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Sample records for canopy scale valutazione

  1. Canopy-scale turbulence under oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Dolors; Casamitjana, Xavier; Serra, Teresa; Colomer, Jordi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the turbulent flow structure within diverse canopy models dominated by progressive waves. A set of experimental conditions were considered in a laboratory flume: three vegetation models (submerged rigid, submerged flexible and emergent rigid), three canopy densities (128, 640 and 1280 stems/m2) and three wave frequencies (f=0.8, 1 and 1.4 Hz). The canopy morphology through both the plant flexibility and height and the canopy density were the characteristic parameters that exerted a control on wave induced turbulence within the canopy bed. In the flexible canopy model, sheltering at the bed was observed and was associated with the movement of the blades. In contrast, in the rigid canopy model larger TKE was found as compared with the case without canopy. The increase of TKE was associated with the production of the stem-wake turbulence. Sheltering in the submerged rigid canopy model was found at the lower layer for the largest canopy density and highest wave frequency because of a great loss of wave velocity, confined below the top of the canopy. Sweeps and ejections were the predominant events, enhancing the transfer of momentum at the top of the canopy. Therefore, below the top of the submerged rigid canopy was characterized by a vertical energy exchange zone. Unlike the submerged model, sheltering was always found for emergent rigid vegetation, and attributed to the inhibition of the wave energy at all depths.

  2. [Valutazione delle guardie di sicurezza privata attraverso la Suicide Probability Scale e la Brief Symptom Inventory].

    PubMed

    Dogan, Bulent; Canturk, Gurol; Canturk, Nergis; Guney, Sevgi; Özcan, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    RIASSUNTO. Scopo. Lo scopo di questo studio è stato quello di investigare l'influenza della probabilità di suicidio, con le sue caratteristiche sociodemografiche, e di procurare i dati per la prevenzione del suicidio tra le guardie di sicurezza privata che lavorano in condizioni di stress, essendo a contatto ininterrottamente con eventi negativi e traumatici di vita durante il loro lavoro. Metodi. Hanno partecipato allo studio 200 guardie di sicurezza privata e 200 persone dell'Università di Ankara. Per raccogliere i dati sono stati utilizzati un questionario riguardante le condizioni sociodemografiche dei partecipanti, la Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) e la Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Risultati. Genere, stato civile, stipendio, credenze religiose, vivere una situazione di pericolo di vita, passato di tentativi di suicidio, fumare e non avere una malattia cronica hanno causato statisticamente una differenza significativa sui punteggi di SPS tra il gruppo di guardie di sicurezza privata e quello di controllo. In aggiunta, c'è stata una correlazione positiva statisticamente significativa tra i punteggi totali delle sottoscale di SPS e quelli di BSI. Conclusioni. Allo stesso modo degli agenti di polizia e dei gendarmi, le guardie di sicurezza privata sono ad alto rischio di commettere e tentare il suicidio trovandosi in condizioni stressanti di lavoro e anche soffrendo del trauma secondario. È necessario che essi siano consapevoli della propria tendenza al suicidio e avere controlli psichiatrici regolari. PMID:27183512

  3. High within-canopy variation in isoprene emission potentials in temperate trees: Implications for predicting canopy-scale isoprene fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, ÜLo; Copolovici, Lucian; Hüve, Katja

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene emission potential (ES) varies in tree canopies, and such variations have potentially major implications for predicting canopy level emissions. So far, quantitative relationships of ES with irradiance are missing, and interspecific variation in ES plasticity and potential effects on canopy level emissions have not been characterized. ES, foliage structural, chemical, and photosynthetic characteristics were studied relative to integrated within-canopy daily quantum flux density (Qint) in temperate deciduous tree species Quercus robur, Populus tremula, Salix alba, and Salix caprea, and canopy isoprene emissions were calculated considering observed variation in ES and under different simplifying assumptions. Strong positive curvilinear relationships between nitrogen and dry mass per unit area, photosynthetic potentials and ES per area with Qint were observed. Structural, chemical, and photosynthetic traits varied 1.5-fold to 4-fold and ES per area 3-fold to 27-fold within the canopy. ES variation reflected accumulation of mesophyll cell layers and greater emission capacity of average cells. Species with largest structural and photosynthetic plasticity had greatest plasticity in ES. Relative to the simulation considering within-canopy variation in ES, the bias from assuming a constant ES varied between -8% and +68%, and it scaled positively with ES plasticity. The bias of big-leaf simulations varied between -22% and -35%, and it scaled negatively with ES plasticity. A generalized canopy response function of ES developed for all species resulted in the lowest bias between -11% and 6% and can be recommended for practical applications. The results highlight huge within-canopy and interspecific variation in ES and demonstrate that ignoring these variations strongly biases canopy emission predictions.

  4. Temporal Scales of the Nocturnal Flow Within and Above a Forest Canopy in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Daniel M.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Fuentes, José D.; Gerken, Tobias; Stoy, Paul C.

    2016-04-01

    Multiresolution decomposition is applied to 10 months of nocturnal turbulence observations taken at eight levels within and above a forest canopy in Central Amazonia. The aim is to identify the contributions of different temporal scales of the flow above and within the canopy. Results show that turbulence intensity in the lower canopy is mostly affected by the static stability in the upper canopy. Horizontal velocity fluctuations peak at time scales longer than 100 s within the canopy, which correspond to the scale of non-turbulent submeso motions above the canopy. In the vertical velocity spectrum near the surface, the peak occurs at time scales around 100 s, which are larger than the time scales of the turbulent flow above the canopy. Heat-flux cospectra within the canopy peak at the same temporal scales as the vertical velocity fluctuations at that level, suggesting the existence of buoyancy driven turbulence. Case studies are presented as evidence that low-frequency fluctuations propagate towards the canopy interior more easily than does turbulence.

  5. Landscape-scale changes in forest canopy structure across a partially logged tropical peat swamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedeux, B. M. M.; Coomes, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Forest canopy structure is strongly influenced by environmental factors and disturbance, and in turn influences key ecosystem processes including productivity, evapotranspiration and habitat availability. In tropical forests increasingly modified by human activities, the interplay between environmental factors and disturbance legacies on forest canopy structure across landscapes is practically unexplored. We used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to measure the canopy of old-growth and selectively logged peat swamp forest across a peat dome in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, and quantified how canopy structure metrics varied with peat depth and under logging. Several million canopy gaps in different height cross-sections of the canopy were measured in 100 plots of 1 km2 spanning the peat dome, allowing us to describe canopy structure with seven metrics. Old-growth forest became shorter and had simpler vertical canopy profiles on deeper peat, consistent with previous work linking deep peat to stunted tree growth. Gap size frequency distributions (GSFDs) indicated fewer and smaller canopy gaps on the deeper peat (i.e. the scaling exponent of Pareto functions increased from 1.76 to 3.76 with peat depth). Areas subjected to concessionary logging until 2000, and illegal logging since then, had the same canopy top height as old-growth forest, indicating the persistence of some large trees, but mean canopy height was significantly reduced. With logging, the total area of canopy gaps increased and the GSFD scaling exponent was reduced. Logging effects were most evident on the deepest peat, where nutrient depletion and waterlogged conditions restrain tree growth and recovery. A tight relationship exists between canopy structure and peat depth gradient within the old-growth tropical peat swamp forest. This relationship breaks down after selective logging, with canopy structural recovery, as observed by ALS, modulated by environmental conditions. These findings improve our

  6. Landscape-scale changes in forest canopy structure across a partially logged tropical peat swamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedeux, B. M. M.; Coomes, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Forest canopy structure is strongly influenced by environmental factors and disturbance, and in turn influences key ecosystem processes including productivity, evapotranspiration and habitat availability. In tropical forests increasingly modified by human activities, the interplaying effects of environmental factors and disturbance legacies on forest canopy structure across landscapes are practically unexplored. We used high-fidelity airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to measure the canopy of old-growth and selectively logged peat swamp forest across a peat dome in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, and quantified how canopy structure metrics varied with peat depth and under logging. Several million canopy gaps in different height cross-sections of the canopy were measured in 100 plots of 1 km2 spanning the peat dome, allowing us to describe canopy structure with seven metrics. Old-growth forest became shorter and had simpler vertical canopy profiles on deeper peat, consistently with previous work linking deep peat to stunted tree growth. Gap Size Frequency Distributions (GSFDs) indicated fewer and smaller canopy gaps on the deeper peat (i.e. the scaling exponent of pareto functions increased from 1.76 to 3.76 with peat depth). Areas subjected to concessionary logging until 2000, and informal logging since then, had the same canopy top height as old-growth forest, indicating the persistence of some large trees, but mean canopy height was significantly reduced; the total area of canopy gaps increased and the GSFD scaling exponent was reduced. Logging effects were most evident on the deepest peat, where nutrient depletion and waterlogged conditions restrain tree growth and recovery. A tight relationship exists between canopy structure and the peat deph gradient within the old-growth tropical peat swamp. This relationship breaks down after selective logging, with canopy structural recovery being modulated by environmental conditions.

  7. Scaling CO2-photosynthesis relationships from the leaf to the canopy.

    PubMed

    Amthor, J S

    1994-03-01

    Responses of individual leaves to short-term changes in CO2 partial pressure have been relatively well studied. Whole-plant and plant community responses to elevated CO2 are less well understood and scaling up from leaves to canopies will be complicated if feedbacks at the small scale differ from feedbacks at the large scale. Mathematical models of leaf, canopy, and ecosystem processes are important tools in the study of effects on plants and ecosystems of global environmental change, and in particular increasing atmospheric CO2, and might be used to scale from leaves to canopies. Models are also important in assessing effects of the biosphere on the atmosphere. Presently, multilayer and big leaf models of canopy photosynthesis and energy exchange exist. Big leaf models - which are advocated here as being applicable to the evaluation of impacts of 'global change' on the biosphere - simplify much of the underlying leaf-level physics, physiology, and biochemistry, yet can retain the important features of plant-environment interactions with respect to leaf CO2 exchange processes and are able to make useful, quantitative predictions of canopy and community responses to environmental change. The basis of some big leaf models of photosynthesis, including a new model described herein, is that photosynthetic capacity and activity are scaled vertically within a canopy (by plants themselves) to match approximately the vertical profile of PPFD. The new big leaf model combines physically based models of leaf and canopy level transport processes with a biochemically based model of CO2 assimilation. Predictions made by the model are consistent with canopy CO2 exchange measurements, although a need exists for further testing of this and other canopy physiology models with independent measurements of canopy mass and energy exchange at the time scale of 1 h or less. PMID:24311128

  8. The impact of beetle-induced conifer death on stand-scale canopy snow interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, E. T.; Small, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Snow that falls on a forest either passes through the canopy to the ground or is intercepted by the canopy on needles, branches or bark. The interception of snowfall in forest canopies impacts the water budget because intercepted snow is more likely to sublimate than subcanopy snow. Because forest canopy characteristics are a primary control of canopy snow interception, which in turn controls subcanopy snow accumulation, reductions in canopy density have important implications for snow accumulation on the forest floor. Forest structure can be drastically and rapidly altered by forest disturbance, such as insect attack, wildfire and blowdown. Here, we look at the impact that changing forest characteristics associated with beetle infestation have on canopy snow interception. The mountain pine beetle is currently impacting more than 100,000 km2 of pine forest in western North America. Trees killed by bark beetles eventually lose the majority of their canopy material. We hypothesize that tree death significantly reduces available interception platforms, leading to greater subcanopy snow accumulation than pre-infestation conditions. These potential impacts on snow accumulation are especially important for water resources in the western U.S., where the hydrologic cycle is dominated by snowmelt. We test this hypothesis using extensive data collected from adjacent living and grey phase dead stands. We employ multiple methods to measure canopy snow interception, at both the storm- and season-scales. During the winter of 2011, we made more than 10,000 spatially distributed measurements of subcanopy snow accumulation in three living and two dead lodgepole pine stands as well as three clearings. Measurements were made daily as well as immediately prior to and following storm events, allowing us to calculate storm-scale canopy interception. Interception is estimated by comparing subcanopy snow accumulation in clearings and forests. Additionally, by taking repeated daily

  9. Spectral measurements at different spatial scales in potato: relating leaf, plant and canopy nitrogen status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongschaap, Raymond E. E.; Booij, Remmie

    2004-09-01

    Chlorophyll contents in vegetation depend on soil nitrogen availability and on crop nitrogen uptake, which are important management factors in arable farming. Crop nitrogen uptake is important, as nitrogen is needed for chlorophyll formation, which is important for photosynthesis, i.e. the conversion of absorbed radiance into plant biomass. The objective of this study was to estimate leaf and canopy nitrogen contents by near and remote sensing observations and to link observations at leaf, plant and canopy level. A theoretical base is presented for scaling-up leaf optical properties to whole plants and crops, by linking different optical recording techniques at leaf, plant and canopy levels through the integration of vertical nitrogen distribution. Field data come from potato experiments in The Netherlands in 1997 and 1998, comprising two potato varieties: Eersteling and Bintje, receiving similar nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha -1) in varying application schemes to create differences in canopy nitrogen status during the growing season. Ten standard destructive field samplings were performed to follow leaf area index and crop dry weight evolution. Samples were analysed for inorganic nitrogen and total nitrogen contents. At sampling dates, spectral measurements were taken both at leaf level and at canopy level. At leaf level, an exponential relation between SPAD-502 readings and leaf organic nitrogen contents with a high correlation factor of 0.91 was found. At canopy level, an exponential relation between canopy organic nitrogen contents and red edge position ( λrep, nm) derived from reflectance measurements was found with a good correlation of 0.82. Spectral measurements (SPAD-502) at leaf level of a few square mm were related to canopy reflectance measurements (CropScan™) of approximately 0.44 m 2. Statistical regression techniques were used to optimise theoretical vertical nitrogen profiles that allowed scaling-up leaf chlorophyll measurements

  10. Scaling uncertainties in estimating canopy foliar maintenance respiration for black spruce ecosystems in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, X.; McGuire, A.D.; Ruess, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge confronting the scientific community is to understand both patterns of and controls over spatial and temporal variability of carbon exchange between boreal forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. An understanding of the sources of variability of carbon processes at fine scales and how these contribute to uncertainties in estimating carbon fluxes is relevant to representing these processes at coarse scales. To explore some of the challenges and uncertainties in estimating carbon fluxes at fine to coarse scales, we conducted a modeling analysis of canopy foliar maintenance respiration for black spruce ecosystems of Alaska by scaling empirical hourly models of foliar maintenance respiration (Rm) to estimate canopy foliar Rm for individual stands. We used variation in foliar N concentration among stands to develop hourly stand-specific models and then developed an hourly pooled model. An uncertainty analysis identified that the most important parameter affecting estimates of canopy foliar Rm was one that describes R m at 0??C per g N, which explained more than 55% of variance in annual estimates of canopy foliar Rm. The comparison of simulated annual canopy foliar Rm identified significant differences between stand-specific and pooled models for each stand. This result indicates that control over foliar N concentration should be considered in models that estimate canopy foliar Rm of black spruce stands across the landscape. In this study, we also temporally scaled the hourly stand-level models to estimate canopy foliar Rm of black spruce stands using mean monthly temperature data. Comparisons of monthly Rm between the hourly and monthly versions of the models indicated that there was very little difference between the estimates of hourly and monthly models, suggesting that hourly models can be aggregated to use monthly input data with little loss of precision. We conclude that uncertainties in the use of a coarse-scale model for estimating canopy foliar

  11. Contrasting effects of sampling scale on insect herbivores distribution in response to canopy structure.

    PubMed

    Neves, Frederico S; Sperber, Carlos F; Campos, Ricardo I; Soares, Janaína P; Ribeiro, Sérvio P

    2013-03-01

    Species diversity of insect herbivores associated to canopy may vary local and geographically responding to distinct factors at different spatial scales. The aim of this study was to investigate how forest canopy structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance depending on feeding guilds' specificities. We tested the hypothesis that habitat structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance differently to sap-sucking and chewing herbivore guilds. Two spatial scales were evaluated: inside tree crowns (fine spatial cale) and canopy regions (coarse spatial scale). In three sampling sites we measured 120 tree crowns, grouped n five points with four contiguous tree crowns. Insects were sampled by beating method from each crown and data were summed up for analyzing each canopy region. In crowns (fine spatial scale) we measured habitat tructure: trunk circumference, tree height, canopy depth, number of ramifications and maximum ramification level. In each point, defined as a canopy region (coarse spatial scale), we measured habitat structure using a vertical cylindrical transect: tree species richness, leaf area, sum of strata heights and maximum canopy height. A principal component analysis based on the measured variables for each spatial scale was run to estimate habitat structure parameters. To test the effects of habitat structure upon herbivores, different general linear models were adjusted using the first two principal components as explanatory variables. Sap-sucking insect species richness and all herbivore abundances increased with size of crown at fine spatial scale. On the other hand, chewer species richness and abundance increased with resource quantity at coarse scale. Feeding specialization, resources availability, and agility are discussed as ecological causes of the found pattern. PMID:23894967

  12. Temporal Dynamics and Environmental Controls on Carbon Isotope Discrimination at the Canopy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, K. A.; Griffis, T. J.; Lee, X.; Welp, L. R.; Baker, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Much is currently known about 13C isotopic discrimination by C3 plants at the leaf scale. Multidisciplinary techniques from micrometeorology and the stable isotope community have exploited this knowledge to better understand the dynamic processes and environmental controls on atmosphere/biosphere exchange. Unfortunately, there remains a dearth of measurements relating carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy scalecanopy) with the net carbon ecosystem flux. Our goals here are to evaluate temporal fluctuations in Δcanopy as a result of variable environmental conditions and to critically assess the efficacy of leaf-level assumptions applied at the canopy scale. At the University of Minnesota's Rosemount Research and Outreach Center (RROC), the exchange of 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopologues are continuously measured using tunable diode laser (TDL) and micrometeorological techniques (eddy covariance-TDL and gradient-TDL methods). We utilize these data in conjunction with eddy flux and ancillary meteorological measurements to estimate Δcanopy, a key parameter for understanding ecosystem carbon source/sink behavior. Traditionally, Δcanopy is estimated using stomatal conductance models and leaf level isotopic discrimination parameters. In this study, we similarly calculated Δcanopy (Big-Leaf approach), where stomatal conductance was obtained through inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Additionally, given the high resolution of eddy flux and isoflux measurements at the RROC site, we were able to calculate Δcanopy using an inverse flux approach. For this approach, we partitioned the net ecosystem flux using eddy covariance measurements and a nighttime temperature regression method, and then calculated Δcanopy from the isoflux mass balance. Both calculations of Δcanopy emphasized the diurnal, daily and seasonal variability of this important parameter. In particular, atypically hot weather strongly influenced canopy isotope discrimination. Trends in the two Δcanopy

  13. Functional relation among subpixel canopy cover, ground shadow, and illuminated ground at large sampling scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    The functional relation among subpixel canopy cover, illuminated soil, and shadowed soil, which progressively develops with increasing pixel size, is investigated for Poisson distributed plants using a geometric canopy simulation model. An analytical relation among cover components is shown to be applicable when the scale of the pixel is much larger than the scale of the plant and ground shadow. The analysis is facilitated through the use of a nondimensional solar-geometric similarity parameter, eta, equal to the ratio of the area of one plant canopy to its associated ground shadow area, as viewed from nadir. A sampling scale ratio, defined as the ratio of the area of the pixel to the mean area of a single plant shadow, is tested as a quantitative criterion to evaluate when the functional relation among subpixel components occurs. The results of a remote sensing experiment over a natural conifer landscape provide preliminary confirmation of the theoretical analysis.

  14. Modelling canopy scale solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence simulated by the three dimensional radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Nagai, S.; Inoue, T.; Yang, W.; Ichii, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies show that the vegetation canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be observed from satellite. To understand how the canopy scale bidirectional fluorescence observations are related to three-dimensional fluorescence distribution within a plant canopy, it is necessary to evaluate canopy scale fluorescence emission using a detailed plant canopy radiative transfer model. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional plant canopy radiative transfer model that can simulate the bidirectional chlorophyll fluorescence radiance and show several preliminary results of fluorescence distribution at the tree level. To simulate the three dimensional variations in chlorophyll fluorescence from trees, we measured tree structures using a terrestrial LiDAR instrument. The measurements were conducted in Yokohama, Japan (35°22'49" N 139°37'29" E). Three Japanese cherry trees (Cerasus Speciosa) were chosen for our study (Figure 1). Leaf-level sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) is also necessary as an input of radiative transfer model. To measure the leaf-level SIF, we used high spectral resolution spectroradiometer (HR 4000, Ocean Optics Inc. USA). The spectral resolution of this instrument is 0.05 nm (full width half maximum). The spectral range measured was 720 to 780 nm. From the spectral radiance measurements, we estimated SIF using the three band Fraunhofer Line Depth (3FLD) method. The effect of solar and view zenith angles, multiple scattering depends on many factors such as back ground reflectance, leaf reflectance transmittance and landscape structures. To understand how the SIF from both sparse and dense forest stands vary with sun and view angles and optical variables, it is necessary to conduct further sensitivity analysis. Radiative transfer simulation will help understand SIF emission at variety of forest canopy cases.

  15. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERIZATION FOR FINE-SCALE SIMULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) (Grell et al. 1994) has been modified to include an urban canopy parameterization (UCP) for fine-scale urban simulations ( 1 - km horizontal grid spacing ). The UCP accounts for dr...

  16. Turbulent Flow Structure Inside a Canopy with Complex Multi-Scale Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Kunlun; Katz, Joseph; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry laboratory measurements are carried out to study mean flow distributions and turbulent statistics inside a canopy with complex geometry and multiple scales consisting of fractal, tree-like objects. Matching the optical refractive indices of the tree elements with those of the working fluid provides unobstructed optical paths for both illuminations and image acquisition. As a result, the flow fields between tree branches can be resolved in great detail, without optical interference. Statistical distributions of mean velocity, turbulence stresses, and components of dispersive fluxes are documented and discussed. The results show that the trees leave their signatures in the flow by imprinting wake structures with shapes similar to the trees. The velocities in both wake and non-wake regions significantly deviate from the spatially-averaged values. These local deviations result in strong dispersive fluxes, which are important to account for in canopy-flow modelling. In fact, we find that the streamwise normal dispersive flux inside the canopy has a larger magnitude (by up to four times) than the corresponding Reynolds normal stress. Turbulent transport in horizontal planes is studied in the framework of the eddy viscosity model. Scatter plots comparing the Reynolds shear stress and mean velocity gradient are indicative of a linear trend, from which one can calculate the eddy viscosity and mixing length. Similar to earlier results from the wake of a single tree, here we find that inside the canopy the mean mixing length decreases with increasing elevation. This trend cannot be scaled based on a single length scale, but can be described well by a model, which considers the coexistence of multi-scale branches. This agreement indicates that the multi-scale information and the clustering properties of the fractal objects should be taken into consideration in flows inside multi-scale canopies.

  17. Airborne remote sensing of canopy water thickness scaled from leaf spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The reflectance ratio of the middle-infrared band (MIR) to the near-infrared band (NIR) is linearly related to the log(10) equivalent water thickness (EWT) for single leaves of different morphologies, whereas the MIR/NIR radiance ratio is correlated with the leaf area index (LAI). The hypothesis that the MIR/NIR ratio measures canopy EWT was tested by reanalyzing airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator and field data obtained across a large gradient of LAI in western Oregon, U.S.A. The measured airborne MIR/NIR reflectance ratios for canopies were not significantly different from the predicted ratios using leaf data for canopy EWT, except for two desert woodland sites. The interpretation of the MIR/NIR ratio is scale-dependent, because leaf EWT is determined primarily by variations in LAI.

  18. Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance related to reflectance on the canopy scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. B.; Sellers, P. J.; Walthall, C. L.; Hall, F. G.; Kim, J.; Goetz, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Field measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes were analyzed in conjunction with reflectances obtained from a helicopter-mounted Modular Multiband Radiometer at a grassland study site during the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment. These measurements are representative of the canopy scale and were made over a range of meteorological and soil moisture conditions during different stages in the annual life cycle of the prairie vegetation, and thus provide a good basis for investigating hpotheses/relationships potentially useful in remote sensing applications. We tested the hypothesis (Sellers, 1987) that the simple ratio vegetation index should be near-linearly related to the derivatives of the unstressed canopy stomatal conductance and the unstressed canopy photosynthesis with respect to photosynthetically active radiation. Even though there is some scatter in our data, the results seem to support this hypothesis.

  19. Organised Motion in a Tall Spruce Canopy: Temporal Scales, Structure Spacing and Terrain Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the organised motion near the canopy-atmosphere interface of a moderately dense spruce forest in heterogeneous, complex terrain. Wind direction is used to assess differences in topography and surface properties. Observations were obtained at several heights above and within the canopy using sonic anemometers and fast-response gas analysers over the course of several weeks. Analysed variables include the three-dimensional wind vector, the sonic temperature, and the concentration of carbon dioxide. Wavelet analysis was used to extract the organised motion from time series and to derive its temporal scales. Spectral Fourier analysis was deployed to compute power spectra and phase spectra. Profiles of temporal scales of ramp-like coherent structures in the vertical and longitudinal wind components showed a reversed variation with height and were of similar size within the canopy. Temporal scales of scalar fields were comparable to those of the longitudinal wind component suggesting that the lateral scalar transport dominates. The existence of a 1 power law in the longitudinal power spectra was confirmed for a few cases only, with a majority showing a clear 5/3 decay. The variation of effective scales of organised motion in the longitudinal velocity and temperature were found to vary with atmospheric stability, suggesting that both Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and attached eddies dominate the flow with increasing convectional forcing. The canopy mixing-layer analogy was observed to be applicable for ramp-like coherent structures in the vertical wind component for selected wind directions only. Departures from the prediction of m = Λ w L {/s -1} = 8 10 (where Λ w is the streamwise spacing of coherent structures in the vertical wind w and L s is a canopy shear length scale) were caused by smaller shear length scales associated with large-scale changes in the terrain as well as the vertical structure of the canopy. The occurrence of linear

  20. Simulating, Measuring, and Parameterizing Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Multi-Scale, Fractal Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Graham, Jason; Bai, Kunlun; Katz, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    In many regions the atmospheric surface layer is affected substantially by vegetation canopies. Most previous work has focused on effects of vegetated terrain characterized by a single length scale, e.g. a single obstruction of a particular size, or canopies consisting of plants, often modeled using a prescribed leaf-area density distribution with a characteristic dominant scale. It is well known, however, that typical flow obstructions such as canopies are characterized by a wide range of length scales, branches, sub-branches, etc.. Yet, it is not known how to parameterize the effects of such multi-scale objects on the lower atmospheric dynamics. This work aims to study boundary layer flow over fractal, tree-like shapes. Fractals provide convenient idealizations of the inherently multi-scale character of vegetation geometries, within certain ranges of scales. We report on Large Eddy Simulations whose results are compared with a ongoing experiments that also aim at understanding drag forces acting on fractal trees. The experiments are performed in a water tunnel facility that uses optically index-matched fluid. This enables to access the full 3-D flow volume with Particle-Image-Velocimetry. The measurements complement computer simulations using LES, and the aim is to use the results to develop downscaling parameterizations for unresolved branch drag forces with a technique called Renormalized Numerical Simulation (RNS). This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (IGERT Project # 0801471 and ATM grant # 0621396).

  1. Does the Response of Leaf Photosynthetic Productivity to Rising Atmospheric Temperature and CO2 Scale Up to the Canopy?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory predicts that interacting increases in temperature and CO2 will synergistically enhance leaf photosynthesis but how this interaction will scale to affect canopy and ecosystem productivity is less clear. Numerous factors contribute to this uncertainty including higher canopy temperatures from ...

  2. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in using and interpreting EC flux measurements. We compare EC observations from two towers established over sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Hawai'i, USA under similar cultivation, temperature, sunlight, and precipitation, but drastically different wind conditions due to orographic effects. At a daily scale, we find that energy closure for both towers occurs on days when the entire 24 hours has sufficient turbulence. At our windier site, this turbulence condition occurs over 60% of the time, which contributes to substantially better daily energy closure (~98%) than at the calmer site (~75%). At our windy site, we then invert the daily energy closure for continuously windy days to calculate canopy energy storage. At full canopy, peak daily canopy energy storage fluxes (200-400 Wm-2) are approximately an order of magnitude larger than soil heat flux (20-40 Wm-2). As a fraction of net radiation, canopy energy storage appears to vary seasonally and shows substantially greater variability than soil heat flux. The results illustrate the importance of sustained turbulence for accurate, direct measurement of land-atmosphere fluxes. As increasing number of EC towers are established in complex terrain, these results indicate the need for preliminary wind studies to optimize tower placement where orography enhances, rather than suppresses, turbulence.

  3. Canopy BRF simulation of forest with different crown shape and height in larger scale based on Radiosity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinling; Qu, Yonghua; Wang, Jindi; Wan, Huawei; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2007-06-01

    Radiosity method is based on the computer simulation of 3D real structures of vegetations, such as leaves, branches and stems, which are composed by many facets. Using this method we can simulate the canopy reflectance and its bidirectional distribution of the vegetation canopy in visible and NIR regions. But with vegetations are more complex, more facets to compose them, so large memory and lots of time to calculate view factors are required, which are the choke points of using Radiosity method to calculate canopy BRF of lager scale vegetation scenes. We derived a new method to solve the problem, and the main idea is to abstract vegetation crown shapes and to simplify their structures, which can lessen the number of facets. The facets are given optical properties according to the reflectance, transmission and absorption of the real structure canopy. Based on the above work, we can simulate the canopy BRF of the mix scenes with different species vegetation in the large scale. In this study, taking broadleaf trees as an example, based on their structure characteristics, we abstracted their crowns as ellipsoid shells, and simulated the canopy BRF in visible and NIR regions of the large scale scene with different crown shape and different height ellipsoids. Form this study, we can conclude: LAI, LAD the probability gap, the sunlit and shaded surfaces are more important parameter to simulate the simplified vegetation canopy BRF. And the Radiosity method can apply us canopy BRF data in any conditions for our research.

  4. Sensitivity of the normalized difference vegetation index to subpixel canopy cover, soil albedo, and pixel scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical framework is provided for examining the physically based behavior of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in terms of the variability in bulk subpixel landscape components and with respect to variations in pixel scales, within the context of the stochastic-geometric canopy reflectance model. Analysis focuses on regional scale variability in horizontal plant density and soil background reflectance distribution. Modeling is generalized to different plant geometries and solar angles through the use of the nondimensional solar-geometric similarity parameter. Results demonstrate that, for Poisson-distributed plants and for one deterministic distribution, NDVI increases with increasing subpixel fractional canopy amount, decreasing soil background reflectance, and increasing shadows, at least within the limitations of the geometric reflectance model. The NDVI of a pecan orchard and a juniper landscape is presented and discussed.

  5. The transpiration and the spectral response of non-irrigated Haloxylon ammodendron at canopy scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiao-ming; Wang, Juan-le; Gao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Mao-si

    2012-10-01

    Transpiration, an essential component of surface evapotranspiration, is particularly important in the research of surface evapotranspiration in arid areas. The paper explores the spectral information of the arid vegetal evapotranspiration from a semi-empirical perspective by the measured data and the up-scaling method. The paper inverted the transpiration of Haloxylon ammodendronat at the canopy, pixel and regional scales in the southern edge of the Gurbantunggut desert in Xinjiang, China. The results are as follows: At the canopy scale, the optimal exponential model of the sap flow based on the hyperspectrum is Y = 3.65× SR(1580,1600) + 0.76, R2 = 0.72. At the pixel scale, there was a good linear relationship between the sap flow and the SR index, with a linear relationship of Y = 0.0787 X - 0.0724, R2 = 0.604. At the regional scale, based on the optimal exponential model and the EO-1 Hyperion remote sensing data, the transpiration of the study area was inverted. Comparing the results of the SEBAL and SEBS models, the errors of the simulation results were 12.66% and 11.68%. The paper made full use of the knowledge flow at different scales, bridging the scale difference in canopy and remote sensing images to avoid the information bottleneck in the up-scaling. However, there is much limit in the data acquirement, the endmembers determine, the temporal-spatial up-scaling, and the accuracy assessment to be improved in the future studies.

  6. Scaling Heterogeneous Soil Hydraulic Properties Using Canopy/Interspace Distributions in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, T. G.; Young, M. H.; Zhu, J.; Fenstermaker, L. F.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Desert piedmonts are a mosaic of interspersed vegetation and open soil or interspaces. The distribution of perennial plants in arid regions is ultimately tied to available soil moisture. Surface soils in deserts undergo different pedologic processes depending on the proximity to plant canopies. For example, bioturbation and the accumulation of aeolian material and organic matter around plant canopies result in a mound-like formation around perennial plant canopies, whereas interspace areas tend to be microtopographic low points with reduced organic matter. Differences in soil structure and texture in undercanopy and interspace microsites can be significant, thus affecting infiltration, plant available water and ET. In this study, we sought to answer the questions: do soil hydraulic properties vary predictably from the undercanopy to interspace at the plot scale, and if so, how does this heterogeneous parameter field affect large-scale hydrologic processes of a heterogeneous landscape in the Mojave Desert? To answer these questions, a total of four radial transects was run on each of six shrubs (three each of L. tridentata and L. paladin) at the Mojave Global Change Facility (MGCF), located at the Nevada Test Site, USA. The extent of heterogeneity in soil physical and hydraulic properties (texture, bulk density, hydraulic conductivity functions K(h)) was measured across microsites by soil sampling and analysis, and by using up to 7 mini-disk tension infiltrometers (MDTI) spaced at 25-cm increments in linear array across a distance of 150 cm. Significant gradients of soil physical and hydraulic properties were observed from canopy to interspace microsites at 1.2 times the mean mound diameter. Despite a decrease in bulk density and fines under shrub canopies, a consistent trend of increasing K(h) and decreasing Gardner's alpha with increasing radial distance from shrubs was measured. Using the results of observed gradients around canopies, hydraulic property

  7. Scaling up Semi-Arid Grassland Biochemical Content from the Leaf to the Canopy Level: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuhong; Mui, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing imagery is being used intensively to estimate the biochemical content of vegetation (e.g., chlorophyll, nitrogen, and lignin) at the leaf level. As a result of our need for vegetation biochemical information and our increasing ability to obtain canopy spectral data, a few techniques have been explored to scale leaf-level biochemical content to the canopy level for forests and crops. However, due to the contribution of non-green materials (i.e., standing dead litter, rock, and bare soil) from canopy spectra in semi-arid grasslands, it is difficult to obtain information about grassland biochemical content from remote sensing data at the canopy level. This paper summarizes available methods used to scale biochemical information from the leaf level to the canopy level and groups these methods into three categories: direct extrapolation, canopy-integrated approach, and inversion of physical models. As for semi-arid heterogeneous grasslands, we conclude that all methods are useful, but none are ideal. It is recommended that future research should explore a systematic upscaling framework which combines spatial pattern analysis, canopy-integrated approach, and modeling methods to retrieve vegetation biochemical content at the canopy level. PMID:22163513

  8. [The research on bidirectional reflectance computer simulation of forest canopy at pixel scale].

