm fecundity and egg output in the faeces of infected foxes collected from four localities in southern England. A significant positive correlation was found between female worm size and the number of eggs in the uterus but there was no significant relationship between T. canis worm numbers and egg output in fox faeces. Reliable estimates of worm burdens in foxes could not, therefore, be determined from faecal egg counts alone. The highest mean egg output of 2145.0 epg recorded from adult foxes indicated that fox cubs are not necessarily the main sources of environmental contamination with T. canis eggs. Saturated magnesium sulphate was found to be a more effective flotation solution than zinc sulphate and sodium chloride for recovering eggs from fox faecal samples. PMID:11520440

  9. Synergistic inhibition of the growth in vitro of Microsporum canis by miconazole and chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Perrins, N; Bond, R

    2003-04-01

    An agar dilution technique was used to assess the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of miconazole, chlorhexidine and a 1:1 combination of both agents for 10 isolates of Microsporum canis. For nine of 10 of the isolates, a combination of miconazole and chlorhexidine was more effective than either agent alone; fractional inhibitory concentration indices indicated a synergistic effect for five isolates and an additive effect for four. These results illustrate the potent antimycotic effect of miconazole and chlorhexidine against M. canis and are in accordance with previous clinical studies that showed the value of using miconazole and chlorhexidine shampoo in association with oral griseofulvin in the treatment of feline dermatophytosis caused by M. canis. PMID:12662267

  10. Extracellular proteolytic activity and molecular analysis of Microsporum canis strains isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic cats.

    PubMed

    Viani, Flvio Cesar; Cazares Viani, Paula Regina; Gutierrez Rivera, Irma Nelly; Gonalves da Silva, Eriques; Rodrigues Paula, Claudete; Gambale, Walderez

    2007-03-01

    Microsporum canis is the main zoophylic dermatophyte in dogs and cats, and it is also an important zoonotic agent. The literature showed that cats are asymptomatic carriers of M. canis. This is apparently due to host resistance and/or the presence of strains with lower virulence. This study was aimed to evaluate the keratinolytic, elastinolytic and collagenolytic activities of M. canis strains and their relationship with symptomatic and asymptomatic cats. In addition, these strains were analysed by RFLP. The strains isolated from cats with clinical dermatophytosis had higher keratinase and elastase activity than those isolated from asymptomatic animals (p minus than 0.05). There were not differences in RFLP patterns based on Hind III digestion. PMID:17592886

  11. Data on the parasitological status of golden jackal (Canis aureus L., 1758) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Takács, András; Szabó, László; Juhász, Lajos; Takács, András Attila; Lanszki, József; Takács, Péter Tamás; Heltai, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    In Hungary, twenty Canis aureus individuals were submitted to parasitological examinations in 2010-2012. Two Coccidia: Cystoisospora canis (15%) and Toxoplasma-type oocysts (5%), one Trematoda: Alaria alata (10%), six Cestoda: Mesocestoides lineatus (20%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Dipylidium caninums (5%), Taenia hydatigena (15%), Taenia pisiformis (20%), Taenia crassiceps (40%), and nine Nematoda: Angiostrongylus vasorum (10%), Crenosoma vulpis (30%), Capillaria aerophila (5%), Toxocara canis (20%), Toxascaris leonina (15%), Trichuris vulpis (10%), Ancylostoma caninum (45%), Uncinaria stenocephala (40%), Capillaria plica (45%) have been identified. Angiostronglyus vasorum has been reported from carnivores in Europe, Africa, South America and North America. The helminth A. vasorum or French heartworm is a metastrongylid nematode, widely distributed in Western Europe, that infects the pulmonary arterial tree of dogs, various species of foxes, wolves, Eurasian badgers, coyotes and stoats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural A. vasorum infection in golden jackal. PMID:24334089

  12. Endoparasites of the coyote (Canis latrans), a recent migrant to insular newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Kimberly E; Baggs, Eric M; Finney-Crawley, Jean

    2009-10-01

    This study provides the first data on the helminth fauna of the coyote (Canis latrans) in insular Newfoundland. Sixty-nine coyotes were collected between 2001 and 2003 and examined for helminths. A total of 10 helminth species were recorded: the cestodes Taenia ovis krabbei (9%), Taenia hydatigena (4%), Taenia pisiformis (1%), and Mesocestoides spp. (5%); and the nematodes Toxocara canis (19%), Toxascaris leonina (1%), Crenosoma vulpis (19%), Physaloptera rara (6%), Uncinaria stenocephala (3%), and Angiostrongylus vasorum (1%). No significant differences (P< or =0.05) were detected between sexes. Mesocestoides spp., T. canis, and C. vulpis were more prevalent in juveniles than adults. Angiostrongylus vasorum is reported in coyotes for the second time in Newfoundland, Canada. PMID:19901402

  13. Tinea Corporis, Caused by Microsporum Canis - a Case Report From Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Kokollari, Fatime; Daka, Aferdita; Blyta, Ymrane; Ismajli, Fellanza; Haxhijaha-Lulaj, Kujtesa

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tinea corporis (B35.6) caused by Microsporum canis which is fungal species that causes numerous forms of disease. It is part of a group of fungi known as Dermatophytes. Though mostly well known for ringworm in pets, it is also known to infect humans. This fact makes this pathogen both anthrophilic and zoophilic in nature. Microsporum canis is a communicable pathogen. Case report: We will report about a case, 22-year-old female, residing in a village, with typical changes of a mycotic infection caused by M. Canis. Dermatological description can be summarized with polymorphic erythematous, papulosquamous changes, erosions mainly on genital organ and spread to the thighs and lower abdomen which are accompanied with itching and burning. Diagnosis B35.6 was determined on the basis of clinical appearance complemented with anamnesis, microscopic examination and culture. The patient was treated successfully with general and local antimycotics and antibiotics. PMID:26622092

  14. PARASITOLOGY AND SEROLOGY OF FREE-RANGING COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS) IN NORTH CAROLINA, USA.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, M Colter; Swingen, Morgan B; Lashley, Marcus A; Flowers, James R; Palamar, Maria B; Apperson, Charles S; Olfenbuttel, Colleen; Moorman, Christopher E; DePerno, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) have expanded recently into the eastern US and can serve as a source of pathogens to domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), livestock, and humans. We examined free-ranging coyotes from central North Carolina, US, for selected parasites and prevalence of antibodies against viral and bacterial agents. We detected ticks on most (81%) coyotes, with Amblyomma americanum detected on 83% of those with ticks. Fifteen (47%) coyotes were positive for heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), with a greater detection rate in adults (75%) than juveniles (22%). Serology revealed antibodies against canine adenovirus (71%), canine coronavirus (32%), canine distemper virus (17%), canine parvovirus (96%), and Leptospira spp. (7%). We did not detect antibodies against Brucella abortus/suis or Brucella canis. Our results showed that coyotes harbor many common pathogens that present health risks to humans and domestic animals and suggest that continued monitoring of the coyote's role in pathogen transmission is warranted. PMID:25984773

  15. The prevalence of immediate and delayed type hypersensitivity reactions to Microsporum canis antigens in cats.

    PubMed

    Moriello, K A; DeBoer, D J; Greek, J; Kuhl, K; Fintelman, M

    2003-06-01

    Spontaneous recovery from Microsporum canis infections in cats is thought to be dependent on the development of a competent immune response. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of positive delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in cats with and without dermatophytosis. Four groups of cats were intradermally skin tested with M canis extract and test sites were evaluated both subjectively and objectively at 0, 24 and 48 h after injection. Delayed intradermal testing (IDT) reactions were absent in cats not exposed to dermatophytosis (n=20); infected-recovered cats (n=38 culture negative lesion negative and n=43 lesion negative but culture positive) had significantly larger IDT reactions than unexposed cats and cats that were still actively infected (n=18). Based on the results of this study, IDT with M canis extract can be used to assess the cellular immune response of cats with dermatophytosis. PMID:12765626

  16. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  17. Comparative Functional Analysis of 12 Mammalian IFN-λ4 Orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Paquin, Ashley; Onabajo, Olusegun O.; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    IFN-λ4 is a novel type-III interferon with strong clinical significance in humans. Only a subset of individuals—up to 10% of Asians, 50% of Europeans, and 90% of Africans—carry the ΔG allele of a genetic variant rs368234815-TT/ΔG and are genetically able to produce IFN-λ4 protein. Carriers of the ΔG allele have impaired ability to clear infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). IFN-λ4 is also predicted to exist and be functionally important in several nonhuman mammals. In this study, we present the first comparative analysis of 12 mammalian IFN-λ4 orthologs in a human hepatic cell line, HepG2, which supports signaling of the human IFN-λ4. We show that despite differences in protein sequences, functional properties of the recombinant human and nonhuman IFN-λ4 proteins are comparable—they are all expressed as predominantly cytoplasmic proteins that are biologically active for induction of interferon signaling. We show that several IFN-λ4 orthologs can be detected by Western blotting, flow cytometry, and confocal imaging using a monoclonal antibody developed for the human IFN-λ4. Studies of IFN-λ4 in animals should help improve our understanding of the biology of this novel clinically important interferon in normal and disease conditions. PMID:26308395

  18. Membrane Thickness Sensitivity of Prestin Orthologs: The Evolution of a Piezoelectric Protein

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Chisako; Bird, JonathanE.; Iwasa, KuniH.

    2011-01-01

    How proteins evolve new functionality is an important question in biology; prestin (SLC26A5) is a case in point. Prestin drives outer hair cell somatic motility and amplifies mechanical vibrations in the mammalian cochlea. The motility of mammalian prestin is analogous to piezoelectricity, in which charge transfer is coupled to changes in membrane area occupied by the protein. Intriguingly, nonmammalian prestin orthologs function as anion exchangers but are apparently nonmotile. We previously found that mammalian prestin is sensitive to membrane thickness, suggesting that prestin's extended conformation has a thinner hydrophobic height in the lipid bilayer. Because prestin-based motility is a mammalian specialization, we initially hypothesized that nonmotile prestin orthologs, while functioning as anion transporters, should be much less sensitive to membrane thickness. We found the exact opposite to be true. Chicken prestin was the most sensitive to thickness changes, displaying the largest shift in voltage dependence. Platypus prestin displayed an intermediate response to membrane thickness and gerbil prestin was the least sensitive. To explain these observations, we present a theory where force production, rather than displacement, was selected for the evolution of prestin as a piezoelectric membrane motor. PMID:21641306

  19. Rapid Genome Evolution Revealed by Comparative Sequence Analysis of Orthologous Regions from Four Triticeae Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong Qiang; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Kong, Xiuying; Anderson, Olin D.

    2004-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an allohexaploid species, consisting of three subgenomes (A, B, and D). To study the molecular evolution of these closely related genomes, we compared the sequence of a 307-kb physical contig covering the high molecular weight (HMW)-glutenin locus from the A genome of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum, AABB) with the orthologous regions from the B genome of the same wheat and the D genome of the diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii (Anderson et al., 2003; Kong et al., 2004). Although gene colinearity appears to be retained, four out of six genes including the two paralogous HMW-glutenin genes are disrupted in the orthologous region of the A genome. Mechanisms involved in gene disruption in the A genome include retroelement insertions, sequence deletions, and mutations causing in-frame stop codons in the coding sequences. Comparative sequence analysis also revealed that sequences in the colinear intergenic regions of these different genomes were generally not conserved. The rapid genome evolution in these regions is attributable mainly to the large number of retrotransposon insertions that occurred after the divergence of the three wheat genomes. Our comparative studies indicate that the B genome diverged prior to the separation of the A and D genomes. Furthermore, sequence comparison of two distinct types of allelic variations at the HMW-glutenin loci in the A genomes of different hexaploid wheat cultivars with the A genome locus of durum wheat indicates that hexaploid wheat may have more than one tetraploid ancestor. PMID:15122014

  20. Development of universal genetic markers based on single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes in Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailan; Guo, Xiaoqin; Wu, Jiasheng; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ying, Yeqing

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We develop a set of universal genetic markers based on single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes in Poaceae. Being evolutionary conserved, single-copy orthologous (COSII) genes are particularly useful in comparative mapping and phylogenetic investigation among species. In this study, we identified 2,684 COSII genes based on five sequenced Poaceae genomes including rice, maize, sorghum, foxtail millet, and brachypodium, and then developed 1,072 COSII markers whose transferability and polymorphism among five bamboo species were further evaluated with 46 pairs of randomly selected primers. 91.3% of the 46 primers obtained clear amplification in at least one bamboo species, and 65.2% of them produced polymorphism in more than one species. We also used 42 of them to construct the phylogeny for the five bamboo species, and it might reflect more precise evolutionary relationship than the one based on the vegetative morphology. The results indicated a promising prospect of applying these markers to the investigation of genetic diversity and the classification of Poaceae. To ease and facilitate access of the information of common interest to readers, a web-based database of the COSII markers is provided ( http://www.sicau.edu.cn/web/yms/PCOSWeb/PCOS.html ). PMID:23233129

  1. ABS: a database of Annotated regulatory Binding Sites from orthologous promoters

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Enrique; Farr, Domnec; Alb, M. Mar; Messeguer, Xavier; Guig, Roderic

    2006-01-01

    Information about the genomic coordinates and the sequence of experimentally identified transcription factor binding sites is found scattered under a variety of diverse formats. The availability of standard collections of such high-quality data is important to design, evaluate and improve novel computational approaches to identify binding motifs on promoter sequences from related genes. ABS () is a public database of known binding sites identified in promoters of orthologous vertebrate genes that have been manually curated from bibliography. We have annotated 650 experimental binding sites from 68 transcription factors and 100 orthologous target genes in human, mouse, rat or chicken genome sequences. Computational predictions and promoter alignment information are also provided for each entry. A simple and easy-to-use web interface facilitates data retrieval allowing different views of the information. In addition, the release 1.0 of ABS includes a customizable generator of artificial datasets based on the known sites contained in the collection and an evaluation tool to aid during the training and the assessment of motif-finding programs. PMID:16381947

  2. Mining from transcriptomes: 315 single-copy orthologous genes concatenated for the phylogenetic analyses of Orchidaceae

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lin, Min; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships are hotspots for orchid studies with controversial standpoints. Traditionally, the phylogenies of orchids are based on morphology and subjective factors. Although more reliable than classic phylogenic analyses, the current methods are based on a few gene markers and PCR amplification, which are labor intensive and cannot identify the placement of some species with degenerated plastid genomes. Therefore, a more efficient, labor-saving and reliable method is needed for phylogenic analysis. Here, we present a method of orchid phylogeny construction using transcriptomes. Ten representative species covering five subfamilies of Orchidaceae were selected, and 315 single-copy orthologous genes extracted from the transcriptomes of these organisms were applied to reconstruct a more robust phylogeny of orchids. This approach provided a rapid and reliable method of phylogeny construction for Orchidaceae, one of the most diversified family of angiosperms. We also showed the rigorous systematic position of holomycotrophic species, which has previously been difficult to determine because of the degenerated plastid genome. We concluded that the method presented in this study is more efficient and reliable than methods based on a few gene markers for phylogenic analyses, especially for the holomycotrophic species or those whose DNA sequences have been difficult to amplify. Meanwhile, a total of 315 single-copy orthologous genes of orchids are offered and more informative loci could be used in the future orchid phylogenetic studies. PMID:26380706

  3. The wheat TaGI1, involved in photoperiodic flowering, encodes an Arabidopsis GI ortholog.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang Yu; Liu, Mao Sen; Li, Jia Rui; Guan, Chun Mei; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2005-05-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop and requires long day and short night to flower. To study the molecular mechanism of photoperiodic regulation of flowering in this species, we isolated a wheat TaGI1 gene, an ortholog of GIGANTEA (GI) in Arabidopsis. RNA blot hybridization revealed that TaGI1 is expressed in leaves in a rhythmic manner under long day and short day conditions and its rhythmic expression is regulated by photoperiods and circadian clocks. Further study demonstrated that the TaGI1 rhythmic expression in the leaves of seedlings is initiated by photoperiods, implying that TaGI1 does not show circadian regulation until after being entrained in a light/dark cycle. Interestingly, TaGI1 mRNA was detected in adaxial epidermal cells right above the vascular bundles of leaves, suggesting that the localization of TaGI1 transcripts in leaves may function to regulate flowering in response to photoperiods. Since overexpression of TaGI1 altered flowering time in wild type and complemented the gi mutant in Arabidopsis, it confirmed that TaGI1 is an ortholog of GI in Arabidopsis. PMID:16028116

  4. The Dictyostelium discoideum GPHR Ortholog Is an Endoplasmic Reticulum and Golgi Protein with Roles during Development

    PubMed Central

    Deckstein, Jaqueline; van Appeldorn, Jennifer; Tsangarides, Marios; Yiannakou, Kyriacos; Müller, Rolf; Stumpf, Maria; Sukumaran, Salil K.; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum GPHR (Golgi pH regulator)/Gpr89 is a developmentally regulated transmembrane protein present on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus. Transcript levels are low during growth and vary during development, reaching high levels during the aggregation and late developmental stages. The Arabidopsis ortholog was described as a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for abscisic acid present at the plasma membrane, whereas the mammalian ortholog is a Golgi apparatus-associated anion channel functioning as a Golgi apparatus pH regulator. To probe its role in D. discoideum, we generated a strain lacking GPHR. The mutant had different growth characteristics than the AX2 parent strain, exhibited changes during late development, and formed abnormally shaped small slugs and fruiting bodies. An analysis of development-specific markers revealed that their expression was disturbed. The distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus were unaltered at the immunofluorescence level. Likewise, their functions did not appear to be impaired, since membrane proteins were properly processed and glycosylated. Also, changes in the external pH were sensed by the ER, as indicated by a pH-sensitive ER probe, as in the wild type. PMID:25380752

  5. miR-1322 Binding Sites in Paralogous and Orthologous Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niyazova, Raigul; Berillo, Olga; Atambayeva, Shara; Pyrkova, Anna; Alybayeva, Aigul; Ivashchenko, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    We searched for 2,563 microRNA (miRNA) binding sites in 17,494 mRNA sequences of human genes. miR-1322 has more than 2,000 binding sites in 1,058 genes with ΔG/ΔGm ratio of 85% and more. miR-1322 has 1,889 binding sites in CDSs, 215 binding sites in 5′ UTRs, and 160 binding sites in 3′ UTRs. From two to 28 binding sites have arranged localization with the start position through three nucleotides of each following binding site. The nucleotide sequences of these sites in CDSs encode oligopeptides with the same and/or different amino acid sequences. We found that 33% of the target genes encoded transcription factors. miR-1322 has arranged binding sites in the CDSs of orthologous MAMLD1, MAML2, and MAML3 genes. These sites encode a polyglutamine oligopeptide ranging from six to 47 amino acids in length. The properties of miR-1322 binding sites in orthologous and paralogous target genes are discussed. PMID:26114118

  6. Conserved Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in an Orthologous RNase H Pair

    PubMed Central

    Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Many reports qualitatively describe conserved stability and flexibility profiles across protein families, but biophysical modeling schemes have not been available to robustly quantify both. Here we investigate an orthologous RNase H pair by using a minimal distance constraint model (DCM). The DCM is an all atom microscopic model that accurately reproduces heat capacity measurements, and is unique in its ability to harmoniously calculate thermodynamic stability and flexibility in practical computing times. Consequently, quantified stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR) can be determined using the DCM. For the first time, a comparative QSFR analysis is performed, serving as a paradigm study to illustrate the utility of a QSFR analysis for elucidating evolutionarily conserved stability and flexibility profiles. Despite global conservation of QSFR profiles, distinct enthalpy-entropy compensation mechanisms are identified between the RNase H pair. In both cases, local flexibility metrics parallel H/D exchange experiments by correctly identifying the folding core and several flexible regions. Remarkably, at appropriately shifted temperatures (e.g., melting temperature), these differences lead to a global conservation in Landau free energy landscapes, which directly relate thermodynamic stability to global flexibility. Using ensemble-based sampling within free energy basins, rigidly, and flexibly correlated regions are quantified through cooperativity correlation plots. Five conserved flexible regions are identified within the structures of the orthologous pair. Evolutionary conservation of these flexibly correlated regions is strongly suggestive of their catalytic importance. Conclusions made herein are demonstrated to be robust with respect to the DCM parameterization. PMID:16287093

  7. A combined approach exploring gene function based on Worm-Human Orthology

    PubMed Central

    Tamas, Ivica; Hodges, Emily; Dessi, Patrick; Johnsen, Robert; Vaz Gomes, Ana

    2005-01-01

    Background Many aspects of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans biology are conserved between invertebrates and vertebrates establishing this particular organism as an excellent genetic model. Because of its small size, large populations and self-fertilization of the hermaphrodite, functional predictions carried out by genetic modifications as well as RNAi screens, can be rapidly tested. Results In order to explore the function of a set of C. elegans genes of unknown function, as well as their potential functional roles in the human genome, we performed a phylogenetic analysis to select the most probable worm orthologs. A total of 13 C. elegans genes were subjected to down- regulation via RNAi and characterization of expression profiles using GFP strains. Previously unknown distinct expression patterns were observed for four of the analyzed genes, as well as four visible RNAi phenotypes. In addition, subcellular protein over-expression profiles of the human orthologs for seven out of the thirteen genes using human cells were also analyzed. Conclusion By combining a whole-organism approach using C. elegans with complementary experimental work done on human cell lines, this analysis extends currently available information on the selected set of genes. PMID:15877817

  8. Orthologous gene clusters and taxon signature genes for viruses of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, David M; Waller, Alison S; Yamada, Takuji; Bork, Peer; Mushegian, Arcady R; Koonin, Eugene V

    2013-03-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth and encompass a vast amount of genetic diversity. The recent rapid increase in the number of sequenced viral genomes has created unprecedented opportunities for gaining new insight into the structure and evolution of the virosphere. Here, we present an update of the phage orthologous groups (POGs), a collection of 4,542 clusters of orthologous genes from bacteriophages that now also includes viruses infecting archaea and encompasses more than 1,000 distinct virus genomes. Analysis of this expanded data set shows that the number of POGs keeps growing without saturation and that a substantial majority of the POGs remain specific to viruses, lacking homologues in prokaryotic cells, outside known proviruses. Thus, the great majority of virus genes apparently remains to be discovered. A complementary observation is that numerous viral genomes remain poorly, if at all, covered by POGs. The genome coverage by POGs is expected to increase as more genomes are sequenced. Taxon-specific, single-copy signature genes that are not observed in prokaryotic genomes outside detected proviruses were identified for two-thirds of the 57 taxa (those with genomes available from at least 3 distinct viruses), with half of these present in all members of the respective taxon. These signatures can be used to specifically identify the presence and quantify the abundance of viruses from particular taxa in metagenomic samples and thus gain new insights into the ecology and evolution of viruses in relation to their hosts. PMID:23222723

  9. An Orthologous Epigenetic Gene Expression Signature Derived from Differentiating Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Regulators of Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Lin, Yongshun; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Guokai; Michelson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we used predictive gene expression signatures within a multi-species framework to identify the genes that underlie cardiac cell fate decisions in differentiating embryonic stem cells. We show that the overlapping orthologous mouse and human genes are the most accurate candidate cardiogenic genes as these genes identified the most conserved developmental pathways that characterize the cardiac lineage. An RNAi-based screen of the candidate genes in Drosophila uncovered numerous novel cardiogenic genes. shRNA knockdown combined with transcriptome profiling of the newly-identified transcription factors zinc finger protein 503 and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 and the well-known cardiac regulatory factor NK2 homeobox 5 revealed that zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 activates terminal differentiation genes required for cardiomyocyte structure and function whereas zinc finger protein 503 and NK2 homeobox 5 are required for specification of the cardiac lineage. We further demonstrated that an essential role of NK2 homeobox 5 and zinc finger protein 503 in specification of the cardiac lineage is the repression of gene expression programs characteristic of alternative cell fates. Collectively, these results show that orthologous gene expression signatures can be used to identify conserved cardiogenic pathways. PMID:26485529

  10. The Dictyostelium discoideum GPHR ortholog is an endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi protein with roles during development.

    PubMed

    Deckstein, Jaqueline; van Appeldorn, Jennifer; Tsangarides, Marios; Yiannakou, Kyriacos; Mller, Rolf; Stumpf, Maria; Sukumaran, Salil K; Eichinger, Ludwig; Noegel, Angelika A; Riyahi, Tanja Y

    2015-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum GPHR (Golgi pH regulator)/Gpr89 is a developmentally regulated transmembrane protein present on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus. Transcript levels are low during growth and vary during development, reaching high levels during the aggregation and late developmental stages. The Arabidopsis ortholog was described as a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for abscisic acid present at the plasma membrane, whereas the mammalian ortholog is a Golgi apparatus-associated anion channel functioning as a Golgi apparatus pH regulator. To probe its role in D. discoideum, we generated a strain lacking GPHR. The mutant had different growth characteristics than the AX2 parent strain, exhibited changes during late development, and formed abnormally shaped small slugs and fruiting bodies. An analysis of development-specific markers revealed that their expression was disturbed. The distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus were unaltered at the immunofluorescence level. Likewise, their functions did not appear to be impaired, since membrane proteins were properly processed and glycosylated. Also, changes in the external pH were sensed by the ER, as indicated by a pH-sensitive ER probe, as in the wild type. PMID:25380752

  11. Comparative Experimental Infection Study in Dogs with Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma platys and A. phagocytophilum

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Arathy D. S.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Ganta, Chanran K.; Sanderson, Michael W; Alleman, Arthur R.; Munderloh, Ulrike G.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Dogs acquire infections with the Anaplasmataceae family pathogens, E. canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum mostly during summer months when ticks are actively feeding on animals. These pathogens are also identified as causing diseases in people. Despite the long history of tick-borne diseases in dogs, much remains to be defined pertaining to the clinical and pathological outcomes of infections with these pathogens. In the current study, we performed experimental infections in dogs with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. Animals were monitored for 42 days to evaluate infection-specific clinical, hematological and pathological differences. All four pathogens caused systemic persistent infections detectible throughout the 6 weeks of infection assessment. Fever was frequently detected in animals infected with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, and A. platys, but not in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum. Hematological differences were evident in all four infected groups, although significant overlap existed between the groups. A marked reduction in packed cell volume that correlated with reduced erythrocytes and hemoglobin was observed only in E. canis infected animals. A decline in platelet numbers was common with E. canis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum infections. Histopathological lesions in lung, liver and spleen were observed in all four groups of infected dogs; infection with E. canis had the highest pathological scores, followed by E. chaffeensis, then A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. All four pathogens induced IgG responses starting on day 7 post infection, which was predominantly comprised of IgG2 subclass antibodies. This is the first detailed investigation comparing the infection progression and host responses in dogs after inoculation with four pathogens belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family. The study revealed a significant overlap in clinical, hematological and pathological changes resulting from the infections. PMID:26840398

  12. Environmental detection of Microsporum canis arthrospores in the households of infected cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Mancianti, F; Nardoni, S; Corazza, M; D'Achille, P; Ponticelli, C

    2003-12-01

    Microsporum canis is the dermatophyte most frequently recovered from canine and feline ringworm cases. The household environment can be contaminated both by symptomatic animals and through asymptomatic M canis carriage, resulting in a potential human health risk. The load of M canis arthrospores was determined in households harbouring infected pets, in order to evaluate the infectivity of the animals versus the environment. The environments inhabited by 30 symptomatic animals (21 cats and 9 dogs) infected by M canis were examined by sampling both surfaces and indoor air. The surfaces were examined by means of contact plates; the air sampling was performed with a Sas super-100 AIR SAMPLER (PBI, Italy). Environmental contamination was detected in all households with cats, while only four out of nine houses harbouring dogs were found positive. The frequence of isolation in each sampling, and the results in terms of colony forming units per plate in the different houses appeared to be quite homogeneous. Heavily infected environments harboured kittens only. Infected owners were observed in eight households, in all of which at least one infected cat was present. No history of human dermatophytosis in households harbouring dogs was found. On the basis of our results, infected cats appear to cause substantial environmental contamination, and provoke a substantial presence of viable airborne fungal elements. Dogs seem to be of lower importance in the spread of M CANIS: they contaminated surfaces, but they never contaminated the air. The results of this study confirm the potential leading role of the feline species in the environmental spread of M canis. PMID:14623201

  13. Detection of Brucella canis-induced reproductive diseases in a kennel.

    PubMed

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Szeredi, Levente; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Dénes, Béla; Dencso, László; Dán, Ádám; Pálmai, Nimród; Hauser, Zsófia; Lami, Erzsébet; Makrai, László; Erdélyi, Károly; Jánosi, Szilárd

    2011-01-01

    Brucella spp. were isolated from an abortion case submitted for laboratory examination 8 months after the first clinical symptoms appeared in a kennel consisting of 31 dogs. Pathological investigations revealed the parallel presence of necrotic placentitis and the strong immunostaining of trophoblast cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using hyperimmune rabbit anti-Brucella canis primary antibodies. The rapid slide agglutination test was positive in 7 of 31 (23%) cases. The organism B. canis was successfully cultured from the blood, tissues, or vaginal swabs of only 3 of 31 (10%) cases. The isolated strains were identified as B. canis based on their colony morphology and agglutination with R sera. The strains were initially misidentified as B. suis with the "Bruce-ladder" method, and were subsequently correctly identified as B. canis with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing test. Three culture-positive cases and 3 culture-negative cases with histories of reproductive disorders were selected and examined for the presence of B. canis infection using histopathology, IHC, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Characteristic histologic lesions were found in all of the 6 animals, whereas IHC and PCR yielded positive results only in single cases from both groups. The results imply that all cases of canine abortion should be examined for brucellosis by bacterial culture of aborted fetuses and placentas. Immunohistochemical examination of placentas is also recommended because it is a quick and sensitive technique compared with bacterial culture. Multiple methods (i.e., serology, blood, and genital bacterial cultures) should be applied simultaneously and repeatedly for the reliable screening of B. canis infection in live individuals. PMID:21217047

  14. Population identification of Sarcoptes hominis and Sarcoptes canis in China using DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YaE; Cao, ZhiGuo; Cheng, Juan; Hu, Li; Ma, JunXian; Yang, YuanJun; Wang, XiaoPeng; Zeng, JiHui; Wang, TianPing

    2015-03-01

    There has been no consistent conclusion on whether Sarcoptes mites parasitizing in humans and animals are the same species. To identify Sarcoptes (S.) hominis and S. canis in China, gDNA was extracted from individual mites (five from patients with scabies and five from dogs with mange) for amplification of rDNA ITS2, mtDNA 16S, and cox1 fragment sequences. Then, the sequences obtained were aligned with those from different hosts and geographical locations retrieved from GenBank and sequence analyses were conducted. Phylogenetic trees based on 317-bp mtDNA cox1 showed five distinctive branches (species) of Sarcoptes mites, four for S. hominis (S. hominis Chinese, S. nr. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian) and one for S. animal (S. animal). S. animal included mites from nine animal species, with S. canis China, S. canis Australia, and S. canis USA clustering as a subbranch. Further sequence divergence analysis revealed no overlap between intraspecific (? 2.6 %) and interspecific (2.6-10.5 %) divergences in 317-bp mtDNA cox1. However, overlap was detected between intra- and interspecific divergences in 311-bp rDNA ITS2 or 275-bp mtDNA 16S when the divergences exceeded 1.0 %, which resulted in failure in identification of Sarcoptes. The results showed that the 317-bp mtDNA cox1 could be used as a DNA barcode for molecular identification of Sarcoptes mites. In addition, geographical isolation was observed between S. hominis Chinese, S. hominis Australian, and S. hominis Panamanian, but not between all S. canis. S. canis and the other S. animal belonged to the same species. PMID:25547078

  15. Comparative Experimental Infection Study in Dogs with Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma platys and A. phagocytophilum.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arathy D S; Cheng, Chuanmin; Ganta, Chanran K; Sanderson, Michael W; Alleman, Arthur R; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Ganta, Roman R

    2016-01-01

    Dogs acquire infections with the Anaplasmataceae family pathogens, E. canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum mostly during summer months when ticks are actively feeding on animals. These pathogens are also identified as causing diseases in people. Despite the long history of tick-borne diseases in dogs, much remains to be defined pertaining to the clinical and pathological outcomes of infections with these pathogens. In the current study, we performed experimental infections in dogs with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. Animals were monitored for 42 days to evaluate infection-specific clinical, hematological and pathological differences. All four pathogens caused systemic persistent infections detectible throughout the 6 weeks of infection assessment. Fever was frequently detected in animals infected with E. canis, E. chaffeensis, and A. platys, but not in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum. Hematological differences were evident in all four infected groups, although significant overlap existed between the groups. A marked reduction in packed cell volume that correlated with reduced erythrocytes and hemoglobin was observed only in E. canis infected animals. A decline in platelet numbers was common with E. canis, A. platys and A. phagocytophilum infections. Histopathological lesions in lung, liver and spleen were observed in all four groups of infected dogs; infection with E. canis had the highest pathological scores, followed by E. chaffeensis, then A. platys and A. phagocytophilum. All four pathogens induced IgG responses starting on day 7 post infection, which was predominantly comprised of IgG2 subclass antibodies. This is the first detailed investigation comparing the infection progression and host responses in dogs after inoculation with four pathogens belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family. The study revealed a significant overlap in clinical, hematological and pathological changes resulting from the infections. PMID:26840398

  16. OrthoVenn: a web server for genome wide comparison and annotation of orthologous clusters across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Chen, Guoping; Gu, Yong Q

    2015-07-01

    Genome wide analysis of orthologous clusters is an important component of comparative genomics studies. Identifying the overlap among orthologous clusters can enable us to elucidate the function and evolution of proteins across multiple species. Here, we report a web platform named OrthoVenn that is useful for genome wide comparisons and visualization of orthologous clusters. OrthoVenn provides coverage of vertebrates, metazoa, protists, fungi, plants and bacteria for the comparison of orthologous clusters and also supports uploading of customized protein sequences from user-defined species. An interactive Venn diagram, summary counts, and functional summaries of the disjunction and intersection of clusters shared between species are displayed as part of the OrthoVenn result. OrthoVenn also includes in-depth views of the clusters using various sequence analysis tools. Furthermore, OrthoVenn identifies orthologous clusters of single copy genes and allows for a customized search of clusters of specific genes through key words or BLAST. OrthoVenn is an efficient and user-friendly web server freely accessible at http://probes.pw.usda.gov/OrthoVenn or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/OrthoVenn. PMID:25964301

  17. OrthoVenn: a web server for genome wide comparison and annotation of orthologous clusters across multiple species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Chen, Guoping; Gu, Yong Q.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide analysis of orthologous clusters is an important component of comparative genomics studies. Identifying the overlap among orthologous clusters can enable us to elucidate the function and evolution of proteins across multiple species. Here, we report a web platform named OrthoVenn that is useful for genome wide comparisons and visualization of orthologous clusters. OrthoVenn provides coverage of vertebrates, metazoa, protists, fungi, plants and bacteria for the comparison of orthologous clusters and also supports uploading of customized protein sequences from user-defined species. An interactive Venn diagram, summary counts, and functional summaries of the disjunction and intersection of clusters shared between species are displayed as part of the OrthoVenn result. OrthoVenn also includes in-depth views of the clusters using various sequence analysis tools. Furthermore, OrthoVenn identifies orthologous clusters of single copy genes and allows for a customized search of clusters of specific genes through key words or BLAST. OrthoVenn is an efficient and user-friendly web server freely accessible at http://probes.pw.usda.gov/OrthoVenn or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/OrthoVenn. PMID:25964301

  18. Serological evidence of exposure to Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Central Italian healthy domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Ebani, Valentina V; Bertelloni, Fabrizio

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present survey was to estimate the seroprevalences of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the Central Italian feline population. Serum samples of 560 healthy domestic cats were examined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT), considering an antibody titre of 1:40 as cut-off. Seroprevalences of 6.4% and 4.5% were found for E. canis and A. phagocytophilum, respectively. Adult, mixed breed cats showed seroprevalences higher than younger and purebred subjects, whereas no differences were observed in relation to gender and living conditions. PMID:25113987

  19. Ehrlichia canis morulae and DNA detection in whole blood and spleen aspiration samples.

    PubMed

    Faria, Joice Lara Maia; Dagnone, Ana Slvia; Munhoz, Thiago Demarchi; Joo, Carolina Franchi; Pereira, Wanderson Adriano Biscola; Machado, Rosngela Zacarias; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the detection of Ehrlichia canis morulae and DNA by nPCR in whole blood and spleen aspiration. The sample included 40 dogs showing thrombocytopenia associated to clinical signs suggestive of canine ehrlichiosis. Morulae detection showed that in 35 of the dogs studied, 17 had morulae in spleen tissue, and two in buffy coat smears. E. canis DNA was detected in 29/40 blood samples. We verified that morulae detection is more efficient in cytological preparations from spleen aspiration. On the other hand, nPCR on spleen and blood samples were equally efficient for disease diagnosis. PMID:20624346

  20. Ehrlichia canis infection in two dogs that emigrated from endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kenji; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Amimoto, Akiteru; Kitagawa, Kozue; Hiraoka, Hiroko; Mizuno, Takuya; Sato, Hiroshi; Okuda, Masaru

    2012-06-01

    Two dogs, emigrated from Zambia and China to Japan, were diagnosed with Ehrlichia canis infection. Both cases had thrombocytopenia, non-regenerative anemia, and hypergloblinemia with polyclonal gammopathy. Case 1 had ataxia of the hind limbs. Severe meningitis was revealed by magnetic resonance imaging examination. Intracytoplasmic inclusions were observed in mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluid. Case 2 had a history of bilateral epistaxis, and severe pancytopenia was noticed in complete blood count. Diagnosis was finally achieved by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Thus, even in non-endemic areas, E. canis infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of clinically ill dogs that emigrated from endemic areas. PMID:22214859