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Ling; Wang, Jin-Di; Shuai, Yan-Min; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    Computer simulation is based on computer graphics to generate the realistic 3D structure scene of vegetation, and to simulate the canopy regime using radiosity method. In the present paper, the authors expand the computer simulation model to simulate forest canopy bidirectional reflectance at pixel scale. But usually, the trees are complex structures, which are tall and have many branches. So there is almost a need for hundreds of thousands or even millions of facets to built up the realistic structure scene for the forest It is difficult for the radiosity method to compute so many facets. In order to make the radiosity method to simulate the forest scene at pixel scale, in the authors' research, the authors proposed one idea to simplify the structure of forest crowns, and abstract the crowns to ellipsoids. And based on the optical characteristics of the tree component and the characteristics of the internal energy transmission of photon in real crown, the authors valued the optical characteristics of ellipsoid surface facets. In the computer simulation of the forest, with the idea of geometrical optics model, the gap model is considered to get the forest canopy bidirectional reflectance at pixel scale. Comparing the computer simulation results with the GOMS model, and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) multi-angle remote sensing data, the simulation results are in agreement with the GOMS simulation result and MISR BRF. But there are also some problems to be solved. So the authors can conclude that the study has important value for the application of multi-angle remote sensing and the inversion of vegetation canopy structure parameters. PMID:19839326

  9. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  10. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  11. Scaling up carbonyl sulfide (COS) fluxes from leaf and soil to the canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fulin; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) with atmospheric concentrations around 500 ppt is an analog of CO2 which can potentially serve as powerful and much needed tracer of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, and global gross primary production (GPP). However, questions remain regarding the application of this approach due to uncertainties in the contributions of different ecosystem components to the canopy scale fluxes of COS. We used laser quantum cascade spectroscopy in combination with soil and branch chambers, and eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange fluxes of COS and CO2 (NEE) in citrus orchard during the driest summer month to test our ability to integrate the chamber measurements into the ecosystem fluxes. The results indicated that: 1) Soil fluxes showed clear gradient from continuous uptake under the trees in wet soil of up to -4 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~0.5 umol m-2s-1) to emission in dry hot and exposed soil between rows of trees of up to +3 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~11 umol m-2s-1). In all cases a clear correlation between fluxes and soil temperature was observed. 2) At the leaf scale, midday uptake was ~5.5 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 uptake of ~1.8 umol m-2s-1). Some nighttime COS uptake was observed in the citrus leaves consistent with nocturnal leaf stomatal conductance. Leaf relative uptake (LRU) of COS vs. CO2 was not constant over the diurnal cycle, but showed exponential correlation with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime. 3) At the canopy scale mid-day summer flux reached -12.0 pmol m-2s-1 (NEE ~6 umol m-2s-1) with the diurnal patterns of COS fluxes following those of CO2 fluxes during the daytime, but with small COS uptake fluxes maintained also during the night when significant CO2 emission fluxes were observed. The canopy-scale fluxes always indicated COS uptake, irrespective of the soil emission effects. GPP estimates were consistent with conventional indirect estimates based on NEE and nocturnal measurements. Scaling up

  12. Scaling-law equilibria for calcium in canopy-type models of the solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    Scaling laws for resonance line formation are used to obtain approximate excitation and ionization equilibria for a three-level model of singly ionized calcium. The method has been developed for and is applied to the study of magnetograph response in the 8542 A infrared triplet line to magnetostatic canopies which schematically model diffuse, nearly horizontal fields in the low solar chromosphere. For this application, the method is shown to be efficient and semi-quantitative, and the results indicate the type and range of effects on calcium-line radiation which result from reduced gas pressure inside the magnetic regions.

  13. Comparing multilayer and single layer canopy photosynthesis models with measured data at multiple time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoy, P. C.; Schäfer, K. V.; Katul, G. G.; Oren, R.

    2002-05-01

    Models of gas exchange are necessary to understand interactions between biosphere and atmosphere, but the effectiveness of multilayer vs. single-layer canopy models is still a matter of debate. Previous studies have discussed benefits and drawbacks of both approaches with reference to one another or have analytically compared single and multilayer models over a single growing season. Here, we critically analyze the performance of both approaches at multiple time scales with respect to 4.5 years of eddy covariance measurement of carbon exchange in a Pinus taeda forest using orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT). OWT compares model performance at time scales from minutes to years and can identify time scales at which models perform poorly, aiding in the choice between multilayer and single-layer models and identifying areas of model improvement.

  14. Laboratory experiments of fine-scale mixing and mass transport within a coral canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory experiments obtained fine scale measurements of turbulent shear stresses and rates of mixing and mass transfer over a nonliving bed of the coral, Porites compressa, the dominant species found in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A reef canopy was placed in a recirculating wave-current flume and flow was generated that simulated the flow characteristics of the reef flat of Kaneohe Bay. Turbulence and velocity structure under both unidirectional and wave-dominated currents were measured using a two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer. Mass transport measurements were made using a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique in which the scalar transport of Rhodamine 6G dye, fluxed from the surfaces of the coral, was quantified. Results show that the action of surface waves, interacting with the structure of the reef, can increase instantaneous shear and mixing up to six times compared to that of unidirectional currents. Maximum shear and mass transport events coincided with flow separation within the wave-current boundary layer and the ejection of vortices into the flow. Wave action also acted to increase the vertical flux of water from within the coral structure. The combined effects of increased turbulent stress and fluid exchange from the interior of the canopy increased mass flux due to wave action 2.3±0.5 times that measured for comparable unidirectional currents.

  15. Improving and validating 3D models for the leaf energy balance in canopy-scale problems with complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B.; Stoll, R., II; Miller, N. E.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahaffee, W.

    2014-12-01

    Plants cover the majority of Earth's land surface, and thus play a critical role in the surface energy balance. Within individual plant communities, the leaf energy balance is a fundamental component of most biophysical processes. Absorbed radiation drives the energy balance and provides the means by which plants produce food. Available energy is partitioned into sensible and latent heat fluxes to determine surface temperature, which strongly influences rates of metabolic activity and growth. The energy balance of an individual leaf is coupled with other leaves in the community through longwave radiation emission and advection through the air. This complex coupling can make scaling models from leaves to whole-canopies difficult, specifically in canopies with complex, heterogeneous geometries. We present a new three-dimensional canopy model that simultaneously resolves sub-tree to whole-canopy scales. The model provides spatially explicit predictions of net radiation exchange, boundary-layer and stomatal conductances, evapotranspiration rates, and ultimately leaf surface temperature. The radiation model includes complex physics such as anisotropic emission and scattering. Radiation calculations are accelerated by leveraging graphics processing unit (GPU) technology, which allows canopy-scale problems to be performed on a standard desktop workstation. Since validating the three-dimensional distribution of leaf temperature can be extremely challenging, we used several independent measurement techniques to quantify errors in measured and modeled values. When compared with measured leaf temperatures, the model gave a mean error of about 2°C, which was close to the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  16. Mapping canopy gap fraction and leaf area index at continent-scale from satellite lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, C.; Hopkinson, C.; Held, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Information on canopy cover is essential for understanding spatial and temporal variability in vegetation biomass, local meteorological processes and hydrological transfers within vegetated environments. Gap fraction (GF), an index of canopy cover, is often derived over large areas (100's km2) via airborne laser scanning (ALS), estimates of which are reasonably well understood. However, obtaining country-wide estimates is challenging due to the lack of spatially distributed point cloud data. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) removes spatial limitations, however, its large footprint nature and continuous waveform data measurements make derivations of GF challenging. ALS data from 3 Australian sites are used as a basis to scale-up GF estimates to GLAS footprint data by the use of a physically-based Weibull function. Spaceborne estimates of GF are employed in conjunction with supplementary predictor variables in the predictive Random Forest algorithm to yield country-wide estimates at a 250 m spatial resolution; country-wide estimates are accompanied with uncertainties at the pixel level. Preliminary estimates of effective Leaf Area Index (eLAI) are also presented by converting GF via the Beer-Lambert law, where an extinction coefficient of 0.5 is employed; deemed acceptable at such spatial scales. The need for such wide-scale quantification of GF and eLAI are key in the assessment and modification of current forest management strategies across Australia. Such work also assists Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), a key asset to policy makers with regards to the management of the national ecosystem, in fulfilling their government issued mandates.

  17. Does the Response of Leaf Photosynthetic Productivity to Rising Atmospheric Temperature and CO2 Scale Up to the Canopy?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory predicts that interacting increases in temperature and CO2 will work synergistically to enhance leaf photosynthesis. How this interaction will scale up to affect canopy and ecosystem productivity in the future is less clear. Numerous factors contribute to this uncertainty including higher can...

  18. Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proliferation of tower-mounted cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides a novel opportunity to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper, we describe the abilities and limitations of webcams to ...

  19. Fine-scale, multidimensional spatial patterns of forest canopy structure derived from remotely sensed and simulated datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Gordon Wilson

    Forests are not simply storehouses of timber or wood fibre for human consumption and economic development. They represent structurally and ecologically rich habitat for an estimated 40 percent of the earth's extant species, and form the functional interface between the biosphere and atmosphere for some 27 percent of the earth's terrestrial surface. Forests, therefore, play a vital role in the maintenance of biodiversity and the regulation of local to global scale ecosystem processes and functions. Present strategies for conserving biodiversity in managed forests are based on the notion that maintaining the full range of structural conditions historically present in natural forests is the best approach for assuring the long-term persistence of a broad range of native species. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to contribute to the development of novel forest measurements that are relevant to organisms and ecosystems, and much needed by forest scientists and managers to recognize and retain the key elements and patterns of forest structure that are crucial for the conservation of forest biodiversity. This study focuses explicitly on fine-spatial-scale, multidimensional patterns of forest canopy structure based on the assumption that the 'canopy' is the primary focal site of complex interactions between vegetation and the physical environment. Two disparate remote sensing technologies---ground-based hemispherical (fisheye) canopy photography and airborne discrete-return LiDAR---are employed to characterize angular, vertical, and horizontal patterns of forest canopy structure. A quantitative technique is developed for precise measurements of gap fraction (P), element clumping (O), mean projection coefficient (G), and leaf area index (L) from sequences (sets) of black and white pixels extracted at specific view angles in digital fisheye photos. Results are compared with three other leading techniques and validated using well-documented simulated and real

  20. Influence of urban tree canopy on single-family residential structure energy consumption at the community scale in Hutchinson, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, Philip John

    Community forests are vulnerable to invasive pests and a changing climate. Urban forests provide a host of environmental, social, and economic benefits to communities. Cold, long, and windy winters dominate the energy budget of upper Midwest communities. Hot and humid summers are becoming increasingly constant. Quantifying the relationship between energy use and trees has been simulated and estimated in a variety of ways. Few studies have successfully measured this interaction across the landscape, especially in heating dominated climates. Digitized urban tree canopy data at multiple scales has been correlated with weather adjusted normalized energy consumption data while controlling for a variety of housing characteristics. A significant relationship between increased tree canopy and reduced winter heating energy consumption is found at 500-1100 feet (p<0.01), and also from 400-1500 feet (p<0.05) from parcels. Summer cooling energy reduction from increased tree canopy at the parcel (p<0.05) and distances beyond 900 feet (p<0.10) was also found significant. Saving energy with urban forest canopy is a community scale opportunity and obligation.

  1. Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yang, W.; Ichii, K.

    2015-12-01

    Global simulation of canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence with a 3 dimensional radiative transfer modelHideki Kobayashi, Wei Yang, and Kazuhito IchiiDepartment of Environmental Geochemical Cycle Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology3173-25, Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Japan.Plant canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be observed from satellites, such as Greenhouse gases Observation Satellite (GOSAT), Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2), using Fraunhofer lines in the near infrared spectral domain [1]. SIF is used to infer photosynthetic capacity of plant canopy [2]. However, it is not well understoond how the leaf-level SIF emission contributes to the top of canopy directional SIF because SIFs observed by the satellites use the near infrared spectral domain where the multiple scatterings among leaves are not negligible. It is necessary to quantify the fraction of emission for each satellite observation angle. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of sunlit leaves are 100 times higher than that of shaded leaves. Thus, contribution of sunlit and shaded leaves to canopy scale directional SIF emission should also be quantified. Here, we show the results of global simulation of SIF using a 3 dimensional radiative transfer simulation with MODIS atmospheric (aerosol optical thickness) and land (land cover and leaf area index) products and a forest landscape data sets prepared for each land cover category. The results are compared with satellite-based SIF (e.g. GOME-2) and the gross primary production empirically estimated by FLUXNET and remote sensing data.

  2. Continental-scale ICESat canopy height modelling sensitivity and random forest simulations in Australia and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, C.; Mahoney, C.; Held, A. A.; Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), previously onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) uniquely offers near global waveform LiDAR coverage, however, data quality are subject to system, temporal, and spatial issues. These subtleties are investigated here with respect to canopy height comparisons with 3 airborne LiDAR sites in Australia. Optimal GLAS results were obtained from high energy laser transmissions from laser 3 during leaf-on conditions; GLAS data best corresponded with 95th percentile heights from an all return airborne LiDAR point cloud. In addition, best GLAS results were obtained over relatively open canopies, where prominent ground returns can be retrieved. Optimized GLAS data within Australian forests were employed as canopy height observations, and related to 6 predictor variables (landcover, cover fraction, elevation, slope, soils, and species) by random forest (RF) models. Fifty seven RF models were trained, varying by binomial combinations of predictor data, from 2 to 6 inputs. Trained models were separately utilized to predict Australia wide canopy heights; RF canopy height outputs were validated against spatially concurrent airborne LiDAR 95th percentile canopy heights from an all return point cloud for 10 sites, encompassing multiple ecosystems. The best RF output was obtained from predictor data inputs: landcover, cover fraction, elevation soils, and species, yielding a RMSE=7.98 m, and R2=0.97. Results indicate inherent issues (noted in existing literature) in GLAS observations that propagate through RF algorithms, manifested as canopy height underestimations for taller vegetation (>45 m). To extend this research to the Canadian boreal forest context, research is also targeting canopy height model development in the Northwest Territories, allowing investigations of time-variant phenology and landcover sensitivity due to wetland extent and growth, snow cover and other land cover changes common within boreal

  3. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure of Monilinia fructicola During Brown Rot Epidemics Within Individual Peach Tree Canopies.

    PubMed

    Everhart, S E; Scherm, H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fine-scale genetic structure of populations of the brown rot pathogen Monilinia fructicola within individual peach tree canopies to better understand within-tree plant pathogen diversity and to complement previous work on spatiotemporal development of brown rot disease at the canopy level. Across 3 years in a total of six trees, we monitored disease development, collected isolates from every M. fructicola symptom during the course of the season, and created high-resolution three-dimensional maps of all symptom and isolate locations within individual canopies using an electromagnetic digitizer. Each canopy population (65 to 173 isolates per tree) was characterized using a set of 13 microsatellite markers and analyzed for evidence of spatial genetic autocorrelation among isolates during the epidemic phase of the disease. Results showed high genetic diversity (average uh=0.529) and high genotypic diversity (average D=0.928) within canopies. The percentage of unique multilocus genotypes within trees was greater for blossom blight isolates (78.2%) than for fruit rot isolates (51.3%), indicating a greater contribution of clonal reproduction during the preharvest epidemic. For fruit rot isolates, between 54.2 and 81.7% of isolates were contained in one to four dominant clonal genotypes per tree having at least 10 members. All six fruit rot populations showed positive and significant spatial genetic autocorrelation for distance classes between 0.37 and 1.48 m. Despite high levels of within-tree pathogen diversity, the contribution of locally available inoculum combined with short-distance dispersal is likely the main factor generating clonal population foci and associated spatial genetic clustering within trees. PMID:25317843

  4. Developing a regional canopy fuels assessment strategy using multi-scale lidar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Birgit; Nelson, Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessments of canopy fuels are needed by fire scientists to understand fire behavior and to predict future fire occurrence. A key descriptor for canopy fuels is canopy bulk density (CBD). CBD is closely linked to the structure of the canopy; therefore, lidar measurements are particularly well suited to assessments of CBD. LANDFIRE scientists are exploring methods to integrate airborne and spaceborne lidar datasets into a national mapping effort. In this study, airborne lidar, spaceborne lidar, and field data are used to map CBD in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, with the airborne lidar serving as a bridge between the field data and the spaceborne observations. The field-based CBD was positively correlated with airborne lidar observations (R2=0.78). Mapped values of CBD using the airborne lidar dataset were significantly correlated with spaceborne lidar observations when analyzed by forest type (R2=0.62, evergreen and R2=0.71, mixed). Though continued research is necessary to validate these results, they do support the feasibility of airborne and, most importantly, spaceborne lidar data for canopy fuels assessment.

  5. Landscape-Scale Canopy Complexity in and Near Braulio Carillo National Park, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Robert G.; Blair, J. B.; Weishampel, J. F.; Clark, D. B.; Hofton, M. A.; Dubayah, R.

    1999-01-01

    Using medium-large footprint lidar sampling of approximately 500 square km of Costa Rica, we assessed the vertical and horizontal complexity of a forest-dominated tropical landscape. As expected, vertical extents of structure and canopy heights estimated from lidar waveforms were smaller in high elevation forests than in forests at lower elevations. In areas of the park and long-protected areas of La Selva Biological Station, forests typically had more consistent ratios of median height to total height than areas with other types of recent land use. Areas outside the park exhibited both stronger and weaker spatial correlations in canopy properties than most areas within the park. We also simulated the effects of these differences on data products gridded from lidar transects, like those produced by the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission.

  6. Monitoring regional patterns of canopy-scale phenology with a network of digitial webcams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, A. D.; Braswell, B. H.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Jenkins, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding relationships between canopy structure and the seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by forest canopies requires improved knowledge of canopy phenology at eddy covariance flux tower sites. We investigated whether digital webcam images could be used to monitor the trajectories of spring green-up and autumn senescence in a deciduous northern hardwood forest. A standard, commercially available webcam was mounted at the top of the eddy covariance tower at the Bartlett AmeriFlux site. Images were collected each day around mid-day. Red, green and blue color channel brightness data for a 640 x 100 pixel region-of-interest were extracted from each image. We evaluated the green-up signal extracted from webcam images against changes in fAPAR (the fraction of incident photosynthetically active radiation that is absorbed by the canopy), broadband NDVI, and Amax (the light-saturated rate of canopy photosynthesis, inferred from eddy flux measurements). The relative brightness of the green channel (green %) was relatively stable through the winter months. A steady rising trend in green % began around day 120 and continued through day 160, at which point a stable plateau was reached. The relative brightness of the blue channel (blue %) also responded to spring green-up, although there was more day-to-day variation in the signal because blue % was more sensitive to changes in the quality (spectral distribution) of incident radiation. Seasonal changes in blue % were most similar to those in fAPAR and broadband NDVI, whereas changes in green % proceeded more slowly, and were drawn out over a longer period of time. Changes in Amax lagged green-up by at least a week. The onset of autumn senescence was marked by a decrease in green %, which preceded a spike in red % when autumn coloration peaked at day 270. A decrease in red % was observed over the next 30 days (through day 300) as senescence progressed and the deciduous canopy was shed. We conclude that

  7. Remote Sensing of Canopy Water Content: Scaling from Leaf Data to MODIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water in green vegetation is detectable using reflectances in the near infrared and shortwave infrared. Canopy water content is estimated from the product of leaf water content and leaf area index (LAI). The Normalized Difference Infrared Index [NDII = (R0.8 – R1.6)/(R0.8 + R1.6)] was found to ...

  8. Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Michael; Friedl, Mark A; Frolking, Steve; Hufkens, Koen; Klosterman, Stephen; Sonnentag, Oliver; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Bernacchi, Carl J; Biraud, Sebastien C; Bohrer, Gil; Brzostek, Edward; Burns, Sean P; Coursolle, Carole; Hollinger, David Y; Margolis, Hank A; Mccaughey, Harry; Monson, Russell K; Munger, J William; Pallardy, Stephen; Phillips, Richard P; Torn, Margaret S; Wharton, Sonia; Zeri, Marcelo; And, Andrew D; Richardson, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of digital cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides new opportunities to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper we analyze the abilities and limitations of canopy color metrics measured by digital repeat photography to track seasonal canopy development and photosynthesis, determine phenological transition dates, and estimate intra-annual and interannual variability in canopy photosynthesis. We used 59 site-years of camera imagery and net ecosystem exchange measurements from 17 towers spanning three plant functional types (deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, and grassland/crops) to derive color indices and estimate gross primary productivity (GPP). GPP was strongly correlated with greenness derived from camera imagery in all three plant functional types. Specifically, the beginning of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops and the end of the photosynthetic period in grassland/crops were both correlated with changes in greenness; changes in redness were correlated with the end of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest. However, it was not possible to accurately identify the beginning or ending of the photosynthetic period using camera greenness in evergreen needleleaf forest. At deciduous broadleaf sites, anomalies in integrated greenness and total GPP were significantly correlated up to 60 days after the mean onset date for the start of spring. More generally, results from this work demonstrate that digital repeat photography can be used to quantify both the duration of the photosynthetically active period as well as total GPP in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops, but that new and different approaches are required before comparable results can be achieved in evergreen needleleaf forest. PMID:26255360

  9. Incorporating remotely sensed tree canopy cover data into broad scale assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Vierling, Lee A.; Gould, William A.; Vierling, Kerri T.; Hudak, Andrew T.

    2009-12-01

    Remote sensing provides critical information for broad scale assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation. However, such efforts have been typically unable to incorporate information about vegetation structure, a variable important for explaining the distribution of many wildlife species. We evaluated the consequences of incorporating remotely sensed information about horizontal vegetation structure into current assessments of wildlife habitat distribution and conservation. For this, we integrated the new NLCD tree canopy cover product into the US GAP Analysis database, using avian species and the finished Idaho GAP Analysis as a case study. We found: (1) a 15-68% decrease in the extent of the predicted habitat for avian species associated with specific tree canopy conditions, (2) a marked decrease in the species richness values predicted at the Landsat pixel scale, but not at coarser scales, (3) a modified distribution of biodiversity hotspots, and (4) surprising results in conservation assessment: despite the strong changes in the species predicted habitats, their distribution in relation to the reserves network remained the same. This study highlights the value of area wide vegetation structure data for refined biodiversity and conservation analyses. We discuss further opportunities and limitations for the use of the NLCD data in wildlife habitat studies.

  10. Seasonal and within-canopy variation in shoot-scale resource-use efficiency trade-offs in a Norway spruce stand.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Räntfors, Mats; Wallin, Göran

    2015-11-01

    Previous leaf-scale studies of carbon assimilation describe short-term resource-use efficiency (RUE) trade-offs where high use efficiency of one resource requires low RUE of another. However, varying resource availabilities may cause long-term RUE trade-offs to differ from the short-term patterns. This may have important implications for understanding canopy-scale resource use and allocation. We used continuous gas exchange measurements collected at five levels within a Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) karst., canopy over 3 years to assess seasonal differences in the interactions between shoot-scale resource availability (light, water and nitrogen), net photosynthesis (An ) and the use efficiencies of light (LUE), water (WUE) and nitrogen (NUE) for carbon assimilation. The continuous data set was used to develop and evaluate multiple regression models for predicting monthly shoot-scale An . These models showed that shoot-scale An was strongly dependent on light availability and was generally well described with simple one- or two-parameter models. WUE peaked in spring, NUE in summer and LUE in autumn. However, the relative importance of LUE for carbon assimilation increased with canopy depth at all times. Our results suggest that accounting for seasonal and within-canopy trade-offs may be important for RUE-based modelling of canopy carbon uptake. PMID:25944258

  11. Scaling Up Stomatal Conductance from Leaf to Canopy Using a Dual-Leaf Model for Estimating Crop Evapotranspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Risheng; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Hao, Xinmei; Zhang, Yanqun

    2014-01-01

    The dual-source Shuttleworth-Wallace model has been widely used to estimate and partition crop evapotranspiration (λET). Canopy stomatal conductance (Gsc), an essential parameter of the model, is often calculated by scaling up leaf stomatal conductance, considering the canopy as one single leaf in a so-called “big-leaf” model. However, Gsc can be overestimated or underestimated depending on leaf area index level in the big-leaf model, due to a non-linear stomatal response to light. A dual-leaf model, scaling up Gsc from leaf to canopy, was developed in this study. The non-linear stomata-light relationship was incorporated by dividing the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions and calculating each fraction separately according to absorbed irradiances. The model includes: (1) the absorbed irradiance, determined by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaves with consideration of both beam and diffuse radiation; (2) leaf area for the sunlit and shaded fractions; and (3) a leaf conductance model that accounts for the response of stomata to PAR, vapor pressure deficit and available soil water. In contrast to the significant errors of Gsc in the big-leaf model, the predicted Gsc using the dual-leaf model had a high degree of data-model agreement; the slope of the linear regression between daytime predictions and measurements was 1.01 (R2 = 0.98), with RMSE of 0.6120 mm s−1 for four clear-sky days in different growth stages. The estimates of half-hourly λET using the dual-source dual-leaf model (DSDL) agreed well with measurements and the error was within 5% during two growing seasons of maize with differing hydrometeorological and management strategies. Moreover, the estimates of soil evaporation using the DSDL model closely matched actual measurements. Our results indicate that the DSDL model can produce more accurate estimation of Gsc and λET, compared to the big-leaf model, and thus is an effective alternative approach for estimating and

  12. Scaling up stomatal conductance from leaf to canopy using a dual-leaf model for estimating crop evapotranspiration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Risheng; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Hao, Xinmei; Zhang, Yanqun

    2014-01-01

    The dual-source Shuttleworth-Wallace model has been widely used to estimate and partition crop evapotranspiration (λET). Canopy stomatal conductance (Gsc), an essential parameter of the model, is often calculated by scaling up leaf stomatal conductance, considering the canopy as one single leaf in a so-called "big-leaf" model. However, Gsc can be overestimated or underestimated depending on leaf area index level in the big-leaf model, due to a non-linear stomatal response to light. A dual-leaf model, scaling up Gsc from leaf to canopy, was developed in this study. The non-linear stomata-light relationship was incorporated by dividing the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions and calculating each fraction separately according to absorbed irradiances. The model includes: (1) the absorbed irradiance, determined by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaves with consideration of both beam and diffuse radiation; (2) leaf area for the sunlit and shaded fractions; and (3) a leaf conductance model that accounts for the response of stomata to PAR, vapor pressure deficit and available soil water. In contrast to the significant errors of Gsc in the big-leaf model, the predicted Gsc using the dual-leaf model had a high degree of data-model agreement; the slope of the linear regression between daytime predictions and measurements was 1.01 (R2 = 0.98), with RMSE of 0.6120 mm s-1 for four clear-sky days in different growth stages. The estimates of half-hourly λET using the dual-source dual-leaf model (DSDL) agreed well with measurements and the error was within 5% during two growing seasons of maize with differing hydrometeorological and management strategies. Moreover, the estimates of soil evaporation using the DSDL model closely matched actual measurements. Our results indicate that the DSDL model can produce more accurate estimation of Gsc and λET, compared to the big-leaf model, and thus is an effective alternative approach for estimating and partitioning

  13. Water availability predicts forest canopy height at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tamir; Randin, Christophe; Körner, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The tendency of trees to grow taller with increasing water availability is common knowledge. Yet a robust, universal relationship between the spatial distribution of water availability and forest canopy height (H) is lacking. Here, we created a global water availability map by calculating an annual budget as the difference between precipitation (P) and potential evapotranspiration (PET) at a 1-km spatial resolution, and in turn correlated it with a global H map of the same resolution. Across forested areas over the globe, Hmean increased with P-PET, roughly: Hmean (m) = 19.3 + 0.077*(P-PET). Maximum forest canopy height also increased gradually from ~ 5 to ~ 50 m, saturating at ~ 45 m for P-PET > 500 mm. Forests were far from their maximum height potential in cold, boreal regions and in disturbed areas. The strong association between forest height and P-PET provides a useful tool when studying future forest dynamics under climate change, and in quantifying anthropogenic forest disturbance. PMID:26423470

  14. The Effects of Fine-scale Soil Moisture and Canopy Heterogeneities on Energy and Soil Water Fluxes in a Temperate Mixed Deciduous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Bohrer, G.; Maurer, K.; Vogel, C. S.; Moghaddam, M.

    2011-12-01

    Vegetation is heterogeneous at different scales, influencing spatially variable energy and water exchanges between land-surface and atmosphere. Current land surface parameterizations of large-scale models consider spatial variability at a scale of a few kilometers and treat vegetation cover as aggregated patches with uniform properties. However, the coupling mechanisms between fine-scale soil moisture, vegetation, and energy fluxes such as evapotranspiration are strongly nonlinear; the aggregation of surface variations may produce biased energy fluxes. This study aims to improve the understanding of the scale impact in atmosphere-biosphere-hydrosphere interactions, which affects predictive capabilities of land surface models. The study uses a high-resolution, physically-based ecohydrological model tRIBS + VEGGIE as a data integration tool to upscale the heterogeneity of canopy distribution resolved at a few meters to the watershed scale. The study was carried out for a spatially heterogeneous, temperate mixed forest environment of Northern Michigan located near the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). Energy and soil water dynamics were simulated at the tree-canopy resolution in the horizontal plane for a small domain (~2 sq. km) located within a footprint of the AmeriFlux tower. A variety of observational data were used to constrain and confirm the model, including a 3-m profile continuous soil moisture dataset and energy flux data (measured at the AmeriFlux tower footprint). A scenario with a spatially uniform canopy, corresponding to the commonly used 'big-leaf' scheme in land surface parameterizations was used to infer the effects of coarse-scale averaging. To gain insights on how heterogeneous canopy and soil moisture interact and contribute to the domain-averaged transpiration, several scenarios of tree-scale leaf area and soil moisture spatial variability were designed. Specifically, for the same mean states, the scenarios of variability of

  15. The role of acclimation in scaling GPP from the leaf to the canopy for crops in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacchi, C.; Bagley, J. E.; Ort, D. R.; Kumar, P.; Ruiz Vera, U. M.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-faceted challenges from global climate change and increased demands on agriculture for food, fiber and, increasingly fuel is driving a need to understand how major climate change factors, particularly increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and rising temperature, will influence leaf photosynthesis (A) and ecosystem gross primary productivity (GPP). Eight of the ten major crops grown globally utilize the C3 photosynthetic pathway and based on mechanistic understanding of C3 photosynthesis, a synergism exists with rising CO2 and increasing temperature that is predicted to increase A beyond that of an increase in [CO2] alone. However, considerable uncertainty surrounds the acclimation response of photosynthesis to global change and, as a result, the influence of physiological adjustments of photosynthesis is currently not represented in leaf, canopy, ecosystem or general circulation models that are used to predict ecosystem-scale responses to global change scenarios. Here, we incorporate into mechanistic leaf and canopy photosynthesis models the acclimation responses of the two key parameters required for modeling A and GPP, the maximum velocity for carboxylation (Vc,max) and maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax), determined from in-field experimentation for soybean and poplar, which vary in regards to what limits A in elevated CO2. Measurements of Vc,max and Jmax from the Soybean Temperature by Free Air CO2 Enrichment (Soy-T-FACE) experiment and of poplar at the Poplar FACE experiment were used to model the response of net carbon uptake to [CO2] and/or temperature. The modeling was conducted using the mechanistic leaf photosynthesis model (Farquhar, von Caemmerer, & Berry Model) and the latest generation canopy photosynthesis model with an integrated mechanistic representation of physiology and biophysical components, the Multi-Layer Canopy (MLCan) model. While the theory behind the interactions of [CO2] and temperature on photosynthesis are well

  16. Fine-spatial scale predictions of understory species using climate- and LiDAR-derived terrain and canopy metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijland, Wiebe; Nielsen, Scott E.; Coops, Nicholas C.; Wulder, Michael A.; Stenhouse, Gordon B.

    2014-01-01

    Food and habitat resources are critical components of wildlife management and conservation efforts. The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) has diverse diets and habitat requirements particularly for understory plant species, which are impacted by human developments and forest management activities. We use light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data to predict the occurrence of 14 understory plant species relevant to bear forage and compare our predictions with more conventional climate- and land cover-based models. We use boosted regression trees to model each of the 14 understory species across 4435 km2 using occurrence (presence-absence) data from 1941 field plots. Three sets of models were fitted: climate only, climate and basic land and forest covers from Landsat 30-m imagery, and a climate- and LiDAR-derived model describing both the terrain and forest canopy. Resulting model accuracies varied widely among species. Overall, 8 of 14 species models were improved by including the LiDAR-derived variables. For climate-only models, mean annual precipitation and frost-free periods were the most important variables. With inclusion of LiDAR-derived attributes, depth-to-water table, terrain-intercepted annual radiation, and elevation were most often selected. This suggests that fine-scale terrain conditions affect the distribution of the studied species more than canopy conditions.

  17. Quantification of Canopy Structure and its Implication on Radiative Transfer, Carbon Dioxide and Energy Flux Densities in a Heterogeneous Oak-Grass Savanna Ecosystem at the Landscape Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, O.; Ryu, Y.; Vargas, R.; Baldocchi, D.

    2008-12-01

    Oak-grass savanna ecosystems are characterized by pronounced heterogeneity in canopy structure at the landscape scale. Due to this heterogeneity the accurate quantification of canopy structure still remains a major challenge. The objectives of this study are to quantify clumping index, leaf area index (LAI) and the leaf inclination angle distribution function (LIADF) to describe the canopy structure of an oak-grass savanna ecosystem in California, USA. This information is critical for utilizing a radiative transfer model to compute CO2 and energy flux densities. We used four established techniques (LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer, digital hemispherical photography, the Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies (TRAC) instrument, and a robotics railroad radiometer) to measure clumping index and LAI within a 300 x 300 m plot centered at an eddy covariance (EC) tower. Leaf inclination angle distributions were assessed from digital photographs at multiple height intervals through analysis with a public domain image processing software. Preliminary analysis of the data showed that mean values for clumping index and LAI obtained from the various instruments are in good agreement, thus reducing the uncertainty inherent in the measurements. Our leaf angle measurements revealed the canopy to be predominantly erectophile at all height intervals, an ecological consequence of the fact that oak leaves must be erect to reduce thermal load.