  1. ELEVATED TRANS-MAMMARY TRANSMISSION OF Toxocara canis LARVAE IN BALB/c MICE

    PubMed Central

    Telmo, Paula de Lima; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; dos Santos, Cristina Araújo; de Aguiar, Patrícia de Souza; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a widespread zoonosis and is considered an important worldwide public health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of trans-mammary Toxocara canis infection in newborn BALB/c mice nursed by females experimentally infected with 1,200 eggs after delivery. After 50 days of age, the presence of larvae in different organs of the offspring was investigated. Trans-mammary infection was confirmed in 73.9% of the mice that had been nursed by infected females. These data show a high trans-mammary transmission of T. canis and confirm the significance of this transmission route in paratenic hosts. PMID:25651332

  2. Development and bin mapping of a Rosaceae Conserved Ortholog Set (COS) of markers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Detailed comparative genome analyses within the economically important Rosaceae family have not been conducted. This is largely due to the lack of conserved gene-based molecular markers that are transferable among the important crop genera within the family [e.g. Malus (apple), Fragaria (strawberry), and Prunus (peach, cherry, apricot and almond)]. The lack of molecular markers and comparative whole genome sequence analysis for this family severely hampers crop improvement efforts as well as QTL confirmation and validation studies. Results We identified a set of 3,818 rosaceaous unigenes comprised of two or more ESTs that correspond to single copy Arabidopsis genes. From this Rosaceae Conserved Orthologous Set (RosCOS), 1039 were selected from which 857 were used for the development of intron-flanking primers and allele amplification. This led to successful amplification and subsequent mapping of 613 RosCOS onto the Prunus TxE reference map resulting in a genome-wide coverage of 0.67 to 1.06 gene-based markers per cM per linkage group. Furthermore, the RosCOS primers showed amplification success rates from 23 to 100% across the family indicating that a substantial part of the RosCOS primers can be directly employed in other less studied rosaceaous crops. Comparisons of the genetic map positions of the RosCOS with the physical locations of the orthologs in the Populus trichocarpa genome identified regions of colinearity between the genomes of Prunus-Rosaceae and Populus-Salicaceae. Conclusion Conserved orthologous genes are extremely useful for the analysis of genome evolution among closely and distantly related species. The results presented in this study demonstrate the considerable potential of the mapped Prunus RosCOS for genome-wide marker employment and comparative whole genome studies within the Rosaceae family. Moreover, these markers will also function as useful anchor points for the genome sequencing efforts currently ongoing in this family as well as for comparative QTL analyses. PMID:19943965

  3. The evolution of protostome GATA factors: Molecular phylogenetics, synteny, and intron/exon structure reveal orthologous relationships

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Invertebrate and vertebrate GATA transcription factors play important roles in ectoderm and mesendoderm development, as well as in cardiovascular and blood cell fate specification. However, the assignment of evolutionarily conserved roles to GATA homologs requires a detailed framework of orthologous relationships. Although two distinct classes, GATA123 and GATA456, have been unambiguously recognized among deuterostome GATA genes, it has been difficult to resolve exact orthologous relationships among protostome homologs. Protostome GATA genes are often present in multiple copies within any one genome, and rapidly evolving gene sequences have obscured orthology among arthropod and nematode GATA homologs. In addition, a lack of taxonomic sampling has prevented a stepwise reconstruction of protostome GATA gene family evolution. Results We have identified the complete GATA complement (53 genes) from a diverse sampling of protostome genomes, including six arthropods, three lophotrochozoans, and two nematodes. Reciprocal best hit BLAST analysis suggested orthology of these GATA genes to either the ancestral bilaterian GATA123 or the GATA456 class. Using molecular phylogenetic analyses of gene sequences, together with conserved synteny and comparisons of intron/exon structure, we inferred the evolutionary relationships among these 53 protostome GATA homologs. In particular, we resolved the orthology and evolutionary birth order of all arthropod GATA homologs including the highly divergent Drosophila GATA genes. Conclusion Our combined analyses confirm that all protostome GATA transcription factor genes are members of either the GATA123 or GATA456 class, and indicate that there have been multiple protostome-specific duplications of GATA456 homologs. Three GATA456 genes exhibit linkage in multiple protostome species, suggesting that this gene cluster arose by tandem duplications from an ancestral GATA456 gene. Within arthropods this GATA456 cluster appears orthologous and widely conserved. Furthermore, the intron/exon structures of the arthropod GATA456 orthologs suggest a distinct order of gene duplication events. At present, however, the evolutionary relationship to similarly linked GATA456 paralogs in lophotrochozoans remains unclear. Our study shows how sampling of additional genomic data, especially from less derived and interspersed protostome taxa, can be used to resolve the orthologous relationships within more divergent gene families. PMID:18412965

  4. Revisiting the concept of behavior patterns in animal behavior with an example from food-caching sequences in wolves (Canis lupus), coyotes (Canis latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Gadbois, Simon; Sievert, Olivia; Reeve, Catherine; Harrington, F H; Fentress, J C

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the history, conceptualization, and relevance of behavior patterns in modern ethology by explaining the evolution of the concepts of fixed action patterns and modal action patterns. We present the movement toward a more flexible concept of natural action sequences with significant degrees of (production and expressive) freedom. An example is presented with the food caching behavior of three Canidae species: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), coyote (Canis latrans) and gray wolf (Canis lupus). Evolutionary, ecological, and neuroecological/neuroethological arguments are presented to explain the difference in levels of complexity and stereotypy between Canis and Vulpes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. PMID:25446624

  5. Negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by the Brassica oleracea ABI1 ortholog.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feifei; Wang, Mengyao; Hao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhao, Huixian; Guo, Aiguang; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2013-12-13

    ABI1 (ABA Insensitive 1) is an important component of the core regulatory network in early ABA (Abscisic acid) signaling. Here, we investigated the functions of an ABI1 ortholog in Brassica oleracea (BolABI1). The expression of BolABI1 was dramatically induced by drought, and constitutive expression of BolABI1 confers ABA insensitivity upon the wild-type. Subcellular localization and phosphatase assays reveal that BolABI1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors phosphatase activity. Furthermore, BolABI1 interacts with a homolog of OST1 (OPEN STOMATA 1) in B. oleracea (BolOST1) and can dephosphorylate ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5) in vitro. Overall, these results suggest that BolABI1 is a functional PP2C-type protein phosphatase that is involved in the negative modulation of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:24269821

  6. Inferring nonneutral evolution from human-chimp-mouse orthologous gene trios.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew G; Glanowski, Stephen; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thomas, Paul D; Kejariwal, Anish; Todd, Melissa A; Tanenbaum, David M; Civello, Daniel; Lu, Fu; Murphy, Brian; Ferriera, Steve; Wang, Gary; Zheng, Xianqgun; White, Thomas J; Sninsky, John J; Adams, Mark D; Cargill, Michele

    2003-12-12

    Even though human and chimpanzee gene sequences are nearly 99% identical, sequence comparisons can nevertheless be highly informative in identifying biologically important changes that have occurred since our ancestral lineages diverged. We analyzed alignments of 7645 chimpanzee gene sequences to their human and mouse orthologs. These three-species sequence alignments allowed us to identify genes undergoing natural selection along the human and chimp lineage by fitting models that include parameters specifying rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution. This evolutionary approach revealed an informative set of genes with significantly different patterns of substitution on the human lineage compared with the chimpanzee and mouse lineages. Partitions of genes into inferred biological classes identified accelerated evolution in several functional classes, including olfaction and nuclear transport. In addition to suggesting adaptive physiological differences between chimps and humans, human-accelerated genes are significantly more likely to underlie major known Mendelian disorders. PMID:14671302

  7. Molecular detection of Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis in dogs from Kabylie, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, Mustapha; Loudahi, Abdelghani; Mediannikov, Oleg; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Davoust, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys are bacteria belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family that cause acute, self-limiting and sometimes fatal vector-borne infections in dogs. These bacteria have been reported worldwide and are transmitted mainly by Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Aside from a report on E. canis once in 1935, no other Anaplasmataceae bacteria have been reported in Algeria to date. The aim of this study was to identify the microbial species implicated in ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis by a molecular epidemiological survey in dogs. The study was carried out in Kabylie, in northeast Algeria. Sampling was performed in 11 municipalities in the province of Tizi Ouzou and 2 municipalities in the province of Bjaa. Peripheral blood samples from 110 dogs were screened by qPCR, which is capable of identifying most Anaplasmataceae bacteria. Out of 110, a total of 13 samples screened positive (7/110 E. canis and 6/110 A. platys), and two genetic variants of A. platys and one of E. canis were identified. This is the first study to report the presence of A. platys in dogs from Algeria using a molecular investigative method. This survey was conducted in early spring. As tick activity can affect the prevalence of these pathogens in dogs, further investigations are needed to establish the year-round prevalence of these infections. PMID:25583345

  8. Rapid screening and cultivation of Ehrlichia canis from refrigerated carrier blood

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Jennifer C.; Crothers, Michelle L.; Schaefer, John J.; Stanley, Patrick D.; Stich, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Improved detection and isolation of rickettsial agents from naturally infected dogs would facilitate understanding the epidemiologic roles of these hosts. In this study, current methods were refined for rapid screening of carrier blood and ticks for Ehrlichia canis, and the feasibility of blood culture after PCR screening was addressed. PMID:19438630

  9. Differential Expression of Iron Acquisition Genes by Brucella melitensis and Brucella canis during Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glasner, Jeremy; Splitter, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. cause chronic zoonotic disease often affecting individuals and animals in impoverished economic or public health conditions; however, these bacteria do not have obvious virulence factors. Restriction of iron availability to pathogens is an effective strategy of host defense. For brucellae, virulence depends on the ability to survive and replicate within the host cell where iron is an essential nutrient for the growth and survival of both mammalian and bacterial cells. Iron is a particularly scarce nutrient for bacteria with an intracellular lifestyle. Brucella melitensis and Brucella canis share ?99% of their genomes but differ in intracellular lifestyles. To identify differences, gene transcription of these two pathogens was examined during infection of murine macrophages and compared to broth grown bacteria. Transcriptome analysis of B. melitensis and B. canis revealed differences of genes involved in iron transport. Gene transcription of the TonB, enterobactin, and ferric anguibactin transport systems was increased in B. canis but not B. melitensis during infection of macrophages. The data suggest differences in iron requirements that may contribute to differences observed in the lifestyles of these closely related pathogens. The initial importance of iron for B. canis but not for B. melitensis helps elucidate differing intracellular survival strategies for two closely related bacteria and provides insight for controlling these pathogens. PMID:22403618

  10. First description of natural Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys infections in dogs from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Eiras, Diego Fernando; Craviotto, Mara Beln; Vezzani, Daro; Eyal, Osnat; Baneth, Gad

    2013-03-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family are vector transmitted agents that affect a variety of vertebrate hosts including the tick-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys, which cause canine monocytic ehrlichiosis and cyclic thrombocytopenia, respectively. These two infections, typically reported from tropical and sub-tropical regions, have not been previously reported in dogs from Argentina. A total of 86 blood samples from dogs with suspected rickettsial disease and 28 non-suspected dogs were studied. Analysis included evaluation of hematological findings, PCR for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species and sequencing of the positive PCR products. E. canis was detected in the blood of six dogs and A. platys in eighteen. All the dogs categorized as non-suspected were negative by PCR. Co-infection with Hepatozoon canis and Babesia vogeli was documented. This first report of E. canis and A. platys infections in dogs from Argentina indicates that these tick-borne infections have a considerably broader range than previously recognized in South America. PMID:23273677

  11. Outbreak of tinea capitis by Trichophyton tonsurans and Microsporum canis in Niteri, RJ, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Towersey, L; Hay, R J; Monteiro, M H; Lago, M B; Martins, E de C; Estrella, R R

    1992-01-01

    18 girls from an orphanage (Orfanato Santo Antnio) in Niteri presented tinea capitis due to Trichophyton tonsurans (15 cases-83.3%) and Microsporum canis (3 cases-26.7%). Comments are made about clinical, mycological and therapeutic aspects of this microepidemic. PMID:1342076

  12. Clinical, Hematologic, and Molecular Findings in Naturally Occurring Babesia canis vogeli in Egyptian Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Salem, N. Y.; Farag, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Canine babesiosis is a clinically important hemoprotozoan parasite affecting dogs. The goal of this present study was to determine the clinical symptoms and to establish its hematological and microscopic detection and compare it with the PCR findings attained from dogs infected with Babesia canis vogeli. Methodology/Principal Findings. 13-PCR confirmed Babesia-infected dogs were examined; seminested PCR was used to discover the precise type of Babesia and Babesia canis vogeli was the only subspecies detected. The most consistent clinical signs were elevated rectal temperature and a pale mucous membrane. Thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, and lymphocytosis, along with a significant reduction in red cell parameters, were the most commonly recorded hematologic alterations. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of typical large merozoites and trophozoites of B. canis in the ratio 76.92%. Conclusions/Significance. The presumptive diagnosis of canine babesiosis should be based on a fever and anemia, while thrombocytopenia is considered the hallmark of the disease; microscopic examination may not be very revealing in the detection at low parasitemia, but it remains the most rapid confirmatory method. Seminested PCR turned out to be a sensitive and accurate method for diagnosis; during the process of differentiation between Babesia subspecies, only B. canis subsp. vogeli was detected. PMID:24693460

  13. The Use of Ozonized Oil in the Treatment of Dermatophitosis Caused by Microsporum Canis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Fernanda Vasquez; Ueda, Suely Mitoi Ykko; Navarini, Alessandra; Mmica, Lycia Mara Jenn

    2011-01-01

    The ozone is effective against most microorganisms due to its high oxidant power. Low concentrations and short-term contact are sufficient to inactivate bacteria, mold, yeast, parasites, seaweeds, protozoa and fungi. Microsporum canis is an important agent of dermatophitosis in human and animal. The aim of the current study was to assess the efficacy of ozonized oil over Microsporum canis in rabbits. Eighteen male New Zealand white rabbits, weight ranging from 2 to 3.2 kg were depilated in the cranial dorso-lateral and right caudal, and cranial and left caudal regions. The regions were inoculated with Microsporum canis, excepting the right caudal region, and were denominated TM, O, OM and M, respectively. After seven days, the treatment of lesions in TM began with 0.12g of terbinaphine 1% cream; in OM and O with 0.12g of ozonized oil; all animals were treated once a day for 28 days. Region M was not treated. Material was collected from those regions for cultivation in Sabouraud agar at day 28 of treatment. In the evolution of the treatment with terbinaphine, of 14 contaminated regions with Microsporum canis ten evolved to cure. With the ozonized oil, of 15 contaminations, four were cured. Clinically, that is, the macroscopic evaluation of lesions showed improvement in the TM and OM treated regions. We can conclude that there was statistical evidence of the protection action of the oil against the dermatophyte. PMID:24031632

  14. Hair Contamination of Sheepdog and Pet Dogs with Toxocara canis Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M; Javadi, S; Firozi, R; Rezaei, F; Khezri, AR; Hadian, M

    2012-01-01

    Background We tried to investigate the hair contamination of pet dogs and farm sheepdog with Toxocara eggs in terms of the different sex and age groups in north-west of Iran (Urmia and its suburbs). Methods Hair samples were collected from a total of 138 pet and farm sheepdogs from November 2008 to June 2009 in Urmia City and the suburb (West Azerbaijan-Iran) and examined for the presence of T. canis eggs. Results T. canis eggs found in 60 samples altogether (pet and shepherd dogs) showed a contamination rate of 36.2%. The number of observed T. canis eggs in each microscope field was varied from 1 to > 400. The age of the dog was found a significant factor to influence the prevalence and intensity of contamination, with 82% of all the eggs recovered from puppies (six months and younger). Additionally, the numbers of eggs in farm sheepdogs were significantly higher than pet dogs (P<0.05). Conclusion This report shows that direct contact with T. canis infected dogs, particularly puppies from shepherd dogs, may pose a serious hazard to human. Besides, as they may harbor a considerable number of eggs on their hair, they can contaminate the soil and the environment. PMID:23323100

  15. Killing of a muskox, Ovibus moschatus, by two wolves, Canis lupis, and subsequent caching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Adams, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    The killing of a cow Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) by two Wolves (Canis lupus) in 5 minutes during summer on Ellesmere Island is described. After two of the four feedings observed, one Wolf cached a leg and regurgitated food as far as 2.3 km away and probably farther. The implications of this behavior for deriving food-consumption estimates are discussed

  16. Gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a natural definitive host for Neospora caninum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) was found to be a new natural definitive host for Neospora caninum. This finding is based on the recovery of Neospora-like oocysts from the feces of 3 of 73 wolves from Minnesota examined at necropsy, and on successful amplification of N. caninum-specific sequences from ...

  17. Proximity of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, ranges to wolf Canis lupus, pack homesites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    Seven adult female White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Minnesota lived within 1.8 km of Wolf pack (Canis lupus) homesites without vacating their home ranges. Six of these deer and at least three of their fawns survived through the Wolf homesite period.

  18. Killing of a Muskox, Ovibos moschatus, by two Wolves, Canis lupus, and subsequent caching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Mech L.; Adams, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    The killing of a cow Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) by two Wolves (Canis lupus) in 5 minutes during summer on Ellesmere Island is described. After two of the four feedings observed, one Wolf cached a leg and regurgitated food as far as 2.3 km away and probably farther. The implications of this behavior for deriving food-consumption estimates are discussed.

  19. A gray wolf (Canis lupus) delivers live prey to a pup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    A two-year-old sibling Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) carefully captured an Arctic Hare (Lepus arcticus) leveret alive on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada, and delivered it alive to a pup 28–33 days old. This appears to be the first observation of a Gray Wolf delivering live prey to a pup.

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from the gray wolf Canis lupus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study feral gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 130 (52.4%) of 248 wolves tested by the modified agglutination test...

  1. First identification of Trichinella sp. in golden jackal (Canis aureus) in Romania.

    PubMed

    Blaga, R; Gherman, C; Seucom, D; Cozma, V; Boireau, P

    2008-04-01

    Larvae of Trichinella sp. were identified in a golden jackal (Canis aureus) from Romania by both trichinelloscopy and artificial digestion. The larvae were identified as Trichinella britovi using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction biotyping method. This is the first report of Trichinella sp. in a jackal in Romania. PMID:18436679

  2. Failure of imidocarb dipropionate and toltrazuril/emodepside plus clindamycin in treating Hepatozoon canis infection.

    PubMed

    De Tommasi, Anna Sara; Giannelli, Alessio; de Caprariis, Donato; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Di Paola, Giancarlo; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2014-03-01

    Hepatozoonosis caused by Hepatozoon canis (Eucoccidiorida, Hepatozoidae) is among the most widespread vector-borne infections of dogs, primarily transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato ticks. Based on the absence of a consensus on the treatment regimes for canine hepatozoonosis, the present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of imidocarb dipropionate (5-6 mg/kg subcutaneously once a week for 6 weeks), and of toltrazuril/emodepside (Procox(), 15 mg/kg once a day for 6 days) in association with clindamycin (15 mg/kg once a day for 21 days) in treating naturally infected dogs. At the enrollment time (T0), 32 dogs, cytologically or molecularly positive for H. canis, were assigned to test and control groups. Animals were treated according to the specific therapeutic protocol, and the presence of H. canis gamonts was assessed weekly by cytology and PCR throughout six months (T1-T19). In addition, any abnormality in leucocyte morphology was evaluated and recorded. Results indicate that, in spite of a reduction in the percentage of infected dogs, both treatments did not provide parasitological cure. Accordingly, new treatment protocols or active compounds against H. canis should be investigated. PMID:24439769

  3. RAD sequencing and genomic simulations resolve hybrid origins within North American Canis

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, L. Y.; Devillard, S.; Boone, J. Q.; Hohenlohe, P. A.; White, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Top predators are disappearing worldwide, significantly changing ecosystems that depend on top-down regulation. Conflict with humans remains the primary roadblock for large carnivore conservation, but for the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon), disagreement over its evolutionary origins presents a significant barrier to conservation in Canada and has impeded protection for grey wolves (Canis lupus) in the USA. Here, we use 127 235 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) of wolves and coyotes, in combination with genomic simulations, to test hypotheses of hybrid origins of Canis types in eastern North America. A principal components analysis revealed no evidence to support eastern wolves, or any other Canis type, as the product of grey wolf × western coyote hybridization. In contrast, simulations that included eastern wolves as a distinct taxon clarified the hybrid origins of Great Lakes-boreal wolves and eastern coyotes. Our results support the eastern wolf as a distinct genomic cluster in North America and help resolve hybrid origins of Great Lakes wolves and eastern coyotes. The data provide timely information that will shed new light on the debate over wolf conservation in eastern North America. PMID:26156129

  4. RAD sequencing and genomic simulations resolve hybrid origins within North American Canis.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, L Y; Devillard, S; Boone, J Q; Hohenlohe, P A; White, B N

    2015-07-01

    Top predators are disappearing worldwide, significantly changing ecosystems that depend on top-down regulation. Conflict with humans remains the primary roadblock for large carnivore conservation, but for the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon), disagreement over its evolutionary origins presents a significant barrier to conservation in Canada and has impeded protection for grey wolves (Canis lupus) in the USA. Here, we use 127,235 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) of wolves and coyotes, in combination with genomic simulations, to test hypotheses of hybrid origins of Canis types in eastern North America. A principal components analysis revealed no evidence to support eastern wolves, or any other Canis type, as the product of grey wolf × western coyote hybridization. In contrast, simulations that included eastern wolves as a distinct taxon clarified the hybrid origins of Great Lakes-boreal wolves and eastern coyotes. Our results support the eastern wolf as a distinct genomic cluster in North America and help resolve hybrid origins of Great Lakes wolves and eastern coyotes. The data provide timely information that will shed new light on the debate over wolf conservation in eastern North America. PMID:26156129

  5. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of serine/threonine protein phosphatase of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Hu, Shi Jun; Huang, Han Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Xia, Qing You

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis (T. canis) is a widely prevalent zoonotic parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. We generated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the serine/threonine phosphatase gene of T. canis (Tc stp) using 5' rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. The 1192-bp sequence contained a continuous 942-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 313-amino-acid polypeptide. The Tc STP polypeptide shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity with the predicted STPs of Loa loa (89%), Brugia malayi (86%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (76%), and Oesophagostomumdentatum (76%). The Tc STP contains GDXHG, GDXVDRG, GNHE motifs, which are characteristic of members of the phosphoprotein phosphatase family. Our quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the Tc STP was expressed in six different tissues in the adult male, with high-level expression in the spermary, vas deferens, and musculature, but was not expressed in the adult female, suggesting that Tc STP might be involved in spermatogenesis and mating behavior. Thus, STP might represent a potential molecular target for controlling T. canis reproduction. PMID:24657583

  6. BEHAVIORAL AND MEMORY CHANGES IN Mus musculus COINFECTED BY Toxocara canis AND Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Corra, Flvia Motta; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Lescano, Susana A. Zevallos; dos Santos, Sergio Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Several researchers have stated that parasites can alter the behavior of their hosts, in order to increase the transmission rate, principally when prey-predator relationships are a reliable way of infection transmission. The aim of this study was to verify the occurrence of changes in anxiety and short-term memory patterns in experimentally infected Mus musculus by Toxocara canis and/or Toxoplasma gondii. Forty male Mus musculus (Balb/c) eight-week-old were divided into four groups of 10 mice each. One group was infected with 300 eggs of Toxocara canis; a second group was submitted to infection with 10 cysts of Toxoplasma gondii; a third group was concomitantly infected with both parasites with the same inoculums and the last group was maintained without infection. The anxiety levels were evaluated using an elevated plus maze and an actometer; the short-term memory was determined by a two-way active avoidance equipment. The determination of anxiety levels were conducted 40 and 70 days after infection and the short-term memory was evaluated 140 days after infection. Mice chronically infected by Toxoplasma gondii showed impaired learning and short-term memory, but no significant differences were found in mice infected by Toxocara canis or concomitantly infected by Toxocara canis and Toxoplasma gondii when compared to non infected mice. PMID:25076438

  7. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  8. Phyletic Profiling with Cliques of Orthologs Is Enhanced by Signatures of Paralogy Relationships

    PubMed Central

    kunca, Nives; Bonjak, Matko; Kriko, Anita; Panov, Pan?e; Deroski, Sao; muc, Tomislav; Supek, Fran

    2013-01-01

    New microbial genomes are sequenced at a high pace, allowing insight into the genetics of not only cultured microbes, but a wide range of metagenomic collections such as the human microbiome. To understand the deluge of genomic data we face, computational approaches for gene functional annotation are invaluable. We introduce a novel model for computational annotation that refines two established concepts: annotation based on homology and annotation based on phyletic profiling. The phyletic profiling-based model that includes both inferred orthologs and paralogshomologs separated by a speciation and a duplication event, respectivelyprovides more annotations at the same average Precision than the model that includes only inferred orthologs. For experimental validation, we selected 38 poorly annotated Escherichia coli genes for which the model assigned one of three GO terms with high confidence: involvement in DNA repair, protein translation, or cell wall synthesis. Results of antibiotic stress survival assays on E. coli knockout mutants showed high agreement with our model's estimates of accuracy: out of 38 predictions obtained at the reported Precision of 60%, we confirmed 25 predictions, indicating that our confidence estimates can be used to make informed decisions on experimental validation. Our work will contribute to making experimental validation of computational predictions more approachable, both in cost and time. Our predictions for 998 prokaryotic genomes include ?400000 specific annotations with the estimated Precision of 90%, ?19000 of which are highly specifice.g. penicillin binding, tRNA aminoacylation for protein translation, or pathogenesisand are freely available at http://gorbi.irb.hr/. PMID:23308060

  9. Quest for Orthologs Entails Quest for Tree of Life: In Search of the Gene Stream

    PubMed Central

    Boeckmann, Brigitte; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rees, Jonathan A.; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Muffato, Matthieu; Yilmaz, Pelin; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bork, Peer; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Quest for Orthologs (QfO) is a community effort with the goal to improve and benchmark orthology predictions. As quality assessment assumes prior knowledge on species phylogenies, we investigated the congruency between existing species trees by comparing the relationships of 147 QfO reference organisms from six Tree of Life (ToL)/species tree projects: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) taxonomy, Opentree of Life, the sequenced species/species ToL, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) database, and trees published by Ciccarelli et al. (Ciccarelli FD, et al. 2006. Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life. Science 311:1283–1287) and by Huerta-Cepas et al. (Huerta-Cepas J, Marcet-Houben M, Gabaldon T. 2014. A nested phylogenetic reconstruction approach provides scalable resolution in the eukaryotic Tree Of Life. PeerJ PrePrints 2:223) Our study reveals that each species tree suggests a different phylogeny: 87 of the 146 (60%) possible splits of a dichotomous and rooted tree are congruent, while all other splits are incongruent in at least one of the species trees. Topological differences are observed not only at deep speciation events, but also within younger clades, such as Hominidae, Rodentia, Laurasiatheria, or rosids. The evolutionary relationships of 27 archaea and bacteria are highly inconsistent. By assessing 458,108 gene trees from 65 genomes, we show that consistent species topologies are more often supported by gene phylogenies than contradicting ones. The largest concordant species tree includes 77 of the QfO reference organisms at the most. Results are summarized in the form of a consensus ToL (http://swisstree.vital-it.ch/species_tree) that can serve different benchmarking purposes. PMID:26133389

  10. Overexpression of a citrus NDR1 ortholog increases disease resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Albrecht, Ute; Shimizu, Rena; Wang, Guanfeng; Bowman, Kim D.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging devastating diseases, such as Huanglongbing (HLB) and citrus canker, have caused tremendous losses to the citrus industry worldwide. Genetic engineering is a powerful approach that could allow us to increase citrus resistance against these diseases. The key to the success of this approach relies on a thorough understanding of defense mechanisms of citrus. Studies of Arabidopsis and other plants have provided a framework for us to better understand defense mechanisms of citrus. Salicylic acid (SA) is a key signaling molecule involved in basal defense and resistance (R) gene-mediated defense against broad-spectrum pathogens. The Arabidopsis gene NDR1 (NON-RACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1) is a positive regulator of SA accumulation and is specifically required for signaling mediated by a subset of R genes upon recognition of their cognate pathogen effectors. Our bioinformatic analysis identified an ortholog of NDR1 from citrus, CsNDR1. Overexpression of CsNDR1 complemented susceptibility conferred by the Arabidopsis ndr1-1 mutant to Pseudomonas syringae strains and also led to enhanced resistance to an oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Such heightened resistance is associated with increased SA production and expression of the defense marker gene PATHOGENESIS RELATED 1 (PR1). In addition, we found that expression of PR1 and accumulation of SA were induced to modest levels in citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the bacterial pathogen associated with HLB disease. Thus, our data suggest that CsNDR1 is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis NDR1. Since Ca. L. asiaticus infection only activates modest levels of defense responses in citrus, we propose that genetically increasing SA/NDR1-mediated pathways could potentially lead to enhanced resistance against HLB, citrus canker, and other destructive diseases challenging global citrus production. PMID:23761797

  11. Overexpression of a citrus NDR1 ortholog increases disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Zhang, Chong; Albrecht, Ute; Shimizu, Rena; Wang, Guanfeng; Bowman, Kim D

    2013-01-01

    Emerging devastating diseases, such as Huanglongbing (HLB) and citrus canker, have caused tremendous losses to the citrus industry worldwide. Genetic engineering is a powerful approach that could allow us to increase citrus resistance against these diseases. The key to the success of this approach relies on a thorough understanding of defense mechanisms of citrus. Studies of Arabidopsis and other plants have provided a framework for us to better understand defense mechanisms of citrus. Salicylic acid (SA) is a key signaling molecule involved in basal defense and resistance (R) gene-mediated defense against broad-spectrum pathogens. The Arabidopsis gene NDR1 (NON-RACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE 1) is a positive regulator of SA accumulation and is specifically required for signaling mediated by a subset of R genes upon recognition of their cognate pathogen effectors. Our bioinformatic analysis identified an ortholog of NDR1 from citrus, CsNDR1. Overexpression of CsNDR1 complemented susceptibility conferred by the Arabidopsis ndr1-1 mutant to Pseudomonas syringae strains and also led to enhanced resistance to an oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Such heightened resistance is associated with increased SA production and expression of the defense marker gene PATHOGENESIS RELATED 1 (PR1). In addition, we found that expression of PR1 and accumulation of SA were induced to modest levels in citrus infected with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the bacterial pathogen associated with HLB disease. Thus, our data suggest that CsNDR1 is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis NDR1. Since Ca. L. asiaticus infection only activates modest levels of defense responses in citrus, we propose that genetically increasing SA/NDR1-mediated pathways could potentially lead to enhanced resistance against HLB, citrus canker, and other destructive diseases challenging global citrus production. PMID:23761797

  12. Alternative splicing of the AGAMOUS orthologous gene in double flower of Magnolia stellata (Magnoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Zhi-Xiong; Ma, Jiang; Song, Yi; Chen, Fa-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Magnolia stellata is a woody ornamental shrub with more petaloid tepals than related plants from family Magnoliaceae. Recent studies revealed that expression changes in an AGAMOUS (AG) orthologous gene could resulted in double flowers with increased numbers of petals. We isolated three transcripts encoding different isoforms of a single AG orthologous gene, MastAG, mastag_2 and mastag_3, from M. stellata. Sequence alignments and Southern blot analyses suggested that MastAG was a single-copy gene in M. stellata genomes, and that mastag_2 and mastag_3 were abnormally spliced isoforms of MastAG. An 144bp exon skipping in MastAG results in the truncated mastag_2 protein lacking the completely I domain and 18 aa of the K1 subdomain, whereas an 165bp exon skipping of MastAG produces a truncated mastag_3 protein lacking 6 aa of the K3 subdomain and the completely C terminal region. Expression analyses showed that three alternative splicing (AS) isoforms expressed only in developing stamens and carpels. Functional analyses revealed that MastAG could mimic the endogenous AG to specify carpel identity, but failed to regulate stamen development in an Arabidopsis ag-1 mutant. Moreover, the key domain or subdomain deletions represented by mastag_2 and mastag_3 resulted in loss of C-function. However, ectopic expression of mastag_2 in Arabidopsis produced flowers with sepals converted into carpeloid organs, but without petals and stamens, whereas ectopic expression of mastag_3 in Arabidopsis could mimic the flower phenotype of the ag mutant and produced double flowers with homeotic transformation of stamens into petals and carpels into another ag flower. Our results also suggest that mastag_3 holds some potential for biotechnical engineering to create multi-petal phenotypes in commercial ornamental cultivars. PMID:26706078

  13. The Evolutionary Panorama of Organ-Specifically Expressed or Repressed Orthologous Genes in Nine Vertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Libing; Liu, Gangbiao; Zou, Yangyun; Zhou, Zhan; Su, Zhixi; Gu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology provides the detailed transcriptomic information for a biological sample. Using the RNA-Seq data of six organs from nine vertebrate species, we identified a number of organ-specifically expressed or repressed orthologous genes whose expression patterns are mostly conserved across nine species. Our analyses show the following results: (i) About 80% of these genes have a chordate or more ancient origin and more than half of them are the legacy of one or multiple rounds of large-scale gene duplication events. (ii) Their evolutionary rates are shaped by the organ in which they are expressed or repressed, e.g. the genes specially expressed in testis and liver generally evolve more than twice as fast as the ones specially expressed in brain and cerebellum. The organ-specific transcription factors were discriminated from these genes. The ChIP-seq data from the ENCODE project also revealed the transcription-related factors that might be involved in regulating human organ-specifically expressed or repressed genes. Some of them are shared by all six human organs. The comparison of ENCODE data with mouse/chicken ChIP-seq data proposes that organ-specifically expressed or repressed orthologous genes are regulated in various combinatorial fashions in different species, although their expression features are conserved among these species. We found that the duplication events in some gene families might help explain the quick organ/tissue divergence in vertebrate lineage. The phylogenetic analysis of testis-specifically expressed genes suggests that some of them are prone to develop new functions for other organs/tissues. PMID:25679776

  14. Quest for Orthologs Entails Quest for Tree of Life: In Search of the Gene Stream.

    PubMed

    Boeckmann, Brigitte; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rees, Jonathan A; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Muffato, Matthieu; Yilmaz, Pelin; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bork, Peer; Lewis, Suzanna E; Gabaldn, Toni

    2015-07-01

    Quest for Orthologs (QfO) is a community effort with the goal to improve and benchmark orthology predictions. As quality assessment assumes prior knowledge on species phylogenies, we investigated the congruency between existing species trees by comparing the relationships of 147 QfO reference organisms from six Tree of Life (ToL)/species tree projects: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) taxonomy, Opentree of Life, the sequenced species/species ToL, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) database, and trees published by Ciccarelli et al. (Ciccarelli FD, et al. 2006. Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life. Science 311:1283-1287) and by Huerta-Cepas et al. (Huerta-Cepas J, Marcet-Houben M, Gabaldon T. 2014. A nested phylogenetic reconstruction approach provides scalable resolution in the eukaryotic Tree Of Life. PeerJ PrePrints 2:223) Our study reveals that each species tree suggests a different phylogeny: 87 of the 146 (60%) possible splits of a dichotomous and rooted tree are congruent, while all other splits are incongruent in at least one of the species trees. Topological differences are observed not only at deep speciation events, but also within younger clades, such as Hominidae, Rodentia, Laurasiatheria, or rosids. The evolutionary relationships of 27 archaea and bacteria are highly inconsistent. By assessing 458,108 gene trees from 65 genomes, we show that consistent species topologies are more often supported by gene phylogenies than contradicting ones. The largest concordant species tree includes 77 of the QfO reference organisms at the most. Results are summarized in the form of a consensus ToL (http://swisstree.vital-it.ch/species_tree) that can serve different benchmarking purposes. PMID:26133389

  15. Molecular and histopathological detection of Hepatozoon canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatozoon canis is a protozoan tick-borne pathogen of dogs and wild canids. Hepatozoon spp. have been reported to infect foxes in different continents and recent studies have mostly used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection and characterization of the infecting species. Surveying red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) may contribute to better understanding the epidemiology of canine vector-borne diseases, including hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis in domestic dogs. The present study investigated the prevalence of Hepatozoon spp. by means of histopathology and molecular analysis of different tissues in red foxes from different parts of Portugal. Methods Blood and tissues including bone marrow, heart, hind leg muscle, jejunum, kidney, liver, lung, popliteal or axillary lymph nodes, spleen and/or tongue were collected from 91 red foxes from eight districts in northern, central and southern Portugal. Tissues were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified a ~650bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. and the DNA products were sequenced. Results Hepatozoon canis was detected in 68 out of 90 foxes (75.6%) from all the sampled areas by PCR and sequencing. Histopathology revealed H. canis meronts similar in shape to those found in dogs in the bone marrow of 11 (23.4%) and in the spleen of two (4.3%) out of 47 foxes (p?=?0.007). All the 11 foxes found positive by histopathology were also positive by PCR of bone marrow and/or blood. Positivity by PCR (83.0%) was significantly higher (p?canis were 9899% identical to those in GenBank. Conclusions Hepatozoon canis was found to be highly prevalent in red fox populations from northern, central and southern Portugal. Detection of the parasite by histopathology was significantly less sensitive than by PCR. Red foxes are a presumptive reservoir of H. canis infection for domestic dogs. PMID:24655375