  18. Scaling the effects of moose browsing on forage distribution, from the geometry of plant canopies to landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Jager, N. R.; Pastor, J.; Hodgson, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    jointly regulated intake rate during winter. Browsing-induced changes in the small-scale geometry of plant canopies can determine intake rate at larger spatial scales by changing d* relative to d and, hence, which mechanisms determine intake rate, essentially altering how herbivores sense the distribution of their food resources. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux–gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-09-16

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes, variances, and the bulk transfer parameterization for sensible heat above, within, and beneath a tall closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime sub-canopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at timescales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime sub-canopy heat flux co-spectra. The daytime momentum flux co-spectra in the upper bole space and in the sub-canopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of amore » mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of the momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the sub-canopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed sub-canopy secondary wind speed maximum. For the smallest resolved scales in the canopy at nighttime, we find increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing timescale, consistent with very small eddies possibly generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum, but not heat. Unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy were observed, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the very dense canopy. The flux–gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately in spite of the very small fluxes on the order of a few W m−2 in the sub-canopy. However, single-source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers. While sub-canopy Stanton numbers agreed well with values typically reported

  20. Assessment of rice leaf chlorophyll content using visible bands at different growth stages at both the leaf and canopy scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberioon, M. M.; Amin, M. S. M.; Anuar, A. R.; Gholizadeh, A.; Wayayok, A.; Khairunniza-Bejo, S.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen is an important variable for paddy farming management. The objectives of this study were to develop and test a new method to determine the status of nitrogen and chlorophyll content in rice leaf by analysing and considering all visible bands derived from images captured using a conventional digital camera. The images from the 6-pannel leaf colour chart were acquired using Basler Scout scA640-70fc under light-emitting diode lighting, in which principal component analysis was used to retain the lower order principal component to develop a new index. Digital photographs of the upper most collared leaf of rice (Oriza sativa L.), grown over a range of soils with different nitrogen treatments, were processed into 11 indices and IPCA through six growth stages. Also a conventional digital camera mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle was used to acquire images over the rice canopy for the purpose of verification. The result indicated that the conventional digital camera at the both leaf (r = -0.81) and the canopy (r = 0.78) scale could be used as a sensor to determine the status of chlorophyll content in rice plants through different growth stages. This indicates that conventional low-cost digital cameras can be used for determining chlorophyll content and consequently for monitoring nitrogen content of the growing rice plant, thus offering a potentially inexpensive, fast, accurate and suitable tool for rice growers. Additionally, results confirmed that a low cost LARS system would be well suited for high spatial and temporal resolution images and data analysis for proper assessment of key nutrients in rice farming in a fast, inexpensive and non-destructive way.

  1. The Role of Wake Production on the Scaling Laws of Scalar Concentration Fluctuation Spectra Inside Dense Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, D.; Katul, G. G.; Vidakovic, B.

    2011-04-01

    The scalar concentration fluctuations within a plane parallel-to-the-ground surface were measured inside a model canopy composed of densely arrayed rods using the laser-induced fluorescence technique. Two-dimensional scalar concentration spectra were computed and were shown to exhibit an approximate -3 power-law scaling at wavenumbers larger than those associated with wake production during quiescent instances when von Karman vortex streets dominated the flow. However, during instances when sweeps disrupted the flow, the spectral exponents increased above -3. The -3 power-law for these concentration fluctuation spectra measurements was shown to be consistent with a simplified spectral budget for locally homogeneous and isotropic turbulence augmented with a relaxation time scale similarity argument that assumed a constant enstrophy injection rate and wake generation mechanism. Hence, the origin of this -3 power-law scaling here differs from the well-known -3 power-law result for the so-called inertial diffusive range derived for the scalar concentration spectrum at small Prandtl numbers.

  2. Effects of Fine-Scale Landscape Variability on Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature Products Over Sparse Vegetation Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Goulden, M.; Peterson, S.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is a primary environmental control on biological systems and processes at a range of spatial and temporal scales, from controlling biochemical processes such as photosynthesis to influencing continental-scale species distribution. The Landsat satellite series provides a long record (since the mid-1980s) of relatively high spatial resolution thermal infrared (TIR) imagery, from which we derive land surface temperature (LST) grids. Here, we investigate fine spatial resolution factors that influence Landsat-derived LST over a spectrally and spatially heterogeneous landscape. We focus on paired sites (inside/outside a 1994 fire scar) within a pinyon-juniper scrubland in Southern California. The sites have nearly identical micro-meteorology and vegetation species composition, but distinctly different vegetation abundance and structure. The tower at the unburned site includes a number of in-situ imaging tools to quantify vegetation properties, including a thermal camera on a pan-tilt mount, allowing hourly characterization of landscape component temperatures (e.g., sunlit canopy, bare soil, leaf litter). We use these in-situ measurements to assess the impact of fine-scale landscape heterogeneity on estimates of LST, including sensitivity to (i) the relative abundance of component materials, (ii) directional effects due to solar and viewing geometry, (iii) duration of sunlit exposure for each compositional type, and (iv) air temperature. To scale these properties to Landsat spatial resolution (~100-m), we characterize the sub-pixel composition of landscape components (in addition to shade) by applying spectral mixture analysis (SMA) to the Landsat Operational Land Imager (OLI) spectral bands and test the sensitivity of the relationships established with the in-situ data at this coarser scale. The effects of vegetation abundance and cover height versus other controls on satellite-derived estimates of LST will be assessed by comparing estimates at the burned vs

  3. Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence that correlates with canopy photosynthesis on diurnal and seasonal scales in a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Tang, Jianwu; Mustard, John F.; Lee, Jung-Eun; Rossini, Micol; Joiner, Joanna; Munger, J. William; Kornfeld, Ari; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) is correlated with Gross Primary Production (GPP). However, it remains unclear to what extent this relationship is due to absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and/or light use efficiency (LUE). Here we present the first time series of near-surface measurement of canopy-scale SIF at 760 nm in temperate deciduous forests. SIF correlated with GPP estimated with eddy covariance at diurnal and seasonal scales (r2 = 0.82 and 0.73, respectively), as well as with APAR diurnally and seasonally (r2 = 0.90 and 0.80, respectively). SIF/APAR is significantly positively correlated with LUE and is higher during cloudy days than sunny days. Weekly tower-based SIF agreed with SIF from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (r2 = 0.82). Our results provide ground-based evidence that SIF is directly related to both APAR and LUE and thus GPP, and confirm that satellite SIF can be used as a proxy for GPP.

  4. Predicting landscape-scale CO2 flux at a pasture and rice paddy with long-term hyperspectral canopy reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, J. H.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C.; Sonnentag, O.; Verfaillie, J.; Baldocchi, D.

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of hyperspectral canopy reflectance provide a detailed snapshot of information regarding canopy biochemistry, structure and physiology. In this study, we collected five years of repeated canopy hyperspectral reflectance measurements for a total of over 100 site visits within the flux footprints of two eddy covariance towers at a pasture and rice paddy in Northern California. The vegetation at both sites exhibited dynamic phenology, with significant inter-annual variability in the timing of seasonal patterns that propagated into inter-annual variability in measured hyperspectral reflectance. We used partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling to leverage the information contained within the entire continuous canopy reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) in order to investigate questions regarding the connection between measured hyperspectral reflectance and landscape-scale fluxes of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) across multiple timescales, from instantaneous flux to monthly-integrated flux. With the PLSR models developed from this large dataset we achieved a high level of predictability for both NEE and GPP flux in these two ecosystems, where the R2 of prediction with an independent validation dataset ranged from 0.24 to 0.69. The PLSR models achieved the highest skill at predicting the integrated GPP flux for the week prior to the hyperspectral canopy reflectance collection, whereas the NEE flux often achieved the same high predictive power at the daily- through monthly-integrated flux timescales. The high level of predictability achieved by PLSR regression in this study demonstrated the potential for using repeated hyperspectral canopy reflectance measurements to help partition NEE measurements into its component fluxes, GPP and ecosystem respiration, and for using continuous hyperspectral reflectance measurements to model regional carbon flux in future analyses.

  5. Predicting landscape-scale CO2 flux at a pasture and rice paddy with long-term hyperspectral canopy reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, J. H.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C.; Sonnentag, O.; Verfaillie, J.; Baldocchi, D.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of hyperspectral canopy reflectance provide a detailed snapshot of information regarding canopy biochemistry, structure and physiology. In this study, we collected 5 years of repeated canopy hyperspectral reflectance measurements for a total of over 100 site visits within the flux footprints of two eddy covariance towers at a pasture and rice paddy in northern California. The vegetation at both sites exhibited dynamic phenology, with significant interannual variability in the timing of seasonal patterns that propagated into interannual variability in measured hyperspectral reflectance. We used partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling to leverage the information contained within the entire canopy reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) in order to investigate questions regarding the connection between measured hyperspectral reflectance and landscape-scale fluxes of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) across multiple timescales, from instantaneous flux to monthly integrated flux. With the PLSR models developed from this large data set we achieved a high level of predictability for both NEE and GPP flux in these two ecosystems, where the R2 of prediction with an independent validation data set ranged from 0.24 to 0.69. The PLSR models achieved the highest skill at predicting the integrated GPP flux for the week prior to the hyperspectral canopy reflectance collection, whereas the NEE flux often achieved the same high predictive power at daily to monthly integrated flux timescales. The high level of predictability achieved by PLSR in this study demonstrated the potential for using repeated hyperspectral canopy reflectance measurements to help partition NEE into its component fluxes, GPP and ecosystem respiration, and for using quasi-continuous hyperspectral reflectance measurements to model regional carbon flux in future analyses.

  6. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  7. Continental-scale patterns of canopy tree composition and function across Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Steege, Hans; Pitman, Nigel C. A.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Chave, Jerome; Sabatier, Daniel; Duque, Alvaro; Molino, Jean-François; Prévost, Marie-Françoise; Spichiger, Rodolphe; Castellanos, Hernán; von Hildebrand, Patricio; Vásquez, Rodolfo

    2006-09-01

    The world's greatest terrestrial stores of biodiversity and carbon are found in the forests of northern South America, where large-scale biogeographic patterns and processes have recently begun to be described. Seven of the nine countries with territory in the Amazon basin and the Guiana shield have carried out large-scale forest inventories, but such massive data sets have been little exploited by tropical plant ecologists. Although forest inventories often lack the species-level identifications favoured by tropical plant ecologists, their consistency of measurement and vast spatial coverage make them ideally suited for numerical analyses at large scales, and a valuable resource to describe the still poorly understood spatial variation of biomass, diversity, community composition and forest functioning across the South American tropics. Here we show, by using the seven forest inventories complemented with trait and inventory data collected elsewhere, two dominant gradients in tree composition and function across the Amazon, one paralleling a major gradient in soil fertility and the other paralleling a gradient in dry season length. The data set also indicates that the dominance of Fabaceae in the Guiana shield is not necessarily the result of root adaptations to poor soils (nodulation or ectomycorrhizal associations) but perhaps also the result of their remarkably high seed mass there as a potential adaptation to low rates of disturbance.

  8. Intermittent Emission of High-Frequency Waves by Magnetic Reconnection Between Canopy Field and Small-Scale Horizontal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.

    2007-12-01

    The energy source of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is the interaction of magnetic field and thermal convection in the photosphere. Magnetoconvection has complicated bifurcation structure, and the mode, spectra and power of the waves generated in the photosphere depend on the nature of magnetoconvection in the photosphere. In order to study the relation between magnetoconvection and coronal heating/solar wind acceleration, we performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a domain that includes from upper convection zone to the corona. We first ran the simulation without magnetic field until convection developed to quasi-steady state, and then imposed a vertical and uniform magnetic field. We found that, in addition to the well-known fact that vertical magnetic field is swept into the downflow region, small scale horizontal fields as strong as 800G intermittently emerge in the photosphere. Even though the initial magnetic field is vertical and uniform, magnetic field in the convection zone become turbulent, and occasionally a bundle of strong magnetic flux is driven by the upward convection flow and emerges in the photosphere. Such horizontal fields undergo magnetic reconnection with pre-existing magnetic field in the chromosphere (so called "canopy" field), and then emit high-frequency (>0.05mHz) waves into the corona. We discuss the possible role of these processes in heating, acceleration and turbulence of the corona and the solar wind.

  9. The relationship between canopy structure, light dynamics and deciduousness in a seasonal tropical forest in Panama: A multiple scale study using remote sensing and allometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlman, Stephanie Ann

    This dissertation uses two tools, remote sensing and allometry, to quantify canopy structure, phenology and light interception on stand to landscape levels in a semi-deciduous tropical forest in Panama. The remote sensing studies used a multiple scale approach. First relationships between spectral and physiological data were developed on a fine spatial scale. Then the interpretations were verified at a series of plots across the landscape. Finally, interpretation was applied to satellite images of the whole Panama Canal Zone. Using this approach, the applicability of the relationship between the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and fraction of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) was tested for the first time in a tropical forest. NDVI was more strongly related to changes in the FPAR of the upper canopy than FPAR of the whole canopy profile. Both NDVI and FPAR were driven by the contrast of deciduous and non-deciduous tree crowns in the dry season. On a landscape scale, spectral mixture analysis (SMA) of remotely-sensed images quantified the percent of deciduous tree crowns in the overstory very accurately. Using the map of deciduousness developed from a Landsat image, I found high fine scale variability in deciduousness, highly deciduous patches throughout the canal zone of 4--250 ha in size, and landscape trends related to rainfall and geologic formation. Allometric relationships between stem diameter, tree height and crown size were developed for 65 species on Barro Colorado Island. Tree height was asymptotic with stem diameter, but crown radius was not, continuing to grow at large diameters. Allometric relationships through ontongeny varied among different functional groups. Gap species are taller than shade species when both functional groups were below 10 cm dbh, but have smaller crowns than shade species above 10 cm dbh. Subcanopy species are shorter with larger canopies than tall species. A simple canopy model based on these

  10. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux-gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C.

    2014-05-13

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes and variances above, within and beneath a tall closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime subcanopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at time scales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime subcanopy heat flux cospectra. The daytime momentum flux cospectra inside the canopy and in the subcanopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of a mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of themore » momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the subcanopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed mean wind speed profile. In the canopy at night at the smallest resolved scales, we find relatively large momentum fluxes (compared to at larger scales), and increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing time scale, consistent with very small eddies likely generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum but not heat. We find unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the canopy. The flux-gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the subcanopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately; however, single source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the subcanopy and above-canopy layers. Modeled sensible heat fluxes above dark warm closed canopies are likely underestimated using typical values of the Stanton number.« less

  11. Large-scale canopy opening causes decreased photosynthesis in the saplings of shade-tolerant conifer, Abies veitchii.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Masako; Yamamura, Yasuo; Nakano, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Although the environmental change by canopy gap formation in a forest improves the light availability for the saplings on the forest floor, it may result in stresses on the saplings due to high radiation and drought. In large-scale gaps, the photosynthesis of shade-tolerant species may be inhibited by high radiation and drought stress if they lack effective tolerance or avoidance mechanisms for the stresses. We investigated the photosynthetic traits and water relations of Abies veitchii Lindl. saplings in an open habitat created by an avalanche and in a nearby forest floor habitat undisturbed by the avalanche. We analyzed the influence of exposed conditions on sapling photosynthesis. The maximum photosynthetic rate of the saplings in the open habitat was lower than that in the forest habitat. The ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (F(v)/F(m)) was lower in the open habitat than that in the forest habitat during the late growing season, indicating that the open habitat saplings suffer photoinhibition of photosystem II for a long period. A lower Rubisco concentration in needles in the open habitat indicated the breakdown of this photosynthetic protein because of excess solar energy resulting from serious photoinhibition. The shoot water potential of the saplings in the open habitat at daytime was higher than that of the saplings in the forest habitat because of less transpiration caused by the remarkable stomatal closure in the open habitat. Although these acclimations to high radiation improve the tolerance of A. veitchii saplings to high radiation and drought stress, they would result in low gain of daily carbon and a reduction in growth in the open habitat. PMID:19203939

  12. Leaf-level gas exchange and scaling-up of forest understory carbon fixation rates with a ``patch-scale'' canopy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedler, M.; Geyer, R.; Heindl, B.; Hahn, S.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    1996-03-01

    During the Hartheim experiment (HartX) 1992, conducted in the Upper Rhine Valley, Germany, we estimated water vapor flux from the understory by several methods as reported in Wedler et al. (this issue). We also examined the photosynthetic gas exchange of the dominant understory species Brachypodium pinnatum, Carex alba, and Carex flacca at the leaf level with an CO2/H2O porometer. A mechanisticallybased leaf gas exchange model was parameterized for these understory species and validated via the measured diurnal courses of carbon dioxide exchange. Leaf CO2 gas exchange was scaled-up to patch- and then to stand-level utilizing the leaf gas exchange model as a component of the canopy light interception/energy balance model GAS-FLUX, and by further considering variation in vegetation “patch-type” distribution, patch-specific spatial structure, patch-type leaf area index, and microclimate beneath the tree canopy. At patch-level, C. alba exhibited the lowest net CO2 uptake of ca. 75 mmol m-2 d-1 due to a low leaf-level photosynthetic capacity, whereas net CO2 fixation of B. pinnatum- and C. flacca-patches was approx. 178 and 184 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. Highest CO2 uptake was estimated for mixed patches where B. pinnatum grew together with the sedge species C. alba or C. flacca. Scaling-up of leaf gas exchange to stand level resulted in an estimated average rate of total CO2 fixation by the graminoid understory patches of approximately 93 mmol m-2 d-1 during the HartX period. The conservative gas exchange behavior of C. alba at Hartheim and its apparent success in space capture seems to affect overall functioning of this pine forest ecosystem by limiting understory CO2 uptake. The CO2 uptake by the understory is approximately 20% of stand total CO2 uptake. CO2 uptake fluxes mirror the relative differences in water loss from the understory and crown layer during the HartX period. Comparative measurements indicate that understory vegetation in spruce and pine

  13. Active crop canopy sensor optimal spatial scale for in-season variable-rate nitrogen application in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active crop canopy reflectance sensors have shown to be an efficient method for assessing spatially-variable crop nitrogen (N) need and controlling remedial in-season N applications in wheat. Recently, these sensors have been studied for N application in corn. This study will be conducted during the...

  14. EFFECTS OF LEAF AREA PROFILES AND CANOPY STRATIFICATION ON SIMULATED ENERGY FLUXES: THE PROBLEM OF VERTICAL SPATIAL SCALE. (R827676)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of the shape of leaf area profiles and the number of canopy layers on simulated sensible and latent heat fluxes using a gradient diffusion-based biometeorological model. Three research questions were addressed through simulation experiments: (1) Given ...

  15. Acclimation of Leaf Nitrogen to Vertical Light Gradient at Anthesis in Wheat Is a Whole-Plant Process That Scales with the Size of the Canopy1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Delphine; Allard, Vincent; Gaju, Oorbessy; Le Gouis, Jacques; Foulkes, M. John; Martre, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Vertical leaf nitrogen (N) gradient within a canopy is classically considered as a key adaptation to the local light environment that would tend to maximize canopy photosynthesis. We studied the vertical leaf N gradient with respect to the light gradient for wheat (Triticum aestivum) canopies with the aims of quantifying its modulation by crop N status and genetic variability and analyzing its ecophysiological determinants. The vertical distribution of leaf N and light was analyzed at anthesis for 16 cultivars grown in the field in two consecutive seasons under two levels of N. The N extinction coefficient with respect to light (b) varied with N supply and cultivar. Interestingly, a scaling relationship was observed between b and the size of the canopy for all the cultivars in the different environmental conditions. The scaling coefficient of the b-green area index relationship differed among cultivars, suggesting that cultivars could be more or less adapted to low-productivity environments. We conclude that the acclimation of the leaf N gradient to the light gradient is a whole-plant process that depends on canopy size. This study demonstrates that modeling leaf N distribution and canopy expansion based on the assumption that leaf N distribution parallels that of the light is inappropriate. We provide a robust relationship accounting for vertical leaf N gradient with respect to vertical light gradient as a function of canopy size. PMID:22984122

  16. A Comparison of Snowpack Mass and Energy Dynamics Across a Canopy Discontinuity and Small-Scale Elevational Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, T. E.; Carson, D.

    2014-12-01

    The processes governing the accumulation and melt of seasonal snowcovers in large open areas and under continuous forest canopies are well understood, however our understanding of spatiotemporal variations in snowcover processes in discontinuous forests is limited. The objective of this study was to quantify the snowcover mass and energy-balance dynamics across a canopy discontinuity and from a valley bottom to hilltop location to improved the understanding of hydrologic fluxes in complex terrain. Energy balance components were calculated using both the mass and energy balance snowmelt model (SNOBAL) and the 1-dimensional Simultaneous Heat and Water Balance (SHAW) Model, driven with micrometeorological from 7 contrasting sites. Results indicate that the canopy gap accumulated 52% more snow water equivalent (SWE) than the forest canopy sites. Net energy flux in the gap was approximately half of the open location and twice the sub-canopy locations. Net radiation was highest at the north and center points of the gap, smallest at the south point in the gap, and intermediate at the forested locations. Net turbulent (sensible and latent) energy fluxes were typically small positive values in the gap, and slightly negative in the forest, due to cold-air drainage and low wind speeds at all valley bottom sites, and colder air temperatures at the forested sites. Soil heat flux was a relatively minor component of the energy balance at the gap sites, but was surprisingly large at the forested sites due to relatively warm soil temperatures and slightly cooler snow temperatures. A sensitivity study, multi-model comparison, and comparison to other similar studies suggests that the computed spatiotemporal fluxes are reasonable for this specific site. The combination of mass and net energy flux differences between the open and gap sites resulted in the open site melting out 60 days prior to the south gap site. The mass and energy flux differences similarly resulted in the forested

  17. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, W. J. F.; Schallhart, S.; Langford, B.; Valach, A.; Rantala, P.; Fares, S.; Carriero, G.; Tillmann, R.; Tomlinson, S. J.; Dragosits, U.; Gianelle, D.; Hewitt, C. N.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (PTR-MS) and eddy covariance (PTR-ToF-MS). Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean day-time flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28 day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the MEGAN isoprene emissions algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006). A detailed tree species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using GC-MS to be scaled up to produce a "bottom-up" canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the "top-down" canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  18. Modeling Stand-Scale Patterns in Evapotranspiration and Soil Moisture in a Heterogeneous Plant Canopy: A Coupled Subsurface-Land Surface Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. R.; Gou, S.; Ferguson, I. M.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Savanna ecosystems present a well-known modeling challenge; understory grasses and overstory woody vegetation combine to form an open, heterogeneous canopy that creates strong spatial differences in soil moisture and evapotranspiration rates. In this analysis, we used ParFlow.CLM to create a stand-scale model of the Tonzi Ranch oak savanna, based on extensive topography, vegetation, soil, and hydrogeology data collected at the site. Measurements included canopy distribution and ground surface elevation from airborne Lidar, depth to groundwater from deep piezometers, soil and rock hydraulic conductivity, and leaf area index. We then compared the results to the site's long-term data records of radiative flux partitioning, obtained using the eddy-covariance method, and soil moisture, collected via a distributed network of capacitance probes. In order to obtain good agreement between the measured and modeled values, we identified several necessary modifications to the current CLM parameterization. These changes included the addition of a "winter grass" type and the alteration of the root structure and water stress functions to accommodate uptake of groundwater by deep roots. Finally, we compared variograms of site parameters and response variables and performed a scaling analysis relating ET and soil moisture variance to sampling size.

  19. Plant photomorphogenesis and canopy growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballare, Carlos L.; Scopel, Ana L.

    1994-01-01

    An important motivation for studying photomorphogenesis is to understand the relationships among plant photophysiology in canopies, canopy productivity, and agronomic yield. This understanding is essential to optimize lighting systems used for plant farming in controlled environments (CE) and for the design of genetically engineered crop strains with altered photoresponses. This article provides an overview of some basic principles of plant photomorphogenesis in canopies and discusses their implications for (1) scaling up information on plant photophysiology from individual plants in CE to whole canopies in the field, and (2) designing lighting conditions to increase plant productivity in CE used for agronomic purposes (e.g. space farming in CE Life Support Systems). We concentrate on the visible (lambda between 400 and 700 nm) and far-infrared (FR; lambda greater than 700 nm) spectral regions, since the ultraviolet (UV; 280 to 400 nm) is covered by other authors in this volume.

  20. Modeling Coniferous Canopy Structure over Extensive Areas for Ray Tracing Simulations: Scaling from the Leaf to the Stand Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aardt, J. A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Kelbe, D.; Kampe, T.; Krause, K.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing is widely accepted as a useful technology for characterizing the Earth surface in an objective, reproducible, and economically feasible manner. To date, the calibration and validation of remote sensing data sets and biophysical parameter estimates remain challenging due to the requirements to sample large areas for ground-truth data collection, and restrictions to sample these data within narrow temporal windows centered around flight campaigns or satellite overpasses. The computer graphics community have taken significant steps to ameliorate some of these challenges by providing an ability to generate synthetic images based on geometrically and optically realistic representations of complex targets and imaging instruments. These synthetic data can be used for conceptual and diagnostic tests of instrumentation prior to sensor deployment or to examine linkages between biophysical characteristics of the Earth surface and at-sensor radiance. In the last two decades, the use of image generation techniques for remote sensing of the vegetated environment has evolved from the simulation of simple homogeneous, hypothetical vegetation canopies, to advanced scenes and renderings with a high degree of photo-realism. Reported virtual scenes comprise up to 100M surface facets; however, due to the tighter coupling between hardware and software development, the full potential of image generation techniques for forestry applications yet remains to be fully explored. In this presentation, we examine the potential computer graphics techniques have for the analysis of forest structure-function relationships and demonstrate techniques that provide for the modeling of extremely high-faceted virtual forest canopies, comprising billions of scene elements. We demonstrate the use of ray tracing simulations for the analysis of gap size distributions and characterization of foliage clumping within spatial footprints that allow for a tight matching between characteristics

  1. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, W. Joe F.; Schallhart, Simon; Langford, Ben; Valach, Amy; Rantala, Pekka; Fares, Silvano; Carriero, Giulia; Tillmann, Ralf; Tomlinson, Sam J.; Dragosits, Ulrike; Gianelle, Damiano; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Nemitz, Eiko

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (using PTR-MS) and eddy covariance (using PTR-ToF-MS). Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean daytime flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28-day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) isoprene emission algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006). A detailed tree-species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emission of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to be scaled up to produce a bottom-up canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the top-down canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant-species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  2. Canopy chlorophyll estimation with hyperspectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng

    In this research, proximal measurements of hyperspectral reflectance were used to develop models for estimating chlorophyll content in tallgrass prairie at leaf and canopy scales. Models were generated at the leaf scale and then extended to the canopy scale. Three chlorphyll estimation models were developed, one based on reflectance spectra and two derived from derivative transformations of the reflectance spectra. The triangle chlorophyll index (TCI) model was derived from the reflectance spectrum, whereas the first and second derivative indices (FDI and SDI) models were developed from the derivative transformed spectra. The three models were found to be well-correlated with the chlorophyll content measured with solvent extraction. The result indicated that the three models were effective for the leaf scale estimates of chlorophyll content. The three chlorophyll models developed at the leaf scale were further extended to the canopy scale and fine-scale images. The three models were found to be conditionally effective for estimating canopy chlorophyll content. The TCI model was more effective in dense vegetation, and the FDI and SDI models were better in sparser vegetation. This research suggests that the extension of chlorophyll models from the leaf scale to canopy scale is complex and affected not only by soil background, but also by canopy structure and components.

  3. Key canopy traits drive forest productivity.

    PubMed

    Reich, Peter B

    2012-06-01

    Quantifying the mechanistic links between carbon fluxes and forest canopy attributes will advance understanding of leaf-to-ecosystem scaling and its potential application to assessing terrestrial ecosystem metabolism. Important advances have been made, but prior studies that related carbon fluxes to multiple canopy traits are scarce. Herein, presenting data for 128 cold temperate and boreal forests across a regional gradient of 600 km and 5.4°C (from 2.4°C to 7.8°C) in mean annual temperature, I show that stand-scale productivity is a function of the capacity to harvest light (represented by leaf area index, LAI), and to biochemically fix carbon (represented by canopy nitrogen concentration, %N). In combination, LAI and canopy %N explain greater than 75 per cent of variation in above-ground net primary productivity among forests, expressed per year or per day of growing season. After accounting for growing season length and climate effects, less than 10 per cent of the variance remained unexplained. These results mirror similar relations of leaf-scale and canopy-scale (eddy covariance) maximum photosynthetic rates to LAI and %N. Collectively, these findings indicate that canopy structure and chemistry translate from instantaneous physiology to annual carbon fluxes. Given the increasing capacity to remotely sense canopy LAI, %N and phenology, these results support the idea that physiologically based scaling relations can be useful tools for global modelling. PMID:22279168

  4. Utility of an image-based canopy reflectance modeling tool for remote estimation of LAI and leaf chlorophyll content at the field scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A REGularized canopy reFLECtance (REGFLEC) modeling tool that couples leaf optics (PROSPECT), canopy reflectance (ACRM), and atmospheric radiative transfer (6SV1) models is described and the model output of leaf chlorophyll (Cab) and total leaf area index (LAI) is validated against ground measuremen...

  5. ROLE OF CANOPY-SCALE PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN MODIFYING BIOGENIC-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE OF REACTIVE TERPENE SPECIES: RESULTS FROM THE CELTIC FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional canopy model was used to quantify the impact of photochemistry in modifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of trace gases. Canopy escape efficiencies, defined as the fraction of emission that escapes into the well-mixed boundary layer, were calculated for reactiv...

  6. Lidar Altimeter Measurements of Canopy Structure: Methods and Validation for Closed Canopy, Broadleaf Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, D. J.; Lefsky, M. A.; Parker, G. G.; Blair, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Lidar altimeter observations of vegetated landscapes provide a time-resolved measure of laser pulse backscatter energy from canopy surfaces and the underlying ground. Airborne lidar altimeter data was acquired using the Scanning Lidar Imager of Canopies by Echo Recovery (SLICER) for a successional sequence of four, closed-canopy, deciduous forest stands in eastern Maryland. The four stands were selected so as to include a range of canopy structures of importance to forest ecosystem function, including variation in the height and roughness of the outer-most canopy surface and the vertical organization of canopy stories and gaps. The character of the SLICER backscatter signal is described and a method is developed that accounts for occlusion of the laser energy by canopy surfaces, transforming the backscatter signal to a canopy height profile (CHP) that quantitatively represents the relative vertical distribution of canopy surface area. The transformation applies an increased weighting to the backscatter amplitude as a function of closure through the canopy and assumes a horizontally random distribution of the canopy components. SLICER CHPs, averaged over areas of overlap where lidar ground tracks intersect, are shown to be highly reproducible. CHP transects across the four stands reveal spatial variations in vegetation, at the scale of the individual 10 m diameter laser footprints, within and between stands. Averaged SLICER CHPs are compared to analogous height profile results derived from ground-based sightings to plant intercepts measured on plots within the four stands. Tbe plots were located on the segments of the lidar ground tracks from which averaged SLICER CHPs were derived, and the ground observations were acquired within two weeks of the SLICER data acquisition to minimize temporal change. The differences in canopy structure between the four stands is similarly described by the SLICER and ground-based CHP results, however a Chi-square test of similarity

  7. Explosive Fracturing of an F-16 Canopy for Through-Canopy Crew Egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    2000-01-01

    Through-canopy crew egress, such as in the Harrier (AV-8B) aircraft, expands escape envelopes by reducing seat ejection delays in waiting for canopy jettison. Adverse aircraft attitude and reduced forward flight speed can further increase the times for canopy jettison. However, the advent of heavy, high-strength polycarbonate canopies for bird-strike resistance has not only increased jettison times, but has made seat penetration impossible. The goal of the effort described in this paper was to demonstrate a method of explosively fracturing the F-16 polycarbonate canopy to allow through-canopy crew ejection. The objectives of this effort were to: 1. Mount the explosive materials on the exterior of the canopy within the mold line, 2. Minimize visual obstructions, 3. Minimize internal debris on explosive activation, 4. Operate within less than 10 ms, 5. Maintain the shape of the canopy after functioning to prevent major pieces from entering the cockpit, and 6. Minimize the resistance of the canopy to seat penetration. All goals and objectives were met in a full-scale test demonstration. In addition to expanding crew escape envelopes, this canopy fracture approach offers the potential for reducing system complexity, weight and cost, while increasing overall reliability, compared to current canopy jettison approaches. To comply with International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and permit public disclosure, this document addresses only the principles of explosive fracturing of the F-16 canopy materials and the end result. ITAR regulations restrict information on improving the performance of weapon systems. Therefore, details on the explosive loads and final assembly of this canopy fracture approach, necessary to assure functional performance, are not included.

  8. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERIZATION IN MM5 FOR MESO-GAMMA-SCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is extending its Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System to provide detailed gridded air quality concentration fields and sub-grid variability characterization at neighborhood scales and in urban areas...

  9. [Distribution patterns of canopy and understory tree species at local scale in a Tierra Firme forest, the Colombian Amazonia].