  16. First molecular evidence of Hepatozoon canis infection in red foxes and golden jackals from Hungary

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, Hepatozoon canis infection has been detected among shepherd, hunting and stray dogs in the southern part of Hungary, which is considered to be free of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and close to the border with Croatia. The aim of this study was to acquire information on the possibility that red foxes and/or golden jackals could play a role in the appearance and spread of H. canis in Hungary. Methods A conventional PCR was used to amplify a 666 bp long fragment of the Hepatozoon 18S rRNA gene from blood samples collected from 334 foxes shot in 231 locations in 16 counties and 15 golden jackals shot in 9 locations in two southwestern counties close to Croatia. A second PCR assay was performed in some of the samples positive by the first PCR to amplify a larger segment (approximately 1500 bp) of the 18S rRNA gene of Hepatozoon spp. for further phylogenetic analysis. Results Hepatozoon infection was detected in canids shot in 30 locations and 9 counties. Altogether 26 foxes (8.0%, 95% CI: 5-11%) and 9 jackals (60%, 95% CI: 33-81%) were PCR positive. Hepatozoon canis sequences were obtained from 12 foxes and 7 jackals. DNA sequences from 16 animals were 99-100% similar to H. canis from Croatian foxes or dogs while two of the sequences were 99% similar to an Italian fox. Half (13/26) of the infected red foxes and all golden jackals were shot in the two southwestern counties. Conclusions This is the first report on molecular evidence of H. canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and golden jackals (Canis aureus) from Hungary, which is considered free from the tick vector of H. canis, R. sanguineus. Although no R. sanguineus sensu lato had been found on infected or non-infected wild canids, the detection of authochnous canine hepatozoonosis in Hungary might imply that the range of R. sanguineus sensu lato has reached this country. PMID:24985073

  17. The first case of Brucella canis in Sweden: background, case report and recommendations from a northern European perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Infection with Brucella canis has been diagnosed in Sweden for the first time. It was diagnosed in a three-year-old breeding bitch with reproductive disturbances. Fifteen in-contact dogs were tested repeatedly and all of them were negative for B. canis. The source of infection could not be defined. The present article describes the case and the measures undertaken and gives a short review over B. canis. Recommendations on how to avoid the infection in non-endemic countries are given. PMID:22452858

  18. Detection and characterization of four novel genotypes of Ehrlichia canis from dogs.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chen; Lee, Chung-Chan; Tsang, Chau-Loong; Chung, Yang-Tsung

    2010-11-20

    The genetic diversity of Ehrlichia canis strains worldwide is currently poorly defined. The present study aimed to characterize E. canis strains in naturally infected dogs in Taiwan, using a combination of PCR and sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA and two antigen-encoding genes, gp19 and gp36. Genomic DNA was extracted from 34 parasitemic dogs and the genes of the pathogen were separately amplified, sequenced, and aligned with corresponding sequences available in GenBank. All 16S rDNA sequences (1623 bp) amplified from the Taiwanese isolates were identical and had very high similarity (99.4-100%) with previously reported E. canis sequences. Nevertheless, most of the gp19 gene sequences (414 bp) from the Taiwanese isolates had three specific nucleotide substitutions at positions 9, 323 and 371 that resulted in three amino acid changes. The gp36 gene of the Taiwanese isolates consists of three regions: a 5' end pre-repeat region (426 bp), a tandem repeat region with variable numbers of the 27-bp repeat unit depending on the isolate, and a 3' end region (87 bp). The nucleotide sequences of the 5' end region of gp36 from Taiwanese isolates were identical to each other, but unexpectedly, quite distinct from the sequences of eleven other E. canis strains previously published, with 86.7-87.2% identities only. A phylogenetic tree of E. canis strains based on the gp36 amino acid sequences showed that the Taiwanese isolates fell into a separate clade, indicating the presence of a novel strain that had not yet been characterized. PMID:20451333

  19. Clinical Sarcocystis neurona, Sarcocystis canis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Chapman, Jennifer L; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Mense, M; Schueler, Ronald L

    2006-04-15

    Sarcocystis neurona, Sarcocystis canis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum are related apicomplexans that can cause systemic illness in many species of animals, including dogs. We investigated one breeder's 25 Basset Hounds for these infections. In addition, tissues from dogs and other non-canine hosts previously reported as S. canis infections were studied retrospectively. Schizonts resembling those of S. neurona, and recognized by polyclonal rabbit anti-S. neurona antibodies, were found in six of eight retrospective cases, as well as in two additional dogs (one Basset Hound, one Springer Spaniel) not previously reported. S. neurona schizonts were found in several tissues including the central nervous system, lungs, and kidneys. Fatal toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in an adult dog, and neosporosis was diagnosed in an adult and a pup related to the one diagnosed with S. neurona. No serological reactivity to S. neurona antibodies occurred when S. canis-like liver schizonts were retrospectively assayed from two dogs, a dolphin, a sea lion, a horse, a chinchilla, a black or either of two polar bears. Sequencing conserved (18S) and variable (ITS-1) portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA isolated from the schizont-laden liver of a polar bear distinguished it from all previously characterized species of Sarcocystis. We take this genetic signature as provisionally representative of S. canis, an assumption that should be tested with future sequencing of similar liver infections in other mammalian hosts. These findings further extend the uncharacteristically broad intermediate host range for S. neurona, which also causes a neurologic disease in cats, mink, raccoons, skunks, Pacific harbor seals, ponies, zebras, lynxes, and sea otters. Further work is necessary to delineate the causative agent(s) of other cases of canine sarcocystosis, and in particular to specify the attributes of S. canis, which corresponds morphologically to infections reported from wide range of terrestrial and marine mammals. PMID:16458431

  20. A virulent genotype of Microsporum canis is responsible for the majority of human infections.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; de Hoog, S; Presber, Wolfgang; Grser, Yvonne

    2007-10-01

    The zoophilic dermatophyte species Microsporum canis belongs to the Arthroderma otae complex and is known to mate with tester strains of that teleomorph species, at least in the laboratory. Human infections are likely to be acquired from the fur of cats, dogs and horses. Epidemiological studies to reveal sources and routes of infection have been hampered by a lack of polymorphic molecular markers. Human cases mainly concern moderately inflammatory tinea corporis and tinea capitis, but, as cases of highly inflammatory ringworm are also observed, the question arises as to whether all lineages of M. canis are equally virulent to humans. In this study, two microsatellite markers were developed and used to analyse a global set of 101 M. canis strains to reveal patterns of genetic variation and dispersal. Using a Bayesian and a distance approach for structuring the M. canis samples, three populations could be distinguished, with evidence of recombination in one of them (III). This population contained 44 % of the animal isolates and only 9 % of the human strains. Population I, with strictly clonal reproduction (comprising a single multilocus genotype), contained 74 % of the global collection of strains from humans, but only 23 % of the animal strains. From these findings, it was concluded that population differentiation in M. canis is not allopatric, but rather is due to the emergence of a (virulent) genotype that has a high potential to infect the human host. Adaptation of genotypes resulting in a particular clinical manifestation was not evident. Furthermore, isolates from horses did not show a monophyletic clustering. PMID:17893177

  1. THE retinoid-X receptor ORTHOLOG, ULTRASPIRACLE, BINDS WITH HIGH nanomolar AFFINITY TO AN ENDOGENOUS MORPHOGENETIC LIGAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vivo ligand binding function and ligand-binding activity of the Drosophila melanogaster RXR ortholog, ultraspiracle, toward natural farnesoid products of the ring gland were assessed. Using an equilibrium fluorescence binding assay, farnesoid products in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis ...

  2. Evolutionary Distance of Amino Acid Sequence Orthologs across Macaque Subspecies: Identifying Candidate Genes for SIV Resistance in Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Cody T.; Roodgar, Morteza; Smith, David Glenn

    2015-01-01

    We use the Reciprocal Smallest Distance (RSD) algorithm to identify amino acid sequence orthologs in the Chinese and Indian rhesus macaque draft sequences and estimate the evolutionary distance between such orthologs. We then use GOanna to map gene function annotations and human gene identifiers to the rhesus macaque amino acid sequences. We conclude methodologically by cross-tabulating a list of amino acid orthologs with large divergence scores with a list of genes known to be involved in SIV or HIV pathogenesis. We find that many of the amino acid sequences with large evolutionary divergence scores, as calculated by the RSD algorithm, have been shown to be related to HIV pathogenesis in previous laboratory studies. Four of the strongest candidate genes for SIVmac resistance in Chinese rhesus macaques identified in this study are CDK9, CXCL12, TRIM21, and TRIM32. Additionally, ANKRD30A, CTSZ, GORASP2, GTF2H1, IL13RA1, MUC16, NMDAR1, Notch1, NT5M, PDCD5, RAD50, and TM9SF2 were identified as possible candidates, among others. We failed to find many laboratory experiments contrasting the effects of Indian and Chinese orthologs at these sites on SIVmac pathogenesis, but future comparative studies might hold fertile ground for research into the biological mechanisms underlying innate resistance to SIVmac in Chinese rhesus macaques. PMID:25884674

  3. HomoMINT: an inferred human network based on orthology mapping of protein interactions discovered in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Persico, Maria; Ceol, Arnaud; Gavrila, Caius; Hoffmann, Robert; Florio, Arnaldo; Cesareni, Gianni

    2005-01-01

    Background The application of high throughput approaches to the identification of protein interactions has offered for the first time a glimpse of the global interactome of some model organisms. Until now, however, such genome-wide approaches have not been applied to the human proteome. Results In order to fill this gap we have assembled an inferred human protein interaction network where interactions discovered in model organisms are mapped onto the corresponding human orthologs. In addition to a stringent assignment to orthology classes based on the InParanoid algorithm, we have implemented a string matching algorithm to filter out orthology assignments of proteins whose global domain organization is not conserved. Finally, we have assessed the accuracy of our own, and related, inferred networks by benchmarking them against i) an assembled experimental interactome, ii) a network derived by mining of the scientific literature and iii) by measuring the enrichment of interacting protein pairs sharing common Gene Ontology annotation. Conclusion The resulting networks are named HomoMINT and HomoMINT_filtered, the latter being based on the orthology table filtered by the domain architecture matching algorithm. They contains 9749 and 5203 interactions respectively and can be analyzed and viewed in the context of the experimentally verified interactions between human proteins stored in the MINT database. HomoMINT is constantly updated to take into account the growing information in the MINT database. PMID:16351748

  4. Transcription Factor Binding Probabilities in Orthologous Promoters: An Alignment-Free Approach to the Inference of Functional Regulatory Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Clarke, Neil D.

    Using a physically principled method of scoring genomic sequences for the potential to be bound by transcription factors, we have developed an algorithm for assessing the conservation of predicted binding occupancy that does not rely on sequence alignment of promoters. The method, which we call ortholog-weighting, assesses the degree to which the predicted binding occupancy of a transcription factor in a reference gene is also predicted in the promoters of orthologous genes. The analysis was performed separately for over 100 different transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Statistical significance was evaluated by simulation using permuted versions of the position weight matrices. Ortholog-weighting produced about twice as many significantly high scoring genes as were obtained from the S. cerevisiae genome alone. Gene Ontology analysis found a similar two-fold enrichment of genes. Both analyses suggest that ortholog-weighting improves the prediction of true regulatory targets. Interestingly, the method has only a marginal effect on the prediction of binding by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. We suggest several possibilities for reconciling this result with the improved enrichment that we observe for functionally related promoters and for promoters that are under positive selection.

  5. Genomics in cereals: from genome-wide conserved orthologous set (COS) sequences to candidate genes for trait dissection.

    PubMed

    Quraishi, Umar Masood; Abrouk, Michael; Bolot, Stphanie; Pont, Caroline; Throude, Mickael; Guilhot, Nicolas; Confolent, Carole; Bortolini, Fernanda; Praud, Sbastien; Murigneux, Alain; Charmet, Gilles; Salse, Jerome

    2009-11-01

    Recent updates in comparative genomics among cereals have provided the opportunity to identify conserved orthologous set (COS) DNA sequences for cross-genome map-based cloning of candidate genes underpinning quantitative traits. New tools are described that are applicable to any cereal genome of interest, namely, alignment criterion for orthologous couples identification, as well as the Intron Spanning Marker software to automatically select intron-spanning primer pairs. In order to test the software, it was applied to the bread wheat genome, and 695 COS markers were assigned to 1,535 wheat loci (on average one marker/2.6 cM) based on 827 robust rice-wheat orthologs. Furthermore, 31 of the 695 COS markers were selected to fine map a pentosan viscosity quantitative trait loci (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7A. Among the 31 COS markers, 14 (45%) were polymorphic between the parental lines and 12 were mapped within the QTL confidence interval with one marker every 0.6 cM defining candidate genes among the rice orthologous region. PMID:19575250

  6. ZmPep1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis elicitor Peptide 1, regulates maize innate immunity and enhances disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ZmPep1 is a bioactive peptide encoded by a previously uncharacterized maize gene termed ZmPROPEP1. The gene was identified by sequence similarity as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis AtPROPEP1 gene, which encodes the precursor protein of elicitor peptide 1 (AtPep1). Together with its receptors, AtPEPR1...

  7. OsPIE1, the Rice Ortholog of Arabidopsis PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1, Is Essential for Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Zhanghua; Bao, Lieming; Wang, Junming; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Background The SWR1 complex is important for the deposition of histone variant H2A.Z into chromatin necessary to robustly regulate gene expression during growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the catalytic subunit of the SWR1-like complex, encoded by PIE1 (PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1), has been shown to function in multiple developmental processes including flowering time pathways and petal number regulation. However, the function of the PIE1 orthologs in monocots remains unknown. Methodology/Findings We report the identification of the rice (Oryza sativa) ortholog, OsPIE1. Although OsPIE1 does not exhibit a conserved exon/intron structure as Arabidopsis PIE1, its encoded protein is highly similar to PIE1, sharing 53.9% amino acid sequence identity. OsPIE1 also has a very similar expression pattern as PIE1. Furthermore, transgenic expression of OsPIE1 completely rescued both early flowering and extra petal number phenotypes of the Arabidopsis pie1-2 mutant. However, homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of OsPIE1 in rice were embryonically lethal, in contrast to the viable mutants in the orthologous genes for yeast, Drosophila and Arabidopsis (Swr1, DOMINO and PIE1, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results suggest that OsPIE1 is the rice ortholog of Arabidopsis PIE1 and plays an essential role in rice embryo development. PMID:20585576

  8. Natural variation in maize architecture is mediated by allelic differences at the PINOID co-ortholog barren inflorescence2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We characterized allelic variation at barren inflorescence2 (bif2), a maize co-ortholog of the Arabidopsis PINOID protein kinase (PID), and tested for trait associations with bif2 in both an association mapping population of 277 diverse maize inbreds and in the inter-mated B73-Mo17 (IBM) linkage pop...

  9. Unresolved orthology and peculiar coding sequence properties of lamprey genes: the KCNA gene family as test case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In understanding the evolutionary process of vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lamprey) occupy crucial positions. Resolving molecular phylogenetic relationships of cyclostome genes with gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) genes is indispensable in deciphering both the species tree and gene trees. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses, especially those including lamprey genes, have produced highly discordant results between gene families. To efficiently scrutinize this problem using partial genome assemblies of early vertebrates, we focused on the potassium voltage-gated channel, shaker-related (KCNA) family, whose members are mostly single-exon. Results Seven sea lamprey KCNA genes as well as six elephant shark genes were identified, and their orthologies to bony vertebrate subgroups were assessed. In contrast to robustly supported orthology of the elephant shark genes to gnathostome subgroups, clear orthology of any sea lamprey gene could not be established. Notably, sea lamprey KCNA sequences displayed unique codon usage pattern and amino acid composition, probably associated with exceptionally high GC-content in their coding regions. This lamprey-specific property of coding sequences was also observed generally for genes outside this gene family. Conclusions Our results suggest that secondary modifications of sequence properties unique to the lamprey lineage may be one of the factors preventing robust orthology assessments of lamprey genes, which deserves further genome-wide validation. The lamprey lineage-specific alteration of protein-coding sequence properties needs to be taken into consideration in tackling the key questions about early vertebrate evolution. PMID:21699680

  10. The ABCs of eye color in Tribolium castaneum: Orthologs of the Drosophila white, scarlet, and brown genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, three ABC transporters (white, scarlet and brown) are required for normal pigmentation of the compound eye. We have cloned one of the orthologous genes, Tc white (Tcw), from the beetle Tribolium castaneum. Conceptual translation of Tcw reveals that it is 52% identical t...

  11. Molecular evaluation of the incidence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Flvia; Coppede, Juliana S; Pereira, Andr L A; Oliveira, Letcia P; Roberto, Patrcia G; Benedetti, Roberta B R; Zucoloto, Lenise B; Lucas, Flvia; Sobreira, Lcia; Marins, Mozart

    2009-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichiacanis is endemic in many regions of Brazil. Since thrombocytopenia is a common finding in infected dogs, many clinicians tend to use it as an indication for antibiotic treatment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR were used to study the presence of E. canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in thrombocytopenic and non-thrombocytopenic dogs from Ribeiro Preto, Brazil. Despite the high prevalence of E. canis infection among thrombocytopenic dogs, 46.7% of the thrombocytopenic dogs studied were either infected with Babesia spp. or A.platys or not infected with any of the three pathogens. There was a high incidence (25.4%) of E. canis infection in non-thrombocytopenic dogs. Although infection with E. canis should be considered in thrombocytopenic dogs, the final diagnosis needs to be confirmed by complementary tests such as blood smears and PCR to avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics. PMID:17920967

  12. In vitro culture and structural differences in the major immunoreactive protein gp36 of geographically distant Ehrlichia canis isolates.

    PubMed

    Zweygarth, Erich; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Josemans, Antoinette I; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Matjila, Paul T; Lis, Katarzyna; Broniszewska, Marzena; Schl, Heidrun; Ferrolho, Joana; Grubhoffer, Libor; Passos, Lygia M F

    2014-06-01

    Ehrlichia canis, the etiologic agent of canine ehrlichiosis, is an obligate intracytoplasmic Gram-negative tick-borne bacterium belonging to the Anaplasmataceae family. E. canis is distributed worldwide and can cause serious and fatal infections in dogs. Among strains of E. canis, the 16S rRNA gene DNA sequences are highly conserved. Using this gene to genetically differentiate isolates is therefore difficult. As an alternative, the gene gp36, which encodes for a major immunoreactive protein in E. canis, has been successfully used to characterize the genetic diversity of this pathogen. The present study describes the isolation and continuous propagation of a Spanish and 2 South African isolates of E. canis in IDE8 tick cells. Subsequently, canine DH82 cell cultures were infected using initial bodies obtained from infected IDE8 cultures. It was possible to mimic the life cycle of E. canis in vitro by transferring infection from tick cells to canine cells and back again. To characterize these E. canis strains at the molecular level, the 16S rRNA and gp36 genes were amplified by PCR, sequenced, and aligned with corresponding sequences available in GenBank. All 16S rRNA sequences amplified in this study were identical to previously reported E. canis strains. Maximum likelihood analysis based on the gp36 amino acid sequences showed that the South African and Spanish strains fall into 2 well-defined phylogenetic clusters amongst other E. canis strains. The members of these 2 phylogenetic clusters shared 2 unique molecular properties in the gp36 amino acid sequences: (i) deletion of glycine 117 and (ii) the presence of an additional putative N-linked glycosylation site. We further show correlation between the putative secondary structure and the theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of the gp36 amino acid sequences. A putative role of gp36 as an adhesin in E. canis is discussed. Overall, we report the successful in vitro culture of 3 new E. canis strains which present different molecular properties in their gp36 sequences. PMID:24713279

  13. Longitudinal quantification of Ehrlichia canis in experimental infection with comparison to natural infection.

    PubMed

    Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon; Ohnona, Frederic S; Schlesinger, Yechiel

    2009-05-12

    Ehrlichia canis is a major tick-borne bacterial pathogen of dogs. Quantitative real-time PCR was evaluated for the detection of E. canis in naturally (NI) and experimentally infected (EI) dogs. DNA was extracted from blood, spleen and conjunctival swabs of experimentally infected dogs pre- and post-infection (PI), and during doxycycline therapy, and from blood and conjunctivas of naturally infected dogs. The primers and probe were designed to amplify a 93bp fragment of the single copy E. canis 16S rRNA gene with the TaqMan system. All EI dogs were positive for E. canis DNA by 7d PI and developed clinical ehrlichiosis by 9-12d PI. A rapid increase in ehrlichial DNA in EI dogs correlated with the appearance of severe clinical signs of disease. The mean spleen and blood DNA copies significantly increased by more than 10-folds from 7d PI to 10 and 12d PI (p<0.05). E. canis DNA was undetectable in the blood by day 9 post-treatment. Although the spleen was more frequently positive than blood (15/15 specimens vs. 13/15), no significant differences were found between the mean ehrlichial DNA copies in the spleen and blood on each day of examination. In 12 naturally infected dogs, the mean blood DNA copies was similar to the number found in EI 7d PI, but significantly lower than the means of 10 and 12d PI (p<0.0001). Although the conjunctivas of all EI dogs were positive by 12d PI, only 3/5 (60%) NI dogs were positive also by conjunctival PCR. In conclusion, the kinetics of E. canis during acute experimental infection with complete pathogen clearance following doxycyline treatment was demonstrated for the first time by real-time PCR. The value of real-time PCR was shown in NI dogs as well as in EI dogs with spleen and blood sampling more sensitive than non-invasive conjunctival PCR. PMID:19128893

  14. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Ehrlichia canis Infection among Companion Dogs of Mashhad, North East of Iran, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Mood, Maneli; Khoshnegah, Javad; Mohri, Mehrdad; Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of canine ehrlichiosis and risk factors of this disease in companion dogs’ population of Mashhad, North East of Iran. Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis (CME) is a zoonotic disease transmitted by ticks, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, and caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia canis. Methods: During September 2009 until November 2010, 250 companion dogs from Mashhad, North-East of Iran, were examined for serum antibody detection against E. canis by means of immunofluorescence assay test (IFAT) and factors associated with a positive antibody response. Results: There was a very low prevalence of anti-E. canis antibodies (0.8%, 2/250) among studied dogs. The antibody titers for two seropositive dogs were 1:80 and 1:160, respectively. One (0.4%) of seropositive dogs was infested with, R. sanguineus. In blood smears from one of infested dogs (0.4%), typical morulae of E. canis was observed in lymphocytes. The results confirm that the lowest occurrence of reactive dogs indoors probably related to low tick infestion. Conclusion: This is the first report that describes serological evidences of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis in North-East of Iran. Results suggested that E. canis infection in owned pet dogs from North of Khorasan was not endemic from 2009 to 2010. Additional molecular studies are necessary to confirm E. canis infection and to identify the local strains of the organism. PMID:26623430

  15. Comprehensive identification of host modulators of HIV-1 replication using multiple orthologous RNAi reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Davoli, Teresa; Perriera, Jill M; Chin, Christopher R; Gaiha, Gaurav D; John, Sinu P; Sigiollot, Frederic D; Gao, Geng; Xu, Qikai; Qu, Hongjing; Pertel, Thomas; Sims, Jennifer S; Smith, Jennifer A; Baker, Richard E; Maranda, Louise; Ng, Aylwin; Elledge, Stephen J; Brass, Abraham L

    2014-10-23

    RNAi screens have implicated hundreds of host proteins as HIV-1 dependency factors (HDFs). While informative, these early studies overlap poorly due to false positives and false negatives. To ameliorate these issues, we combined information from the existing HDF screens together with new screens performed with multiple orthologous RNAi reagents (MORR). In addition to being traditionally validated, the MORR screens and the historical HDF screens were quantitatively integrated by the adaptation of an established analysis program, RIGER, for the collective interpretation of each gene's phenotypic significance. False positives were addressed by the removal of poorly expressed candidates through gene expression filtering, as well as with GESS, which identifies off-target effects. This workflow produced a quantitatively integrated network of genes that modulate HIV-1 replication. We further investigated the roles of GOLGI49, SEC13, and COG in HIV-1 replication. Collectively, the MORR-RIGER method minimized the caveats of RNAi screening and improved our understanding of HIV-1-host cell interactions. PMID:25373910

  16. The Drosophila Huntington's disease gene ortholog dhtt influences chromatin regulation during development.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Kevin N; Di Stefano, Luisa; Maher, Robert C; Zhu, Hui; Macdonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F; Walker, James A

    2015-01-15

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG expansion mutation in HTT, the gene encoding huntingtin. Evidence from both human genotype-phenotype relationships and mouse model systems suggests that the mutation acts by dysregulating some normal activity of huntingtin. Recent work in the mouse has revealed a role for huntingtin in epigenetic regulation during development. Here, we examine the role of the Drosophila huntingtin ortholog (dhtt) in chromatin regulation in the development of the fly. Although null dhtt mutants display no overt phenotype, we found that dhtt acts as a suppressor of position-effect variegation (PEV), suggesting that it influences chromatin organization. We demonstrate that dhtt affects heterochromatin spreading in a PEV model by modulating histone H3K9 methylation levels at the heterochromatin-euchromatin boundary. To gain mechanistic insights into how dhtt influences chromatin function, we conducted a candidate genetic screen using RNAi lines targeting known PEV modifier genes. We found that dhtt modifies phenotypes caused by knockdown of a number of key epigenetic regulators, including chromatin-associated proteins, histone demethylases (HDMs) and methyltransferases. Notably, dhtt strongly modifies phenotypes resulting from loss of the HDM dLsd1, in both the ovary and wing, and we demonstrate that dhtt appears to act as a facilitator of dLsd1 function in regulating global histone H3K4 methylation levels. These findings suggest that a fundamental aspect of huntingtin function in heterochromatin/euchromatin organization is evolutionarily conserved across phyla. PMID:25168387

  17. Inference of gene-phenotype associations via protein-protein interaction and orthology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Panwen; Lai, Wing-Fu; Li, Mulin Jun; Xu, Feng; Yalamanchili, Hari Krishna; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Wang, Junwen

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental goals of genetics is to understand gene functions and their associated phenotypes. To achieve this goal, in this study we developed a computational algorithm that uses orthology and protein-protein interaction information to infer gene-phenotype associations for multiple species. Furthermore, we developed a web server that provides genome-wide phenotype inference for six species: fly, human, mouse, worm, yeast, and zebrafish. We evaluated our inference method by comparing the inferred results with known gene-phenotype associations. The high Area Under the Curve values suggest a significant performance of our method. By applying our method to two human representative diseases, Type 2 Diabetes and Breast Cancer, we demonstrated that our method is able to identify related Gene Ontology terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The web server can be used to infer functions and putative phenotypes of a gene along with the candidate genes of a phenotype, and thus aids in disease candidate gene discovery. Our web server is available at http://jjwanglab.org/PhenoPPIOrth. PMID:24194887

  18. Global alignment of multiple protein interaction networks with application to functional orthology detection.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Xu, Jinbo; Berger, Bonnie

    2008-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and their networks play a central role in all biological processes. Akin to the complete sequencing of genomes and their comparative analysis, complete descriptions of interactomes and their comparative analysis is fundamental to a deeper understanding of biological processes. A first step in such an analysis is to align two or more PPI networks. Here, we introduce an algorithm, IsoRank, for global alignment of multiple PPI networks. The guiding intuition here is that a protein in one PPI network is a good match for a protein in another network if their respective sequences and neighborhood topologies are a good match. We encode this intuition as an eigenvalue problem in a manner analogous to Google's PageRank method. Using IsoRank, we compute a global alignment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens PPI networks. We demonstrate that incorporating PPI data in ortholog prediction results in improvements over existing sequence-only approaches and over predictions from local alignments of the yeast and fly networks. Previous methods have been effective at identifying conserved, localized network patterns across pairs of networks. This work takes the further step of performing a global alignment of multiple PPI networks. It simultaneously uses sequence similarity and network data and, unlike previous approaches, explicitly models the tradeoff inherent in combining them. We expect IsoRank-with its simultaneous handling of node similarity and network similarity-to be applicable across many scientific domains. PMID:18725631

  19. The mammalian Ced-1 ortholog MEGF10/KIAA1780 displays a novel adhesion pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Emiko; Nakayama, Manabu . E-mail: nmanabu@kazusa.or.jp

    2007-07-01

    Ced-1 protein is a Caenorhabditis elegans cell surface receptor involved in phagocytosis of dead cells. The gene encoding the mammalian ortholog of Ced-1 is yet to be identified. Here, we describe a potential candidate: human MEGF10. MEGF10 has the overall domain organization of Ced-1, containing a signal peptide, a EMI domain, 17 atypical EGF-like repeats, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain with NPXY and YXXL motifs. MEGF10-EGFP fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells produced an irregular, mosaic-like pattern on the surface of coated glass. Protruded MEGF10 bound tightly to the glass, in effect 'pinning' the cytoplasmic membrane firmly onto the glass, thereby restricting cell motility. These cells also took on a flat appearance. Although MEGF10-EGFP localized throughout the cytoplasmic membrane, no MEGF10-EGFP was found in lamellipodia. The MEGF10-EGFP signal was surrounded by a 1-2-{mu}m-wide dark strip lacking EGFP. Expression analyses of various MEGF10 deletion mutants revealed that the irregular, mosaic-like adhesion pattern characteristic of MEGF10 family members is due to concerted interactions between the EMI and 17 atypical EGF-like domains. Co-culturing of MEGF10-EGFP-expressing cells with apoptotic cells revealed that MEGF10 protein accumulated around the contact region during engulfment of apoptotic cells.

  20. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  1. Ect2, an ortholog of Drosophila Pebble, regulates formation of growth cones in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Chiharu; Aoki, Yoshihiko; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Dohmoto, Mitsuko; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2012-11-01

    In collaboration with Marshall Nirenberg, we performed in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) genome-wide screening in Drosophila embryos. Pebble has been shown to be involved in Drosophila neuronal development. We have also reported that depletion of Ect2, a mammalian ortholog of Pebble, induces differentiation in NG108-15 neuronal cells. However, the precise role of Ect2 in neuronal development has yet to be studied. Here, we confirmed in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells that inhibition of Ect2 expression by RNAi stimulated neurite outgrowth, and in the mouse embryonic cortex that Ect2 was accumulated throughout the ventricular and subventricular zones with neuronal progenitor cells. Next, the effects of Ect2 depletion were studied in primary cultures of mouse embryonic cortical neurons: Loss of Ect2 did not affect the differentiation stages of neuritogenesis, the number of neurites, or axon length, while the numbers of growth cones and growth cone-like structures were increased. Taken together, our results suggest that Ect2 contributes to neuronal morphological differentiation through regulation of growth cone dynamics. PMID:22366651

  2. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4-8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  3. Expression of the decapentaplegic ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Treffkorn, Sandra; Mayer, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The gene decapentaplegic (dpp) and its homologs are essential for establishing the dorsoventral body axis in arthropods and vertebrates. However, the expression of dpp is not uniform among different arthropod groups. While this gene is expressed along the dorsal body region in insects, its expression occurs in a mesenchymal group of cells called cumulus in the early spider embryo. A cumulus-like structure has also been reported from centipedes, suggesting that it might be either an ancestral feature of arthropods or a derived feature (=synapomorphy) uniting the chelicerates and myriapods. To decide between these two alternatives, we analysed the expression patterns of a dpp ortholog in a representative of one of the closest arthropod relatives, the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed unique expression patterns in the early mesoderm anlagen of the antennal segment and in the dorsal and ventral extra-embryonic tissue, suggesting a divergent role of dpp in these tissues in Onychophora. In contrast, the expression of dpp in the dorsal limb portions resembles that in arthropods, except that it occurs in the mesoderm rather than in the ectoderm of the onychophoran limbs. A careful inspection of embryos of E. rowelli revealed no cumulus-like accumulation of dpp expressing cells at any developmental stage, suggesting that this feature is either a derived feature of chelicerates or a synapomorphy uniting the chelicerates and myriapods. PMID:23872340

  4. High-resolution cardiovascular function confirms functional orthology of myocardial contractility pathways in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jordan T; Pomerantsev, Eugene V; Mably, John D; MacRae, Calum A

    2010-07-01

    Phenotype-driven screens in larval zebrafish have transformed our understanding of the molecular basis of cardiovascular development. Screens to define the genetic determinants of physiological phenotypes have been slow to materialize as a result of the limited number of validated in vivo assays with relevant dynamic range. To enable rigorous assessment of cardiovascular physiology in living zebrafish embryos, we developed a suite of software tools for the analysis of high-speed video microscopic images and validated these, using established cardiomyopathy models in zebrafish as well as modulation of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway. Quantitative analysis in wild-type fish exposed to NO or in a zebrafish model of dilated cardiomyopathy demonstrated that these tools detect significant differences in ventricular chamber size, ventricular performance, and aortic flow velocity in zebrafish embryos across a large dynamic range. These methods also were able to establish the effects of the classic pharmacological agents isoproterenol, ouabain, and verapamil on cardiovascular physiology in zebrafish embryos. Sequence conservation between zebrafish and mammals of key amino acids in the pharmacological targets of these agents correlated with the functional orthology of the physiological response. These data provide evidence that the quantitative evaluation of subtle physiological differences in zebrafish can be accomplished at a resolution and with a dynamic range comparable to those achieved in mammals and provides a mechanism for genetic and small-molecule dissection of functional pathways in this model organism. PMID:20388839

  5. Genetical and comparative genomics of Brassica under altered Ca supply identifies Arabidopsis Ca-transporter orthologs.

    PubMed

    Graham, Neil S; Hammond, John P; Lysenko, Artem; Mayes, Sean; O Lochlainn, Seosamh; Blasco, Bego; Bowen, Helen C; Rawlings, Chris J; Rios, Juan J; Welham, Susan; Carion, Pierre W C; Dupuy, Lionel X; King, Graham J; White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2014-07-01

    Although Ca transport in plants is highly complex, the overexpression of vacuolar Ca(2+) transporters in crops is a promising new technology to improve dietary Ca supplies through biofortification. Here, we sought to identify novel targets for increasing plant Ca accumulation using genetical and comparative genomics. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping to 1895 cis- and 8015 trans-loci were identified in shoots of an inbred mapping population of Brassica rapa (IMB211 R500); 23 cis- and 948 trans-eQTLs responded specifically to altered Ca supply. eQTLs were screened for functional significance using a large database of shoot Ca concentration phenotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana. From 31 Arabidopsis gene identifiers tagged to robust shoot Ca concentration phenotypes, 21 mapped to 27 B. rapa eQTLs, including orthologs of the Ca(2+) transporters At-CAX1 and At-ACA8. Two of three independent missense mutants of BraA.cax1a, isolated previously by targeting induced local lesions in genomes, have allele-specific shoot Ca concentration phenotypes compared with their segregating wild types. BraA.CAX1a is a promising target for altering the Ca composition of Brassica, consistent with prior knowledge from Arabidopsis. We conclude that multiple-environment eQTL analysis of complex crop genomes combined with comparative genomics is a powerful technique for novel gene identification/prioritization. PMID:25082855

  6. Arabidopsis Has Two Functional Orthologs of the Yeast V-ATPase Assembly Factor Vma21p

    PubMed Central

    Neubert, Christoph; Graham, Laurie A.; Black-Maier, Eric W.; Coonrod, Emily M.; Liu, Tzu-Yin; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Seidel, Thorsten; Stevens, Tom H.; Schumacher, Karin

    2010-01-01

    How individual protein subunits assemble into the higher order structure of a protein complex is not well understood. Four proteins dedicated to the assembly of the V0 subcomplex of the V-ATPase in the ER have been identified in yeast, but their precise mode of molecular action remains to be identified. In contrast to the highly conserved subunits of the V-ATPase, orthologs of the yeast assembly factors are not easily identified based on sequence similarity. We show here that two ER-localized Arabidopsis proteins that share only 25% sequence identity with Vma21p can functionally replace this yeast assembly factor. Loss of AtVMA21a function in RNAi seedlings caused impaired cell expansion and changes in Golgi morphology characteristic for plants with reduced V-ATPase activity, and we therefore conclude that AtVMA21a is the first V-ATPase assembly factor identified in a multicellular eukaryote Moreover, VMA21p acts as a dedicated ER escort chaperone, a class of substrate specific accessory proteins so far not identified in higher plants. PMID:18694437

  7. Axillary Meristem Formation in Rice Requires the WUSCHEL Ortholog TILLERS ABSENT1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Wakana; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Ushijima, Tomokazu; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomonao; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Hiro-Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Axillary shoot formation is a key determinant of plant architecture. Formation of the axillary shoot is regulated by initiation of the axillary meristem or outgrowth of the axillary bud. Here, we show that rice (Oryza sativa) TILLERS ABSENT1 (TAB1; also known as Os WUS), an ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana WUS, is required to initiate axillary meristem development. We found that formation of the axillary meristem in rice proceeds via a transient state, which we term the premeristem, characterized by the expression of OSH1, a marker of indeterminate cells in the shoot apical meristem. In the tab1-1 (wus-1) mutant, however, formation of the axillary meristem is arrested at various stages of the premeristem zone, and OSH1 expression is highly reduced. TAB1/WUS is expressed in the premeristem zone, where it shows a partially overlapping pattern with OSH1. It is likely, therefore, that TAB1 plays an important role in maintaining the premeristem zone and in promoting the formation of the axillary meristem by promoting OSH1 expression. Temporal expression patterns of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX4 (WOX4) indicate that WOX4 is likely to regulate meristem maintenance instead of TAB1 after establishment of the axillary meristem. Lastly, we show that the prophyll, the first leaf in the secondary axis, is formed from the premeristem zone and not from the axillary meristem. PMID:25841039

  8. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamir,D.; Zierow, S.; Leng, L.; Cho, Y.; Diaz, Y.; Griffith, J.; McDonald, C.; Merk, M.; Mitchell, R.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 A). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (K(d) = 2.9 x 10(-8) M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction.

  9. The molecular basis of chromosome orthologies and sex chromosomal differentiation in palaeognathous birds.

    PubMed

    Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Tsuda, Yayoi; Ishijima, Junko; Ando, Junko; Fujiwara, Atushi; Matsuda, Yoichi; Griffin, Darren K

    2007-01-01

    Palaeognathous birds (Struthioniformes and Tinamiformes) have morphologically conserved karyotypes and less differentiated ZW sex chromosomes. To delineate interspecific chromosome orthologies in palaeognathous birds we conducted comparative chromosome painting with chicken (Gallus gallus, GGA) chromosome 1-9 and Z chromosome paints (GGA1-9 and GGAZ) for emu, double-wattled cassowary, ostrich, greater rhea, lesser rhea and elegant crested tinamou. All six species showed the same painting patterns: each probe was hybridized to a single pair of chromosomes with the exception that the GGA4 was hybridized to the fourth largest chromosome and a single pair of microchromosomes. The GGAZ was also hybridized to the entire region of the W chromosome, indicating that extensive homology remains between the Z and W chromosomes on the molecular level. Comparative FISH mapping of four Z- and/or W-linked markers, the ACO1/IREBP, ZOV3 and CHD1 genes and the EE0.6 sequence, revealed the presence of a small deletion in the proximal region of the long arm of the W chromosome in greater rhea and lesser rhea. These results suggest that the karyotypes and sex chromosomes of palaeognathous birds are highly conserved not only morphologically, but also at the molecular level; moreover, palaeognathous birds appear to retain the ancestral lineage of avian karyotypes. PMID:17605112

  10. Mycobacterium thermoresistibile as a source of thermostable orthologs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Liao, Reiling; Phan, Isabelle; Myler, Peter J; Grundner, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises major human pathogens such as the causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), and many environmental species. Tuberculosis claims ~1.5 million lives every year, and drug resistant strains of Mtb are rapidly emerging. To aid the development of new tuberculosis drugs, major efforts are currently under way to determine crystal structures of Mtb drug targets and proteins involved in pathogenicity. However, a major obstacle to obtaining crystal structures is the generation of well-diffracting crystals. Proteins from thermophiles can have better crystallization and diffraction properties than proteins from mesophiles, but their sequences and structures are often divergent. Here, we establish a thermophilic mycobacterial model organism, Mycobacterium thermoresistibile (Mth), for the study of Mtb proteins. Mth tolerates higher temperatures than Mtb or other environmental mycobacteria such as M. smegmatis. Mth proteins are on average more soluble than Mtb proteins, and comparison of the crystal structures of two pairs of orthologous proteins reveals nearly identical folds, indicating that Mth structures provide good surrogates for Mtb structures. This study introduces a thermophile as a source of protein for the study of a closely related human pathogen and marks a new approach to solving challenging mycobacterial protein structures. PMID:22544630

  11. Occurrence of Ehrlichia canis in free-living primates of the genus Callithrix.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Claudio; Barcelos, Rafael Mazioli; Mantovani, Cynthia; Carrizo, Juliana; Soares, Adriano Carlos; Moreira, Higo Nasser Sant'Anna; Maia, Natasha Lagos; da Silva, Fernanda de Ftima Rodrigues; e Silva, Vincius Herold Dornelas; Boere, Vanner; e Silva, Ita de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Ehrlichia are Gram-negative and coccoid-shaped microorganisms that cause ehrlichiosis - a serious infectious disease that often leads to death. These bacteria present a strong zoonotic potential and primates may act as reservoir hosts. This study involved a molecular analysis to detect these microorganisms in blood samples collected from nineteen primates of the genus Callithrix living free in an Atlantic Forest fragment in the municipality of Viosa, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. One of the 19 primates was found to be infected with Ehrlichia canis. This finding points to a new wild host of E. canis with a strong potential for transmission to humans because of its increasing contact with people. This is the first report of Ehrlichia spp. in primate of the genus Callithrix. PMID:25909257

  12. Serum DHEA-S increases in dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, M C H; Munhoz, T D; Catandi, P B; Freschi, C R; Palacios Junior, R J G; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2015-06-01

    Adrenocortical disturbances are expected in canine ehrlichiosis due to the immunological challenges caused by infection and consequent inflammation. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the occurrence of adrenocortical hormonal alterations in dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis (n?=?21) as positively confirmed by the presence of anti-E.?canis antibodies (Dot-ELISA) and nested PCR (nPCR). Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) concentrations were assessed via ELISA before and one hour after ACTH stimulation. Another 10 healthy dogs were subjected to the same stimulation protocol and used as controls. The results revealed that baseline and post-ACTH DHEA-S concentrations were significantly greater in sick dogs, regardless of gender, and this finding illustrates the stress induced by naturally acquired ehrlichiosis in dogs. PMID:25956636

  13. Epidemiology of Toxocara canis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from urban areas of Bristol.

    PubMed

    Richards, D T; Harris, S; Lewis, J W

    1993-08-01

    A descriptive epidemiological survey was undertaken of the ascarid nematode Toxocara canis in 521 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) during the period January 1986 to July 1990. Age-prevalence and age-intensity profiles show that worm burdens are significantly higher in cubs than in subadult or adult foxes and higher in subadult than in adult foxes. Seasonal variations in worm burdens occur, with the highest prevalences and intensities being found during the spring, when cubs are born, and in the summer months. Prevalences and intensities then decrease during the autumn and winter months in both subadult and adult foxes, but, during this period, prevalences are significantly higher in male than in female foxes. Variations in worm burdens in the fox population are likely to be related to the reproductive cycle of the fox, with a high proportion of cubs becoming infected in utero. The role of the fox in the transmission of T. canis in the urban environment is discussed. PMID:8414671

  14. ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle (CITRONELLA) AGAINST Microsporum canis FROM ANIMALS AND HOME ENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    CAPOCI, Isis Regina Grenier; da CUNHA, Michele Milano; BONFIM-MENDONA, Patricia de Souza; GHIRALDI-LOPES, Luciana Dias; BAEZA, Lilian Cristiane; KIOSHIMA, Erika Seki; SVIDZINSKI, Terezinha Inez Estivalet

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytosis is a common zoonosis in urban centers. Dogs and cats have played an important role as its disseminators. Environmental decontamination is essential for the prevention of its propagation to humans and animals. However, sanitizers or disinfectants with antifungal activity, currently available, have high toxicity. The present study evaluated the in vitro effects of an extract of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus) on 31 Microsporum canis isolates from animals and home environments. Susceptibility tests were performed based on document M38-A2 (2008) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute with modifications for natural products. Although susceptibility variation was observed between the fungus tested, the concentrations that inhibited the growth of 50 and 90% of the microorganisms were low (19.5 and 78 g/mL, respectively). Thus, this citronella extract showed potent fungistatic and fungicide activities against M. canis isolated from animals and home environments. Therefore, it could be an alternative for dermatophytosis prophylaxis in the home environment.

  15. Presence of Leishmania and Brucella species in the golden jackal Canis aureus in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Cirovi?, Duko; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tomanovi?, Sneana; Sukara, Ratko; Penezi?, Aleksandra; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The golden jackal Canis aureus occurs in south-eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East, the Caucasus, and Africa. In Serbia, jackals neared extinction; however, during the last 30 years, the species started to spread quickly and to increase in number. Few studies in the past have revealed their potential role as carriers of zoonotic diseases. Animal samples were collected over a three-year period (01/2010-02/2013) from 12 sites all over Serbia. Of the tissue samples collected, spleen was chosen as the tissue to proceed; all samples were tested for Leishmania species and Brucella species by real-time PCR. Of the 216 samples collected, 15 (6.9%) were positive for Leishmania species, while four (1.9%) were positive for B. canis. The potential epidemiologic role of the golden jackal in carrying and dispersing zoonotic diseases in Serbia should be taken under consideration when applying surveillance monitoring schemes. PMID:24967397

  16. Presence of Leishmania and Brucella Species in the Golden Jackal Canis aureus in Serbia

    PubMed Central

    ?irovi?, Duko; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tomanovi?, Sneana; Sukara, Ratko; Penezi?, Aleksandra; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The golden jackal Canis aureus occurs in south-eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East, the Caucasus, and Africa. In Serbia, jackals neared extinction; however, during the last 30 years, the species started to spread quickly and to increase in number. Few studies in the past have revealed their potential role as carriers of zoonotic diseases. Animal samples were collected over a three-year period (01/201002/2013) from 12 sites all over Serbia. Of the tissue samples collected, spleen was chosen as the tissue to proceed; all samples were tested for Leishmania species and Brucella species by real-time PCR. Of the 216 samples collected, 15 (6.9%) were positive for Leishmania species, while four (1.9%) were positive for B. canis. The potential epidemiologic role of the golden jackal in carrying and dispersing zoonotic diseases in Serbia should be taken under consideration when applying surveillance monitoring schemes. PMID:24967397

  17. Parasitology, virology, and serology of free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michelle; Gerhold, Richard W; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Gulsby, William D; Maestas, Lauren; Rosypal, Alexa; Miller, Karl V; Miller, Debra L

    2014-10-01

    We examined 31 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Georgia, USA, for select parasites and viral agents. Sixteen coyotes had adult heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis). Serum samples from 27 animals revealed antibodies against canine parvovirus (100%), canine distemper virus (48%), canine adenovirus (37%), and Trypanosoma cruzi (7%); none were detected against Leishmania spp. Twenty-two of 24 (92%) coyotes were positive for Toxoplasma gondii. Real-time PCR of feces revealed 32% of coyotes were shedding canine parvovirus, and sequencing revealed type 2b and 2c. Because coyotes could be a spillover host of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) pathogens, studies of the transmission of pathogens between coyotes and domestic dogs are warranted. PMID:25098300

  18. Seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii in dogs in North America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the exposure of dogs to three different Ehrlichia spp. in the south and central regions of the United States where vector-borne disease prevalence has been previously difficult to ascertain, particularly beyond the metropolitan areas. Methods Dog blood samples (n = 8,662) were submitted from 14 veterinary colleges, 6 private veterinary practices and 4 diagnostic laboratories across this region. Samples were tested for E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii specific antibodies using peptide microtiter ELISAs. Results Overall, E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii seroprevalence was 0.8%, 2.8%, and 5.1%, respectively. The highest E. canis seroprevalence (2.3%) was found in a region encompassing Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. E. chaffeensis seroreactivity was 6.6% in the central region (Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma) and 4.6% in the southeast region (Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia). Seroreactivity to E. ewingii was also highest in the central region (14.6%) followed by the southeast region (5.9%). The geospatial pattern derived from E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii seropositive samples was similar to previous reports based on E. chaffeensis seroreactivity in white-tailed deer and the distribution of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) cases reported by the CDC. Conclusions The results of this study provide the first large scale regional documentation of exposure to E. canis, E. chaffeensis and E. ewingii in pet dogs, highlighting regional differences in seroprevalence and providing the basis for heightened awareness of these emerging vector-borne pathogens by veterinarians and public health agencies. PMID:22316160

  19. Restricted evaluation of Trichodectes canis (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) detection methods in Alaska gray wolves

    PubMed Central

    Woldstad, Theresa M.; Dullen, Kimberly N.; Hundertmark, Kris J.; Beckmen, Kimberlee B.

    2014-01-01

    Trichodectes canis (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) was first documented on Alaska (USA) gray wolves (Canis lupus) on the Kenai Peninsula in 1981. In subsequent years, numerous wolves exhibited visually apparent, moderate to severe infestations. Currently, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game utilizes visual inspection, histopathology, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) hide digestion for T.?canis detection. Our objective was to determine optimal sampling locations for T.?canis detection. Wolf hides were subjected to lice enumeration using KOH hide digestion. Thirty nine of the 120 wolves examined had lice. Of these 39, total louse burdens ranged from 14 to an extrapolated 80,000. The hides of 12 infested animals were divided into 10?cm by 10?cm subsections and the lice enumerated on a subsection from each of four regions: neck; shoulder; groin; and rump. Combining the data from these 12 wolves, the highest mean proportions of the total louse burdens on individual wolves were found on the rump and differed significantly from the lowest mean proportion on the neck. However, examination of the four subsections failed to detect all infested wolves. Hides from 16 of the 39 infested animals were cut into left and right sides, and each side then cut into four, approximately equal sections: neck and shoulder; chest; abdomen; and rump. Half hides were totally digested from 11 wolves, and whole hides from 5. For these 21 half hides, the highest mean proportions of total louse burdens were found on the rump, and this section had the highest sensitivity for louse detection, regardless of burden. However, removal of this large section from a hide would likely be opposed by hunters and trappers. PMID:25426419

  20. Weight changes in wild Wolves, Canis lupus, from ages 2 to 24 months

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, Mech L.

    2008-01-01

    Weights of 118 female and 141 male Minnesota Wolves (Canis lupus) aged 2-24 months increased almost linearly from about 8 kg for females and 10 kg for males at 3 months to 30 kg for females and 32 kg for males at 10-12 months and then tended to increase much more slowly in an overall curvilinear trend. Considerable variation was apparent for both sexes during their first year.

  1. Serum concentrations of eicosanoids and lipids in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Mrljak, Vladimir; Ku?er, Nada; Kule, Josipa; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Brklja?i?, Mirna; Crnogaj, Martina; Zivi?njak, Tatjana; Smit, Iva; Ceron, Jose Joaquin; Rafaj, Renata Bari?

    2014-03-17

    Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease with world-wide significance caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus Babesia. The eicosanoids, as inflammatory mediators, are involved in the regulation of the immune response and inflammatory reaction. Metabolism of lipids is of great importance in babesiosis. In this study it was aimed to investigate the dynamics of serum concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane B2 (TxB2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), triglycerides, total cholesterol (Chol), HDL- and LDL-cholesterol in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis and healthy dogs. Both groups were measured for all parameters on the admission day and on the first, second and seventh day of the disease. Dogs that were included in this study had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). It was demonstrated that the level of LTB4, PGE2, TxB2 in dogs naturally infected with B. canis significantly changed during the disease. The level of LTB4 was significantly higher during the study, while the concentration of PGE2 was significantly higher second, third and seventh day of disease in relation with healthy dogs. The level of TxB2 was significantly lower at the beginning of the disease, but after seven days concentration was significantly higher. Both group of patients with SIRS and MODS had significantly higher level of LTB4. Substained high concentrations of PGE2 were observed in dogs with MODS after therapy but not in dogs with SIRS, and LTB4 followed a similar tendency. On the other hand, increases in TxB2 were only significant in dogs with SIRS. The lipid profile in naturally infected dogs with B. canis infection was significantly changed. Further studies are needed to assess the prognostic values of lipid mediators in dogs with B. canis infection, and the ability of these markers to predict the progress of SIRS and MODS. PMID:24468427

  2. A molecular and parasitological survey of Hepatozoon canis in domestic dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Munir; zbek, Sezayi; Altay, Kr?at; Balkaya, ?brahim; Utuk, Armagan Erdem; K?rbas, Ak?n; ?imsek, Sami; Dumanl?, Nazir

    2015-04-30

    In this study, asymptomatic dogs in nine provinces of Turkey were surveyed to investigate the prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon canis infection. DNA obtained from blood samples collected from 694 domestic dogs (243 stray, 288 shelter, and 163 pets) of both genders and varying ages were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, 285 thin blood smears prepared from these blood samples were also evaluated for microscopic examination. Direct microscopy revealed Hepatozoon gamonts in the peripheral blood of three of 285 (1.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21-3.04) tested. Using PCR, 155 of the 694 (22.3%; 95% CI: 19.28-25.61) were found to be positive for the presence of H. canis DNA. The prevalence of infection was higher in adult dogs (26.2%; 95% CI: 22.1-30.7) than young animals (16.4%; 95% CI: 12.2-21.3). Although the prevalence determined by PCR was higher in male dogs (24.5%; 95% CI: 19.6-29.9) than in female dogs (20.8%; 95% CI: 16.9-25.1), gender differences were not significant. Pet dogs had a lower prevalence of infection (10.4%; 95% CI: 6.2-16.2) compared to stray (26.3%; 95% CI: 20.9-32.3) and shelter dogs (25.7%; 95% CI: 20.7-31.1), but no significant association between stray and shelter dogs was found for the presence of the parasite. Partial sequences of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene shared 99-100% similarity with the corresponding H. canis isolates. This epidemiological survey revealed a high prevalence of H. canis in dogs from several provinces in Turkey, and it suggests that the age and origin are associated with the parasite. PMID:25771934

  3. Comparison between different polymerase chain reaction methods for the diagnosis of Ehrlichia canis infection.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Enara; Tesouro, Miguel A; Amusategui, Inmaculada; Rodrguez-Franco, Fernando; Sainz, Angel

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection of Ehrlichia canis in blood samples and to relate these results to clinical findings and serology to E. canis using the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test. Nine seropositive and nine seronegative dogs were included in this study. DNA was extracted once and used in one simple PCR and five nested PCR protocols previously described. In selected dogs (three seropositive and one seronegative) blood samples were aseptically collected in order to attempt the isolation of E. canis in the DH82 cell line. Results show that nested PCR protocols seem to be more sensitive than the simple PCR. Considering only nested PCR protocols, 33% of the IFA-positive samples were PCR positive using the five different protocols. The rest of the IFA-positive samples were PCR positive or negative depending on the protocol used. Clinical signs and laboratory findings compatible with canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) were found in 67% of dogs positive by the IFA test. All samples positive by both techniques (IFA test and PCR) were from dogs suffering from clinical CME. IFA-negative samples were PCR negative, except 22% that were PCR positive when using only one of the nested PCR protocols. Isolation of the agent was exclusively achieved in the only case in which the IFA test and all the PCR protocols were also positive. PMID:19120188

  4. Serological survey of Ehrlichia canis in stray dogs from Yucatan, Mexico, using two different diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Jimnez-Coello, M; Prez-Osorio, C; Vado-Sols, I; Rodrguez-Buenfil, J C; Ortega-Pacheco, A

    2009-04-01

    Canine ehrlichiosis is a disease produced by the rickettsial organism Ehrlichia canis. Reported prevalence may vary greatly depending on the test and sampling method used. For the serological detection of antibodies against E. canis, the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFA) is considered the gold standard. However, other available serological techniques such as the indirect immunoperoxidase technique (IPT) have not yet been tested and may be efficient in detecting specific antibodies. Prevalence found (8.7% and 8.1% for IFA and IPT, respectively) was lower than previously reported in the studied area despite the well-established technique used for the determination of antigens. A kappa value of 0.958 (95% CI 0.9-1.0) was found with a sensitivity and specificity for IPT of 92.59% (95% CI 80.8-99.9) and 99.9% (95% CI 99.8 -100), respectively. The positive predictive value was 99.9% and the negative predictive value was 99.29%. The IPT technique can be used safely for serological determination of E. canis antibodies. PMID:18945189

  5. Clinical babesiosis and molecular identification of Babesia canis and Babesia gibsoni infections in dogs from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Davitkov, Darko; Vucicevic, Milos; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Krstic, Vanja; Tomanovic, Snezana; Glavinic, Uros; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2015-06-01

    Canine babesiosis is a frequent and clinically significant tick-borne disease. Sixty symptomatic dogs with clinical findings compatible with babesiosis were included in this study conducted in Serbia. After clinical examination, blood samples were taken for microscopic examination, complete blood count (CBC), Canine SNAP 4Dx Test, DNA analyses and sequencing. The main clinical signs included apathy, anorexia, fever, brown/red discoloration of urine, pale mucous membranes, icterus, splenomegaly, and vomiting. The main clinicopathological findings in Babesia infections were a slight to severe thrombocytopenia and a mild to very severe normocytic normochromic anaemia. Microscopic evaluation revealed 58 positive samples with the presence of large and small intraerythrocytic piroplasms in 57 and 1 sample(s), respectively. No co-infections were found using SNAP test. Two Babesia species, B. canis (58/60) and B. gibsoni (2/60), were differentiated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Species identification was further confirmed by sequencing PCR products of B. gibsoni samples and six randomly selected B. canis samples. All dogs were treated with imidocarb dipropionate (6.6 mg/kg of body weight), given intramuscularly twice at an interval of 14 days. This report presents the first molecular evidence of the occurrence of B. gibsoni and B. canis, confirmed by DNA sequencing, in sick dogs from Serbia. PMID:26051258

  6. Within-host evolution of Brucella canis during a canine brucellosis outbreak in a kennel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is currently known about Brucella evolution within the host during infection. The current study is the first to employ fine-scale genotyping on an isolate collection derived from a Brucella canis outbreak. Eight isolates of B. canis, cultured from different tissues of three dogs (female, stud dog, puppy of another female) from a single kennel over three months were genetically characterized with a 15-marker multi-locus, variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) to assess the genetic relatedness of isolates and potential rapid mutational changes. Results MLVA discriminated among the otherwise indistinguishable isolates from different animals and from isolates collected at different time points within each host, with different VNTR alleles being detected at multiple dates and tissue sites. We suspect that all isolates cultured from the female, puppy, and stud dogs originated from the same strain, with subsequent rapid in vivo mutations. However, high mutation rates and apparent in several of the loci prevented making definitive epidemiological relationships among isolates. Conclusions This investigation highlights the rapid in vivo genetic mutations of several VNTRs of B. canis over a short time period in the host and the emergence of alternate alleles. However, this work also suggests the challenges of using highly mutable VNTRs to infer epidemiological relationships of strains within a short duration outbreak. PMID:23587163

  7. Use of western blot to study Microsporum canis antigenic proteins in canine dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Peano, Andrea; Min, Annarita Molinar; Beccati, Massimo; Menzano, Arianna; Pasquetti, Mario; Gallo, Maria Grazia

    2011-05-01

    Western blotting was used to describe the Microsporum canis proteins with antigenic activity in dogs with dermatophytosis. Electrophoretic separation of whole fungal strain extract cultured from a cat was performed under denaturing conditions. The proteins were blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with sera collected from 22 dogs with dermatophytosis (18 M. canis, 3 M. gypseum, 1 Trichophyton mentagrophytes; group A), 20 dogs with skin diseases other than dermatophytosis, and 22 dogs with no clinical cutaneous signs (group B, n = 42). Nine principal IgG-binding proteins with apparent molecular weights of 180, 144, 130, 120, 102, 96, 80, 68, and 48 kD were visualised on group A blots. For these proteins, serological cross-reactivity with different strains of M. canis may be indirectly confirmed, whereas additional proteins were found to react with sera from individual dogs. The proteins visualised in this study may represent diagnostic markers of dermatophyte infection. The proteins should be further evaluated for their role in the cellular immune response of dogs with dermatophytosis. PMID:19912544

  8. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis. PMID:25852228

  9. Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus canis, and Arcanobacterium phocae of healthy Canadian farmed mink and mink with pododermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Gabhan; McLean, John; Hunter, D. Bruce; Brash, Marina; Slavic, Durda; Pearl, David L.; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pododermatitis is a disease of concern for mink breeders in Canada and worldwide, as it causes discomfort and lowers the breeding rates on farms affected by the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology and pathogenesis of pododermatitis are still unknown. In this study, we compared Staphylococcus spp. and Streptococcus canis isolates from healthy mink with isolates from animals with pododermatitis on 2 farms in Ontario. Almost all hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. isolated were shown to be Staphylococcus delphini Group A by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequence analysis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) did not reveal any S. delphini or S. canis clonal lineages specifically associated with pododermatitis, which suggests that these bacteria do not act as primary pathogens, but does not dismiss their potential roles as opportunistic pathogens. While S. delphini and S. canis were the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in mink pododermatitis, they were also present in samples from healthy mink. Arcanobacterium phocae is occasionally isolated from pododermatitis cases, but is difficult to recover with conventional culture methods due to its slow growth. A quantitative real-time PCR was developed for the detection of A. phocae and was tested on 138 samples of footpad tissues from 14 farms. The bacterium was detected only in pododermatitis-endemic farms in Canada and was at higher concentrations in tissues from infected footpads than in healthy tissues. This finding suggests that A. phocae is involved in the pathogenesis of pododermatitis. PMID:25852228

  10. Determination of anthelmintic efficacy against Toxocara canis in dogs by use of capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice C Y; Epe, Christian; Bowman, Dwight D

    2015-09-15

    Industry guidelines for anthelmintic testing call for postmortem inspection of animals to verify treatment efficacy. A previous study showed that capsule endoscopy (CE) can be performed on dogs in vivo to quantify hookworms in the small intestine. Adoption of a minimally invasive procedure such as this could reduce the need for necropsy in efficacy trials. The present study employed CE to enumerate Toxocara canis in dogs, with two main goals: to determine if multiple capsule examinations improves the accuracy of worm counts compared to a single examination, and to establish if the efficacy of an anthelmintic compound is the same whether calculated using CE or necropsy data. To avoid needless animal sacrifice, the study was carried out on beagle dogs already in a product development trial with a planned terminal endpoint. Dogs were infected by oral inoculation with T. canis eggs. Untreated control dogs (n=8) were evaluated by CE three times while dogs treated with test compounds (3 groups of 4) were examined only once. Utilizing either the average count or just the last complete capsule examination, a robust correlation was found between CE and postmortem numbers (r=0.94, p<0.001). Calculated anthelmintic efficacy was essentially identical for the two enumeration methods, ranging from 94% to 100% for the three research compounds. CE may therefore be a viable alternative to necropsy for T. canis parasiticide trials. PMID:26321133

  11. Sequence analysis of a Torque teno canis virus isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Lan, Daoliang; Hua, Xiuguo; Cui, Li; Luo, Xuenong; Liu, Zhijie; San, Tongling; Zhu, CaiXia; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Zhibiao

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, a total of 158 fecal samples were collected from diarrheal dogs younger than 1 year old in pet clinic in China. 20 specimens (20/158, 13%) were positive for Torque teno canis virus DNA using detection PCR. One representative positive isolate designated LDL was randomly selected, cloned and sequenced. The complete genome of the LDL Chinese strain was 2799 nucleotides in length and contains three open reading frames (ORFs), which encode 576 (ORF1), 101 (ORF2), and 243 (ORF3) aa. Compared with the human and other animal TTV genomes, the genome of the LDL strain is clearly smaller and shares 95% identity with Japanese cf-TTV10 strain (AB076002). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the present Chinese Torque teno canis virus LDL strain was also closely clustered with the previous Japanese cf-TTV10 strain, and formed a different branch together with Torque teno sus viruses 1 and 2 compared with other Torque teno viruses, Torque teno mini virus, and Torque teno midi virus. Our study demonstrated that Torque teno canis virus is present in China. PMID:21645561

  12. Seroprevalence of Babesia canis infection in clinically healthy dogs from western Romania.

    PubMed

    Imre, Mirela; Farkas, Róbert; Ilie, Marius; Imre, Kálmán; Hotea, Ionela; Morariu, Sorin; Morar, Doru; Dărăbuş, Gheorghe

    2013-02-01

    Serum samples from 197 clinically healthy dogs residing in the Banat Region, the western historical part of Romania, were assayed by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the presence of anti-Babesia canis antibodies. Overall, the seroprevalence was 19.8% (39/197). The percent of seropositive dogs in rural areas (28.4%; 19/67) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared to dogs living in urban areas (15.4%; 20/130). Seroprevalence of B. canis infection in hunting dogs was also found to be significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared to canines with other lifestyles, but no significant difference was found between companion and kennel dogs. The statistical analysis showed that no significant differences (P > 0.05) were present between the seroprevalence of infected animals associated with age, gender, or breed. The hunting lifestyle was the only factor (OR = 4.57; 95% CI = 2.1-10.2; P = 0.002) positively associated with seroprevalence in dogs and can be considered the risk factor in the acquisition of infection. Also, the results of the present survey indicate that infection with B. canis in dogs is common in the sampling area and that it is an important pathogen for the local canine population. PMID:22681255

  13. Eosinophilic myocarditis in CBA/J mice infected with Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Cookston, M.; Stober, M.; Kayes, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    In humans, chronic eosinophilia has been associated clinically with endomyocardial fibrosis and myocardial damage. Mice infected with Toxocara canis have a marked eosinophilia, and develop eosinophil-rich granulomatous lesions in the soft tissues of the body, especially the lungs, liver, brain, and skeletal muscle. Few reports have described myocardial lesions associated with T. canis infections in mice. We examined the hearts of CBA/J mice killed at weekly intervals over an 8-week period for evidence of myocardial damage that might be attributable to eosinophils. Total white blood cell counts and eosinophil counts were obtained during this period, and revealed a peak white blood cell count of approximately 28,000 cells/mm3 at day 7 after infection and a peak eosinophil count of approximately 4,000 cells/mm3 at day 14 after infection. Myocardial lesions in the ventricular wall began as focal infiltrates of eosinophils and histiocytes, then progressed into granulomata containing necrotic debris. Collagen deposition was noted by day 21 after infection. By day 42 after infection, the lesions had contracted greatly because of a loss of cellularity, and consisted mainly of fibroblasts and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Myocyte damage, characterized by increased eosinophilia and necrosis, was observed. T. canis-infected CBA/J mice thus offer a useful model to study eosinophil-dependent myocardial damage. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2349964

  14. Immunopathological Changes in the Brain of Immunosuppressed Mice Experimentally Infected with Toxocara canis

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Mohamed M.; El-Kowrany, Samy I.; Othman, Ahmad A.; Gendy, Dina I. El; Saied, Eman M.

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a soil-transmitted helminthozoonosis due to infection of humans by larvae of Toxocara canis. The disease could produce cognitive and behavioral disturbances especially in children. Meanwhile, in our modern era, the incidence of immunosuppression has been progressively increasing due to increased incidence of malignancy as well as increased use of immunosuppressive agents. The present study aimed at comparing some of the pathological and immunological alterations in the brain of normal and immunosuppressed mice experimentally infected with T. canis. Therefore, 180 Swiss albino mice were divided into 4 groups including normal (control) group, immunocompetent T. canis-infected group, immunosuppressed group (control), and immunosuppressed infected group. Infected mice were subjected to larval counts in the brain, and the brains from all mice were assessed for histopathological changes, astrogliosis, and IL-5 mRNA expression levels in brain tissues. The results showed that under immunosuppression, there were significant increase in brain larval counts, significant enhancement of reactive gliosis, and significant reduction in IL-5 mRNA expression. All these changes were maximal in the chronic stage of infection. In conclusion, the immunopathological alterations in the brains of infected animals were progressive over time, and were exaggerated under the effect of immunosuppression as did the intensity of cerebral infection. PMID:25748709

  15. Use of cranial characters in taxonomy of the Minnesota wolf (Canis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Nowak, R.M.; Weisberg, S.

    2011-01-01

    Minnesota wolves (Canis sp.) sometimes are reported to have affinity to a small, narrow-skulled eastern form (Canis lupus lycaon Schreber, 1775) and sometimes to a larger, broader western form (Canis lupus nubilus Say, 1823). We found that pre-1950 Minnesota wolf skulls were similar in size to those of wolves from southeastern Ontario and smaller than those of western wolves. However, Minnesota wolf skulls during 1970-1976 showed a shift to the larger, western form. Although Minnesota skull measurements after 1976 were unavailable, rostral ratios from 1969 through 1999 were consistent with hybridization between the smaller eastern wolf and the western form. Our findings help resolve the different taxonomic interpretations of Minnesota skull morphology and are consistent with molecular evidence of recent hybridization or intergradation of the two forms of wolves in Minnesota. Together these data indicate that eastern- and western-type wolves historically mixed and hybridized in Minnesota and continue to do so. Our findings are relevant to a recent government proposal to delist wolves from the endangered species list in Minnesota and surrounding states.

  16. Use of cranial characters in taxonomy of the Minnesota wolf (Canis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Nowak, Ronald M.; Weisberg, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    Minnesota wolves (Canis sp.) sometimes are reported to have affinity to a small, narrow-skulled eastern form (Canis lupus lycaon Schreber, 1775) and sometimes to a larger, broader western form (Canis lupus nubilus Say, 1823). We found that pre-1950 Minnesota wolf skulls were similar in size to those of wolves from southeastern Ontario and smaller than those of western wolves. However, Minnesota wolf skulls during 1970–1976 showed a shift to the larger, western form. Although Minnesota skull measurements after 1976 were unavailable, rostral ratios from 1969 through 1999 were consistent with hybridization between the smaller eastern wolf and the western form. Our findings help resolve the different taxonomic interpretations of Minnesota skull morphology and are consistent with molecular evidence of recent hybridization or intergradation of the two forms of wolves in Minnesota. Together these data indicate that eastern- and western-type wolves historically mixed and hybridized in Minnesota and continue to do so. Our findings are relevant to a recent government proposal to delist wolves from the endangered species list in Minnesota and surrounding states.

  17. Yeast Gis2 and Its Human Ortholog CNBP Are Novel Components of Stress-Induced RNP Granules

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Marta; Farr, George W.; Fernandez, Cesar F.; Lauden, Laura; McCormack, John C.; Wolin, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Although a CCTG expansion in the gene encoding the zinc knuckle protein CNBP causes a common form of muscular dystrophy, the function of both human CNBP and its putative budding yeast ortholog Gis2 remain poorly understood. Here we report the protein interactions of Gis2 and the subcellular locations of both Gis2 and CNBP. We found that Gis2 exhibits RNA-dependent interactions with two proteins involved in mRNA recognition, the poly(A) binding protein and the translation initiation factor eIF4G. We show that Gis2 is a component of two large RNA-protein granules, processing bodies and stress granules, which contain translationally repressed mRNAs. Consistent with a functional ortholog, CNBP also associates with the poly(A) binding protein and accumulates in stress granules during arsenite treatment of human cells. These results implicate both Gis2 and CNBP in mRNA handling during stress. PMID:23285195

  18. Molecular epidemiology of rabies: focus on domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) from northern South Africa.

    PubMed

    Zulu, G C; Sabeta, C T; Nel, L H

    2009-03-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of rabies viruses recovered from black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) in northern South Africa were investigated to determine whether the black-backed jackal is an emerging maintenance host species for rabies in this region. A panel of 123 rabies viruses obtained from the two host species between 1980 and 2006 were characterised by nucleotide sequencing of the cytoplasmic domain of the glycoprotein gene and the non-coding G-L intergenic region. Through phylogenetic analysis a viral cluster specific to black-backed jackals and spanning a 5-year period was delineated in western Limpopo. Virus strains associated with domestic dogs prevail in densely populated communal areas in north-eastern Limpopo and in south and eastern Mpumalanga. The data presented in this study indicated the likelihood that black-backed jackals are capable of sustaining rabies cycles independent of domestic dogs. It is proposed that wildlife rabies control strategies, in synergy with domestic animal vaccination should be considered for effective control of rabies in South Africa. PMID:19061924

  19. Identification and characterization of orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Ford, Brett A; Ernest, Joanne R; Gendall, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    Improving crop species by breeding for salt tolerance or introducing salt tolerant traits is one method of increasing crop yields in saline affected areas. Extensive studies of the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana has led to the availability of substantial information regarding the function and importance of many genes involved in salt tolerance. However, the identification and characterization of A. thaliana orthologs in species such as Brassica napus (oilseed rape) can prove difficult due to the significant genomic changes that have occurred since their divergence approximately 20 million years ago (MYA). The recently released Brassica rapa genome provides an excellent resource for comparative studies of A. thaliana and the cultivated Brassica species, and facilitates the identification of Brassica species orthologs which may be of agronomic importance. Sodium hydrogen antiporter (NHX) proteins transport a sodium or potassium ion in exchange for a hydrogen ion in the other direction across a membrane. In A. thaliana there are eight members of the NHX family, designated AtNHX1-8, that can be sub-divided into three clades, based on their subcellular localization: plasma membrane (PM), intracellular class I (IC-I) and intracellular class II (IC-II). In plants, many NHX proteins are primary determinants of salt tolerance and act by transporting Na(+) out of the cytosol where it would otherwise accumulate to toxic levels. Significant work has been done to determine the role of both PM and IC-I clade members in salt tolerance in a variety of plant species, but relatively little analysis has been described for the IC-II clade. Here we describe the identification of B. napus orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6, using the B. rapa genome sequence, macro- and micro-synteny analysis, comparative expression and promoter motif analysis, and highlight the value of these multiple approaches for identifying true orthologs in closely related species with multiple paralogs. PMID:22973287

  20. Structural implications of mutations in the pea SYM8 symbiosis gene, the DMI1 ortholog, encoding a predicted ion channel.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Anne; Heckmann, Anne B; Yousafzai, Faridoon; Duc, Gerard; Downie, J Allan

    2007-10-01

    The Pisum sativum SYM8 gene plays an essential part in both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses. Mutation of sym8 in the original type line R25 blocks nodulation, mycorrhization, and Nod-factor-induced calcium spiking, an early component of the nodulation signaling pathway. We describe four new sym8 alleles of pea, which fall into the same complementation group as R25. The sym8 mutants are phenotypically similar to Medicago truncatula dmi1 mutants and map to a syntenic location. We used sequence homology to isolate the pea ortholog of M. truncatula DMI1 and have shown that the cloned pea ortholog can complement a M. truncatula dmi1 mutant for nodulation. Each of the five pea sym8 mutants carries a mutation in the DMI1 ortholog, confirming that the pea SYM8 is the DMI1 ortholog. Based on predicted structural similarities with an archaebacterial ion channel, we propose that SYM8 forms a tetrameric calcium-gated channel of a predicted structure similar to the archaebacterial potassium channel but containing a filter region that is different. The predicted structure identifies four aspartate residues (one from each subunit) forming the channel opening. We made a mutation changing the aspartate to valine and identified a missense mutation (changing alanine to valine adjacent to the aspartate residues) in this predicted filter region; both mutations caused a loss of function. We also identified a loss-of-function missense mutation (changing arginine to isoleucine) in a domain proposed to link the predicted channel and the gating ring domains, indicating that this mutation may block function by preventing a protein conformational change being transmitted from the gating-ring domain to the pore domain. PMID:17918620

  1. Characterization of a Drosophila ortholog of the Cdc7 kinase: a role for Cdc7 in endoreplication independent of Chiffon.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Robert; Hosler, Marcus R; Gavande, Navnath S; Ghosh, Arun K; Weake, Vikki M

    2015-01-16

    Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates components of the pre-replication complex during DNA replication initiation. Cdc7 is highly conserved, and Cdc7 orthologs have been characterized in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Cdc7 is activated specifically during late G1/S phase by binding to its regulatory subunit, Dbf4. Drosophila melanogaster contains a Dbf4 ortholog, Chiffon, which is essential for chorion amplification in Drosophila egg chambers. However, no Drosophila ortholog of Cdc7 has yet been characterized. Here, we report the functional and biochemical characterization of a Drosophila ortholog of Cdc7. Co-expression of Drosophila Cdc7 and Chiffon is able to complement a growth defect in yeast containing a temperature-sensitive Cdc7 mutant. Cdc7 and Chiffon physically interact and can be co-purified from insect cells. Cdc7 phosphorylates the known Cdc7 substrates Mcm2 and histone H3 in vitro, and Cdc7 kinase activity is stimulated by Chiffon and inhibited by the Cdc7-specific inhibitor XL413. Drosophila egg chamber follicle cells deficient for Cdc7 have a defect in two types of DNA replication, endoreplication and chorion gene amplification. However, follicle cells deficient for Chiffon have a defect in chorion gene amplification but still undergo endocycling. Our results show that Cdc7 interacts with Chiffon to form a functional Dbf4-dependent kinase complex and that Cdc7 is necessary for DNA replication in Drosophila egg chamber follicle cells. Additionally, we show that Chiffon is a member of an expanding subset of DNA replication initiation factors that are not strictly required for endoreplication in Drosophila. PMID:25451925

  2. Identification and characterization of orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Brett A.; Ernest, Joanne R.; Gendall, Anthony R.