    PubMed

    Barreto-Silva, Juan Sebastian; López, Dairon Cárdenas; Montoya, Alvaro Javier Duque

    2014-03-01

    The effect of environmental variation on the structure of tree communities in tropical forests is still under debate. There is evidence that in landscapes like Tierra Firme forest, where the environmental gradient decreases at a local level, the effect of soil on the distribution patterns of plant species is minimal, happens to be random or is due to biological processes. In contrast, in studies with different kinds of plants from tropical forests, a greater effect on floristic composition of varying soil and topography has been reported. To assess this, the current study was carried out in a permanent plot of ten hectares in the Amacayacu National Park, Colombian Amazonia. To run the analysis, floristic and environmental variations were obtained according to tree species abundance categories and growth forms. In order to quantify the role played by both environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, the variation of the spatial configuration was included. We used Detrended Correspondence Analysis and Canonical Correspondence Analysis, followed by a variation partitioning, to analyze the species distribution patterns. The spatial template was evaluated using the Principal Coordinates of Neighbor Matrix method. We recorded 14 074 individuals from 1 053 species and 80 families. The most abundant families were Myristicaceae, Moraceae, Meliaceae, Arecaceae and Lecythidaceae, coinciding with other studies from Northwest Amazonia. Beta diversity was relatively low within the plot. Soils were very poor, had high aluminum concentration and were predominantly clayey. The floristic differences explained along the ten hectares plot were mainly associated to biological processes, such as dispersal limitation. The largest proportion of community variation in our dataset was unexplained by either environmental or spatial data. In conclusion, these results support random processes as the major drivers of the spatial variation of tree species at a local scale on Tierra Firme

  10. Seagrass Canopy Photosynthetic Response Is a Function of Canopy Density and Light Environment: A Model for Amphibolis griffithii

    PubMed Central

    Hedley, John D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Fearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments. PMID:25347849

  11. Canopy Vertical Spatial Scales which Constrain Biomass in a Tropical Forest at the Plot Level: Unifying Lidar and InSAR for Biomass Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F. G.; Drake, J. B.; Chapman, B. D.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L. V.; Graca, P. M.; Purcell, G. H.

    2009-12-01

    Structural remote sensing of forest biomass, using lidar and/or interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), often involves regressing field measured biomass against remotely sensed characteristics of the vertical density profile. Because spaceborne lidar or InSAR sensors will estimate structural characteristics averaged at the plot level (0.04-1 hectare), and because tropical forests contain 40% of the Earth’s forested biomass, this study focuses on the scales of vertical characteristics which best correlate with tropical forest biomass. This work suggests that the structural characteristics used in both lidar and InSAR biomass estimation, such as mean height or total height or height of median energy, are based on the behavior of Fourier vertical frequency components of vegetation density near zero frequency; that is, they are very low-spatial frequency characteristics of the vertical vegetation distribution. In this work, we ask which other vertical Fourier frequencies in lidar- or InSAR-produced structure metrics can best correlate with field biomass. Using lidar (LVIS) data from La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, taken in 2005, lidar canopy observations are Fourier transformed in the vertical direction to decompose into vertical frequency components. Each baseline of an InSAR observation, the complex coherence, is this Fourier transform of the canopy, if the ground contribution can be neglected. Using the qualitative similarity in vertical profiles seen by lidar, InSAR (at C-band, from AirSAR in 2004), and field measurements in the La Selva data, we produce the equivalent many (1000’s of) InSAR baselines from the lidar data and, using the lidar-simulated InSAR, determine the optimal spatial frequencies—baselines at DESDynI orbital altitudes for InSAR—which would estimate biomass in this wet tropical forest most accurately for either technique. For biomass ranging from 39-490 Mg/ha, regressing field biomass against some function of height

  12. Geometric-optical Modeling of a Conifer Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to explore how the geometry of trees in forest stands influences the reflectance of the forest as imaged from space. Most plant canopy modeling has viewed the canopy as an assemblage of plane-parallel layers on top of a soil surface. For these models, leaf angle distribution, leaf area index, and the angular transmittance and reflectance of leaves are the primary optical and geometric parameters. Such models are now sufficiently well developed to explain most of the variance in angular reflectance measurements observed from homogeneous plant canopies. However, forest canopies as imaged by airborne and spaceborne scanners exhibit considerable variance at quite a different scale. Brightness values vary strongly from one pixel to the next primarily as a function of the number of trees they contain. At this scale, the forest canopy is nonuniform and discontinuous. This research focuses on a discrete-element, geometric-optical view of the forest canopy.

  13. Estimation of carotenoid content at the canopy scale using the carotenoid triangle ratio index from in situ and simulated hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weiping; Huang, Wenjiang; Zhou, Xianfeng; Song, Xiaoyu; Casa, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Precise estimation of carotenoids (Car) content in plants, from remotely sensed data, is challenging due to their small proportion in the overall total pigment content and to the overlapping of spectral absorption features with chlorophyll (Chl) in the blue region of the spectrum. The use of narrow band vegetation indices (VIs) obtained from hyperspectral data has been considered an effective way to estimate Car content. However, VIs have proved to lack sensitivity to low or high Car content in a number of studies. In this study, the carotenoid triangle ratio index (CTRI), derived from the existing modified triangular vegetation index and a single band reflectance at 531 nm, was proposed and employed to estimate Car canopy content. We tested the potential of three categories of hyperspectral indices earlier proposed for Car, Chl, Car/Chl ratio estimation, and the new CTRI index, for Car canopy content assessment in winter wheat and corn. Spectral reflectance representing plant canopies were simulated using the PROSPECT and SAIL radiative transfer model, with the aim of analyzing saturation effects of these indices, as well as Chl effects on the relationship between spectral indices and Car content. The result showed that the majority of the spectral indices tested, saturated with the increase of Car canopy content above 28 to 64 μg/cm2. Conversely, the CTRI index was more robust and was linearly and highly sensitive to Car content in winter wheat and corn datasets, with coefficients of determination of 0.92 and 0.75, respectively. The corresponding root mean square error of prediction were 6.01 and 9.70 μg/cm2, respectively. Furthermore, the CTRI index did not show a saturation effect and was not greatly influenced by changes of Chl values, outperforming all the other indices tested. Estimation of Car canopy content using the CTRI index provides an insight into diagnosing plant physiological status and environmental stress.

  14. Forest Canopy Processes in a Regional Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makar, Paul; Staebler, Ralf; Akingunola, Ayodeji; Zhang, Junhua; McLinden, Chris; Kharol, Shailesh; Moran, Michael; Robichaud, Alain; Zhang, Leiming; Stroud, Craig; Pabla, Balbir; Cheung, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Forest canopies have typically been absent or highly parameterized in regional chemical transport models. Some forest-related processes are often considered - for example, biogenic emissions from the forests are included as a flux lower boundary condition on vertical diffusion, as is deposition to vegetation. However, real forest canopies comprise a much more complicated set of processes, at scales below the "transport model-resolved scale" of vertical levels usually employed in regional transport models. Advective and diffusive transport within the forest canopy typically scale with the height of the canopy, and the former process tends to dominate over the latter. Emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons arise from the foliage, which may be located tens of metres above the surface, while emissions of biogenic nitric oxide from decaying plant matter are located at the surface - in contrast to the surface flux boundary condition usually employed in chemical transport models. Deposition, similarly, is usually parameterized as a flux boundary condition, but may be differentiated between fluxes to vegetation and fluxes to the surface when the canopy scale is considered. The chemical environment also changes within forest canopies: shading, temperature, and relativity humidity changes with height within the canopy may influence chemical reaction rates. These processes have been observed in a host of measurement studies, and have been simulated using site-specific one-dimensional forest canopy models. Their influence on regional scale chemistry has been unknown, until now. In this work, we describe the results of the first attempt to include complex canopy processes within a regional chemical transport model (GEM-MACH). The original model core was subdivided into "canopy" and "non-canopy" subdomains. In the former, three additional near-surface layers based on spatially and seasonally varying satellite-derived canopy height and leaf area index were added to the original model

  15. Using the Normalized Differential Wetness Index to Scale Leaf Area Index, Create Three-Dimensional Classification Maps, and Scale Seasonal Evapotranspiration Depletions in Canopies Along the Middle Rio Grande Riparian CorridorCorridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, D. E.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C. N.; Coonrod, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    This research creates temporally and spatially explicit data layers of vegetation, leaf area index (LAI), three dimensional (3D) vegetation classification maps, and seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) depletions along the middle Rio Grande riparian corridor. The first part of this work produces two dimensional (2D) classification maps of native and non-native canopy vegetation using temporal patterns and the decision tree classifier in ENVI 4.0 (Research Systems Inc. Boulder, Colorado). The second part of this work correlates the normalized differential wetness index (NDWI) with field measurements of plant area index (PAI), stem area index (SAI), and leaf area index (LAI) using the LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer (PCA) (LICOR Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska). SAI is measured in winter to capture only branches and stems. PAI is measured during the growing season. Field measurements taken within 10 days of image capture dates provide adequate correlations though the closer the dates the better the correlation. LAI represents the surface area of active green leafy vegetation. NDWI correlates with both PAI and estimated LAI in both Tamarisk chinensis and Populus deltoides ssp. Wislizeni sites better than the more traditional normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI). This study also suggests that winter PCA measurements approximate SAI which should be subtracted from PAI in woody vegetation like T. chinensis and Salix exigua stands. The results show that correcting for leaf geometry by multiplying T. chinensis areas with cylindrical cladophylls by pi and the remaining flat leaf vegetation by two yields the best relationship between NDWI and total LAI. The 2Dclassification maps can be placed on top of relief maps of LAI to produce 3D classification maps. The final part of this research scales ET from four 3D eddy covariance towers located in two T. chinensis and two P. deltoides study sites. ET is regressed with LAI, percent daylight (PD), and average hourly incoming net

  16. A hotspot model for leaf canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    The hotspot effect, which provides important information about canopy structure, is modeled using general principles of environmental physics as driven by parameters of interest in remote sensing, such as leaf size, leaf shape, leaf area index, and leaf angle distribution. Specific examples are derived for canopies of horizontal leaves. The hotspot effect is implemented within the framework of the model developed by Suits (1972) for a canopy of leaves to illustrate what might occur in an agricultural crop. Because the hotspot effect arises from very basic geometrical principles and is scale-free, it occurs similarly in woodlands, forests, crops, rough soil surfaces, and clouds. The scaling principles advanced are also significant factors in the production of image spatial and angular variance and covariance which can be used to assess land cover structure through remote sensing.

  17. Characterization of Canopy Layering in Forested Ecosystems Using Full Waveform Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, Amanda S.; Swatantran, Anu; Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Dubayah, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Canopy structure, the vertical distribution of canopy material, is an important element of forest ecosystem dynamics and habitat preference. Although vertical stratification, or "canopy layering," is a basic characterization of canopy structure for research and forest management, it is difficult to quantify at landscape scales. In this paper we describe canopy structure and develop methodologies to map forest vertical stratification in a mixed temperate forest using full-waveform lidar. Two definitions-one categorical and one continuous-are used to map canopy layering over Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire with lidar data collected in 2009 by NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). The two resulting canopy layering datasets describe variation of canopy layering throughout the forest and show that layering varies with terrain elevation and canopy height. This information should provide increased understanding of vertical structure variability and aid habitat characterization and other forest management activities.

  18. Runoff from a cornfield as affected by tillage and corn canopy: A large-scale simulated-rainfall hydrologic data set for model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauchope, R. D.; Sumner, H. R.; Truman, C. C.; Johnson, A. W.; Dowler, C. C.; Hook, J. E.; Gascho, G. J.; Davis, J. G.; Chandler, L. D.

    1999-09-01

    A rainfall simulator was used to apply 5 cm of rainfall in 2 hours to two replicate 624 m2 plots at six times during each of the growing seasons of 1992 and 1993. Because the simulator generated reproducible and time-invariant rainfall intensities, the resulting 24 hydrographs reproducibly reveal the effects of tractor wheel compaction, tillage, soil reconsolidation, surface sealing, and corn canopy development. A time series data set including weather, crop development, soils properties, evapotranspiration, and antecedent soil water is available. These data should provide hydrologie modelers, particularly those interested in modeling runoff with time resolutions of <1 day, with a useful validation data set.

  19. Radiative transfer modeling of a coniferous canopy characterized by airborne remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar radiation beneath a forest canopy can have large spatial variations, but his is frequently neglected in radiative transfer models for large-scale applications. To explicitly model spatial variations in sub-canopy radiation, maps of canopy structure are required. Aerial photography and airbor...

  20. Flow over a Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslambolchi, Ali; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    The flow field over a full-scale, ram-air personnel parachute canopy was investigated numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachute canopies resemble wings with arc-anhedral, surface protuberances, and an open leading edge for inflation. The rectangular planform canopy had an aspect ratio of 2.2 and was assumed to be rigid and impermeable. The chord-based Reynolds number was 3.2 million. Results indicate that the oncoming flow barely penetrates the canopy opening, and creates a large separation bubble below the lower lip of canopy. A thick boundary layer exists over the entire lower surface of the canopy. The flow over the upper surface of the canopy remains attached for an extended fraction of the chord. Lift increases linearly with angle of attack up to about 12 degrees. To assess the capability of lifting-line theory in predicting the forces on the canopy, the lift and drag data from a two-dimensional simulation of the canopy profile were extended using finite-wing expressions and compared with the forces from the present simulations. The finite-wing predicted lift and drag trends compare poorly against the full-span simulation, and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is over-predicted by 36%. Sponsored by the US Army NRDEC.

  1. Thermal vegetation canopy model studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Ranson, K.J.; Nguyen, D.; Balick, L.; Link, L.E.; Fritschen, L.; Hutchison, B.

    1981-01-01

    An iterative-type thermal model applicable to forest canopies was tested with data from two diverse forest types. The model framework consists of a system of steady-state energy budget equations describing the interactions of short- and long-wave radiation within three horizontally infinite canopy layers. A state-space formulation of the energy dynamics within the canopy is used which permits a factorization of canopy geometrical parameters from canopy optical and thermal coefficients as well as environmental driving variables. Two sets of data characterizing a coniferous (Douglas-fir) and deciduous (oak-hickory) canopy were collected to evaluate the thermal model. The results show that the model approximates measured mean canopy temperatures to within 2/sup 0/C for relatively clear weather conditions and deviates by a maximum of 3/sup 0/C for very hazy or foggy conditions.

  2. Investigation of the Loads on a Conventional Front and Rear Sliding Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, Howard E.; Rickey, Edward A.

    1947-01-01

    As one phase of a comprehensive canopy load investigation, conventional front and rear sliding canopies which are typified by installation on the SB2C-4E airplane, were tested in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the pressure distributions and the aerodynamic loads on the canopies. A preliminary analysis of the results of these tests is presented in this report. Plots are presented that show the distribution of pressure at four longitudinal stations through each canopy for a range of conditions selected to determine the effects of varying canopy position, yaw, lift coefficient, and power. The results indicate that the maximum loads, based on the external-internal pressure differential, for the front and rear canopies were obtained with the airplane simulating the high speed flight condition. The highest loading on the front canopy was in the exploding direction for the configuration with the front and rear canopies closed. The highest loads on the rear canopy were in the crushing direction with the front canopy open and the rear canopy closed. For most of the simulated flight conditions, the highest loads on the front canopy, per unit area, were over twice as great as the highest loads on the rear canopy when the comparison was made for the most critical canopy configuration in each case. The external pressure distribution over the front and rear canopies, which were fairly symmetrical to 0 degree angle of yaw, were greatly distorted at other yaw attitudes, particularly for the propeller operating conditions. These distorted pressure distributions resulted in local exploding and crushing loads on both canopies which were often considerably higher than the average canopy loads.

  3. Small-Footprint Lidar Estimations of Sagebrush Canopy Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Anderson; Ryan Hruska; Jessica Mitchell; Nancy Glenn

    2011-05-01

    Separating lidar returns for use in determining canopy height and shape in low-height vegetation is difficult because the vegetation canopy return is often close to the ground return in time and space. In addition, height underestimation is likely exacerbated in sparsely vegetated shrub ecosystems. This study compares lidar point-cloud data to sagebrush canopy characteristics measured in the field. It was determined that cumulative prediction error could account for as much as 35.6% of the average height and 37.4% of the average canopy area of shrubs sampled. When scaling from the individual shrub scale to coarser scales, prediction error averaged over a number of shrubs decreases as observation numbers increase. High density (in this case an average of 9.46 returns per m2), small footprint lidar (in this case a footprint diameter of 18 cm at nadir) may provide sufficient accuracy for characterizing sagebrush structure and cover and estimating biomass across landscapes.

  4. Comparison of three methods to derive canopy-scale flux measurements above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, William; Schallhart, Simon; Langford, Ben; Valach, Amy; Rantala, Pekka; Fares, Silvano; Carriero, Giulia; Mentel, Thomas; Tomlinson, Sam; Dragosits, Ulrike; Hewitt, Nicholas; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Plants emit a wide range of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) into the atmosphere. These BVOCs are a major source of reactive carbon into the troposphere and play an important role in atmospheric chemistry by, for example, acting as an OH sink and contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol. While the emission rates of some of these compounds are relatively well understood, large uncertainties are still associated with the emission estimates of many compounds. Here the fluxes and mixing ratios of BVOCs recorded during June/July 2012 over the Bosco Fontana forest reserve in northern Italy are reported and discussed, together with a comparison of three methods of flux calculation. This work was carried out as a part of the EC FP7 project ECLAIRE (Effects of Climate Change on Air Pollution and Response Strategies for European Ecosystems). The Bosco Fontana reserve is a semi natural deciduous forest dominated by Carpinus betulus (hornbeam), Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) and Quercus rubra (northern red oak). Virtual disjunct eddy covariance measurements made using Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) were used to calculate fluxes and mixing ratios of BVOCs above the forest canopy at Bosco Fontana. BVOC mixing ratios were dominated by methanol with acetaldehyde, acetone, acetic acid, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes also recorded. A large flux of isoprene was observed as well as significant fluxes of monoterpenes, methanol, acetaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone / methacrolein. The fluxes recorded using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed good agreement. Comparison of the isoprene fluxes calculated using these instruments also agreed well with fluxes modelled using the MEGAN algorithms (Guenther et al. 2006). The detailed tree distribution maps for the forest at Bosco Fontana compiled by Dalponte et

  5. Vertical and Horizontal Transport of Energy and Matter by Coherent Motions in a Tall Spruce Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, Andrei; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    In the framework of the EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project, the contribution of coherent structures to vertical and horizontal transports in a tall spruce canopy is investigated. The combination of measurements done in both the vertical and horizontal directions allows us to investigate coherent structures, their temporal scales, their role in flux transport, vertical coupling between the sub-canopy, canopy and air above the canopy, and horizontal coupling in the sub-canopy layer. The temporal scales of coherent structures detected with the horizontally distributed systems in the sub-canopy layer are larger than the temporal scales of coherent structures detected with the vertically distributed systems. The flux contribution of coherent structures to the momentum and sensible heat transport is found to be dominant in the canopy layer. Carbon dioxide and latent heat transport by coherent structures increase with height and reach a maximum at the canopy height. The flux contribution of the ejection decreases with increasing height and becomes dominant above the canopy level. The flux fraction transported during the sweep increases with height and becomes the dominant exchange process at the upper canopy level. The determined exchange regimes indicate consistent decoupling between the sub-canopy, canopy and air above the canopy during evening, nighttime and morning hours, whereas the coupled states and coupled by sweep states between layers are observed mostly during the daytime. Furthermore, the horizontal transport of sensible heat by coherent structures is investigated, and the heterogeneity of the contribution of coherent events to the flux transport is demonstrated. A scheme to determine the horizontal coupling by coherent structures in the sub-canopy layer is proposed, and it is shown that the sub-canopy layer is horizontally coupled mainly in the wind direction. The vertical coupling in most cases is observed together with streamwise

  6. [Effects of canopy shapes of grape on canopy microenvironment, leaf and fruit quality in greenhouse].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang-bin; Liu, Feng-zhi; Cheng, Cun-gang; Wang, Xiao-di; Wang, Bao-liang; Zheng, Xiao-cui; Wang, Hai-bo

    2015-12-01

    The effects of three canopy shapes, i.e., vertical canopy, V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy, on canopy microenvironment, quality of leaves and fruits were studied in the 3-year-old grape 'Jingmi' grafted on ' Beta' in greenhouse. The results showed that gap fraction and openness of vertical canopy were significantly higher than that of V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy, and leaf area index, light interception rate and canopy temperature difference between day and night were significantly lower than those of V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy. There was no significant difference between the latter two treatments. The palisade thickness of V-shaped canopy was significantly greater than that of vertical canopy, and horizontal canopy was in the middle. The chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of V-shaped canopy were significantly higher than those of vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, and those in the latter two treatments had no significant difference. The fruit quality of V-shaped canopy was the best, and that of horizontal canopy was the worst. The results of GC-MS analysis showed that 29 types of volatile aroma compounds were detected in V-shaped canopy, but just 17 and 16 in vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, respectively. In V-shaped canopy, the characteristic aroma in grape 'Jingmi' was higher, except ethanol, trans-2- hexene-1-alcohol, 2-octyl ketone and formic acid ester. The linalool content in vertical canopy and V-shaped canopy was higher than that in horizontal canopy. The nerol content in V-shaped canopy was higher than that in vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, and the leaf alcohol content in V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy was higher than that in vertical canopy. The citronellol was de-tected only in V-shaped canopy. In greenhouse, the fruit aroma of V-shaped canopy grape was stronger, and well reflected the variety characteristics. PMID:27112012

  7. Momentum and scalar transport within a vegetation canopy following atmospheric stability and seasonal canopy changes: the CHATS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, S.; Patton, E. G.

    2012-07-01

    Momentum and scalar (heat and water vapor) transfer between a walnut canopy and the overlying atmosphere are investigated for two seasonal periods (before and after leaf-out), and for five thermal stability regimes (free and forced convection, near-neutral condition, transition to stable, and stable). Quadrant and octant analyses of momentum and scalar fluxes followed by space-time autocorrelations of observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study's (CHATS) thirty meter tower help characterize the motions exchanging momentum, heat, and moisture between the canopy layers and aloft. During sufficiently windy conditions, i.e. in forced convection, near-neutral and transition to stable regimes, momentum and scalars are generally transported by sweep and ejection motions associated with the well-known canopy-top "shear-driven" coherent eddy structures. During extreme stability conditions (both unstable and stable), the role of these "shear-driven" structures in transporting scalars decreases, inducing notable dissimilarity between momentum and scalar transport. In unstable conditions, "shear-driven" coherent structures are progressively replaced by "buo-yantly-driven" structures, known as thermal plumes; which appear very efficient at transporting scalars, especially upward thermal plumes above the canopy. Within the canopy, downward thermal plumes become more efficient at transporting scalars than upward thermal plumes if scalar sources are located in the upper canopy. We explain these features by suggesting that: (i) downward plumes within the canopy correspond to large downward plumes coming from above, and (ii) upward plumes within the canopy are local small plumes induced by canopy heat sources where passive scalars are first injected if there sources are at the same location as heat sources. Above the canopy, these small upward thermal plumes aggregate to form larger scale upward thermal plumes. Furthermore, scalar quantities carried by downward

  8. Plant canopy specular reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1985-01-01

    A model is derived for the amount of light specularly reflected and polarized by a plant canopy. The model is based on the morphological and phenological characteristics of the canopy and upon the Fresnel equations of optics. The theory demonstrates that the specular reflectance of the plant canopy is a function of the angle of incidence and potentially contains information to help discriminate between species. The theory relates the specular reflectance to botanical condition of the canopy - to factors such as development stage, plant vigor, and leaf area index (LAI).

  9. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  10. Predicting Ecosystem-scale CO2 Fluxes and Vegetation Biophysical Parameters of a Subalpine Grassland with Continuous Canopy Hyperspectral Reflectance Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakowska, K.; Vescovo, L.; Marcolla, B.; Cavagna, M.; Zampedri, R.; Gianelle, D.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the potential of the ASD-WhiteRef system for monitoring CO2 fluxes and vegetation biophysical parameters (such as e.g. fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation - fapar, canopy total chlorophyll content - TotChl). The ASD-WhiteRef is an automated system designed for continuous and unattended acquisition of radiometric data using an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer. The ASD-WhiteRef system was installed in May 2013 at the EC tower (at a height of 6 m, with a field of view of 25°) of the FLUXNET Monte Bondone site (IT-MBo), which is a representative of a typical extensively-managed, low-productive meadow of the Italian Alps. Vegetation hyperspectral reflectance and EC observations were collected on a continuous basis for three growing seasons covering periods of extreme weather conditions (both hot/dry and rainy periods), while fapar and TotChl were determined periodically (at around weekly intervals) during two growing seasons at different vegetation development stages by means of line quantum sensors and UV-VIS spectroscopy method, respectively. In order to characterize the interannual dynamics in grassland CO2 fluxes three approaches were used: i) linear regression between CO2 fluxes and spectral vegetation indices - VI (model 1); ii) linear regression between CO2 fluxes and a product of VI and PAR (model 2), iii) partial least squares regression (PLSR) using simultaneously the full set of ASD-WhiteRef reflectance spectra (2151 bands, 350-2500 nm) to predict CO2 fluxes. In addition, model i) and model iii) were tested also for predicting fapar and TotChl variability. The range of presented VIs contained both VIs derived from the Sentinel-2 bands simulation and VIs calculated using all two-band combinations of wavelengths available from the ASD-WhiteRef hyperspectral dataset. The findings of the study highlight the potential of vegetation spectroscopy to monitor temporal variations in key drivers of photosynthesis process

  11. Medium term ecohydrological response of peatland bryophytes to canopy disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Rhoswen; Kettridge, Nick; Krause, Stefan; Devito, Kevin; Granath, Gustaf; Petrone, Richard; Mandoza, Carl; Waddington, James Micheal

    2016-04-01

    Canopy disturbance in northern forested peatlands is widespread. Canopy changes impact the ecohydrological function of moss and peat, which provide the principal carbon store within these carbon rich ecosystems. Different mosses have contrasting contributions to carbon and water fluxes (e.g. Sphagnum fuscum and Pleurozium schreberi) and are strongly influenced by canopy cover. As a result, changes in canopy cover lead to long-term shifts in species composition and associated ecohydrological function. Despite this, the medium-term response to such disturbance, the associated lag in this transition to a new ecohydrological and biogeochemical regime, is not understood. Here we investigate this medium term ecohydrological response to canopy removal using a randomised plot design within a north Albertan peatland. We show no significant ecohydrological change in treatment plots four years after canopy removal. Notably, Pleurozium schreberi and Sphagnum fuscum remained within respective plots post treatment and there was no significant difference in plot resistance to evapotranspiration or carbon exchange. Our results show that canopy removal alone has little impact on bryophyte ecohydrology in the short/medium term. This resistance to disturbance contrasts strongly with dramatic short-term changes observed within mineral soils suggesting that concurrent shifts in the large scale hydrology induced within such disturbances are necessary to cause rapid ecohydrological transitions. Understanding this lagged response is critical to determine the decadal response of carbon and water fluxes in response to disturbance and the rate at which important medium term ecohydrological feedbacks are invoked.

  12. Canopy wake measurements using multiple scanning wind LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Stefan, Heinz; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Canopy wakes have been shown, in controlled wind tunnel experiments, to significantly affect the fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars at the land and water surface over distances of ~O(1 km), see Markfort et al. (EFM, 2013). However, there are currently no measurements of the velocity field downwind of a full-scale forest canopy. Point-based anemometer measurements of wake turbulence provide limited insight into the extent and details of the wake structure, whereas scanning Doppler wind LiDARs can provide information on how the wake evolves in space and varies over time. For the first time, we present measurements of the velocity field in the wake of a tall patch of forest canopy. The patch consists of two uniform rows of 35-meter tall deciduous, plane trees, which border either side of the Allée de Dorigny, near the EPFL campus. The canopy is approximately 250 m long, and it is 35 m wide, along the direction of the wind. A challenge faced while making field measurements is that the wind rarely intersects a canopy normal to the edge. The resulting wake flow may be deflected relative to the mean inflow. Using multiple LiDARs, we measure the evolution of the wake due to an oblique wind blowing over the canopy. One LiDAR is positioned directly downwind of the canopy to measure the flow along the mean wind direction and the other is positioned near the canopy to evaluate the transversal component of the wind and how it varies with downwind distance from the canopy. Preliminary results show that the open trunk space near the base of the canopy results in a surface jet that can be detected just downwind of the canopy and farther downwind dissipates as it mixes with the wake flow above. A time-varying recirculation zone can be detected by the periodic reversal of the velocity vector near the surface, downwind of the canopy. The implications of canopy wakes for measurement and modeling of surface fluxes will be discussed.

  13. Canopy wake measurements using multiple scanning wind LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, C. D.; Carbajo Fuertes, F.; Iungo, V.; Stefan, H. G.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy wakes have been shown, in controlled wind tunnel experiments, to significantly affect the fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars at the land and water surface over distances of ˜O(1 km), see Markfort et al. (EFM, 2013). However, there are currently no measurements of the velocity field downwind of a full-scale forest canopy. Point-based anemometer measurements of wake turbulence provide limited insight into the extent and details of the wake structure, whereas scanning Doppler wind LiDARs can provide information on how the wake evolves in space and varies over time. For the first time, we present measurements of the velocity field in the wake of a tall patch of forest canopy. The patch consists of two uniform rows of 40-meter tall deciduous, plane trees, which border either side of the Allée de Dorigny, near the EPFL campus. The canopy is approximately 250 m long, and it is approximately 40 m wide, along the direction of the wind. A challenge faced while making field measurements is that the wind rarely intersects a canopy normal to the edge. The resulting wake flow may be deflected relative to the mean inflow. Using multiple LiDARs, we measure the evolution of the wake due to an oblique wind blowing over the canopy. One LiDAR is positioned directly downwind of the canopy to measure the flow along the mean wind direction and the other is positioned near the canopy to evaluate the transversal component of the wind and how it varies with downwind distance from the canopy. Preliminary results show that the open trunk space near the base of the canopy results in a surface jet that can be detected just downwind of the canopy and farther downwind dissipates as it mixes with the wake flow above. A time-varying recirculation zone can be detected by the periodic reversal of the velocity near the surface, downwind of the canopy. The implications of canopy wakes for measurement and modeling of surface fluxes will be discussed.

  14. Canopy temperature and cotton performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The temperature of a cotton canopy is a useful indicator of both the metabolic state and water status of the crop. Recent advances in equipment have resulted in reductions in the cost and complexity of near continuous canopy temperature monitoring. Measurements on a seasonal timeframe at a ...

  15. NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE AIR QUALITY MODELING IN HOUSTON USING URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERS IN MM5 AND CMAQ WITH IMPROVED CHARACTERIZATION OF MESOSCALE LAKE-LAND BREEZE CIRCULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced capability of air quality simulation models towards accurate performance at finer scales will be needed for such models to serve as tools for performing exposure and risk assessments in urban areas. It is recognized that the impact of urban features such as street and t...

  16. EVALUATION OF FOREST CANOPY MODELS FOR ESTIMATING ISOPRENE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the summer of 1992, isoprene emissions were measured in a mixed deciduous forest near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Measurements were aimed at the experimental scale-up of emissions from the leaf level to the forest canopy to the mixed layer. Results from the scale-up study are co...

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Montagnani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Flows within and just above forest canopy over mountainous terrain are most complicated, which substantially influence the biosphere-atmosphere interaction of mass and energy. Due to the significant spatial variation, canopy flow in complex terrain is poorly understood based on the point-based tower measurement. We employ numerical model integrated with biogenic CO2 process to examine the impacts of topography, canopy structure, and synoptic atmospheric motion on canopy flow and associated CO2 transport in an alpine forest, with special focus on stable nocturnal condition when biogenic CO2 emission is active. Our model prediction is in better agreement with tower measurements when background synoptic wind is present, which leads to better larger-scale mixing, while local slope flow is just thermal-driven in the modeled domain by ignorance of surround mountain-valley. Our results show that large-scale synoptic wind is modified by local slope-canopy flow within and just above canopy. As the synoptic wind is down-slope (Figure 1a), recirculation is formed on the downwind slope with cool air and high accumulation of CO2 in front of tall and dense vegetation. As the synoptic wind is up-slope(Figure 1b), canopy flow at the higher elevation of the slope is in the same direction of synoptic wind, while canopy flow at the lower part of the slope blows down-slope. The upslope wind causes better mixing in the canopy and leads to smaller CO2 accumulation just close to the slope surface. The local down-slope wind (Figure 1c) causes rich and deep CO2 build-up in the downwind direction on the lower slope. Our numerical performance has demonstrated that three-dimensional CFD approach is a useful tool to understanding relationships between tower-point measurements and surrounding's field distributions. Acknowledgement: This research was supported by NSF Grants ATM-0930015, CNS-0958379 & CNS-0855217, PSC-CUNY ENHC-42-64 & CUNY HPCC. Figure 1 CO2 distribution within and just above

  18. Velocity field measurements in the near wake of a parachute canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desabrais, Kenneth J.

    The velocity field in the wake of a small scale flexible parachute canopy was measured using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry. The experiments were performed in a water tunnel with the Reynolds number ranging from 3.0--6.0 x 104. Both a fully inflated canopy and the inflation phase were investigated in a constant freestream (i.e. an infinite mass condition). The fully inflated canopy experienced a cyclic "breathing" which corresponded to the shedding of a vortex ring from the canopy. The normalized breathing frequency had a value of 0.56 +/- 0.03. The investigation of the canopy inflation showed that during the early stages of the inflation, the boundary layer on the canopy surface remains attached to the canopy while the canopy diameter increases substantially. The boundary layer begins to separate near the apex region when the diameter is ˜68% of the fully inflated diameter. The separation point then progresses upstream from the canopy apex region toward the canopy skirt. During this time period, the force rapidly increases to its maximum value while the separation point of the boundary layer moves upstream towards the skirt. The force then declines rapidly and the separated boundary layer rolls-up into a large vortex ring near the canopy skirt. At the same time, the canopy is drawn into an over-expanded state after which the cyclic breathing initiates. The unsteady potential force was estimated from the rate of change of the canopy volume. It contributed no more than 10% of the peak opening force and was only significant during the early stages of inflation. The majority of the opening force was the result of the time rate of change of the fluid impulse. It accounts for approximately 60% of the peak opening force. This result shows that the formation of the viscous wake is the primary factor in the peak drag force of the canopy.

  19. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  20. Forest canopy gap distributions in the southern Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Kellner, James R; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E; Anderson, Christopher; Martin, Roberta E

    2013-01-01

    Canopy gaps express the time-integrated effects of tree failure and mortality as well as regrowth and succession in tropical forests. Quantifying the size and spatial distribution of canopy gaps is requisite to modeling forest functional processes ranging from carbon fluxes to species interactions and biological diversity. Using high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and analyzed 5,877,937 static canopy gaps throughout 125,581 ha of lowland Amazonian forest in Peru. Our LiDAR sampling covered a wide range of forest physiognomies across contrasting geologic and topographic conditions, and on depositional floodplain and erosional terra firme substrates. We used the scaling exponent of the Zeta distribution (λ) as a metric to quantify and compare the negative relationship between canopy gap frequency and size across sites. Despite variable canopy height and forest type, values of λ were highly conservative (λ mean  = 1.83, s  = 0.09), and little variation was observed regionally among geologic substrates and forest types, or at the landscape level comparing depositional-floodplain and erosional terra firme landscapes. λ-values less than 2.0 indicate that these forests are subjected to large gaps that reset carbon stocks when they occur. Consistency of λ-values strongly suggests similarity in the mechanisms of canopy failure across a diverse array of lowland forests in southwestern Amazonia. PMID:23613748

  1. Forest Canopy Gap Distributions in the Southern Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Kellner, James R.; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Anderson, Christopher; Martin, Roberta E.