    2012-01-01

    Improving crop species by breeding for salt tolerance or introducing salt tolerant traits is one method of increasing crop yields in saline affected areas. Extensive studies of the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana has led to the availability of substantial information regarding the function and importance of many genes involved in salt tolerance. However, the identification and characterization of A. thaliana orthologs in species such as Brassica napus (oilseed rape) can prove difficult due to the significant genomic changes that have occurred since their divergence approximately 20 million years ago (MYA). The recently released Brassica rapa genome provides an excellent resource for comparative studies of A. thaliana and the cultivated Brassica species, and facilitates the identification of Brassica species orthologs which may be of agronomic importance. Sodium hydrogen antiporter (NHX) proteins transport a sodium or potassium ion in exchange for a hydrogen ion in the other direction across a membrane. In A. thaliana there are eight members of the NHX family, designated AtNHX1-8, that can be sub-divided into three clades, based on their subcellular localization: plasma membrane (PM), intracellular class I (IC-I) and intracellular class II (IC-II). In plants, many NHX proteins are primary determinants of salt tolerance and act by transporting Na+ out of the cytosol where it would otherwise accumulate to toxic levels. Significant work has been done to determine the role of both PM and IC-I clade members in salt tolerance in a variety of plant species, but relatively little analysis has been described for the IC-II clade. Here we describe the identification of B. napus orthologs of AtNHX5 and AtNHX6, using the B. rapa genome sequence, macro- and micro-synteny analysis, comparative expression and promoter motif analysis, and highlight the value of these multiple approaches for identifying true orthologs in closely related species with multiple paralogs. PMID:22973287

  3. Bacterial and fungal chitinase chiJ orthologs evolve under different selective constraints following horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Certain bacteria from the genus Streptomyces are currently used as biological control agents against plant pathogenic fungi. Hydrolytic enzymes that degrade fungal cell wall components, such as chitinases, are suggested as one possible mechanism in biocontrol interactions. Adaptive evolution of chitinases are previously reported for plant chitinases involved in defence against fungal pathogens, and in fungal chitinases involved in fungal-fungal interactions. In this study we investigated the molecular evolution of chitinase chiJ in the bacterial genus Streptomyces. In addition, as chiJ orthologs are previously reported in certain fungal species as a result from horizontal gene transfer, we conducted a comparative study of differences in evolutionary patterns between bacterial and fungal taxa. Findings ChiJ contained three sites evolving under strong positive selection and four groups of co-evolving sites. Regions of high amino acid diversity were predicted to be surface-exposed and associated with coil regions that connect certain ?-helices and ?-strands in the family 18 chitinase TIM barrel structure, but not associated with the catalytic cleft. The comparative study with fungal ChiJ orthologs identified three regions that display signs of type 1 functional divergence, where unique adaptations in the bacterial and fungal taxa are driven by positive selection. Conclusions The identified surface-exposed regions of chitinase ChiJ where sequence diversification is driven by positive selection may putatively be related to functional divergence between bacterial and fungal orthologs. These results show that ChiJ orthologs have evolved under different selective constraints following the horizontal gene transfer event. PMID:23095575

  4. Comparative analysis of function and interaction of transcription factors in nematodes: Extensive conservation of orthology coupled to rapid sequence evolution

    PubMed Central

    Haerty, Wilfried; Artieri, Carlo; Khezri, Navid; Singh, Rama S; Gupta, Bhagwati P

    2008-01-01

    Background Much of the morphological diversity in eukaryotes results from differential regulation of gene expression in which transcription factors (TFs) play a central role. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an established model organism for the study of the roles of TFs in controlling the spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression. Using the fully sequenced genomes of three Caenorhabditid nematode species as well as genome information from additional more distantly related organisms (fruit fly, mouse, and human) we sought to identify orthologous TFs and characterized their patterns of evolution. Results We identified 988 TF genes in C. elegans, and inferred corresponding sets in C. briggsae and C. remanei, containing 995 and 1093 TF genes, respectively. Analysis of the three gene sets revealed 652 3-way reciprocal 'best hit' orthologs (nematode TF set), approximately half of which are zinc finger (ZF-C2H2 and ZF-C4/NHR types) and HOX family members. Examination of the TF genes in C. elegans and C. briggsae identified the presence of significant tandem clustering on chromosome V, the majority of which belong to ZF-C4/NHR family. We also found evidence for lineage-specific duplications and rapid evolution of many of the TF genes in the two species. A search of the TFs conserved among nematodes in Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens revealed 150 reciprocal orthologs, many of which are associated with important biological processes and human diseases. Finally, a comparison of the sequence, gene interactions and function indicates that nematode TFs conserved across phyla exhibit significantly more interactions and are enriched in genes with annotated mutant phenotypes compared to those that lack orthologs in other species. Conclusion Our study represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TFs across three nematode species and other organisms. The findings indicate substantial conservation of transcription factors even across distant evolutionary lineages and form the basis for future experiments to examine TF gene function in nematodes and other divergent phyla. PMID:18752680

  5. The C-Terminal Sequence and PI motif of the Orchid (Oncidium Gower Ramsey) PISTILLATA (PI) Ortholog Determine its Ability to Bind AP3 Orthologs and Enter the Nucleus to Regulate Downstream Genes Controlling Petal and Stamen Formation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Hsing-Fun; Hsu, Wei-Han; Li, Jen-Ying; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-11-01

    This study focused on the investigation of the effects of the PI motif and C-terminus of the Oncidium Gower Ramsey MADS box gene 8 (OMADS8), a PISTILLATA (PI) ortholog, on floral organ formation. 35S::OMADS8 completely rescued and 35S::OMADS8-PI (with the PI motif deleted) partially rescued petal/stamen formation, whereas these deficiencies were not rescued by 35S::OMADS8-C (C-terminal 29 amino acids deleted) in pi-1 mutants. OMADS8 could interact with Arabidopsis APETALA3 (AP3) and enter the nucleus. The nuclear entry efficiency was reduced for OMADS8-PI/AP3 and OMADS8-C/AP3. OMADS8 could also interact with OMADS5/OMADS9 (the Oncidium AP3 ortholog) and enter the nucleus with an efficiency only slightly affected by the deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. However, the stability of the OMADS8/OMADS5 and OMADS8/OMADS9 complexes was significantly reduced by deletion of the C-terminal sequence or PI motif. Further analysis indicated that the expression of genes downstream of AP3/PI (BNQ1/BNQ2/GNC/At4g30270) was compensated by 35S::OMADS8 and 35S::OMADS8-PI to a level similar to wild-type plants but was not affected by 35S::OMADS8-C in the pi-1 mutants. A similar FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) efficiency was observed for Arabidopsis AGAMOUS (AG) and the Oncidium AG ortholog OMADS4 for OMADS8, OMADS8-PI and OMADS8-C. These results indicated that the OMADS8 PI motif and C-terminus were valuable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AP3 orthologs to form higher order heterotetrameric complexes that regulated petal/stamen formation in both Oncidium orchids and transgenic Arabidopsis. However, the C-terminal sequence and PI motif were dispensable for the interaction of OMADS8 with the AG orthologs. PMID:26423960

  6. Comparing the evolutionary conservation between human essential genes, human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Zheng, Jiajia; Luan, Meiwei; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-01

    Human housekeeping genes are often confused with essential human genes, and several studies regard both types of genes as having the same level of evolutionary conservation. However, this is not necessarily the case. To clarify this, we compared the differences between human housekeeping genes and essential human genes with respect to four aspects: the evolutionary rate (dN/dS), protein sequence identity, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density and level of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The results showed that housekeeping genes had lower evolutionary rates, higher sequence identities, lower SNP densities and higher levels of LD compared with essential genes. Together, these findings indicate that housekeeping and essential genes are two distinct types of genes, and that housekeeping genes have a higher level of evolutionary conservation. Therefore, we suggest that researchers should pay careful attention to the distinctions between housekeeping genes and essential genes. Moreover, it is still controversial whether we should substitute human orthologs of mouse essential genes for human essential genes. Therefore, we compared the evolutionary features between human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes and we got inconsistent results in long-term and short-term evolutionary characteristics implying the irrationality of simply replacing human essential genes with human orthologs of mouse essential genes. PMID:25911641

  7. Gene cloning, expression and characterization of avian cathelicidin orthologs, Cc-CATHs, from Coturnix coturnix.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Wenjuan; He, Weiyu; Guang, Huijuan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Duo; Liu, Jingze; Chen, Ming; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2011-05-01

    Cathelicidins comprise a family of antimicrobial peptides sharing a highly conserved cathelin domain, which play a central role in the early innate host defense against infection. In the present study, we report three novel avian cathelicidin orthologs cloned from a constructed spleen cDNA library of Coturnix coturnix, using a nested-PCR-based cloning strategy. Three coding sequences containing ORFs of 447, 465 and 456 bp encode three mature antimicrobial peptides (named Cc-CATH1, 2 and 3) of 26, 32 and 29 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that precursors of Cc-CATHs are significantly conserved with known avian cathelicidins. Synthetic Cc-CATH2 and 3 displayed broad and potent antimicrobial activity against most of the 41 strains of bacteria and fungi tested, especially the clinically isolated drug-resistant strains, with minimum inhibitory concentration values in the range 0.3-2.5 ?m for most strains with or without the presence of 100 mm NaCl. Cc-CATH2 and 3 showed considerable reduction of cytotoxic activity compared to other avian cathelicidins, with average IC(50) values of 20.18 and 17.16 ?m, respectively. They also exerted a negligible hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes, lysing only 3.6% of erythrocytes at a dose up to 100 ?gmL(-1) . As expected, the recombinant Cc-CATH2 (rCc-CATH2) also showed potent bactericidal activity. All these features of Cc-CATHs encourage further studies aiming to estimate their therapeutic potential as drug leads, as well as coping with current widespread antibiotic resistance, especially the new prevalent and dangerous 'superbug' that is resistant to almost all antibiotics. PMID:21375690

  8. Structural Investigation of a Viral Ortholog of Human NEIL2/3 DNA Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Eckenroth, Brian E.; Averill, April M.; Imamura, Kayo; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Assault to DNA that leads to oxidative base damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway with specialized enzymes called DNA glycosylases catalyzing the first step of this pathway. These glycosylases can be categorized into two families: the HhH superfamily, which includes endonuclease III (or Nth), and the Fpg/Nei family, which comprises formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (or Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (or Nei). In humans there are three Nei-like (NEIL) glycosylases: NEIL1, 2, and 3. Here we present the first crystal structure of a viral ortholog of the human NEIL2/NEIL3 proteins, Mimivirus Nei2 (MvNei2), determined at 2.04 Å resolution. The C-terminal region of the MvNei2 enzyme comprises two conserved DNA binding motifs: the helix-two-turns-helix (H2TH) motif and a C-H-C-C type zinc-finger similar to that of human NEIL2. The N-terminal region of MvNei2 is most closely related to NEIL3. Like NEIL3, MvNei2 bears a valine at position 2 instead of the usual proline and it lacks two of the three conserved void-filling residues present in other members of the Fpg/Nei family. Mutational analysis of the only conserved void-filling residue methionine 72 to alanine yields an MvNei2 variant with impaired glycosylase activity. Mutation of the adjacent His73 causes the enzyme to be more productive thereby suggesting a plausible role for this residue in the DNA lesion search process. PMID:24120312

  9. Functional Characterization of PhapLEAFY, a FLORICAULA/LEAFY Ortholog in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seonghoe

    2015-11-01

    The plant-specific transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) is considered to be a master regulator of flower development in the model plant, Arabidopsis. This protein plays a dual role in plant growth, integrating signals from the floral inductive pathways and acting as a floral meristem identity gene by activating genes for floral organ development. Although LFY occupies an important position in flower development, the functional divergence of LFY homologs has been demonstrated in several plants including monocots and gymnosperms. In particular, the functional roles of LFY genes from orchid species such as Phalaenopsis that contain unique floral morphologies with distinct expression patterns of floral organ identity genes remain elusive. Here, PhapLFY, an ortholog of Arabidopsis LFY from Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana, a Taiwanese native monopodial orchid, was isolated and characterized through analyses of expression and protein activity. PhapLFY transcripts accumulated in the floral primordia of developing inflorescences, and the PhapLFY protein had transcriptional autoactivation activity forming as a homodimer. Furthermore, PhapLFY rescues the aberrant floral phenotypes of Arabidopsis lfy mutants. Overexpression of PhapLFY alone or together with PhapFT1, a P. aphrodite subsp. formosana homolog of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in rice, caused precocious heading. Consistently, a higher Chl content in the sepals and morphological changes in epidermal cells were observed in the floral organs of PhapLFY knock-down orchids generated by virus-induced gene silencing. Taken together, these results suggest that PhapLFY is functionally distinct from RICE FLORICAULA/LEAFY (RFL) but similar to Arabidopsis LFY based on phenotypes of our transgenic Arabidopsis and rice plants. PMID:26493518

  10. Evolutionary rate analyses of orthologs and paralogs from 12 Drosophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2007-01-01

    The newly sequenced genome sequences of 11 Drosophila species provide the first opportunity to investigate variations in evolutionary rates across a clade of closely related species. Protein-coding genes were predicted using established Drosophila melanogaster genes as templates, with recovery rates ranging from 81%97% depending on species divergence and on genome assembly quality. Orthology and paralogy assignments were shown to be self-consistent among the different Drosophila species and to be consistent with regions of conserved gene order (synteny blocks). Next, we investigated the rates of diversification among these species gene repertoires with respect to amino acid substitutions and to gene duplications. Constraints on amino acid sequences appear to have been most pronounced on D. ananassae and least pronounced on D. simulans and D. erecta terminal lineages. Codons predicted to have been subject to positive selection were found to be significantly over-represented among genes with roles in immune response and RNA metabolism, with the latter category including each subunit of the Dicer-2/r2d2 heterodimer. The vast majority of gene duplications (96.5%) and synteny rearrangements were found to occur, as expected, within single Mller elements. We show that the rate of ancient gene duplications was relatively uniform. However, gene duplications in terminal lineages are strongly skewed toward very recent events, consistent with either a rapid-birth and rapid-death model or the presence of large proportions of copy number variable genes in these Drosophila populations. Duplications were significantly more frequent among trypsin-like proteases and DM8 putative lipid-binding domain proteins. PMID:17989258

  11. The Complexity of Vesicle Transport Factors in Plants Examined by Orthology Search

    PubMed Central

    Mirus, Oliver; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle transport is a central process to ensure protein and lipid distribution in eukaryotic cells. The current knowledge on the molecular components and mechanisms of this process is majorly based on studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, which revealed 240 different proteinaceous factors either experimentally proven or predicted to be involved in vesicle transport. In here, we performed an orthologue search using two different algorithms to identify the components of the secretory pathway in yeast and 14 plant genomes by using the core-set of 240 factors as bait. We identified 4021 orthologues and (co-)orthologues in the discussed plant species accounting for components of COP-II, COP-I, Clathrin Coated Vesicles, Retromers and ESCRTs, Rab GTPases, Tethering factors and SNAREs. In plants, we observed a significantly higher number of (co-)orthologues than yeast, while only 8 tethering factors from yeast seem to be absent in the analyzed plant genomes. To link the identified (co-)orthologues to vesicle transport, the domain architecture of the proteins from yeast, genetic model plant A. thaliana and agriculturally relevant crop Solanum lycopersicum has been inspected. For the orthologous groups containing (co-)orthologues from yeast, A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum, we observed the same domain architecture for 79% (416/527) of the (co-)orthologues, which documents a very high conservation of this process. Further, publically available tissue-specific expression profiles for a subset of (co-)orthologues found in A. thaliana and S. lycopersicum suggest that some (co-)orthologues are involved in tissue-specific functions. Inspection of localization of the (co-)orthologues based on available proteome data or localization predictions lead to the assignment of plastid- as well as mitochondrial localized (co-)orthologues of vesicle transport factors and the relevance of this is discussed. PMID:24844592

  12. Expression study of the hunchback ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Mayer, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors encoded by hunchback homologs play different roles in arthropods, including maternally mediated control, segmentation, and mesoderm and neural development. Knockdown experiments in spider and insect embryos have also revealed homeotic effects and gap phenotypes, the latter indicating a function of hunchback as a "gap gene". Although the expression pattern of hunchback has been analysed in representatives of all four major arthropod groups (chelicerates, myriapods, crustaceans and insects), nothing is known about its expression in one of the closest arthropod relatives, the Onychophora (velvet worms). We therefore examined the expression pattern of hunchback in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our transcriptomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed only one hunchback ortholog in this species. The putative Hunchback protein contains all nine zinc finger domains known from other protostomes. We found no indication of maternally contributed transcripts of hunchback in early embryos of E. rowelli. Its initial expression occurs in the ectodermal tissue of the antennal segment, followed by the jaw, slime papilla and trunk segments in an anterior-to-posterior progression. Later, hunchback expression is seen in the mesoderm of the developing limbs. A second "wave" of expression commences later in development in the antennal segment and continues posteriorly along each developing nerve cord. This expression is restricted to the neural tissues and does not show any segmental pattern. These findings are in line with the ancestral roles of hunchback in mesoderm and neural development, whereas we find no evidence for a putative function of hunchback as a "gap gene" in Onychophora. PMID:26093940

  13. An RNAi-based suppressor screen identifies interactors of the Myt1 ortholog of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Allen, Anna K; Nesmith, Jessica E; Golden, Andy

    2014-12-01

    Oocyte maturation in all species is controlled by a protein complex termed the maturation promoting factor (MPF). MPF comprises a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and its partner cyclin, and it is regulated by dueling regulatory phosphorylation events on the CDK. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Wee1/Myt1 ortholog WEE-1.3 provides the inhibitory phosphorylations on CDK-1 that keep MPF inactive and halt meiosis. Prior work has shown that depletion of WEE-1.3 in C. elegans results in precocious oocyte maturation in vivo and a highly penetrant infertility phenotype. This study sought to further define the precocious maturation phenotype and to identify novel interactors with WEE-1.3. We found that WEE-1.3 is expressed throughout the germline and in developing embryos in a perinuclear pattern, and demonstrated that oocytes in WEE-1.3-depleted germlines have begun to transcribe embryonic genes and exhibit inappropriate expression of proteins normally restricted to fertilized eggs. In addition, we performed an RNAi suppressor screen of the infertile phenotype to identify novel factors that, when co-depleted with WEE-1.3, restore fertility to these animals. We screened ?1900 essential genes by RNAi feeding and identified 44 (?2% of the tested genes) that are suppressors of the WEE-1.3 depletion phenotype. The suppressors include many previously unidentified players in the meiotic cell cycle and represent a pool of potential WEE-1.3 interacting proteins that function during C. elegans oocyte maturation and zygotic development. PMID:25298536

  14. The Zebrafish Ortholog of TRPV1 Is Required for Heat-Induced Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Philia; Poon, Jason; Ufret-Vincenty, Carmen; Snelson, Corey D.; Gordon, Sharona E.; Raible, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect hot temperatures is critical to maintaining body temperature and avoiding injury in diverse animals from insects to mammals. Zebrafish embryos, when given a choice, actively avoid hot temperatures and display an increase in locomotion similar to that seen when they are exposed to noxious compounds such as mustard oil. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the single zebrafish ortholog of TRPV1/2 may have arisen from an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian TRPV1 and TRPV2. As opposed to TRPV2, mammalian TRPV1 is essential for environmentally relevant heat sensation. In the present study, we provide evidence that the zebrafish TRPV1 ion channel is also required for the sensation of heat. Contrary to development in mammals, zebrafish TRPV1+ neurons arise during the first wave of somatosensory neuron development, suggesting a vital importance of thermal sensation in early larval survival. In vitro analysis showed that zebrafish TRPV1 acts as a molecular sensor of environmental heat (≥25°C) that is distinctly lower than the sensitivity of the mammalian form (≥42°C) but consistent with thresholds measured in behavioral assays. Using in vivo calcium imaging with the genetically encoded calcium sensor GCaMP3, we show that TRPV1-expressing trigeminal neurons are activated by heat at behaviorally relevant temperatures. Using knock-down studies, we also show that TRPV1 is required for normal heat-induced locomotion. Our results demonstrate for the first time an ancient role for TRPV1 in the direct sensation of environmental heat and show that heat sensation is adapted to reflect species-dependent requirements in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:23516290

  15. Depletion of the IKBKAP ortholog in zebrafish leads to hirschsprung disease-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, William Wai-Chun; Tang, Clara Sze-Man; Gui, Hong-Sheng; So, Man-Ting; Lui, Vincent Chi-Hang; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Merc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of IKBKAP (inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase complex-associated protein) in the development of enteric nervous system (ENS) and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). METHODS: In this study, we injected a morpholino that blocked the translation of ikbkap protein to 1-cell stage zebrafish embryos. The phenotype in the ENS was analysed by antibody staining of the pan-neuronal marker HuC/D followed by enteric neuron counting. The mean numbers of enteric neurons were compared between the morphant and the control. We also studied the expressions of ret and phox2bb, which are involved in ENS development, in the ikbkap morpholino injected embryos by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and compared them with the control. RESULTS: We observed aganglionosis (?2, P < 0.01) and a reduced number of enteric neurons (38.8 9.9 vs 50.2 17.3, P < 0.05) in the zebrafish embryos injected with ikbkap translation-blocking morpholino (morphant) when compared with the control embryos. Specificity of the morpholino was confirmed by similar results obtained using a second non-overlapping morpholino that blocked the translation of ikbkap. We further studied the morphant by analysing the expression levels of genes involved in ENS development such as ret, phox2bb and sox10, and found that phox2bb, the ortholog of human PHOX2B, was significantly down-regulated (0.51 0.15 vs 1.00 0, P < 0.05). Although we also observed a reduction in the expression of ret, the difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: Loss of IKBKAP contributed to HSCR as demonstrated by functional analysis in zebrafish embryos. PMID:25717236

  16. Pervasive Variation of Transcription Factor Orthologs Contributes to Regulatory Network Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nadimpalli, Shilpa; Persikov, Anton V.; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Differences in transcriptional regulatory networks underlie much of the phenotypic variation observed across organisms. Changes to cis-regulatory elements are widely believed to be the predominant means by which regulatory networks evolve, yet examples of regulatory network divergence due to transcription factor (TF) variation have also been observed. To systematically ascertain the extent to which TFs contribute to regulatory divergence, we analyzed the evolution of the largest class of metazoan TFs, Cys2-His2 zinc finger (C2H2-ZF) TFs, across 12 Drosophila species spanning ~45 million years of evolution. Remarkably, we uncovered that a significant fraction of all C2H2-ZF 1-to-1 orthologs in flies exhibit variations that can affect their DNA-binding specificities. In addition to loss and recruitment of C2H2-ZF domains, we found diverging DNA-contacting residues in ~44% of domains shared between D. melanogaster and the other fly species. These diverging DNA-contacting residues, found in ~70% of the D. melanogaster C2H2-ZF genes in our analysis and corresponding to ~26% of all annotated D. melanogaster TFs, show evidence of functional constraint: they tend to be conserved across phylogenetic clades and evolve slower than other diverging residues. These same variations were rarely found as polymorphisms within a population of D. melanogaster flies, indicating their rapid fixation. The predicted specificities of these dynamic domains gradually change across phylogenetic distances, suggesting stepwise evolutionary trajectories for TF divergence. Further, whereas proteins with conserved C2H2-ZF domains are enriched in developmental functions, those with varying domains exhibit no functional enrichments. Our work suggests that a subset of highly dynamic and largely unstudied TFs are a likely source of regulatory variation in Drosophila and other metazoans. PMID:25748510

  17. Cloning, expression, and functional characterization of the rat Pax6 5a orthologous splicing variant.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fei; Li, Min; Cheng, Sai-Yu; Wen, Liang; Liu, Ming-Hua; Shuai, Jie

    2014-08-15

    Pax6 functions as a pleiotropic regulator in eye development and neurogenesis. Its splice variant Pax6 5a has been cloned in many vertebrate species including human and mouse, but never in rat. This study focused on the cloning and characterization of the Pax6 5a orthologous splicing variant in rat. It was cloned from Sprague-Dawley rats 10 days post coitum (E10) by RT-PCR and was sequenced for comparison with Pax6 sequences in the GenBank by BLAST. The rat Pax6 5a was revealed to contain an additional 42 bp insertion at the paired domain. At the nucleotide level, the rat Pax6 5a coding sequence (1,311 bp) had a higher degree of homology to the mouse (96% identical) than to the human (93% identical) sequence. At the amino acid (aa) level, rat PAX6 5a shares 99.8% identity with the mouse sequence and 99.5% with the human sequence. The splice variant is preferentially expressed in the rat E10 embryonic headfolds and not in the trunk of neurula. Its effects on the proliferation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were preliminarily evaluated by the MTT assay. Both pLEGFP-Pax6 5a-transfected cells and pLEGFP-Pax6-transfected cells exhibited a similar growth curve (P>0.05), suggesting that the Pax6 5a has a similar effect on the proliferation of rMSCs as Pax6. PMID:24952136

  18. Prevalence and diversity of Hepatozoon canis in naturally infected dogs in Japanese islands and peninsulas.

    PubMed

    El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; Goto, Minami; Noishiki, Kaori; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Hirata, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroki; Takashima, Yasuhiro; El-Morsey, Ahmed; Yanai, Tokuma

    2013-09-01

    Canine hepatozoonosis is a worldwide protozoal disease caused by Hepatozoon canis and Hepatozoon americanum and is transmitted by ixodid ticks, Rhipicephalus and Amblyomma spp., respectively. H. canis infection is widespread in Africa, Europe, South America, and Asia, including Japan. The objective of this study was to study the distribution pattern and diversity of H. canis in naturally infected dogs in nine Japanese islands and peninsulas. Therefore, 196 hunting dogs were randomly sampled during the period from March to September 2011 and the ages and sexes were identified. Direct microscopy using Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed H. canis gametocytes in the peripheral blood of 45 (23.6%) dogs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on EDTA-anticoagulated blood, initially with the common primer set (B18S-F and B18S-R) amplifying the 1,665-bp portion of the 18S rRNA gene, and then with the specific primer set (HepF and HepR) amplifying about 660 bp fragments of the same gene. Based on PCR, 84 (42.9%) dogs were positive using the common primer and 81 (41.3%) were positive using the specific primer. The current investigation indicated that all screened areas, except for Sado Island and Atsumi Peninsula, were infected. Yaku Island had the highest infection rate (84.6% in males and 100.0% in females), while Ishigaki Island showed the lowest infection rates (8.3% in males and 17.7% in females). Both sexes were infected with no significant difference. However, diversity of infection among the surveyed islands and peninsulas was significantly different (P < 0.05). Although H. canis has previously been reported in dogs in Japan, the higher infection rate described in the current study and the diversity of infection in a wide range of islands strongly encourage prospective studies dealing with the prevention and treatment of the infection in dogs, as well as control of ticks. PMID:23812601

  19. Characterization of the monoterpene synthase gene tps26, the ortholog of a gene induced by insect herbivory in maize.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changfa; Shen, Binzhang; Xu, Zhennan; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Dooner, Hugo K

    2008-03-01

    Plants damaged by insects can synthesize and release volatile chemicals that attract natural enemies of the herbivore. The maize (Zea mays subsp. mays) terpene synthase gene stc1 is part of that indirect defense response, being induced in seedling blades in response to herbivory by beet army worm. Many genes in maize are duplicated because of a past whole-genome duplication event, and several of these orthologs display different expression patterns. We report here the isolation and characterization of tps26 and confirm by homology and synteny criteria that it is the ortholog of stc1. Prior genetic analysis revealed that the stc1 function is not duplicated, raising the interesting question of how the two orthologs have become differentiated in their expression. tps26 encodes a 633-amino acid protein that is highly conserved with STC1. Like stc1, tps26 is induced by wounding, but in the roots and leaf sheath, instead of the blade, and not in response to beet army worm feeding. tps26 maps near a quantitative trait locus for Southwestern corn borer resistance, making it a plausible candidate gene for that quantitative trait locus. However, while possessing highly polymorphic tps26 alleles, the resistant and susceptible parents of the mapping population do not differ in levels of tps26 expression. Moreover, tps26 is not induced specifically by Southwestern corn borer feeding. Therefore, although they share a wounding response, the stc1 and tps26 maize orthologs differ in their tissue specificity and their induction by insect herbivores. The N termini of STC1 and TPS26 are predicted to encode plastid transit peptides; fusion proteins of green fluorescent protein to either N terminus localized to the plastid, confirming that prediction. The mature proteins, but not the respective complete proteins, were active and synthesized a blend of monoterpenes, indicating that they are monoterpene synthases. A gene closely related to stc1/tps26 is found in the sorghum (Sorghum spp.) genome at a location that is not orthologous with stc1. The possible origin of stc1-like genes is discussed. PMID:18218975

  20. [Comparison of nested-PCR with blood smear examination in detection of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in dogs].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos A N; Ramos, Rafael A N; Arajo, Flbio R; Guedes, Daniel S; Souza, Ingrid I F; Ono, Tatiana M; Vieira, Anahi S; Pimentel, Danillo S; Rosas, Eduardo O; Faustino, Maria A G; Alves, Leucio C

    2009-12-01

    The clinical signs of Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys infection are similar, and the diagnosis of these pathogens made by stained blood smears is poor due sensibility and specificity. On the other hand, the molecular diagnosis is highly sensitive and specific and nested-PCR have been optimized for accurate diagnosis these pathogens in dogs. At the veterinary teaching hospital, whole-blood samples with EDTA were obtained from 100 dogs and smears were made from blood samples for evaluation for intracellular parasites. For each sample, DNA was extracted and submitted to nPCR analysis for detection of E. canis and A. platys. The results of stained blood smears showed 9% of the animals were positive for E. canis and 21% for A. platys. Regarding of nPCR analysis, 57 and 55% of dogs were positive for E. canis and A. platys respectively. As compared to a nested PCR, the stained blood smears revealed false-negative results for both E. canis and A. platys. The results indicate that the nPCR is highly sensitive and specific for detection of both pathogens and the molecular diagnosis could be more useful at veterinary hospital. PMID:20040193

  1. The Dog Mite, Demodex canis: Prevalence, Fungal Co-Infection, Reactions to Light, and Hair Follicle Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Jen; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Lian-Chen; Ju, Yu-Ten; Hong, Chin-Lin; Tsai, Yu-Yang; Li, Yi-Hung; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Infection rate, reaction to light, and hair follicle apoptosis are examined in the dogmite, Demodex canis Leydig (Prostigmata: Demodicidae), in dogs from the northern area of Taiwan. An analysis of relevant samples revealed 7.2% (73/1013) prevalence of D. canis infection. Infection during the investigation peaked each winter, with an average prevalence of 12.5% (32/255). The infection rates significantly varied in accordance with month, sex, age, and breed (p < 0.05). Most of the lesions were discovered on the backs of the infected animals, where the infection rate was 52.1% (38/73) (P < 0.05). The epidemiologic analysis of infection based on landscape area factor, found that employing a map-overlapping method showed a higher infection rate in the eastern distribution of Taiwan's northern area than other areas. Isolation tests for Microsporum canis Bodin (Onygenales: Arthrodermataceae) and Trichophyton mentagrophyte Robin (Blanchard) on the D. canis infected dogs revealed prevalence rates of 4.4% (2/45) and 2.2% (1/45), respectively. Observations demonstrated that D. canis slowly moved from a light area to a dark area. Skin samples were examined for cellular apoptosis by activated caspase3 immunohistochemical staining. Cells that surrounded the infected hair follicles were activated caspase3-positive, revealing cell apoptosis in infected follicles via the activation of caspase3. PMID:21867442

  2. The spreading process of Ehrlichia canis in macrophages is dependent on actin cytoskeleton, calcium and iron influx and lysosomal evasion.