    2013-01-01

    Canopy gaps express the time-integrated effects of tree failure and mortality as well as regrowth and succession in tropical forests. Quantifying the size and spatial distribution of canopy gaps is requisite to modeling forest functional processes ranging from carbon fluxes to species interactions and biological diversity. Using high-resolution airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), we mapped and analyzed 5,877,937 static canopy gaps throughout 125,581 ha of lowland Amazonian forest in Peru. Our LiDAR sampling covered a wide range of forest physiognomies across contrasting geologic and topographic conditions, and on depositional floodplain and erosional terra firme substrates. We used the scaling exponent of the Zeta distribution (λ) as a metric to quantify and compare the negative relationship between canopy gap frequency and size across sites. Despite variable canopy height and forest type, values of λ were highly conservative (λ mean  = 1.83, s  = 0.09), and little variation was observed regionally among geologic substrates and forest types, or at the landscape level comparing depositional-floodplain and erosional terra firme landscapes. λ-values less than 2.0 indicate that these forests are subjected to large gaps that reset carbon stocks when they occur. Consistency of λ-values strongly suggests similarity in the mechanisms of canopy failure across a diverse array of lowland forests in southwestern Amazonia. PMID:23613748

  2. Methane emissions from canopy wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, G. O.; Conrad, R.

    2012-12-01

    Ground wetlands are the main natural source of methane but they fail to explain the observed amounts of methane over tropical forests. Bromeliad tanks are discrete habitats for aquatic organisms and up to several thousand of bromeliad individuals per hectare of tropical forest create a unique canopy wetland ecosystem in neotropical forests. Recently, we have discovered that canopy wetlands inhabit methanogenic archaea, emit substantial amounts of methane and may help to explain the high amounts of methane over neotropical forests. However, the pathway of methane formation and potential methane production in canopy wetlands of different tropical forest ecosystems have not yet been studied. In this study, we investigated the stable carbon isotope fractionation, methanogenic pathway and potential methane production of bromeliad tanks along an elevation gradient in neotropical forests for the first time. We sampled the bromeliad tank-substrate of 3 tank bromeliads per functional type and elevation (1000 m, 2000 m and 3000 m above the sea level). We distinguished three functional types of tank bromeliads, based on plant architecture and ecological niche preference. Functional type I-tank bromeliads are concentrated in the understory and on the ground. Functional type II and type III are concentrated in the mid and overstory. We conducted tank-substrate incubation experiments and measured CH4, CO2, 13CH4 and 13CO2 at regular time intervals during the incubation period. The methane production potential of bromeliad tanks correlated positively with tank-substrate carbon concentration and decreased with increasing canopy height and increasing elevation. The dominant pathway of methane formation in bromeliad tanks was hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (>50%) and this dominance increased with increasing canopy height and increasing elevation. Our results provide novel insights into the pathway of methane formation in neotropical canopy wetlands and suggest that canopy height is

  3. Characterizing canopy nonrandomness with a multiband vegetation imager (MVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharik, C. J.; Norman, J. M.; Murdock, L. M.; Gower, S. T.

    1997-12-01

    A new method for measuring plant canopy nonrandomness and other architectural components has been developed using a 16 bit (65535 gray scale levels) charged-coupled device (CCD) camera that captures images of plant canopies in two wavelength bands. This complete system is referred to as a multiband vegetation imager (MVI). The use of two wavelength bands (visible (VIS) 400-620 nm and near infrared (NIR) 720-950 nm) permits identification of sunlit and shaded foliage, sunlit and shaded branch area, clouds, and blue sky based on the camera's resolution, and the varying spectral properties that scene components have in the two wavelength bands. This approach is different from other canopy imaging methods (such as fish-eye photography) because it emphasizes measuring the fraction of an image occupied by various scene components (branches, shaded leaves, sunlit leaves) under different sky conditions rather than simply the canopy gap fraction under uniform sky conditions. The MVI has been used during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in aspen (Populus tremuloides) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) to estimate architectural characteristics of each canopy. The leaf area index (LAI), sunlit LAI, and degree of nonrandomness within a canopy are architectural properties that have been measured with the MVI. Using a crown-based Monte Carlo model for nonrandom canopies, nonrandomness factors are calculated from MVI data using two approaches (gap fraction and gap-size distribution theories) to correct total and sunlit LAI estimates from indirect methods that assume random foliage distributions. Canopy nonrandomness factors obtained from analyzing the gap-size distribution in a Monte Carlo model are shown to be a function of path length (angle) through the canopy (Ωe(θ)); thus we suggest that LAI-2000 indirect measurements of LAI be adjusted with the value of Ωe(θ) at θ=35° because this is the mean angle at which the canopy gap fraction is measured by the

  4. Soybean canopy reflectance modeling data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Numerous mathematical models of the interaction of radiation with vegetation canopies have been developed over the last two decades. However, data with which to exercise and validate these models are scarce. During three days in the summer of 1980, experiments are conducted with the objective of gaining insight about the effects of solar illumination and view angles on soybean canopy reflectance. In concert with these experiment, extensive measurements of the soybean canopies are obtained. This document is a compilation of the bidirectional reflectance factors, agronomic, characteristics, canopy geometry, and leaf, stem, and pod optical properties of the soybean canopies. These data sets should be suitable for use with most vegetation canopy reflectance models.

  5. Influence of Zostera marina canopies on unidirectional flow, hydraulic roughness and sediment movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, A.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Amos, C. L.

    2010-09-01

    Seagrasses develop extensive or patchy underwater meadows in coastal areas around the world, forming complex, highly productive ecosystems. Seagrass canopies exert strong effects on water flow inside and around them, thereby affecting flow structure, sediment transport and benthic ecology. The influence of Zostera marina canopies on flow velocity, turbulence, hydraulic roughness and sediment movement was evaluated through laboratory experiments in 2 flumes and using live Z. marina and a mobile sand bed. Profiles of instantaneous velocities were measured and sediment movement was identified upstream, within and downstream of patches of different sizes and shoot density and at different free-stream velocities. Flow structure was characterised by time-averaged velocity, turbulence intensity and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE). When velocity data were available above the canopy, they were fitted to the Law of the Wall and shear velocities and roughness lengths were calculated. When a seagrass canopy was present, three layers were distinguishable in the water column: (1) within canopy represented by low velocities and high turbulence; (2) transition zone around the height of the canopy, where velocities increased, turbulence decreased and TKE was high; and (3) above canopy where velocities were equal or higher than free-stream velocities and turbulence and TKE were lower than below. Shoot density and patch-width influenced this partitioning of the flow when the canopy was long enough (based on flume experiments, at least more than 1 m-long). The enhanced TKE observed at the canopy/water interface suggests that large-scale turbulence is generated at the canopy surface. These oscillations, likely to be related to the canopy undulations, are then broken down within the canopy and high-frequency turbulence takes place near the bed. This turbulence 'cascade' through the canopy may have an important impact on biogeochemical processes. The velocity above the canopy generally

  6. Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chris B.; Caterina, Giulia L.; Will, Rodney E.; Stebler, Elaine; Turton, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S) ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F) of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change. PMID:26544182

  7. Groundlayer vegetation gradients across oak woodland canopy gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, N.B.; Grundel, R.; Sluis, W.

    2006-01-01

    Frequency of groundlayer plants was measured across oak woodland canopy gaps at three sites in northwest Indiana to examine how vegetation varied with gap size, direction along the gap edge, and microhabitat. Microhabitats were defined as under the canopy adjacent to the gap, along the gap edge, and within the gap. Gap-sites consisted of gaps plus adjacent tree canopy. Gaps were classified as small (16 ± 1 m2), medium (97 ± 8), and large (310 ± 32). Neither richness nor diversity differed among microhabitats, gap sizes, or edges. Similarity between microhabitats wthin a gap-site increased as the distance between plots decreased and as the difference in PAR decreased, the latter explaining twice the variation in percent dissimilarity compared to Mg concentration, A horizon depth, and litter cover. Diervilla lonicera, Frageria virginiana, Helianthus divaricatus, Polygonatum pubescens, Quercus velutina, Smilacena stellata, and Tradescantia ohiensis decreased, whileTephrosia virginiana and legumes increased in frequency, from canopy to gap, and C4 grasses peaked at the gap edge, independent of gap size. Additional species frequency varied across the microhabitat gradient within specific sites. Sorghastrum nutans was three times more frequent in gaps at large sites than elsewhere. The vegetation in medium-sized gap-sites was more variable than within small and large gap-sites, suggesting greater environmental heterogeneity at that scale. Within gap-sites, vegetation was more heterogeneous within edges and canopies than in gaps. Edges were more similar in composition to gaps than to canopy groundlayer within gap-sites. Few species varied significantly in frequency around the gap edge. The oak woodland groundlayer on sandy substrates can be characterized as a mosaic of forb dominated vegetation that varies across light gradients associated with canopy gaps, transitioning to islands of grassland vegetation when gaps exceed 160 m2.

  8. Canopy Interception for a Tallgrass Prairie under Juniper Encroachment.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chris B; Caterina, Giulia L; Will, Rodney E; Stebler, Elaine; Turton, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall partitioning and redistribution by canopies are important ecohydrological processes underlying ecosystem dynamics. We quantified and contrasted spatial and temporal variations of rainfall redistribution for a juniper (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) woodland and a tallgrass prairie in the south-central Great Plains, USA. Our results showed that redcedar trees had high canopy storage capacity (S) ranging from 2.14 mm for open stands to 3.44 mm for closed stands. The canopy funneling ratios (F) of redcedar trees varied substantially among stand type and tree size. The open stands and smaller trees usually had higher F values and were more efficient in partitioning rainfall into stemflow. Larger trees were more effective in partitioning rainfall into throughfall and no significant changes in the total interception ratios among canopy types and tree size were found. The S values were highly variable for tallgrass prairie, ranging from 0.27 mm at early growing season to 3.86 mm at senescence. As a result, the rainfall interception by tallgrass prairie was characterized by high temporal instability. On an annual basis, our results showed no significant difference in total rainfall loss to canopy interception between redcedar trees and tallgrass prairie. Increasing structural complexity associated with redcedar encroachment into tallgrass prairie changes the rainfall redistribution and partitioning pattern at both the temporal and spatial scales, but does not change the overall canopy interception ratios compared with unburned and ungrazed tallgrass prairie. Our findings support the idea of convergence in interception ratio for different canopy structures under the same precipitation regime. The temporal change in rainfall interception loss from redcedar encroachment is important to understand how juniper encroachment will interact with changing rainfall regime and potentially alter regional streamflow under climate change. PMID:26544182

  9. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERIZATION IN MM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) (Grell et al. 1994) has been modified to include an urban canopy parameterization (UCP) for fine-scale urban simulations (~1-km horizontal grid spacing). The UCP accounts for drag ...

  10. Emergence time in forest bats: the influence of canopy closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    The role of the forest canopy in protecting bats roosting in forest from predators is poorly known. We analysed the effect of canopy closure on emergence time in Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. We used radio-tracking to locate roosts and filmed evening emergence. Comparisons were made between roosts in open areas and those in dense forest. Median emergence time and illuminance were correlated. Moreover, from pregnancy to late lactation bats emerged progressively earlier, probably because of the exceptionally high wing loading affecting pregnant bats and the high energy demand of lactation. A significant influence of canopy closure on median emergence time was revealed after adjusting for the effects of light and reproductive state. Bats in open habitat emerged later than those roosting beneath closed canopy. In cluttered habitats, predators relying on vision may find it more difficult to detect and catch bats at light levels which would offer more chances of success when attacking prey in open habitats. Bats in dense forest are less vulnerable to predators and may take advantage of an earlier emergence by prolonging foraging. Although more vulnerable, lactating females roosting at open sites may benefit from warmer roosting conditions. Roosts in dense forest may be preferred under intense predation pressure. Forest management should favour canopy heterogeneity to provide bats with a range of roosting conditions. Our work emphasises the role of a fine-grained spatial scale in the roosting ecology of forest bats.

  11. Canopy Cover Predictions using Ground Observations and Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1999-01-01

    Maps of vegetation status are needed at many scales, from the field level to monitor ecosystem condition to the global level to understand the carbon cycle. Status is quantified by such variables as leaf area index, biomass, and fraction of canopy cover. Current methods of predicting vegetation variables use remote sensing data to provide a spatially exhaustive data source. In a study in western Montana, several hundred ground observations made by the US Forest Service on tenth-acre conifer plots were used to develop aspatial regression and geostatistical prediction models. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values from Landsat Thematic Mapper images were used as ancillary data. These models were then used to predict canopy cover at unsampled locations in a 97 square kilometer region on the boundary of the Flathead National Forest and the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Independent data from two dates six years apart were used for validation. Given the assumption that actual canopy cover remained relatively unchanged within this time period, partial validation can be achieved by measuring the correspondence of the two maps. This criterion results in ranking the aspatial regression maps as less accurate than the geostatistically generated maps. The geostatistical approach emphasizes ground measurements more heavily than does aspatid regression. Geostatistical simulations of canopy cover also provide a means of describing uncertainty about the patterns of canopy cover.

  12. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain are investigated by employing the Renormalized Group (RNG) k-ɛ turbulence model. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by a few multi-tower advection experiments can be produced by this numerical simulation, such as: (1) unstable layer in the canopy, (2) super-stable layer associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy, (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  13. Experimental canopy removal enhances diversity of vernal pond amphibians.

    PubMed

    Skelly, David K; Bolden, Susan R; Freidenburg, L Kealoha

    2014-03-01

    Vernal ponds are often treated as protected environments receiving special regulation and management. Within the landscapes where they are found, forest vegetation frequently dominates surrounding uplands and can grow to overtop and shade pond basins. Two bodies of research offer differing views of the role of forest canopy for vernal pond systems. Studies of landscape conversion suggest that removing forest overstory within uplands can cause local extinctions of amphibians by altering terrestrial habitat or hindering movement. Studies of canopy above pond basins imply an opposite relationship; encroachment of overstory vegetation can be associated with local extinctions potentially via changes in light, thermal, and food resource environments. Unresolved uncertainties about the role of forest canopy reveal significant gaps in our understanding of wetland species distributions and dynamics. Any misunderstanding of canopy influences is simultaneously important to managers because current practices emphasize promoting or conserving vegetation growth particularly within buffers immediately adjacent to ponds. We evaluated this apparent contradiction by conducting a landscape-scale, long-term experiment using 14 natural vernal ponds. Tree felling at six manipulated ponds was limited in spatial scope but was nevertheless effective in increasing water temperature. Compared with eight control ponds, manipulated ponds maintained more amphibian species during five years post-manipulation. There was little evidence that any species was negatively influenced, and the reproductive effort of species for which we estimated egg inputs maintained pretreatment population densities in manipulated compared with control ponds. Overall, our experiment shows that a carefully circumscribed reduction of overhead forest canopy can enhance the capacity of vernal ponds to support wildlife diversity and suggests a scale dependence of canopy influences on amphibians. These findings have

  14. Deducing a Canopy Reduction Factor for Biogenic Emission Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guenther, A.

    2005-12-01

    The IPCC 2001 report states that "there is a serious discrepancy between the isoprene emissions derived by [Guenther et al., 1995] based on a global scaling of emission" . and "highlights a key uncertainty in global modeling of highly reactive trace gases: namely, what fraction of primary emissions escapes immediate reaction/removal in the vegetation canopy or immediate boundary layer and participates in the chemistry on the scales represented by global models?". A recent modeling study [Makar et al., 1999] suggested that up to 40 % of isoprene can be lost due to in-canopy chemistry. However, up to date only limited experimental datasets have been used to constrain canopy reduction factors (CRF) . Based on our recent CELTIC (Chemistry, Emission, Loss and Transformation in Canopies) initiative we measured VOC emissions above tropical, deciduous and evergreen ecosystems. In this paper we infer a new parameterization for modeling a CRF due to chemically short-lived biogenic compounds of the form: CRF = h/(a x u* x tau +h) (h: canopy height [m], u*: friction velocity [m/s], tau: lifetime [s], a: dimensionless fitting parameter a=1.5 +/- 0.1). This parameterization is based on results obtained during recent field studies in combination with a random walk model. For isoprene we find that the CRF is on the order of 2-5 % for typical daytime conditions. Loss rates for isoprene are somewhat smaller but within the range of previously reported values [Strong et al., 2004], [Stroud et al., 2005]. Many reactive terpenoid compounds (such as beta-caryophellene) with lifetimes on the order of minutes can be substantially reduced (e.g. up to 60-80 %) before they escape the forest canopy. References: Guenther, A., C.N. Hewitt, D. Erickson, and R. Fall, A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions, Journal of geophysical research, 100 (D/5), 8873-8892, 1995. Makar, P., J. Fuentes, D. Wang, R. Staebler, and H. Wiebe, Chemical processing of biogenic hydrocarbons within

  15. Amazonian functional diversity from forest canopy chemical assembly.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Sinca, Felipe; Carranza-Jiménez, Loreli; Martinez, Paola

    2014-04-15

    Patterns of tropical forest functional diversity express processes of ecological assembly at multiple geographic scales and aid in predicting ecological responses to environmental change. Tree canopy chemistry underpins forest functional diversity, but the interactive role of phylogeny and environment in determining the chemical traits of tropical trees is poorly known. Collecting and analyzing foliage in 2,420 canopy tree species across 19 forests in the western Amazon, we discovered (i) systematic, community-scale shifts in average canopy chemical traits along gradients of elevation and soil fertility; (ii) strong phylogenetic partitioning of structural and defense chemicals within communities independent of variation in environmental conditions; and (iii) strong environmental control on foliar phosphorus and calcium, the two rock-derived elements limiting CO2 uptake in tropical forests. These findings indicate that the chemical diversity of western Amazonian forests occurs in a regionally nested mosaic driven by long-term chemical trait adjustment of communities to large-scale environmental filters, particularly soils and climate, and is supported by phylogenetic divergence of traits essential to foliar survival under varying environmental conditions. Geographically nested patterns of forest canopy chemical traits will play a role in determining the response and functional rearrangement of western Amazonian ecosystems to changing land use and climate. PMID:24591585

  16. Amazonian functional diversity from forest canopy chemical assembly

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Martin, Roberta E.; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B.; Sinca, Felipe; Carranza-Jiménez, Loreli; Martinez, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of tropical forest functional diversity express processes of ecological assembly at multiple geographic scales and aid in predicting ecological responses to environmental change. Tree canopy chemistry underpins forest functional diversity, but the interactive role of phylogeny and environment in determining the chemical traits of tropical trees is poorly known. Collecting and analyzing foliage in 2,420 canopy tree species across 19 forests in the western Amazon, we discovered (i) systematic, community-scale shifts in average canopy chemical traits along gradients of elevation and soil fertility; (ii) strong phylogenetic partitioning of structural and defense chemicals within communities independent of variation in environmental conditions; and (iii) strong environmental control on foliar phosphorus and calcium, the two rock-derived elements limiting CO2 uptake in tropical forests. These findings indicate that the chemical diversity of western Amazonian forests occurs in a regionally nested mosaic driven by long-term chemical trait adjustment of communities to large-scale environmental filters, particularly soils and climate, and is supported by phylogenetic divergence of traits essential to foliar survival under varying environmental conditions. Geographically nested patterns of forest canopy chemical traits will play a role in determining the response and functional rearrangement of western Amazonian ecosystems to changing land use and climate. PMID:24591585

  17. A review of crop canopy reflectance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Various models for calculating crop canopy reflectance, in the visible and infrared wavelengths, from the optical and geometrical properties of a canopy and its constituents are reviewed. The radiative transfer equation is discussed as well as both analytical and numerical crop reflectance models which are manifestations of the solution of this equation. Recommendations are made for further work in modeling of canopy reflectance.

  18. Influence of canopy foliage on turbulence above tall deciduous vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkalijevski, Metodija; Moene, Arnold; Ouwersloot, Huug; Patton, Edward; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the role of tree phenology on the atmospheric turbulence over tall vegetation is investigated. Our aim is to study dimensionless mean gradients, variances, and the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) within the roughness sublayer (RSL), and their dependence on the leaf state of the canopy and the stability regimes. To do this, we analyse observations, that are continuously collected over a whole season above and in a walnut tree orchard during the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment near Dixon, California. To support this data analysis, we compare profiles of vertical fluxes and co-variances, as well as vertical gradients of mean wind, temperature and humidity, with empirically derived dimensionless gradients from previous studies and results from a second-order closure turbulence diagnostic model. In doing so, we study the differences in the calculation of the dimensionless gradients between recently developed model approaches that account for the RSL effects on these gradients against representations that omit those effects. The observations and model results are non-dimensionalized using atmospheric surface layer scaling, paying special attention to the displacement height. The latter is calculated from the observations and depends on the variable under consideration and the leaf state. Our results for the dimensionless gradients of momentum, heat and moisture show a reduction of these variables closer to the canopy top compared to the standard Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) for both unstable and near neutral conditions. We find that the reduction is larger for canopy with leaves than for leafless canopy. This confirms the applicability of the aforementioned RSL models. Their results are in better agreement with the observations for the fully vegetated canopy then for the leafless canopy. With regard to the TKE-budget, our analysis shows that turbulent transport is increasingly important term of the budget when

  19. Beyond the Big Leaf: Quantifying Interactions between Canopy Structure and Canopy Photosynthesis Using Isotopic Partitioning of Net Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of CO2 in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asirwatham, J.; Wehr, R. A.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon isotopes can be used to partition the net total carbon exchange (measured by standard eddy covariance) into its photosynthetic and respiratory components. This partitioning requires an estimate of the isotopic signature of canopy-scale photosynthesis, which has been obtained to date by assuming that the canopy behaves like a single 'big leaf'. This assumption neglects the heterogeneity of the canopy both vertically and with respect to leaf angles: leaves at various heights and angles experience different sunlight, temperature, and wind, and are physiologically different as well. In order to explore errors associated with the big leaf assumption, we applied a big leaf isotopic partitioning algorithm to canopy-scale net fluxes of 13CO2, 12CO2, heat, and water generated by a multi-leaf isotopic canopy simulation. The simulation included micro-environmental heterogeneity produced by the canopy geometry (leaf angles and arrangement) as well as physiological variation among leaves, invoking leaf-level energy balance to determine leaf temperatures. Leaf behavior in the simulation was parameterized by leaf-level gas-exchange measurements of the relevant characteristics of a range of leaves in the canopy (e.g. limiting photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, daytime respiration). These measurements indicated that photosynthetic capacity increased with height in the canopy, but that within a given canopy layer, leaf behavior showed surprisingly little variability. They also indicated that stomatal conductance did not relate quasi-linearly to light or photosynthetic rate, but was instead roughly constant with light at all photosynthetic photon flux densities above 100 μE m-2 s-1. The multi-leaf simulation incorporating these leaf behaviors suggested that the big leaf assumption is valid under diffuse light conditions but can lead to significant errors under clear sky conditions.

  20. Thermal Imaging of Forest Canopy Temperatures: Relationships with Biological and Biophysical Drivers and Ecosystem Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, C. J.; Kim, Y.; Hanson, C. V.; Law, B. E.; Kwon, H.; Schulze, M.; Pau, S.; Detto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is a primary environmental control on plant processes at a range of spatial and temporal scales, affecting enzymatic reactions, ecosystem biogeochemistry, and species distributions. Although most focus is on air temperature, the radiative or skin temperature of plants is more relevant. Canopy skin temperature dynamics reflect biophysical, physiological, and anatomical characteristics and interactions with environmental drivers, and can be used to examine forest responses to stresses like droughts and heat waves. Direct measurements of plant canopy temperatures using thermocouple sensors have been challenging and offer limited information. Such measurements are usually conducted over short periods of time and a limited spatial extent of the canopy. By contrast, thermal infrared (TIR) imaging allows for extensive temporal and spatial measurement of canopy temperature regimes. We present results of TIR imaging of forest canopies at a range of well-studied forest sites in the United States and Panama. These forest types include temperate rainforests, a semi­arid pine forest, and a semi­deciduous tropical forest. Canopy temperature regimes at these sites are highly variable spatially and temporally and display frequent departures from air temperature, particularly during clear sky conditions. Canopy tissue temperatures are often warmer (daytime) and colder (nighttime) than air temperature, and canopy structure seems to have a large influence on the thermal regime. Additionally, comparison of canopy temperatures to eddy covariance fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy reveals relationships not apparent using air temperature. Initial comparisons between our forest canopy temperatures and remotely sensed skin temperature using Landsat and MODIS data show reasonably good agreement. We conclude that temporal and spatial changes in canopy temperature and its relationship to biological and environmental factors can improve our understanding of how

  1. Employing lidar to detail vegetation canopy architecture for prediction of aeolian transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Law, Darin J.; Breshears, David D.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse and fundamental effects that aeolian processes have on the biosphere and geosphere are commonly generated by horizontal sediment transport at the land surface. However, predicting horizontal sediment transport depends on vegetation architecture, which is difficult to quantify in a rapid but accurate manner. We demonstrate an approach to measure vegetation canopy architecture at high resolution using lidar along a gradient of dryland sites ranging from 2% to 73% woody plant canopy cover. Lidar-derived canopy height, distance (gaps) between vegetation elements (e.g., trunks, limbs, leaves), and the distribution of gaps scaled by vegetation height were correlated with canopy cover and highlight potentially improved horizontal dust flux estimation than with cover alone. Employing lidar to estimate detailed vegetation canopy architecture offers promise for improved predictions of horizontal sediment transport across heterogeneous plant assemblages.

  2. Near Wake of an Inflating Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desabrais, Kenneth; Johari, Hamid

    2001-11-01

    The near wake of a parachute canopy inflating in a constant freestream was experimentally investigated in a water tunnel at a Re = 30,000. The temporal evolution of the velocity field immediately downstream of the canopy was measured along with the canopy diameter and force. The inflation of the canopy occurs in three stages. In the initial stage, the flow is fully attached to the surface of the canopy. During this stage, the canopy diameter increases substantially but the drag only rises gradually. The next stage of inflation initiates when the boundary layer separates from the canopy surface near the apex of the canopy. The drag rapidly increases at this point and achieves its maximum value. Subsequently, the drag sharply declines even while the canopy diameter continues to increase. During this stage of inflation, the boundary layer separation point moves from the apex region towards the canopy skirt. The final stage of inflation occurs once the separated shear layer, originating at the canopy skirt, rolls-up into a large vortex ring. The drag achieves a local minimum during the final stage, while the diameter achieves its maximum value.

  3. Does canopy nitrogen uptake enhance carbon sequestration by trees?

    PubMed

    Nair, Richard K F; Perks, Micheal P; Weatherall, Andrew; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    Temperate forest (15) N isotope trace experiments find nitrogen (N) addition-driven carbon (C) uptake is modest as little additional N is acquired by trees; however, several correlations of ambient N deposition against forest productivity imply a greater effect of atmospheric nitrogen deposition than these studies. We asked whether N deposition experiments adequately represent all processes found in ambient conditions. In particular, experiments typically apply (15) N to directly to forest floors, assuming uptake of nitrogen intercepted by canopies (CNU) is minimal. Additionally, conventional (15) N additions typically trace mineral (15) N additions rather than litter N recycling and may increase total N inputs above ambient levels. To test the importance of CNU and recycled N to tree nutrition, we conducted a mesocosm experiment, applying 54 g N/(15) N ha(-1)  yr(-1) to Sitka spruce saplings. We compared tree and soil (15) N recovery among treatments where enrichment was due to either (1) a (15) N-enriched litter layer, or mineral (15) N additions to (2) the soil or (3) the canopy. We found that 60% of (15) N applied to the canopy was recovered above ground (in needles, stem and branches) while only 21% of (15) N applied to the soil was found in these pools. (15) N recovery from litter was low and highly variable. (15) N partitioning among biomass pools and age classes also differed among treatments, with twice as much (15) N found in woody biomass when deposited on the canopy than soil. Stoichiometrically calculated N effect on C uptake from (15) N applied to the soil, scaled to real-world conditions, was 43 kg C kg N(-1) , similar to manipulation studies. The effect from the canopy treatment was 114 kg C kg N(-1) . Canopy treatments may be critical to accurately represent N deposition in the field and may address the discrepancy between manipulative and correlative studies. PMID:26391113

  4. Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Kutter, E.

    2015-07-01

    Stably stratified canopy flow in complex terrain has been considered a difficult condition for measuring net ecosystem-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water vapor, and energy. A long-standing advection error in eddy-flux measurements is caused by stably stratified canopy flow. Such a condition with strong thermal gradient and less turbulent air is also difficult for modeling. To understand the challenging atmospheric condition for eddy-flux measurements, we use the renormalized group (RNG) k-ϵ turbulence model to investigate the main characteristics of stably stratified canopy flows in complex terrain. In this two-dimensional simulation, we imposed persistent constant heat flux at ground surface and linearly increasing cooling rate in the upper-canopy layer, vertically varying dissipative force from canopy drag elements, buoyancy forcing induced from thermal stratification and the hill terrain. These strong boundary effects keep nonlinearity in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations high enough to generate turbulent behavior. The fundamental characteristics of nighttime canopy flow over complex terrain measured by the small number of available multi-tower advection experiments can be reproduced by this numerical simulation, such as (1) unstable layer in the canopy and super-stable layers associated with flow decoupling in deep canopy and near the top of canopy; (2) sub-canopy drainage flow and drainage flow near the top of canopy in calm night; (3) upward momentum transfer in canopy, downward heat transfer in upper canopy and upward heat transfer in deep canopy; and (4) large buoyancy suppression and weak shear production in strong stability.

  5. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  6. Ground-Based Robotic Sensing of an Agricultural Sub-Canopy Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, A.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing is a useful method for measuring agricultural crop parameters over large areas; however, the approach becomes limited to above-canopy characterization as a crop matures due to reduced visual access of the sub-canopy environment. During the growth cycle of an agricultural crop, such as soybeans, the micrometeorology of the sub-canopy environment can significantly impact pod development and reduced yields may result. Larger-scale environmental conditions aside, the physical structure and configuration of the sub-canopy matrix will logically influence local climate conditions for a single plant; understanding the state and development of the sub-canopy could inform crop models and improve best practices but there are currently no low-cost methods to quantify the sub-canopy environment at a high spatial and temporal resolution over an entire growth cycle. This work describes the modification of a small tactical and semi-autonomous, ground-based robotic platform with sensors capable of mapping the physical structure of an agricultural row crop sub-canopy; a soybean crop is used as a case study. Point cloud data representing the sub-canopy structure are stored in LAS format and can be used for modeling and visualization in standard GIS software packages.

  7. Measurement of tree canopy architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, S. N.; Ustin, S. L.; Norman, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The lack of accurate extensive geometric data on tree canopies has retarded development and validation of radiative transfer models. A stratified sampling method was devised to measure the three-dimensional geometry of 16 walnut trees which had received irrigation treatments of either 100 or 33 per cent of evapotranspirational (ET) demand for the previous two years. Graphic reconstructions of the three-dimensional geometry were verified by 58 independent measurements. The distributions of stem- and leaf-size classes, lengths, and angle classes were determined and used to calculate leaf area index (LAI), stem area, and biomass. Reduced irrigation trees have lower biomass of stems, leaves and fruit, lower LAI, steeper leaf angles and altered biomass allocation to large stems. These data can be used in ecological models that link canopy processes with remotely sensed measurements.

  8. Incorporating Canopy Cover for Airborne-Derived Assessments of Forest Biomass in the Tropical Forests of Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Minerva; Evans, Damian; Coomes, David A.; Friess, Daniel A.; Suy Tan, Boun; Samean Nin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the role of canopy cover in influencing above ground biomass (AGB) dynamics of an open canopied forest and evaluates the efficacy of individual-based and plot-scale height metrics in predicting AGB variation in the tropical forests of Angkor Thom, Cambodia. The AGB was modeled by including canopy cover from aerial imagery alongside with the two different canopy vertical height metrics derived from LiDAR; the plot average of maximum tree height (Max_CH) of individual trees, and the top of the canopy height (TCH). Two different statistical approaches, log-log ordinary least squares (OLS) and support vector regression (SVR), were used to model AGB variation in the study area. Ten different AGB models were developed using different combinations of airborne predictor variables. It was discovered that the inclusion of canopy cover estimates considerably improved the performance of AGB models for our study area. The most robust model was log-log OLS model comprising of canopy cover only (r = 0.87; RMSE = 42.8 Mg/ha). Other models that approximated field AGB closely included both Max_CH and canopy cover (r = 0.86, RMSE = 44.2 Mg/ha for SVR; and, r = 0.84, RMSE = 47.7 Mg/ha for log-log OLS). Hence, canopy cover should be included when modeling the AGB of open-canopied tropical forests. PMID:27176218

  9. Incorporating Canopy Cover for Airborne-Derived Assessments of Forest Biomass in the Tropical Forests of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Minerva; Evans, Damian; Coomes, David A; Friess, Daniel A; Suy Tan, Boun; Samean Nin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the role of canopy cover in influencing above ground biomass (AGB) dynamics of an open canopied forest and evaluates the efficacy of individual-based and plot-scale height metrics in predicting AGB variation in the tropical forests of Angkor Thom, Cambodia. The AGB was modeled by including canopy cover from aerial imagery alongside with the two different canopy vertical height metrics derived from LiDAR; the plot average of maximum tree height (Max_CH) of individual trees, and the top of the canopy height (TCH). Two different statistical approaches, log-log ordinary least squares (OLS) and support vector regression (SVR), were used to model AGB variation in the study area. Ten different AGB models were developed using different combinations of airborne predictor variables. It was discovered that the inclusion of canopy cover estimates considerably improved the performance of AGB models for our study area. The most robust model was log-log OLS model comprising of canopy cover only (r = 0.87; RMSE = 42.8 Mg/ha). Other models that approximated field AGB closely included both Max_CH and canopy cover (r = 0.86, RMSE = 44.2 Mg/ha for SVR; and, r = 0.84, RMSE = 47.7 Mg/ha for log-log OLS). Hence, canopy cover should be included when modeling the AGB of open-canopied tropical forests. PMID:27176218

  10. Averaging procedures for flow within vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, M. R.; Shaw, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Most one-dimensional models of flow within vegetation canopies are based on horizontally averaged flow variables. This paper formalizes the horizontal averaging operation. Two averaging schemes are considered: pure horizontal averaging at a single instant, and time averaging followed by horizontal averaging. These schemes produce different forms for the mean and turbulent kinetic energy balances, and especially for the ‘wake production’ term describing the transfer of energy from large-scale motion to wake turbulence by form drag. The differences are primarily due to the appearance, in the covariances produced by the second scheme, of dispersive components arising from the spatial correlation of time-averaged flow variables. The two schemes are shown to coincide if these dispersive fluxes vanish.

  11. Turbulent Wind Temperature and Pressure in a Mature Hardwood Canopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, Paul Sheldon

    An understanding of the mechanisms controlling turbulent exchange in plant canopies is necessary for a variety of ecological, meteorological and agricultural problems. Previous studies have shown that most of the exchange is caused by intermittent, coherent, turbulence structures. This study describes these structures in a mature hardwood forest, with special attention to the role of static pressure fluctuations within and above the canopy. The study was conducted from an instrument tower in a 31 m tall forest in the piedmont region of North Carolina, USA. Measurements were made at two levels: above the forest at 1.2 times the canopy height (h), and either just below the forest canopy at 0.6 h or in the middle of the lower third of the canopy at 0.7 h. A static pressure probe consisting of two parallel, flat disks was fabricated and tested in a wind tunnel. Each measurement level included the pressure probe (p), a sonic anemometer (u v w) and a fine wire thermocouple (T). A third pressure probe was installed at the surface. Measurements from all instruments were made at five Hz and block averaged to one Hz for analysis. 22 hrs of data were analyzed. Integral time scales were calculated for each of the above variables. The relative duration of coherent signals was p > T = u > w. Lagged correlations between the measurements made above and below the canopy show that the variables were well correlated between the levels, with the order of correlation being p > w > T = u. p and w measurements were synchronous at all measurement heights, while T below the canopy lagged T above, and u showed both lags and leads. The segments of the data showing turbulent structures were ensemble averaged for a variety of atmospheric stability conditions. These averages show that a vertically synchronous pressure pulse accompanies each turbulent structure. Two flow regimes are demonstrated for u, one driven by advected momentum and one driven by pressure gradients. Vertical velocity

  12. Influence of seasonal canopy development on turbulent flow characteristics in a hedgerow vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Pitacco, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence is the main driver of vegetation-atmosphere exchanges. Flow characteristics determine the transport of energy and matter between different layers of the canopy and the atmosphere, defining local microclimatic conditions and influencing physiological processes of the vegetation. Therefore, studying turbulent flow dynamics inside and above the canopy is crucial to correctly predict overall fluxes of matter and energy and to understand their nature. Numerous studies have already investigated the characteristics of canopy turbulence over a wide range of vegetation types, leading to a thorough description of canopy turbulence. However, only a few studies have investigated the influence of gradual canopy structural changes such as foliage density (on multi-day time scales) on turbulence field properties. We hypothesize that seasonal variations of foliage density play a crucial role modifying foliage drag and canopy roughness, determining the degree of coupling between vegetation and the atmosphere, and changing the profiles of turbulent moments. The aim of this study was to follow the continuous evolution of turbulent flow characteristics from leaf budbreak to fully developed foliage in a hedgerow vineyard in the North East of Italy. Synchronous measurements from a vertical profile of five sonic anemometers on a 5 m tower have been collected at 20 Hz from beginning of April to end of July 2015.Detailed measurements of Leaf Area Density (LAD) profile and canopy architecture were performed at regular intervals (ca. weekly) around the tower. The canopy bulk drag coefficient increased during the growing season, suggesting that the coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere increased with LAD. Vertical profiles of turbulent statistics showed to be highly correlated to local values of LAD. The penetration of momentum flux in the canopy decreased with the gradual increase of foliage. Most of the drag was exerted by the part of the canopy with denser foliage

  13. Improved regional mapping of carbon, water, and energy land-surface fluxes through indicators of canopy light use efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown that canopy-scale estimates of chlorophyll (Cab) can be useful for constraining canopy light-use-efficiency (LUE) parameters used in many models of carbon fluxes. LUE is the amount of carbon that a plant can assimilate for a given amount of absorbed Photosynthetically Acti...

  14. Waveform- and Terrestrial Lidar Assessment of the Usual (Structural) Suspects in a Forest Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aardt, J. A.; Romanczyk, P.; Kelbe, D.; van Leeuwen, M.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; Gough, C. M.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    Forest inventory has evolved from standard stem diameter-height relationships, to coarse canopy metrics, to more involved ecologically-meaningful variables, such as leaf area index (LAI) and even canopy radiative transfer as a function of canopy gaps, leaf clumping, and leaf angle distributions. Accurate and precise measurement of the latter set of variables presents a challenge to the ecological and modeling communities; however, relatively novel remote sensing modalities, e.g., waveform lidar (wlidar) and terrestrial lidar systems (TLS), have the potential to adress this challenge. Research teams at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) have been collaborating with the National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) to assess vegetation canopy structure and variation at the University of Michigan Biological Research Station and the NEON Northeast domain (Harvard Forest, MA). Airborne small-footprint wlidar data, in-situ TLS data, and first-principles, physics-based simulation tools are being used to study (i) the impact of vegetation canopy geometric elements on wlidar signals (twigs and petioles have been deemed negligible), (ii) the analysis of airborne wlidar data for top-down assessment of canopy metrics such as LAI, and (iii) our ability to extract "bottom-up" canopy structure from TLS using scans registered to each other using a novel marker-free registration approach (e.g., basal area: R2=0.82, RMSE=7.43 m2/ha). Such studies indicate that we can potentially assess radiative transfer through vegetation canopies remotely using a vertically-stratified approach with wlidar, and augment such an approach via rapid-scan TLS technology to gain a better understanding of fine-scale variation in canopy structure. This in turn is key to quantifying and modeling radiative transfer based on understanding of forest canopy structural change as a function of ecosystem development, climate, and anthropogenic drivers.

  15. Evaluation of the Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Surface Algorithm (ACASA Model) Using Eddy Covariance Technique Over Sparse Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Spano, D.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Snyder, R.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.

    2008-12-01

    Land surface models are usually used to quantify energy and mass fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere on micro- and regional scales. One of the most elaborate land surface models for flux modelling is the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) model, which provides micro-scale as well as regional-scale fluxes when imbedded in a meso-scale meteorological model (e.g., MM5 or WRF). The model predicts vegetation conditions and changes with time due to plant responses to environment variables. In particular, fluxes and profiles of heat, water vapor, carbon and momentum within and above canopy are estimated using third-order equations. It also estimates turbulent profiles of velocity, temperature, humidity within and above canopy, and CO2 fluxes are estimated using a combination of Ball-Berry and Farquhar equations. The ACASA model is also able to include the effects of water stress on stomata, transpiration and CO2 assimilation. ACASA model is unique because it separates canopy domain into twenty atmospheric layers (ten layers within the canopy and ten layers above the canopy), and the soil is partitioned into fifteen layers of variable thickness. The model was mainly used over dense canopies in the past, so the aim of this work was to test the ACASA model over a sparse canopy as Mediterranean maquis. Vegetation is composed by sclerophyllous species of shrubs that are always green, with leathery leaves, small height, with a moderately sparse canopy, and that are tolerant at water stress condition. Eddy Covariance (EC) technique was used to collect continuous data for more than 3 years period. Field measurements were taken in a natural maquis site located near Alghero, Sardinia, Italy and they were used to parameterize and validate the model. The input values were selected by running the model several times varying the one parameter per time. A second step in the parameterization process was the simultaneously variation of some parameters

  16. An empirical model that uses light attenuation and plant nitrogen status to predict within-canopy nitrogen distribution and upscale photosynthesis from leaf to whole canopy

    PubMed Central

    Louarn, Gaëtan; Frak, Ela; Zaka, Serge; Prieto, Jorge; Lebon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Modelling the spatial and temporal distribution of leaf nitrogen (N) is central to specify photosynthetic parameters and simulate canopy photosynthesis. Leaf photosynthetic parameters depend on both local light availability and whole-plant N status. The interaction between these two levels of integration has generally been modelled by assuming optimal canopy functioning, which is not supported by experiments. During this study, we examined how a set of empirical relationships with measurable parameters could be used instead to predict photosynthesis at the leaf and whole-canopy levels. The distribution of leaf N per unit area (Na) within the canopy was related to leaf light irradiance and to the nitrogen nutrition index (NNI), a whole-plant variable accounting for plant N status. Na was then used to determine the photosynthetic parameters of a leaf gas exchange model. The model was assessed on alfalfa canopies under contrasting N nutrition and with N2-fixing and non-fixing plants. Three experiments were carried out to parameterize the relationships between Na, leaf irradiance, NNI and photosynthetic parameters. An additional independent data set was used for model evaluation. The N distribution model showed that it was able to predict leaf N on the set of leaves tested. The Na at the top of the canopy appeared to be related linearly to the NNI, whereas the coefficient accounting for N allocation remained constant. Photosynthetic parameters were related linearly to Na irrespective of N nutrition and the N acquisition mode. Daily patterns of gas exchange were simulated accurately at the leaf scale. When integrated at the whole-canopy scale, the model predicted that raising N availability above an NNI of 1 did not result in increased net photosynthesis. Overall, the model proposed offered a solution for a dynamic coupling of leaf photosynthesis and canopy N distribution without requiring any optimal functioning hypothesis. PMID:26433705

  17. Post senescent grass canopy remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of in situ collected spectral reflectance data from a dormant or senescent grass canopy showed a direct relationship existed between spectral reflectance and biomass for the 0.50-0.80 micron spectral region. The data, collected four weeks after the end of the growing season, indicated that post senescent remote sensing of grass canopy biomass is possible and helps to elucidate the spectral contribution of recently dead vegetation in mixed live/dead canopy situations.

  18. Canopy architecture measured with a laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Silva, L. F.; Bauer, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    A laser based method was employed to measure and numerically describe the architecture of a corn canopy. Use of the method provides an interception coefficient for classes of vegetation in layers of the canopy viewed in various directions. Architectural data obtained for similar corn canopies but measured by differing methods are comparable to the results obtained using the laser based method. These results provide input data to mathematical models employed in remote sensing for describing the radiation environment in a plant canopy and predicting its reflectance.

  19. Tree canopy radiance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, William; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-01-01

    A system is described for obtaining both an estimate of the spatial mean bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for a tree canopy (displaying a horizontally heterogeneous foliage distribution) and the statistical significance of that estimate. The system includes a manlift supporting a horizontal beam 7 m long on which are mounted four radiometers. These radiometers may be pointed, and radiance data acquired, in any of 11 view directions in the principal plane of the sun. A total of 80 data points, acquired in 3 min, were used to estimate the BRF of a walnut orchard 5 m tall and detect true differences of 12 percent of the mean approximately 90 percent of the time.

  20. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  1. Patterns of association between canopy-morphology and understorey assemblages across temperate Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler-Walker, Meegan J.; Gillanders, Bronwyn M.; Connell, Sean D.; Irving, Andrew D.

    2005-04-01

    Patterns of association between canopy and understorey vegetation have been described over 1000s of km according to the presence and absence of algal canopies and the different types of canopies. However, the degree to which morphological variation of the canopy is correlated with patterns in the understorey algal assemblage is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that variation in the morphology of Ecklonia radiata, growing in monospecific canopies, is associated with variation in the structure of understorey assemblages at regional scales across temperate Australia. We found that the morphology of kelp did correlate with the structure of understorey assemblages, over broad spatial scales, particularly that of surface area/volume ratio and measures of stipe width. These canopy-understorey associations revealed two 'types' of kelp forest; one characteristic of Western and South Australia and the other of Eastern Australia. We suggest that future research on causal relationships between morphology and understorey assemblages of algae consider the potential importance that morphology may have on mechanisms such as light penetration and physical abrasion by fronds. Whilst correlations between the understorey and morphology do not demonstrate causality, the realisation that these associations occur over broad spatial scales and that southern and eastern Australia differ in their 'type' of kelp forest, at the very least, contributes to a more broadly based understanding of a major ecological pattern across the world's most extensive west-east coastline.

  2. Forest canopy structural parameters and Leaf Area Index retrieval using multi-sensors synergy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhuo; Wang, Jindi; Song, Jinling; Zhou, Hongmin; Pang, Yong; Cai, Wenwen; Chen, Baisong

    2009-08-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key vegetation structural parameter in ecosystem. Our new approach is on forest LAI retrieval by GOMS model (Geometrical-Optical model considering the effect of crown shape and Mutual Shadowing) inversion using multi-sensor observations. The mountainous terrain forest area in Dayekou in Gansu province of China is selected as our study area. The model inversion method by integrating MODIS, MISR and LIDAR data for forest canopy LAI retrieval is proposed. In the MODIS sub-pixel scale, four scene components' spectrum (sunlit canopy, sunlit background, shaded canopy and shaded background) of GOMS model are extracted from SPOT data. And tree heights are extracted from airborne LIDAR data. The extracted four scene components and tree heights are taken as the a priori knowledge applied in GOMS model inversion for improving forest canopy structural parameters estimation accuracy. According to the field investigation, BRDF data set of needle forest pixels is collected by combining MODIS BRDF product and MISR BRF product. Then forest canopy parameters are retrieved based on GOMS. Finally, LAI of forest canopy is estimated by the retrieved structural parameters and it is compared with ground measurement. Results indicate that it is possible to improve the forest canopy structural parameters estimation accuracy by combining observations of passive and active remote sensors.

  3. Canopy spectral and chemical diversity from lowland to tree line in the Western Amazon using CAO-VSWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Canopy chemistry and spectroscopy offer insight into community assembly and ecosystem processes in high-diversity tropical forests. Results from one lowland site in the Peruvian Amazon suggests both an environmental and an evolutionary component of canopy trait development however, the degree to which larger environmental differences influence diversity in canopy traits and their respective spectroscopic signatures across remains poorly understood. The spectranomics approach explicitly connects phylogenetic, chemical and spectral patterns in tropical canopies providing the basis for analysis, while high-fidelity, airborne remote sensing measurements extend plot-level data to landscape-scale, achieving a comprehensive view of the region. In 2011, the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) was used to sample a large region of the Western Amazon Basin in southeastern Peru, extending from lowlands to tree line in the Andean mountains. The CAO Visible-Shortwave Imaging Spectrometer (VSWIR) collected 480-band high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data of the forest canopy, while its high-resolution LiDAR captured information on canopy structure and the underlying terrain. The data were used to quantify relationships between environmental gradients and canopy chemical and spectral diversity. Results suggest strong environmental control with additional phylogenetic influence over canopy spectral and chemical properties, particularly those related to structure, defense and metabolic function. Data from CAO-VSWIR extends the large range in canopy chemical and spectral diversity related to environmental factors across the Western Amazon Basin.

  4. Detecting forest canopy layering: applying lidar remote sensing to further understand the role of vertical structure in species habitat preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehurst, A. S.; Dubayah, R.; Swatantran, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full waveform lidar reflects off all forest canopy elements, showing not only height, but also the structure within the canopy from the top to the forest floor, making it an ideal remote sensing technology for research in forest ecosystem dynamics. Vertical stratification or canopy layering has long been noted as an essential element in the forest ecosystem and of importance for species habitat. This project explores the utility of lidar for characterizing forest canopy layering and applying canopy layering information to better understand species habitat preference. Canopy layering will be mapped across the landscape using full-waveform lidar remote sensing data from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). Two methods for quantifying layering have been developed from LVIS data collected during the summer of 2009 for Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. The two layering datasets (one categorical, one continuous) describe how vertical stratification varies across the forest with canopy height and elevation. The relationships between of canopy layering and avian species habitat preference will also be assessed for bird species within Hubbard Brook Experimental forest. These results will provide ecologically meaningful information and a relevant method for quantifying canopy layering at the landscape scale, which will aid in a better understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics for forest management and species habitat research.

  5. Changes in leaf area, nitrogen content and canopy photosynthesis in soybean exposed to an ozone concentration gradient.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Shimpei; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    Influences of ozone (O3) on light-saturated rates of photosynthesis in crop leaves have been well documented. To increase our understanding of O3 effects on individual- or stand level productivity, a mechanistic understanding of factors determining canopy photosynthesis is necessary. We used a canopy model to scale photosynthesis from leaf to canopy, and analyzed the importance of canopy structural and leaf ecophysiological characteristics in determining canopy photosynthesis in soybean stands exposed to 9 concentrations of [O3] (37-116 ppb; 9-h mean). Light intensity and N content peaked in upper canopy layers, and sharply decreased through the lower canopy. Plant leaf area decreased with increasing [O3] allowing for greater light intensity to reach lower canopy levels. At the leaf level, light-saturated photosynthesis decreased and dark respiration increased with increasing [O3]. These data were used to calculate daily net canopy photosynthesis (Pc). Pc decreased with increasing [O3] with an average decrease of 10% for an increase in [O3] of 10 ppb, and which was similar to changes in above-ground dry mass production of the stands. Absolute daily net photosynthesis of lower layers was very low and thus the decrease in photosynthesis in the lower canopy caused by elevated [O3] had only minor significance for total canopy photosynthesis. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the decrease in Pc was associated with changes in leaf ecophysiology but not with decrease in leaf area. The soybean stands were very crowded, the leaves were highly mutually shaded, and sufficient light for positive carbon balance did not penetrate to lower canopy leaves, even under elevated [O3]. PMID:27261884

  6. Canopy Spectral Invariants. Part 2; Application to Classification of Forest Types from Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schull, M. A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Xu, L.; Samanta, A.; Carmona, P. L.; Lepine, L.; Jenkins, J. P.; Ganguly, S.; Myneni, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to demonstrate the ability of hyperspectral data to discriminate plant dominant species. Most of them have employed the use of empirically based techniques, which are site specific, requires some initial training based on characteristics of known leaf and/or canopy spectra and therefore may not be extendable to operational use or adapted to changing or unknown land cover. In this paper we propose a physically based approach for separation of dominant forest type using hyperspectral data. The radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants underlies the approach, which facilitates parameterization of the canopy reflectance in terms of the leaf spectral scattering and two spectrally invariant and structurally varying variables - recollision and directional escape probabilities. The methodology is based on the idea of retrieving spectrally invariant parameters from hyperspectral data first, and then relating their values to structural characteristics of three-dimensional canopy structure. Theoretical and empirical analyses of ground and airborne data acquired by Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over two sites in New England, USA, suggest that the canopy spectral invariants convey information about canopy structure at both the macro- and micro-scales. The total escape probability (one minus recollision probability) varies as a power function with the exponent related to the number of nested hierarchical levels present in the pixel. Its base is a geometrical mean of the local total escape probabilities and accounts for the cumulative effect of canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The ratio of the directional to the total escape probability becomes independent of the number of hierarchical levels and is a function of the canopy structure at the macro-scale such as tree spatial distribution, crown shape and size, within-crown foliage density and ground cover. These properties allow for the natural

  7. Temporal Variability of Stemflow Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Concentrations and Quality from Morphologically Contrasting Deciduous Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stan, J. T.; Levia, D. F.; Inamdar, S. P.; Mitchell, M. J.; Mage, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) inputs from canopy-derived hydrologic fluxes play a significant role in the terrestrial carbon budgets of forested ecosystems. However, no studies known to the authors have examined the variability of both DOC concentrations and quality for stemflow across time scales, nor has any study to date evaluated the effects of canopy structure on stemflow DOC characteristics. This investigation seeks to rectify this knowledge gap by examining the variability of stemflow DOC concentrations and quality across contrasting canopy morphologies and time scales (seasonal, storm and intrastorm). Bulk and intrastorm stemflow samples from a less dense, rough-barked, more plagiophile (Liriodendron tulipifera L. (tulip poplar)) and a denser, thin-barked, more erectophile (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech)) canopy were collected and analyzed for DOC quality using metrics derived from UV-vis spectroscopy (E2:E3 ratio, SUVA254, select spectral slope (S), and spectral slope ratios (SR)). Our results suggest that stemflow DOC concentrations and quality change as crown architectural traits enhance or diminish hydrologic retention time within the canopy. The architecture of L. tulipifera canopies likely retards the flow of intercepted water, increasing chemical exchange with bark and foliar surfaces. UV-vis metrics indicated that this increased chemical exchange, particularly with bark surfaces, generally enhanced aromatic hydrocarbon content and increased molecular weight. Because leaf presence influenced DOC quality, stemflow DOC characteristics also varied seasonally in response to canopy condition. At the inter- and intrastorm scale, stemflow DOC concentration and quality varied with meteorological and antecedent canopy conditions. Since recent studies have linked stemflow production to preferential subsurface transport of dissolved chemistries, trends in DOC speciation and fluxes described in this study may impact soil environments within wooded

  8. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Renata C.; Andersen, Thomas L.; Friedman, Peter A.; Tumber, Navdeep; Salusky, Isidro B.; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies consisting of a layer of flat osteoblastic cells. These canopies have been suggested to play a key role in the recruitment of osteoprogenitors during the process of bone remodeling. This study was performed to address the characteristics of the canopies above bone formation and resorption sites and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2–5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces with visible canopy coverage was associated with plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, bone formation rate, and the extent of remodeling surfaces. Collectively, these data support the conclusion that canopies respond to the elevated PTH levels in CKD and that they possess the molecular machinery necessary to respond to PTH signaling. PMID:27045269

  9. Canopy Structure in Relation to Rainfall Interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathizadeh, Omid; Mohsen Hosseini, Seyed; Keim, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Spatial variation of throughfall (TF) is linked to canopy structure. The effects of canopy structure on the spatial redistribution of rainfall in deciduous stands remains poorly documented. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of canopy structure such as stand density on the partitioning of incident rainfall when passing through the canopy of Brant's oak (Quercus branti) forest stands. The study site is the Zagros forests in the western Iranian state of Ilam, protected forests of Dalab region. Twelve TF plots (50 m × 50 m) with 30 gauges randomly placed within each plot were established. Interception loss was computed as the difference between rain and TF. Canopy cover (%) and leaf area index (LAI, m2 m‑2) were estimated from the analysis of hemispherical photographs obtained during the fully leafed period. Relative interception varied from ˜4% at 0.1 LAI and canopy cover of 10% to ˜25% at 1.5 LAI and canopy cover of 65%. Interception represents a significant component of the seasonal water balance of oak forests, particularly in the case of intensive plantings. Keywords: Canopy Structure, Rainfall redistribution, Zagros forests, Quercus branti

  10. Plant canopy characteristics effect on spray deposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While it is common for applicators to standardize their application parameters to minimize changes in settings during a season, this practice does not necessarily provide the best delivery when targeting different types of plant canopies and different zones within the canopy. The objective of this w...

  11. Ecophysiological Remote Sensing of Leaf-Canopy Photosynthetic Characteristics in a Cool-Temperate Deciduous Forest in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H. M.; Muraoka, H.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of structure and function of canopy is crucial to detect temporal and spatial distributions of forest ecosystems dynamics in changing environments. The spectral reflectance of the canopy is determined by optical properties (spectral reflectance and transmittance) of single leaves and their spatial arrangements in the canopy. The optical properties of leaves reflect their pigments contents and anatomical structures. Thus detailed information and understandings of the consequence between ecophysiological traits and optical properties from single leaf to canopy level are essential for remote sensing of canopy ecophysiology. To develop the ecophysiological remote sensing of forest canopy, we have been promoting multiple and cross-scale measurements in "Takayama site" belonging to AsiaFlux and JaLTER networks, located in a cool-temperate deciduous broadleaf forest on a mountainous landscape in Japan. In this forest, in situ measurement of canopy spectral reflectance has been conducted continuously by a spectroradiometer as part of the "Phenological Eyes Network (PEN)" since 2004. To analyze the canopy spectral reflectance from leaf ecophysiological viewpoints, leaf mass per area, nitrogen content, chlorophyll contents, photosynthetic capacities and the optical properties have been measured for dominant canopy tree species Quercus crispla and Betula ermanii throughout the seasons for multiple years.Photosynthetic capacity was largely correlated with chlorophyll contents throughout the growing season in both Q. crispla and B. ermanii. In these leaves, the reflectance at "red edge" (710 nm) changed by corresponding to the changes of chlorophyll contents throughout the seasons. Our canopy-level examination showed that vegetation indices obtained by red edge reflectance have linear relationship with leaf chlorophyll contents and photosynthetic capacity. Finally we apply this knowledge to the Rapid Eye satellite imagery around Takayama site to scale

  12. Effects of vegetation canopy structure on remotely sensed canopy temperatures. [inferring plant water stress and yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of vegetation canopy structure on thermal infrared sensor response must be understood before vegetation surface temperatures of canopies with low percent ground cover can be accurately inferred. The response of a sensor is a function of vegetation geometric structure, the vertical surface temperature distribution of the canopy components, and sensor view angle. Large deviations between the nadir sensor effective radiant temperature (ERT) and vegetation ERT for a soybean canopy were observed throughout the growing season. The nadir sensor ERT of a soybean canopy with 35 percent ground cover deviated from the vegetation ERT by as much as 11 C during the mid-day. These deviations were quantitatively explained as a function of canopy structure and soil temperature. Remote sensing techniques which determine the vegetation canopy temperature(s) from the sensor response need to be studied.

  13. A new thermal vegetation canopy model

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengzhi; Dong Gouquan )

    1992-10-01

    A three-layer thermal vegetation canopy model applicable to forest canopies was developed and tested by field experiments. The model is based on energy budget equations that describe the interactions between short and long wave radiation, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux within three horizontally infinite canopy layers. Particularly it concerns the wind, air temperature, and water vapor pressure profiles in the canopy, which were never considered in earlier models. In solving the nonlinear energy budget equations, a new method was adopted resulting in great reduction of the model computer time. The calculated results of the model are in good agreement with observed data, which shows that the new model is able to simulate exactly the variation of canopy temperature with vegetation structure and environmental conditions. 11 refs.

  14. Multidisciplinary Research on Canopy Photosynthetic Productivity in a Cool-Temperate Deciduous Broadleaf Forest in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, H.; Noda, H. M.; Saitoh, T. M.; Nagai, S.

    2014-12-01

    Forest canopy has crucial roles in regulating energy and material exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems and in ecological processes with respect to carbon cycle and growth in the ecosystems. Challenges to the canopy of tall forests for such research involve the access to the leaves for ecophysiological observations, responses of leaves to the changing environments from seconds to years, and up-scaling the leaf-level phenomena to canopy and landscape-levels. A long-term, multidisciplinary approach has been conducted in a cool-temperate deciduous broadleaf forest in Takayama site (ca. 1400m a.s.l.) in central Japan. This forest canopy is dominated by Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii. We have been focusing on the phenology of photosynthetic productivity from a single leaf to canopy, and to landscape level, by combining leaf ecophysiological research, optical observations by spectroradiometers and time-laps cameras with the aid of "Phenological Eyes Network (PEN)", and process-based modellings. The canopy-level photosynthesis is then compared with the micrometeorolgical observation of CO2 flux at the site. So far we have been clarifying that (1) inter-annual variations in seasonal growth rate and senescence rate of leaf photosynthetic capacity and canopy leaf area are largely responsible for the inter-annual change in forest photosynthesis, and (2) spectral vegetation indices such as enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and chlorophyll index (CCI) can be the indicator to observe the phenology of forest canopy photosynthesis. In addition to these efforts since 2003, we established an open-field warming experiment on the branches of the canopy trees, to investigate the possible influence of temperature increase on leaf photosynthetic and optical properties and then to examine whether the optical satellite remote sensing can detect the changes in photosynthetic capacity and phenology by ongoing global warming.

  15. Stochastic Transport Theory for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure from Space Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Dong; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wang, Weile; Deering, Donald W,; Stenberg, Pauline; Shabanov, Nikolay; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation reflected from vegetation canopies exhibits high spatial variation. Satellite-borne sensors measure the mean intensities emanating from heterogeneous vegetated pixels. The theory of radiative transfer in stochastic media provides the most logical linkage between satellite observations and the three-dimensional canopy structure through a closed system of simple equations which contains the mean intensity and higher statistical moments directly as its unknowns. Although this theory has been a highly active research field in recent years, its potential for satellite remote sensing of vegetated surfaces has not been fully realized because of the lack of models of a canopy pair-correlation function that the stochastic radiative transfer equations require. The pair correlation function is defined as the probability of finding simultaneously phytoelements at two points. This paper presents analytical and Monte Carlo generated pair correlation functions. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the spatial correlation between phytoelements is primarily responsible for the effects of the three-dimensional canopy structure on canopy reflective and absorptive properties. The pair correlation function, therefore, is the most natural and physically meaningful measure of the canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The stochastic radiative transfer equations naturally admit this measure and thus provide a powerful means to investigate the three-dimensional canopy structure from space. Canopy reflectances predicted by the stochastic equations are assessed by comparisons with the PARABOLA measurements from coniferous and broadleaf forest stands in the BOREAS Southern Study Areas. The pair correlation functions are derived from data on tree structural parameters collected during field campaigns conducted at these sites. The simulated canopy reflectances compare well with the PARABOLA data.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Canopy Complexity and Leaf Acclimation to Variable Canopy Microhabitats.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotis, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The theory that forests become carbon (C) neutral with maturity has recently been challenged. While a growing body of evidence shows that net C accumulation continues in forests that are centuries old, the reasons remain poorly known. Increasing canopy structural complexity, quantified by high variability in leaf distribution, has been proposed as a mechanism for sustained rates of C assimilation in mature forests. The goal of our research was to expand on these findings and explore a new idea of spatio-temporal canopy structural complexity as a mechanism linking canopy structure to function (C assimilation).Our work takes place at the UMBS AmeriFlux core facility (US-UMB) in northern Michigan, USA. Canopy structure was quantified over 6 seasons with portable canopy LiDAR (PCL) and canopy spatial microhabitat variability was studied using hemispherical photographs from different heights within the canopy. We found a more even distribution of irradiance in more structurally complex canopies within a single year, and furthermore, that between-year variability of spatial leaf arrangement decreased with increasing canopy complexity. We suggest that in complex canopies less redistribution of leaf material over time may lead to more similar light microhabitats within and among years. Conversely, in less complex canopies this relationship can lead to a year-to-year time lag in morphological leaf acclimation since the effects of the previous-year's light environment are reflected in the morphological characteristics of current-year leaves.Our study harnesses unique spatio-temporal resolution measurements of canopy structure and microhabitat that can inform better management strategies seeking to maximize forest C uptake. Future research quantifying the relationship between canopy structure and light distribution will improve performance of ecosystem models that currently lack spatially explicit canopy structure information.

  17. Atmosphere-plant canopy interactions of methyl bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Leonard, T.D.; Gustin, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the planetary boundary layer, parcels of air containing background and elevated concentrations of methyl bromide commonly pass through plant canopies in managed (agriculture) and natural (forests, grasslands) ecosystems. It is hypothesized that leaf surfaces are a significant sink or methyl bromide on a local and regional scale and that failure to account for this sink results in a significant overestimation of methyl bromide transport to the stratosphere. Using highly controlled environments, studies are investigating the reactivity of leaf surfaces for methyl bromide at elevated and global background concentrations. Estimates of pathway resistances are being calculated and sites of deposition determined. The results indicate that plant canopies are a significant unrecognized sink for methyl bromide in the atmosphere.

  18. Performance of the Cray T3D and emerging architectures on canopy QCD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Uchima, M.

    1995-11-01

    The Cray T3D, an MIMD system with NUMA shared memory capabilities and in principle very low communications latency, can support the Canopy framework for grid-oriented applications. CANOPY has been ported to the T3D, with the intent of making it available to a spectrum of users. The performance of the T3D running Canopy has been benchmarked on five QCD applications extensively run on ACPMAPS at Fermilab, requiring a variety of data access patterns. The net performance and scaling behavior reveals an efficiency relative to peak Gflops almost identical to that achieved on ACPMAPS. Detailed studies of the major factors impacting performance are presented. Generalizations applying this analysis to the newly emerging crop of commercial systems reveal where their limitations will lie. On these applications, efficiencies of above 25% are not to be expected; eliminating overheads due to Canopy will improve matters, but by less than a factor of two.

  19. Estimating the Instantaneous Drag-Wind Relationship for a Horizontally Homogeneous Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ying; Chamecki, Marcelo; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2016-07-01

    The mean drag-wind relationship is usually investigated assuming that field data are representative of spatially-averaged metrics of statistically stationary flow within and above a horizontally homogeneous canopy. Even if these conditions are satisfied, large-eddy simulation (LES) data suggest two major issues in the analysis of observational data. Firstly, the streamwise mean pressure gradient is usually neglected in the analysis of data from terrestrial canopies, which compromises the estimates of mean canopy drag and provides misleading information for the dependence of local mean drag coefficients on local velocity scales. Secondly, no standard approach has been proposed to investigate the instantaneous drag-wind relationship, a critical component of canopy representation in LES. Here, a practical approach is proposed to fit the streamwise mean pressure gradient using observed profiles of the mean vertical momentum flux within the canopy. Inclusion of the fitted mean pressure gradient enables reliable estimates of the mean drag-wind relationship. LES data show that a local mean drag coefficient that characterizes the relationship between mean canopy drag and the velocity scale associated with total kinetic energy can be used to identify the dependence of the local instantaneous drag coefficient on instantaneous velocity. Iterative approaches are proposed to fit specific models of velocity-dependent instantaneous drag coefficients that represent the effects of viscous drag and the reconfiguration of flexible canopy elements. LES data are used to verify the assumptions and algorithms employed by these new approaches. The relationship between mean canopy drag and mean velocity, which is needed in models based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, is parametrized to account for both the dependence on velocity and the contribution from velocity variances. Finally, velocity-dependent drag coefficients lead to significant variations of the calculated

  20. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests.