    PubMed

    Alves, R N; Levenhagen, M A; Levenhagen, M M M D; Rieck, S E; Labruna, M B; Beletti, M E

    2014-01-31

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular microorganism and the etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. The invasion process has already been described for some bacteria in this genus, such as E. muris and E. chaffeensis, and consists of four stages: adhesion, internalisation, intracellular proliferation and intercellular spreading. However, little is known about the spreading process of E. canis. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium, iron and lysosomes from the host cell in the spreading of E. canis in dog macrophages in vitro. Different inhibitory drugs were used: cytochalasin D (actin polymerisation inhibitor), verapamil (calcium channel blocker) and deferoxamine (iron chelator). Our results showed a decrease in the number of bacteria in infected cells treated with all drugs when compared to controls. Lysosomes in infected cells were cytochemically labelled with acid phosphatase to allow the visualisation of phagosome-lysosome fusion and were further analysed by transmission electron microscopy. Phagosome-lysosome fusion was rarely observed in vacuoles containing viable E. canis. These data suggest that the spreading process of E. canis in vitro is dependent on cellular components analysed and lysosomal evasion. PMID:24378068

  3. Morphological, biometrical, and molecular characterization of Ctenocephalides felis and Ctenocephalides canis isolated from dogs from different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Marrugal, A; Callejn, R; de Rojas, M; Halajian, A; Cutillas, C

    2013-06-01

    In the present work, a comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular study of Ctenocephalides spp. isolated from dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) from different geographical regions (Spain, Iran, and South Africa) has been carried out. The internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences of Ctenocephalides felis and Ctenocephalides canis collected from dogs from different geographical regions have been determined to clarify the taxonomic status of these species and to assess intraspecific variation and interspecific sequence differences. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis based on ITS1 sequences has been performed. Four different morphological populations were observed in the individuals of C. felis collected from dogs from different geographical locations. Nevertheless, the comparative study of the ITS1 sequences of the different morphological populations observed in C. felis did not show molecular differences. The results showed clear molecular differences between C. felis and C. canis and some specific recognition sites for endonucleases were detected between both species. Thus, BfrBI and DraI sites have diagnostic value for specific determination in C. felis. The phylogenetic tree based on the ITS1 sequences of C. felis and C. canis revealed that all the populations of C. felis from different geographical regions clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, from C. canis. We conclude that ITS1 region is a useful tool to approach different taxonomic and phylogenetic questions in Ctenocephalides species. PMID:23525642

  4. Microbesnoitia leoni Bwangamoi, 1989, from the African lion (Panthera leo) redetermined as a junior synonym of Hepatozoon canis (James, 1905) Wenyon, 1926.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Bwangamoi, O

    1994-04-01

    Hepatozoon canis-like schizonts were found in the hearts of 2 lionesses (Panthera leo) from Kenya. The parasite, initially described as a new genus and new species Microbesnoitia leoni Bwangamoi, 1989, is determined to be a junior synonym of Hapatozoon canis (James, 1905) Wenyon, 1926. PMID:8158481

  5. Biochemical properties, expression profiles, and tissue localization of orthologous acetylcholinesterase-2 in the mosquito, Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Picheng; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter for cholinergic neurotransmission in animals. Most insects studied so far possess two AChE genes: ace-1 paralogous and ace-2 orthologous to Drosophila melanogaster ace. We characterized the catalytic domain of Anopheles gambiae AChE1 in a previous study (Jiang et al., 2009) and report here biochemical properties of A. gambiae AChE2 expressed in Sf9 cells. An unknown protease in the expression system cleaved the recombinant AChE2 next to Arg110, yielding two non-covalently associated polypeptides. A mixture of the intact and cleaved AChE2 had a specific activity of 72.3 U/mg, much lower than that of A. gambiae AChE1 (523 U/mg). The order of Vmax/KM values for the model substrates was acetylthiocholine > propionylthiocholine ? acetyl-(?-methyl)thiocholine > butyrylthiocholine. The IC50s for eserine, carbaryl, BW284C51, paraoxon and malaoxon were 1.32, 13.6, 26.8, 192 and 294 nM, respectively. A. gambiae AChE2 bound eserine and carbaryl stronger than paraoxon and malaoxon, whereas eserine and malaoxon modified the active site Ser232 faster than carbaryl or paraoxon did. Consequently, the kis were 1.173, 0.245, 0.029 and 0.018 ?M?1min?1 for eserine, carbaryl, paraoxon and malaoxon, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions showed a similar pattern of ace-1 and ace-2 expression. Their mRNAs were abundant in early embryos, greatly decreased in late embryos, larvae, pupae, and pharate adult, and became abundant again in adults. Both transcripts were higher in head and abdomen than thorax of adults and higher in male than female mosquitos. Transcript levels of ace-1 were 1.9- to 361.8-fold higher than those of ace-2, depending on developmental stages and body parts. Cross-reacting polyclonal antibodies detected AChEs in adult brains, thoracic ganglia, and genital/rectal area. Activity assays, immunoblotting, and tandem mass spectrometric analysis indicated that A. gambiae AChE1 is responsible for most of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis in the head extracts. Taken together, these data indicate that A. gambiae AChE2 may play a less significant role than AChE1 does in the mosquito nervous system. PMID:23267863

  6. Detection of Microsporum canis in the skin scrapings and hairs of dogs with dermatophytosis based on sequences of the chitin synthase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kano, R; Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, S; Hasegawa, A

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, to confirm Microsporum canis infection rapidly, we detected the chitin synthase gene 1 (CHS1) gene of M. canis in the hair and skin samples of four dogs with dermatophytosis. Amplification of the DNAs in the four samples with CHS1 primers yielded fragments of about 620-bp. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the CHS1 gene fragments from samples and a reference strain of M. canis gene showed more than 99% similarity. The method presented in this study can rapidly detect the DNA of M. canis in skin scrapings, and we anticipate that it will be a useful microbiological tool for the diagnosis of M. canis infections in animals and humans. PMID:10981834

  7. Efficacy of moxidectin 6-month injectable and milbemycin oxime/lufenuron tablets against naturally acquired toxocara canis infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D; Legg, Walter; Stansfield, David G

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of moxidectin injection (ProHeart 6 Sustained Release Injectable for Dogs, Fort Dodge Animal Health) against naturally acquired infections of Toxocara canis was compared with that of milbemycin oxime/lufenuron tablets (Sentinel Flavor Tabs, Novartis Animal Health). Eighteen dogs with naturally acquired infections of T. canis were ranked by egg counts and randomly assigned to treatment with moxidectin (170 micro g/kg), milbemycin (500 micro g/kg)/lufenuron (10 mg/kg), or to an untreated control group (six dogs per treatment). Dogs were euthanized 7 days after treatment for recovery, identification, and enumeration of parasites by species. There was no apparent efficacy for moxidectin against T. canis. Conversely, milbemycin oxime/lufenuron was 91.5 % effective against naturally occurring infections of this canine parasite. PMID:12447835

  8. Toxocara canis glycans influence antigen recognition by mouse IgG1 and IgM antibodies.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Ewa; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sugar moieties of Toxocara canis glycoprotein antigens on their recognition by infected mouse antibodies was investigated in this study. Native TES and recombinant Toxocara mucins generated in Pichia pastoris yeast as well as their deglycosylated forms were used in ELISA. TES and recombinant mucins were equally recognized by T. canis infected mouse IgG1 antibodies. IgM immunoglobulins predominantly recognized TES antigens. Among mucins recognition of Tc-MUC-4 was the most significant. Deglycosylation of antigens resulted in significant loss of IgM and IgG1 reactivity to TES, mucins, Tc-MUC-3 and Tc-MUC-4. The presence of sugar moieties had no influence on IgE binding to native or recombinant T. canis antigens. Our results suggest that glycans are involved in epitope formation what should be taken into consideration in production of recombinant helminth antigens for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26751891

  9. Recombinant gp19 as a potential antigen for detecting anti-Ehrlichia canis antibodies in dog sera.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rômulo Silva de; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Gonçales, Relber Aguiar; Lara, Ana Paula de Souza Stori de; Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa de; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-01-01

    The canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia canis, is endemic in several regions of Brazil. Some serological diagnostic techniques using immunodominant proteins of E. canis as antigens are available, but their specificities and sensitivities are questionable. Based on this, the objective of this study was to test the antigenic potential of the recombinant gp19 protein (rGP19) for subsequent use in diagnostic tests. The rGP19 expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) C41 was recognized in the sera from experimentally infected dogs using ELISA and Western blotting. Thus, it was possible to obtain a promising antigen with the ability to differentiate between E. canis-positive and -negative animals, even 1 week after infection. PMID:26291145

  10. Coyote (Canis latrans) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) mortality and morbidity due to a Karenia brevis red tide in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castle, Kevin T; Flewelling, Leanne J; Bryan, John; Kramer, Adam; Lindsay, James; Nevada, Cheyenne; Stablein, Wade; Wong, David; Landsberg, Jan H

    2013-10-01

    In October 2009, during a Karenia brevis red tide along the Texas coast, millions of dead fish washed ashore along the 113-km length of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS). Between November 2009 and January 2010, at least 12 coyotes (Canis latrans) and three domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) died or were euthanized at PAIS or local veterinary clinics because of illness suspected to be related to the red tide. Another red tide event occurred during autumn 2011 and, although fewer dead fish were observed relative to the 2009 event, coyotes again were affected. Staff at PAIS submitted carcasses of four coyotes and one domestic dog from November 2009 to February 2010 and six coyotes from October to November 2011 for necropsy and ancillary testing. High levels of brevetoxins (PbTxs) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in seven of the coyotes and the dog, with concentrations up to 634 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in stomach contents, 545 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in liver, 195 ng PbTx-3 eq/g in kidney, and 106 ng PbTx-3 eq/mL in urine samples. Based on red tide presence, clinical signs, and postmortem findings, brevetoxicosis caused by presumptive ingestion of toxic dead fish was the likely cause of canid deaths at PAIS. These findings represent the first confirmed report of terrestrial mammalian wildlife mortalities related to a K. brevis bloom. The implications for red tide impacts on terrestrial wildlife populations are a potentially significant but relatively undocumented phenomenon. PMID:24502723

  11. Retrospective clinical and molecular analysis of conditioned laboratory dogs (Canis familiaris) with serologic reactions to Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Scorpio, Diana G; Wachtman, Lynn M; Tunin, Richard S; Barat, Nicole C; Garyu, Justin W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2008-09-01

    Dogs are susceptible to different tickborne infections, including members of the Anaplasmataceae (Ehrlichia canis, E. ewingii, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys), Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii. These diseases can manifest with clinical signs including fever, anorexia, malaise, lameness, rash, and bleeding episodes; however, these signs are nonpathognomonic, and infections can occur in the absence of clinical signs. Hematologic abnormalities can include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, hyperproteinemia and hypergammaglobulinemia. In biomedical research, diseases such as canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever may cause morbidity among exposed dogs and confound research results. Random-source dogs are susceptible to these diseases because of their increased risk of arthropod exposure. Nonpurpose bred, randomly selected conditioned dogs (n = 21) were examined; blood samples were taken for hematology, biochemistry analysis, tickborne pathogen serology, and PCR. Of these, 2 dogs (10% of the population) presented with illness characterized by fever, malaise, lameness, or hemostatic abnormalities, and 15 (71%) had antibodies to one or more tickborne pathogens. No specific hematologic or biochemical differences were apparent between seronegative dogs and seropositive dogs reactive to all 3 pathogens. E. canis and B. burgdorferi PCR of tissues and blood were negative for all dogs. PCR amplification of several Ehrlichia and Anaplasma genes yielded no positive samples. From this cohort of dogs, serologic and molecular results indicate prior exposure without active infection or clinical disease. Exposure to and potential for infection with these bacteria and other pathogens may contribute to blood and tissue alterations that could confound experiments and lead to misinterpretation of data in canine models. PMID:18947166

  12. Retrospective Clinical and Molecular Analysis of Conditioned Laboratory Dogs (Canis familiaris) with Serologic Reactions to Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii

    PubMed Central

    Scorpio, Diana G; Wachtman, Lynn M; Tunin, Richard S; Barat, Nicole C; Garyu, Justin W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Dogs are susceptible to different tickborne infections, including members of the Anaplasmataceae (Ehrlichia canis, E. ewingii, E. chaffeensis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys), Borrelia burgdorferi, and Rickettsia rickettsii. These diseases can manifest with clinical signs including fever, anorexia, malaise, lameness, rash, and bleeding episodes; however, these signs are nonpathognomonic, and infections can occur in the absence of clinical signs. Hematologic abnormalities can include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, hyperproteinemia and hypergammaglobulinemia. In biomedical research, diseases such as canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever may cause morbidity among exposed dogs and confound research results. Random-source dogs are susceptible to these diseases because of their increased risk of arthropod exposure. Nonpurpose bred, randomly selected conditioned dogs (n = 21) were examined; blood samples were taken for hematology, biochemistry analysis, tickborne pathogen serology, and PCR. Of these, 2 dogs (10% of the population) presented with illness characterized by fever, malaise, lameness, or hemostatic abnormalities, and 15 (71%) had antibodies to one or more tickborne pathogens. No specific hematologic or biochemical differences were apparent between seronegative dogs and seropositive dogs reactive to all 3 pathogens. E. canis and B. burgdorferi PCR of tissues and blood were negative for all dogs. PCR amplification of several Ehrlichia and Anaplasma genes yielded no positive samples. From this cohort of dogs, serologic and molecular results indicate prior exposure without active infection or clinical disease. Exposure to and potential for infection with these bacteria and other pathogens may contribute to blood and tissue alterations that could confound experiments and lead to misinterpretation of data in canine models. PMID:18947166

  13. Current Surveys of the Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis, Angiostrongylus vasorum and Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Schnyder, Manuela; Vrhovec, Majda Globokar; Schaper, Roland; Tsachev, Ilia

    2015-08-01

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) have increasingly become a focus of interest in recent years. Some of the CVBDs are zoonotic and may therefore also represent a risk for the human population. Different factors are in discussion to explain the expansion of vectors and pathogens into formerly unaffected areas. Knowledge of the prevalence and distribution of CVBDs in Bulgaria is scant overall and most data rely on single case descriptions. The aim of the present study was to determine the seroprevalence of important CVBDs in 167 dogs from central-southern Bulgaria (Stara Zagora), with special emphasis on hitherto uninvestigated babesiosis and angiostrongylosis, on poorly investigated Lyme borreliosis and canine granulocytic anaplasmosis, and on the potentially zoonotic dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis. Relatively high prevalence rates were documented for anti-Babesia canis antibodies, Dirofilaria immitis antigen (16.2 %; 27/167 each), anti-Ehrlichia canis (21 %; 35/167) and anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum antibodies (30.5 - 46.1 %; 51 - 77/167), while Borrelia burgdorferi seroprevalence was low (2.4 %; 4/167). All samples were negative for Leishmania infantum antibodies and Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and antibodies. In total, 64.7 % (108/167) of the samples indicated infection or exposure to at least one agent and a high proportion of dual infections (39.8 %; 43/108) was demonstrated. Multiple infections with up to four different organisms were also detected. Our data underline the importance of CVBDs and especially of co-infections which could influence the clinical outcome in dogs. PMID:26152413

  14. Comparative Evaluation of the Vector Competence of Four South American Populations of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus Group for the Bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the Agent of Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Krawczak, Felipe S; Costa, Francisco B; Soares, Joo Fbio; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the vector competence of four populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks for the bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). Ticks (larvae and nymphs) from the four populations-one from So Paulo state, southeastern Brazil (BSP), one from Rio Grande do Sul state, southern Brazil (BRS), one from Argentina (ARG), and one from Uruguay (URU)-were exposed to E. canis infection by feeding on dogs that were experimentally infected with E. canis. Engorged ticks (larvae and nymphs) were allowed to molt to nymphs and adults, respectively, which were tested by molecular analysis (E. canis-specific PCR assay) and used to infest nave dogs. Through infestation of adult ticks on nave dogs, after nymphal acquisition feeding on E. canis-infected dogs, only the BSP population was shown to be competent vectors of E. canis, i.e., only the dogs infested with BSP adult ticks developed clinical illness, seroconverted to E. canis, and yielded E. canis DNA by PCR. This result, demonstrated by two independent replications, is congruent with epidemiological data, since BSP ticks were derived from So Paulo state, Brazil, where CME is highly endemic. On the other hand, BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were derived from a geographical region (South America southern cone) where CME has never been properly documented. Molecular analysis of unfed adults at 30 days post molting support these transmission results, since none of the BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were PCR positive, whereas 1% of the BSP nymphs and 31.8% of the BSP adults contained E. canis DNA. We conclude that the absence or scarcity of cases of CME due to E. canis in the South America southern cone is a result of vector incompetence of the R. sanguineus group ticks that prevail on dogs in this part of South America. PMID:26414283

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Vector Competence of Four South American Populations of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus Group for the Bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the Agent of Canine Monocytic Ehrlichiosis

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Krawczak, Felipe S.; Costa, Francisco B.; Soares, João Fábio; Labruna, Marcelo B.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the vector competence of four populations of Rhipicephalus sanguineus group ticks for the bacterium Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). Ticks (larvae and nymphs) from the four populations—one from São Paulo state, southeastern Brazil (BSP), one from Rio Grande do Sul state, southern Brazil (BRS), one from Argentina (ARG), and one from Uruguay (URU)–were exposed to E. canis infection by feeding on dogs that were experimentally infected with E. canis. Engorged ticks (larvae and nymphs) were allowed to molt to nymphs and adults, respectively, which were tested by molecular analysis (E. canis-specific PCR assay) and used to infest naïve dogs. Through infestation of adult ticks on naïve dogs, after nymphal acquisition feeding on E. canis-infected dogs, only the BSP population was shown to be competent vectors of E. canis, i.e., only the dogs infested with BSP adult ticks developed clinical illness, seroconverted to E. canis, and yielded E. canis DNA by PCR. This result, demonstrated by two independent replications, is congruent with epidemiological data, since BSP ticks were derived from São Paulo state, Brazil, where CME is highly endemic. On the other hand, BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were derived from a geographical region (South America southern cone) where CME has never been properly documented. Molecular analysis of unfed adults at 30 days post molting support these transmission results, since none of the BRS, ARG, and URU ticks were PCR positive, whereas 1% of the BSP nymphs and 31.8% of the BSP adults contained E. canis DNA. We conclude that the absence or scarcity of cases of CME due to E. canis in the South America southern cone is a result of vector incompetence of the R. sanguineus group ticks that prevail on dogs in this part of South America. PMID:26414283

  16. In vivo evaluation of albendazole microspheres for the treatment of Toxocara canis larva migrans.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Mara G; Leonardi, Daro; Bolmaro, Raul E; Echenique, Claudia G; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, Mara C

    2010-08-01

    Albendazole is a benzimidazole derivative with proven efficacy against many parasites such as intestinal helminths. Toxocariasis is one of the important parasitic diseases in humans and animals caused by Toxocara canis. It is well known that T. canis larvae migrate in paratenic hosts, including humans where it may cause visceral larva migrans. Thus, the present research was carried out using in vivo experiments with the aim of finding whether novel albendazole microparticles would be active against migrating larvae of the parasite. Albendazole-chitosan microparticles were prepared by ionotropic gelation with sodium lauryl sulphate or by a liquid-liquid phase separation with sodium hydroxide. Mice were infected with T. canis and then treated with both albendazole-chitosan microparticles. After treatment (28days post-infection), it was examined the anthelmintic effect in mice after oral administration of microparticulate preparations. The number of larvae recovered from mice treated with albendazole formulations were compared with placebo. The results showed that albendazole microparticles were easily prepared in high yield using both aqueous solutions of sodium lauryl sulphate or sodium hydroxide. In vivo evaluation of larva migration showed that albendazole microparticles exhibited a greater anthelmintic effect in the brain (0 larva/mouse). In addition, it was also found that liver and lung showed a significant decrease in the number of larvae. Therefore, these data suggest that albendazole-chitosan microparticles are effective formulations for the treatment of toxocariasis infection by reducing the number of larvae in liver and lung. Particularly, these polymeric preparations were able to totally prevent migration of larvae to the mice brain. PMID:20347973

  17. A protected area influences genotype-specific survival and the structure of a Canis hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R; Mahoney, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    It is widely recognized that protected areas can strongly influence ecological systems and that hybridization is an important conservation issue. However, previous studies have not explicitly considered the influence of protected areas on hybridization dynamics. Eastern wolves are a species of special concern and their distribution is largely restricted to a protected population in Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada, where they are the numerically dominant canid. We studied intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing survival and cause-specific mortality of hybrid and parental canids in the three-species hybrid zone between eastern wolves, eastern coyotes, and gray wolves in and adjacent to APP. Mortality risk for eastern wolves in areas adjacent to APP was significantly higher than for other sympatric Canis types outside of APP, and for eastern wolves and other canids within APP. Outside of APP, the annual mortality rate of all canids by harvest (24%) was higher than for other causes of death (4-7%). Furthermore, eastern wolves (hazard ratio = 3.5) and nonresidents (transients and dispersing animals, hazard ratio = 2.7) were more likely to die from harvest relative to other Canis types and residents, respectively. Thus, eastern wolves dispersing from APP were especially vulnerable to harvest mortality. For residents, eastern wolf survival was more negatively influenced by increased road density than for other Canis types, further highlighting the sensitivity of eastern wolves to human disturbance. A cycle of dispersal from APP followed by high rates of mortality and hybridization appears to maintain eastern wolves at low density adjacent to APP, limiting the potential for expansion beyond the protected area. However, high survival and numerical dominance of eastern wolves within APP suggest that protected areas can allow rare hybridizing species to persist even if their demographic performance is compromised and barriers to hybridization are largely absent in the adjacent matrix. PMID:24669720

  18. Isolation of a Microsporum canis gene family encoding three subtilisin-like proteases expressed in vivo.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Frdric; Brouta, Frdric; Monod, Michel; Zaugg, Christophe; Baar, Didier; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2002-10-01

    Microsporum canis is the main agent of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats and is responsible for frequent zoonosis. The pathogenesis of the disease remains largely unknown, however. Among potential fungal virulence factors are secreted keratinolytic proteases, whose molecular characterization would be an important step towards the understanding of dermatophytic infection pathogenesis. M. canis secretes a 31.5 kDa keratinolytic subtilisin-like protease as the major component in a culture medium containing cat keratin as the sole nitrogen source. Using a probe corresponding to a gene's internal fragment, which was obtained by polymerase chain reaction, the entire gene encoding this protease named SUB3 was cloned from a M. canislambdaEMBL3 genomic library. Two closely related genes, termed SUB1 and SUB2, were also cloned from the library using as a probe the gene coding for Aspergillus fumigatus 33 kDa alkaline protease (ALP). Deduced amino acid sequence analysis revealed that SUB1, SUB2, and SUB3 are secreted proteases and show large regions of identity between themselves and with subtilisin-like proteases of other filamentous fungi. Interest ingly, mRNA of SUB1, SUB2, and SUB3 were detected by reverse transcriptase nested-polymerase chain reaction from hair of experimentally infected guinea pigs. These results show that SUB1, SUB2, and SUB3 encode a family of subtilisin-like proteases and strongly suggest that these proteases are produced by M. canis during the invasion of keratinized structures. This is the first report describing the isolation of a gene family encoding potential virulence-related factors in dermatophytes. PMID:12406327

  19. Photoprotective implications of leaf variegation in E. dens-canis L. and P. officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Raquel; Fernndez-Marn, Beatriz; Becerril, Jos Mara; Garca-Plazaola, Jos Ignacio

    2008-08-25

    Variegated leaves occur rarely in nature, but there are some species, primarily in the forest understory, that possess this characteristic. We recently studied two variegated plants: Erytronium dens-canis L., which is characterised by a pattern of red patches and Pulmonaria officinalis L., with light green spots. These non-green areas could attenuate light reaching mesophyll cells with respect to green sections. The aim of the study was to verify whether such red and light green parts are more photoprotected than green ones and if this trait could be of adaptive value. Red patches in E. dens-canis were due to a single layer of red cells in the upper parenchyma, which accumulated anthocyanins. Light green spots in P. officinalis were caused by the presence of loosely arranged cells instead of a well-established layer of packed cells in the palisade parenchyma. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was performed under light treatment, showing a greater decrease of photochemical efficiency in red and light green patches than in green sections. Differences in the extent of photochemical efficiency among patches were not attributable to different activation of the xanthophyll cycle. These observations failed to confirm our initial hypothesis, but they questioned the physiological reason for this higher sensitivity in red and light green patches of photosynthetic tissues. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was therefore performed in the field. The same pattern of photochemical efficiency was maintained only in E. dens-canis. The current results demonstrate that in both species the benefits of variegation, if any, are different from enhanced photosynthetic performance. PMID:18180073

  20. Ectoparasitic species from Canis familiaris (Linn) in Buenos Aires province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez, Alda; Castro, Dolores del C; Gonzlez, Sandra

    2004-02-26

    Several arthropods that live as ectoparasites on domestic dogs can cause severe dermatitis or act as vectors of pathogenic agents, resulting in serious diseases not only in dogs, but also in humans. We studied ectoparasites found on Canis familiaris sampled in five areas in Buenos Aires province, Argentina. The prevalence of fleas, ticks and lice was analyzed, as well as their seasonal variations through the different sites studied. The kind of infestation found in each host was determined and the intensity of natural infestation was estimated. The study was carried out from October 2001 to July 2002, with 116 dogs that lived in rural areas and did not receive control treatments. In order to remove the ectoparasites, the dogs' skin was rubbed with a piece of cotton soaked in ether. All dogs had at least one species of ectoparasites. A total number of 5193 ectoparasites were found corresponding to four species, 15.7% Ctenocephalides canis, 73% Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 1.8 Linognathus setosus and 9.4% Heterodoxus spiniger. R. sanguineus was the most abundant species, and C. canis was the only flea species found. This may be due to the dogs being exclusively rural animals. Within the zones sampled, Magdalena showed the greatest prevalence, maybe as a consequence of having the highest relative humidity in relation to the other areas. Triple infestation (ticks-fleas-lice) was observed in 56.9% of the dogs; 39.6% presented double infestation, most being ticks-fleas, and only 3.4% showed simple infestation (lice). Female hosts were the most affected. Even though there were records of ectoparasites throughout all the year, a higher intensity was observed during the spring months, most likely as a result of the increase in temperature after the winter months. PMID:15019149

  1. Distinct Physiological Roles of the Three [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Orthologs in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis ?

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Nakajima, Akihito; Okada, Yoshihiro; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) and play a key role in the energy metabolism of microorganisms in anaerobic environments. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1, which assimilates organic carbon coupled with the reduction of elemental sulfur (S0) or H2 generation, harbors three gene operons encoding [NiFe]-hydrogenase orthologs, namely, Hyh, Mbh, and Mbx. In order to elucidate their functions in vivo, a gene disruption mutant for each [NiFe]-hydrogenase ortholog was constructed. The Hyh-deficient mutant (PHY1) grew well under both H2S- and H2-evolving conditions. H2S generation in PHY1 was equivalent to that of the host strain, and H2 generation was higher in PHY1, suggesting that Hyh functions in the direction of H2 uptake in T. kodakarensis under these conditions. Analyses of culture metabolites suggested that significant amounts of NADPH produced by Hyh are used for alanine production through glutamate dehydrogenase and alanine aminotransferase. On the other hand, the Mbh-deficient mutant (MHD1) showed no growth under H2-evolving conditions. This fact, as well as the impaired H2 generation activity in MHD1, indicated that Mbh is mainly responsible for H2 evolution. The copresence of Hyh and Mbh raised the possibility of intraspecies H2 transfer (i.e., H2 evolved by Mbh is reoxidized by Hyh) in this archaeon. In contrast, the Mbx-deficient mutant (MXD1) showed a decreased growth rate only under H2S-evolving conditions and exhibited a lower H2S generation activity, indicating the involvement of Mbx in the S0 reduction process. This study provides important genetic evidence for understanding the physiological roles of hydrogenase orthologs in the Thermococcales. PMID:21515783

  2. Expression of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of a myriapod: evidence for pair rule-like mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A hallmark of Drosophila segmentation is the stepwise subdivision of the body into smaller and smaller units, and finally into the segments. This is achieved by the function of the well-understood segmentation gene cascade. The first molecular sign of a segmented body appears with the action of the pair rule genes, which are expressed as transversal stripes in alternating segments. Drosophila development, however, is derived, and in most other arthropods only the anterior body is patterned (almost) simultaneously from a pre-existing field of cells; posterior segments are added sequentially from a posterior segment addition zone. A long-standing question is to what extent segmentation mechanisms known from Drosophila may be conserved in short-germ arthropods. Despite the derived developmental modes, it appears more likely that conserved mechanisms can be found in anterior patterning. Results Expression analysis of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests that these genes are generally involved in segmenting the anterior embryo. We find that the Glomeris pairberry-1 ( pby-1) gene is expressed in a pair rule pattern that is also found in insects and a chelicerate, the mite Tetraynchus urticae. Other Glomeris pair rule gene orthologs are expressed in double segment wide domains in the blastoderm, which at subsequent stages split into two stripes in adjacent segments. Conclusions The expression patterns of the millipede pair rule gene orthologs resemble pair rule patterning in Drosophila and other insects, and thus represent evidence for the presence of an ancestral pair rule-like mechanism in myriapods. We discuss the possibilities that blastoderm patterning may be conserved in long-germ and short-germ arthropods, and that a posterior double segmental mechanism may be present in short-germ arthropods. PMID:22595029

  3. High-throughput RNA sequencing reveals structural differences of orthologous brain-expressed genes between western lowland gorillas and humans.

    PubMed

    Lipovich, Leonard; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Jia, Hui; Sinkler, Christopher; McGowen, Michael; Sterner, Kirstin N; Weckle, Amy; Sugalski, Amara B; Pipes, Lenore; Gatti, Domenico L; Mason, Christopher E; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Grossman, Lawrence I; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2016-02-01

    The human brain and human cognitive abilities are strikingly different from those of other great apes despite relatively modest genome sequence divergence. However, little is presently known about the interspecies divergence in gene structure and transcription that might contribute to these phenotypic differences. To date, most comparative studies of gene structure in the brain have examined humans, chimpanzees, and macaque monkeys. To add to this body of knowledge, we analyze here the brain transcriptome of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), an African great ape species that is phylogenetically closely related to humans, but with a brain that is approximately one-third the size. Manual transcriptome curation from a sample of the planum temporale region of the neocortex revealed 12 protein-coding genes and one noncoding-RNA gene with exons in the gorilla unmatched by public transcriptome data from the orthologous human loci. These interspecies gene structure differences accounted for a total of 134 amino acids in proteins found in the gorilla that were absent from protein products of the orthologous human genes. Proteins varying in structure between human and gorilla were involved in immunity and energy metabolism, suggesting their relevance to phenotypic differences. This gorilla neocortical transcriptome comprises an empirical, not homology- or prediction-driven, resource for orthologous gene comparisons between human and gorilla. These findings provide a unique repository of the sequences and structures of thousands of genes transcribed in the gorilla brain, pointing to candidate genes that may contribute to the traits distinguishing humans from other closely related great apes. PMID:26132897

  4. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  5. Genome-wide co-localization of Polycomb orthologs and their effects on gene expression in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycomb group proteins form multicomponent complexes that are important for establishing lineage-specific patterns of gene expression. Mammalian cells encode multiple permutations of the prototypic Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) with little evidence for functional specialization. An aim of this study is to determine whether the multiple orthologs that are co-expressed in human fibroblasts act on different target genes and whether their genomic location changes during cellular senescence. Results Deep sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against CBX6, CBX7, CBX8, RING1 and RING2 reveals that the orthologs co-localize at multiple sites. PCR-based validation at representative loci suggests that a further six PRC1 proteins have similar binding patterns. Importantly, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different orthologs implies that multiple variants of PRC1 associate with the same DNA. At many loci, the binding profiles have a distinctive architecture that is preserved in two different types of fibroblast. Conversely, there are several hundred loci at which PRC1 binding is cell type-specific and, contrary to expectations, the presence of PRC1 does not necessarily equate with transcriptional silencing. Interestingly, the PRC1 binding profiles are preserved in senescent cells despite changes in gene expression. Conclusions The multiple permutations of PRC1 in human fibroblasts congregate at common rather than specific sites in the genome and with overlapping but distinctive binding profiles in different fibroblasts. The data imply that the effects of PRC1 complexes on gene expression are more subtle than simply repressing the loci at which they bind. PMID:24485159

  6. A 3-decade dearth of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a wolf (Canis lupus)-dominated ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Some 30 years after wolves (Canis lupus) were implicated in decimating wintering white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a 3000-km2 area of northeastern Minnesota, winter deer still have not recolonized the area. Although habitat in the study area generally remains poor, some regeneration has taken place, and deer have increased adjacent to the area. However, wolf numbers have persisted by preying on moose (Alces alces). We could detect no reason other than wolf predation and deer migration traditions for why wintering deer have not recolonized the area.

  7. White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn risk from Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) predation during summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Morris, Aaron; Barber-Meyer, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how often various prey animals are at risk of predation by Gray Wolves (Canis lupus). We used a system to monitor the presence during the day of two radio-collared Gray Wolves within 2 km of a radio-collared White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with a fawn or fawns in August 2013 in the Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota. We concluded that the fawn or fawns were at risk of predation by at least one wolf at least daily.

  8. Epidemiological characteristics of Toxocara canis zoonotic infection of children in a Caribbean community.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D E; Bundy, D A; Cooper, E S; Schantz, P M

    1986-01-01

    The study reports the results of a summary of the prevalence and symptomatology of paediatric toxocariasis in Anse-la-Raye, St. Lucia. The seroprevalence of Toxocara canis among the children, as determined by ELISA, was 86%, the highest level recorded to date. In contrast, the prevalence of infection in dogs was not abnormally high, although the canine population was large and unconstrained compared to that in industrial countries. The presence of infective ova in peridomestic areas and the widespread practice of pica among children in the village probably combine to enhance exposure to infection. PMID:3488844

  9. Epidemiological characteristics of Toxocara canis zoonotic infection of children in a Caribbean community

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, D. E.; Bundy, D. A. P.; Cooper, E. S.; Schantz, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The study reports the results of a summary of the prevalence and symptomatology of paediatric toxocariasis in Anse-la-Raye, St. Lucia. The seroprevalence of Toxocara canis among the children, as determined by ELISA, was 86%, the highest level recorded to date. In contrast, the prevalence of infection in dogs was not abnormally high, although the canine population was large and unconstrained compared to that in industrial countries. The presence of infective ova in peridomestic areas and the widespread practice of pica among children in the village probably combine to enhance exposure to infection. PMID:3488844

  10. Natural West Nile virus infection in a captive juvenile Arctic wolf (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Lanthier, Isabelle; Hébert, Michel; Tremblay, Donald; Harel, Josée; Dallaire, André D; Girard, Christiane

    2004-07-01

    A case of West Nile virus (WNV) infection in a captive 4-month-old Arctic wolf (Canis lupus) is described. The animal had vomiting, anorexia, and ataxia before death. Histopathology revealed multifocal severe renal lymphoplasmacytic vasculitis, mostly affecting small arterioles, with fibrinoid degeneration of some vessel walls. Many small foci of gliosis were detected in the cerebral cortex. West Nile virus was demonstrated in the kidneys and cerebrum by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. The described renal changes represent a novel pathological finding of WNV infection. PMID:15305745

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tibetan wolf (Canis lupus laniger).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Honghai; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Lei; Sha, Weilai; Yang, Xiufeng; Liu, Guangshuai

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the Tibetan wolf (Canis lupus laniger) was sequenced using blood samples obtained from a wild female Tibetan wolf captured from Lhasa in Tibet, China. Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, with an average elevation above 3500?m, is the highest plateau in the world. Sequence analysis showed that its structure is in accordance with other Canidae species, but GTG is used as the start codon in ND4L gene which is different from many canide animals. PMID:24438245

  12. Unusual behavior by bison, Bison bison, toward elk, Cervus elaphus, and wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; McIntyre, R.T.; Smith, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Incidents are described of bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park mauling and possibly killing a young elk (Cervus elaphus) calf, chasing wolves (Canis lupus) off elk they had just killed or were killing, and keeping the wolves away for extended periods. During one of the latter cases, the bison knocked a wolf-wounded elk down. Bison were also seen approaching wolves that were resting and sleeping, rousting them, following them to new resting places and repeating this behavior. These behaviors might represent some type of generalized hyper-defensiveness that functions as an anti-predator strategy.

  13. Unusual behavior by Bison, Bison bison, toward Elk, Cervus elaphus, and wolves, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; McIntyre, R.T.; Smith, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Incidents are described of Bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park mauling and possibly killing a young Elk (Cervus elaphus) calf, chasing wolves (Canis lupus) off Elk they had just killed or were killing, and keeping the wolves away for extended periods. During one of the latter cases, the Bison knocked a wolf-wounded Elk down. Bison were also seen approaching wolves that were resting and sleeping, rousting them, following them to new resting places and repeating this behavior. These behaviors might represent some type of generalized hyper-defensiveness that functions as an anti-predator strategy.

  14. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  15. Effects of disinfectants on Toxocara canis embryogenesis and larval establishment in mice tissues.

    PubMed

    Verocai, G G; Tavares, P V; Ribeiro, F de A; Correia, T R; Scott, F B

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to evaluate the effects of several different disinfectant solutions on embryonic development of Toxocara canis eggs and (ii) to investigate the potential infectivity of exposed eggs by assessing larval establishment in various tissues in a murine model. All the disinfectants tested were products routinely used in veterinary clinics, kennels, animal shelters and laboratories. Ova were obtained from gravid female T. canis uteri. Thirty samples containing 10,000 eggs were divided into five groups of six identical sample tubes per group. The treatments for the groups were as follows: Group H benzalconium chloride, Group A 70% ethanol, Group B 2-2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution, Group L 7.99% formaldehyde-based disinfectant and Group C tap water (controls). Samples were incubated at 27 1C and 80 10% relative humidity. Embryonic development was evaluated on days +6, +9, +12, +15, +18, +21, +25, +28 and +36 of exposure by visual observation under light microscopy. Seventy percent ethanol degenerated all eggs within a few days and thus inhibited larval development. Sodium hypochlorite removed the external layer of the ova, but eggs harboured infective larvae for up to 2 weeks. Benzalconium chloride and formaldehyde-based disinfectants had no effect on T. canis embryogenesis according to comparison with control eggs (P > 0.05). Embryonated eggs from each of the six samples from Groups C, H and L were administered to mice as only these ova were considered viable based on in vitro trial. On day 30pi, those were euthanized and had their tissues were submitted to organ compression (brains) or acid-isolation technique (kidneys, lungs, livers and carcasses) for larval counting. The mean number of recovered larvae for Groups C, H and L were: 512.8, 393.7 and 477 respectively (P > 0.05). Larvae derived from Groups H and L eggs maintained their ability to migrate. However, larval establishment pattern differed from control. While certain disinfectants do negatively affect embryogenesis (70% ethanol) and reduce the integrity and durability (sodium hypochlorite) of infective T. canis eggs, others have no effect upon embryogenesis. Those eggs can still be a threat to human and animal health even after over a month of disinfectant exposure. PMID:20500505

  16. The influence of social and endocrine factors on urine-marking by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.; Plotka, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    Although serum hormones varied seasonally in all adult animals, only dominant male and female wolves urine-marked. Serum testosterone and urine-marking rates, which increased during the fall/winter breeding season, were positively correlated in both male and female dominant wolves. Estradiol, which increased in conjunction with proestrus and estrus, was not correlated with female urine-marking. These findings suggest that hormonal influence on urine-marking in the wolf is modulated by social factors and contrast with those for both domestic dogs and coyotes, two other members of the genus Canis.