    PubMed

    Košulič, Ondřej; Michalko, Radek; Hula, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40%) and red-listed threatened species (26%). The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small-scale improvements

  1. Estimating the Instantaneous Drag-Wind Relationship for a Horizontally Homogeneous Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ying; Chamecki, Marcelo; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2016-02-01

    The mean drag-wind relationship is usually investigated assuming that field data are representative of spatially-averaged metrics of statistically stationary flow within and above a horizontally homogeneous canopy. Even if these conditions are satisfied, large-eddy simulation (LES) data suggest two major issues in the analysis of observational data. Firstly, the streamwise mean pressure gradient is usually neglected in the analysis of data from terrestrial canopies, which compromises the estimates of mean canopy drag and provides misleading information for the dependence of local mean drag coefficients on local velocity scales. Secondly, no standard approach has been proposed to investigate the instantaneous drag-wind relationship, a critical component of canopy representation in LES. Here, a practical approach is proposed to fit the streamwise mean pressure gradient using observed profiles of the mean vertical momentum flux within the canopy. Inclusion of the fitted mean pressure gradient enables reliable estimates of the mean drag-wind relationship. LES data show that a local mean drag coefficient that characterizes the relationship between mean canopy drag and the velocity scale associated with total kinetic energy can be used to identify the dependence of the local instantaneous drag coefficient on instantaneous velocity. Iterative approaches are proposed to fit specific models of velocity-dependent instantaneous drag coefficients that represent the effects of viscous drag and the reconfiguration of flexible canopy elements. LES data are used to verify the assumptions and algorithms employed by these new approaches. The relationship between mean canopy drag and mean velocity, which is needed in models based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, is parametrized to account for both the dependence on velocity and the contribution from velocity variances. Finally, velocity-dependent drag coefficients lead to significant variations of the calculated

  2. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests

    PubMed Central

    Košulič, Ondřej; Michalko, Radek; Hula, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40%) and red-listed threatened species (26%). The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small-scale improvements

  3. Interaction of a line vortex with a round parachute canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Levshin, A.

    2009-11-01

    The interaction of a rectilinear vortex with an inflated round parachute canopy model was studied experimentally in a water tunnel where the vortex core was aligned with the axis of the canopy. Three different canopy diameters were used, and the canopy model was attached to a streamlined forebody. Dye flow visualization indicated that vortex breakdown was present when the core trajectory was within the canopy opening. Vortex breakdown occurred about one to two canopy diameters upstream of the canopy opening. The vortex core completely disintegrated when it interacted with the forebody near the canopy centerline. The vortex breakdown and disintegration caused unsteady, asymmetric deformations on the canopy surface. A reduction in the time-averaged drag and an increase in the fluctuating drag was observed when the vortex core was within the canopy opening. The disintegration of the vortex core near the canopy centerline lessened the drag reduction brought on by the presence of the core.

  4. Identifying throughfall flowpaths in the forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, Richard; Link, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    As precipitation moves through the canopy, it is routed via a number of flowpaths to the soil that give rise to spatial variability of infiltration. The temporary detention of water in canopies that smooths intensity of throughfall delivered to the forest floor also entails flow along canopy surfaces to cause spatial redistribution. However, details of linkages between these two phenomena remain unclear, preventing development of a general conceptual model for how water is routed through forest canopies. We investigated the relationship between point throughfall amount and intensity smoothing using 25 tipping bucket rain gauges both under and above a coniferous forest canopy in 11 storms. Overall, hydraulic residence time in the canopy was negatively correlated with storm-total throughfall amount, i.e., locations with more throughfall generally had intensity fluctuations more like rainfall. This effect was greatest in storms with higher intensity and higher ratio of evaporation to intensity, and was not related to wind speed. Thus, at least in this forest, it appears that both evaporation and high intensity can enhance concentration of throughfall into preferential flowpaths through the canopy, by the opposing mechanisms of either retarding or enhancing flowpath development, respectively.

  5. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  6. A state-space modeling approach to estimating canopy conductance and associated uncertainties from sap flux density data.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Ward, Eric J; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram; Flikkema, Paul G; Clark, James S

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainties in ecophysiological responses to environment, such as the impact of atmospheric and soil moisture conditions on plant water regulation, limit our ability to estimate key inputs for ecosystem models. Advanced statistical frameworks provide coherent methodologies for relating observed data, such as stem sap flux density, to unobserved processes, such as canopy conductance and transpiration. To address this need, we developed a hierarchical Bayesian State-Space Canopy Conductance (StaCC) model linking canopy conductance and transpiration to tree sap flux density from a 4-year experiment in the North Carolina Piedmont, USA. Our model builds on existing ecophysiological knowledge, but explicitly incorporates uncertainty in canopy conductance, internal tree hydraulics and observation error to improve estimation of canopy conductance responses to atmospheric drought (i.e., vapor pressure deficit), soil drought (i.e., soil moisture) and above canopy light. Our statistical framework not only predicted sap flux observations well, but it also allowed us to simultaneously gap-fill missing data as we made inference on canopy processes, marking a substantial advance over traditional methods. The predicted and observed sap flux data were highly correlated (mean sensor-level Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.88). Variations in canopy conductance and transpiration associated with environmental variation across days to years were many times greater than the variation associated with model uncertainties. Because some variables, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture, were correlated at the scale of days to weeks, canopy conductance responses to individual environmental variables were difficult to interpret in isolation. Still, our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty in models of ecophysiological and ecosystem function where the process of interest, canopy conductance in this case, is not observed directly. The StaCC modeling

  7. Canopy reflectance modelling of semiarid vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Janet

    1994-01-01

    Three different types of remote sensing algorithms for estimating vegetation amount and other land surface biophysical parameters were tested for semiarid environments. These included statistical linear models, the Li-Strahler geometric-optical canopy model, and linear spectral mixture analysis. The two study areas were the National Science Foundation's Jornada Long Term Ecological Research site near Las Cruces, NM, in the northern Chihuahuan desert, and the HAPEX-Sahel site near Niamey, Niger, in West Africa, comprising semiarid rangeland and subtropical crop land. The statistical approach (simple and multiple regression) resulted in high correlations between SPOT satellite spectral reflectance and shrub and grass cover, although these correlations varied with the spatial scale of aggregation of the measurements. The Li-Strahler model produced estimated of shrub size and density for both study sites with large standard errors. In the Jornada, the estimates were accurate enough to be useful for characterizing structural differences among three shrub strata. In Niger, the range of shrub cover and size in short-fallow shrublands is so low that the necessity of spatially distributed estimation of shrub size and density is questionable. Spectral mixture analysis of multiscale, multitemporal, multispectral radiometer data and imagery for Niger showed a positive relationship between fractions of spectral endmembers and surface parameters of interest including soil cover, vegetation cover, and leaf area index.

  8. Canopy Influence on Throughfall in a Transitional Cloud Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleakney, S. A.; Teale, N. G.; Berger, A.; Mahan, H.; Rapp, A. D.; Frauenfeld, O. W.; Quiring, S. M.; Roark, B.

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing the spatial heterogeneity of throughfall in a tropical pre-montane forest is vital to understanding the water budget of the tropical ecosystem. One significant influence on throughfall is canopy cover. This study looks at the influence of canopy through LiDAR technology, Hemiview software, and the dendrologic characterization of sites. To quantify throughfall, a network of 164 wedge-shaped rain gauges were deployed in a premontane transitional forest in northwestern Costa Rica. These gauges were split into four hyper dense networks (6x6, 2-m spacing) and one extensive network (5x5, approx. 10-m spacing). Forest stands were characterized by species, diameter at breast height, and height. Hemispheric photography was used to calculate leaf area index over each gauge. LiDAR data were also used to quantify vegetation density over isolated gauges. Percent throughfall and throughfall variability were both compared separately to leaf area index, and no correlation existed, contrary to the results of previous studies. This illustrates the complexity of throughfall distribution in this dynamic ecosystem. Throughfall heterogeneity is dependent on multiple independent factors, and canopy cover cannot be analyzed independently. We recommend future studies to analyze small-scale heterogeneity of throughfall as multiply affected by a number of drivers in a complex and changing ecosystem.

  9. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    De Bei, Roberta; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Steve; Edwards, Everard; Bianchini, Nicolò; Smith, Jason; Collins, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI), canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants. PMID:27120600

  10. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine.

    PubMed

    De Bei, Roberta; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Steve; Edwards, Everard; Bianchini, Nicolò; Smith, Jason; Collins, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI), canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants. PMID:27120600

  11. A canopy-type similarity model for wind farm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Zhang, Wei; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow through and over wind farms has been found to be similar to canopy-type flows, with characteristic flow development and shear penetration length scales (Markfort et al., 2012). Wind farms capture momentum from the ABL both at the leading edge and from above. We examine this further with an analytical canopy-type model. Within the flow development region, momentum is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This spatial heterogeneity of momentum within the wind farm is characterized by large dispersive momentum fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area-averaged velocity profile exhibits a characteristic inflection point near the top of the wind farm, similar to that of canopy-type flows. The inflected velocity profile is associated with the presence of a dominant characteristic turbulence scale, which may be responsible for a significant portion of the vertical momentum flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The new model is tested with results from wind tunnel experiments, which were conducted to characterize the turbulent flow in and above model wind farms in aligned and staggered configurations. The model is useful for representing wind farms in regional scale models, for the optimization of wind farms considering wind turbine spacing and layout configuration, and for assessing the impacts of upwind wind farms on nearby wind resources. Markfort CD, W Zhang and F Porté-Agel. 2012. Turbulent flow and scalar transport through and over aligned and staggered wind farms. Journal of Turbulence. 13(1) N33: 1-36. doi:10.1080/14685248.2012.709635.

  12. Assessing aboveground tropical forest biomass using Google Earth canopy images.

    PubMed

    Ploton, Pierre; Pélissier, Raphaël; Proisy, Christophe; Flavenot, Théo; Barbier, Nicolas; Rai, S N; Couteron, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) in efforts to combat climate change requires participating countries to periodically assess their forest resources on a national scale. Such a process is particularly challenging in the tropics because of technical difficulties related to large aboveground forest biomass stocks, restricted availability of affordable, appropriate remote-sensing images, and a lack of accurate forest inventory data. In this paper, we apply the Fourier-based FOTO method of canopy texture analysis to Google Earth's very-high-resolution images of the wet evergreen forests in the Western Ghats of India in order to (1) assess the predictive power of the method on aboveground biomass of tropical forests, (2) test the merits of free Google Earth images relative to their native commercial IKONOS counterparts and (3) highlight further research needs for affordable, accurate regional aboveground biomass estimations. We used the FOTO method to ordinate Fourier spectra of 1436 square canopy images (125 x 125 m) with respect to a canopy grain texture gradient (i.e., a combination of size distribution and spatial pattern of tree crowns), benchmarked against virtual canopy scenes simulated from a set of known forest structure parameters and a 3-D light interception model. We then used 15 1-ha ground plots to demonstrate that both texture gradients provided by Google Earth and IKONOS images strongly correlated with field-observed stand structure parameters such as the density of large trees, total basal area, and aboveground biomass estimated from a regional allometric model. Our results highlight the great potential of the FOTO method applied to Google Earth data for biomass retrieval because the texture-biomass relationship is only subject to 15% relative error, on average, and does not show obvious saturation trends at large biomass values. We also provide the first reliable map of tropical forest aboveground biomass predicted

  13. Seedling mycorrhizal type and soil chemistry are related to canopy condition of Eucalyptus gomphocephala.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Lily; Barber, Paul A; Hardy, Giles E St J; Calver, Michael; Dell, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    The health of Eucalyptus gomphocephala is declining within its natural range in south-western Australia. In a pilot study to assess whether changes in mycorrhizal fungi and soil chemistry might be associated with E. gomphocephala decline, we set up a containerized bioassay experiment with E. gomphocephala as the trap plant using intact soil cores collected from 12 sites with E. gomphocephala canopy condition ranging from healthy to declining. Adjacent soil samples were collected for chemical analysis. The type of mycorrhiza (arbuscular or ectomycorrhizal) formed in containerized seedlings predicted the canopy condition of E. gomphocephala at the sites where the cores were taken. Ectomycorrhizal fungi colonization was higher in seedling roots in soil taken from sites with healthy canopies, whereas colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi dominated in roots in soil taken from sites with declining canopies. Furthermore, several soil chemical properties predicted canopy condition and the type of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots. These preliminary findings suggest that large-scale studies should be undertaken in the field to quantify those ectomycorrhiza (ECM) fungi sensitive to E. gomphocephala canopy decline and whether particular ECM fungi are bioindicators of ecosystem health. PMID:23314749

  14. Habitat use by the endangered Karner blue butterfly in oak woodlands: The influence of canopy cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grundel, Ralph; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Sulzman, Christina L.

    1998-01-01

    The Karner blue butterfly Lycaeides melissa samuelis is an endangered species residing in the Great Lakes and northeastern regions of the United States. Increased canopy cover is a major factor implicated in the decline of the Karner blue at many locales. Therefore, we examined how the butterfly's behavior varied with canopy cover. Adult males at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore used habitat under canopy openings for nearly 90% of their activities; females used openings and shaded areas more equally. The frequency of oviposition on the sole host plant, wild lupine Lupinus perennis, was highest under 30–60% canopy cover even though lupine was more abundant in more open areas. Larvae fed preferentially on larger lupine plants and on lupines in denser patches. However, lupines were generally larger in the shade. Therefore, shade-related trade-offs existed between lupine abundance and distribution of larval feeding and oviposition. Also, heterogeneity of shading by sub-canopy woody vegetation was greater at oviposition sites than at sites where lupine did not grow. Given the importance of shade heterogeneity, a mixture of canopy openings and shade, on a scale similar to daily adult movement range, should be beneficial for this butterfly.

  15. Multispectral radiometer to measure crop canopy characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brach, E. J.; Poirier, P.; Desjardins, R. L.; Lord, D.

    1983-04-01

    A spectroradiometer has been designed for the study of crop reflectance characteristics in the spectral range of 400-1000 nm. Since the instrument records the ratio of incoming to reflected radiation the values obtained are independent of variations in solar elevation, and azimuth angle and atmospheric conditions. A filter wheel with four interchangeable interference filters is used for wavelength selection. The spectroradiometer traverses above a crop canopy on a movable track. This makes it possible to compare measurements from various locations several times in an hour, and to study more than one canopy a day. This instrument provides agronomists with data to estimate crop canopy characteristics such as leaf area index (LAI) rapidly and nondestructively. It also measures the variability of canopy reflectance introduced by temporal and spatial factors.

  16. Vortex generation in oscillatory canopy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Schlosser, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the generation of coherent vortices at the top of a canopy in oscillatory (i.e., wave-dominated) flow. Through a series of flow visualization experiments, vortex formation is shown to occur when two conditions described by the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) and Reynolds (Re) numbers are met. First, the wave period must be sufficiently long to allow the generation of the shear-driven instability at the top of the canopy; this occurs when KC ≳ 5. Second, the vortex instability must be able to overcome the stabilizing effects of viscosity; this occurs when Re ≳ 1000. The vortices greatly increase the rate of vertical mixing within the canopy, such that any prediction of residence time in a coastal canopy requires an understanding of whether vortex generation is occurring.

  17. Canopy architecture of a walnut orchard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Martens, Scott N.; Vanderbilt, Vern C.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed dataset describing the canopy geometry of a walnut orchard was acquired to support testing and comparison of the predictions of canopy microwave and optical inversion models. Measured canopy properties included the quantity, size, and orientation of stems, leaves, and fruit. Eight trees receiving 100 percent of estimated potential evapotranspiration water use and eight trees receiving 33 percent of potential water use were measured. The vertical distributions of stem, leaf, and fruit properties are presented with respect to irrigation treatment. Zenith and probability distributions for stems and leaf normals are presented. These data show that, after two years of reduced irrigation, the trees receiving only 33 percent of their potential water requirement had reduced fruit yields, lower leaf area index, and altered allocation of biomass within the canopy.

  18. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  19. Interactions between Fragmented Seagrass Canopies and the Local Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    El Allaoui, Nazha; Colomer, Jordi; Soler, Marianna; Casamitjana, Xavier; Oldham, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The systematic creation of gaps within canopies results in fragmentation and the architecture of fragmented canopies differs substantially from non-fragmented canopies. Canopy fragmentation leads to spatial heterogeneity in hydrodynamics and therefore heterogeneity in the sheltering of canopy communities. Identifying the level of instability due to canopy fragmentation is important for canopies in coastal areas impacted by human activities and indeed, climate change. The gap orientation relative to the wave direction is expected to play an important role in determining wave attenuation and sheltering. Initially we investigated the effect of a single transversal gap within a canopy (i.e. a gap oriented perpendicular to the wave direction) on hydrodynamics, which was compared to fully vegetated canopies (i.e. no gaps) and also to bare sediment. The wave velocity increased with gap width for the two canopy densities studied (2.5% and 10% solid plant fraction) reaching wave velocities found over bare sediments. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) within the gap also increased, but was more attenuated by the adjacent vegetation than the wave velocity. As expected, denser canopies produced a greater attenuation of both the wave velocity and the turbulent kinetic energy within an adjacent gap, compared to sparse canopies. Using non-dimensional analysis and our experimental data, a parameterization for predicting TKE in a canopy gap was formulated, as a function of easily measured variables. Based on the experimental results, a fragmented canopy model was then developed to determine the overall mixing level in such canopies. The model revealed that canopies with large gaps present more mixing than canopies with small gaps despite having the same total gap area in the canopy. Furthermore, for the same total gap area, dense fragmented canopies provide more shelter than sparse fragmented canopies. PMID:27227321

  20. Interactions between Fragmented Seagrass Canopies and the Local Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    El Allaoui, Nazha; Serra, Teresa; Colomer, Jordi; Soler, Marianna; Casamitjana, Xavier; Oldham, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The systematic creation of gaps within canopies results in fragmentation and the architecture of fragmented canopies differs substantially from non-fragmented canopies. Canopy fragmentation leads to spatial heterogeneity in hydrodynamics and therefore heterogeneity in the sheltering of canopy communities. Identifying the level of instability due to canopy fragmentation is important for canopies in coastal areas impacted by human activities and indeed, climate change. The gap orientation relative to the wave direction is expected to play an important role in determining wave attenuation and sheltering. Initially we investigated the effect of a single transversal gap within a canopy (i.e. a gap oriented perpendicular to the wave direction) on hydrodynamics, which was compared to fully vegetated canopies (i.e. no gaps) and also to bare sediment. The wave velocity increased with gap width for the two canopy densities studied (2.5% and 10% solid plant fraction) reaching wave velocities found over bare sediments. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) within the gap also increased, but was more attenuated by the adjacent vegetation than the wave velocity. As expected, denser canopies produced a greater attenuation of both the wave velocity and the turbulent kinetic energy within an adjacent gap, compared to sparse canopies. Using non-dimensional analysis and our experimental data, a parameterization for predicting TKE in a canopy gap was formulated, as a function of easily measured variables. Based on the experimental results, a fragmented canopy model was then developed to determine the overall mixing level in such canopies. The model revealed that canopies with large gaps present more mixing than canopies with small gaps despite having the same total gap area in the canopy. Furthermore, for the same total gap area, dense fragmented canopies provide more shelter than sparse fragmented canopies. PMID:27227321

  1. Parameterization and sensitivity analyses of a radiative transfer model for remote sensing plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carlton Raden

    thickness Ltadj, LAI, and h (m). Its function is to translate leaf level estimates of diffuse absorption and backscatter to the canopy scale allowing the leaf optical properties to directly influence above canopy estimates of reflectance. The model was successfully modified and parameterized to operate in a canopy scale and a leaf scale mode. Canopy scale model simulations produced the best results. Simulations based on leaf derived coefficients produced calculated above canopy reflectance errors of 15% to 18%. A comprehensive sensitivity analyses indicated the most important parameters were beam to diffuse conversion c(lambda, m-1), diffuse absorption a(lambda, m-1), diffuse backscatter b(lambda, m-1), h (m), Q, and direct and diffuse irradiance. Sources of error include the estimation procedure for the direct beam to diffuse conversion and attenuation coefficients and other field and laboratory measurement and analysis errors. Applications of the model include creation of synthetic reflectance data sets for remote sensing algorithm development, simulations of stress and drought on vegetation reflectance signatures, and the potential to estimate leaf moisture and chemical status.

  2. Photosynthetic Enzyme Level and Distribution through Canopies in Relation to Canopy Photosynthesis and its Acclimation to Light, Temperature and CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution of photosynthetic enzymes through the canopy affects canopy photosynthesis, as well as plant quality and nitrogen demand. Most canopy photosynthesis models assume an exponential distribution of photosynthetic enzymes through the canopy, although this is rarely consistent with exper...

  3. In situ hyperspectral data analysis for canopy chlorophyll content estimation of an invasive species spartina alterniflora based on PROSAIL canopy radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jinquan; Gao, Wei; Shi, Runhe; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhibin; Chen, Wenhui; Liu, Chaoshun; Zeng, Yuyan

    2015-09-01

    Spartina alterniflora is one of the most serious invasive species in the coastal saltmarshes of China. An accurate quantitative estimation of its canopy leaf chlorophyll content is of great importance for monitoring plant physiological state and vegetation productivity. Hyperspectral reflectance data representing a range of canopy chlorophyll content were simulated by using the PROSAIL radiative transfer model at a 1nm sampling interval, which was based on prior knowledge of S.alterniflora. A set of indices was tested for estimating canopy chlorophyll content. Subsequently, validation were performed for testing the performance of indices, based on the PROSAIL model using in situ data measured by a Spectroradiometer with spectral range of 350-2500nm in a late autumn in a sub-tropical estuarine marsh. PROSAIL simulations showed that the most readily available indices were not good to be directly used in canopy chlorophyll estimation of S.alterniflora. The modified Chlorophyll Absorption in Reflectance Index MCARI[705,750] was linear related to the canopy chlorophyll content (R2=0.94) , but did not achieve a satisfactory estimation results with a high RMSE (RMSE=0.95 g.m-2). We optimized the index MCARI[705,750] by introducing a scale conversion coefficient to the formula to solve data units inconsistent, which is between the practical application unit and the unit used in the process of establishing the index, and balance scale transformation through radiative transfer models and examing corresponding canopy reflectance index values. We proposed index Optimized modified Chlorophyll Absorption in Reflectance Index OMCARI[705, 750]. The results showed that the index OMCARI[705, 750] had higher precision of prediction of chlorophyll for S.alterniflora (R2=0.94,RMSE=0.41 g.m-2 ).

  4. A new 500-m resolution map of canopy height for Amazon forest using spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yoshito; Suwa, Rempei; Jindo, Keiji; Endo, Takahiro; Oki, Kazuo; Sawada, Haruo; Arai, Egidio; Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Celes, Carlos Henrique Souza; Campos, Moacir Alberto Assis; Higuchi, Francisco Gasparetto; Lima, Adriano José Nogueira; Higuchi, Niro; Kajimoto, Takuya; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to map canopy heights in the Brazilian Amazon mainly on the basis of spaceborne LiDAR and cloud-free MODIS imagery with a new method (the Self-Organizing Relationships method) for spatial modeling of the LiDAR footprint. To evaluate the general versatility, we compared the created canopy height map with two different canopy height estimates on the basis of our original field study plots (799 plots located in eight study sites) and a previously developed canopy height map. The compared canopy height estimates were obtained by: (1) a stem diameter at breast height (D) - tree height (H) relationship specific to each site on the basis of our original field study, (2) a previously developed D-H model involving environmental and structural factors as explanatory variables (Feldpausch et al., 2011), and (3) a previously developed canopy height map derived from the spaceborne LiDAR data with different spatial modeling method and explanatory variables (Simard et al., 2011). As a result, our canopy height map successfully detected a spatial distribution pattern in canopy height estimates based on our original field study data (r = 0.845, p = 8.31 × 10-3) though our canopy height map showed a poor correlation (r = 0.563, p = 0.146) with the canopy height estimate based on a previously developed model by Feldpausch et al. (2011). We also confirmed that the created canopy height map showed a similar pattern with the previously developed canopy height map by Simard et al. (2011). It was concluded that the use of the spaceborne LiDAR data provides a sufficient accuracy in estimating the canopy height at regional scale.

  5. Partitioning forest evapotranspiration: Interception evaporation and the impact of canopy structure, local and regional advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringgaard, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Spatial and temporal variation in interception evaporation, energy balance during rain and total water loss was explored in a structurally heterogeneous Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] plantation in western Denmark. The trees are arranged in a distinctive small scale mosaic (0.25 ha) of young open canopy stands interspaced with older mature closed canopy stands. The mature stands are bound by a single line of taller Grand Fir [Abies grandis] on their northern edge. Interception loss (I) was measured and modeled in the open and closed canopy stands and under a Grand Fir row using net precipitation gauges and the Gash rain interception model. Incorporating complementary data on individual stand transpiration, forest floor evaporation and total ET (Ringgaard et al., 2012) we show that (a) I is 3% points higher in the closed canopy than in the open canopy (34% and 31% of PG respectively) while the Grand Fir row promotes a zone of relative drought with I = 47%, (b) in terms of total water loss, the open canopy has an annual ET of about 7.5% higher than the closed canopy stand and (c) in months with little precipitation there is good agreement between the individual components of the evaporation balance and the gap-filled eddy-covariance evapotranspiration (EC-ET) estimate while in months with high precipitation the EC-ET data underestimate both the magnitude and variability of I. The Gash model had to be parameterized separately for summer and winter. In winter, the available energy for evaporation during rain was dominated by regional scale advection of heat from the North Sea, while in summer half the available energy came from local advection. The mean evaporation rate during rain was 0.09 mm h-1 in winter and 0.21 mm h-1 in summer.

  6. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  7. Validating spatial structure in canopy water content using geostatistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, E. W.; Zhang, M. H.; Ustin, S. L.; Rejmankova, E.; Haxo, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneity in ecological phenomena are scale dependent and affect the hierarchical structure of image data. AVIRIS pixels average reflectance produced by complex absorption and scattering interactions between biogeochemical composition, canopy architecture, view and illumination angles, species distributions, and plant cover as well as other factors. These scales affect validation of pixel reflectance, typically performed by relating pixel spectra to ground measurements acquired at scales of 1m(exp 2) or less (e.g., field spectra, foilage and soil samples, etc.). As image analysis becomes more sophisticated, such as those for detection of canopy chemistry, better validation becomes a critical problem. This paper presents a methodology for bridging between point measurements and pixels using geostatistics. Geostatistics have been extensively used in geological or hydrogeolocial studies but have received little application in ecological studies. The key criteria for kriging estimation is that the phenomena varies in space and that an underlying controlling process produces spatial correlation between the measured data points. Ecological variation meets this requirement because communities vary along environmental gradients like soil moisture, nutrient availability, or topography.

  8. Surface-atmosphere interactions with coupled within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; van der Tol, C.; Verhoef, W.; Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Models that describe the exchange of CO2 and H2O between the surface and atmosphere use bulk-parametrization of the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and leaf area density (eq. LAI). This bulk parametrization is based on the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. The MOS theory however breaks down for sparse canopies and it cannot couple profiles in the leaf density to profiles in the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The objective of this research is to create a simple model that is able to couple the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection for different levels in the canopy. This model should be able to represent the canopy using as fewer parameters as possible, in order to facilitate inversion of remote sensing imagery. A virtual canopy was simulated using an L-systems approach, Lindenmayer 1968. The L-system approach was chosen because it describes the canopy with fractals. It therefore needs very little inputs to simulate a virtual canopy. A vertical profile of leaf density was calculated for 60 levels from this virtual canopy. The within-canopy aerodynamic resistance was modeled from the vertical leaf density profile using foliage drag coefficient, Massman 1997. A modified version of the SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observations and Photosynthesis) model was used to calculate the H2O and CO2 fluxes using the vertical profiles of leaf density and within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The simulated fluxes are compared with field measurements over a vineyard and a forested area. The field measurements in both areas are acquired using the same setup: a basic flux tower in addition with an eddy-covariance setup. We present in this article the methodology and the results, as a proof of concept. references Massman, W.J., An Analytical One-Dimensional Model of Momentum Transfer by vegetation of arbitrary structure, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1997, 83, 407-421 Lindenmayer, A., Mathematical Models for Cellular Interactions in Development, Journal of

  9. Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance in sunflower canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tha Paw u, Kyaw; Ustin, Susan L.; Zhang, Chang-An

    1989-01-01

    Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance above and within a relatively closed fully irrigated sunflower canopy is detailed. Azimuthal variation in thermal infrared exitance above canopies was weakly (statistically) related to solar position and was comparable to or larger than errors in satellite-based canopy estimates. Anisotropy within canopies was significantly lower and decreased with canopy closure and depth into the canopy. Measured azimuthal isotropy within canopies supports the use of this assumption in radiative transfer models. Significant differences in canopy temperature measurements were found depending upon whether the instruments were within or above the canopy. These differences could produce errors of 20-35 percent in latent energy estimates during periods of high evapotranspiration (ET) and greater errors in periods of restricted ET.

  10. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate that nucleation mode particle concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by drought and thus a reduction in the production of condensable products during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of BVOC modeled on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide indirect evidence that drought stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  11. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  12. A laser technique for characterizing the geometry of plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Silva, L. F.; Bauer, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    The interception of solar power by the canopy is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle (time), component of the canopy, and depth into the canopy. The projected foliage area, cumulative leaf area, and view factors within the canopy are examined as a function of the same parameters. Two systems are proposed that are capable of describing the geometrical aspects of a vegetative canopy and of operation in an automatic mode. Either system would provide sufficient data to yield a numerical map of the foliage area in the canopy. Both systems would involve the collection of large data sets in a short time period using minimal manpower.

  13. Large eddy simulations as a parameterization tool for canopy-structure X VOC-flux interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, William; Bohrer, Gil; Chatziefstratiou, Efthalia

    2015-04-01

    We have been working to develop a new post-processing model - High resolution VOC Atmospheric Chemistry in Canopies (Hi-VACC) - which resolves the dispersion and chemistry of reacting chemical species given their emission rates from the vegetation and soil, driven by high resolution meteorological forcing and wind fields from various high resolution atmospheric regional and large-eddy simulations. Hi-VACC reads in fields of pressure, temperature, humidity, air density, short-wave radiation, wind (3-D u, v and w components) and sub-grid-scale turbulence that were simulated by a high resolution atmospheric model. This meteorological forcing data is provided as snapshots of 3-D fields. We have tested it using a number of RAMS-based Forest Large Eddy Simulation (RAFLES) runs. This can then be used for parameterization of the effects of canopy structure on VOC fluxes. RAFLES represents both drag and volume restriction by the canopy over an explicit 3-D domain. We have used these features to show the effects of canopy structure on fluxes of momentum, heat, and water in heterogeneous environments at the tree-crown scale by modifying the canopy structure representing it as both homogeneous and realistically heterogeneous. We combine this with Hi-VACC's capabilities to model dispersion and chemistry of reactive VOCs to parameterize the fluxes of these reactive species with respect to canopy structure. The high resolution capabilities of Hi-VACC coupled with RAFLES allows for sensitivity analysis to determine important structural considerations in sub-grid-scale parameterization of these phenomena in larger models.

  14. The Effect of Vegetation Density on Canopy Sub-Layer Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, D.; Porporato, A.; Ridolfi, L.; Albertson, J.D.; Katul, G.G.

    The canonical form of atmospheric flows near theland surface, in the absence of a canopy, resembles a rough-wallboundary layer. However, in the presence of an extensive and densecanopy, the flow within and just above the foliage behaves as aperturbed mixing layer. To date, no analogous formulation existsfor intermediate canopy densities. Using detailed laser Dopplervelocity measurements conducted in an open channel over a widerange of canopy densities, a phenomenological model that describesthe structure of turbulence within the canopy sublayer (CSL) isdeveloped. The model decomposes the space within the CSL intothree distinct zones: the deep zone in which the flow field isshown to be dominated by vortices connected with vonKármán vortex streets, butperiodically interrupted by strong sweep events whose features areinfluenced by canopy density. The second zone, which is near thecanopy top, is a superposition of attached eddies andKelvin-Helmholtz waves produced by inflectional instability in themean longitudinal velocity profile. Here, the relative importanceof the mixing layer and attached eddies are shown to vary withcanopy density through a coefficient . We show that therelative enhancement of turbulent diffusivity over its surface-layer value near the canopy top depends on the magnitude of. In the uppermost zone, the flow follows the classicalsurface-layer similarity theory. Finally, we demonstrate that thecombination of this newly proposed length scale and first-orderclosure models can accurately reproduce measured mean velocity andReynolds stresses for a wide range of roughness densities. Withrecent advancement in remote sensing of canopy morphology, thismodel offers a promising physically based approach to connect theland surface and the atmosphere without resorting to empiricalmomentum roughness lengths.

  15. Leaf Area Index Estimation in Vineyards from Uav Hyperspectral Data, 2d Image Mosaics and 3d Canopy Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperakis, I.; Stentoumis, Ch.; Grammatikopoulos, L.; Karantzalos, K.

    2015-08-01

    The indirect estimation of leaf area index (LAI) in large spatial scales is crucial for several environmental and agricultural applications. To this end, in this paper, we compare and evaluate LAI estimation in vineyards from different UAV imaging datasets. In particular, canopy levels were estimated from i.e., (i) hyperspectral data, (ii) 2D RGB orthophotomosaics and (iii) 3D crop surface models. The computed canopy levels have been used to establish relationships with the measured LAI (ground truth) from several vines in Nemea, Greece. The overall evaluation indicated that the estimated canopy levels were correlated (r2 > 73%) with the in-situ, ground truth LAI measurements. As expected the lowest correlations were derived from the calculated greenness levels from the 2D RGB orthomosaics. The highest correlation rates were established with the hyperspectral canopy greenness and the 3D canopy surface models. For the later the accurate detection of canopy, soil and other materials in between the vine rows is required. All approaches tend to overestimate LAI in cases with sparse, weak, unhealthy plants and canopy.

  16. A simple and complete two-interface model for spatially developing flow in rigid and flexible canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Samaneh; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    At the front of a canopy, flow deceleration is associated with strong vertical fluxes of mass and momentum. Accurately describing this region is important in many applications, including terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, as well as large wind farms. Simple models can provide a framework to analyze these flows, thereby guiding and complementing more refined and computationally intensive tools. Jerram et al. (2003) introduced a linearised model that describes the flow field through sparse canopies, albeit at the cost of solving a PDE. A simpler approach involves vertically integrating the governing equations across the canopy, yielding scalings that relate key variables (e.g. Chen & Nepf 2013), which in turn can be used to construct empirical fits. We build a simple and complete model, by separating the flow in three horizontal layers. These comprise the canopy, the overlying boundary layer, and the outer flow, such that exchanges of mass and momentum occur at two interfaces. We parameterize turbulent exchanges by means of the entrainment hypothesis; this is a closure that has been used extensively in other problems in geophysical fluid dynamics. We neglect pressure gradients inside the canopy, but account for upstream pressure variations and retain nonlinear terms. Our two-interface model quantitatively describes the flow velocities and boundary layer heights in developing canopy flows, and successfully accounts for the effect of ambient stratification. Finally, we discuss developments accounting for the effects of flexibility in vegetation canopies.