  17. Helminth infections in faecal samples of wolves Canis lupus L. from the western Beskidy Mountains in southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Popio?ek, Marcin; Szczesnaa, Justyna; Nowaka, Sabina; Mys?ajeka, Robert W

    2007-12-01

    Eighty-nine samples of grey wolf (Canis lupus L.) faeces were collected between 2002 and 2004 from two areas in the western Beskidy Mts (south Poland). Helminth eggs were observed in 56.2% of faeces examined. These included: Alaria alata (2.2%), taeniid eggs (11.2%), Toxocara canis (5.6%), Toxascaris leonina (1.1%), Eucoleus aerophilus (14.6%), Ancylostoma caninum (12.3%), Uncinaria stenocephala (37%) and unidentified roundworm eggs of the family Strongyloididae (1.1%). Eucoleus aerophilus is recorded for the first time from Poland. The results are compared with the helminth fauna of other wolf populations in Europe. PMID:18251025

  18. Seroepidemiology of Toxocara Canis infection among primary schoolchildren in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxocariasis, which is predominantly caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection, is a common zoonotic parasitosis worldwide; however, the status of toxocariasis endemicity in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unknown. Methods A seroepidemiological investigation was conducted among 166 primary school children (PSC) aged 7–12 years from the capital area of the RMI. Western blots based the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES) was employed, and children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted at a titer of 1:64. Information regarding demographic characteristics of and environmental risk factors affecting these children was collected using a structured questionnaire. A logistic regression model was applied to conduct a multivariate analysis. Results The overall seropositive rate of T. canis infection was 86.75% (144/166). In the univariate analysis, PSC who exhibited a history of feeding dogs at home (OR = 5.52, 95% CI = 1.15–26.61, p = 0.02) and whose parents were employed as nonskilled workers (OR = 2.86, 95% CI = 1.08–7.60, p = 0.03) demonstrated a statistically elevated risk of contracting T. canis infections. Cleaning dog huts with gloves might prevent infection, but yielded nonsignificant effects. The multivariate analysis indicated that parental occupation was the critical risk factor in this study because its effect remained significant after adjusting for other variables; by contrast, the effect of dog feeding became nonsignificant because of other potential confounding factors. No associations were observed among gender, age, consuming raw meat or vegetables, drinking unboiled water, cleaning dog huts with gloves, or touching soil. Conclusions This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among PSC in the RMI. The high seroprevalence indicates the commonness of T. canis transmission and possible human risk. The fundamental information that the present study provides regarding T. canis epidemiology can facilitate developing strategies for disease prevention and control. PMID:24886153

  19. Solution Structure of the QUA1 Dimerization Domain of pXqua, the Xenopus Ortholog of Quaking

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muzaffar; Broadhurst, R. William

    2013-01-01

    The STAR protein family member Quaking is essential for early development in vertebrates. For example, in oligodendrocyte cells it regulates the splicing, localization, translation and lifetime of a set of mRNAs that code for crucial components of myelin. The Quaking protein contains three contiguous conserved regions: a QUA1 oligomerization element, followed by a single-stranded RNA binding motif comprising the KH and QUA2 domains. An embryonic lethal point mutation in the QUA1 domain, E48G, is known to affect both the aggregation state and RNA-binding properties of the murine Quaking ortholog (QKI). Here we report the NMR solution structure of the QUA1 domain from the Xenopus laevis Quaking ortholog (pXqua), which forms a dimer composed of two perpendicularly docked α-helical hairpin motifs. Size exclusion chromatography studies of a range of mutants demonstrate that the dimeric state of the pXqua QUA1 domain is stabilized by a network of interactions between side-chains, with significant roles played by an intra-molecular hydrogen bond between Y41 and E72 (the counterpart to QKI E48) and an inter-protomer salt bridge between E72 and R67. These results are compared with recent structural and mutagenesis studies of QUA1 domains from the STAR family members QKI, GLD-1 and Sam68. PMID:23520467

  20. The fractionated orthology of Bs2 and Rx/Gpa2 supports shared synteny of disease resistance in the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Mazourek, Michael; Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Collier, Sarah M; Landry, Laurie G; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Quirin, Edmund A; Bradeen, James M; Moffett, Peter; Jahn, Molly M

    2009-08-01

    Comparative genomics provides a powerful tool for the identification of genes that encode traits shared between crop plants and model organisms. Pathogen resistance conferred by plant R genes of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich-repeat (NB-LRR) class is one such trait with great agricultural importance that occupies a critical position in understanding fundamental processes of pathogen detection and coevolution. The proposed rapid rearrangement of R genes in genome evolution would make comparative approaches tenuous. Here, we test the hypothesis that orthology is predictive of R-gene genomic location in the Solanaceae using the pepper R gene Bs2. Homologs of Bs2 were compared in terms of sequence and gene and protein architecture. Comparative mapping demonstrated that Bs2 shared macrosynteny with R genes that best fit criteria determined to be its orthologs. Analysis of the genomic sequence encompassing solanaceous R genes revealed the magnitude of transposon insertions and local duplications that resulted in the expansion of the Bs2 intron to 27 kb and the frequently detected duplications of the 5'-end of R genes. However, these duplications did not impact protein expression or function in transient assays. Taken together, our results support a conservation of synteny for NB-LRR genes and further show that their distribution in the genome has been consistent with global rearrangements. PMID:19474202

  1. Multiple layers of regulation influence cell integrity control by the PKC ortholog Pck2 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Marisa; Jimnez, Rafael; Snchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Prez, Pilar; Cansado, Jos

    2015-01-15

    The fission yeast protein kinase C (PKC) ortholog Pck2 controls cell wall synthesis and is a major upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway (CIP) and its core component, the MAP kinase Pmk1 (also known as Spm1), in response to environmental stimuli. We show that in vivo phosphorylation of Pck2 at the conserved T842 activation loop during growth and in response to different stresses is mediated by the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase (PDK) ortholog Ksg1 and an autophosphorylation mechanism. However, T842 phosphorylation is not essential for Pmk1 activation, and putative phosphorylation at T846 might play an additional role in Pck2 catalytic activation and downstream signaling. These events, together with turn motif autophosphorylation at T984 and binding to small GTPases Rho1 and/or Rho2, stabilize Pck2 and render it competent to exert its biological functions. Remarkably, the target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2) does not participate in the catalytic activation of Pck2, but instead contributes to de novo Pck2 synthesis, which is essential to activate the CIP in response to cell wall damage or glucose exhaustion. These results unveil a novel mechanism whereby TOR regulates PKC function at a translational level, and they add a new regulatory layer to MAPK signaling cascades. PMID:25416816

  2. ATGC: a database of orthologous genes from closely related prokaryotic genomes and a research platform for microevolution of prokaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Ratnere, Igor; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2009-07-23

    The database of Alignable Tight Genomic Clusters (ATGCs) consists of closely related genomes of archaea and bacteria, and is a resource for research into prokaryotic microevolution. Construction of a data set with appropriate characteristics is a major hurdle for this type of studies. With the current rate of genome sequencing, it is difficult to follow the progress of the field and to determine which of the available genome sets meet the requirements of a given research project, in particular, with respect to the minimum and maximum levels of similarity between the included genomes. Additionally, extraction of specific content, such as genomic alignments or families of orthologs, from a selected set of genomes is a complicated and time-consuming process. The database addresses these problems by providing an intuitive and efficient web interface to browse precomputed ATGCs, select appropriate ones and access ATGC-derived data such as multiple alignments of orthologous proteins, matrices of pairwise intergenomic distances based on genome-wide analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates and others. The ATGC database will be regularly updated following new releases of the NCBI RefSeq. The database is hosted by the Genomics Division at Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory and is publicly available at http://atgc.lbl.gov.

  3. eggNOG 4.5: a hierarchical orthology framework with improved functional annotations for eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral sequences

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Szklarczyk, Damian; Forslund, Kristoffer; Cook, Helen; Heller, Davide; Walter, Mathias C.; Rattei, Thomas; Mende, Daniel R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kuhn, Michael; Jensen, Lars Juhl; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    eggNOG is a public resource that provides Orthologous Groups (OGs) of proteins at different taxonomic levels, each with integrated and summarized functional annotations. Developments since the latest public release include changes to the algorithm for creating OGs across taxonomic levels, making nested groups hierarchically consistent. This allows for a better propagation of functional terms across nested OGs and led to the novel annotation of 95 890 previously uncharacterized OGs, increasing overall annotation coverage from 67% to 72%. The functional annotations of OGs have been expanded to also provide Gene Ontology terms, KEGG pathways and SMART/Pfam domains for each group. Moreover, eggNOG now provides pairwise orthology relationships within OGs based on analysis of phylogenetic trees. We have also incorporated a framework for quickly mapping novel sequences to OGs based on precomputed HMM profiles. Finally, eggNOG version 4.5 incorporates a novel data set spanning 2605 viral OGs, covering 5228 proteins from 352 viral proteomes. All data are accessible for bulk downloading, as a web-service, and through a completely redesigned web interface. The new access points provide faster searches and a number of new browsing and visualization capabilities, facilitating the needs of both experts and less experienced users. eggNOG v4.5 is available at http://eggnog.embl.de. PMID:26582926

  4. Novel function of a putative MOC1 ortholog associated with spikelet number per spike in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xia; Xu, Weina; Chang, Jianzhong; Li, Ang; Mao, Xinguo; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2015-01-01

    Axillary meristems play an important role in determining final plant architecture and floral structures. Tomato Ls, Arabidopsis LAS and rice MOC1 are orthologous genes regulating axillary meristem initiation and outgrowth. Their functions are generally conserved but the functional specificities are divergent among species. Obvious differences between rice panicles and wheat spikes suggest the divergent functions of MOC1 and its wheat ortholog. We show that TaMOC1 might be involved in wheat spikelet development. TaMOC1 is a typical nucleus localized protein with transcriptional activation abilities. The variable N-termini of TaMOC1 protein is necessary for transcriptional activation. TaMOC1 is highly expressed in ears with length of 2, 3 and 6 cm. Significant associations between the TaMOC1-7A haplotype and spikelet number per spike were observed in ten environments over 3 years and 2 sites. TaMOC1-7A HapH, a favored haplotype acquired during wheat polyploidization, may make a positive contribution to spikelet number per spike. Based on evolutionary analysis, geographic distribution and frequency changes, TaMOC1-7A HapH might be associated with wheat domestication and Chinese wheat breeding history. The pyramiding favorable alleles of TaMOC1-7A HapH and TaSnRK2.10 (C, associated with higher TGW) can improve both spikelet number per spike and TGW simultaneously. PMID:26197925

  5. eggNOG 4.5: a hierarchical orthology framework with improved functional annotations for eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral sequences.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Szklarczyk, Damian; Forslund, Kristoffer; Cook, Helen; Heller, Davide; Walter, Mathias C; Rattei, Thomas; Mende, Daniel R; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Kuhn, Michael; Jensen, Lars Juhl; von Mering, Christian; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    eggNOG is a public resource that provides Orthologous Groups (OGs) of proteins at different taxonomic levels, each with integrated and summarized functional annotations. Developments since the latest public release include changes to the algorithm for creating OGs across taxonomic levels, making nested groups hierarchically consistent. This allows for a better propagation of functional terms across nested OGs and led to the novel annotation of 95 890 previously uncharacterized OGs, increasing overall annotation coverage from 67% to 72%. The functional annotations of OGs have been expanded to also provide Gene Ontology terms, KEGG pathways and SMART/Pfam domains for each group. Moreover, eggNOG now provides pairwise orthology relationships within OGs based on analysis of phylogenetic trees. We have also incorporated a framework for quickly mapping novel sequences to OGs based on precomputed HMM profiles. Finally, eggNOG version 4.5 incorporates a novel data set spanning 2605 viral OGs, covering 5228 proteins from 352 viral proteomes. All data are accessible for bulk downloading, as a web-service, and through a completely redesigned web interface. The new access points provide faster searches and a number of new browsing and visualization capabilities, facilitating the needs of both experts and less experienced users. eggNOG v4.5 is available at http://eggnog.embl.de. PMID:26582926

  6. Genetic and physical interactions between the yeast ELG1 gene and orthologs of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shivani; Shemesh, Keren; Liefshitz, Batia; Kupiec, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human syndrome characterized by genomic instability and increased incidence of cancer. FA is a genetically heterogeneous disease caused by mutations in at least 15 different genes; several of these genes are conserved in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Elg1 is also a conserved protein that forms an RFC-like complex, which interacts with SUMOylated PCNA. The mammalian Elg1 protein has been recently found to interact with the FA complex. Here we analyze the genetic interactions between elg1?and mutants of the yeast FA-like pathway. We show that Elg1 physically contacts the Mhf1/Mhf2 histone-like complex and genetically interacts with MPH1 (ortholog of the FANCM helicase) and CHL1 (ortholog of the FANCJ helicase) genes. We analyze the sensitivity of double, triple, quadruple and quintuple mutants to methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and to hydroxyurea (HU). Our results show that genetic interactions depend on the type of DNA damaging agent used and show a hierarchy: Chl1 and Elg1 play major roles in the survival to these genotoxins and exhibit synthetic fitness reduction. Mph1 plays a lesser role, and the effect of the Mhf1/2 complex is seen only in the absence of Elg1 on HU-containing medium. Finally, we dissect the relationship between yeast FA-like mutants and the replication clamp, PCNA. Our results point to an intricate network of interactions rather than a single, linear repair pathway. PMID:23624835

  7. Expression of recombinant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, R. annulatus and R. decoloratus Bm86 orthologs as secreted proteins in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Mario; de la Lastra, Jos M Prez; Naranjo, Victoria; Nijhof, Ard M; Hope, Michelle; Jongejan, Frans; de la Fuente, Jos

    2008-01-01

    Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp. ticks economically impact on cattle production in Africa and other tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Tick vaccines constitute a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative to tick control. The R. microplus Bm86 protective antigen has been produced by recombinant DNA technology and shown to protect cattle against tick infestations. Results In this study, the genes for Bm86 (R. microplus), Ba86 (R. annulatus) and Bd86 (R. decoloratus) were cloned and characterized from African or Asian tick strains and the recombinant proteins were secreted and purified from P. pastoris. The secretion of recombinant Bm86 ortholog proteins in P. pastoris allowed for a simple purification process rendering a final product with high recovery (3542%) and purity (8085%) and likely to result in a more reproducible conformation closely resembling the native protein. Rabbit immunization experiments with recombinant proteins showed immune cross-reactivity between Bm86 ortholog proteins. Conclusion These experiments support the development and testing of vaccines containing recombinant Bm86, Ba86 and Bd86 secreted in P. pastoris for the control of tick infestations in Africa. PMID:18275601

  8. TaWRKY68 responses to biotic stresses are revealed by the orthologous genes from major cereals

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Junbin; Song, Na; Li, Ming; Cheng, Qiaolin; Huang, Guozhong; Guo, Yaolin; Fu, Yang; Xie, Chaojie; Sun, Qixin; Xie, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors have been extensively characterized in the past 20 years, but in wheat, studies on WRKY genes and their function are lagging behind many other species. To explore the function of wheat WRKY genes, we identified a TaWRKY68 gene from a common wheat cultivar. It encodes a protein comprising 313 amino acids which harbors 19 conserved motifs or active sites. Gene expression patterns were determined by analyzing microarray data of TaWRKY68 in wheat and of orthologous genes from maize, rice and barley using Genevestigator. TaWRKY68 orthologs were identified and clustered using DELTA-BLAST and COBALT programs available at NCBI. The results showed that these genes, which are expressed in all tissues tested, had relatively higher levels in the roots and were up-regulated in response to biotic stresses. Bioinformatics results were confirmed by RT-PCR experiments using wheat plants infected by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Blumeria graminis, or treated with Deoxynivalenol, a Fusarium graminearum-induced mycotoxin in wheat or barley. In summary, TaWRKY68 functions differ during plant developmental stages and might be representing a hub gene function in wheat responses to various biotic stresses. It was also found that including data from major cereal genes in the bioinformatics analysis gave more accurate and comprehensive predictions of wheat gene functions. PMID:24688294

  9. [Ehrlichia canis in dogs attended in a veterinary hospital from Botucatu, So Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tatiana E H; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J; Ribeiro, Mrcio G; Paes, Antnio C; Megid, Jane; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the etiology of canine ehrlichiosis and possible clinical and epidemiological data associated with the infection in 70 dogs suspect of ehrlichiosis attended at the Veterinary Hospital of the So Paulo State University in Botucatu city during 2001 and 2002. Dogs were evaluated by clinical-epidemiological and hematological data and molecular analysis by partial amplification and DNA sequencing of the ehrlichial dsb gene. E. canis DNA was amplified and sequenced in 28 (40.0%) dogs. Dogs younger than 12 months old showed significantly higher infection rates (65.0%; P < 0.05). Diarrhea, apathy, and anorexia were the major clinical signs observed in 55.2% (P = 0.05), 47.0% (P > 0.05), and 42.4% (P > 0.05) of the PCR-positive dogs, respectively. Twenty-five anemic (<5.5 x 10(6) RBC x microL (-1)), and 8 leukopenic (<5.5 x 103 WBC x microL (-1)) dogs were PCR-positive (P > 0.05). All 28 PCR-positive dogs showed thrombocytopenia (< 175 x 103 platelets x microL (-1)) and revealed statistical significance (P < 0.05). E. canis was the only Ehrlichia species found in dogs in the studied region, with higher infection rates in younger dogs, and statistically associated with thrombocytopenia. PMID:19772777

  10. Microsporum canis infection in three familial cases with tinea capitis and tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bin; Xiao, Yuling; Ran, Yuping; Kang, Daoxian; Dai, Yaling; Lama, Jebina

    2013-10-01

    We report a familial infection caused by Microsporum canis. The first two patients were a 30-year-old female and her son, a 5-year-old boy, who came in contact with a pet dog at a farm house. The boy then suffered from hair loss for 3months. There were circular and patchy alopecia with diffuse scaling on his scalp. Meanwhile, his mother also developed patchy erythema and scaling on her face. Several weeks later, the boy's sister, a 4-year-old girl, was noted to have inconspicuous scaly plaques in the center of her scalp. The development of tinea capitis in the two children and tinea corporis in their mother were diagnosed based on the positive KOH examination. Morphologic characteristics and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, amplified from primary culture isolates, confirmed that their infections were caused by the zoophilic M. canis. Repetitive sequence-based molecular typing using the DiversiLab system secreted enzymatic activity analysis, and antifungal susceptibility indicated that these isolates might share the same source. The boy and girl were cured by the treatment with oral itraconazole and topical naftifine-ketoconazole cream after washing the hair with 2% ketoconazole shampoo, and their mother was successfully treated by terbinafine orally in combination with topical application of naftifine-ketoconazole cream. PMID:23918090

  11. Ecological changes in Coyotes (Canis latrans) in response to the ice age megafaunal extinctions.

    PubMed

    Meachen, Julie A; Janowicz, Adrianna C; Avery, Jori E; Sadleir, Rudyard W

    2014-01-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) are an important species in human-inhabited areas. They control pests and are the apex predators in many ecosystems. Because of their importance it is imperative to understand how environmental change will affect this species. The end of the Pleistocene Ice Age brought with it many ecological changes for coyotes and here we statistically determine the changes that occurred in coyotes, when these changes occurred, and what the ecological consequences were of these changes. We examined the mandibles of three coyote populations: Pleistocene Rancho La Brean (13-29 Ka), earliest Holocene Rancho La Brean (8-10 Ka), and Recent from North America, using 2D geometric morphometrics to determine the morphological differences among them. Our results show that these three populations were morphologically distinct. The Pleistocene coyotes had an overall robust mandible with an increased shearing arcade and a decreased grinding arcade, adapted for carnivory and killing larger prey; whereas the modern populations show a gracile morphology with a tendency toward omnivory or grinding. The earliest Holocene populations are intermediate in morphology and smallest in size. These findings indicate that a niche shift occurred in coyotes at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary - from a hunter of large prey to a small prey/more omnivorous animal. Species interactions between Canis were the most likely cause of this transition. This study shows that the Pleistocene extinction event affected species that did not go extinct as well as those that did. PMID:25551387

  12. Detection of Ehrlichia canis in domestic cats in the central-western region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Braga, sis Assis; dos Santos, Luana Gabriela Ferreira; de Souza Ramos, Dirceu Guilherme; Melo, Andria Lima Tom; da Cruz Mestre, Gustavo Leandro; de Aguiar, Daniel Moura

    2014-01-01

    Ehrlichiosis is a worldwide distributed disease caused by different bacteria of the Ehrlichia genus that are transmitted by arthropod vectors. Its occurrence in dogs is considered endemic in several regions of Brazil. Regarding cats, however, few studies have been done and, consequently, there is not enough data available. In order to detect Ehrlichia spp. in cats from the central-western region of Brazil, blood and serum samples were collected from a regional population of 212 individuals originated from the cities of Cuiab and Vrzea Grande. These animals were tested by the Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) designed to amplify a 409 bp fragment of the dsb gene. The results obtained show that 88 (41.5%) cats were seropositive by IFA and 20 (9.4%) cats were positive by PCR. The partial DNA sequence obtained from PCR products yielded twenty samples that were found to match perfectly the Ehrlichia canis sequences deposited on GenBank. The natural transmission of Ehrlichia in cats has not been fully established. Furthermore, tick infestation was not observed in the evaluated cats and was not observed any association between age, gender and positivity of cats in both tests. The present study reports the first serological and molecular detection of E. canis in domestic cats located in the endemic area previously mentioned. PMID:25242952

  13. Multiorgan fungal infection caused by Microsporum canis in a green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Ho; Kim, Eun-Ju; Choi, Ul Soo

    2014-06-01

    Multiple organ invasion by keratinophilic fungi in the green iguana (Iguana iguana) has not been previously reported. In this case, a 1-yr-old female green iguana presented with a nodular, darkly discolored skin lesion surrounded by necrosis in the right ventral abdominal region. A cytologic examination of the fine needle aspiration of the lesion revealed an exuberant proliferation of fibroblasts, macrophages, and multinucleated cells along with frequent filamentous structures consistent with hyphal elements. The necropsy revealed diffuse infiltration of the liver, lung, and cardiac apex with white nodules. A histopathologic examination of the lesions also confirmed a fungal infection associated with granulomatous inflammation. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the chitin synthase 1 gene was conducted for rapid direct detection, and inter-simple sequence repeat fingerprinting was conducted to classify the infectious origin. The PCR analysis definitively demonstrated representative Microsporum canis fungus. The present report is the first case of disseminated M. canis infection with multiorgan involvement in a green iguana. PMID:25000705

  14. Population structure and evolutionary origins of Microsporum canis, M. ferrugineum and M. audouinii.

    PubMed

    Kaszubiak, A; Klein, S; de Hoog, G S; Gräser, Y

    2004-09-01

    The recurrent evolutionary emergence of asexual lineages within sexual zoo- and anthropophilic dermatophyte species living in animal-frequented soil is likely to be triggered by changes in ecological niche, i.e., shifts of host animal. Subsequent adaptation to the new host species is noted. Sometimes geographic isolation or intrinsic host factors like human race may also play a role in speciation. In the present study, we elaborate concepts of speciation in dermatophytes using the Microsporum canis complex as an example. The group consists of a cluster of phylogenetically closely related anamorphs: the anthropophilic taxa Microsporum audouinii and M. ferrugineum, and the zoophilic taxon M. canis. The sexually reproducing species underlying this complex is Arthroderma otae. The study is done by an analysis of the population structure of about 200 isolates and using intergenic spacers, non-translated regions of genes as well as hypervariable microsatellite markers that are known to evolve at high mutation rates. The results suggest that sympatric speciation took place already during the period where mating ability was maintained and thus that strictly clonal fungal species emerged in Africa and led to genetically isolated clonal species elsewhere. PMID:15450196

  15. Colorimetric Detection of Ehrlichia Canis via Nucleic Acid Hybridization in Gold Nano-Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Muangchuen, Ajima; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Suriyasomboon, Annop; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a major thick-bone disease of dog caused by Ehrlichia canis. Detection of this causal agent outside the laboratory using conventional methods is not effective enough. Thus an assay for E. canis detection based on the p30 outer membrane protein gene was developed. It was based on the p30 gene amplification using loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP). The primer set specific to six areas within the target gene were designed and tested for their sensitivity and specificity. Detection of DNA signals was based on modulation of gold nanoparticles' surface properties and performing DNA/DNA hybridization using an oligonucleotide probe. Presence of target DNA affected the gold colloid nanoparticles in terms of particle aggregation with a plasmonic color change of the gold colloids from ruby red to purple, visible by the naked eye. All the assay steps were completed within 90 min including DNA extraction without relying on standard laboratory facilities. This method was very specific to target bacteria. Its sensitivity with probe hybridization was sufficient to detect 50 copies of target DNA. This method should provide an alternative choice for point of care control and management of the disease. PMID:25111239

  16. Low voltage scanning electron microscopy study of naftifine activity on Microsporum canis.

    PubMed

    Butty, P; Gorenflot, A; Mallié, M; Bastide, J M

    1992-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is at present considered a good way to observe the morphological alterations induced by an antifungal on pathogenic fungi. Owing to its high precision, low voltage scanning electron microscopy (LVSEM) improves the quality of observations. The Microsporum canis morphology alterations induced by naftifine at a concentration of 0.9 microgram ml-1 (10 times the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for 7 days were studied in LVSEM. The young lateral ramifications and the aborted buds take on a granulous aspect. These granulations can be localized as brassard shapes around hyphae. The mycelial filaments often appear irregularly swollen with bulbous tips. Macroconidia are selectively covered with a microfibrillar network. In addition, LVSEM on control samples reveals pavimentous angular structures on the macroconidial surface and fine granulations on the filament surface of M. canis unknown until now. A cytological study with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of filaments altered by naftifine permitted us to observe the disorganization of cell wall fibrillar structure, an excessive plasma membrane undulation and an intracytoplasmic accumulation of large vesicles with probably lipidic contents. PMID:1302809

  17. The evolutionary basis for the feeding behavior of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, John W S

    2006-07-01

    The dentition, sense of taste and meal patterning of domestic dogs and cats can be interpreted in terms of their descent from members of the order Carnivora. The dog is typical of its genus, Canis, in its relatively unspecialized dentition, and a taste system that is rather insensitive to salt. The preference of many dogs for large infrequent meals reflects the competitive feeding behavior of its pack-hunting ancestor, the wolf Canis lupus. However, its long history of domestication, possibly 100,000 years, has resulted in great intraspecific diversity of conformation and behavior, including feeding. Morphologically and physiologically domestic cats are highly specialized carnivores, as indicated by their dentition, nutritional requirements, and sense of taste, which is insensitive to both salt and sugars. Their preference for several small meals each day reflects a daily pattern of multiple kills of small prey items in their ancestor, the solitary territorial predator Felis silvestris. Although in the wild much of their food selection behavior must focus on what to hunt, rather than what to eat, cats do modify their food preferences based on experience. For example, the "monotony effect" reduces the perceived palatability of foods that have recently formed a large proportion of the diet, in favor of foods with contrasting sensory characteristics, thereby tending to compensate for any incipient nutritional deficiencies. Food preferences in kittens during weaning are strongly influenced by those of their mother, but can change considerably during at least the first year of life. PMID:16772461

  18. Ecological analyses of the intestinal helminth communities of the wolf, Canis lupus, in Spain.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Juan-Matas; Guerrero, Ricardo; Torres, Jordi; Miquel, Jordi; Feliu, Carlos

    2003-09-01

    This work describes the ecological characteristics of the intestinal helminth communities of 50 wolves (Canis lupus L.) from Spain. The species found were classified into three groups according to prevalence, intensity and intestinal distribution. Taenia hydatigena Pallas, 1766 and Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884) are the core species of the community. Taenia multiceps (Leske, 1780) is a secondary species. The rest of the species, Alaria alata (Goeze, 1782), Taenia serialis (Gervais, 1847). Taenia pisiformis (Bloch, 1780), Dipylidium caninum (Linnaeus, 1758), Mesocestoides sp. aff. litteratus, Toxocara canis (Werner, 1782), Toxascaris leonina (von Linstow, 1902), Ancylostoma caninum (Ercolani, 1859) and Trichuris vulpis (Froelich, 1789), behave as satellite species. The linear intestinal distribution of all helminth species was analysed. The location of most species can be considered predictable, especially for core and secondary species. The analysis of interspecific relationships between infracommunities shows that negative associations are more numerous than positive associations. The role of A. caninum in the community is compared with that of U. stenocephala. PMID:14535350

  19. Intestinal helminth parasites of the grey wolf (Canis lupus L.) in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ćirović, Duško; Pavlović, Ivan; Penezić, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    The grey wolf (Canis lupus L.) is the most widespread large carnivore in Europe with large populations in the Eastern part of Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. In this study, a total of 102 wolves were examined for intestinal helminth parasites. The carcasses were collected within the Serbian part of the wolf's range during the period 2009-2014. Nine helminth species were found: one nematode, Toxocara canis (3.9%), one trematode, Alaria alata (1.0%), and seven cestodes, Taenia pisiformis (1.0%), T. hydatigena (9.8%), T. polyacantha (2.9%), T. taeniaeformis (2.0%), T. (syn. Multiceps) multiceps (3.9%), T. serialis (1.0%) and Mesocestoides litteratus (1.0%). Taenia (syn. Hydatigera) taeniaeformis has been registered for the first time in a wolf from Europe. An overall moderate prevalence (16.7%) of infected wolves was recorded. There was no statistically significant difference in prevalence between sexes. Of the years studied, the highest prevalence was found in 2014 (57.1%). The maximum number of helminth species per host specimen was four. PMID:26051257

  20. A faecal analysis of helminth infections in wild and captive wolves, Canis lupus L., in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szafra?ska, E; Wasielewski, O; Bereszy?ski, A

    2010-12-01

    One hundred and three samples of faeces of reared grey wolves from four locations (Stobnica Park and Zoological Gardens in Bydgoszcz, Wroc?aw and Cracow) and twenty-six samples of faeces from two free-roaming packs of grey wolf (Canis lupus L.) in Pi?a (Forest Divisions: Borne Sulinowo, Czarnobr, Jastrowo) and Zielona Gra (Forest Divisions: Torzym, Krosno Odrza?skie) were collected between 2005 and 2007. Helminth eggs were detected in 78.6% of faecal samples of reared grey wolves and in 88.4% of those of free-roaming wolves. The trematode Alaria alata (80.1%) and nematodes Eucoleus aerophilus (23.1%) and Spirocerca lupi (11.5%) were only detected from wild packs of wolves and the nematodes Ancylostoma caninum (35.9%), Trichuris vulpis (15.5%) and Toxocara canis (3.9%) were only detected from reared wolves. Differences were observed in the prevalence and composition of helminth fauna between reared and wild grey wolves and our results are compared with those from studies within Poland and elsewhere in Europe. PMID:20236557

  1. Colorimetric detection of Ehrlichia canis via nucleic acid hybridization in gold nano-colloids.

    PubMed

    Muangchuen, Ajima; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Suriyasomboon, Annop; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a major thick-bone disease of dog caused by Ehrlichia canis. Detection of this causal agent outside the laboratory using conventional methods is not effective enough. Thus an assay for E. canis detection based on the p30 outer membrane protein gene was developed. It was based on the p30 gene amplification using loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP). The primer set specific to six areas within the target gene were designed and tested for their sensitivity and specificity. Detection of DNA signals was based on modulation of gold nanoparticles' surface properties and performing DNA/DNA hybridization using an oligonucleotide probe. Presence of target DNA affected the gold colloid nanoparticles in terms of particle aggregation with a plasmonic color change of the gold colloids from ruby red to purple, visible by the naked eye. All the assay steps were completed within 90 min including DNA extraction without relying on standard laboratory facilities. This method was very specific to target bacteria. Its sensitivity with probe hybridization was sufficient to detect 50 copies of target DNA. This method should provide an alternative choice for point of care control and management of the disease. PMID:25111239

  2. ANTHELMINTIC ACTIVITY OF LAPACHOL, ?-LAPACHONE AND ITS DERIVATIVES AGAINST Toxocara canis LARVAE

    PubMed Central

    MATA-SANTOS, Tas; PINTO, Nitza Frana; MATA-SANTOS, Hilton Antnio; DE MOURA, Kelly Gallan; CARNEIRO, Paula Fernandes; CARVALHO, Tatiane dos Santos; DEL RIO, Karina Pena; PINTO, Maria do Carmo Freire Ribeiro; MARTINS, Lourdes Rodrigues; FENALTI, Juliana Montelli; DA SILVA, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; SCAINI, Carlos James

    2015-01-01

    Anthelmintics used for intestinal helminthiasis treatment are generally effective; however, their effectiveness in tissue parasitosis (i.e. visceral toxocariasis) is moderate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitroactivity of lapachol, ?-lapachone and phenazines in relation to the viability of Toxocara canis larvae. A concentration of 2 mg/mL (in duplicate) of the compounds was tested using microculture plates containing Toxocara canis larvae in an RPMI-1640 environment, incubated at 37 C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 hours. In the 2 mg/mL concentration, four phenazines, lapachol and three of its derivatives presented a larvicide/larvistatic activity of 100%. Then, the minimum larvicide/larvistatic concentration (MLC) test was conducted. The compounds that presented the best results were nor-lapachol (MLC, 1 mg/mL), lapachol (MLC 0.5 mg/mL), ?-lapachone, and ?-C-allyl-lawsone (MLC, 0.25 mg/mL). The larvae exposed to the compounds, at best MLC with 100% in vitro activity larvicide, were inoculated into healthy BALB/c mice and were not capable of causing infection, confirming the larvicide potential in vitro of these compounds. PMID:26200958

  3. Curative and preventive efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against Ctenocephalides canis infestation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Pascal; Gale, Boyd; Chester, Theodore S; Larsen, Diane L

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of orally administered afoxolaner against adult dog fleas, Ctenocephalides canis, was evaluated in a controlled, blinded study. A total of 32 dogs were infested with 100 adult unfed fleas approximately 24h prior to treatment and then at weekly intervals for 5 weeks after treatment. Live fleas were counted upon removal at 12h (for 16 dogs) and 24h (for the remaining 16 dogs) after treatment (for counts performed the first week) or after infestation (for counts performed on subsequent weeks). In addition, flea eggs were collected from each pen and counted for the dogs with flea removal at 24h. Dosing of individual dogs was achieved using a combination of the chewable tablets to be as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of 2.5mg/kg. The percent efficacy of the afoxolaner treatment was ? 99.0% for all 24-h flea counts. For flea counts performed 12h after treatment or infestations, the percent efficacy was ? 94.1% up to Day 21. After Day 1, no flea eggs were recovered from the afoxolaner treated group, providing 100% reduction in numbers of flea eggs recovered versus untreated control group. This study confirmed that a single oral treatment with afoxolaner provided excellent efficacy against infestations by C. canis within 12-24h after treatment, prevented re-infestations, and completely prevented egg production from new flea infestations for up to 5 weeks. PMID:24631503

  4. The genome of obligately intracellular Ehrlichia canis revealsthemes of complex membrane structure and immune evasion strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K.; Kuyler Doyle, C.; Lykidis, A.; Ivanova, N.; Francino, P.; Chain, P.; Shin, M.; Malfatti, S.; Larimer, F.; Copeland,A.; Detter, J.C.; Land, M.; Richardson, P.M.; Yu, X.J.; Walker, D.H.; McBride, J.W.; Kyrpides, N.C.

    2005-09-01

    Ehrlichia canis, a small obligately intracellular, tick-transmitted, gram-negative, a-proteobacterium is the primary etiologic agent of globally distributed canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Complete genome sequencing revealed that the E. canis genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 1,315,030 bp predicted to encode 925 proteins, 40 stable RNA species, and 17 putative pseudogenes, and a substantial proportion of non-coding sequence (27 percent). Interesting genome features include a large set of proteins with transmembrane helices and/or signal sequences, and a unique serine-threonine bias associated with the potential for O-glycosylation that was prominent in proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions. Furthermore, two paralogous protein families associated with immune evasion were identified, one of which contains poly G:C tracts, suggesting that they may play a role in phase variation and facilitation of persistent infections. Proteins associated with pathogen-host interactions were identified including a small group of proteins (12) with tandem repeats and another with eukaryotic-like ankyrin domains (7).

  5. Ecological Changes in Coyotes (Canis latrans) in Response to the Ice Age Megafaunal Extinctions

    PubMed Central

    Meachen, Julie A.; Janowicz, Adrianna C.; Avery, Jori E.; Sadleir, Rudyard W.

    2014-01-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) are an important species in human-inhabited areas. They control pests and are the apex predators in many ecosystems. Because of their importance it is imperative to understand how environmental change will affect this species. The end of the Pleistocene Ice Age brought with it many ecological changes for coyotes and here we statistically determine the changes that occurred in coyotes, when these changes occurred, and what the ecological consequences were of these changes. We examined the mandibles of three coyote populations: Pleistocene Rancho La Brean (13–29 Ka), earliest Holocene Rancho La Brean (8–10 Ka), and Recent from North America, using 2D geometric morphometrics to determine the morphological differences among them. Our results show that these three populations were morphologically distinct. The Pleistocene coyotes had an overall robust mandible with an increased shearing arcade and a decreased grinding arcade, adapted for carnivory and killing larger prey; whereas the modern populations show a gracile morphology with a tendency toward omnivory or grinding. The earliest Holocene populations are intermediate in morphology and smallest in size. These findings indicate that a niche shift occurred in coyotes at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary – from a hunter of large prey to a small prey/more omnivorous animal. Species interactions between Canis were the most likely cause of this transition. This study shows that the Pleistocene extinction event affected species that did not go extinct as well as those that did. PMID:25551387

  6. A comparison of Toxocara canis embryonation under controlled conditions in soil and hair.

    PubMed

    Keegan, J Devoy; Holland, C V

    2013-03-01

    Toxocara spp. eggs require a period of time under appropriate environmental conditions to become infective to definitive and paratenic hosts. Temperature and humidity are important factors known to affect the levels of development in soil. We aimed to investigate whether the eggs of T. canis could embryonate in dog hair under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity and, if so, to what degree. No previous work had been carried out on embryonation in hair under controlled conditions. Soil samples exposed to the same conditions as the hair samples were considered a suitable comparison in order to investigate differing levels of development. Development at two temperatures (10°C and 20°C) and the addition of water to samples was investigated over a period of 8 weeks. Importantly, we demonstrated that unembryonated T. canis eggs are capable of development in hair under controlled conditions. The rate of development is lower than that observed in soil, but remains biologically significant in terms of the overall numbers of potentially infective embryonated eggs present. Temperature is responsible for the rate of embryonation while moisture is essential for encouraging development and maintaining egg viability in general. In light of these findings the transmission of Toxocara spp. as a result of direct contact with well-cared-for owned dogs seems unlikely, but should not be ignored. PMID:22335837

  7. Infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in two lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cicuttin, Gabriel L; Tarragona, Evelina L; De Salvo, M Nazarena; Mangold, Atilio J; Nava, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Natural infection with Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma platys in ticks belonging to the tropical and temperate lineages of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato from Argentina was evaluated. Samples were tested for Ehrlichia canis infection by PCR assays using 16S rRNA, dsb and p28 gene, while detection of A. platys was performed with 16S rRNA and groESL gene. The assignment of the ticks to each lineage was corroborated with 16S rDNA sequences. All ticks infected with E. canis and A. platys belonged to the tropical lineage. These results constitute the first record of E. canis infection in R. sanguineus s.l ticks from Argentina. No ticks from the temperate lineage were found to be infected with E. canis, coinciding with previous studies performed in Argentina and Uruguay where E. canis infection was not detected in R. sanguineus s.l from the temperate lineage. Because the presence of the tropical lineage of R. sanguineus s.l has been documented in tropical areas of northern Argentina between 22° and 24° of south latitude, the findings of this work indicate that transmission of E. canis and A. platys to dogs by R. sanguineus s.l probably occurs along this region. PMID:26100492

  8. Identification of Putative Ortholog Gene Blocks Involved in Gestant and Lactating Mammary Gland Development: A Rodent Cross-Species Microarray Transcriptomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rodrguez-Cruz, Maricela; Coral-Vzquez, Ramn M.; Hernndez-Stengele, Gabriel; Snchez, Ral; Salazar, Emmanuel; Sanchez-Muoz, Fausto; Encarnacin-Guevara, Sergio; Ramrez-Salcedo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland (MG) undergoes functional and metabolic changes during the transition from pregnancy to lactation, possibly by regulation of conserved genes. The objective was to elucidate orthologous genes, chromosome clusters and putative conserved transcriptional modules during MG development. We analyzed expression of 22,000 transcripts using murine microarrays and RNA samples of MG from virgin, pregnant, and lactating rats by cross-species hybridization. We identified 521 transcripts differentially expressed; upregulated in early (78%) and midpregnancy (89%) and early lactation (64%), but downregulated in mid-lactation (61%). Putative orthologous genes were identified. We mapped the altered genes to orthologous chromosomal locations in human and mouse. Eighteen sets of conserved genes associated with key cellular functions were revealed and conserved transcription factor binding site search entailed possible coregulation among all eight block sets of genes. This study demonstrates that the use of heterologous array hybridization for screening of orthologous gene expression from rat revealed sets of conserved genes arranged in chromosomal order implicated in signaling pathways and functional ontology. Results demonstrate the utilization power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using rodent microarrays to identification of putative coexpressed orthologous genes involved in the control of human mammary gland development. PMID:24288657

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Ehrlichia mineirensis, a Novel Organism Closely Related to Ehrlichia canis with a New Host Association.

    PubMed

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Zweygarth, Erich; Broniszweska, Marzena; Passos, Lygia M F; Ribeiro, Mcio Flvio Barbosa; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; de la Fuente, Jos

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequencing of Ehrlichia mineirensis, an Ehrlichia organism that was isolated from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus microplus-engorged females. E.mineirensis is the best characterized Ehrlichia isolate from a novel cattle-related clade closely related to the monocytotropic pathogen E.canis. PMID:25614563

  10. Killing and caching of an adult White-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, by a single Gray Wolf, Canis lupus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    A single Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) killed an adult male White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and cached the intact carcass in 76 cm of snow. The carcass was revisited and entirely consumed between four and seven days later. This is the first recorded observation of a Gray Wolf caching an entire adult deer.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Ehrlichia mineirensis, a Novel Organism Closely Related to Ehrlichia canis with a New Host Association

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Zweygarth, Erich; Broniszweska, Marzena; Passos, Lygia M. F.; Ribeiro, Mcio Flvio Barbosa; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequencing of Ehrlichia mineirensis, an Ehrlichia organism that was isolated from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus microplusengorged females. E.mineirensis is the best characterized Ehrlichia isolate from a novel cattle-related clade closely related to the monocytotropic pathogen E.canis. PMID:25614563

  12. Spatial heterodyne interferometry of VY Canis Major's, alpha Orionis, alpha Scorpii, and R leonis at 11 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, E. C.; Storey, J. W. V.; Betz, A. L.; Townes, C. H.; Spears, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Using the technique of heterodyne interferometry, measurements were made of the spatial distribution of 11 micron radiation from four late type stars. The circumstellar shells surrounding VY Canis Majoris, alpha Orionis, and alpha Scorpii were resolved, whereas that of R Leonis was only partially resolved at a fringe spacing of 0.4 sec.

  13. Presence and effects of the dog louse Trichodectes canis (Mallophaga, Trichodectidae) on wolves and coyotes from Minnesota and Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Thiel, R.P.; Fritts, S.H.; Berg, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The dog louse was found on 19 wolves (Canis lupus) and six coyotes (C. latrans) from Minnesota and Wisconsin during the July-February, 1973 through 1983, period. No evidence was found that lice had any serious effect on wolf survival.

  14. Interactions of Brown Bears, Ursus arctos, and Gray Wolves, Canis lupus, at Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T.S.; Partridge, S.T.; Schoen, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    We describe several encounters between Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) and Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) that were observed at Katmai National Park and Preserve in southwest Alaska. Katmai Brown Bears and Gray Wolves were observed interacting in a variety of behavioral modes that ranged from agonistic to tolerant. These observations provide additional insight regarding the behavioral plasticity associated with bear-wolf interactions.

  15. Detection and molecular characterization of canine babesiosis causative agent Babesia canis in the naturally infected dog in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Paulauskas, Algimantas; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Karvelien?, Birut?; Grigonis, Aidas; Aleksandravi?ien?, Asta; Zamokas, Gintaras; Babickait?, Lina; Sab?nas, Vytautas; Petkevi?ius, Saulius

    2014-10-15

    Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis is an emerging infectious disease in Europe. Although previously uncommon, canine babesiosis has become quite frequent in Lithuania during the past decade. In the last few years an increasing number of cases with a wide variety of clinical signs have been recorded throughout the country. In Lithuania the identification of the disease agent in veterinarian clinics is based on a microscopic analysis of size and morphology. To date, no data on the genetic characterization of Babesia species in dogs have been documented for Lithuania. A total of 123 blood samples from dogs showing clinical signs of babesiosis on the basis of veterinary examination were tested for the presence of babesial parasites. Babesia isolated from dogs were detected and characterized by nested-PCR and sequence analysis of a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene. Babesia parasites were detected in blood smears of 94 dogs (76.4%). The molecular analysis revealed the presence of B. canis in 108 dogs (87.8%). Two genotypes of B. canis were distinguished on the basis on two nucleotide (GA ? AG) substitutions observed in 18S rRNA gene sequences. The results of the present study provide knowledge of the distribution of B. canis genotypes in dogs in Lithuania, and show the necessity to use a molecular analysis for an accurate diagnosis of canine babesiosis. PMID:25257504

  16. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-08-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26033026

  17. A genomewide survey of bHLH transcription factors in the coral Acropora digitifera identifies three novel orthologous families, pearl, amber, and peridot.

    PubMed

    Gyoja, Fuki; Kawashima, Takeshi; Satoh, Nori

    2012-04-01

    Decoding the genome of the coral, Acropora digitifera, enabled us to characterize a nearly full set of 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors in this organism. This number is comparable to 68 bHLH genes in the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, and larger than those in most other invertebrate metazoans. The 70 bHLH genes were assigned to 29 orthologous families previously reported. In addition, we identified three novel HLH orthologous families, which we designated pearl, amber, and peridot, increasing the number of orthologous families to 32. Pearl and amber orthologues were found in genomes and expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) of Mollusca and Annelida in addition to Cnidaria. Peridot orthologues were found in genomes and ESTs of Cephalochordata and Hemichordata in addition to Cnidaria. These three genes were likely lost in the clades of Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Homo sapiens during animal evolution. PMID:22419240

  18. Spatial genetic and morphologic structure of wolves and coyotes in relation to environmental heterogeneity in a Canis hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R; Wheeldon, Tyler J

    2012-12-01

    Eastern wolves have hybridized extensively with coyotes and gray wolves and are listed as a 'species of special concern' in Canada. However, a distinct population of eastern wolves has been identified in Algonquin Provincial Park (APP) in Ontario. Previous studies of the diverse Canis hybrid zone adjacent to APP have not linked genetic analysis with field data to investigate genotype-specific morphology or determine how resident animals of different ancestry are distributed across the landscape in relation to heterogeneous environmental conditions. Accordingly, we studied resident wolves and coyotes in and adjacent to APP to identify distinct Canis types, clarify the extent of the APP eastern wolf population beyond the park boundaries and investigate fine-scale spatial genetic structure and landscape-genotype associations in the hybrid zone. We documented three genetically distinct Canis types within the APP region that also differed morphologically, corresponding to putative gray wolves, eastern wolves and coyotes. We also documented a substantial number of hybrid individuals (36%) that were admixed between 2 or 3 of the Canis types. Breeding eastern wolves were less common outside of APP, but occurred in some unprotected areas where they were sympatric with a diverse combination of coyotes, gray wolves and hybrids. We found significant spatial genetic structure and identified a steep cline extending west from APP where the dominant genotype shifted abruptly from eastern wolves to coyotes and hybrids. The genotypic pattern to the south and northwest was a more complex mosaic of alternating genotypes. We modelled genetic ancestry in response to prey availability and human disturbance and found that individuals with greater wolf ancestry occupied areas of higher moose density and fewer roads. Our results clarify the structure of the Canis hybrid zone adjacent to APP and provide unique insight into environmental conditions influencing hybridization dynamics between wolves and coyotes. PMID:23173981

  19. Tinea faciei due to microsporum canis in children: a survey of 46 cases in the District of Cagliari (Italy).

    PubMed

    Atzori, Laura; Aste, Natalia; Aste, Nicola; Pau, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophytoses are frequent in children, but involvement of the facial skin has peculiar aspects that should be considered a separate entity: tinea faciei. Microsporum canis infection in tinea faciei has not been widely documented. To review cases of tinea faciei due to M. canis in children diagnosed at the Dermatology Clinic, University of Cagliari. Between 1990 and 2009, all children with dermatophyte infections of the facial skin were recruited for the study after parental consent. Diagnosis was made through direct microscopic and cultural examination. Age, sex, clinical form, illness duration, identified dermatophyte, source of infection, and treatment were recorded. Forty-six cases of tinea faciei due to M. canis in children aged 11 months to 15 years (29 male/17 female) were diagnosed. In 42 (91.3%) children, the illness was the result of contact with pets, and 4 (8.7%) cases resulted from contact with children affected by tinea capitis due to M. canis. Clinical manifestations were typical ringworm in 34 (74%) patients, whereas in 12 (26%) cases, atypical forms mimicking atopic dermatitis, impetigo, lupus erythematosus, and periorificial dermatitis were observed. In 18 (39%) cases, involvement of the vellus hair follicle was documented as ectothrix invasion. Topical or systemic antifungal therapy was effective in all patients. Tinea faciei shows a complex spectrum of differential diagnosis and age-related variations with respect to other superficial dermatophytosis. M. canis is the main organism responsible in children residing in Cagliari, capitol city of Sardinia, Italy. Close collaboration with veterinary and educational programs within infant communities are required for adequate prevention. PMID:22011084

  20. A Molecular survey of Anaplasma spp., Rickettsia spp., Ehrlichia canis and Babesia microti in foxes and fleas from Sicily.

    PubMed

    Torina, A; Blanda, V; Antoci, F; Scimeca, S; D'Agostino, R; Scariano, E; Piazza, A; Galluzzo, P; Giudice, E; Caracappa, S

    2013-11-01

    Fleas (Insecta: Siphonaptera) are obligate bloodsucking insects, which parasitize birds and mammals, and are distributed throughout the world. Several species have been implicated in pathogen transmission. This study aimed to monitor red foxes and the fleas isolated from them in the Palermo and Ragusa provinces of Sicily, Italy, as these organisms are potential reservoirs and vectors of pathogens. Thirteen foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 110 fleas were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect DNA of the pathogens Ehrlichia canis, Babesia microti, Rickettsia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma ovis. In the foxes, A. ovis was detected in only one animal, whereas the prevalence of the E. canis pathogen was 31%. B. microti and Rickettsia spp. were not detected. Of all of the collected fleas, 75 belonged to the species Xenopsylla cheopis, 32 belonged to Ctenocephalides canis, two belonged to Ctenocephalides felis and one belonged to Cediopsylla inaequalis. In the fleas, the following pathogens were found: A. ovis (prevalence 25%), A. marginale (1%), A. phagocytophilum (1%), Rickettsia felis (2%) and E. canis (3%). X. cheopis was the flea species most frequently infected with Anaplasma, in particular A. ovis (33%), A. marginale (1%) and A. phagocytophilum (1%). Both C. felis exemplars were positive for R. felis. E. canis was found in the lone C. inaequalis and also in 3% of the X. cheopis specimens. No fleas were positive for B. microti or A. platys. As foxes often live in proximity to domestic areas, they may constitute potential reservoirs for human and animal parasites. Further studies should be performed on fleas to determine their vectorial capacity. PMID:24589112

  1. Extracellular Ionic Locks Determine Variation in Constitutive Activity and Ligand Potency between Species Orthologs of the Free Fatty Acid Receptors FFA2 and FFA3*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2 and FFA3) are G protein-coupled receptors for short chain free fatty acids (SCFAs). They respond to the same set of endogenous ligands but with distinct rank-order of potency such that acetate (C2) has been described as FFA2-selective, whereas propionate (C3) is non-selective. Although C2 was confirmed to be selective for human FFA2 over FFA3, this ligand was not selective between the mouse orthologs. Moreover, although C3 was indeed not selective between the human orthologs, it displayed clear selectivity for mouse FFA3 over mouse FFA2. This altered selectivity to C2 and C3 resulted from broad differences in SCFAs potency at the mouse orthologs. In studies to define the molecular basis for these observations, marked variation in ligand-independent constitutive activity was identified using a [35S]GTP?S assay. The orthologs with higher potency for the SCFAs, human FFA2 and mouse FFA3, displayed high constitutive activity in this assay, whereas the orthologs with lower potency for the agonist ligands, mouse FFA2 and human FFA3, did not. Sequence alignments of the second extracellular loop identified single negatively charged residues in FFA2 and FFA3 not conserved between species and predicted to form ionic lock interactions with arginine residues within the FFA2 or FFA3 agonist binding pocket to regulate constitutive activity and SCFA potency. Reciprocal mutation of these residues between species orthologs resulted in the induction (or repression) of constitutive activity and in most cases also yielded corresponding changes in SCFA potency. PMID:23066016

  2. Enigmatic Orthology Relationships between Hox Clusters of the African Butterfly Fish and Other Teleosts Following Ancient Whole-Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kyle J.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous ancient whole-genome duplications (WGD) have occurred during eukaryote evolution. In vertebrates, duplicated developmental genes and their functional divergence have had important consequences for morphological evolution. Although two vertebrate WGD events (1R/2R) occurred over 525 Ma, we have focused on the more recent 3R or TGD (teleost genome duplication) event which occurred approximately 350 Ma in a common ancestor of over 26,000 species of teleost fishes. Through a combination of whole genome and bacterial artificial chromosome clone sequencing we characterized all Hox gene clusters of Pantodon buchholzi, a member of the early branching teleost subdivision Osteoglossomorpha. We find 45 Hox genes organized in only five clusters indicating that Pantodon has suffered more Hox cluster loss than other known species. Despite strong evidence for homology of the five Pantodon clusters to the four canonical pre-TGD vertebrate clusters (one HoxA, two HoxB, one HoxC, and one HoxD), we were unable to confidently resolve 1:1 orthology relationships between four of the Pantodon clusters and the eight post-TGD clusters of other teleosts. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that many Pantodon genes segregate outside the conventional “a” and “b” post-TGD orthology groups, that extensive topological incongruence exists between genes physically linked on a single cluster, and that signal divergence causes ambivalence in assigning 1:1 orthology in concatenated Hox cluster analyses. Out of several possible explanations for this phenomenon we favor a model which keeps with the prevailing view of a single TGD prior to teleost radiation, but which also considers the timing of diploidization after duplication, relative to speciation events. We suggest that although the duplicated hoxa clusters diploidized prior to divergence of osteoglossomorphs, the duplicated hoxb, hoxc, and hoxd clusters concluded diploidization independently in osteoglossomorphs and other teleosts. We use the term “tetralogy” to describe the homology relationship which exists between duplicated sequences which originate through a shared WGD, but which diploidize into distinct paralogs from a common allelic pool independently in two lineages following speciation. PMID:24974377

  3. Enigmatic orthology relationships between Hox clusters of the African butterfly fish and other teleosts following ancient whole-genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kyle J; Holland, Peter W H

    2014-10-01

    Numerous ancient whole-genome duplications (WGD) have occurred during eukaryote evolution. In vertebrates, duplicated developmental genes and their functional divergence have had important consequences for morphological evolution. Although two vertebrate WGD events (1R/2R) occurred over 525 Ma, we have focused on the more recent 3R or TGD (teleost genome duplication) event which occurred approximately 350 Ma in a common ancestor of over 26,000 species of teleost fishes. Through a combination of whole genome and bacterial artificial chromosome clone sequencing we characterized all Hox gene clusters of Pantodon buchholzi, a member of the early branching teleost subdivision Osteoglossomorpha. We find 45 Hox genes organized in only five clusters indicating that Pantodon has suffered more Hox cluster loss than other known species. Despite strong evidence for homology of the five Pantodon clusters to the four canonical pre-TGD vertebrate clusters (one HoxA, two HoxB, one HoxC, and one HoxD), we were unable to confidently resolve 1:1 orthology relationships between four of the Pantodon clusters and the eight post-TGD clusters of other teleosts. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that many Pantodon genes segregate outside the conventional "a" and "b" post-TGD orthology groups, that extensive topological incongruence exists between genes physically linked on a single cluster, and that signal divergence causes ambivalence in assigning 1:1 orthology in concatenated Hox cluster analyses. Out of several possible explanations for this phenomenon we favor a model which keeps with the prevailing view of a single TGD prior to teleost radiation, but which also considers the timing of diploidization after duplication, relative to speciation events. We suggest that although the duplicated hoxa clusters diploidized prior to divergence of osteoglossomorphs, the duplicated hoxb, hoxc, and hoxd clusters concluded diploidization independently in osteoglossomorphs and other teleosts. We use the term "tetralogy" to describe the homology relationship which exists between duplicated sequences which originate through a shared WGD, but which diploidize into distinct paralogs from a common allelic pool independently in two lineages following speciation. PMID:24974377

  4. Functional Evolution of a Multigene Family: Orthologous and Paralogous Pheromone Receptor Genes in the Turnip Moth, Agrotis segetum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Lfstedt, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Lepidopteran pheromone receptors (PRs), for which orthologies are evident among closely related species, provide an intriguing example of gene family evolution in terms of how new functions may arise. However, only a limited number of PRs have been functionally characterized so far and thus evolutionary scenarios suffer from elements of speculation. In this study we investigated the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, in which female moths produce a mixture of chemically related pheromone components that elicit specific responses from receptor cells on male antennae. We cloned nine A. segetum PR genes and the Orco gene by degenerate primer based RT-PCR. The nine PR genes, named as AsegOR1 and AsegOR3-10, fall into four distinct orthologous clusters of known lepidopteran PRs, of which one contains six paralogues. The paralogues are under relaxed selective pressure, contrasting with the purifying selection on other clusters. We identified the receptors AsegOR9, AsegOR4 and AsegOR5, specific for the respective homologous pheromone components (Z)-5-decenyl, (Z)-7-dodecenyl and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetates, by two-electrode voltage clamp recording from Xenopus laevis oocytes co-expressing Orco and each PR candidate. These receptors occur in three different orthologous clusters. We also found that the six paralogues with high sequence similarity vary dramatically in ligand selectivity and sensitivity. Different from AsegOR9, AsegOR6 showed a relatively large response to the behavioural antagonist (Z)-5-decenol, and a small response to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate. AsegOR1 was broadly tuned, but most responsive to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate, (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the behavioural antagonist (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate. AsegOR8 and AsegOR7, which differ from AsegOR6 and AsegOR1 by 7 and 10 aa respectively, showed much lower sensitivities. AsegOR10 showed only small responses to all the tested compounds. These results suggest that new receptors arise through gene duplication, and relaxed evolutionary constraints or positive selection among paralogues allow functional divergence to occur in spite of purifying selection being the norm. PMID:24130875

  5. Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus Proteins Orthologous with pSymA-Encoded Proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: Hypothetical Roles in Plant Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential accessory genes for nitrogen fixation (nif), nodulation and host specificity (nod). A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus genome. Only two Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea) and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (?E-10) with Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies mutational analysis and is consistent with the hypothesis that these proteins may be of particular importance in host/microbe interaction and their duplication likely facilitates their ongoing evolution. PMID:22761700

  6. Transcription repression by Xenopus ET and its human ortholog TBX3, a gene involved in ulnar-mammary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-liang; Wen, Leng; Campbell, Christine E.; Wu, Jane Y.; Rao, Yi

    1999-01-01

    T box (Tbx) genes are a family of developmental regulators with more than 20 members recently identified in invertebrates and vertebrates. Mutations in Tbx genes have been found to cause several human diseases. Our understanding of functional mechanisms of Tbx products has come mainly from the prototypical T/Brachyury, which is a transcription activator. We previously discovered ET, a Tbx gene expressed in Xenopus embryos. We report here that ET is an ortholog of the human Tbx3 and that ET is a repressor of basal and activated transcription. Functional dissection of the ET protein reveals a novel transcription-repression domain highly conserved among ET, human TBX3, and TBX2. These results reveal a new transcription repressor domain, show the existence of a subfamily of transcription repressors in the Tbx superfamily, and provide a basis for understanding etiology of diseases caused by Tbx3 mutations. PMID:10468588

  7. RNAi screening of human glycogene orthologs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the construction of the C. elegans glycogene database

    PubMed Central

    Akiyoshi, Sayaka; Nomura, Kazuko H; Dejima, Katsufumi; Murata, Daisuke; Matsuda, Ayako; Kanaki, Nanako; Takaki, Tetsuro; Mihara, Hiroyuki; Nagaishi, Takayuki; Furukawa, Shuhei; Ando, Keiko-Gengyo; Yoshina, Sawako; Mitani, Shohei; Togayachi, Akira; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Shikanai, Toshihide; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Nomura, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we selected 181 nematode glycogenes that are orthologous to human glycogenes and examined their RNAi phenotypes. The results are deposited in the Caenorhabditis elegans Glycogene Database (CGGDB) at AIST, Tsukuba, Japan. The most prominent RNAi phenotypes observed are disruptions of cell cycle progression in germline mitosis/meiosis and in early embryonic cell mitosis. Along with the previously reported roles of chondroitin proteoglycans, glycosphingolipids and GPI-anchored proteins in cell cycle progression, we show for the first time that the inhibition of the functions of N-glycan synthesis genes (cytoplasmic alg genes) resulted in abnormal germline formation, ER stress and small body size phenotypes. The results provide additional information on the roles of glycoconjugates in the cell cycle progression mechanisms of germline and embryonic cells. PMID:25091817

  8. A novel firmicute protein family related to the actinobacterial resuscitation-promoting factors by non-orthologous domain displacement

    PubMed Central

    Ravagnani, Adriana; Finan, Christopher L; Young, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background In Micrococcus luteus growth and resuscitation from starvation-induced dormancy is controlled by the production of a secreted growth factor. This autocrine resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is the founder member of a family of proteins found throughout and confined to the actinobacteria (high G + C Gram-positive bacteria). The aim of this work was to search for and characterise a cognate gene family in the firmicutes (low G + C Gram-positive bacteria) and obtain information about how they may control bacterial growth and resuscitation. Results In silico analysis of the accessory domains of the Rpf proteins permitted their classification into several subfamilies. The RpfB subfamily is related to a group of firmicute proteins of unknown function, represented by YabE of Bacillus subtilis. The actinobacterial RpfB and firmicute YabE proteins have very similar domain structures and genomic contexts, except that in YabE, the actinobacterial Rpf domain is replaced by another domain, which we have called Sps. Although totally unrelated in both sequence and secondary structure, the Rpf and Sps domains fulfil the same function. We propose that these proteins have undergone "non-orthologous domain displacement", a phenomenon akin to "non-orthologous gene displacement" that has been described previously. Proteins containing the Sps domain are widely distributed throughout the firmicutes and they too fall into a number of distinct subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the accessory domains in the Rpf and Sps proteins, together with their weak similarity to lytic transglycosylases, provide clear evidence that they are muralytic enzymes. Conclusions The results indicate that the firmicute Sps proteins and the actinobacterial Rpf proteins are cognate and that they control bacterial culturability via enzymatic modification of the bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15774001

  9. Hot spots in cold adaptation: Localized increases in conformational flexibility in lactate dehydrogenase A4 orthologs of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter A.; Somero, George N.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of enzymatic adaptation to extreme cold, we determined kinetic properties, thermal stabilities, and deduced amino acid sequences of lactate dehydrogenase A4 (A4-LDH) from nine Antarctic (?1.86 to 1C) and three South American (4 to 10C) notothenioid teleosts. Higher MichaelisMenten constants (Km) and catalytic rate constants (kcat) distinguish orthologs of Antarctic from those of South American species, but no relationship exists between adaptation temperature and the rate at which activity is lost because of heat denaturation. In all species, active site residues are conserved fully, and differences in kcat and Km are caused by substitutions elsewhere in the molecule. Within geographic groups, identical kinetic properties are generated by different substitutions. By combining our data with A4-LDH sequences for other vertebrates and information on roles played by localized conformational changes in setting kcat, we conclude that notothenioid A4-LDHs have adapted to cold temperatures by increases in flexibility in small areas of the molecule that affect the mobility of adjacent active-site structures. Using these findings, we propose a model that explains linked temperature-adaptive variation in Km and kcat. Changes in sequence that increase flexibility of regions of the enzyme involved in catalytic conformational changes may reduce energy (enthalpy) barriers to these rate-governing shifts in conformation and, thereby, increase kcat. However, at a common temperature of measurement, the higher configurational entropy of a cold-adapted enzyme may foster conformations that bind ligands poorly, leading to high Km values relative to warm-adapted orthologs. PMID:9736762

  10. Evolution and Functional Insights of Different Ancestral Orthologous Clades of Chitin Synthase Genes in the Fungal Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu; Jiang, Cong; Wang, Qinhu; Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chitin synthases (CHSs) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of chitin, an important structural component of fungal cell walls that can trigger innate immune responses in host plants and animals. Members of CHS gene family perform various functions in fungal cellular processes. Previous studies focused primarily on classifying diverse CHSs into different classes, regardless of their functional diversification, or on characterizing their functions in individual fungal species. A complete and systematic comparative analysis of CHS genes based on their orthologous relationships will be valuable for elucidating the evolution and functions of different CHS genes in fungi. Here, we identified and compared members of the CHS gene family across the fungal tree of life, including 18 divergent fungal lineages. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fungal CHS gene family is comprised of at least 10 ancestral orthologous clades, which have undergone multiple independent duplications and losses in different fungal lineages during evolution. Interestingly, one of these CHS clades (class III) was expanded in plant or animal pathogenic fungi belonging to different fungal lineages. Two clades (classes VIb and VIc) identified for the first time in this study occurred mainly in plant pathogenic fungi from Sordariomycetes and Dothideomycetes. Moreover, members of classes III and VIb were specifically up-regulated during plant infection, suggesting important roles in pathogenesis. In addition, CHS-associated networks conserved among plant pathogenic fungi are involved in various biological processes, including sexual reproduction and plant infection. We also identified specificity-determining sites, many of which are located at or adjacent to important structural and functional sites that are potentially responsible for functional divergence of different CHS classes. Overall, our results provide new insights into the evolution and function of members of CHS gene family in the fungal kingdom. Specificity-determining sites identified here may be attractive targets for further structural and experimental studies. PMID:26870058

  11. Patterns of structural dynamics in RACK1 protein retained throughout evolution: A hydrogen-deuterium exchange study of three orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Fituch, Kinga; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Dadlez, Michal; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    RACK1 is a member of the WD repeat family of proteins and is involved in multiple fundamental cellular processes. An intriguing feature of RACK1 is its ability to interact with at least 80 different protein partners. Thus, the structural features enabling such interactomic flexibility are of great interest. Several previous studies of the crystal structures of RACK1 orthologs described its detailed architecture and confirmed predictions that RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed ?-propeller fold. However, this did not explain its ability to bind to multiple partners. We performed hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange mass spectrometry on three orthologs of RACK1 (human, yeast, and plant) to obtain insights into the dynamic properties of RACK1 in solution. All three variants retained similar patterns of deuterium uptake, with some pronounced differences that can be attributed to RACK1's divergent biological functions. In all cases, the most rigid structural elements were confined to B-C turns and, to some extent, strands B and C, while the remaining regions retained much flexibility. We also compared the average rate constants for H-D exchange in different regions of RACK1 and found that amide protons in some regions exchanged at least 1000-fold faster than in others. We conclude that its evolutionarily retained structural architecture might have allowed RACK1 to accommodate multiple molecular partners. This was exemplified by our additional analysis of yeast RACK1 dimer, which showed stabilization, as well as destabilization, of several interface regions upon dimer formation. PMID:24591271

  12. Rho1 GTPase and PKC ortholog Pck1 are upstream activators of the cell integrity MAPK pathway in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Ral A; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Prez, Pilar; Cansado, Jos

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms. PMID:24498240

  13. Rho1 GTPase and PKC Ortholog Pck1 Are Upstream Activators of the Cell Integrity MAPK Pathway in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Snchez-Mir, Laura; Soto, Teresa; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Viana, Ral A.; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Prez, Pilar; Cansado, Jos

    2014-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the cell integrity pathway (CIP) orchestrates multiple biological processes like cell wall maintenance and ionic homeostasis by fine tuning activation of MAPK Pmk1 in response to various environmental conditions. The small GTPase Rho2 positively regulates the CIP through protein kinase C ortholog Pck2. However, Pmk1 retains some function in mutants lacking either Rho2 or Pck2, suggesting the existence of additional upstream regulatory elements to modulate its activity depending on the nature of the environmental stimulus. The essential GTPase Rho1 is a candidate to control the activity of the CIP by acting upstream of Pck2, whereas Pck1, a second PKC ortholog, appears to negatively regulate Pmk1 activity. However, the exact regulatory nature of these two proteins within the CIP has remained elusive. By exhaustive characterization of strains expressing a hypomorphic Rho1 allele (rho1-596) in different genetic backgrounds we show that both Rho1 and Pck1 are positive upstream regulatory members of the CIP in addition to Rho2 and Pck2. In this new model Rho1 and Rho2 control Pmk1 basal activity during vegetative growth mainly through Pck2. Notably, whereas Rho2-Pck2 elicit Pmk1 activation in response to most environmental stimuli, Rho1 drives Pmk1 activation through either Pck2 or Pck1 exclusively in response to cell wall damage. Our study reveals the intricate and complex functional architecture of the upstream elements participating in this signaling pathway as compared to similar routes from other simple eukaryotic organisms. PMID:24498240

  14. Frequent and recent retrotransposition of orthologous genes plays a role in the evolution of sperm glycolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The central metabolic pathway of glycolysis converts glucose to pyruvate, with the net production of 2 ATP and 2 NADH per glucose molecule. Each of the ten reactions in this pathway is typically catalyzed by multiple isozymes encoded by a multigene family. Several isozymes in this pathway are expressed only during spermatogenesis, and gene targeting studies indicate that they are essential for sperm function and male fertility in mouse. At least three of the novel glycolytic isozymes are encoded by retrogenes (Pgk2, Aldoart1, and Aldoart2). Their restricted expression profile suggests that retrotransposition may play a significant role in the evolution of sperm glycolytic enzymes. Results We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of glycolytic enzymes in the human and mouse genomes and identified several intronless copies for all enzymes in the pathway, except Pfk. Within each gene family, a single orthologous gene was typically retrotransposed frequently and independently in both species. Several retroposed sequences maintained open reading frames (ORFs) and/or provided evidence of alternatively spliced exons. We analyzed expression of sequences with ORFs and <99% sequence identity in the coding region and obtained evidence for the expression of an alternative Gpi1 transcript in mouse spermatogenic cells. Conclusions Our analysis detected frequent, recent, and lineage-specific retrotransposition of orthologous glycolytic enzymes in the human and mouse genomes. Retrotransposition events are associated with LINE/LTR and genomic integration is random. We found evidence for the alternative splicing of parent genes. Many retroposed sequences have maintained ORFs, suggesting a functional role for these genes. PMID:20459611

  15. Predicting functional transcription factor binding through alignment-free and affinity-based analysis of orthologous promoter sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Lucas D.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The identification of transcription factor (TF) binding sites and the regulatory circuitry that they define is currently an area of intense research. Data from whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIPchip), whole-genome expression microarrays, and sequencing of multiple closely related genomes have all proven useful. By and large, existing methods treat the interpretation of functional data as a classification problem (between bound and unbound DNA), and the analysis of comparative data as a problem of local alignment (to recover phylogenetic footprints of presumably functional elements). Both of these approaches suffer from the inability to model and detect low-affinity binding sites, which have recently been shown to be abundant and functional. Results: We have developed a method that discovers functional regulatory targets of TFs by predicting the total affinity of each promoter for those factors and then comparing that affinity across orthologous promoters in closely related species. At each promoter, we consider the minimum affinity among orthologs to be the fraction of the affinity that is functional. Because we calculate the affinity of the entire promoter, our method is independent of local alignment. By comparing with functional annotation information and gene expression data in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have validated that this biophysically motivated use of evolutionary conservation gives rise to dramatic improvement in prediction of regulatory connectivity and factorfactor interactions compared to the use of a single genome. We propose novel biological functions for several yeast TFs, including the factors Snt2 and Stb4, for which no function has been reported. Our affinity-based approach towards comparative genomics may allow a more quantitative analysis of the principles governing the evolution of non-coding DNA. Availability: The MatrixREDUCE software package is available from http://www.bussemakerlab.org/software/MatrixREDUCE Contact: Harmen.Bussemaker@columbia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18586710

  16. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Ruth C

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer’s vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer’s vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of ‘heart jogging’ and the direction of ‘heart looping’.  ‘Heart jogging’ is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward ‘jog’. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish ‘heart jogging orthologs’ are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach. PMID:24627794

  17. Evolution and Functional Insights of Different Ancestral Orthologous Clades of Chitin Synthase Genes in the Fungal Tree of Life.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Jiang, Cong; Wang, Qinhu; Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chitin synthases (CHSs) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of chitin, an important structural component of fungal cell walls that can trigger innate immune responses in host plants and animals. Members of CHS gene family perform various functions in fungal cellular processes. Previous studies focused primarily on classifying diverse CHSs into different classes, regardless of their functional diversification, or on characterizing their functions in individual fungal species. A complete and systematic comparative analysis of CHS genes based on their orthologous relationships will be valuable for elucidating the evolution and functions of different CHS genes in fungi. Here, we identified and compared members of the CHS gene family across the fungal tree of life, including 18 divergent fungal lineages. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fungal CHS gene family is comprised of at least 10 ancestral orthologous clades, which have undergone multiple independent duplications and losses in different fungal lineages during evolution. Interestingly, one of these CHS clades (class III) was expanded in plant or animal pathogenic fungi belonging to different fungal lineages. Two clades (classes VIb and VIc) identified for the first time in this study occurred mainly in plant pathogenic fungi from Sordariomycetes and Dothideomycetes. Moreover, members of classes III and VIb were specifically up-regulated during plant infection, suggesting important roles in pathogenesis. In addition, CHS-associated networks conserved among plant pathogenic fungi are involved in various biological processes, including sexual reproduction and plant infection. We also identified specificity-determining sites, many of which are located at or adjacent to important structural and functional sites that are potentially responsible for functional divergence of different CHS classes. Overall, our results provide new insights into the evolution and function of members of CHS gene family in the fungal kingdom. Specificity-determining sites identified here may be attractive targets for further structural and experimental studies. PMID:26870058

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans HEN1 ortholog, HENN-1, methylates and stabilizes select subclasses of germline small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Billi, Allison C; Alessi, Amelia F; Khivansara, Vishal; Han, Ting; Freeberg, Mallory; Mitani, Shohei; Kim, John K

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs regulate diverse biological processes by directing effector proteins called Argonautes to silence complementary mRNAs. Maturation of some classes of small RNAs involves terminal 2'-O-methylation to prevent degradation. This modification is catalyzed by members of the conserved HEN1 RNA methyltransferase family. In animals, Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and some endogenous and exogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are methylated, whereas microRNAs are not. However, the mechanisms that determine animal HEN1 substrate specificity have yet to be fully resolved. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a HEN1 ortholog has not been studied, but there is evidence for methylation of piRNAs and some endogenous siRNAs. Here, we report that the worm HEN1 ortholog, HENN-1 (HEN of Nematode), is required for methylation of C. elegans small RNAs. Our results indicate that piRNAs are universally methylated by HENN-1. In contrast, 26G RNAs, a class of primary endogenous siRNAs, are methylated in female germline and embryo, but not in male germline. Intriguingly, the methylation pattern of 26G RNAs correlates with the expression of distinct male and female germline Argonautes. Moreover, loss of the female germline Argonaute results in loss of 26G RNA methylation altogether. These findings support a model wherein methylation status of a metazoan small RNA is dictated by the Argonaute to which it binds. Loss of henn-1 results in phenotypes that reflect destabilization of substrate small RNAs: dysregulation of target mRNAs, impaired fertility, and enhanced somatic RNAi. Additionally, the henn-1 mutant shows a weakened response to RNAi knockdown of germline genes, suggesting that HENN-1 may also function in canonical RNAi. Together, our results indicate a broad role for HENN-1 in both endogenous and exogenous gene silencing pathways and provide further insight into the mechanisms of HEN1 substrate discrimination and the diversity within the Argonaute family. PMID:22548001

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase 1 (PDK1) Ortholog Is Required for Stress Tolerance and Survival in Murine Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chabrier-Roselló, Yeissa; Gerik, Kimberly J.; Koselny, Kristy; DiDone, Louis; Lodge, Jennifer K.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans PKH2-01 and PKH2-02 are orthologous to mammalian PDK1 kinase genes. Although orthologs of these kinases have been extensively studied in S. cerevisiae, little is known about their function in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we show that PKH2-02 but not PKH2-01 is required for C. neoformans to tolerate cell wall, oxidative, nitrosative, and antifungal drug stress. Deletion of PKH2-02 leads to decreased basal levels of Pkc1 activity and, consequently, reduced activation of the cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in response to cell wall, oxidative, and nitrosative stress. PKH2-02 function also is required for tolerance of fluconazole and amphotericin B, two important drugs for the treatment of cryptococcosis. Furthermore, OSU-03012, an inhibitor of human PDK1, is synergistic and fungicidal in combination with fluconazole. Using a Galleria mellonella model of low-temperature cryptococcosis, we found that PKH2-02 is also required for virulence in a temperature-independent manner. Consistent with the hypersensitivity of the pkh2-02Δ mutant to oxidative and nitrosative stress, this mutant shows decreased survival in murine phagocytes compared to that of wild-type (WT) cells. In addition, we show that deletion of PKH2-02 affects the interaction between C. neoformans and phagocytes by decreasing its ability to suppress production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that Pkh2-02-mediated signaling in C. neoformans is crucial for stress tolerance, host-pathogen interactions, and both temperature-dependent and -independent virulence. PMID:23087368

  20. A 3-decade dearth of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a wolf (Canis lupus)-dominated ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Some 30 y after wolves (Canis lupus) were implicated in decimating wintering white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a 3000-km2 area of northeastern Minnesota, wintering deer still have not recolonized the area. From 1976 to 2004, we aerially radio-tracked wolves there during 250 h and recorded 2 deer (in 1985 and 2000) killed or eaten by wolves during February and March. We observed no other deer or deer sign, but regularly observed deer, deer sign and wolf-killed deer in adjacent wolf-pack territories. Although habitat in the study area generally remains poor, some regeneration has taken place, and deer have increased adjacent to the area. However, wolf numbers have persisted by preying on moose (Alces alces). We could detect no reason other than wolf predation and deer migration traditions for why wintering deer have not recolonized the area.