  17. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. Azimuthal radiometric temperature measurements of wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of azimuthal view angle on the radiometric temperature of wheat canopies at various stages of development are investigated. Measurements of plant height, total leaf area index, green leaf area index and Feeks growth stage together with infrared radiometric temperature measurements at 12 azimuth intervals with respect to solar azimuth and at different solar zenith angles were obtained for four wheat canopies at various heights. Results reveal a difference on the order of 2 C between the temperatures measured at azimuths of 0 and 180 deg under calm wind conditions, which is attributed to the time-dependent transfer of heat between canopy component surfaces. The azimuthal dependence must thus be taken into account in the determination of radiometric temperatures.

  19. Vertical and horizontal transport of energy and matter by coherent motions in a tall spruce canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Siebicke, L.; Foken, T.

    2009-04-01

    In a forested ecosystem low frequency coherent events contribute significantly to the budgets of momentum, heat and matter. In the frame of EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project the contribution of coherent structures to the vertical and horizontal transfer of energy and matter in a tall spruce canopy was investigated. Two measuring campaigns were carried out in North-Eastern Bavaria at the Waldstein site in the Fichtelgebirge mountains. Observations of coherent structures were obtained by a vertical profile of sonic anemometers equipped with fast CO2 and H2O analyzers covering all parts of the forest up to the lower part of the roughness sub layer. In addition five small masts were set up in the trunk space of the forest and equipped with sonic anemometers, humidity and temperature sensors as well as CO2 analyzers. Combination of measurements done in vertical and horizontal directions allows us to investigate coherent structures, their temporal scales, their role in flux transport and vertical coupling between the subcanopy, canopy and air above the canopy level. To extract coherent structures from the turbulent time series, the technique based on the wavelet transform has been used. Conditional sampling analysis showed a domination of coherent structure signatures in vertical wind measurements with probable temporal scales in the order of 10 s to 30 s. The mean temporal scale of coherent structures detected in the trunk space of the forest was 30 - 40 s. The number of coherent structures detected at the slim and tall tower was found to be 40% less than the number of coherent structures detected at the heavy main tower. In contrast to the slim tower the main tower is more massive and was equipped with more instruments resulting for additional generation of turbulence. The Reynolds-averaged flux and flux contribution of coherent structures were derived using a triple decomposition for the detected and conditionally averaged time series, when

  20. BIOGENIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION INVENTORY FOR THE U.S. USING A SIMPLE FOREST CANOPY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biogenic hydrocarbon emission inventory system, developed for acid deposition and regional oxidant modeling, is described, and results for a U.S. emission inventory are presented. or deciduous and coniferous forests, scaling relationships are used to account for canopy effects ...

  1. Rising ozone concentrations decrease soybean evapotranspiration and water use efficiency while increasing canopy temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of increasing [O3] on soybean canopy scale fluxes of heat and water vapor as well as water use efficiency (WUE) at the Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment (SoyFACE) facility. Micrometeorological measurements were made to determine the net radiation (Rn) sensible hea...

  2. Regional dynamics of forest canopy change and underlying causal processes in the contiguous U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleeweis, Karen; Goward, Samuel N.; Huang, Chengquan; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Moisen, Gretchen; Kennedy, Robert E.; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2013-07-01

    history of forest change processes is written into forest age and distribution and affects earth systems at many scales. No one data set has been able to capture the full forest disturbance and land use record through time, so in this study, we combined multiple lines of evidence to examine trends, for six US regions, in forest area affected by harvest, fire, wind, insects, and forest conversion to urban/surburban use. We built an integrated geodatabase for the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) with data spanning the nation and decades, from remote sensing observations of forest canopy dynamics, geospatial data sets on disturbance and conversion, and statistical inventories, to evaluate relationships between canopy change observations and casual processes at multiple scales. Results show the variability of major change processes through regions across decades. Harvest affected more forest area than any other major change processes in the North East, North Central, Southeast, and South central regions. In the Pacific Coast and Intermountain West, more forest area was affected by harvest than forest fires. Canopy change rates at regional scales confounded the trends of individual forest change processes, showing the importance of landscape scale data. Local spikes in observed canopy change rates were attributed to wind and fire events, as well as volatile harvest regimes. This study improves the geographic model of forest change processes by updating regional trends for major disturbance and conversion processes and combining data on the dynamics of fire, wind, insects, harvest, and conversion into one integrated geodatabase for the CONUS.

  3. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Forests play a key role in removal of particles from the atmosphere but may also significantly contribute to formation and growth of ultrafine particles. Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate substantial capture of nucleation mode particles by the foliage. Concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that nucleation mode number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual BVOC emissions by drought and thus reduced production of condensable products (and thus particle growth) during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) modeled based on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and PAR, but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide direct evidence for the importance of canopy capture in atmospheric particle budgets and indirect evidence that drought-stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  4. Regional Estimates of Drought-Induced Tree Canopy Loss across Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwantes, A.; Swenson, J. J.; González-Roglich, M.; Johnson, D. M.; Domec, J. C.; Jackson, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The severe drought of 2011 killed millions of trees across the state of Texas. Drought-induced tree-mortality can have significant impacts to carbon cycling, regional biophysics, and community composition. We quantified canopy cover loss across the state using remotely sensed imagery from before and after the drought at multiple scales. First, we classified ~200 orthophotos (1-m spatial resolution) from the National Agriculture Imagery Program, using a supervised maximum likelihood classification. Area of canopy cover loss in these classifications was highly correlated (R2 = 0.8) with ground estimates of canopy cover loss, measured in 74 plots across 15 different sites in Texas. These 1-m orthophoto classifications were then used to calibrate and validate coarser scale (30-m) Landsat imagery to create wall-to-wall tree canopy cover loss maps across the state of Texas. We quantified percent dead and live canopy within each pixel of Landsat to create continuous maps of dead and live tree cover, using two approaches: (1) a zero-inflated beta distribution model and (2) a random forest algorithm. Widespread canopy loss occurred across all the major natural systems of Texas, with the Edwards Plateau region most affected. In this region, on average, 10% of the forested area was lost due to the 2011 drought. We also identified climatic thresholds that controlled the spatial distribution of tree canopy loss across the state. However, surprisingly, there were many local hot spots of canopy loss, suggesting that not only climatic factors could explain the spatial patterns of canopy loss, but rather other factors related to soil, landscape, management, and stand density also likely played a role. As increases in extreme droughts are predicted to occur with climate change, it will become important to define methods that can detect associated drought-induced tree mortality across large regions. These maps could then be used (1) to quantify impacts to carbon cycling and regional

  5. Regional climate modulates the canopy mosaic of favourable and risky microclimates for insects.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sinoquet, Herve; Combes, Didier; Casas, Jerome

    2007-05-01

    1. One major gap in our ability to predict the impacts of climate change is a quantitative analysis of temperatures experienced by organisms under natural conditions. We developed a framework to describe and quantify the impacts of local climate on the mosaic of microclimates and physiological states of insects within tree canopies. This approach was applied to a leaf mining moth feeding on apple leaf tissues. 2. Canopy geometry was explicitly considered by mapping the 3D position and orientation of more than 26 000 leaves in an apple tree. Four published models for canopy radiation interception, energy budget of leaves and mines, body temperature and developmental rate of the leaf miner were integrated. Model predictions were compared with actual microclimate temperatures. The biophysical model accurately predicted temperature within mines at different positions within the tree crown. 3. Field temperature measurements indicated that leaf and mine temperature patterns differ according to the regional climatic conditions (cloudy or sunny) and depending on their location within the canopy. Mines in the sun can be warmer than those in the shade by several degrees and the heterogeneity of mine temperature was incremented by 120%, compared with that of leaf temperature. 4. The integrated model was used to explore the impact of both warm and exceptionally hot climatic conditions recorded during a heat wave on the microclimate heterogeneity at canopy scale. During warm conditions, larvae in sunlight-exposed mines experienced nearly optimal growth conditions compared with those within shaded mines. The developmental rate was increased by almost 50% in the sunny microhabitat compared with the shaded location. Larvae, however, experienced optimal temperatures for their development inside shaded mines during extreme climatic conditions, whereas larvae in exposed mines were overheating, leading to major risks of mortality. 5. Tree canopies act as both magnifiers and reducers

  6. CO2-induced decrease of canopy stomatal conductance of mature conifer and broadleaved trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tor-ngern, P.; Oren, R.; Ward, E. J.; Palmroth, S.; McCarthy, H. R.; domec, J.

    2013-12-01

    Together with canopy leaf area, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) controls forest-atmosphere exchanges of energy and mass. Expectations for stomatal response to elevated atmospheric [CO2] (CO2E) based on seedling studies range from large decreases of conductance in foliage of broadleaved species to little or no response in conifers. These responses are not directly translatable to forest canopies, and their underlying mechanisms are ill-defined. The uncertainty of canopy-scale stomatal response to CO2E reduces confidence in modeled predictions of future forest productivity and carbon sequestration, and of partitioning of net radiation between latent and sensible heat flux. Thus, debates on the potential effects of CO2E-induced stomatal closure continue. We used a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment in a 27-year-old, 25 m tall forest, to generate a whole-canopy CO2-response and test whether canopy-scale GS response to CO2E of widely distributed, fast growing shade-intolerant species, Pinus taeda (L.) and co-occurring broadleaved species dominated by Liquidambar styraciflua (L.), was indirectly affected by slow changes such as hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, as opposed to quickly responding to CO2 concentrations in the leaf-internal air space. Our results show indirect CO2E-induced reductions of GS of 10% and 30%, respectively, and no signs of a direct stomatal response even as CO2E was pushed to 685 μmol mol-1 (~1.8 of ambient). Modeling the effect of CO2E on the water, energy and carbon cycles of forests must consider slow-response indirect mechanisms producing large variation in the reduction of GS, such as the previously observed inconsistent CO2E effect on canopy leaf area and plant hydraulics. Moreover, the new generation of CO2E studies in forests must allow indirect effects caused by, e.g., hydraulic adjustments and canopy development, to play out. Such acclimation will be particularly prolonged in slowly developing ecosystems, such

  7. Simple Forest Canopy Thermal Exitance Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith J. A.; Goltz, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a model to calculate brightness temperature and surface energy balance for a forest canopy system. The model is an extension of an earlier vegetation only model by inclusion of a simple soil layer. The root mean square error in brightness temperature for a dense forest canopy was 2.5 C. Surface energy balance predictions were also in good agreement. The corresponding root mean square errors for net radiation, latent, and sensible heat were 38.9, 30.7, and 41.4 W/sq m respectively.

  8. Energy, water, and carbon fluxes in a loblolly pine stand: Results from uniform and gappy canopy models with comparisons to eddy flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Conghe; Katul, Gabriel; Oren, Ram; Band, Lawrence E.; Tague, Christina L.; Stoy, Paul C.; McCarthy, Heather R.

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the impacts of canopy structure specification on modeling net radiation (Rn), latent heat flux (LE) and net photosynthesis (An) by coupling two contrasting radiation transfer models with a two-leaf photosynthesis model for a maturing loblolly pine stand near Durham, North Carolina, USA. The first radiation transfer model is based on a uniform canopy representation (UCR) that assumes leaves are randomly distributed within the canopy, and the second radiation transfer model is based on a gappy canopy representation (GCR) in which leaves are clumped into individual crowns, thereby forming gaps between the crowns. To isolate the effects of canopy structure on model results, we used identical model parameters taken from the literature for both models. Canopy structure has great impact on energy distribution between the canopy and the forest floor. Comparing the model results, UCR produced lower Rn, higher LE and higher An than GCR. UCR intercepted more shortwave radiation inside the canopy, thus producing less radiation absorption on the forest floor and in turn lower Rn. There is a higher degree of nonlinearity between An estimated by UCR and by GCR than for LE. Most of the difference for LE and An between UCR and GCR occurred around noon, when gaps between crowns can be seen from the direction of the incident sunbeam. Comparing with eddy-covariance measurements in the same loblolly pine stand from May to September 2001, based on several measures GCR provided more accurate estimates for Rn, LE and An than UCR. The improvements when using GCR were much clearer when comparing the daytime trend of LE and An for the growing season. Sensitivity analysis showed that UCR produces higher LE and An estimates than GCR for canopy cover ranging from 0.2 to 0.8. There is a high degree of nonlinearity in the relationship between UCR estimates for An and those of GCR, particularly when canopy cover is low, and suggests that simple scaling of UCR parameters

  9. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases

  10. Winners and losers in the competition for space in tropical forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2014-05-01

    Trees compete for space in the canopy, but where and how individuals or their component parts win or lose is poorly understood. We developed a stochastic model of three-dimensional dynamics in canopies using a hierarchical Bayesian framework, and analysed 267,533 positive height changes from 1.25 m pixels using data from airborne LiDAR within 43 ha on the windward flank of Mauna Kea. Model selection indicates a strong resident's advantage, with 97.9% of positions in the canopy retained by their occupants over 2 years. The remaining 2.1% were lost to a neighbouring contender. Absolute height was a poor predictor of success, but short stature greatly raised the risk of being overtopped. Growth in the canopy was exponentially distributed with a scaling parameter of 0.518. These findings show how size and spatial proximity influence the outcome of competition for space, and provide a general framework for the analysis of canopy dynamics. PMID:24640987

  11. Increases in atmospheric CO2 have little influence on transpiration of a temperate forest canopy.

    PubMed

    Tor-ngern, Pantana; Oren, Ram; Ward, Eric J; Palmroth, Sari; McCarthy, Heather R; Domec, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Models of forest energy, water and carbon cycles assume decreased stomatal conductance with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) based on leaf-scale measurements, a response not directly translatable to canopies. Where canopy-atmosphere are well-coupled, [CO2 ]-induced structural changes, such as increasing leaf-area index (LD), may cause, or compensate for, reduced mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS), keeping transpiration (EC) and, hence, runoff unaltered. We investigated GS responses to increasing [CO2] of conifer and broadleaved trees in a temperate forest subjected to 17-yr free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE; + 200 μmol mol(-1)). During the final phase of the experiment, we employed step changes of [CO2] in four elevated-[CO2 ] plots, separating direct response to changing [CO2] in the leaf-internal air-space from indirect effects of slow changes via leaf hydraulic adjustments and canopy development. Short-term manipulations caused no direct response up to 1.8 × ambient [CO2], suggesting that the observed long-term 21% reduction of GS was an indirect effect of decreased leaf hydraulic conductance and increased leaf shading. Thus, EC was unaffected by [CO2] because 19% higher canopy LD nullified the effect of leaf hydraulic acclimation on GS . We advocate long-term experiments of duration sufficient for slow responses to manifest, and modifying models predicting forest water, energy and carbon cycles accordingly. PMID:25346045

  12. Spatial and diurnal below canopy evaporation in a desert vineyard: Measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kool, D.; Ben-Gal, A.; Agam, N.; Šimůnek, J.; Heitman, J. L.; Sauer, T. J.; Lazarovitch, N.

    2014-08-01

    Evaporation from the soil surface (E) can be a significant source of water loss in arid areas. In sparsely vegetated systems, E is expected to be a function of soil, climate, irrigation regime, precipitation patterns, and plant canopy development and will therefore change dynamically at both daily and seasonal time scales. The objectives of this research were to quantify E in an isolated, drip-irrigated vineyard in an arid environment and to simulate below canopy E using the HYDRUS (2-D/3-D) model. Specific focus was on variations of E both temporally and spatially across the inter-row. Continuous above canopy measurements, made in a commercial vineyard, included evapotranspiration, solar radiation, air temperature and humidity, and wind speed and direction. Short-term intensive measurements below the canopy included actual and potential E and solar radiation along transects between adjacent vine-rows. Potential and actual E below the canopy were highly variable, both diurnally and with distance from the vine-row, as a result of shading and distinct wetted areas typical to drip irrigation. While the magnitude of actual E was mostly determined by soil water content, diurnal patterns depended strongly on position relative to the vine-row due to variable shading patterns. HYDRUS (2-D/3-D) successfully simulated the magnitude, diurnal patterns, and spatial distribution of E, including expected deviations as a result of variability in soil saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  13. Mixed-Grass Prairie Canopy Structure and Spectral Reflectance Vary with Topographic Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rebecca L.; Ngugi, Moffatt K.; Hendrickson, John; Smith, Aaron; West, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Managers of the nearly 0.5 million ha of public lands in North and South Dakota, USA rely heavily on manual measurements of canopy height in autumn to ensure conservation of grassland structure for wildlife and forage for livestock. However, more comprehensive assessment of vegetation structure could be achieved for mixed-grass prairie by integrating field survey, topographic position (summit, mid and toeslope) and spectral reflectance data. Thus, we examined the variation of mixed-grass prairie structural attributes (canopy leaf area, standing crop mass, canopy height, nitrogen, and water content) and spectral vegetation indices (VIs) with variation in topographic position at the Grand River National Grassland (GRNG), South Dakota. We conducted the study on a 36,000-ha herbaceous area within the GRNG, where randomly selected plots (1 km2 in size) were geolocated and included summit, mid and toeslope positions. We tested for effects of topographic position on measured vegetation attributes and VIs calculated from Landsat TM and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data collected in July 2010. Leaf area, standing crop mass, canopy height, nitrogen, and water content were lower at summits than at toeslopes. The simple ratio of Landsat Band 7/Band 1 (SR71) was the VI most highly correlated with canopy standing crop and height at plot and landscape scales. Results suggest field and remote sensing-based grassland assessment techniques could more comprehensively target low structure areas at minimal expense by layering modeled imagery over a landscape stratified into topographic position groups.

  14. [Monitoring models of the plant nitrogen content based on cotton canopy hyperspectral reflectance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-ru; Pan, Wen-chao; Li, Shao-kun; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Hua; Wang, Fang-yong; Chen, Jiang-lu

    2011-07-01

    Cotton production for accurate non-destructive, rapid monitoring of plant nitrogen content there is an urgent demand. Canopy spectral characteristics of the cotton plant and its quantitative relationship between nitrogen content, can achieve non-destructive monitoring of cotton nitrogen. Two consecutive years by different nitrogen test, cotton canopy hyperspectral data collection and simultaneous determination of canopy nitrogen content, analysis of different fertilizer treatments of cotton canopy spectral characteristics and the relationship between nitrogen content of cotton, the results show that: nitrogen content of cotton plant in different periods and spectral reflectance in the visible band (400-700 nm) was negatively related to the near-infrared 700-1300 nm band was a significant positive correlation, and in the short-wave infrared 1300-1800 nm band correlation is more complicated. Canopy scale, the whole growth stage of cotton, the visible band are sensitive to nitrogen content in cotton band, and near-infrared only is the cotton boll nitrogen content of the sensitive band; short-wave infrared band only in the budding period Cotton nitrogen sensitive band. Using nitrogen-sensitive bands in different periods can be constructed Cotton Cotton Nitrogen monitoring indicators. PMID:21942041

  15. Wave propagation in a solar quiet region and the influence of the magnetic canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We seek indications or evidence of transmission/conversion of magnetoacoustic waves at the magnetic canopy, as a result of its impact on the properties of the wave field of the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We use cross-wavelet analysis to measure phase differences between intensity and Doppler signal oscillations in the Hα, Ca ii h, and G-band. We use the height of the magnetic canopy to create appropriate masks to separate internetwork (IN) and magnetic canopy regions. We study wave propagation and differences between these two regions. Results: The magnetic canopy affects wave propagation by lowering the phase differences of progressive waves and allowing the propagation of waves with frequencies lower than the acoustic cut-off. We also find indications in the Doppler signals of Hα of a response to the acoustic waves at the IN, observed in the Ca ii h line. This response is affected by the presence of the magnetic canopy. Conclusions: Phase difference analysis indicates the existence of a complicated wave field in the quiet Sun, which is composed of a mixture of progressive and standing waves. There are clear imprints of mode conversion and transmission due to the interaction between the p-modes and small-scale magnetic fields of the network and internetwork.

  16. Making direct use of canopy profiles in vegetation - atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, James; Polcher, Jan; Peylin, Philippe; Ottlé, Catherine; Chen, Yiying; van Gorsel, Eva; Haverd, Vanessa; McGrath, Matthew; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Most coupled land-surface regional models use the 'big-leaf' approach for simulating the sensible and latent heat fluxes of different vegetation types. However, there has been a progression in the types of questions being asked of these models, such as the consequences of land-use change or the behaviour of BVOCs and aerosol. In addition, recent years has seen growth in the availability of in-canopy datasets across a broaded range of species, with which to calibrate these simulations. Hence, there is now an argument for transferring some of the techniques and processes previously used in local, site-based land surface models to the land surface components of models which operate on a regional or even global scale. We describe here the development and evaluation of a vertical canopy energy budget model (Ryder, J et al., 2014) that can be coupled to an atmospheric model such as LMDz. Significantly, the model preserves the implicit coupling of the land-surface to atmosphere interface, which means that run-time efficiences are preserved. This is acheived by means of an interface based on the approach of Polcher et al. (1998) and Best et al. (2004), but newly developed for a canopy column. The model makes use of techniques from site-based models, such as the calculation of vertical turbulence statistics using a second-order closure model (Massman & Weil, 1999), and the distribution of long-wave and short-wave radiation over the profile, the latter using an innovate multilayer albedo scheme (McGrath et al., in prep.). Complete profiles of atmospheric temperature and specific humidity are now calculated, in order to simulate sensible and latent heat fluxes, as well as the leaf temperature at each level in the model. The model is shown to perform stably, and reproduces well flux measurements at an initial test site, across a time period of several days, or over the course of a year. Further applications of the model might be to simulate mixed canopies, the light

  17. Progressive forest canopy water loss during the 2012-2015 California drought.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Brodrick, Philip G; Anderson, Christopher B; Vaughn, Nicholas; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E

    2016-01-12

    The 2012-2015 drought has left California with severely reduced snowpack, soil moisture, ground water, and reservoir stocks, but the impact of this estimated millennial-scale event on forest health is unknown. We used airborne laser-guided spectroscopy and satellite-based models to assess losses in canopy water content of California's forests between 2011 and 2015. Approximately 10.6 million ha of forest containing up to 888 million large trees experienced measurable loss in canopy water content during this drought period. Severe canopy water losses of greater than 30% occurred over 1 million ha, affecting up to 58 million large trees. Our measurements exclude forests affected by fire between 2011 and 2015. If drought conditions continue or reoccur, even with temporary reprieves such as El Niño, we predict substantial future forest change. PMID:26712020

  18. Progressive forest canopy water loss during the 2012–2015 California drought

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Gregory P.; Brodrick, Philip G.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Vaughn, Nicholas; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.

    2016-01-01

    The 2012–2015 drought has left California with severely reduced snowpack, soil moisture, ground water, and reservoir stocks, but the impact of this estimated millennial-scale event on forest health is unknown. We used airborne laser-guided spectroscopy and satellite-based models to assess losses in canopy water content of California’s forests between 2011 and 2015. Approximately 10.6 million ha of forest containing up to 888 million large trees experienced measurable loss in canopy water content during this drought period. Severe canopy water losses of greater than 30% occurred over 1 million ha, affecting up to 58 million large trees. Our measurements exclude forests affected by fire between 2011 and 2015. If drought conditions continue or reoccur, even with temporary reprieves such as El Niño, we predict substantial future forest change. PMID:26712020

  19. Modelling spatio-temporal variations in leaf chlorophyll content for broadleaf and needle forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, Y.; Simic, A.

    2012-04-01

    Foliar chlorophyll content in forested ecosystems plays a fundamental role in plant photosynthesis, determines plant productivity and can indicate vegetation stress and disturbance. Obtaining accurate measurements of leaf chlorophyll content across a range of spatial and temporal scales is crucial for monitoring vegetation productivity and providing inputs to photosynthesis and carbon cycle models. However, leaf chlorophyll retrieval is complicated as canopy reflectance in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths is affected not only by leaf pigment concentration but also by leaf area index (LAI), canopy architecture, illumination and viewing geometry and understory vegetation. Consequently, empirical indices, often developed at leaf-level, are species, site and time specific. In order to investigate the potential of monitoring chlorophyll dynamics over a growing season at the canopy scale, a process modeling approach is needed to account for the variation of other variables affecting canopy reflectance. Canopy radiative transfer models use physical laws to describe the interaction of solar radiation inside the canopy between scattering elements, which could provide a more accurate estimate of chlorophyll content over multiple vegetation species, time-frames and across broader spatial extents. This study used a coupled canopy (4Scale) and leaf (PROSPECT) model approach to investigate the ability of radiative transfer models to estimate foliar chemistry for multiple vegetation types and species (broadleaf and needle) from optical remote sensing data. Canopy reflectance data was acquired from the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), from 390-1040 nm in 15 wavebands at a spatial resolution of 1200 m, and inverted using a look up table (LUT) approach. Twenty sites were selected in Ontario, Canada representing different dominant vegetation species (Picea mariana, Pinus banksiana and Acer saccharum), and a variety of canopy closures and structures. These

  20. Wireless sensor networks for canopy temperature sensing and irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For researchers, canopy temperature measurements have proven useful in characterizing crop water stress and developing protocols for irrigation management. Today, there is heightened interest in using remote canopy temperature measurements for real-time irrigation scheduling. However, without the us...

  1. TLS monitoring of snowpack distribution in a mountain forested areas: Analysis of canopy disturbance on snow evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Alonso, Esteban; San Miguel, Alba

    2016-04-01

    Forested mountain areas at high elevations show important interaction with snowpack distribution and its evolution in time, and thus in many cases are the limit of the cryosphere in mountain zones. Such interactions have significant consequences in the hydrologic response of mountain rivers. Thereby observing the evolution of snowpack in forested areas has a big importance form a basic science perspective and also for water management. This work presents a detailed comparison of small scale effect of forest characteristics on snowpack distribution in Central Pyrenees, before and after a strong modification of canopies features. The snowpack distribution has been obtained using a novel remote sensing technology (Terrestrial Laser Scanner, TLS), with high spatial resolution (0.25m) over a 1000m2 study area for 27 survey dates along three snow seasons. Between the second and the third snow season a strong canopy pruning was performed in the study site, and thereby the snowpack evolution with both canopy configurations was compared. A Principal Component Analysis has been applied to analyze the snowpack distributions observed during the study period. Results obtained have shown that despite large differences in Canopy radius (1.2 m) and Canopy height (2.5m), not a different snowpack evolution was observed. For both Canopy configurations the variable with higher importance on snowpack distribution is the snow depth amount. The change in forest structure has important implications in the decrease of Canopy areas and the increase of Open areas (proportionally to Canopy change), but not a different interaction with forest structure was observed. The canopy pruning realized in the study site is typically accomplished for fire risk reduction and this shows the consequences that such action has in snowpack distribution and that hereby these may have in water management possibly delaying peak runoff.

  2. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure as Predictors of Net Primary Production Across Successional Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.; Gough, C. M.; Nave, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure is a key predictor of gas exchange processes that control carbon (C) uptake, including the allocation of photosynthetically fixed C to new plant biomass growth, or net primary production (NPP). Prior work suggests forest canopy structural complexity (CSC), the arrangement of leaves within a volume of canopy, changes as forests develop and is a strong predictor of NPP. However, the expressions of CSC that best predict NPP over decadal to century timescales is unknown. Our objectives were to use multiple remote sensing observations to characterize forest canopy structure in increasing dimensional complexity over a forest age gradient, and to identify which expressions of physical structure best served as proxies of NPP. The study at the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI, USA uses two parallel forest chronosequences with different harvesting and fire disturbance histories and includes three old-growth ecosystems varying in canopy composition. We have derived several expressions of 2-D and 3-D forest canopy structure from hemispherical images, a ground-based portable canopy lidar (PCL), and a 3-D terrestrial lidar scanner (TLS), and are relating these structural metrics with NPP and light and nitrogen allocation within the canopy. Preliminary analysis shows that old-growth stands converged on a common mean CSC, but with substantially higher within-stand variation in complexity as deciduous tree species increased in forest canopy dominance. Forest stands that were more intensely disturbed were slower to recover leaf area index (LAI) as they regrew, but 2-D measures of CSC increased similarly as forests aged, regardless of disturbance history. Ongoing work will relate long-term trends in forest CSC with NPP and resource allocation to determine which forest structure remote sensing products are most useful for modeling and scaling C cycling processes through different stages of forest development.

  3. THE EVOLUTION OF DARK CANOPIES AROUND ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E.; Muglach, K. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-05-20

    As observed in spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, transition region, and low corona, active regions are surrounded by an extensive 'circumfacular' area which is darker than the quiet Sun. We examine the properties of these dark moat- or canopy-like areas using Fe IX 17.1 nm images and line-of-sight magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The 17.1 nm canopies consist of fibrils (horizontal fields containing extreme-ultraviolet-absorbing chromospheric material) clumped into featherlike structures. The dark fibrils initially form a quasiradial or vortical pattern as the low-lying field lines fanning out from the emerging active region connect to surrounding network and intranetwork elements of opposite polarity. The area occupied by the 17.1 nm fibrils expands as supergranular convection causes the active-region flux to spread into the background medium; the outer boundary of the dark canopy stabilizes where the diffusing flux encounters a unipolar region of opposite sign. The dark fibrils tend to accumulate in regions of weak longitudinal field and to become rooted in mixed-polarity flux. To explain the latter observation, we note that the low-lying fibrils are more likely to interact with small loops associated with weak, opposite-polarity flux elements in close proximity, than with high loops anchored inside strong unipolar network flux. As a result, the 17.1 nm fibrils gradually become concentrated around the large-scale polarity inversion lines (PILs), where most of the mixed-polarity flux is located. Systematic flux cancellation, assisted by rotational shearing, removes the field component transverse to the PIL and causes the fibrils to coalesce into long PIL-aligned filaments.

  4. Contrasts among bidirectional reflectance of leaves, canopies, and soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Walter, E. A.; Welles, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Simple models are presented for predicting the bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) for soils and plant canopies viewed from various directions. BRDFs are predicted for bare soil, individual leaves, and plant canopies, and the results are compared with measurements and a three coefficient empirical equation. BRDF measurements for corn and soybean leaves are presented to contrast with canopy and soil distributions. Estimates of the soil, canopy, and leaf BRDFs are combined into a model called Cupid to predict BRDFs for complex natural surfaces.

  5. Towards a High Temporal Frequency Grass Canopy Thermal IR Model for Background Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.; Koenig, George G.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present our first results towards understanding high temporal frequency thermal infrared response from a dense plant canopy and compare the application of our model, driven both by slowly varying, time-averaged meteorological conditions and by high frequency measurements of local and within canopy profiles of relative humidity and wind speed, to high frequency thermal infrared observations. Previously, we have employed three-dimensional ray tracing to compute the intercepted and scattered radiation fluxes and for final scene rendering. For the turbulent fluxes, we employed simple resistance models for latent and sensible heat with one-dimensional profiles of relative humidity and wind speed. Our modeling approach has proven successful in capturing the directional and diurnal variation in background thermal infrared signatures. We hypothesize that at these scales, where the model is typically driven by time-averaged, local meteorological conditions, the primary source of thermal variance arises from the spatial distribution of sunlit and shaded foliage elements within the canopy and the associated radiative interactions. In recent experiments, we have begun to focus on the high temporal frequency response of plant canopies in the thermal infrared at 1 second to 5 minute intervals. At these scales, we hypothesize turbulent mixing plays a more dominant role. Our results indicate that in the high frequency domain, the vertical profile of temperature change is tightly coupled to the within canopy wind speed In the results reported here, the canopy cools from the top down with increased wind velocities and heats from the bottom up at low wind velocities. .

  6. A comparative study of some mathematical models of the mean wind structure and aerodynamic drag of plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massman, William

    1987-01-01

    A semianalytical method for describing the mean wind profile and shear stress within plant canopies and for estimating the roughness length and the displacement height is presented. This method incorporates density and vertical structure of the canopy and includes simple parameterizations of the roughness sublayer and shelter factor. Some of the wind profiles examined are consistent with first-order closure techniques while others are consistent with second-order closure techniques. Some profiles show a shearless region near the base of the canopy; however, none displays a secondary maximum there. Comparing several different analytical expressions for the canopy wind profile against observations suggests that one particular type of profile (an Airy function which is associated with the triangular foliage surface area density distribution) is superior to the others. Because of the numerical simplicity of the methods outlined, it is suggested that they may be profitably used in large-scale models of plant-atmosphere exchanges.

  7. Building Plant Canopies: Phytomer Canon in Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1879 when Grey presented the concept of the phytomer, much work has gone into understanding how plants build their canopies by the addition, growth, and subtraction of phytomers. While various definitions of phytomers have been proposed, most commonly the phytomer unit is viewed as consisting ...

  8. Simulation of within-canopy radiation exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radiation exchange at the surface plays a critical role in the surface energy balance, plant microclimate, and plant growth. The ability to simulate the surface energy balance and the microclimate within the plant canopy is contingent upon simulation of the surface radiation exchange. A validation a...

  9. Elements of a dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving photosynthesis throughout the full canopy rather photosynthesis of only the top leaves of the canopy is central to improving crop yields. Many canopy photosynthesis models been developed from physiological and ecological perspectives, however most do not consider heterogeneities of microcl...

  10. [Estimation of canopy chlorophyll content using hyperspectral data].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li; Niu, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    Many researches have developed models to estimate chlorophyl content at leaf and canopy level, but they were species-specific. The objective of the present paper was to develop a new model. First, canopy reflectance was simulated for different species and different canopy architecture using radiative transfer models. Based on the simulated canopy reflectance, the relationship between canopy reflectance and canopy chlorophyll content was studied, and then a chlorophyll estimation model was built using the method of spectral index. The coefficient of determination (R2) between spectral index based model and canopy chlorophyll content reached 0.75 for simulated data. To investigate the applicability of this chlorophyll model, the authors chose a field sample area in Gansu Province to carry out the measurement of leaf chlorophyll content, canopy reflectance and other parameters. Besides, the authors also ordered the synchronous Hyperion data, a hyperspectral image with a spatial resolution of 30 m. Canopy reflectance from field measurment and reflectance from Hyperion image were respectively used as the input parameter for the chlorophyll estimation model. Both of them got good results, which indicated that the model could be used for accurate canopy chlorophyll estimation using canopy reflectance. However, while using spaceborne hyperspectral data to estimate canopy chlorophyll content, good atmospheric correction is required. PMID:20101973